WorldWideScience

Sample records for iaea international database

  1. IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.; Clark, R.E.H.; Stephens, J.A.; Eto, M.; Haag, G.; Hacker, P.; Neighbour, G.B.; Janev, R.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2000-02-01

    This report describes an IAEA database containing data on the properties of irradiated nuclear graphites. Development and implementation of the graphite database followed initial discussions at an IAEA Specialists' Meeting held in September 1995. The design of the database is based upon developments at the University of Bath (United Kingdom), work which the UK Health and Safety Executive initially supported. The database content and data management policies were determined during two IAEA Consultants' Meetings of nuclear reactor graphite specialists held in 1998 and 1999. The graphite data are relevant to the construction and safety case developments required for new and existing HTR nuclear power plants, and to the development of safety cases for continued operation of existing plants. The database design provides a flexible structure for data archiving and retrieval and employs Microsoft Access 97. An instruction manual is provided within this document for new users, including installation instructions for the database on personal computers running Windows 95/NT 4.0 or higher versions. The data management policies and associated responsibilities are contained in the database Working Arrangement which is included as an Appendix to this report. (author)

  2. Directory of IAEA databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    The first edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases is intended to describe the computerized information sources available to IAEA staff members. It contains a listing of all databases produced at the IAEA, together with information on their availability

  3. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 7th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting '7th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 March 2005 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  4. Summary report of consultants' meeting on IAEA international database on irradiated nuclear graphite properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2007-06-01

    The '9th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' was held on 26-27 March 2007 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and make recommendations for actions for the next year. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  5. Directory of IAEA databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This second edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of Scientific and Technical Information (NESI). Its main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to staff members. This directory contains all databases produced at the IAEA, including databases stored on the mainframe, LAN's and PC's. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. For the second edition database owners were requested to review the existing entries for their databases and answer four additional questions. The four additional questions concerned the type of database (e.g. Bibliographic, Text, Statistical etc.), the category of database (e.g. Administrative, Nuclear Data etc.), the available documentation and the type of media used for distribution. In the individual entries on the following pages the answers to the first two questions (type and category) is always listed, but the answers to the second two questions (documentation and media) is only listed when information has been made available

  6. IAEA nuclear databases for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, Otto

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Data Section (NDS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides nuclear data services to scientists on a worldwide scale with particular emphasis on developing countries. More than 100 data libraries are made available cost-free by Internet, CD-ROM and other media. These databases are used for practically all areas of nuclear applications as well as basic research. An overview is given of the most important nuclear reaction and nuclear structure databases, such as EXFOR, CINDA, ENDF, NSR, ENSDF, NUDAT, and of selected special purpose libraries such as FENDL, RIPL, RNAL, the IAEA Photonuclear Data Library, and the IAEA charged-particle cross section database for medical radioisotope production. The NDS also coordinates two international nuclear data centre networks and is involved in data development activities (to create new or improve existing data libraries when the available data are inadequate) and in technology transfer to developing countries, e.g. through the installation and support of the mirror web site of the IAEA Nuclear Data Services at IPEN (operational since March 2000) and by organizing nuclear-data related workshops. By encouraging their participation in IAEA Co-ordinated Research Projects and also by compiling their experimental results in databases such as EXFOR, the NDS helps to make developing countries' contributions to nuclear science visible and conveniently available. The web address of the IAEA Nuclear Data Services is http://www.nds.iaea.org and the NDS mirror service at IPEN (Brasil) can be accessed at http://www.nds.ipen.br/ (author)

  7. Quality assurance for the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, A.J.; Humbert, D.

    2006-06-01

    Consideration has been given to the process of Quality Assurance applied to data entered into current versions of the IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Originally conceived simply as a means of collecting and preserving data on irradiation experiments and reactor operation, the data are increasingly being utilised for the preparation of safety arguments and in the design of new graphites for forthcoming generations of graphite-moderated plant. Under these circumstances, regulatory agencies require assurances that the data are of appropriate accuracy and correctly transcribed, that obvious errors in the original documentation are either highlighted or corrected, etc., before they are prepared to accept analyses built upon these data. The processes employed in the data transcription are described in this document, and proposals are made for the categorisation of data and for error reporting by Database users. (author)

  8. IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database (ITDB) was established in 1995 as a unique network of points of contact connecting 100 states and several international organizations. Information collected from official sources supplemented by open-source reports. The 1994 - GC 38, resolution intensifies the activities through which the Agency is currently supporting Member States in this field. Member states were notified of completed database in 1995 and invited to participate. The purpose of the I TDB is to facilitate exchange of authoritative information among States on incidents of illicit trafficking and other related unauthorized activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials; to collect, maintain and analyse information on such incidents with a view to identifying common threats, trends, and patterns; use this information for internal planning and prioritisation and provide this information to member states and to provide a reliable source of basic information on such incidents to the media, when appropriate

  9. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. Summary report of consultants' meeting. 12. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.K.; Wickham, A.J.

    2010-02-01

    The 12th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 12-13 November 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  10. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists` meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D [ed.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists` Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author).

  11. Development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database. Summary report of an IAEA specialists' meeting, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    An IAEA Specialists' Meeting proposes procedures describing how an internationally accepted database of high-priority nuclear decay data and thermal neutron cross-sections can be developed through a network of experts coordinated by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. (author)

  12. IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 6th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2004-12-01

    This report summarizes the Consultant Meeting 6th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' held on 16-17 September 2004 at Plas Tan-Y-Bwlch, Maentwrog, Gwynedd, UK. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and to make recommendations for actions for the next year. The purposes of the meeting were fully met. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  13. IAEA Radiation Events Database (RADEV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, J.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    2001-01-01

    Whilst the use of ionizing radiation continues to bring benefits to many people throughout the world there is increasing concern at the number of reported accidents involving radiation. Such accidents have had an impact on the lives of patients, workers and members of the public, the consequences of which have ranged from trivial health effects to fatalities. In order to reduce the number of accidents and to mitigate their consequences it is, therefore, necessary to raise awareness of the causes of accidents and to note the lessons that can be learned. The IAEA's database on unusual radiation events (RADEV) is intended to provide a world-wide focal point for such information. (author)

  14. Directory of IAEA databases. 4. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-06-01

    This fourth edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of NESI. ITs main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to the public. This directory contains all publicly available databases which are produced at the IAEA. This includes databases stored on the mainframe, LAN servers and user PCs. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. At the data of printing, some of the information in the directory will be already obsolete. For the most up-to-date information please see the IAEA's World Wide Web site at URL: http:/www.iaea.or.at/databases/dbdir/. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Summary report of consultants meeting on IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 11. meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2009-05-01

    The 11th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties was held on 25-26 March 2009 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database, and make recommendations for action over the next year. This report contains the status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  16. Summary report of consultants' meeting - IAEA International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties. 8th meeting of the Technical Steering Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Wickham, A.J.

    2006-05-01

    The '8th Meeting of the Technical Steering Committee for the International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties' was held on 15-16 March 2006 at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria. All discussions, recommendations and actions of this Consultants' Meeting are recorded in this report. The purposes of the meeting were to review the matters and actions identified in the previous meeting, undertake a review of the current status of the database and make recommendations for actions for the next year. This report contains the current status of the identified actions as well as a summary of the recommendations on enhancements to the database. (author)

  17. Papers presented at the IAEA specialists' meeting on the development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.

    1994-12-01

    The present report contains 20 papers presented at the IAEA meeting on the Development of an International Nuclear Decay Data and Cross-Section Database, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994, covering the following topics: Wall-charts of nuclides, PC systems presenting nuclear data, nuclear decay-data and uncertainties, nuclear spectroscopy, thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance-integrals, reactor-neutron activation analysis, nuclear data standards. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Papers presented at the IAEA specialists` meeting on the development of an international nuclear decay data and cross-section database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D [ed.

    1994-12-01

    The present report contains 20 papers presented at the IAEA meeting on the Development of an International Nuclear Decay Data and Cross-Section Database, Vienna, 24-28 October 1994, covering the following topics: Wall-charts of nuclides, PC systems presenting nuclear data, nuclear decay-data and uncertainties, nuclear spectroscopy, thermal neutron cross-sections and resonance-integrals, reactor-neutron activation analysis, nuclear data standards. (author). Refs, figs and tabs.

  19. Directory of IAEA databases. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This second edition of the Directory of IAEA Databases has been prepared within the Division of Scientific and Technical Information. Its main objective is to describe the computerized information sources available to staff members. This directory contains all databases produced at the IAEA, including databases stored on the mainframe, LAN's and PC's. All IAEA Division Directors have been requested to register the existence of their databases with NESI. For the second edition database owners were requested to review the existing entries for their databases and answer four additional questions. The four additional questions concerned the type of database (e.g. Bibliographic, Text, Statistical etc.), the category of database (e.g. Administrative, Nuclear Data etc.), the available documentation and the type of media used for distribution. In the individual entries on the following pages the answers to the first two questions (type and category) is always listed, but the answer to the second two questions (documentation and media) is only listed when information has been made available

  20. PTS and the IAEA database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.M.; Gillemot, F.; Lyssakov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Data Base has been described previously at this meeting. It is the purpose of this paper to briefly describe PTS and to draw attention to the relevance of the International data base in the area of irradiation effects. 6 refs, 1 fig

  1. PTS and the IAEA database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L M [LMD Consultants, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gillemot, F [Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Lyssakov, V [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle

    1997-09-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency Data Base has been described previously at this meeting. It is the purpose of this paper to briefly describe PTS and to draw attention to the relevance of the International data base in the area of irradiation effects. 6 refs, 1 fig.

  2. IAEA Post Irradiation Examination Facilities Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenssen, Haakon; Blanc, J.Y.; Dobuisson, P.; Manzel, R.; Egorov, A.A.; Golovanov, V.; Souslov, D.

    2005-01-01

    The number of hot cells in the world in which post irradiation examination (PIE) can be performed has diminished during the last few decades. This creates problems for countries that have nuclear power plants and require PIE for surveillance, safety and fuel development. With this in mind, the IAEA initiated the issue of a catalogue within the framework of a coordinated research program (CRP), started in 1992 and completed in 1995, under the title of ''Examination and Documentation Methodology for Water Reactor Fuel (ED-WARF-II)''. Within this program, a group of technical consultants prepared a questionnaire to be completed by relevant laboratories. From these questionnaires a catalogue was assembled. The catalogue lists the laboratories and PIE possibilities worldwide in order to make it more convenient to arrange and perform contractual PIE within hot cells on water reactor fuels and core components, e.g. structural and absorber materials. This catalogue was published as working material in the Agency in 1996. During 2002 and 2003, the catalogue was converted to a database and updated through questionnaires to the laboratories in the Member States of the Agency. This activity was recommended by the IAEA Technical Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) at its plenary meeting in April 2001. The database consists of five main areas about PIE facilities: acceptance criteria for irradiated components; cell characteristics; PIE techniques; refabrication/instrumentation capabilities; and storage and conditioning capabilities. The content of the database represents the status of the listed laboratories as of 2003. With the database utilizing a uniform format for all laboratories and details of technique, it is hoped that the IAEA Member States will be able to use this catalogue to select laboratories most relevant to their particular needs. The database can also be used to compare the PIE capabilities worldwide with current and future

  3. IAEA symposium on international safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The eighth IAEA Symposium on International Safeguards was organized by the IAEA in cooperation with the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management and the European Safeguards Research and Development Association. It was attended by over 350 specialists and policy makers in the field of nuclear safeguards and verification from more than 50 countries and organizations. The purpose of the Symposium was to foster a broad exchange of information on concepts and technologies related to important developments in the areas of international safeguards and security. For the first time in the history of the symposia, the IAEA is issuing proceedings free of charge to participants on CD-ROM. The twenty-two plenary, technical, and poster sessions featured topics related to technological and policy aspects from national, regional and global perspectives. The theme of the Symposium: Four Decades of Development - Safeguarding into the New Millennium set the stage for the commemoration of a number of significant events in the annals of safeguards. 1997 marked the Fortieth Anniversary of the IAEA, the Thirtieth Anniversary of the Tlatelolco Treaty, and the Twentieth Anniversary of the Department of Safeguards Member State Support Programmes. There were special events and noted presentations featuring these anniversaries and giving the participants an informative retrospective view of safeguards development over the past four decades. The proceedings of this symposium provide the international community with a comprehensive view of where nuclear safeguards and verification stood in 1997 in terms of the growing demands and expectations. The Symposium offered thoughtful perspectives on where safeguards are headed within the broader context of verification issues. As the world of international nuclear verification looks towards the next millennium, the implementation of the expanding and strengthened safeguards system presents formidable challenges

  4. The IAEA's Illicit Trafficking Database Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzelon, G.; Hammond, W.; Nicholas, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: As part of its overall programme on nuclear material security, the IAEA has since 1995 maintained a database of incidents of trafficking in nuclear materials and other radioactive sources. The Illicit Trafficking Database Programme (ITDP) is intended to assist Member States by alerting them to current incidents, by facilitating exchange of reliable, detailed information about incidents, and by identifying any common threads or trends that might assist States in combating illicit trafficking. The ITDP also seeks to better inform the public by providing basic information to the media concerning illicit trafficking events. Approximately 70 States have joined this programme for collecting and sharing information on trafficking incidents. Reporting States have the opportunity to designate what information may be shared with other States and what may be shared with the public. In cases where the IAEA's first information about a possible incident comes from news media or other open sources rather than from a State notification, the information first is evaluated, and then, if warranted, the relevant State or States are contacted to request confirmation or clarification of an alleged incident. During 2000, as a result of experience gained working with information on illicit nuclear trafficking, the IAEA developed of a flexible and comprehensive new database system. The new system has an open architecture that accommodates structured information from States, in-house information, open-source articles, and other information sources, such as pictures, maps and web links. The graphical user interface allows data entry, maintenance and standard and ad-hoc reporting. The system also is linked to a Web-based query engine, which enables searching of both structured and open-source information. For the period 1 January 1993 through 31 March 2001, the database recorded more than 550 incidents, of which about two-thirds have been confirmed by States. (Some of these

  5. Tracking Traffickers. The IAEA Incident and Trafficking Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Greg

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive material is missing from a hospital. Contaminated metal is found in a scrap yard. Smugglers try to peddle nuclear- weapon-usable material. These different scenarios illustrate the risks that these materials can pose to human safety and security. To assess those risks and to develop strategies to reduce them, States must understand the implications and the scope of such incidents that are occurring around the world. To better understand and respond to these events, the IAEA maintains an Incident and Trafficking Database (ITDB) which collects information from 122 participating States and some select international organizations. They are asked to share data on a voluntary basis about incidents in which nuclear and other radioactive material has fallen ''out of regulatory control.'' This could mean reporting cases of material that has gone missing, or discoveries of material where none was expected. The cases range from the innocent misplacement of industrial radioactive sources to criminal smuggling efforts which could aid terrorist acts. This information is shared among ITDB participants, and IAEA analysts try to identify trends and characteristics that could help prevent the misuse of these potentially dangerous materials. ''The ITDB has become an internationally recognized tool for States to study the extent and nature of these incidents,'' said John Hilliard, head of the Information Management and Coordination Section that administers the database. ''We've learned a lot by studying them, and we hope the information helps us prevent accidents or crimes in the future.'' The IAEA established the database in 1995 after States became alarmed by a growing number of trafficking incidents in the early 1990s. The service was originally operated by the Department of Safeguards, but later moved to the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, where the Office of Nuclear Security now administers all the data collection and analysis

  6. The IAEA's role in international information exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittinger, M.T.M.; Selling, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency strives to foster the exchange of scientific and technical information in the transport safety area through a dual work programme covering the development and maintenance of the Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, on the one hand, and their implementation, on the other. Under the implementation aspect of its transport safety programme the IAEA takes advantage of the increased availability of mass storage media and the equipment to access them to use databases for information exchange. Information is collected on the identification of national competent authorities, package approval certificates, events in radioactive material transport, research and development, shipments, and exposure data. Data on national competent authorities and the package approval certificates that they issue is updated and disseminated annually to all Member States. Research in progress is described in a document that is published every two years. Databases on events, shipments and radiation exposure are in the development phase. Member States experience difficulty in obtaining the appropriate information and thus, the reporting periods for these subject areas are extended. Information gathered through these activities serve as regulatory aids to the national competent authorities responsible in the Member States for the transport of radioactive material, both internationally and nationally. In addition, it is useful in support of the continuous review and revision process of the transport Regulations and their supporting documents. (J.P.N.)

  7. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  8. IAEA establishes International Seismic Safety Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA today officially inaugurated an international centre to coordinate efforts for protecting nuclear installations against the effects of earthquakes. The International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC), which has been established within the IAEA's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, will serve as a focal point on seismic safety for nuclear installations worldwide. ISSC will assist countries on the assessment of seismic hazards of nuclear facilities to mitigate the consequences of strong earthquakes. 'With safety as our first priority, it is vital that we pool all expert knowledge available worldwide to assist nuclear operators and regulators to be well prepared for coping with major seismic events,' said Antonio Godoy, Acting Head of the IAEA's Engineering Safety Section and leader of the ISSC. 'The creation of the ISSC represents the culmination of three decades of the IAEA's active and recognized involvement in this matter through the development of an updated set of safety standards and the assistance to Member States for their application.' To further seismic safety at nuclear installations worldwide, the ISSC will: - Promote knowledge sharing among the international community in order to avoid or mitigate the consequences of extreme seismic events on nuclear installations; - Support countries through advisory services and training courses; and - Enhance seismic safety by utilizing experience gained from previous seismic events in member states. The centre is supported by a scientific committee of high-level experts from academic, industrial and nuclear safety authorities that will advise the ISSC on implementation of its programme. Experts have been nominated from seven specialized areas, including geology and tectonics, seismology, seismic hazard, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, equipment, and seismic risk. Japan and the United States have both contributed initial funds for creation of the centre, which will be based at

  9. Database for the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabo, Emese; Hozer, Zoltan; Gyori, Csaba; Hegyi, Gyoergy

    2010-01-01

    On 10 April 2003 severe damage of fuel assemblies took place during an incident at Unit 2 of Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank below the water level of the spent fuel storage pool in order to remove crud buildup. That afternoon, the chemical cleaning of assemblies was completed and the fuel rods were being cooled by circulation of storage pool water. The first sign of fuel failure was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank during that evening. The cleaning tank cover locks were released after midnight and this operation was followed by a sudden increase in activity concentrations. The visual inspection revealed that all 30 fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage happened due to inadequate coolant circulation within the cleaning tank. The damaged fuel assemblies will be removed from the cleaning tank in 2005 and will be stored in special canisters in the spent fuel storage pool of the Paks NPP. Following several discussions between expert from different countries and international organisations the OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was proposed. The project is envisaged in two phases. - Phase 1 is to cover organization of visual inspection of material, preparation of database, performance of analyses and preparatory work for fuel examination. - Phase 2 is to cover the fuel transport and the hot cell examination. The first meeting of the project was held in Budapest on 30-31 January 2006. Phase 1 of the Paks Fuel Project will focus on the numerical simulation of the most important aspects of the incident. This activity will help in the reconstruction of the accidental scenario. The first step of Phase 1 was the collection of a database necessary for the code calculations. The main objective of database collection was to provide input data for calculations. For this reason the collection was focused on such data that are

  10. The IAEA's WorldAtom Internet site: International news and information services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides news and public information services via the Internet through its WorldAtom home page. The page is accessible at www.iaea.org/worldatom. Following are brief highlights of the items available on the site by clicking Press Centre, Reference Centre, or other links: Daily Press Review: Summaries of selected news items pertaining to global nuclear developments and the IAEA's work are provided each day, drawing upon a wide range of global media sources. IAEA NewsBriefs: Regularly featured are updates about IAEA activities related to areas of safety, technology transfer, and nuclear safeguards. Meetings and training courses: News about IAEA-sponsored symposia, seminars, and other meetings, as well as information about international meetings on atomic energy sponsored by other organizations, are updated on a daily basis. Press releases and statements: All IAEA press releases and media advisories since 1995 are accessible on the site. Topical and feature pages: In-depth coverage and links to information resources within and outside the IAEA are regularly given to selected topics of high international interest involving the IAEA. IAEA publications: listings and overviews of IAEA technical reports, safety standards, and other publications are updated as they are issued. Scientific and technical information: WorldAtom includes links (Reference Centre) to the International Nuclear Information System, IAEA's extensive bibliographic database of references and resources, to the nuclear database, and to departmental pages at IAEA that focus on IAEA programs and activities. IAEA documents: Electronic versions of official IAEA documents are added as they are issued. These documents include the texts and status lists of international conventions under IAEA auspices; IAEA information circulars to member states; IAEA annual reports (since 1995); and background reports and documents for the IAEA General Conference related to

  11. The IAEA Illicit Trafficking Database Programme: Operations and Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    the IAEA I TDB currently has 90 states participating voluntarily to the database. Information on about 827 incidents of which 500 involved radioactive sources has been reported. States provide information by submitting an Information Notification Form. The incident is assigned an identification number and entered in the database. Information from open sources is collected daily and reviewed. If the information warrants it a new incident is created in the database.

  12. Development of IAEA nuclear reaction databases and services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerkin, V.; Trkov, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Dept. of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-01

    From mid-2004 onwards, the major nuclear reaction databases (EXFOR, CINDA and Endf) and services (Web and CD-Roms retrieval systems and specialized applications) have been functioning within a modern computing environment as multi-platform software, working under several operating systems with relational databases. Subsequent work at the IAEA has focused on three areas of development: revision and extension of the contents of the databases; extension and improvement of the functionality and integrity of the retrieval systems; development of software for database maintenance and system deployment. (authors)

  13. IAEA and the international nuclear law development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsh, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the different objectives of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) as far as nuclear energy use is concerned. It presents the status of the organization, its action int the non-proliferation treaty, and its work on the safeguard regulations. These measures have been taken during the Convention on nuclear safety in 1994. This convention concerns nuclear power plants as well as storage of radioactive wastes. (TEC)

  14. CD-ROM for the PGAA-IAEA database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firestone, R.B.; Zerking, V.

    2007-01-01

    Both the database of prompt gamma rays from slow neutron capture for elemental analysis and the results of this CRP are available on the accompanying CD-ROM. The file index.html is the home page for the CD-ROM, and provides links to the following information: (a) The CRP - General information, papers and reports relevant to this CRP. (b) The PGAA-IAEA database viewer - An interactive program to display and search the PGAA database by isotope, energy or capture cross-section. (c) The Database of Prompt Gamma Rays from Slow Neutron Capture for Elemental Analysis - This report. (d) The PGAA database files - Adopted PGAA database and associated files in EXCEL, PDF and Text formats. The archival databases by Lone et al. and by Reedy and Frankle are also available. (e) The Evaluated Gamma-Ray Activation File (EGAF) - The adopted PGAA database in ENSDF format. Data can be viewed with the Isotope Explorer 2.2 ENSDF Viewer. (f) The PGAA database evaluation - ENSDF format versions of the adopted PGAA database, and the Budapest and ENSDF isotopic input files. Decay scheme balance and statistical analysis summaries are provided. (g) The Isotope Explorer 2.2 ENSDF viewer - Windows software for viewing the level scheme drawings and tables provided in ENSDF format. The complete ENSDF database is included, as of December 2002. The databases and viewers are discussed in greater detail in the following sections

  15. The IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database: Overview and current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Bell, M.J.; Pozdniakov, I.; Petison, G.; Kostitsin, V.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) contains information on national radioactive waste management programmes and organizations, plans and activities, relevant laws and regulations, policies and radioactive waste inventories. The NEWMDB, which was launched on the Internet on 6 July 2001, is the successor to the IAEA's Waste Management Database (WMDB), which was in use during the 1990's. The NEWMDB's first data collection cycle took place from July 2001 to March 2002. This paper provides an overview of the NEWMDB, it describes the results of the first data collection cycle, and it discusses the way forward for additional data collection cycles. Three companion papers describe (1) the role of the NEWMDB as an international source of information about radioactive waste management, (2) issues related to the variety of waste classification schemes used by IAEA Member States, and (3) the NEWMDB in the context of an indicator of sustainable development for radioactive waste management. (author)

  16. IAEA and International Science and Technology Center sign cooperative agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA and the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC) today signed an agreement that calls for an increase in cooperation between the two organizations. The memorandum of understanding seeks to amplify their collaboration in the research and development of applications and technology that could contribute to the IAEA's activities in the fields of verification and nuclear security, including training and capacity building. IAEA Safeguards Director of Technical Support Nikolay Khlebnikov and ISTC Executive Director Adriaan van der Meer signed the Agreement at IAEA headquarters in Vienna on 22 October 2008. (IAEA)

  17. IAEA/NDS requirements related to database software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.; Zerkin, V.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Data Section of the IAEA disseminates data to the NDS users through Internet or on CD-ROMs and diskettes. OSU Web-server on DEC Alpha with Open VMS and Oracle/DEC DBMS provides via CGI scripts and FORTRAN retrieval programs access to the main nuclear databases supported by the networks of Nuclear Reactions Data Centres and Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Centres (CINDA, EXFOR, ENDF, NSR, ENSDF). For Web-access to data from other libraries and files, hyper-links to the files stored in ASCII text or other formats are used. Databases on CD-ROM are usually provided with some retrieval system. They are distributed in the run-time mode and comply with all license requirements for software used in their development. Although major development work is done now at the PC with MS-Windows and Linux, NDS may not at present, due to some institutional conditions, use these platforms for organization of the Web access to the data. Starting the end of 1999, the NDS, in co-operation with other data centers, began to work out the strategy of migration of main network nuclear data bases onto platforms other than DEC Alpha/Open VMS/DBMS. Because the different co-operating centers have their own preferences for hardware and software, the requirement to provide maximum platform independence for nuclear databases is the most important and desirable feature. This requirement determined some standards for the nuclear database software development. Taking into account the present state and future development, these standards can be formulated as follows: 1. All numerical data (experimental, evaluated, recommended values and their uncertainties) prepared for inclusion in the IAEA/NDS nuclear database should be submitted in the form of the ASCII text files and will be kept at NDS as a master file. 2. Databases with complex structure should be submitted in the form of the files with standard SQL statements describing all its components. All extensions of standard SQL

  18. IAEA symposium on international safeguards. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The most important subjects treated in 188 papers presented by the participants from member state and IAEA Safeguards Inspectors at the Symposium were as follows: implementation of IAEA safeguards; national support programs to the IAEA safeguards; experiences in application of safeguard monitoring devices; improved methods for verification of plutonium; highly enriched uranium; surveillance of spent fuel storage facilities, reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants; excess weapon grade plutonium and other fissile materials

  19. IAEA symposium on international safeguards. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The most important subjects treated in 188 papers presented by the participants from member state and IAEA Safeguards Inspectors at the Symposium were as follows: implementation of IAEA safeguards; national support programs to the IAEA safeguards; experiences in application of safeguard monitoring devices; improved methods for verification of plutonium; highly enriched uranium; surveillance of spent fuel storage facilities, reprocessing plants, fuel fabrication plants; excess weapon grade plutonium and other fissile materials Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Officially released mutant varieties - the FAO/IAEA Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluszynski, M.; Nichterlein, K.; Zanten, L. van; Ahloowalia, B.S.

    2000-01-01

    In the approximately 70 year-old history of induced mutations, there are many examples on the development of new and valuable alteration in plant characters significantly contributing to increased yield potential of specific crops. However, knowledge on the success of induced mutations in crop improvement among geneticists and breeders is usually limited to species of their interest. The present paper contains a comprehensive list of officially released mutant varieties, based on information from plant breeders. The number of mutant varieties officially released and recorded in the FAO/IAEA Mutant Varieties Database before the end of 2000 is 2,252. Almost half of these varieties have been released during the last 15 years. Considering a significant delay in the dissemination of information on newly released varieties and difficulties in the collection of such data, there has been a renaissance in the use of mutation techniques in crop improvement. At the demand of geneticists, plant breeders, and more recently molecular geneticists, for information on released mutant varieties of specific crops, the MVD was transferred to the web site of the FAO/IAEA Joint Division. The MVD will be available on our web pages early in 2001. (author)

  1. The international ISOE programme. ISOE IAEA technical centre activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the sub-programme on Occupational Radiation Protection in the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, is to promote a harmonized approach to optimizing occupational radiation protection by developing guidelines for controlling radiation doses in the workplace and on current occupational radiation protection techniques. A significant part of this programme is the provision of assistance to developing member states to bring their radiation safety infrastructure to an appropriate level for the usage of radiation in the state. In consistence with these objectives the IAEA has been involved with the ISOE programme from its inception and has contributed actively to its growth. In 1993 an arrangement was agreed between the IAEA and the Nuclear Energy Agency, NEA, by which the IAEA co-sponsors ISOE inviting those IAEA member states which are not members of the NEA to participate cost-free in the programme. (author)

  2. Joint activities with IAEA on uploading of scieintific papers from Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan into the EXFOR database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenzhebayev, N.; Kurmangalieva, V.; Takibayev, N.; Otuka, N.

    2015-01-01

    More than a year passed since Kazakhstan joined the international network of nuclear reactions data centers (NRDC). A Central Asian centre for nuclear reactions (CANRDB, Central Asia Nuclear Reaction Database) has been established at al-Farabi Kazakh National University, and a group of experts there is actively working on expansion of the database, further development of the specialized software, and fostering partnership with international nuclear physicists. There are also on-going activities aimed on training, searching of the published nuclear data obtained earlier by scientists from Central Asia to incorporate their results in the database. The main objective of CA-NRDB is the development and formation in Kazakhstan of open and user-friendly database on nuclear reactions with further incorporation of this database in the international network of nuclear databases under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We note that such a database is created in the entire Central Asian region for the first time

  3. Joint activities with IAEA on uploading of scientific papers from Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan into the EXFOR database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenzhebayev, N.; Kurmangalieva, V.; Takibayev, N.; Otsuka, N.; )

    2014-01-01

    More than a year passed since Kazakhstan joined the international network of nuclear reactions data centers (NRDC). A Central Asian centre for nuclear reactions (CANRDB, Central Asia Nuclear Reaction Database) has been established at al-Farabi Kazakh National University, and a group of experts there is actively working on expansion of the database, further development of the specialized software, and fostering partnership with international nuclear physicists. There are also on-going activities aimed on training, searching of the published nuclear data obtained earlier by scientists from Central Asia to incorporate their results in the database. The main objective of CA-NRDB is the development and formation in Kazakhstan of open and user-friendly database on nuclear reactions with further incorporation of this database in the international network of nuclear databases under the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We note that such a database is created in the entire Central Asian region for the first time

  4. IAEA Sends International Fact-finding Expert Mission to Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency will dispatch an international expert fact-finding mission to Japan. Based upon the agreement between the IAEA and the Government of Japan, the mission, comprising nearly 20 international and IAEA experts from a dozen countries, will visit Japan between 24 May and 2 June 2011. Under the leadership of Mr. Mike Weightman, HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations of the United Kingdom, the mission will conduct fact-finding activities at Tokyo Electric Power Company's Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) site and in other locations. The expert mission will make a preliminary assessment of the safety issues linked with TEPCO's Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS accident following the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. During the mission, areas that need further exploration or assessment based on the IAEA safety standards will also be identified. In the course of the IAEA mission, the international experts will become acquainted with the Japanese lessons learned from the accident and will share their experience and expertise in their fields of competence with the Japanese authorities. Mr. Weightman will present the mission's report at the Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety organised by the IAEA in Vienna from 20 to 24 June 2011, as an important input in the process of reviewing and strengthening the global nuclear safety framework that will be launched by the Conference. (IAEA)

  5. International Scavenging for First Responder Guidance and Tools: IAEA Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berthelot, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-05-05

    In fiscal years (FY) 2016 and 2017, with support from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examined the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) radiological emergency response and preparedness products (guidance and tools) to determine which of these products could be useful to U.S. first responders. The IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC), which is responsible for emergency preparedness and response, offers a range of tools and guidance documents for responders in recognizing, responding to, and recovering from radiation emergencies and incidents. In order to implement this project, BNL obtained all potentially relevant tools and products produced by the IAEA IEC and analyzed these materials to determine their relevance to first responders in the U.S. Subsequently, BNL organized and hosted a workshop at DHS National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL) for U.S. first responders to examine and evaluate IAEA products to consider their applicability to the United States. This report documents and describes the First Responder Product Evaluation Workshop, and provides recommendations on potential steps the U.S. federal government could take to make IAEA guidance and tools useful to U.S. responders.

  6. International IAEA Emergency Response Workshop in Fukushima Concludes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA workshop aimed at further strengthening nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response capabilities concluded today in Fukushima, Japan. More than 40 participants from 18 countries took part in the four-day Response and Assistance Network (RANET) workshop, which included a field exercise in areas affected following the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. During the exercise, participants conducted radiation monitoring and environmental sampling and analysis. They measured the contamination level of the ground surface and conducted gamma spectrum analysis and vehicle-based monitoring - activities that are conducted following any nuclear or radiological incident or emergency. Results were then compared amongst participants. RANET is a network currently comprising 22 countries through which the IAEA can facilitate the provision of expert support and equipment on request under the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. Pat Kenny, IAEA RANET Officer, said the workshop provided an opportunity to practice cooperation between international teams that would be deployed through RANET following an emergency. 'By bringing together so many experts from different countries in one place, the workshop helped us learn how international teams can work together to provide assistance in a nuclear or radiological emergency situation,' he said. 'It also enabled us to improve the coordination of such assistance, and it gave participants the opportunity to learn from each other.' The workshop was the first activity conducted from the IAEA RANET Capacity Building Centre, a new training centre based in the city of Fukushima that was designated earlier this week with the support of the Japanese Foreign Ministry and Fukushima Prefecture. The Centre will host RANET and other training courses, workshops and exercises aimed at enhancing nuclear emergency preparedness and response

  7. The IAEA stopping power database, following the trends in stopping power of ions in matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, C. C.; Dimitriou, P.

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this work is to present an overview of the state of art of the energy loss of ions in matter, based on the new developments in the stopping power database of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This exhaustive collection of experimental data, graphs, programs and comparisons, is the legacy of Helmut Paul, who made it accessible to the global scientific community, and has been extensively employed in theoretical and experimental research during the last 25 years. The field of stopping power in matter is evolving, with new trends in materials of interest, including oxides, nitrides, polymers, and biological targets. Our goal is to identify areas of interest and emerging data needs to meet the requirements of a continuously developing user community.

  8. IAEA databases on safety issues and plant status for Central and Eastern European NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czibolya, L.

    1995-01-01

    The main principles of the database development for safety issues of WWER and RBMK reactors are described. The IAEA contribution to the G-24 Project Data Bank and an analysis of gaps and overlaps in assistance projects is given. As an example the database on WWER-440/VV-230 type reactors is shown. (HP)

  9. Non-proliferation and international safeguards. [Booklet by IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    This booklet consists of 13 separate, brief analyses related to the subject title, namely: The International Scope of IAEA Safeguards; Application of Safeguards Procedures; Computer-Based Safeguards Information and Accounting System; IAEA Training Activities Related to State Systems of Nuclear Materials Accountancy and Control; Surveillance and Containment Measures to Support IAEA Safeguards; International Plutonium Management; Safeguards for Reprocessing and Enrichment Plants; Non-Destructive Assay: Instruments and Techniques for Agency Safeguards; The Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Its Functions and Analytical Facilities; Resolution of the UN General Assembly on the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons of 12 June 1968; The Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons; Final Declaration of the Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, May 1975; Resolutions on the IAEA's Work in the Field of the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy, adopted by the UN General Assembly on 8 and 12 December, 1977; and a Map on the NPT situation in the world (with explanations).

  10. IAEA and IEA roles in international fusion energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.; Nakamura, K.

    2000-01-01

    The article describes the IAEA's and the IEA's complementary roles in facilitating international fusion research cooperation. These roles represent highly desirable contributions to fusion research through pooling of limited human and financial resources. The two Agencies both coordinate research and organize technical meeting, but in different ways. They each have unique strengths and different modes of operation. In order to deal with potential overlaps and serve the fusion research community optimally, they are coordinating their activities

  11. IAEA/UNESCO Joint International Isotopes in Hydrology Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezgueler, H.

    2002-01-01

    International Hydrology Programme (IHP) of UNESCO was established in 1965 as International Hydrological Decade. This programme was transformed to the IHP having the phases of 6-year duration. Presently, IHP-VI Phase (2002-2007) is based on the fundamental principle that freshwater is as essential to sustainable development as it is to life and that water, beyond its geophysical, chemical, biological function in the hydrological cycle, has social, economic and environmental values that are inter-linked and mutually supportive. The international Programme for Isotopes in the Hydrological Cycle 'proposal was presented by IAEA to the Fifth UNESCO-WMO International Conference on Hydrology' held in Geneva in 1999. The Conference noted the proposal and invited UNESCO and IAEA to develop the proposal further in collaboration with WMO, in order to submit it to the relevant bodies of the organizations concerned. At the end of this study, the IAEA / UNESCO Joint International Isotopes in Hydrology Programme (JIIHP) was formed in 2001. The JIIHP will service a number of international needs including the dissemination of research and application results in isotope methodologies through a global infrastructure network. This is foreseen primarily through an appropriate expansion of the IHP National Committees to include experts in isotope methods in hydrology in order to facilitate a more efficient dialogue and mainstreaming of isotope methods in member states of UNESCO. Main areas for co-operation have already been incorporated within the IHP-VI plans. In this paper, with some brief information on the studies to be realised in the near future under the framework of this programme JIIHP, the isotop related priorities of the Turkish hydrology community are explained herewith

  12. Status of IAEA international data base on irradiated graphite properties with respect to HTR engineering issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hacker, P.J.; Haag, G.

    2002-01-01

    The International Database on Irradiated Nuclear Graphite Properties contains data on the physical, chemical, mechanical and other relevant properties of graphites. Its purpose is to provide a platform that makes these properties accessible to approved users in the fields of nuclear power, nuclear safety and other nuclear science and technology applications. The database is constructed using Microsoft Access 97 software and has a controlled distribution by CD ROM to approved users. This paper describes the organisation and management of the database through administrative arrangements approved by the IAEA. It also outlines the operation of the database. The paper concludes with some remarks upon and illustrations of the usefulness of the database for the design and operation of HTR. (authors)

  13. Uruguayan geological documents produced and included in INIS Database- IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebellato, A.

    2007-01-01

    A possible promotion way for Uruguayan geological documents or foreigner authors who public their researchers in Uruguay was given by International Nuclear Information System INIS of the International Agency Atomic Energy .The article shows not only the INIS historic information, integration products, services and operation but also a safe tool for scientific and technological knowledge preservation. (author)

  14. Improving the Database for Physical and Chemical Sputtering. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.

    2013-02-01

    Seven experts and IAEA staff convened in Vienna to review the existing database for physical and chemical sputtering of fusion wall materials and to make recommendations about priorities for further work. Recommendations were made about database needs for pure and mixed Be, C and W wall material for the processes of physical and chemical sputtering, reflection, penetration and trapping and also for effects of surface and material microstructure. The proceedings and recommendations of the meeting are summarized here. (author)

  15. The IAEA Member States' database of discharges of radionuclides to the atmosphere and the aquatic environment (DIRATA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovskyy, Volodymyr; Hood, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Full text: This paper provides the abstract model for authors. It embodies all the required formats and it is written complying with them. DIRATA is the IAEA Member States' database on discharges of radionuclides to the atmosphere and the aquatic environment (http://dirata.iaea.org/). It is a worldwide centralized repository of data submitted by IAEA Member States on a voluntary basis and each site dataset includes annual discharge and detection limits. Regulatory limits are given by Member States whenever available and a limited amount of information on the location of the site (country, geographical coordinates, water body into which radioactivity is released, number, names and types of installations) is also included. One of important purposes of DIRATA is to assist UNSCEAR in the preparation of the regular reports to the UN General Assembly and to serve Member States as a technical means for reporting and reviewing within the framework of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management. The on-line version of the DIRATA database was deployed for the pilot application by Member States and the general public in 2006 and provides tools for: 1-)Input of the primary information by IAEA Member States and international organizations in batch or interactive (record by record) modes. The Microsoft Excel template is provided on the DIRATA website for the batch input; 2-) On-line access of Member States and the public to the dataset. The information contained in DIRATA is available for downloading (in CSV format) and interactive review. The new web-based version of DIRATA has inherited all of the important features contained on the previous CD-ROM versions, and has been extended by the number of principally new functionalities. The paper describes the structure, functionalities and content of the DIRATA database. (author)

  16. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This CD-ROM is attached to the booklet 'Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)'. It contains the background material with regard to ANENT in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentation material made by Member States, and meeting summaries during the period 2002-2005. Further information on the current ANENT activities and related IAEA activities is available at 'http://anent-iaea.org' and 'http://iaea.org/inisnkm'

  17. IAEA Activities on Uranium Resources and Production, and Databases for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganguly, C.; Slezak, J. [Divison of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-05-15

    In recent years rising expectation for nuclear power has led to a significant increase in the demand for uranium and in turn dramatic increases in uranium exploration, mining and ore processing activities worldwide. Several new countries, often with limited experience, have also embarked on these activities. The ultimate goal of the uranium raw material industry is to provide an adequate supply of uranium that can be delivered to the market place at a competitive price by environmentally sound, mining and milling practices. The IAEA’s programme on uranium raw material encompass all aspects of uranium geology and deposits, exploration, resources, supply and demand, uranium mining and ore processing, environmental issues in the uranium production cycle and databases for the uranium fuel cycle. Radiological safety and environmental protection are major challenges in uranium mines and mills and their remediation. The IAEA has revived its programme for the Uranium Production Site Appraisal Team (UPSAT) to assist Member States to improve operational and safety performances at uranium mines and mill sites. The present paper summarizes the ongoing activities of IAEA on uranium raw material, highlighting the status of global uranium resources, their supply and demand, the IAEA database on world uranium deposit (UDEPO) and nuclear fuel cycle information system (NFCIS), recent IAEA Technical Meetings (TM) and related ongoing Technical Cooperation (TC) projects. (author)

  18. Manual for IRS Coding. Joint IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/NEA). In early 2010, the IAEA and OECD/NEA jointly issued the IRS Guidelines, which described the reporting system and process and gave users the necessary elements to enable them to produce IRS reports to a high standard of quality while retaining the effectiveness of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. The purpose of the present Manual for IRS Coding is to provide supplementary guidance specifically on the coding element of IRS reports to ensure uniform coding of events that are reported through IRS. This Coding Manual does not supersede the IRS Guidelines, but rather, supports users and preparers in achieving a consistent and high level of quality in their IRS reports. Consistency and high quality in the IRS reports allow stakeholders to search and retrieve specific event information with ease. In addition, well-structured reports also enhance the efficient management of the IRS database. This Coding Manual will give specific guidance on the application of each section of the IRS codes, with examples where necessary, of when and how these codes are to be applied. As this reporting system is owned by the Member States, this manual has been developed and approved by the IRS National Coordinators with the assistance of the IAEA and NEA secretariats

  19. International cooperative analysis of standard substance, IAEA-0390

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamoto, Keizo; Takada, Jitsuya; Moriyama, Hirotake; Akaboshi, Mitsuhiko

    1999-01-01

    Three kinds of algae (IAEA-0391, IAEA-0392 and IAEA-0393) were defined as the biological standard substance to monitor environmental pollution by Analytical Quality Control Service of IAEA (IAEA-AQCS). In this study, analysis of these standard substances were made using ICP-MS to compare with the results of simultaneously conducted radioactivation analysis (INAA). The respective cultures of the three algae were cooperatively prepared by IAEA-AQCS and microbial Institute of Czechoslovakia. After drying and sterilizing by Co-60 exposure, these samples were sent to KURRI. When the results from the experiment in KURRI were compared with the values recommended through statistical treatment of the data obtained by IAEA, these values of 5 elements, Fe, Cr, Mg, Mn and Na were well coincident for either of IAEA-0391, IAEA-0392 and IAEA-0393 and the values of As, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, K and Zn were nearly coincident between them. Regarding Hg and La, the data from INAA and ICP-MS were very different from the recommended values of IAEA for either of samples. (M.N.)

  20. International Ventilation Cooling Application Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzer, Peter; Psomas, Theofanis Ch.; OSullivan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The currently running International Energy Agency, Energy and Conservation in Buildings, Annex 62 Ventilative Cooling (VC) project, is coordinating research towards extended use of VC. Within this Annex 62 the joint research activity of International VC Application Database has been carried out...... and locations, using VC as a mean of indoor comfort improvement. The building-spreadsheet highlights distributions of technologies and strategies, such as the following. (Numbers in % refer to the sample of the database’s 91 buildings.) It may be concluded that Ventilative Cooling is applied in temporary......, systematically investigating the distribution of technologies and strategies within VC. The database is structured as both a ticking-list-like building-spreadsheet and a collection of building-datasheets. The content of both closely follows Annex 62 State-Of-The- Art-Report. The database has been filled, based...

  1. Present and future activities of the IAEA on internal dosimetry: Lessons learned from international intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Suarez, R.; Gustafsson, M.; Mrabit, K.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts safety activities to support the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides; a comprehensive set of safety documents will soon be completed. In recent years, extensive improvements in measurement techniques, phantoms and computational tools have been made. Thus, it is important for laboratories involved in internal dosimetry to undergo performance testing procedures to demonstrate the correctness of the methods applied and also to determine the consistency of their results with those obtained by other laboratories. Several intercomparisons were organised, and they revealed significant differences among laboratories in their approaches, methods and assumptions, and consequently in their results. This paper presents the current and future IAEA activities in support of assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides in the IAEA Member States, as well as the lessons learned from several intercomparison exercises in the last 5 years. (author)

  2. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung [Nuclear Data Section, NAPC Division, International Atomic Energy Agency P. O. Box 100, Vienna International Centre, AT-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-25

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  3. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-05-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  4. Databases and coordinated research projects at the IAEA on atomic processes in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, Bastiaan J.; Chung, Hyun-Kyung

    2012-01-01

    The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit at the IAEA works with a network of national data centres to encourage and coordinate production and dissemination of fundamental data for atomic, molecular and plasma-material interaction (A+M/PMI) processes that are relevant to the realization of fusion energy. The Unit maintains numerical and bibliographical databases and has started a Wiki-style knowledge base. The Unit also contributes to A+M database interface standards and provides a search engine that offers a common interface to multiple numerical A+M/PMI databases. Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) bring together fusion energy researchers and atomic, molecular and surface physicists for joint work towards the development of new data and new methods. The databases and current CRPs on A+M/PMI processes are briefly described here.

  5. The IAEA International Project on Innovative Reactors and Fuel Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourogov, V.M.

    2001-01-01

    and policy makers. A 2000 the IAEA General Conference resolution invited 'all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology'. In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated an 'International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles', INPRO. The INPRO Project will be implemented in two phases. In the first phase, the main objective is to identify user requirements facilitating large scale nuclear energy development in the 21st century in the following areas: Resources, Demand and Economics; Environment, Spent Fuel and Waste; Safety, and Non-proliferation. Plus two crosscutting groups addressing Criteria and Methodology; and Institutional, Infrastructure, Social and Sustainability Requirements. Upon successful completion of the first phase, taking into account advice from the Steering Committee, and with the approval of participating Member States, a second phase of INPRO may be initiated. It would examine, in the context of available technologies, the feasibility of an international project including the identification of technologies that might appropriately be implemented by Member States within such an international project. We believe that INPRO'S global character, encompassing both designers and end users and their user's requirements, its long time horizon, its consideration of the changing energy sector and its broad based input through IAEA membership all will make it a valuable forum for the assessment of perspectives for nuclear in the 21st century. (author)

  6. Guidelines for IAEA International Regulatory Review Teams (IRRTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA International Regulatory Review Team (IRRT) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to strengthen and enhance the effectiveness of the nuclear regulatory body whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility of each Member State for nuclear safety. The IRRT programme, initiated in 1989, is not restricted to any particular group of Member States, whether developing or industrialized, but is available to all countries with nuclear installations in operation or approaching operation. The basic concepts, purposes and functions of a national regulatory body are well recognized in all Member States having a nuclear power programme. The IAEA Safety Standards Series publication entitled 'Legal and Governmental Infrastructure for Nuclear, Radiation, Radioactive Waste and Transport Safety, Safety: Requirements', No. GS-R-1 (2000), provides a general consensus reference for the practices necessary for a national organization to fulfil the regulatory purposes and discharge the regulatory functions. The Requirements also defines the terms used in these guidelines. The guidance given in the Requirements recognizes that the organizational structure and regulatory processes will vary from country to country depending on their existing constitutional, legal and administrative systems; the size and structure of their nuclear programme; the technical skills and professional and financial resources available to their regulatory body, and social customs and cultural traditions. The objective of this report is to provide guidance on the basic structure of an IRRT mission and provide a common reference both across the various areas covered by an IRRT mission and across all the missions in the programme. As such, it is addressed, principally, to the team members of IRRT missions but it also provides guidance to a host regulatory body receiving a mission. This report identifies the objectives of the IRRT mission and sets out the scope of the topic areas that are

  7. Summary report on [IAEA] technical meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaeva, S.; Otsuka, N.; Schwerer, O.

    2009-08-01

    An IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres was held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 25 to 26 May 2009. The meeting was attended by 23 participants from 13 cooperating data centres. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status report of the participating data centres. (author)

  8. The Net Enabled Waste Management Database as an international source of radioactive waste management information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Friedrich, V.; Miaw, S.T.W.; Tonkay, D.; Petoe, A.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA's Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) is an integral part of the IAEA's policies and strategy related to the collection and dissemination of information, both internal to the IAEA in support of its activities and external to the IAEA (publicly available). The paper highlights the NEWMDB's role in relation to the routine reporting of status and trends in radioactive waste management, in assessing the development and implementation of national systems for radioactive waste management, in support of a newly developed indicator of sustainable development for radioactive waste management, in support of reporting requirements for the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, in support of IAEA activities related to the harmonization of waste management information at the national and international levels and in relation to the management of spent/disused sealed radioactive sources. (author)

  9. The IAEA inventory databases related to radioactive material entering the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastogi, R.C.; Sjoeblom, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    Contracting Parties to the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter (LC 1972) have requested the IAEA to develop an inventory of radioactive material entering the marine environment from all sources. The rationale for developing and maintaining the inventory is related to its use as an information base with which the impact of radionuclides entering the marine environment from different sources can be assessed and compared. Five anthropogenic sources of radionuclides entering the marine environment can be identified. These sources are: radioactive waste disposal at sea; accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material; discharge of low level liquid effluents from land-based nuclear facilities; the fallout from nuclear weapons testing; and accidental releases from land-based nuclear facilities. The first two of these sources are most closely related to the objective of the LC 1972 and its request to the IAEA. This paper deals with the Agency's work on developing a database on radioactive material entering the marine environment from these two sources. The database has the acronym RAMEM (RAdioactive Material Entering the Marine Environment). It includes two modules: inventory of radioactive waste disposal at sea and inventory of accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material

  10. Computer system for International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunjan, R.; Kabalevsky, S.; Kiselev, V.; Serov, A.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents description of the computer tools for support of International Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Database developed at IAEA. Work was focused on raw, qualified, processed materials data, search, retrieval, analysis, presentation and export possibilities of data. Developed software has the following main functions: provides software tools for querying and search of any type of data in the database; provides the capability to update the existing information in the database; provides the capability to present and print selected data; provides the possibility of export on yearly basis the run-time IRPVMDB with raw, qualified and processed materials data to Database members; provides the capability to export any selected sets of raw, qualified, processed materials data

  11. Report on the IAEA technical meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwerer, O; Dunaeva, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); org, S Dunaeva@iaea [eds.

    2007-11-15

    An IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 8 to 10 October 2007. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 11 cooperating data centres of six Member States and two international organizations. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status reports of the participating data centres. (author)

  12. Report on the IAEA technical meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Dunaeva, S.; S.Dunaeva@iaea.org

    2007-11-01

    An IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from 8 to 10 October 2007. The meeting was attended by 19 participants from 11 cooperating data centres of six Member States and two international organizations. A summary of the meeting is given in this report, along with the conclusions, actions, and status reports of the participating data centres. (author)

  13. Summary Report on IAEA Technical Meeting on the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko

    2011-07-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres, held at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria from 23 - 24 May 2011. The meeting was attended by 25 participants from 13 cooperating data centres of nine Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. (author)

  14. IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    IAEA safeguards are a system of technical measures within the framework of international non-proliferation policy entrusted to the IAEA in its Statute and by other treaties. About 98% of the world's nuclear installations outside the nuclear-weapon countries are now under safeguards. This paper gives a review of IAEA activities in this field: objectives, agreements, work and development of staff of the IAEA's Department of Safeguards, instruments and techniques for direct measurement and verification of nuclear material. (author)

  15. IAEA participation in the International Congress of Radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    The congress is organized every three years, and the latest was held at Montreal, Canada, from 25 August to 1 September, and was attended by about 4000 persons, including approximately 2000 full members. Four scientists from the Agency's staff took part in the congress as full members, and out of a total of 517 scientific papers presented at the congress, three were by the Agency participants. The Agency also participated in a scientific exhibition, which was held along with the congress, with a display entitled 'The Contribution of IAEA to Radiology'

  16. International Nuclear Officials Discuss IAEA Peer Reviews of Nuclear Safety Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Senior nuclear regulators today concluded a Workshop on the Lessons Learned from the IAEA Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) Missions. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) hosted the workshop, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Washington, DC, from 26 to 28 October 2011. About 60 senior regulators from 22 IAEA Member States took part in this workshop. The IRRS programme is an international peer review service offered by the IAEA to its Member States to provide an objective evaluation of their nuclear safety regulatory framework. The review is based on the internationally recognized IAEA Safety Standards. ''The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission was pleased to host the IAEA's IRRS meeting this week. The discussions over the past three days have provided an important opportunity for regulators from many countries to come together to strengthen the international peer review process,'' said U.S. NRC Chairman Gregory B. Jaczko. ''Especially after the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the global community recognizes that IRRS missions fill a vital role in strengthening nuclear safety and security programs around the world, and we are proud to be a part of this important effort.'' The IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety includes actions focused towards strengthening the existing IAEA peer reviews, incorporating lessons learned and improving their effectiveness. The workshop provided a platform for the exchange of information, experience and lessons learned from the IRRS missions, as well as expectations for the IRRS programme for the near future. Further improvements in the planning and implementation of the IRRS missions in the longer term were discussed. A strong commitment of all relevant national authorities to the IRRS programme was identified as a key element of an effective regulatory framework. The conclusions of the workshop will be issued in November 2011 and the main results will be reported to the IAEA

  17. Feasibility study on the establishment of the IAEA international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, E. J.; Kim, Y. T.; Nam, Y. M. and others

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to support 2002-2003 the IAEA project D.4.0.2, facilitating education, training and research in nuclear science and related fields, especially for a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored International Nuclear University. Through this project, the abstract principle for a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored International Nuclear university, which contains the new concepts and its objectives, principles to achieve the objectives, its curriculum outline and operation system, suggested project activities, was developed and submitted to the Agency. The Korean proposal were presented several times at the IAEA meetings and other international meetings related nuclear human resources development for understanding the necessity of a feasibility study on the establishment of the Agency sponsored international nuclear university with Member States. And the Korean proposal included such as the organization of a worldwide network using information and communication technology among Merber States' research institutes and training/education centers, curriculum outline and operation system of the INU will be produced. Also for further cooperation of the IAEA INU project implementation with the Agency, hosting IAEA INIS mirror site, establishment of the RCA region office, establishment of the INTEC at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute, and advanced curriculum of nuclear technology linked with NT, BT, ET, IT were made progress as a part of conceptualizing of the IAEA project

  18. IAEA-coordinated research programme for the establishment of a database of thermophysical properties of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maglic, K.D.; Kupitz, J.; Krett, V.

    1991-01-01

    Operational and safety assessments of nuclear reactors rely on models, computer programs, databases, and input parameters. Obviously, the best computer programs can be only as good as their input data, of which the thermophysical properties of reactor materials constitute an important portion. Thermophysical data are needed for modelling the thermal behaviour of materials under normal, transient, and accident conditions. The IAEA analysed the needs of its member states in this area, and a decision was made to organise a coordinated research programme (CRP) aimed at the generation and establishment of a reliable and complete database of reactor materials. The main features of advanced water-cooled reactors are described, and the content of the IAEA CRP for the establishment of a thermophysical property database-system of operation, objectives, and implementation schedule-is discussed. (Author)

  19. The Matti Kuusi International Database of Proverbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi Lauhakangas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on Matti Kuusi’s library of proverb collections, the Matti Kuusi International Database of Proverbs is designed for cultural researchers, translators, and proverb enthusiasts. Kuusi compiled a card-index with tens of thousands of references to synonymic proverbs. The database is a tool for studying global similarities and national specificities of proverbs. This essay offers a practical introduction to the database, its classification system, and describes future plans for improvement of the database.

  20. IAEA Coordinates International Mission on Remediation of Areas Off-site Fukushima Daiichi NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) will dispatch an international expert mission to Japan to assist the country in its planning to remediate the areas off-site from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Following a request by the Government of Japan, the mission, comprising 12 international and IAEA experts from several countries, will visit Japan between 7 and 15 October 2011 under the leadership of Mr. Juan Carlos Lentijo, General Director for Radiation Protection at Spain's nuclear regulatory authority. The team will go to several locations in the Fukushima Prefecture and conduct meetings in Tokyo with Japanese officials to: Provide assistance to Japan in its plans to manage remediation efforts; Review the country's remediation strategies, plans and work; and Share its findings with the international community. The IAEA mission will provide an opportunity for the international experts to exchange views with the Japanese authorities involved in the decontamination effort and other interested parties. It will also provide an opportunity for the IAEA to take stock of lessons learned from this important decontamination initiative. At the end of the mission a preliminary summary report will be provided to the Government of Japan and be made publically available. The team is also planning to hold a press briefing at the end of the mission. The final report of the mission will be presented to the Government in the month following the conclusion of the mission. Background The accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant has led to the radiological contamination of large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas. The IAEA organized an International Fact Finding Expert Mission Of The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident Following The Great East Japan Earthquake And Tsunami, which was held between 24 May and 2 June 2011. The current mission is a

  1. The IAEA perspective on international and national radioactive waste management information systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Falck, W.E.; Miaw, S.T.W.

    2001-01-01

    individual countries. International radioactive waste management information systems are needed to provide overviews of the status of and trends in: establishing national systems for radioactive waste management, the operational state of radioactive waste management facilities (processing, storage and disposal), and annual radioactive waste arisings and the accumulated inventories of waste in storage and disposal facilities. Various international organizations use and assess information about radioactive waste management, such as the IAEA, the OECD/NEA and the European Union. At a recent international meeting on 'Information for Decision Making', experts noted that the 'lack of full and effective co-operation between departments and institutions both at the national and international levels responsible for data collection.. ..often leads to inefficient information management due to duplication of surveys, inconsistent methodologies and inefficient use of information'. Clearly, international organizations need to co-ordinate their activities in the collection and dissemination of nationally-based information about radioactive waste management. Historically, IAEA Member States have developed and implemented a variety of waste classification schemes in support of their national radioactive waste management programmes. For those Member States that have implemented waste inventory record keeping systems, their databases are used to record waste inventories according to national classification schemes. In addition, the scope and quality of information in these databases not only varies from Member State to Member State, it can also vary from organization to organization within a Member State. Differences in waste management record keeping at the national level complicates reporting at the international level, where the information is to be reported in a consistent format that facilitates comparisons between Member State submissions. The IAEA has undertaken a number of initiatives

  2. Termination of international safeguards on nuclear material discards: An IAEA update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrimore, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA adopted a policy for termination of international safeguards on measured discards in mid-1994. The policy addresses a broad range of termination of safeguards on nuclear material in waste with a focus on conditioned waste arising from reprocessing. The safeguards relevant aspects of waste handling up to the point of termination must be approved, and a determination made that the waste type, form of conditioning and nuclear material concentration satisfy specific criteria. In addition, the State where the terminated waste will be stored is requested to notify the IAEA of future movement or processing of the waste. Cases of international transfers of conditioned waste are also addressed

  3. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreo, P.

    1996-01-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  4. Radiation dosimetry with plane-parallel ionization chambers: An international (IAEA) code of practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreo, P [Lunds Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Radiophysics Dept.; Almond, P R [J.G. Brown Cancer Center, Univ. of Lousville, Lousville, KY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mattsson, O [Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics; Nahum, A E [Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics; Roos, M [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1996-08-01

    Research on plane-parallel ionization chambers since the IAEA Code of Practice (TRS-277) was published in 1987 has expanded our knowledge on perturbation and other correction factors in ionization chamber dosimeter, and also constructional details of these chambers have been shown to be important. Different national organizations have published, or are in the process of publishing, recommendations on detailed procedures for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers. An international working group was formed under the auspices of the IAEA, first to assess the status and validity of IAEA TRS-277, and second to develop an international Code of Practice for the calibration and use of plane-parallel ionization chambers in high-energy electron and photon beams. The purpose of this work is to describe the forthcoming Code of Practice. (author). 39 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  5. A review of fission gas release data within the Nea/IAEA IFPE database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.; Menut, P.; Sartori, E.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the International Fuel Performance Experimental (IFPE) database on nuclear fuel performance. The aim of the project is to provide a comprehensive and well-qualified database on Zr clad UO 2 fuel for model development and code validation in the public domain. The data encompass both normal and off-normal operation and include prototypic commercial irradiations as well as experiments performed in material testing reactors. To date, the database contains some 380 individual cases, the majority of which provide data on FGR either from in-pile pressure measurements or PIE techniques including puncturing, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements. The paper outlines parameters affecting fission gas release and highlights individual datasets addressing these issues. (authors)

  6. IAEA laboratory activities. The IAEA laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo. 3rd report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    This third 'IAEA Laboratory Activities' report describes development and work during the year 1965. It includes activities of the IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, and the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries at Cairo

  7. IAEA Laboratory activities. The IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo. Sixth report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This sixth 'IAEA Laboratory Activities' report describes development and work during the year 1968. It includes activities of the IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, and the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries at Cairo. (author)

  8. IAEA Laboratory activities. The IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo. Fourth report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    This fourth 'IAEA Laboratory Activities' report describes development and work during the year 1966. It includes activities of the IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, and the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries at Cairo. (author)

  9. A review of the report ''IAEA safety targets and probabilistic risk assessment'' prepared for Greenpeace International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    At the request of the Director General, INSAG reviewed the report ''IAEA Safety Targets and Probabilistic Risk Assessment'' prepared for Greenpeace International by the Gesellschaft fuer Oekologische Forschung und Beratung mbH, Hannover, Germany. The conclusions of the report as well as the review results of INSAG experts are reproduced in this document

  10. The recent international situation on the transport of radioactive material and IAEA 2003 transport conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tani, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Since the creation of the United Nations, the international community initiated efforts to harmonize international practices for the safe transport of hazardous goods, including radioactive material. And, IAEA is playing a key role in fostering the establishment of transport regulations on radioactive material. This current worldwide system of regulatory control has achieved an excellent safety record. However, some concerns still remain regarding the transport of radioactive material, as the discussion of this topic at IAEA General Conferences in the last few years. IAEA Transport conference planed as a forum in which to better understand these concerns, and to answer relevant underlying questions. At the same time, outside these technical areas, discussions also covered related issues such as liability resulting from an accident during the transport and communication between concerned governments, and between these governments and the public at large. The International Conference on the Safety of Transport of Radioactive Material took place in Vienna, Austria, from 7 to 11 July 2003. There were 534 nominated participants from 82 States, 9 intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and 5 non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and there were 132 contributed and invited papers. By this report, I report the recent international situation on the transport of radioactive material and result of the IAEA 2003 Transport Conference. (author)

  11. International Ice Patrol (IIP) Iceberg Sightings Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Ice Patrol (IIP) has been collecting information on iceberg activity in the North Atlantic since 1911. This database contains the data from these...

  12. The IAEA's international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuptiz, Juergen; )

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). It defines its rationale, key objectives and specifies the organizational structure. The IAEA General Conference (2000) has invited all interested Member states to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and invited Member states to consider to contribute to a task force on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

  13. INPRO-SYNERGIES - a new international INPRO/IAEA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva-Andrievskaya, L.N.; Kuznetsov, V.V.; Busurin, Yu.N.; Ponomarev, A.V.; )

    2012-01-01

    The new INPRO project entitled Synergistic Nuclear Energy Regional Group Interactions Evaluated for Sustainability (INPRO- SYNERGIES) is described. The project aims to improve the analytical software and databases to model more specifically the particular forms of synergistic architectures involving collaboration among supplier countries and user countries to support an efficient transition towards sustainable energy systems. The project's objectives, methods and contents of the work are analyzed. The synergistic collaborative scenarios for fuel cycle infrastructure development are evaluated. The course of the project and expected outputs are also described [ru

  14. Report on the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Dunaeva, S.; Otsuka, N.

    2010-07-01

    This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. This report summarizes the IAEA Technical Meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (biennial Data Centre Heads Meeting), held at the Japan Nuclear Reaction Data Centre, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, from 20 - 23 April 2010. The meeting was attended by 27 participants from 12 cooperating data centres of seven Member States and two International Organizations. The report contains a summary of the meeting, the conclusions and actions, the lists of working papers and presentations presented at the meeting. (author)

  15. IAEA support of international research and development of materials for sustainable energy applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, Andrej; Kaiser, Ralf; Simon, Aliz

    2013-01-01

    Full-text:The key mandate of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to promote the peaceful application of nuclear science and technology, verification as well as nuclear safety in the world. This includes a number of activities which aim to support the Member States and stimulate international cooperation in order for sustainable development. During the last 35 years, a well-established mechanism called the Coordinated Research Projects (CRP) has been effectively used to stimulate international research and scientific interaction among the Member States, covering various topics in the nuclear science and technology. Besides direct support of, so called coordinated research, the IAEA is also involved in organizing a number of highly specific international conferences and technical meetings which help to provide a broader platform for the specialist and experts in dedicated areas of nuclear science and technology. In view of support for renewable energy and its application, the IAEA organized series of meetings in 2009 (IEA France), 2010 (UQTR Canada) and 2011 (ANL USA) in order to discuss the scientific and technical issues of particular of national research initiatives related to the hydrogen storage and conversion technologies. All selected outputs of the meetings were published in a technical document publication series which are available to all member states. More recent initiatives are focus on the key nuclear techniques which are extremely valuable in research and development of new innovative materials, methods and technologies, characterization and performance testing of functional materials for innovative energy technologies and their application in sustainable energy sources (nuclear and non-nuclear). It is also important to underline that these programmatic activities are an integral part of the IAEA program on the Road to Rio+20: Applying Nuclear Technology for Sustainable Development. The paper summarizes the IAEA actions relevant to the

  16. Nuclear data services provided by the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwerer, O.; Oblozinsky, P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the various nuclear data types, libraries and services available free of charge from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. The databases are collected, maintained and made available within the framework of an international nuclear data center's network. Particular emphasis is given to online services via the Internet. The URL address of the IAEA Nuclear Services is http://www-nds.iaea.or.at. (author)

  17. International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofu, T.; Ley, H.; Turski, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    As an integral part of DOE's International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) at Argonne National Laboratory, the INSC Database has been established to provide an interactively accessible information resource for the world's nuclear facilities and to promote free and open exchange of nuclear safety information among nations. The INSC Database is a comprehensive resource database aimed at a scope and level of detail suitable for safety analysis and risk evaluation for the world's nuclear power plants and facilities. It also provides an electronic forum for international collaborative safety research for the Department of Energy and its international partners. The database is intended to provide plant design information, material properties, computational tools, and results of safety analysis. Initial emphasis in data gathering is given to Soviet-designed reactors in Russia, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe. The implementation is performed under the Oracle database management system, and the World Wide Web is used to serve as the access path for remote users. An interface between the Oracle database and the Web server is established through a custom designed Web-Oracle gateway which is used mainly to perform queries on the stored data in the database tables

  18. IAEA/IDEAS intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.; Andrasi, A.; Cruz-Suarez, R.; Castellani, C. M.; Hurtgen, C.; Marsh, J.; Zeger, J.

    2007-01-01

    An Internet based intercomparison exercise on assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides has been performed to check the applicability of the 'General Guidelines for the Assessment of Internal Dose from Monitoring Data' developed by the IDEAS group. There were six intake cases presented on the Internet and 81 participants worldwide reported solutions to these cases. Results of the exercise indicate that the guidelines have a positive influence on the methodologies applied for dose assessments and, if correctly applied, improve the harmonisation of assessed doses. (authors)

  19. Guidelines for IAEA International Regulatory Review Teams (IRRTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This document is intended to be used by International regulatory review teams in reviewing the activities of a regulatory body as applicable to the regulation of nuclear power plants. The mission will, however, take note of any other activities of the regulatory body when drawing up the review report. The document does not specifically deal with the functions of a regulatory body responsible for other types of nuclear facilities or related nuclear activities, but it is intended that the concepts presented in the document could be applied where appropriate. Refs

  20. Decommissioning: Strategies and programmes at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included decommissioning in its regular programmes since 1985. Until a few years ago, attention was focused on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, and to a lesser extent, research reactors. Some countries, however, are now devoting greater attention to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, with implementation of these programmes being seen as a high priority. This demanded equal attention in IAEA's programmes. In recent years, the IAEA has expanded its programmes to include guidance on decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities which are prevailing in most of its over 130 Member States. By 2010-2020, a significant number of nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle and non-reactor facilities will have exceeded their normal design lifetimes. Many of these facilities are already shutdown and are awaiting decommissioning. In 1996, the IAEA organized the decommissioning programme along two directions. A first direction focuses on the safety of management of radioactive waste including decommissioning. A second direction focuses on the technology and strategies to support waste management and decommissioning activities. This split of activities was instituted in order to keep the regulatory aspects separated from the strategic and technology-related activities. The focus of this paper will be on current and foreseen activities related to strategies and technologies of decommissioning, but other activities will be touched upon as well. All technical divisions of the IAEA provide technical support for Technical Co-operation (TC) projects with developing countries. TC projects in the field of decommissioning are given separate coverage in this paper. The IAEA documents on decommissioning strategies and technologies are presented in Section 2. Technical Co-operation Programme concerning Decommissioning is discussed focusing the objectives, the specific projects and the

  1. Role of the IAEA in establishment of the international standards of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the presentation is to highlight the existing challenges in radiation protection, and provide insight into the role of the IAEA in establishment of the radiation safety standards. It will, inter alia, cover from the following areas: 1. global outreach of safety principles in radiation protection and safety; 2. IAEA and establishment of Safety Standards; 3. IAEA Standards and national regulations; 4. IAEA members states role in drafting and review of IAEA Safety Standards; 5. existing, novel issues and challenges. The role of the IAEA is to establish fundamental safety objectives in radiation protection and safety following fundamental safety objectives, safety principles and concepts. The main aim of Safety Standards is to provide for the establishment of a system for protection of people and the environment from harmful effects of ionizing radiation. The requirements as included in the Safety Standards aim to assess, manage and control exposure to radiation so that radiation risks, including risks of health effects and risks to the environment, are reduced to the extent reasonably achievable.One of the novel feature adopted in the revised Basic Safety Standards (BSS) is the classification of exposures - planned, emergency and existing - each of them including several categories of exposure (occupational, public and medical), where appropriate.The revised BSS also addresses areas like exemption and clearance being particularly important in international trade and transport; significantly increases the number of requirements in medicine, in response to novel and/or expanding techniques in medicine using ionizing radiation; incorporates new regulatory limits for exposure to radon, and in protection of the lens of the eyes, as recommended by WHO and ICRP; newly introduces requirements for specific practices like, for example, airport security screenings; and addresses many other areas.While the principal approach to regulatory aspects in emergency exposure

  2. The IAEA Nuclear Data Center its role in the International Scientific Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1976-07-01

    The role of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section as an international data information and analysis center for the co-ordination of the world-wide collection, exchange and dissemination of nuclear data is described. Emphasis is put on the recent activities of the center in the assessment of nuclear data needs in various branches of science and technology, and on its projected development as a global referral center for nuclear data. (author)

  3. International movement on radiation safety related to the ICRP and the IAEA-RADWASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso

    1994-01-01

    Nowadays discussion on Radiation Safety has a spread of world wide range. The main framework on radiation safety was constructed by ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), which was established in 1928. This term of the committee was from June 1993 to May 1997 and the first plenary meeting was held at the Queen's hotel in Bournemouth of the United Kingdom on September 1993. The outline of this meeting, especially related items to the Committee 4, were summarized in this paper. The second point of our workshop considerations is radioactive waste problems, which are now under discussion in RADWASS (Radioactive Waste Safety Standards) project of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). This IAEA-RADWASS will last nearly 10 years to cover whole subjects. These discussed items are arranged into various international standards; the safety fundamental, the safety standards, the safety guides and the safety practices. These systematic approach, if we could summarize, would be effective not only to the specialists but also to a general public to get an acceptance of radioactive waste problem. Here, this IAEA-RADWASS project is reviewed. (author)

  4. Report on the observation of IAEA international emergency response exercise ConvEx-3(2008)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya; Sumiya, Akihiro

    2009-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA carried out a large-scale international emergency response exercise under the designated name of ConvEx-3(2008), accompanying the national exercise of Mexico in July 2008. This review report summarizes two simultaneous observations of the exercises in Mexico and the IAEA headquarter during ConvEx-3(2008). Mexico has established a very steady nuclear emergency response system based on that of US, while only two BWR nuclear power units have been operated yet. The Mexican nuclear emergency response system and the emergency response activities of the Incident and Emergency Centre of the IAEA headquarter impressed important knowledge on observers that is helpful for enhancement of Japanese nuclear emergency response system in the future, e.g. establishment of Emergency Action Level and of implementation of long time exercise and enhancement of prompt protective actions. Japan had established the Act on Special Measures Concerning Nuclear Emergency Preparedness and has developed the nuclear disaster prevention system since the JCO Criticality Accident in Tokai-mura. Now is the new stage to enhance the system on the view point of prevention of a nuclear disaster affecting the neighboring countries' or prevention of a nuclear disaster which arise from the neighboring countries'. The ConvEx-3(2008) suggested key issues about nuclear disaster prevention related to the neighboring countries, e.g. establishment of much wider environmental monitoring and of international assistance system against a foreign nuclear disaster. The observations of the IAEA ConvEx-3(2008) exercise described in this review report were funded by the MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology). (author)

  5. Managing Nuclear Knowledge: IAEA Activities and International Coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    The important role which the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) plays in assisting Member States in the preservation and enhancement of nuclear knowledge and in facilitating international collaboration in this area has been recognized by the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency in resolutions GC(46)/RES/11B, GC(47)/RES/10B, GC(48)/RES/13 and GC(50)/RES/13. The IAEA continues to support the enhancement and stabilization of nuclear education and training with the objective of securing the availability of qualified human resources for the nuclear sector. Its most important approaches are networking regional educational institutions and fostering cooperation to develop harmonized curricula, prepare and disseminate teaching materials. The Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT), established by the IAEA in 2004, became operational in 2005. An ANENT website has been set up and is being expanded, such as developing a long-distance learning platform. Also, a reference curriculum for nuclear engineering is being developed with the cooperation of external partners.This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002–2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. CD-ROM attached to the printed booklet containing nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  6. IAEA Contribution to International Peace, Security and Prosperity, 27 July 2011, Matsumoto, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2011-01-01

    It is a great honour for me to address this 23rd United Nations Conference on Disarmament Issues. I would like to begin by expressing my deepest sympathy, on behalf of the International Atomic Energy Agency, to the Government and people of Japan on the terrible earthquake and tsunami which devastated the country in March. Our thoughts are with the many thousands of people who lost loved ones or whose homes and livelihoods were destroyed. As you know, this natural disaster of unprecedented severity led to a serious accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. The IAEA has been working at full stretch since the accident happened on March 11 to assist the plant operator and the Japanese authorities in bringing the situation back under control. Before talking about the Agency's work in nuclear non-proliferation, I would like to update you on recent developments concerning Fukushima Daiichi. The IAEA has served as the international focal point for assistance, information-sharing and follow-up. We have shared authenticated information about the situation at the Fukushima Daiichi plant with Member States and sent specialist technical teams to advise Japan in areas such as radiological monitoring and food safety. Throughout the crisis, we have worked closely with our key partners in the UN system. In fact, this has been a good example of the UN ''one house'' approach at work. I convened an IAEA Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety which took place in Vienna last month. It agreed a Ministerial Declaration which I am confident will lead to a significant strengthening of nuclear safety, emergency preparedness and radiation protection of people and the environment throughout the world. I was encouraged by the fact that proposals which I made in five key areas were included in the Ministerial Declaration. These were: To strengthen IAEA Safety Standards; To systematically review the safety of all nuclear power plants, including by expanding the IAEA's programme of

  7. Activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianko, L.

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the IAEA international working group on life management of nuclear power plants are outlined with emphasis on objectives, scope of activities, methods of work, organizational matters, financing

  8. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): current and future activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2004-01-01

    Upon resolutions of the IAEA General Conference in 2000, the IAEA initiated International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). The objective of INPRO, which comprises two phases, is to support sustainable deployment and use of nuclear technology to meet the global energy needs in the next 50 years and beyond. During Phase I, work is subdivided into two sub phases. Phase 1A focused on determining user requirements in the areas of economics, environment, safety, proliferation resistance, and recommendations in the area of so-called crosscutting issues, which are legal, institutional, and infrastructure issues accompanying the deployment of nuclear power, and is targeted at developing a methodology and guidelines for the assessment of various nuclear reactor and fuel cycle concepts and approaches. Phase 1A was finalised in June 2003 with its results now available as IAEA TECDOC-1362. Phase 1B has started in July 2003. During this phase interested Member States are performing case studies to validate the INPRO methodology and, later on, to assess selected innovative nuclear energy systems using the updated INPRO methodology. In accordance with the INPRO Terms of Reference, after successful completion of Phase I, Phase II may be initiated to examine the feasibility of commencing international projects on innovative nuclear energy systems. The paper contains a description of the current and future activities of INPRO and summarizes the outcome of the project.(author)

  9. Focus on International Cooperation in D and D Cost Estimations for Research Reactors and the Role of the IAEA in It

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniska, V.; Laraia, M.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating decommissioning costs and collecting funds are the prerequisites for safe, timely and cost effective decommissioning. These issues were addressed by main international organizations involved in decommissioning - IAEA, OECD/NEA and European Commission. While the activities of OECD/NEA and European Commission are focused mainly on nuclear power plants, the activities of IAEA involve the whole spectrum of nuclear facilities worldwide and the aspects of decommissioning of research reactors, due to their spread in member states, have the special position in IAEA activities. The experience in decommissioning of research reactors was accumulated in developed countries and international activities are needed to support the planning and implementation of decommissioning of research reactors in other IAEA Member States. Decommissioning costing plays the key role among these issues. One of the main results of the common effort of the above listed organisations in costing is the standardised structure of decommissioning cost items which was jointly published as the common platform for harmonisation in decommissioning costing and is recommended for general use. Main subject of the paper is the preliminary presentation of a new IAEA project planned for the period 2009-2011 with the objectives to develop the robust standardised cost estimation methodology, which implements the standardised cost structure. The aim of the proposed methodology is to support the Member States to prepare their own specific cost estimates for research reactors. The planned target is the parametric cost estimating model applicable for various types of research reactors and for various national decommissioning backgrounds. The model is supported by facility inventory database and database of unit factors and data specific for facility to be decommissioned. The paper reviews main types of research reactors; the currant practice for decommissioning costing which will be implemented in the

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and recommendations on radioactive waste and transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Rawl, R.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publishes standards and recommendations on all aspects of nuclear safety in its Safety Series, which includes radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials. Safety Series documents may be adopted by a State into its national legal framework. Most of the States used the IAEA transport regulations (Safety Series No. 6) as a basis for their national regulation. The two highest ranking documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme, the Safety Fundamentals and the Safety Standard on the national waste management system, have been published. Both provide impetus into the waste management safety convention, a legally binding document for signatory states, which is being drafted. The already existing Convention on Nuclear Safety covers the management of radioactive waste at land-based civil nuclear power plants. (author) 1 fig., 18 refs

  11. Gamma techniques for IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards at centrifuge enrichment cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaldijk, J.K.; de Betue, P.A.C.; van der Meer, K.; Harry, R.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    On February 4, 1983, the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP) concluded that the safeguards approach involving limited frequency unannounced access (LFUA) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to cascades areas together with inspection activities outside the cascade areas meets the IAEA safeguards objectives in an effective and efficient way. In this way, the risks of revealing sensitive information were also minimized. The approach has been defined clearly and unambiguously, and it should be applied equally to all technology holders. One of the conclusions of the HSP was that a nondestructive assay go/no-go technique should be used during the LFUA inspections in the cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. The purpose is to verify that the enrichment of the product UF 6 gas is in the range of low-enriched uranium (LEU), i.e., the enrichment is below 20%

  12. SOME ASPECTS REGARDING THE INTERNATIONAL DATABASES NOWADAYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilian M. DOBRESCU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A national database (NDB or an international one (abbreviated IDB, also named often as “data bank”, represents a method of storing some information and data on an external device (a storage device, with the possibility of an easy extension or an easy way to quickly find these information. Therefore, through IDB we don`t only understand a bibliometric or bibliographic index, which is a collection of references, that normally represents the “soft”, but also the respective IDB “hard”, which is the support and the storage technology. Usually, a database – a very comprehensive notion in the computer’s science – is a bibliographic index, compiled with specific purpose, objectives and means. In reality, the national and international databases are operated through management systems, usually electronic and informational, based on advanced manipulation technologies in the virtual space. On line encyclopedias can also be considered and are important international database (IDB. WorldCat, for example, is a world catalogue, that included the identification data for the books within circa 71.000 libraries in 112 countries, data classified through Online Computer Library Center (OCLC, with the participation of the libraries in the respective countries, especially of those that are national library.

  13. Behaviour of core internals. Proceedings of the IAEA specialists meeting. Working document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This meeting was organized by the IAEA within the framework of its International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants. It was held in Rez near Prague on the 6-8 October 1998. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an international forum for discussion on recent results in research and utility experience and to provide recommendations for future developments in NPP life management programmes. 12 papers were presented during 3 sessions. Individual abstracts have been prepared for each of the papers

  14. International experts conclude IAEA peer review of Iran's safety regulation of Bushehr NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed an IAEA mission to review the effectiveness of Iran's safety regulation of its first nuclear power plant and to identify possible improvements before the plant begins operation. Upon invitation of the Islamic Republic of Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of senior regulators from seven Member States for an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1). The IRRS review took place from 20 February to 2 March at the INRA offices in Tehran and included a technical visit to the BNPP-1 site. The mission was an objective peer review based on IAEA safety standards, and was neither an inspection, nor an audit. Ms. Olena Mykolaichuk, IRRS Team Leader and Head of the State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine, commended her INRA counterparts: 'The regulatory work performed on the Bushehr construction and in preparation for commissioning has demonstrated significant progress of INRA as a nuclear regulatory authority,' she said. Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division, added: 'Through this IRRS mission, both Iran and the international experts contribute to the enhancement of nuclear safety and worldwide experience sharing.' In the course of its review the IRRS team identified the following strengths: - INRA has a dedicated, conscientious staff, demonstrating clear commitments to further improvements. - INRA clearly recognizes the value of peer reviews and international cooperation regarding nuclear safety. - Despite a shortage of staff, INRA demonstrated strong leadership while performing both review and assessment and inspection tasks during the BNPP-1 construction and pre-commissioning. - INRA has developed an excellent computerized documentation control system. Recommendations and suggestions to improve INRA's regulatory

  15. IAEA Expands International Cooperation on Small, Medium Sized or Modular Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is launching an effort to expand international cooperation and coordination in the design, development and deployment of small, medium sized or modular reactors (SMRs), among the most promising emerging technologies in nuclear power. Significant advances have been made on SMRs, some of which will use pre-fabricated systems and components to shorten construction schedules and offer greater flexibility and affordability than traditional nuclear power plants. With some 50 SMR concepts at various stages of development around the world, the IAEA is forming a Technical Working Group (TWG) to guide its activities on SMRs and provide a forum for Member States to share information and knowledge, IAEA Deputy Director General Mikhail Chudakov said. “Innovation is crucial for nuclear power to play a key role in decarbonising the energy sector,” Chudakov, who heads the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy, said at a conference on SMRs in Prague on 15 February. “Many Member States that are operating, expanding, introducing or considering nuclear power are quite keen on the development and deployment of SMRs.” Global interest in SMRs is growing. SMRs have the potential to meet the needs of a wide range of users and to be low carbon replacements for ageing fossil fuel fired power plants. They also display enhanced safety features and are suitable for non-electric applications, such as cooling, heating and water desalination. In addition, SMRs offer options for remote regions with less developed infrastructure and for energy systems that combine nuclear and alternative sources, including renewables.

  16. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Poland's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: International safety experts last week concluded a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Poland. In its preliminary report, the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team found that Poland's nuclear regulator, Panstwowa Agencja Atomistyki (PAA), has a clear commitment to safety, a high level of transparency, competent staff and leadership, and a good recognition of challenges ahead related to Poland's efforts to develop nuclear power. ''Poland's regulatory framework and the work of PAA give high confidence of strong radiation protection for the Polish people. Further, there has been significant progress in the development of Poland's regulatory framework in preparation for the challenge of regulating nuclear power,'' said team leader Robert Lewis, a senior executive in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The mission was conducted at the request of the Government of Poland from 15-25 April. The team was made up of 11 regulatory experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, the Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as five IAEA staff members. The IRRS review team was very thorough in its review, and we welcome its advice on how to continue to improve our programmes to protect people and the environment , said Janusz Wlodarski, President of PAA. The team interviewed members of PAA and officials from various ministries, as well as key players in the Polish safety framework. Such IRRS missions are peer reviews based on IAEA Safety Standards, not inspections or audits. Among its main observations the IRRS review team identified the following good practices: Applying the considerable experience of PAA's senior management to regulatory issues; The introduction of changes to Poland's laws and regulations following broad public consultation at an early stage in

  17. The case for international nuclear co-operation. An IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klerk, P. de

    2001-01-01

    In the light of the diminished commitment to the promotion and development of nuclear technologies by governments, and in view of the globalization of major parts of the nuclear sector, international cooperation is becoming increasingly more important. Continued strong cooperation is expected in the areas of nuclear safety and the advanced, development of nuclear power plant projects, the decommissioning of nuclear installations, and in waste management. The broad range of activities this entails for the future also add to the duties and the scope of activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as one of the main coordinating international institutions. In addition to the Agency's basic duty, i.e. overseeing more than nine hundred nuclear facilities in the non-nuclear weapon states under the non-proliferation scheme, it is mainly coordinating activities which are becoming more and more important in the changing environment. In the research sector alone, 159 projects are currently handled internationally under the 'Coordinated Research Projects' heading. In the interest of making national safety standards compatible, a multi-level international safety system is being developed which is to lay the foundations for decisions about the engineered safeguards design of nuclear plants on the national level which continues to bear responsibility for deciding in matters of safety. This broad range of duties in technology, safety, and oversight will make IAEA an important organization for multilateral cooperation. (orig.) [de

  18. International Nuclear Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Swiss Regulatory Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A team of international nuclear safety experts today completed a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) review of the regulatory framework for nuclear safety in Switzerland. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission noted good practices in the Swiss system and also made recommendations for the nation's nuclear regulatory authority, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). ''Our team developed a good impression of the independent Swiss regulator - ENSI - and the team considered that ENSI deserves particular credit for its actions to improve Swiss safety capability following this year's nuclear accident in Japan,'' said IRRS Team Leader Jean-Christophe Niel of France. The mission's scope covered the Swiss nuclear regulatory framework for all types of nuclear-related activities regulated by ENSI. The mission was conducted from 20 November to 2 December, mainly at ENSI headquarters in Brugg. The team held extensive discussions with ENSI staff and visited many Swiss nuclear facilities. IRRS missions are peer reviews, not inspections or audits, and are conducted at the request of host nations. For the Swiss review, the IAEA assembled a team of 19 international experts from 14 countries. The experts came from Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Republic of Korea, Norway, Russia, Slovakia, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. ''The findings of the IRRS mission will help us to further improve our work. That is part of our safety culture,'' said ENSI Director General Hans Wanner. ''As Switzerland argued at international nuclear safety meetings this year for a strengthening of the international monitoring of nuclear power, we will take action to fulfil the recommendations.'' The IRRS team highlighted several good practices of the Swiss regulatory system, including the following: ENSI requires Swiss nuclear operators to back-fit their facilities by continuously upgrading

  19. The International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Guy; Karsch-Mizrachi, Ilene; Nakamura, Yasukazu

    2011-01-01

    Under the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC; http://www.insdc.org), globally comprehensive public domain nucleotide sequence is captured, preserved and presented. The partners of this long-standing collaboration work closely together to provide data formats and conventions that enable consistent data submission to their databases and support regular data exchange around the globe. Clearly defined policy and governance in relation to free access to data and relationships with journal publishers have positioned INSDC databases as a key provider of the scientific record and a core foundation for the global bioinformatics data infrastructure. While growth in sequence data volumes comes no longer as a surprise to INSDC partners, the uptake of next-generation sequencing technology by mainstream science that we have witnessed in recent years brings a step-change to growth, necessarily making a clear mark on INSDC strategy. In this article, we introduce the INSDC, outline data growth patterns and comment on the challenges of increased growth.

  20. International atomic energy agency organization (IAEA) in case of extra territorial accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Nogueira de Oliveira, C.

    2006-01-01

    This article sums up the actual activities of IAEA in terms of preparation and responses to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The Agency has established in 1986 a surveillance unit 24 h/24 h and an operational unit: the center of response to emergencies (C.R.U). The C.R.U. is the principal operational unit in charge of acting in case of nuclear emergency notification and to answer to the demand of information or help during an incident or emergency. It receives the reports of an authority of any state, on an incident and checks any report that is not confirmed. It establishes the first functional links with the state at the origin o the report and any state potentially concerned. It establishes links with W.H.O (world health organization), W.M.O.(world meteorological organization), (B.C.A.H.) the office of coordination of humanitarian affairs of united nations, the FAO ( food and agriculture organization).The principal lessons got from interventions made during real events have been the following ones: first, official information communicated by the Center for the IAEA emergency interventions have contributed to avoid the propagations of hearsay and panic, secondly a fast international cooperation and the presence of the team of IAEA center on the premises during an intervention in case of event with multi sectorial consequences are extremely important. (N.C.)

  1. Optimizing IAEA Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varjoranta, Tero

    2016-01-01

    IAEA safeguards make a vital contribution to international security. Through safeguards, the IAEA deters the spread of nuclear weapons and provides credible assurance that States are honouring their international obligations to use nuclear material only for peaceful purposes. Its independent verification work allows the IAEA to facilitate building international confidence and strengthening collective security for all.

  2. IRS Guidelines: Joint IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on lessons learned from operating and construction experience at the international level. This information could be related to issues and events that are related to safety. The purpose of these guidelines is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the effectiveness of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants. As this system is owned by the Member States, the IRS Guidelines have been developed and approved by the IRS National Co-ordinators with the assistance of both Secretariats (IAEA/NEA).

  3. Worldwide status of food irradiation and the role of IAEA and other international organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1988-01-01

    While there has been an increasing interest in introducing irradiation for preservation and decontamination of food by national authorities and food industry, this technology has generated wide public debate in view of its perceived association with nuclear technology. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide objectivity to the application of irradiation for food processing and (2) to project future trends of this technology. Irradiation appears to offer the most viable alternative to the existing technologies in quarantine treatment, hygienic quality of foods, reduction of food losses, and increase in market demand for fresh foods. Current limitations of food irradiation are discussed in terms of technical aspects, infrastructure and economics, consumer concerns, and harmonization of national regulations. Commercial applications have been reported in 19 countries. It is estimated that the total production of irradiated foods world-wide amounted to approximately 500,000 tons per annum. To ensure an effective implementation of the technology on a global basis, FAO and WHO have collaborated closely with the IAEA. An International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation was established under the aegis of FAO, IAEA, and WHO in May 1984. These organizations play an important role in training, technology transfer, developing guidelines on specific applications of food irradiation, international register of food irradiation facilities, acceptance and international trade in irradiated foods, and public information. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Worldwide status of food irradiation and the role of IAEA and other international organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P.

    1988-04-01

    While there has been an increasing interest in introducing irradiation for preservation and decontamination of food by national authorities and food industry, this technology has generated wide public debate in view of its perceived association with nuclear technology. The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to provide objectivity to the application of irradiation for food processing and (2) to project future trends of this technology. Irradiation appears to offer the most viable alternative to the existing technologies in quarantine treatment, hygienic quality of foods, reduction of food losses, and increase in market demand for fresh foods. Current limitations of food irradiation are discussed in terms of technical aspects, infrastructure and economics, consumer concerns, and harmonization of national regulations. Commercial applications have been reported in 19 countries. It is estimated that the total production of irradiated foods world-wide amounted to approximately 500,000 tons per annum. To ensure an effective implementation of the technology on a global basis, FAO and WHO have collaborated closely with the IAEA. An International Consultative Group on Food Irradiation was established under the aegis of FAO, IAEA, and WHO in May 1984. These organizations play an important role in training, technology transfer, developing guidelines on specific applications of food irradiation, international register of food irradiation facilities, acceptance and international trade in irradiated foods, and public information. (Namekawa, K.).

  5. An international database of radionuclide concentration ratios for wildlife: development and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copplestone, D.; Beresford, N.A.; Brown, J.E.; Yankovich, T.

    2013-01-01

    A key element of most systems for assessing the impact of radionuclides on the environment is a means to estimate the transfer of radionuclides to organisms. To facilitate this, an international wildlife transfer database has been developed to provide an online, searchable compilation of transfer parameters in the form of equilibrium-based whole-organism to media concentration ratios. This paper describes the derivation of the wildlife transfer database, the key data sources it contains and highlights the applications for the data. -- Highlights: • An online database containing wildlife radionuclide transfer parameters is described. • Database underpins recent ICRP and IAEA data wildlife transfer compilations. • Database contains equilibrium based whole organism to media concentration ratios

  6. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H. [Research Reactor Section, Vianna (Australia); Shokr, A. [Research Reactor Safety Section, Vienna (Australia); Zeman, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Australia)

    2013-07-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from

  7. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Schaaf, Van Der; Barnea, Y.; Bradley, E.; Morris, C.; Rao, D. V. H.; Shokr, A.; Zeman, A.

    2013-01-01

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from the MS

  8. Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  9. International nuclear safety experts complete IAEA peer review of German regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: An international expert team has today completed a two-week IAEA review of Germany's nuclear regulatory system. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for further improvement. The IAEA has conveyed the initial findings to German authorities but the final report will be submitted within two months. At the request of the Government of the Federal Republic of Germany, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of 14 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This is a peer review based on IAEA Standards. It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission was limited to the safety regulation of nuclear power plants. Experts from Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Republic of Korea, Spain, Switzerland, the UK, the US and from the IAEA took part in the mission, which was conducted from 7 to 19 September in Bonn, Stuttgart and Berlin. The main basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment made by the Federal Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) and the Ministry of Environment of the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg (UM BW). 'The team members were impressed by the extensive preparation and dedication of the staff both at BMU and UM BW to excellence in nuclear safety,' said Mike Weightman, IRRS Team Leader and Chief Inspector of the UK nuclear regulatory body, the Nuclear Directorate of the Health and Safety Executive. 'We hope the IRRS mission will facilitate further improvements in the safety regulation of nuclear power in Germany and throughout the world.' 'Germany's invitation to undergo such a detailed review is a clear demonstration of its openness and commitment to continuously improve nuclear safety regulation,' said Philippe Jamet, Director of the IAEA's Nuclear Installation Safety Division. Among the particular strengths of BMU and UM BW associated with their

  10. International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO): outcomes of an IAEA meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Eeva K; Kiel, Krystyna; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Joiner, Michael C; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Wondergem, Jan; Meghzifene, Ahmed

    2011-02-04

    The IAEA held the International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO) in Vienna on 27-29 April 2009. The Conference dealt with the issues and requirements posed by the transition from conventional radiotherapy to advanced modern technologies, including staffing, training, treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance (QA) and the optimal use of available resources. The current role of advanced technologies (defined as 3-dimensional and/or image guided treatment with photons or particles) in current clinical practice and future scenarios were discussed.ICARO was organized by the IAEA at the request of the Member States and co-sponsored and supported by other international organizations to assess advances in technologies in radiation oncology in the face of economic challenges that most countries confront. Participants submitted research contributions, which were reviewed by a scientific committee and presented via 46 lectures and 103 posters. There were 327 participants from 70 Member States as well as participants from industry and government. The ICARO meeting provided an independent forum for the interaction of participants from developed and developing countries on current and developing issues related to radiation oncology.

  11. International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO: Outcomes of an IAEA Meeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondergem Jan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The IAEA held the International Conference on Advances in Radiation Oncology (ICARO in Vienna on 27-29 April 2009. The Conference dealt with the issues and requirements posed by the transition from conventional radiotherapy to advanced modern technologies, including staffing, training, treatment planning and delivery, quality assurance (QA and the optimal use of available resources. The current role of advanced technologies (defined as 3-dimensional and/or image guided treatment with photons or particles in current clinical practice and future scenarios were discussed. ICARO was organized by the IAEA at the request of the Member States and co-sponsored and supported by other international organizations to assess advances in technologies in radiation oncology in the face of economic challenges that most countries confront. Participants submitted research contributions, which were reviewed by a scientific committee and presented via 46 lectures and 103 posters. There were 327 participants from 70 Member States as well as participants from industry and government. The ICARO meeting provided an independent forum for the interaction of participants from developed and developing countries on current and developing issues related to radiation oncology.

  12. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of Canada's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: An international team of nuclear safety experts today completed a two-week IAEA review of the regulatory framework and effectiveness of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on some areas for improvement. The IAEA has conveyed initial findings to Canadian authorities; the final report will be submitted by autumn. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assembled a team of nuclear, radiation, and waste safety experts at the request of the Government of Canada, to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The mission from 31 May to 12 June was a peer review based on IAEA Standards, not an inspection, nor an audit. The scope of the mission included sources, facilities and activities regulated by the CNSC: the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs), research reactors and fuel cycle facilities; the refurbishment or licensing of new NPPs; uranium mining; radiation protection and environmental protection programmes; and the implementation of IAEA Code of Conduct on Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. The 21-member team from 13 IAEA States and from the IAEA itself reviewed CNSC's work in all relevant areas: legislative and governmental responsibilities; responsibilities and functions; organization; activities of the regulatory body, including the authorization process, review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, the development of regulations, as well as guides and its the management system of CNSC. The basis for the review was a well-prepared self-assessment by the CNSC, including an evolution of its strengths and proposed actions to improve its regulatory effectiveness. Mr. Shojiro Matsuura, IRRS Team Leader and President of the Japanese Nuclear Safety Research Association, said the team 'was impressed by the extensive preparation at all CNSC staff levels.' 'We identified a number of good practices and made recommendations and suggestions

  13. International Shock-Wave Database: Current Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levashov, Pavel

    2013-06-01

    Shock-wave and related dynamic material response data serve for calibrating, validating, and improving material models over very broad regions of the pressure-temperature-density phase space. Since the middle of the 20th century vast amount of shock-wave experimental information has been obtained. To systemize it a number of compendiums of shock-wave data has been issued by LLNL, LANL (USA), CEA (France), IPCP and VNIIEF (Russia). In mid-90th the drawbacks of the paper handbooks became obvious, so the first version of the online shock-wave database appeared in 1997 (http://www.ficp.ac.ru/rusbank). It includes approximately 20000 experimental points on shock compression, adiabatic expansion, measurements of sound velocity behind the shock front and free-surface-velocity for more than 650 substances. This is still a useful tool for the shock-wave community, but it has a number of serious disadvantages which can't be easily eliminated: (i) very simple data format for points and references; (ii) minimalistic user interface for data addition; (iii) absence of history of changes; (iv) bad feedback from users. The new International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb) is intended to solve these and some other problems. The ISWdb project objectives are: (i) to develop a database on thermodynamic and mechanical properties of materials under conditions of shock-wave and other dynamic loadings, selected related quantities of interest, and the meta-data that describes the provenance of the measurements and material models; and (ii) to make this database available internationally through the Internet, in an interactive form. The development and operation of the ISWdb is guided by an advisory committee. The database will be installed on two mirrored web-servers, one in Russia and the other in USA (currently only one server is available). The database provides access to original experimental data on shock compression, non-shock dynamic loadings, isentropic expansion, measurements of sound

  14. Conclusions and Recommendations of the IAEA International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety: Ensuring Safety for Sustainable Nuclear Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanawany, Mamdouh

    2011-01-01

    experience and harmonising safety approaches among Member States. However there is still a need to build on international cooperation in order to promote sharing of experience and knowledge for practical enhancement of nuclear safety. 3. Countries embarking on nuclear power programmes assume very important safety responsibilities that cannot and must not be delegated. Therefore, the establishment of a sustainable national safety infrastructure is an essential foundation for ensuring safe design, construction, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants. The process involves the development of a strong governmental, legal and regulatory framework as well as the necessary education and training, technical capacity building and integrated approach to safety, and safety management for all nuclear stakeholders. Vendor countries (vendors and regulators) that are supplying nuclear technology, materials and equipment to the new entrants have moral responsibility and common interest towards these countries and as such should contribute to the creation of strong safety infrastructures in the recipient countries. IAEA should support this process. Specific IAEA safety guides for countries embarking on nuclear power should be enhanced or developed and tailored safety reviews should be prerequisite at different stages of newcomer programme development. IAEA should also develop and provide to the newcomers appropriate training programmes to assure development of safety capacity. Other countries could also provide useful input particularly if they are involved in similar projects. 4. Operating Experience Feedback is an important element of the continuous safety improvement process for nuclear power plants. OEF databases should be analyzed and used more extensively and the lessons learned disseminated and applied among the Member States. All Member States, through their regulatory bodies, have the joint responsibility to adopt the OEF lessons learned in their respective nuclear

  15. Establishment of Foundation for Export of Korean Environmental Assessment Technology through IAEA International Radioecology Project(EMRAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Suh, K. S.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, C. W

    2005-08-15

    This study was performed to obtain the international verification of Korea developed assessment code and experimental data on radioecology through the participation of EMRAS joint research program of IAEA, and consequently to establish the export foundation of the related technologies. The work scope includes 1) the provision of Korean experimental data and the verification of tritium assessment codes within Tritium Working Group, 2) the verification of Korean experimental data to be included in IAEA TRS364 Revision Group, and 3) the collection of information on other Working Groups activities. Major results comprise the comparison of model predictions between 12 organizations for Korean soybean scenario (to be published in IAEA TECDOC), and the verification of data (the interception factor for foliar contamination by dry(wet) deposition, weathering loss rate and translocation factor) submitted by update IAEA TRS364.

  16. Establishment of Foundation for Export of Korean Environmental Assessment Technology through IAEA International Radioecology Project(EMRAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Suh, K. S.; Choi, H. J.; Lee, C. W.

    2005-08-01

    This study was performed to obtain the international verification of Korea developed assessment code and experimental data on radioecology through the participation of EMRAS joint research program of IAEA, and consequently to establish the export foundation of the related technologies. The work scope includes 1) the provision of Korean experimental data and the verification of tritium assessment codes within Tritium Working Group, 2) the verification of Korean experimental data to be included in IAEA TRS364 Revision Group, and 3) the collection of information on other Working Groups activities. Major results comprise the comparison of model predictions between 12 organizations for Korean soybean scenario (to be published in IAEA TECDOC), and the verification of data (the interception factor for foliar contamination by dry(wet) deposition, weathering loss rate and translocation factor) submitted by update IAEA TRS364

  17. Thermodynamics of Advanced Fuels - International Database Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massara, Simone; Gueneau, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Thermodynamics of Advanced Fuels - International Database (TAF-ID) Project was established in 2013 under the auspices of the NEA Nuclear Science Committee. The project was designed to make available a comprehensive, internationally recognised and quality-assured database of phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties of advanced nuclear fuels with a view to meeting specialised requirements for the development of advanced fuels for a future generation of nuclear reactors. Some of the specific technical objectives that this programme intends to achieve are to predict the solid, liquid and/or gas phases formed during fuel cladding chemical interactions under normal and accident conditions, to improve the control of the experimental conditions during the fabrication of fuel materials at high temperature, for example by predicting the vapour pressures of the elements (particularly of plutonium and the minor actinides) and to predict the evolution of the chemical composition of fuel under irradiation versus temperature and burn-up. This joint project, co-ordinated by the NEA, was established for an initial three-year period among nine organisations from six NEA member countries: Canada (AECL, RMCC, UOIT), France (CEA), Japan (JAEA, CRIEPI), the Netherlands (NRG), the Republic of Korea (KAERI) and the United States (US DOE). It is entirely funded by the nine signatories of the project. (authors)

  18. Intercalibration of radiological measurements for surveillance purposes of the internal dosimetry laboratory coordinated by the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro L, M.M.

    2002-07-01

    The ININ of Mexico participated in this intercomparison organized by the IAEA in 2000. The objective of this activity is that the dosimetry laboratories that participate can validate the programs of internal dosimetry, with the purpose of improving its capacity in the evaluation of the internal dose and have access to a mechanism to evaluate its dosimetry system under real conditions. The specific objectives of this intercomparison were: 1. To evaluate the participant's capacity to manage the measurements of individual monitoring in terms of the activity in the phantom. 2. To provide the access to the unique calibration resources that otherwise would not be available. 3. To compare the operation of several detection systems, the geometry, phantoms, calibration methods and methods for the evaluation of activity of the radionuclide used by each institution. 4. To provide the independent verification of the direct measurement methods of the dosimetry service. (Author)

  19. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Finland's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: International safety experts today concluded a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Finland. In its preliminary report, the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team found that the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland (STUK) is a competent and highly credible regulator that is open and transparent and derives great strength from the technical competence of its staff. ''Finland's comprehensive regulatory framework allows STUK to operate in practice as an independent regulatory body,'' said team leader Philippe Jamet, a commissioner of the French regulatory body ASN. The mission was conducted at the request of the Government of Finland from 15-26 October. The team interviewed members of STUK and officials from various ministries, as well as key players in the Finnish safety framework. Such IRRS missions are peer reviews based on IAEA Safety Standards, not inspections or audits. The team was made up of 18 members from Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Romania, the Russian Federation, South Africa, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as six IAEA staff members. 'The IRRS mission and preparation for it was a unique occasion that involved the whole organization, provided motivation for improvement of the safety framework in Finland and assists STUK review its mission', said Tero Varjoranta, Director General of STUK. The IRRS team identified a number of good practices and achievements, including: - STUK's excellence in its safety assessment of nuclear power plants and waste repositories, in particular its demonstration that long-term political commitment is a necessity to sustain the creation of a waste repository as well as its regulatory oversight of medical applications of radiation sources; and - STUK's excellent record in

  20. International nuclear safety experts conclude IAEA peer review of China's regulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior experts on nuclear safety regulation today completed a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) review of the governmental and regulatory framework for nuclear safety in the People's Republic of China. The team identified good practices within the system and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of the People's Republic of China. The final report will be submitted to China by Autumn 2010. At the request of Chinese authorities, the IAEA assembled a team of 22 experts to conduct an Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. This mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards . It is not an inspection, nor an audit. The experts came from 15 different countries: Australia, Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Hungary, Japan, Pakistan, the Republic of Korea, Slovenia, South Africa, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Ukraine and the United States. Mike Weightman, the United Kingdom's Head of Nuclear Directorate, HSE and HM Chief Inspector of Nuclear Installations said: ''I was honoured and pleased to lead such a team of senior regulatory experts from around the world, and I was impressed by their commitment, experience and hard work to provide their best advice possible. We had very constructive interactions with the Chinese authority to maximize the beneficial impact of the mission.'' The scope of the mission included the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety of the facilities and activities regulated by the Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP) National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA). The mission was conducted from 18 to 30 July, mainly in Beijing. To observe Chinese regulatory activities, the IRRS team visited several nuclear facilities, including a nuclear power plant, a manufacturer of safety components for nuclear power plants, a research reactor, a fuel cycle facility, a waste management facility

  1. Review of events occurring during the transport of radioactive material for the period 1984-1993. A report on the IAEA's EVTRAM database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    In 1988 the International Atomic Energy Agency initiated data collecting activities for accidents and incidents (EVTRAM), shipments (SHIPTRAM) and radiation exposure (EXTRAM) in connection with radioactive material transport. This publication reports on the data made available for the EVTRAM database by ten Member States regarding events occurring during the transport of radioactive material during the period 1984-1993. The main objectives of the EVATRAM database are to provide information to support evaluations of the effectiveness of the IAEA's Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material and provide a means of information exchange for any lessons learned. Member States providing data do so on a voluntary basis an report only those events that involve the safety features of packages being transported. The tables presented in this report are based solely on the data provided regarding 128 valid cases. Where it is meaningful to relate frequency tables this has been done in the section containing cross-tabulations; otherwise, the frequency tables are to be considered individually. Because it is neither complete nor comprehensive the data has severely limited uses for establishing trends or drawing conclusions. The statistical analyses performed are to be considered only in this light. Neither the data nor the tables may be cited as the basis for general, conclusive statements about radioactive material transport events. 4 refs, 5 tabs

  2. Implementation of the international structure for decommissioning costing; examples and related IAEA projects - 59313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniska, Vladimir; Laraia, Michele; O'Sullivan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, IAEA, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the European Commission jointly proposed the standardised listing of decommissioning activities [1] to serve as a general basis for presentation of decommissioning costs and for promoting the harmonisation in decommissioning costing. The standardised listing of activities [1] was developed in three hierarchical levels based on analysis of typical decommissioning activities identified in various decommissioning projects. The structure [1] has been currently updated by the same organisations as the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) based on the experience gained over ten years of use of the original standardised listing [2]. First part of the paper presents the revised ISDC. The principle of the three-level original hierarchical structure has been preserved. Re-definition of the content and re-structuring was done to avoid ambiguity and to ensure comprehensiveness. Paper presents two basic approaches for implementation of the ISDC structure in costing - converting the cost data available in specific cost structures, mostly according the work breakdown structures of decommissioning projects into ISDC and implementation of the ISDC as the cost calculation structure. Examples of the second approach are given to show that this approach is feasible and may have several advantages. An ORACLE based costing model with implemented of the extended ISDC for detailed costing and an Excel based costing model for preliminary costing at IAEA for research reactors are given. (authors)

  3. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Slovakia's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded an 11-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear safety in Slovakia. At the request of the Slovak Government, the IAEA assembled a team of 12 senior regulatory experts from 12 nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission involving the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (UJD SR). The international experts also met officials from the Public Health Authority of the Slovak Republic (UVZ SR) regarding the regulation of occupational radiation protection in nuclear facilities. The mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards. Marta Ziakova, Chairperson of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Slovak Republic, declared that ''The IRRS mission has a great value for the future development and orientation of the UJD SR.'' ''Slovakia has established a regulatory framework for nuclear safety which is in line with international standards and practice,'' said Mission Team Leader Andrej Stritar, Director of the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration. The main observations of the IRRS Review team included: UJD SR operates with independence and transparency; UJD SR has developed and implemented a systematic training approach to meet its competence needs; and in response to the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, UJD SR has reacted and communicated to interested parties, including the public. The good practices identified by the IRRS Review Team include: UJD SR has a comprehensive and well-formalized strategic approach to informing and consulting interested parties; UJD SR has developed and implemented a structured approach to training and developing its staff; and Detailed legal requirements provide a solid basis for on-site and off-site response in nuclear emergencies coordinated with local authorities. The IRRS Review team identified areas for further improvement and believes

  4. Water chemistry-related activities at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, H.; Onufriev, V.

    2005-01-01

    Water chemistry activities and publications in the past are listed. IAEA Coordinated Research Programmes, WWER-1000 SG water chemistry database, materials issues TM in Vienna, TC workshops and attendance of international meetings, publications. There is a list of IAEA publications related to water chemistry and corrosion. Finally water chemistry activities planned for 2006-2008 are detailed. (N.T.)

  5. Study on IAEA international emergency response exercise convEx-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuya

    2007-05-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carried out a large-scale international emergency response exercise in 2005 under the designated name of ConvEx-3(2005), at Romania. This review report summarizes a study about ConvEx-3(2005) based on several related open literature. The ConvEx-3 was conducted in accordance with Agency's safety standard series and requirements in the field of Emergency Preparedness and Response. The study on the preparation, conduct and evaluation of ConvEx-3(2005) exercise is expected to provide very useful knowledge for development of drills and educational programs conducted by Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT). Especially, study on the exercise evaluations is instrumental in improving evaluations of drills planned by the national government and local governments. As international cooperation among Asian countries in the field of nuclear emergency preparedness and response is going to realize, it is very useful to survey and consider scheme and methodology about international emergency preparedness, response and exercise referring the knowledge of this ConvEx-3 study. The lessons learned from this study of ConvEx-3(2005) are summarized in four chapters; methodology of exercises and educational programs, exercise evaluation process, amendments/verification of the emergency response plan of NEAT, and technical issues of systems for emergency response and assistance of NEAT relevant to interface for international emergency communication. (author)

  6. EXFOR: Improving the quality of international databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupont, Emmeric

    2014-01-01

    The NEA Data Bank is an international centre of reference for basic nuclear tools used for the analysis and prediction of phenomena in nuclear energy applications. The Data Bank collects, compiles, disseminates and contributes to improving computer codes and associated data. In the area of nuclear data, the Data Bank works in close co-operation with other data centres that contribute to the worldwide compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data in the EXFOR database. EXFOR contains basic nuclear data on low- to medium-energy experiments for incident neutron, photon and various charged particle induced reactions on a wide range of nuclei and compounds. Today, with more than 150 000 data sets from more than 20 000 experiments performed since 1935, EXFOR is by far the most important and complete experimental nuclear reaction database. It is widely used to further improve nuclear reaction models and evaluated nuclear data libraries. The Data Bank supervises the development of the Joint Evaluated Fission and Fusion (JEFF) file, which is one of the major evaluated nuclear data libraries used in the field of nuclear science and technology. As part of its mission, the Data Bank works to maintain the highest level of quality in its databases. One method that was proposed to check the mutual consistency of experimental data in EXFOR is to test for outlier measurements more than a few standard deviations from the mean value as, in principle, several measurements of the same reaction quantity should form a continuous distribution. More recently, another method was developed to cross-check evaluated and experimental data in databases in order to detect aberrant values. It was noted that there is no evidence, on the basis of numerical comparisons only, that outliers represent 'bad' data. The fact that such data deviate significantly from other data of the same reaction may, however, be helpful to nuclear data evaluators who focus on one or a few isotopes and may wish to

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiatives: Records management for deep and near surface geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The international scientific community has long had an interest in determining methods by which information regarding nuclear waste repositories, and the inherent danger to humanity, could be passed from generation to generation and society to society. Because nuclear waste will remain radioactive for thousands of years future generations must be warned of the dangers thus eliminating intentional or inadvertent intrusion. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained so that this information remains accessible to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years; thus the retention of information continues beyond current societies, cultures and languages, and must be continually migrated to new retrieval technologies to assure access

  8. The IAEA International Seismic Safety Centre and IAEA safety standards for site evaluation and design of NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godoy, A.; Sollogoub, P; )

    2009-01-01

    This presentation covers the following topics: 'Lessons learned' from the occurrence of strong natural events, (tsunamis, earthquakes, hurricanes, etc.) The International Seismic Safety Centre as a global focal point for the nuclear engineering community in those fields. A need for international cooperation, openness and transparency – Sharing of experience

  9. IAEA biological reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parr, R.M.; Schelenz, R.; Ballestra, S.

    1988-01-01

    The Analytical Quality Control Services programme of the IAEA encompasses a wide variety of intercomparisons and reference materials. This paper reviews only those aspects of the subject having to do with biological reference materials. The 1988 programme foresees 13 new intercomparison exercises, one for major, minor and trace elements, five for radionuclides, and seven for stable isotopes. Twenty-two natural matrix biological reference materials are available: twelve for major, minor and trace elements, six for radionuclides, and four for chlorinated hydrocarbons. Seven new intercomparisons and reference materials are in preparation or under active consideration. Guidelines on the correct use of reference materials are being prepared for publication in 1989 in consultation with other major international producers and users of biological reference materials. The IAEA database on available reference materials is being updated and expanded in scope, and a new publication is planned for 1989. (orig.)

  10. International Nuclear Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Korea's Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety experts concluded today a two-week mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear safety in the Republic of Korea. The team identified good practices and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of Korea, while the final report will be submitted by the end of summer 2011. At the request of the Korean Government, the IAEA assembled a team of 16 senior regulatory experts from 14 nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission involving the Korean Ministry for Education, Science and Technology (MEST) and the Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety (KINS). The mission is a peer-review based on the IAEA Safety Standards. ''This was the first IRRS mission organized after Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident and it included a review of the regulatory implications of that event,' explains Denis Flory, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security. William Borchardt, Executive Director of Operations from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Team Leader of this mission commended the Korean authorities for their openness and commitment to sharing their experience with the world's nuclear safety community. ''IRRS missions such as the one that was just concluded here in the Republic of Korea are crucial to the enhancement of nuclear safety worldwide,'' he said. The IRRS team reviewed Korea's current regulatory framework while acknowledging the fact that the country's Government has already decided to establish, as of October 2011, a new independent regulatory body to be called Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC). As a consequence, KINS role will be as a regulatory expert organization reporting to the NSC, while MEST's role will be restricted to promoting the utilization of nuclear energy. The IRRS team identified particular strengths in the Korean regulatory system

  11. Intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment. Final report of a joint IAEA-IDEAS project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-09-01

    There have been several intercomparison exercises organized already at national and international levels for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. These intercomparison exercises revealed significant differences in approaches, methods and assumptions, and consequently in the results. Because of the relevance of the issue for internal dosimetrists, the IAEA organized a new intercomparison exercise in cooperation with the IDEAS project General Guidelines for the Evaluation of Incorporation Monitoring Data, launched under the 5th EU Framework Programme (EU Contract No. FIKR-CT2001-00160). This new intercomparison exercise focused especially on the effect of the guidelines for harmonization of internal dosimetry. It also considered the following aspects: - to provide possibilities for the participating laboratories to check the quality of their internal dose assessment methods in applying the recent ICRP recommendations (e.g. for the new respiratory tract model); - to compare different approaches in interpretation of internal contamination monitoring data; - to quantify the differences in internal dose assessments based on the new guidelines or on other procedures, respectively; - to provide some figures for the influence of the input parameters on the monitoring results; and - to provide a broad forum for information exchange. Several cases have been selected for this exercise with the aim of covering a wide range of practices in the nuclear fuel cycle and in medical applications. The cases were: 1. Acute intake of HTO; 2. Acute inhalation of fission products 137 Cs and 90 Sr; 3. Intake of 60 Co; 4. Repeated intakes of 131 I; 5. Intake of enriched uranium; 6. Single intake of plutonium radionuclides and 241 Am. An Internet based approach had been used for the presentation of the cases, collection of responses and potential discussion of the results. Solutions to these cases were reported by 80 participants worldwide. This report

  12. IAEA perspectives on geological repositories. Address at the international conference on geological repositories, Denver, 1 November 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his address at the International Conference on Geological Repositories (Denver, 1 November 1999), the Director General of the IAEA gave a general presentation of the problem of disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and described the current situation in the countries using nuclear energy including present and future Agency's activities

  13. The IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juergen Kupitz

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). It defines its rationale, key objectives and specifies the organizational structure. The IAEA General Conference (2000) has invited 'all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the Agency in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology' (GC(44)/RES/21) and invited Member States to consider to contribute to a task force on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycle (GC(44)/RES/22). In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated an 'International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles', INPRO. The Terms of Reference for INPRO were adopted at a preparatory meeting in November 2000, and the project was finally launched by the INPRO Steering Committee in May 2001. At the General Conference in 2001, first progress was reported, and the General Conference adopted a resolution on 'Agency Activities in the Development of Innovative Nuclear Technology' [GC(45)/RES/12, Tab F], giving INPRO a broad basis of support. The resolution recognized the 'unique role that the Agency can play in international collaboration in the nuclear field'. It invited both 'interested Member States to contribute to innovative nuclear technology activities' at the Agency as well as the Agency itself 'to continue it's efforts in these areas'. Additional endorsement came in a UN General Assembly resolution in December 2001 (UN GA 2001, A/RES/56/94), that again emphasized 'the unique role that the Agency can play in developing user requirements and in addressing safeguards, safety and environmental questions for innovative reactors and their fuel cycles' and stressed 'the need for international collaboration in the development of innovative nuclear technology'. As of February 2002, the following countries or entities have become members of INPRO: Argentina

  14. International Nuclear and Radiation Safety Experts Conclude IAEA Peer Review of Slovenia's Regulatory System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety experts today concluded a 10-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Slovenia. The team identified good practices and gave advice on areas for future improvements. The IAEA has conveyed the team's main conclusions to the Government of Slovenia and a final report will be submitted by the end of 2011. At the request of the Slovenian Government, the IAEA assembled a team of 10 senior regulatory experts from nine nations to conduct the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission involving the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA). The mission is a peer review based on the IAEA Safety Standards. Andrej Stritar, Director of Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration, stressed ''how important it is for a small country like Slovenia to tightly follow international standards in the area of nuclear safety.'' He also expressed his gratitude to the IAEA, and the countries from which team members came, for their support and for their intensive work during the last ten days. Mission Team Leader Colin Patchett, Deputy Chief Inspector from the UK's Office for Nuclear Regulation commended ''the Slovenian authorities for their commitment to nuclear and radiation safety regulation and for sharing their experience.'' The IRRS team reviewed Slovenia's current regulatory framework and all SNSA-regulated facilities and activities, as well as the regulatory implications of the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi accident. The IRRS team identified particular strengths in the Slovenian regulatory system, including: Through its legal framework, the Slovenian government has appointed SNSA to regulate its nuclear safety program and SNSA has in place an effective process for carrying out this responsibility; and Slovenia's response to the accident at the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi power plant has been prompt and effective. Communications with the public, development of actions for improvement

  15. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Bulgaria's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: An international team of senior nuclear safety and radiation protection experts today concluded a 12-day mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Bulgaria. The Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission, conducted at the request of the Government of Bulgaria, identified a series of good practices and made recommendations to help enhance the overall performance of the regulatory system. IRRS missions, which were initiated in 2006, are peer reviews based on the IAEA Safety Standards; they are not inspections or audits. ''Bulgaria has a clear national policy and strategy for safety, which are well in line with international standards and practices and contribute to a high level of nuclear safety,'' said Mission Team Leader Marta Ziakova, Chairperson of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic. The mission team, which conducted the review from 8 to 19 April, was made up of 16 senior regulatory experts from 16 nations, and six IAEA staff. ''The results of the IRRS mission will be valuable for the future development and reinforcement of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Agency (BNRA). The use of international standards and good practices helps to improve global harmonization in all areas of nuclear safety and radiation protection,'' said Sergey Tzotchev, Chairman of the BNRA. Among the main observations in its preliminary report, the IRRS mission team found that BNRA operates as an independent regulatory body and conducts its regulatory processes in an open and transparent manner. In line with the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, the mission reviewed the regulatory implications for Bulgaria of the March 2011 accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan. It found that the BNRA's response to the lessons learned from that accident was both prompt and effective. Strengths and good practices identified by the IRRS team include the following: A no-blame policy is enshrined in law for

  16. IRPhE - International Reactor Physics Experiments database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, E.

    2004-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists and has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. It is a significant saving results from disseminating a standard benchmark set to be used worldwide. A framework for professionals that use the standard benchmark set to validate and verify modeling codes and data for radiation transport, criticality safety and reactor physics applications guarantees a comparative set of analyses. It represents also a good basis for pinpointing important gaps and where efforts should be concentrated and ensures knowledge and competence preservation, management and transfer in nuclear science and engineering. A large number of experimentalists, physicists, evaluators, modelers have devoted large amounts of their efforts and competencies to produce the data on which the methods we are using today are based. These data are far from having been exploited fully for the different nuclear and radiation technologies. This wealth of information needs to be preserved in a form more easily exploitable by modern information technology and for use in connection with novel and refined computational models with limitations of the past removed. These data will form the basis for the studies of more advanced nuclear technology, will be instrumental in identifying areas where there is a lack of knowledge and thus provide support to justifying new experiments that would reduce design uncertainties and consequently costs. Improvement of

  17. The IAEA International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO): Status, Ongoing Activities and Outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, Juergen; Depisch, Frank; Azpitarte, Osvaldo

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA General Conference (2000) invited 'all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the IAEA in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology'. In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). The overall objectives of INPRO are to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21. century in a sustainable manner, and to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. In order to fulfil these objectives, the first phase of INPRO dealt with the development of a methodology to assess and compare the performance of innovative nuclear energy systems. This methodology includes the definition of a set of Basic principles, User requirements and Criteria to be met in different areas (Economics, Sustainability and environment, Safety of nuclear installations, Waste management and Proliferation resistance). The result of this phase was presented in a IAEA document (IAEA-TECDOC-1362, Guidance for the evaluation of innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles) issued in June 2003. In the present phase of the project, case studies are being carried out in order to validate and improve the developed methodology and the defined set of Basic principles, User requirements and Criteria. This paper shortly summarizes the results published in IAEA-TECDOC-1362 and the ongoing actions related to case studies. Finally, an outlook of INPRO activities is presented. (authors)

  18. International nuclear safety center database on material properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.

    1996-01-01

    International nuclear safety center database on the following material properties is described: fuel, cladding,absorbers, moderators, structural materials, coolants, concretes, liquid mixtures, uranium dioxide

  19. IAEA'S International Working Group on Integrated Transport and Storage Safety case for Dual Purpose Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumano, Yumiko; Varley, Kasturi; ); Droste, Bernhard; Wolff, Dietmar; Hirose, Makoto; Harvey, John; Reiche, Ingo; McConnell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is generated from the operation of nuclear reactors and it is imperative that it is safely managed following its removal from reactor cores. Reactor pools are usually designed based on the assumption that the fuel will be removed after a short period of time either for reprocessing, disposal, or further storage. As a result of storing higher burn-up fuel, significantly increased time-frame till disposal solutions are prepared, and delays in decisions on strategies for spent fuel management, the volume of spent fuel discharged from reactors which needs to be managed and stored is on the increase. Consequently, additional storage capacity is needed following the initial storage in reactor pools. Options for additional storage include wet storage or dry storage in a dedicated facility or in storage casks. One of these options is the use of a Dual Purpose Cask (DPC), which is a specially designed cask for both storage and transport. The management of spent fuel using a DPC generally involves on-site and off-site transportation before and after storage. Most countries require package design approval for the DPC to be transported. In addition, it is required in many countries to have a licence for storage of the spent fuel in the DPC or a licence for a storage facility that contains DPCs. Therefore, demonstration of compliance of the DPC with national and international transport regulations as well as with the storage requirements is necessary. In order to address this increasing need among Member States, the IAEA established an international working group in 2010 to develop a guidance for integrating safety cases for both storage and transport in a holistic manner. The working group consists of experts from regulatory bodies, Technical Support Organizations, operators for both transportation and storage, and research institutes. This activity is planned to be completed by 2013. Currently, a technical report has been drafted and is expected to be

  20. The UDEPO database of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneton, P.

    2009-01-01

    The author presents the work performed and data collected by the IAEA on uranium deposits in the world. Several documents have been published: a map called 'World Distribution of Uranium Deposits', a guidebook to the map with brief descriptions of 582 deposits. These deposits have been classified according to 14 different types which led to the development of a database, UDEPO (World Distribution of Uranium Deposits). As uranium exploration activities started again, new data have been published in 2003. A web site has been created. In 2009, 1176 deposits were present in the database along with many geographical, geological and technical parameters. Maps, photos, plans and drawings may also be present in the database. But some data are either not present because of the will of some countries, or not verified

  1. Planning Report for Establishment and Management of IAEA Designated International Cooperation Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Myung Woo; Jo, Cheol Hun; Noh, Yong Chang

    2006-05-01

    Establishment of research infrastructure and assistant of industry renovation is needed to achieve technology level-up in the all industry areas including plant engineering, material engineering, polymers, nondestructive tests, radioisotope tracer application, environment engineering, medical science, agriculture, sterilization, sprouting, biotechnology and aerospace, which would be the core motivation of our future industry. Early settlement of research environment is needed for the new RT-specialized national institute, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute (ARTi) in Jeongup, Chonbuk, Korea. From the early settlement, development of user program, technical assistance, and trendy information can be rapidly initiated by an industry-university-institute network. As a result, a RT hub in the northeast Asia will be founded with upgrade of international level of Korea. For this purpose, an intensive system construction is demanded. Establishment of a basic and advanced analysis system should be set up to analyze and evaluate the research products scientifically and industrially produced by using the RT-based research facilities. Establishment of a collaboration network in R and D among industry, university and institutes related to RT or RFT as well as development of an advanced RT industry system is demanded for the assistance of technology transfer. From the clarification of project details, comparisons of domestic/international technology levels and the demand of project in technical and economical aspects, and the prospect of development tendency of related technology, it is expected the effect and possible utilization after completion of the project. Especially, we proposed the direction for development of IAEA appointed international cooperation center with a long term development plan for the national radiation technology. This project report was consistently prepared with a long term development plan and consisted of establishments of training system for

  2. An international peer review of the biosphere modelling programme of the US Department of Energy's Yucca mountain site characterization project. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has a project for characterizing the site of a facility for disposing of radioactive waste located at Yucca Mountain Nevada, USA (the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project). This Project has developed an approach for assessing the future potential impact of any releases of radionuclides to the biosphere from a potential disposal facility sited at Yucca Mountain The DOE requested the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to organize an independent international expert review of the assessment methodology being used in its biosphere modelling programme. The IAEA accepted the request in the context of its statutory obligation to provide for the application of its established international standards of safety for the protection of health, at the request of a State, to any of that State's activities in the field of atomic energy. The terms of reference of the peer review were to review the biosphere assessment methodology being used for the total system performance assessment of the potential disposal facility. The main purpose was to analyze critically the proposed rationale and methodology and to identify consistencies and inconsistencies between methods being used in the frame of the Project and those established in international standards or in international programmes such as the IAEA's Biosphere Modelling and Assessment Programme (BIOMASS). This report presents the consensus view of the international experts convened by the IAEA for carrying out the review

  3. The IAEA Establishes Partnerships with International Organizations to Prevent Malnutrition in Children and Older People

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The period from conception to 2 years of age — the first thousand days of a child’s life — represents a critical window of opportunity for avoiding health risks later in life. The assessment of growth during this crucial period of early vulnerability has traditionally been largely based on anthropometric measurements such as body weight and length, with less attention to the quality of growth and the relative partitioning of nutrients to fat-free mass or fat mass. However, now, the amount and distribution of body fat and the amount and composition of lean mass are understood to be very important for the long term health prospects of infants and children. Isotope techniques can be used to measure body composition with a high degree of accuracy. This provides governments with key data to enable them to make decisions about national nutrition interventions on the basis of evidence. The IAEA is working in partnership with international organizations around the world to reduce malnutrition, and, consequently, to alleviate the multitude of preventable diseases caused by poor nutrition

  4. The IAEA Establishes Partnerships With International Organizations To Prevent Malnutrition In Children And Older People

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusuf, Omar [International Atomic Energy Agency, Office of Public Information and Communication, Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    The period from conception to 2 years of age — the first thousand days of a child’s life — represents a critical window of opportunity for avoiding health risks later in life. The assessment of growth during this crucial period of early vulnerability has traditionally been largely based on anthropometric measurements such as body weight and length, with less attention to the quality of growth and the relative partitioning of nutrients to fat-free mass or fat mass. However, now, the amount and distribution of body fat and the amount and composition of lean mass are understood to be very important for the long term health prospects of infants and children. Isotope techniques can be used to measure body composition with a high degree of accuracy. This provides governments with key data to enable them to make decisions about national nutrition interventions on the basis of evidence. The IAEA is working in partnership with international organizations around the world to reduce malnutrition, and, consequently, to alleviate the multitude of preventable diseases caused by poor nutrition.

  5. IPPAS guidelines. Reference document for the IAEA International Physical Protection Advisory Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The IAEA International Physical protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) provides advice to Member States to assist them in strengthening the effectiveness of their national physical protection system whilst recognizing the ultimate responsibility for physical protection is that of the Member State. The IPPAS is available to all countries with nuclear materials and facilities. The basic concepts, purposes and functions of physical protection are provided in INFCIR/225, 'The Physical Protection of Nuclear Material and Nuclear Facilities' as amended from time to time and 'the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (INFCIR/247/Rev.1). The guidance given in INFCIR/225 recognizes that implementation of these requirements vary from country to country depending on their existing constitutional, legal and administrative systems; the assessment of the threat for the potential theft of nuclear material or sabotage of nuclear facilities; the technical skills and professional and financial resources available to the competent authority; and social customs and cultural traditions. IPPAS missions are performance oriented in that they accept different approaches to the implementation of national physical protection system

  6. The IAEA Establishes Partnerships With International Organizations To Prevent Malnutrition In Children And Older People

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, Omar

    2014-01-01

    The period from conception to 2 years of age — the first thousand days of a child’s life — represents a critical window of opportunity for avoiding health risks later in life. The assessment of growth during this crucial period of early vulnerability has traditionally been largely based on anthropometric measurements such as body weight and length, with less attention to the quality of growth and the relative partitioning of nutrients to fat-free mass or fat mass. However, now, the amount and distribution of body fat and the amount and composition of lean mass are understood to be very important for the long term health prospects of infants and children. Isotope techniques can be used to measure body composition with a high degree of accuracy. This provides governments with key data to enable them to make decisions about national nutrition interventions on the basis of evidence. The IAEA is working in partnership with international organizations around the world to reduce malnutrition, and, consequently, to alleviate the multitude of preventable diseases caused by poor nutrition

  7. IAEA activities in support of the international programmes to return fresh and spent research reactor nuclear fuel to the conuntry of origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelgang, P.; Tozser, S.; Marshall, F.; Borio di Tigliole, A.

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than thirty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU), whose enrichment is ≥ 20% in 235U, in international commerce. In particular, IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the two main international efforts to return fresh and spent HEU research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched: the United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRRSNF) Acceptance Programme and the United States-IAEA-Russian Federation tripartite initiative known as the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Programme. This report gives an account of IAEA efforts in support of both programmes including a historical overview of fuel return shipments and a brief description of associated cooperation activities carried out by the IAEA. [es

  8. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): Status, ongoing activities and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Khorochev, M.

    2004-01-01

    The IAEA General Conference (2000) invited 'all interested Member States to combine their efforts under the aegis of the IAEA in considering the issues of the nuclear fuel cycle, in particular by examining innovative and proliferation-resistant nuclear technology'. In response to this invitation, the IAEA initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). The overall objectives of INPRO are to help to ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute in fulfilling energy needs in the 21 st century in a sustainable manner; and to bring together both technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. INPRO is addressing the identification of full spectrum of user requirements for innovative technologies as well as the development of methodologies and guidelines for the comparison of different innovative approaches taking into account variations in potential demands across countries. INPRO can make major contributions by focusing on economic aspects, and societal acceptability issues and those areas where IAEA can make unique contributions such as proliferation resistance, nuclear safety, waste management and sustainability issues and providing assistance to the user community. To enhance the potential for the deployment of innovative technologies, some changes in the infrastructure under which nuclear energy is developed and used; should be envisaged. In order to fulfil these objectives, the first phase of INPRO dealt with the development of a methodology to assess and compare the performance of innovative nuclear energy systems (INS). This methodology includes the definition of a set of Basic principles, User requirements and Criteria to be met in different areas (Economics, Sustainability and environment, Safety of nuclear installations, Waste management and Proliferation resistance). The result of

  9. Outcome and Perspectives from the First IAEA International Technical Meeting on Statistical Methodologies for Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, C.; Binner, R.; Peter, N. J.; Wuester, J.; Zhao, K.; Krieger, T.; Walczak-Typke, A.C.; Richet, S.; Portaix, C.G.; Martin, K.; Bonner, E.R.

    2015-01-01

    Statistical and probabilistic methodologies have always played a fundamental role in the field of safeguards. In-field inspection approaches are based on sampling algorithms and random verification schemes designed to achieve a designed detection probability for defects of interest (e.g., missing material, indicators of tampering with containment and other equipment, changes of design). In addition, the evaluation of verification data with a view to drawing soundly based safeguards conclusions rests on the application of various advanced statistical methodologies. The considerable progress of information technology in the field of data processing and computational capabilities as well as the evolution of safeguards concepts and the steep increase in the volume of verification data in the last decades call for the review and modernization of safeguards statistical methodologies, not only to improve the efficiency of the analytical processes but also to address new statistical and probabilistic questions. Modern computer-intensive approaches are also needed to fully exploit the large body of verification data collected over the years in the increasing number and diversifying types of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the world. The first biennial IAEA International Technical Meeting on Statistical Methodologies for Safeguards was held in Vienna from the 16 to 18 October 2013. Recommendations and a working plan were drafted which identify and chart necessary steps to review, harmonize, update and consolidate statistical methodologies for safeguards. Three major problem spaces were identified: Random Verification Schemes, Estimation of Uncertainties and Statistical Evaluation of Safeguards Verification Data for which a detailed list of objectives and actions to be taken were established. Since the meeting, considerable progress was made to meet these objectives. The actions undertaken and their outcome are presented in this paper. (author)

  10. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 2(79). Apr-May 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Board Meetings Set in May and June, Database of the IAEA's International Nuclear Information Systems (INIS) is being made available over the Internet free of charge, Senior Expert Group Starts Review of IAEA Programmes, IAEA Reports to Security Council on Nuclear Inspections in Iraq, Parties Consider Extending Fusion Research through the ITER Project, Status of Joint Safety and Nuclear Liability Conventions, Proposed Global Convention Against Nuclear Terrorism, Upcoming Symposia and Conferences, New IAEA Books, Nuclear Data File, and other short information

  11. IAEA Laboratory Activities. The IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo. Fifth Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    This fifth report describes development and work during the year 1967. It includes activities of the IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, and the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries at Cairo. Contents: The IAEA Laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf: Introduction; Standardization of measurement and of analytical methods related to peaceful applications of nuclear energy; Services to Member States and International Organizations; Chemical and physico-chemical investigations relevant to the Agency's programme; Nuclear techniques in hydrology; Nuclear techniques in medicine; Nuclear techniques in agriculture; Nuclear electronics service and development; Administrative matters. — The International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco: Introduction; Research; Administrative matters. — The International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste: Assistance to developing countries; Research activities; Administrative matters; Annexes. — The Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo: Introduction; The scientific programme of the Centre; Publications on work done at the Centre; Finance; Annex. Entirely in English. (author)

  12. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  13. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  14. Report of the COG/IAEA international workshop on managing nuclear safety at CANDU (PHWR) plants. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The workshop, hosted by COG and co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna) was held in Toronto, April 28 - May 1st, 1997. The 40 participants included senior managers from IAEA member countries operating or constructing CANDU (PHWR) stations. All the offshore utilities with PHWR stations in Korea, Romania, India, Argentina, Pakistan, and China were present with their domestic counterparts from Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Power, and AECL. The objectives of the workshop were to: provide a forum for exchange of ideas among nuclear safety managers operating CANDU (PHWR) stations and to learn from each other's experiences; to foster sharing of information on different operating approaches to managing safety and, in particular, to highlight the strategies for controlling the overall plant risk to a low level; to identify and discuss issues of mutual interest pertinent to PHWR stations and to define future follow-up activities. Refs, figs

  15. Report of the COG/IAEA international workshop on managing nuclear safety at CANDU (PHWR) plants. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The workshop, hosted by COG and co-sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA, Vienna) was held in Toronto, April 28 - May 1st, 1997. The 40 participants included senior managers from IAEA member countries operating or constructing CANDU (PHWR) stations. All the offshore utilities with PHWR stations in Korea, Romania, India, Argentina, Pakistan, and China were present with their domestic counterparts from Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Power, and AECL. The objectives of the workshop were to: provide a forum for exchange of ideas among nuclear safety managers operating CANDU (PHWR) stations and to learn from each other`s experiences; to foster sharing of information on different operating approaches to managing safety and, in particular, to highlight the strategies for controlling the overall plant risk to a low level; to identify and discuss issues of mutual interest pertinent to PHWR stations and to define future follow-up activities. Refs, figs.

  16. Regulatory Capacity Building in Romania – an International Nuclear Safety Cooperation between Norway, Romania and the IAEA 2013-2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattsson, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Romanian National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is cooperating on a project named “Regional Excellence Project on Regulatory Capacity Building in Nuclear and Radiological Safety, Emergency Preparedness and Response in Romania“. The project started in the end of 2013 and will be completed in 2017. The project has a budget of 4.2 million euros, where 85% is covered by Norway Grants and 15% covered by Romania. Norway Grants is the contribution of Norway to reducing economical and social disparities and strengthening bilateral relations with 16 EU countries in Central and Southern Europe. The entire project is organised through an IAEA extra-budgetary programme. This project is a continuation of a similar project with the same partners that was successfully implemented in the period 2009-2011.

  17. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2004 - December 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-05-15

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) in 2004 and 2005, as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Work of NDS staff and their consultants has focused on the continued data development and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. This information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  18. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2004 - December 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2006-05-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) in 2004 and 2005, as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Work of NDS staff and their consultants has focused on the continued data development and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. This information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  19. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronyaev, V.G.

    1999-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the thirteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 14-17 December 1998. The meeting was attended by 30 scientists from 10 Member States and 2 international organizations concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the conclusions and recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  20. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G

    2001-02-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourteenth meeting of the International Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators Network at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 4-7 December 2000. The meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 7 Member States and 1 international organization concerned with compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. The present document contains a meeting summary, the recommendations, the data center reports and proposals considered by the participants. (author)

  1. International database on ageing management and life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ianko, L.; Lyssakov, V.; McLachlan, D.; Russell, J.; Mukhametshin, V.

    1995-01-01

    International database on ageing management and life extension for reactor pressure vessel materials (RPVM) is described with the emphasis on the following issues: requirements of the system; design concepts for RPVM database system; data collection, processing and storage; information retrieval and dissemination; RPVM information assessment and evaluation. 1 fig

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. Publications catalogue 2001-2002, including IAEA technical documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming between January 2001 and September 2002. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. The lists all publications by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category

  3. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 4(81). Oct-Nov 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference Concludes in Vienna, Newly Elected IAEA Board of Governors, Director General Highlights Major Work Ahead, Statement to UN General Assembly, More States Accept Strengthened Safeguards Measures, Status of Additional Protocols, Signings at IAEA General Conference, USA Backs International Nuclear Fusion Project, September Meeting on Trilateral Initiative, Results From IAEA-Supported Projects, Database of Nuclear Medicine Best Practices, 1999 Seminar on Radiopharmaceuticals in Medical Treatment, International Symposium on Marine Pollution in Monaco, Safeguards Support From France and United Kingdom, Nuclear Inspections in Iraq, States Move to Join International Safety Conventions, Safety of Radiation Sources and Security of Radioactive Materials, Technical Team Trained in IAEA-Supported Project, Scientific Forum on Water Issues, International Scientific and Technical Meetings, New IAEA Books, and other short information

  4. Working material. IAEA seismic safety of nuclear power plants. International workshop on lessons learned from strong earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    The International Workshop on Lessons Learned from Strong Earthquake was held at Kashiwazaki civic plaza, Kashiwazaki, Niigata-prefecture, Japan, for three days in June 2008. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPP (KK-NPP) is located in the city of Kashiwazaki and the village of Kariwa, and owned and operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company Ltd. (TEPCO). After it experienced the Niigata-ken Chuetsu-oki earthquake in July 2007, IAEA dispatched experts' missions twice and held technical discussions with TEPCO. Through such activities, the IAEA secretariat and experts obtained up-dated information of plant integrity, geological and seismological evaluation and developments of the consultation in the regulatory framework of Japan. Some of the information has been shared with the member states through the reports on findings and lessons learned from the missions to Japan. The international workshop was held to discuss and share the information of lessons learned from strong earthquakes in member states' nuclear installations. It provided the opportunity for participants from abroad to share the information of the recent earthquake and experience in Japan and to visit KK-NPP. And for experts in Japan, the workshop provided the opportunity to share the international approach on seismic-safety-related measures and experiences. The workshop was organised by the IAEA as a part of an extra budgetary project, in cooperation with OECD/NEA, hosted by Japanese organisations including Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), Nuclear Safety Commission (NSC), and Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES). The number of the workshop participants was 70 experts from outside Japan, 27 countries and 2 international organisations, 154 Japanese experts and 81 audience and media personnel, totalling to 305 participants. The three-day workshop was open to the media including the site visit, and covered by NHK (the nation's public broadcasting corporation) and nation-wide and local television

  5. IAEA laboratory activities. The IAEA laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries. 2nd report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This Second Report 'IAEA Laboratory Activities' describes developments and scientific work during the year 1964. It reports on the activities of the Agency's Laboratory Vienna - Seibersdorf, the Marine Biological Project at Monaco, and the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries. In addition, it contains a first, short review on the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste. This Centre was established in October 1963 and started its operations in 1964. The Report is similar to the first one published at the beginning of 1964, and is intended as a source of current information

  6. Joint study on activation of international nuclear information use through implementation INIS DB server with IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. C.; Yi, J. H.; Kim, T. W.; Chun, Y. C.; Yoo, A. N.

    2003-03-01

    In order to install the INIS DB host site in Korea, the Korea INIS national center has cooperated with KAERI and organizations concerned, contacted the INIS secretariat participated in the consultative meeting of INIS liaison officers, and strengthened the relationship with Asian and Oceanian countries. And KAERI staff and a maintenance engineer participated training seminar on INIS DB installation and maintenance. The Korea national center obtained the INIS DB server code and data by international cooperation activity. Based these code and data, hardware and software for INIS DB server are purchased. INIS DB server system was installed the software and INIS database(2,347,302) was constructed. In 2003 INIS host DB site started to provide web service in Korea. Also It enables the users in the member countries in Asia as well as domestic users to get quick information. It will also bring the active use of the domestic INIS DB and the increase of the productivity of domestic research activities

  7. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO):status, development of approaches and outlook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshev, M.; Sokolov, Y.; Facer, I.

    2005-01-01

    During the last fifty years remarkable results have been achieved in the application of nuclear technology for the production of electricity. Looking ahead to the next fifty years it is clear that the demand for energy will grow considerably and also new requirements have to be fulfilled for the way nuclear energy will be supplied, UNCSD, WSSD, IPCC and others have emphasized the substantial growth in 21st century energy supplies needed to meet sustainable development (SD) goals. This will be driven by continuing population growth, economic development and aspiration to provide access to modern energy systems to be 1,6 billion people now without such access, the growth demand on limiting greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing the risk oaf climate change. A key factor to the future of nuclear power is the degree to which innovative nuclear technologies can be developed to meet challenges of economic competitiveness, safety,waste and proliferation concerns. There are two major international initiatives in the area of innovative nuclear technology: the IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle (INPRO) and the Generation IV International Forum. Following a resolution of the General Conference of the IAEA in the year 2000 an International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles, referred to as INPRO, was initiated (Authors)

  8. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Nickell, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  9. World wide web for database of Japanese translation on international nuclear event scale reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Hirano, Masashi

    1999-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means designed for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events, that occurred at nuclear facilities, and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public. The INES is jointly operated by the IAEA and the OECD-NEA. Nuclear events reported are rated by the Scale', a consistent safety significance indicator. The scale runs from level 0, for events with no safety significance, to level 7 for a major accident with widespread health and environmental effects. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been promptly translating the INES reports into Japanese and developing a world-wide-web database for the Japanese translation, aiming at more efficient utilization of the INES information inside Japan. The present paper briefly introduces the definitions of INES rating levels and the scope of the Scale, and describes the outlines of the database (the information stored in the database, its functions and how to use it). As well, technical use of the INES reports and the availability/ effectiveness of the database are discussed. (author)

  10. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.K.

    2009-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  11. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Nichols, A L [Departments of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Tuli, J K [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Brookhaven, Upton, NY (United States)

    2011-10-15

    The 19th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 4 to 8 April 2011, by the staff members of IAEA, Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 35 scientists from 20 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants, and recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document. (author)

  12. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Nichols, A.L.; Tuli, J.K.

    2011-10-01

    The 19th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 4 to 8 April 2011, by the staff members of IAEA, Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 35 scientists from 20 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants, and recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document. (author)

  13. International Cooperation for Enhancing Nuclear Safety, Security, Safeguards and Non-proliferation : 60 Years of IAEA and EURATOM

    CERN Document Server

    Abousahl, Said; Plastino, Wolfango

    2018-01-01

    This open access book examines key aspects of international cooperation to enhance nuclear safety, security, safeguards, and non-proliferation, thereby assisting in development and maintenance of the verification regime and fostering progress toward a nuclear weapon-free world. The book opens by addressing important political, institutional, and legal dimensions. Current challenges are discussed and attempts made to identify possible solutions and future improvements. Subsequent sections consider scientific developments that have the potential to increase the effectiveness of implementation of international regimes, particularly in critical areas, technology foresight, and the ongoing evaluation of current capabilities. The closing sections examine scientific and technical challenges and discuss the role of international cooperation and actions of the scientific community in leading the world toward peace and security. The book – which celebrates 60 years of IAEA Atoms for Peace and Development and the EURA...

  14. INIS: international nuclear information system. World first international database on pacific uses of nuclear sciences and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, J.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    This poster, prepared for the 2007 CEA meetings on scientific and technical information, presents the INIS information system, the document-types content and subject coverage of the database, the French contribution to this system thanks to the INIS team of the CEA-Saclay, the input preparation process, and an example of valorization of a scientific and historical patrimony with the CEA/IAEA joint project of digitization of about 2760 CEA reports published between 1948 and 1969. All these reports have been digitized by the IAEA and analyzed by CEA, and entered in the INIS database with a link to the full text. (J.S.)

  15. Project for export system construction of nuclear equipment to IAEA; survey on current market status of the nuclear related international organizations and the domestic possible suppliers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, T S; Cho, H K; Kim, H J [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-05-01

    Republic of Korea are keeping the dynamic activities in IAEA as the 8th advanced nuclear country over the world but has occupied very low late less than 0.01% in supplying the equipments to IAEA. About 6,000 nuclear equipment suppliers are registered in IAEA Supply Roster over the world but only 3 Suppliers of our country are registered in IAEA Supply Roster. The supply of nuclear industrial products equivalent to about 100 million dollars into IAEA market will endorse not only the international authorization for our technology and products but also give contribution to activate the domestic nuclear industries in order to increase its expert. The explanation for IAEA procurement market to the 53 nuclear companies will be made on May 16, 2001, and the participants for the export of their goods will be selected. And then we will do all possible supports by the government and related organizations for them to register in IAEA Supply Roster. 21 refs. (Author)

  16. Energy confinement scaling from the international stellarator database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroth, U [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Murakami, M; Dory, R A; Yamada, H; Okamura, S; Sano, F; Obiki, T

    1995-09-01

    An international stellarator database on global energy confinement is presented comprising data from the ATF, CHS and Heliotron E heliotron/torsatrons and the W7-A and W7-AS shearless stellarators. Regression expressions for the energy confinement time are given for the individual devices and the combined dataset. A comparison with tokamak L mode confinement is discussed on the basis of various scaling expressions. In order to make this database available to interested colleagues, the structure of the database and the parameter list are explained in detail. More recent confinement results incorporating data from enhanced confinement regimes such as H mode are reported elsewhere. (author).

  17. Linking international trademark databases to inform IP research and policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, P.

    2016-07-01

    Researchers and policy makers are concerned with many international issues regarding trademarks, such as trademark squatting, cluttering, and dilution. Trademark application data can provide an evidence base to inform government policy regarding these issues, and can also produce quantitative insights into economic trends and brand dynamics. Currently, national trademark databases can provide insight into economic and brand dynamics at the national level, but gaining such insight at an international level is more difficult due to a lack of internationally linked trademark data. We are in the process of building a harmonised international trademark database (the “Patstat of trademarks”), in which equivalent trademarks have been identified across national offices. We have developed a pilot database that incorporates 6.4 million U.S., 1.3 million Australian, and 0.5 million New Zealand trademark applications, spanning over 100 years. The database will be extended to incorporate trademark data from other participating intellectual property (IP) offices as they join the project. Confirmed partners include the United Kingdom, WIPO, and OHIM. We will continue to expand the scope of the project, and intend to include many more IP offices from around the world. In addition to building the pilot database, we have developed a linking algorithm that identifies equivalent trademarks (TMs) across the three jurisdictions. The algorithm can currently be applied to all applications that contain TM text; i.e. around 96% of all applications. In its current state, the algorithm successfully identifies ~ 97% of equivalent TMs that are known to be linked a priori, as they have shared international registration number through the Madrid protocol. When complete, the internationally linked trademark database will be a valuable resource for researchers and policy-makers in fields such as econometrics, intellectual property rights, and brand policy. (Author)

  18. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-07-01

    This booklet summarizes the main activities being carried out by the IAEA with regard to the Asian Network for Education in Nuclear Technology (ANENT) and other related activities including those completed during the period 2002-2005. It briefly describes the background information on the events leading to the formation of the ANENT; the terms of reference formulated at the second Coordination Committee meeting held in Vietnam, October 2005; and objectives, strategy and other institutional and managerial policies reaffirmed by the members. The attached CD-ROM contains nearly all of the background material in full text, including policy level papers, reports, presentations made by Member States, and meeting summaries

  19. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, D.; Dimitriou, P.; Ricard-McCutchan, E.; Tuli, J.K.

    2013-08-01

    Biennial meetings of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators are held under the auspices of the IAEA. The Network consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This Network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration are included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS). The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data properties. These data and bibliographic details are also available through the World Wide Web, CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides, Nuclear Wallet Cards and other such media. The US efforts are coordinated by the Coordinating Committee of the US Nuclear Data Program. The ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Centre at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and these data are also available from other distribution centres including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. Biennial meetings of the Network are sponsored by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and have the following objectives: (a) coordination of the work of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD; (b) maintenance of and improvements to the standards and rules governing NSDD evaluations; (c) review of the development and common use of computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. In those meetings detailed studies and discussions are undertaken over a five-day period. This document represents a summary of the Network meeting held at the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS), Safat, Kuwait, from 27 to 31 January 2013. Thirty-six nuclear data specialists from seventeen countries attended this meeting to

  20. Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting on Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Dimitriou, P. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Ricard-McCutchan, E.; Tuli, J. K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Biennial meetings of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) evaluators are held under the auspices of the IAEA. The Network consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This Network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration are included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS). The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data properties. These data and bibliographic details are also available through the World Wide Web, CD-ROM, wall charts of the nuclides, Nuclear Wallet Cards and other such media. The US efforts are coordinated by the Coordinating Committee of the US Nuclear Data Program. The ENSDF master database is maintained by the US National Nuclear Data Centre at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and these data are also available from other distribution centres including the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. Biennial meetings of the Network are sponsored by the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, and have the following objectives: (a) coordination of the work of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD; (b) maintenance of and improvements to the standards and rules governing NSDD evaluations; (c) review of the development and common use of computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. In those meetings detailed studies and discussions are undertaken over a five-day period. This document represents a summary of the Network meeting held at the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Sciences (KFAS), Safat, Kuwait, from 27 to 31 January 2013. Thirty-six nuclear data specialists from seventeen countries attended this meeting to

  1. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the Period January 2010 - December 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, Daniel H.; Forrest, Robin A.

    2012-04-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) during 2010 and 2011, and is provided as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). NDS staff and affiliated consultants have focused their work on analysing and fulfilling data development needs and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. The present information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data projects are presented to the INDC for information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  2. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the Period January 2008 - December 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, Daniel H; Forrest, Robin A [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-04-15

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) during 2008 and 2009, and is provided as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). NDS staff and affiliated consultants have focused their work on analysing and fulfilling data development needs and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. The present information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data projects are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  3. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the Period January 2008 - December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriola, Daniel H.; Forrest, Robin A.

    2010-04-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) during 2008 and 2009, and is provided as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). NDS staff and affiliated consultants have focused their work on analysing and fulfilling data development needs and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. The present information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data projects are presented to the INDC for their information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  4. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2002 - December 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Alan L [ed.

    2004-05-01

    This report contains descriptions of the major activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2002 and 2003 for review by the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Information is provided on the staff and budget, atomic, molecular and nuclear data activities of the Nuclear Data Centre, coordination of the Nuclear Data Centre Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, and computer support. This information is complemented by descriptions of other relevant activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for information only, since those specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  5. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2000 - December 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.

    2002-05-01

    This report contains descriptions of the major activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 2000 and 2001 for review by the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). Information is provided on the staff and budget, atomic, molecular and nuclear data activities of the Nuclear Data Center, coordination of the Nuclear Data Center Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, and computer support. This information is complemented by descriptions of other relevant activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data programmes are presented to the INDC for information only, since those specific activities are reviewed in depth by the A+M Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  6. Developing a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for transport casks for adoption by the International Atomic Energy Agency(IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Falci, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    With increasing nuclear material transportation demands, new generation casks have included designs which propose the use of structural materials other than austenitic stainless steel. Motivation for using alternate materials include potentials for lower cost, easier fabrication, no welding and less weight (higher payload). Examples of candidate materials for structural components include ferritic steels and ductile cast iron for the containment boundary and borated stainless steel for the basket. The primary technical issue which separates these candidate materials from austenitic stainless steel is that they may, under certain combinations of mechanical and environmental loadings, fail in a brittle fracture mode. There is a clear need to develop a consensus criterion that will encompass a broad range of materials and provide a consistent method for evaluating candidate materials with respect to brittle fracture. Adopting such a criterion through the auspices of the IAEA has distinct advantages. An international consensus would provide assurance to regulators and the public that the most appropriate method is used, and countries developing packages using candidate materials could work with a single criterion without concern that another country is setting precedent using a different criterion. The development of such a criterion has been in progress for two and one-half years. There are two major efforts which are being pursued in parallel. There is the technical effort to write a draft document and the formal effort to facilitate adoption of a criterion by the IAEA. 7 refs., 1 fig

  7. Nuclear technology: the role of the IAEA. Ninth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems, Tel Aviv, 28 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Ninth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, in Tel Aviv, Israel, on 28 June 1998. The Director General outlines the role of the IAEA in assisting its Member States to meet the challenges facing the use of nuclear energy, based on the Agency' mandate on the following inter-related tasks: ta act as a catalyst for the scientific community and as a hub for state-of-the-art technology; to act as a centre for the transfer of nuclear technologies so as to ensure their accessibility to member State in general, and to developing countries in particular; to assist Member States to make informed and appropriate choices concerning the energy mix by producing comparative assessments of nuclear and other technologies; to strive for the highest level of safety in all areas of the use of nuclear energy; and to assure, through its verification system, the pledges to use nuclear energy exclusively for peaceful purposes are fulfilled

  8. Participation of Czechoslovakia in the beginnings of international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy (IAEA, UNSCEAR, ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2006-01-01

    The former Czechoslovakia, as a producer or natural uranium and a country heading to construction of nuclear power stations, took an active part in the establishment of international cooperation in peaceful use of atomic energy in the mid-1950s. Its 17-member delegation attended the 1 st International Conference on Peaceful Use of Atomic Energy in Geneva in August 1955. Czechoslovakia was invited to work of the twelve countries on the final draft of the International Atomic Energy Agency Statutes in 1956, it became a member of the IAEA Board of Governors (alternating with Poland), and the first Czechoslovak Governor P. Winkler was elected President of the Board in 1957. Czechoslovakia also was one of the fifteen countries designated to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 1955. Besides, Czechoslovak specialists participated actively in the work of committees of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for many years. Involvement in the international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy represented for Czechoslovakia obligations as well as stimuli to the national development of nuclear fields, including radiobiology. (author)

  9. IAEA safeguards glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An unambiguous definition and rationalization of many of the terms for the purpose of IAEA safeguards are given, with a view to improving the common understanding of such terms within the international community. The glossary focuses only on safeguards meanings in general, and IAEA meanings in particular, of the terms discussed. Terms belong to the following problems: nuclear and non-nuclear material, nuclear equipment, design of the safeguards approach, nuclear material accountancy, physical standards, sampling, measurements, statistical concepts and others

  10. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  11. FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains extended synopses of 90 articles presented to the FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing, held in Anatalya, Turkey, 19-22 October, 1999. The major themes covered include food irradiation technologies, public acceptance of irradiated food items, effectiveness and economic aspects of food irradiation

  12. FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This document contains extended synopses of 90 articles presented to the FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing, held in Anatalya, Turkey, 19-22 October, 1999. The major themes covered include food irradiation technologies, public acceptance of irradiated food items, effectiveness and economic aspects of food irradiation.

  13. Harmonization of internal dosimetry procedures in Latin America - ARCAL/IAEA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, D.; Dantas, B.M.; Juliao, L. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria - Av. Salvador Allende S/N, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, RJ 22780-160 (Brazil); Cruz Suarez, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Rojo, A.; Serdero, N. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Videla, R. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Puerta, J.A. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia); Lopez, G. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones, Ciudad de la Habana (Cuba); Alfaro, M.M. [Instituto nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico); Gonzales, S. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Lima (Peru); Hermida, J.C. [Hospital de Clinicas, Montevideo (Uruguay); Navarro, T. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Mediciones Ambientales y Tecnologicas - CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Under the auspices of the Regional Coordination Agreement for Latin America, representatives of the eight member states have participated in a project to improve radiological protection for workers exposed to unsealed sources of radiation. The design of the project was based on information obtained from a questionnaire circulated among the participants, from which the initial status of internal dosimetry services in each country was characterised. The objective of the project is to harmonize internal dosimetry procedures, with reference to International Atomic Energy Agency recommendations. After the implementation of new procedures and personnel training, four intercomparison exercises were carried out: measurement of iodine in thyroid phantoms, measurement of gamma emitters in urine samples, measurement of beta emitters in urine samples and internal dose assessments. This project has resulted in important improvements in internal dosimetry services in the region. (authors)

  14. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators; Summary Report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D.; Tuli, J.

    2009-03-23

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 18th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 23 to 27 March 2009. This meeting was attended by 22 scientists from 14 Member States, plus IAEA staff, concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. The International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators holds biennial meetings under the auspices of the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centres in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets (NDS).

  15. Establish the Foundation of Environmental Assessment Technique in ROK via the International Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety Managed by IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Ahn, S. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Lee, C. W.; Hwang, W. T.; Seo, K. S

    2005-08-15

    Tritiated water (HTO) released from the nuclear facilities can easily be absorbed by plants via their stomata and incorporated into organics by metabolic processes such as photosynthesis. Organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant cells is mostly inexchangeable and remains at harvest to contribute some to the ingestion radiation dose (Barry et al., 1999). In assessing the ingestion dose due to an accidental release of HTO, a dynamic model simulating its environmental behaviors is needed. Various types of dynamic HTO models have been developed in many different countries. Joint international researches have been conducted many times for model comparisons and validations (BIOMOVS II, 1996a, 1996b). In 2003, however, with the understanding of an insufficiency in the validation test, the IAEA started on a joint international research program for the validation of environmental models (EMRAS : Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) as a successor to the BIOMASS (2001). The KAERI submitted 'a scenario of an acute soybean exposure to HTO' to the Tritium Working Group (Theme 1) in the EMRAS program. It was accepted as Task 2 of the working group. This report is the result of a joint research for the KAERI scenario carried out by the EMRAS tritium working group with the KAERI playing a role of a coordinator.

  16. Establish the Foundation of Environmental Assessment Technique in ROK via the International Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety Managed by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Soo; Choi, Y. H.; Keum, D. K.; Kang, H. S.; Ahn, S. S.; Chung, Y. S.; Lee, C. W.; Hwang, W. T.; Seo, K. S.

    2005-08-01

    Tritiated water (HTO) released from the nuclear facilities can easily be absorbed by plants via their stomata and incorporated into organics by metabolic processes such as photosynthesis. Organically bound tritium (OBT) in plant cells is mostly inexchangeable and remains at harvest to contribute some to the ingestion radiation dose (Barry et al., 1999). In assessing the ingestion dose due to an accidental release of HTO, a dynamic model simulating its environmental behaviors is needed. Various types of dynamic HTO models have been developed in many different countries. Joint international researches have been conducted many times for model comparisons and validations (BIOMOVS II, 1996a, 1996b). In 2003, however, with the understanding of an insufficiency in the validation test, the IAEA started on a joint international research program for the validation of environmental models (EMRAS : Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety) as a successor to the BIOMASS (2001). The KAERI submitted 'a scenario of an acute soybean exposure to HTO' to the Tritium Working Group (Theme 1) in the EMRAS program. It was accepted as Task 2 of the working group. This report is the result of a joint research for the KAERI scenario carried out by the EMRAS tritium working group with the KAERI playing a role of a coordinator

  17. Quality of Service: a study in databases bibliometric international

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deosir Flávio Lobo de Castro Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to serve as a source of references on Quality of Service for future research. After surveying the international databases, EBSCO and ProQuest, the results on the state of the art in this issue are presented. The method used was the bibliometrics, and 132 items from a universe of 13,427 were investigated. The analyzed works cover the period from 1985 to 2011. Among the contributions, results and conclusions for future research are presented: i most cited authors ii most used methodology, dimensions and questionnaire; iii most referenced publications iv international journals with most publications on the subject, v distribution of the number of publications per year; vi authors networks vii educational institutions network; viii terms used in the search in international databases; ix the relationships studied in 132 articles; x criteria for choice of methodology in the research on quality of services; xi most often used paradigm, and xii 160 high impact references.

  18. Report of the international workshop on safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at radioactive waste management and nuclear fuel cycle facilities. (Supplement to IAEA-TECDOC-1073 and IAEA-TECDOC-1087)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to address the Year 2000 (Y2K) issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at ... fuel cycle facilities ... to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat, 'within existing resources, to act as a clearinghouse and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... fuel cycle facilities ... to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. In response to resolution GC(42)/RES/11, the Secretariat convened: a group of consultants who met in Vienna from 20 to 22 January 1999 and produced a technical document (IAEA-TECDOC-1073) entitled Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management Facilities; and a specialists meeting in Vienna from 24 to 26 March 1999, which produced a technical document (IAEA-TECDOC-1087) entitled Potential Vulnerabilities of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities to the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue and Measures to Address Them. To foster information exchange and share existing experience the IAEA held an International Workshop on Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Vienna on 1-2 July 1999. Whereas the focus of TECDOC-1073 and TECDOC-1087 had been on identifying relevant safety issues in relation to Y2K computer problems and on proposing methods to address them, the focus of the International Workshop was on sharing experience, setting priorities

  19. Cluster Analysis of the International Stellarator Confinement Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kus, A.; Dinklage, A.; Preuss, R.; Ascasibar, E.; Harris, J. H.; Okamura, S.; Yamada, H.; Sano, F.; Stroth, U.; Talmadge, J.

    2008-01-01

    Heterogeneous structure of collected data is one of the problems that occur during derivation of scalings for energy confinement time, and whose analysis tourns out to be wide and complicated matter. The International Stellarator Confinement Database [1], shortly ISCDB, comprises in its latest version 21 a total of 3647 observations from 8 experimental devices, 2067 therefrom beeing so far completed for upcoming analyses. For confinement scaling studies 1933 observation were chosen as the standard dataset. Here we describe a statistical method of cluster analysis for identification of possible cohesive substructures in ISDCB and present some preliminary results

  20. IAEA technical documents (TECDOCs) 1992-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all technical documents (TECDOCs) of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all documents in numerical order, starting with the most recent publication. The second part lists all documents by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  1. Application of IAEA's International Nuclear Event Scale to events at testing/research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Masao; Watanabe, Norio

    1999-01-01

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means for providing prompt, clear and consistent information related to nuclear events and facilitating communication between the nuclear community, the media and the public on such events. This paper describes the INES rating process for events at testing/research reactors and nuclear fuel processing facilities and experience on the application of the INES scale in Japan. (author)

  2. International Perspectives on Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine: Outcomes of an IAEA Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, 'Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine' (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  3. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  4. IAEA safeguards: some pros and cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.

    1986-01-01

    The author gives a personal view of the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safeguards. The IAEA safeguards system is described (including containment, surveillance and inspection), and the limitations and strengths of the system are examined. (U.K.)

  5. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  6. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  7. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-06-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  8. IAEA safeguards glossary. 2001 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    IAEA safeguards have evolved since their inception in the late 1960s. In 1980 the IAEA published the first IAEA Safeguards Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l) with the aim of facilitating understanding of the specialized safeguards terminology within the international community. In 1987 the IAEA published a revised edition of the Glossary (IAEA/SG/INF/l (Rev.l)) which took into account developments in the safeguards area as well as comments received since the first edition appeared. Since 1987, IAEA safeguards have become more effective and efficient, mainly through the series of strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors during 1992-1997, the Board's approval, in 1997, of the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)), and the work, begun in 1999, directed towards the development and implementation of integrated safeguards. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition reflects these developments. Each of the 13 sections of the Glossary addresses a specific subject related to IAEA safeguards. To facilitate understanding. definitions and, where applicable, explanations have been given for each of the terms listed. The terms defined and explained intentionally have not been arranged in alphabetical order, but their sequence within each section corresponds to the internal relationships of the subject treated. The terms are numbered consecutively within each section and an index referring to these numbers has been provided for ease of reference. The terms used have been translated into the official languages of the IAEA, as well as into German and Japanese. The IAEA Safeguards Glossary 2001 Edition has no legal status and is not intended to serve as a basis for adjudicating on problems of definition such as might arise during the negotiation or in the interpretation of safeguards agreements or additional protocols. The IAEA

  9. IAEA/SiP senior managers workshop on international promotion of safety culture for the NPPs with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA/SiP Senior Managers Workshop on International Promotion of Safety Culture for the NPPs with RMBK reactors was organized in the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Regional Project RER/9/035 and the IAEA Extrabudgetary Project on WWER and RBMK Safety in co-operation with Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety (SiP). It took place at the Forsmark NPP, Sweden, from 1 to 4 October 1996. The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum for senior managers to exchange national and international experience on factors influencing safety culture, to better understand these factors and to further enhance promotion of safety culture. Twenty-three specialists participated in the workshop from six countries (Canada, Lithuania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Ukraine and USA) and from two international organizations (WANO, EC-G24 coordination). Participants were from regulatory bodies, ministries and operational organizations of respective countries. The INSAG-4 definition of safety culture was taken as a starting point for the discussions, but at the start of the workshop participants did not seem to have the same understanding of what is contained in the safety culture context. Specifically the difference between measures taken to improve safety and establishing a proper safety culture level was discussed with useful results. Some participants proposed quantitative safety culture indicators, but there was no agreement at this stage about how to define them. Refs

  10. IAEA/SiP senior managers workshop on international promotion of safety culture for the NPPs with RBMK reactors. Working material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The IAEA/SiP Senior Managers Workshop on International Promotion of Safety Culture for the NPPs with RMBK reactors was organized in the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Regional Project RER/9/035 and the IAEA Extrabudgetary Project on WWER and RBMK Safety in co-operation with Swedish International Project Nuclear Safety (SiP). It took place at the Forsmark NPP, Sweden, from 1 to 4 October 1996. The objectives of the workshop were to provide a forum for senior managers to exchange national and international experience on factors influencing safety culture, to better understand these factors and to further enhance promotion of safety culture. Twenty-three specialists participated in the workshop from six countries (Canada, Lithuania, Russian Federation, Sweden, Ukraine and USA) and from two international organizations (WANO, EC-G24 coordination). Participants were from regulatory bodies, ministries and operational organizations of respective countries. The INSAG-4 definition of safety culture was taken as a starting point for the discussions, but at the start of the workshop participants did not seem to have the same understanding of what is contained in the safety culture context. Specifically the difference between measures taken to improve safety and establishing a proper safety culture level was discussed with useful results. Some participants proposed quantitative safety culture indicators, but there was no agreement at this stage about how to define them. Refs.

  11. IDEAS international contamination database: a compilation of published internal contamination cases. A tool for the internal dosimetry community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtgen, C.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the IDEAS project was to develop General Guidelines for the Assessment of Internal Dose from Monitoring Data. The project was divided into 5 Work Packages for the major tasks. Work Package 1 entitled Collection of incorporation cases was devoted to the collection of data by means of bibliographic research (survey of the open literature), contacting and collecting data from specific organisations and using information from existing databases on incorporation cases. To ensure that the guidelines would be applicable to a wide range of practical situations, a database of cases of internal contamination including monitoring data suitable for dose assessment was compiled. The IDEAS Bibliography database and the IDEAS Internal Contamination database were prepared and some reference cases were selected for use in Work Package 3. The other Work packages of the IDEAS Project (WP-2 Preparation of evaluation software, WP-3 Evaluation of incorporation cases, WP-4 Development of the general guidelines and WP-5 Practical testing of general guidelines) have been described in detail elsewhere and can be found on the IDEAS website. A search for reference from the open literature, which contained information on cases of internal contamination from which intake and committed doses could be assessed, has been compiled into a database. The IDEAS Bibliography Database includes references to papers which might (but were not certain to) contain such information, or which included references to papers which contained such information. This database contains the usual bibliographical information: authors' name(s), year of publication, title of publication and the journal or report number. Up to now, a comprehensive Bibliography Database containing 563 references has been compiled. Not surprisingly more than half of the references are from Health Physics and Radiation Protection Dosimetry Journals.The next step was for the partners of the IDEAS project to obtain the references

  12. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, A.L.; Tuli, J.K.

    2007-09-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 17th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators in St. Petersburg, Russian Federation, 11-15 June 2007. This meeting was attended by 27 scientists from 13 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  13. The IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abou Yehia, H.

    2007-01-01

    According to the research reactor database of IAEA (RRDB), 250 reactors are operating worldwide, 248 have been shut down and 170 have been decommissioned. Among the 248 reactors that do not run, some will resume their activities, others will be dismantled and the rest do not face a clear future. The analysis of reported incidents shows that the ageing process is a major cause of failures, more than two thirds of operating reactors are over 30 years old. It also appears that the lack of adequate regulations or safety standards for research reactors is an important issue concerning reactor safety particularly when reactors are facing re-starting or upgrading or modifications. The IAEA has launched a 4-axis program: 1) to set basic safety regulations and standards for research reactors, 2) to provide IAEA members with an efficient help for the application of these safety regulations to their reactors, 3) to foster international exchange of information on research reactor safety, and 4) to provide IAEA members with a help concerning safety issues linked to malicious acts or sabotage on research reactors

  14. The IRPVM-DB database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, L.M.; Gillemot, F.; Yanko, L.; Lyssakov, V.

    1997-01-01

    The IRPVM-DB (International Reactor Pressure Vessel Material Database) initiated by the IAEA IWG LMNPP is going to collect the available surveillance and research data world-wide on RPV material ageing. This paper presents the purpose of the database; it summarizes the type and the relationship of data included; it gives information about the data access and protection; and finally, it summarizes the state of art of the database. (author). 1 ref., 2 figs

  15. The IRPVM-DB database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, L M [Davies Consultants, Oxford (United Kingdom); Gillemot, F [Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary); Yanko, L [Minatom (Russian Federation); Lyssakov, V [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-09-01

    The IRPVM-DB (International Reactor Pressure Vessel Material Database) initiated by the IAEA IWG LMNPP is going to collect the available surveillance and research data world-wide on RPV material ageing. This paper presents the purpose of the database; it summarizes the type and the relationship of data included; it gives information about the data access and protection; and finally, it summarizes the state of art of the database. (author). 1 ref., 2 figs.

  16. The evolution of IAEA safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This, second in a new series of booklets dealing with IAEA safeguards is intended for persons professionally interested in the subject as government officials responsible for non-proliferation or management of nuclear facilities, and practitioners of safeguards - the international and national officials charged with implementing IAEA safeguards. It is also aimed at the broader public concerned with the spread of nuclear weapons and interested in nuclear arms control and disarmament. It presents the situation as IAEA safeguards make `quantum jump` into new phase characterized by the IAEA as the `Strengthened Safeguards System`. It includes the historical overview of the International safeguards from 1945-1998; the aims and limitations of IAEA Safeguards; a chapter on how safeguards work in practice; as well as new challenges and opportunities

  17. The evolution of IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This, second in a new series of booklets dealing with IAEA safeguards is intended for persons professionally interested in the subject as government officials responsible for non-proliferation or management of nuclear facilities, and practitioners of safeguards - the international and national officials charged with implementing IAEA safeguards. It is also aimed at the broader public concerned with the spread of nuclear weapons and interested in nuclear arms control and disarmament. It presents the situation as IAEA safeguards make 'quantum jump' into new phase characterized by the IAEA as the 'Strengthened Safeguards System'. It includes the historical overview of the International safeguards from 1945-1998; the aims and limitations of IAEA Safeguards; a chapter on how safeguards work in practice; as well as new challenges and opportunities

  18. Genebanks: a comparison of eight proposed international genetic databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Melissa A; Harding, Sarah; McElroy, Courtney

    2003-01-01

    To identify and compare population-based genetic databases, or "genebanks", that have been proposed in eight international locations between 1998 and 2002. A genebank can be defined as a stored collection of genetic samples in the form of blood or tissue, that can be linked with medical and genealogical or lifestyle information from a specific population, gathered using a process of generalized consent. Genebanks were identified by searching Medline and internet search engines with key words such as "genetic database" and "biobank" and by reviewing literature on previously identified databases such as the deCode project. Collection of genebank characteristics was by an electronic and literature search, augmented by correspondence with informed individuals. The proposed genebanks are located in Iceland, the United Kingdom, Estonia, Latvia, Sweden, Singapore, the Kingdom of Tonga, and Quebec, Canada. Comparisons of the genebanks were based on the following criteria: genebank location and description of purpose, role of government, commercial involvement, consent and confidentiality procedures, opposition to the genebank, and current progress. All of the groups proposing the genebanks plan to search for susceptibility genes for complex diseases while attempting to improve public health and medical care in the region and, in some cases, stimulating the local economy through expansion of the biotechnology sector. While all of the identified plans share these purposes, they differ in many aspects, including funding, subject participation, and organization. The balance of government and commercial involvement in the development of each project varies. Genetic samples and health information will be collected from participants and coded in all of the genebanks, but consent procedures range from presumed consent of the entire eligible population to recruitment of volunteers with informed consent. Issues regarding confidentiality and consent have resulted in opposition to

  19. IAEA activities in the field of NPP life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Lyssakov, V.; Davies, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The IAEA has established programmes in the field of Nuclear Plant Lifetime in the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle (NEPF) and also in the Division of Nuclear Safety. In the Division of NEPF the International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants carries out its activities within the IAEA Project A2.03 ''Nuclear Power Plant Life Management''. Activities under this project have produced a wealth of information by organizing specialists meeting, preparing technical publications on related topics and arranging co-ordinated research programmes with good results. The most recent development is a database which has been developed and is being maintained. 4 figs

  20. IAEA activities in the field of NPP life management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueorguiev, B; Lyssakov, V; Davies, L M

    1997-09-01

    The IAEA has established programmes in the field of Nuclear Plant Lifetime in the Division of Nuclear Power and the Fuel Cycle (NEPF) and also in the Division of Nuclear Safety. In the Division of NEPF the International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants carries out its activities within the IAEA Project A2.03 ``Nuclear Power Plant Life Management``. Activities under this project have produced a wealth of information by organizing specialists meeting, preparing technical publications on related topics and arranging co-ordinated research programmes with good results. The most recent development is a database which has been developed and is being maintained. 4 figs.

  1. Comment on the internal consistency of thermodynamic databases supporting repository safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, R.C.

    2001-11-01

    This report addresses the concept of internal consistency and its relevance to the reliability of thermodynamic databases used in repository safety assessments. In addition to being internally consistent, a reliable database should be accurate over a range of relevant temperatures and pressures, complete in the sense that all important aqueous species, gases and solid phases are represented, and traceable to original experimental results. No single definition of internal consistency need to be universally accepted as the most appropriate under all conditions, however. As a result, two databases that are each internally consistent may be inconsistent with respect to each other, and a database derived from two or more such databases must itself be internally inconsistent. The consequences of alternative definitions that are reasonably attributable to the concept of internal consistency can be illustrated with reference to the thermodynamic database supporting SKB's recent SR 97 safety assessment. This database is internally inconsistent because it includes equilibrium constants calculated over a range of temperatures: using conflicting reference values for some solids, gases and aqueous species that are common to two internally consistent databases (the OECD/NEA database for radioelements and SUPCRT databases for non-radioactive elements) that serve as source databases for the SR 97 TDB, using different definitions in these source databases of standard states for condensed phases and aqueous species, based on different mathematical expressions used in these source databases representing the temperature dependence of the heat capacity, and based on different chemical models adopted in these source databases for the aqueous phase. The importance of such inconsistencies must be considered in relation to the other database reliability criteria noted above, however. Thus, accepting a certain level of internal inconsistency in a database it is probably preferable to use a

  2. Comment on the internal consistency of thermodynamic databases supporting repository safety assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, R.C. [Monitor Scientific, LLC, Denver, CO (United States)

    2001-11-01

    This report addresses the concept of internal consistency and its relevance to the reliability of thermodynamic databases used in repository safety assessments. In addition to being internally consistent, a reliable database should be accurate over a range of relevant temperatures and pressures, complete in the sense that all important aqueous species, gases and solid phases are represented, and traceable to original experimental results. No single definition of internal consistency need to be universally accepted as the most appropriate under all conditions, however. As a result, two databases that are each internally consistent may be inconsistent with respect to each other, and a database derived from two or more such databases must itself be internally inconsistent. The consequences of alternative definitions that are reasonably attributable to the concept of internal consistency can be illustrated with reference to the thermodynamic database supporting SKB's recent SR 97 safety assessment. This database is internally inconsistent because it includes equilibrium constants calculated over a range of temperatures: using conflicting reference values for some solids, gases and aqueous species that are common to two internally consistent databases (the OECD/NEA database for radioelements and SUPCRT databases for non-radioactive elements) that serve as source databases for the SR 97 TDB, using different definitions in these source databases of standard states for condensed phases and aqueous species, based on different mathematical expressions used in these source databases representing the temperature dependence of the heat capacity, and based on different chemical models adopted in these source databases for the aqueous phase. The importance of such inconsistencies must be considered in relation to the other database reliability criteria noted above, however. Thus, accepting a certain level of internal inconsistency in a database it is probably preferable to

  3. Radioactive waste safety appraisal. An international peer review of the licence application for the Australian near surface radioactive waste disposal facility. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    Radioactive waste has been generated in Australia for a number of decades from the production and use of radioactive materials in medicine and industry, from the processing of various minerals containing natural radionuclides and from various research activities. It has been decided in the overall interest of safety and security to develop a radioactive waste disposal facility to accommodate the low level and short lived intermediate level waste, which make up the bulk of the waste, other than mining and minerals processing residues. A site selection process has been undertaken and environmental impact statement report prepared and approved. A licence application has been submitted to the national nuclear regulatory authority, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) for siting, construction and operation of the facility. In order to assist the CEO of ARPANSA with his deliberations in this regard a request was made to the IAEA, in terms of its statutory mandate to establish international safety standards for radioactive waste safety and to provide for their application, to undertake an international peer review of the licence application and to advise the CEO accordingly. The outcome and recommendations of this peer review are presented in the report

  4. IAEA safeguards assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.; Parisick, R.; Pushkarjov, V.; Shea, T.; Brach, E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes the safeguards program administered by the IAEA, which must provide assurance to the international community that agency safeguards have the capacity to deter diversion, if contemplated, to detect diversion, if undertaken, and to provide assurance that no diversions have occurred when none are detected. This assurance to the international community is based upon the capability of the Agency's safeguards program to detect diversion and its complementary effect of deterrance

  5. Coordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muir, D.W.; Pronyaev, V.G.

    1998-03-01

    The international network of nuclear structure and decay data (NSDD) evaluators aims at a complete and periodic nuclear structure and decay data evaluation of all nuclides, the continuous publication of these evaluations and their dissemination to the scientific community. The evaluated data resulting from this concerted international effort are introduced in the Evaluated Structure and Decay Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. Periodic meetings of this network are held in order to maintain the coordination of all centres and groups participating in the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of NSDD, to maintain and improve the standards and rules governing NSDS evaluation, and to review the development and common use of the computerized systems and databases maintained specifically for this activity. This document is a summary report of the twelfth Meeting on the Coordination of the NSDD Evaluators held between 14-18 October 1996 in Budapest, Hungary

  6. An international peer review of the programme for evaluating sites for near surface disposal of radioactive waste in Lithuania. Report of the IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-12-01

    Lithuania's national Radioactive Waste Management Agency (RATA) is mandated by national legislation to find a disposal solution for radioactive waste arising mainly from the operation and decommissioning of the Ignalina nuclear power plant. A key step in the process of obtaining a disposal solution is to identify potential sites for detailed consideration. The RATA has completed this first step and is now directing a programme for detailed investigation of these sites. In this context, the RATA requested that the IAEA, on the basis of its statutory mandate to establish safety standards and provide for their application, conduct a peer review of the safety of the proposed disposal concept. The objective of the peer review, carried out in December 2005, was to provide an independent assessment of the safety related aspects of the sites under consideration on the basis of international safety standards and applicable national standards. The review also considered the feasibility of the proposed reference design and its suitability for the local conditions. The peer review provides an independent opinion as to whether the RATA's siting and site characterization programme is consistent with international standards and agrees with good practice in other national disposal programmes. Peer reviews are increasingly being acknowledged as an important component in building broader stakeholder confidence in the safety of facilities. For this reason, an increase in their number and frequency is anticipated. The coming into force of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management has also focused attention on the demonstration of the safety of waste management facilities. This report presents the consensus view of the international group of experts convened by the IAEA to carry out the review. The findings and recommendations of the Review Team were grouped under six topics considered to be of fundamental importance

  7. Comparative international studies of osteoporosis using isotope techniques. Report of an IAEA advisory group meeting held in Vienna, Austria, 28-30 October 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    An Advisory Group Meeting convened by the IAEA in October 1992 made recommendations on the setting up of a Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) using nuclear and isotopic techniques for international comparative studies of osteoporosis. The proposed CRP will be implemented by the IAEA during the period 1993-1997. The main purpose of this programme is to undertake pilot studies of bone density in selected developing country populations for the purposes of (i) determining the age of peak bone mass in each study group, and (ii) quantifying differences in bone density as functions of the age and sex of persons in the study groups, as well as quantifying differences between the study groups in different countries. The preferred technique for bone density measurements in this study is DEXA (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). Additional measurements of trace elements in bone (and possibly also teeth) are also foreseen using neutron activation analysis and other appropriate techniques

  8. Ten years after Chernobyl: What do we really know? Based on the proceedings of the IAEA/WHO/EC international conference, Vienna, April 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-02-01

    This booklet attempts briefly to bring to light what has been learned after ten years of examining the consequences of the accident, reviewing both its immediate and long-term human health and environmental impacts. It is based principally upon the results of an international conference, ''One Decade After Chernobyl: Summing Up the Consequences of the Accident'', which brought together more than 800 experts from 71 countries in Vienna in April 1996 under sponsorship of the European Commission (EC), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  9. IAEA yearbook 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    Part A of the Yearbook describes the role played by the IAEA in helping to advance sustainable development by the transfer of nuclear and radiation technology. The introduction to this section this year discusses the application of quality assurance practices to this important work. The main article describes new planning procedures that are being adopted to ensure that these technical co-operation activities are of significant and practical benefit to the States concerned. The work routinely carried out by the IAEA on the development and dissemination of nuclear and radiation techniques covers a wide range of subjects - the practical aspects of physics and chemistry, hydrology, industrial applications, human health, and food and agriculture. Part B of the Yearbook concentrates on food irradiation and the use of nuclear monitoring techniques in programmes for improving human nutrition. Part C of the Yearbook deals with nuclear power and its fuel cycle and waste management technology. The section on nuclear power describes developments during 1995 in a wide range of countries. It also details the IAEA's work on the comparative health and environmental impacts of different types of energy systems. Of particular interest this year in the fuel cycle area is the report of the downturn in world uranium activities that has lasted for more than 15 years may be coming to an end. In the waste management section, emphasis is given to the technology of environmental restoration of sites after contamination resulting from past nuclear activities. A discussion of different aspects of the safety of nuclear power and of the uses of radiation is to be found in Part D, The Nuclear Safety Review. As in previous years, Part E of the IAEA Yearbook 1996 deals with the IAEA's major contribution to the non-proliferation regime - international safeguards. Part E also contains a description of IAEA activities designed to assist Member States in preventing trafficking in nuclear materials

  10. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    1999-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  11. Nuclear power information at the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelberg-Planer, R.

    2001-01-01

    The reliable and adequate supply of energy, and especially electricity, is necessary not only for economic development but, for economic and political stability. Since its establishment in the in the second half of the 20th century, nuclear power has evolved from the research and development stage to a mature industry that supplies more than 17% of the world's total electricity. Well designed, constructed and operated nuclear power plants have proved to be reliable, safe and economic. Although many countries are heavily reliant on nuclear power, in the last decade, expansion of nuclear power has been almost stagnating in the Western industrialized world, experiencing a low growth in Eastern Europe and expanding only in East Asia. On one side, one of the most important aims of the IAEA is to support the national effort to improve the nuclear power generation and to assist in promoting improvements in their safe, reliable and economic performance. On the other side, the IAEA also provides the only truly international forum for exchange, collection and dissemination of information in many areas related to nuclear energy. The Power Reactor Information System, PRIS, is one fundamental tool for these activities. The PRIS database is managed by the staff of the Nuclear Power Division in the IAEA. In the scope of PRIS various publications and reports have been published, as well as the IAEA has been satisfying request from Member States ranging from simple query to complex analysis. This paper presents an overview of the status of nuclear power world-wide and the related IAEA activities on collecting and disseminating nuclear power information. (author)

  12. An IAEA Survey of Dosimetry Audit Networks for Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grochowska, Paulina; Izewska, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    A Survey: In 2010, the IAEA undertook a task to investigate and review the coverage and operations of national and international dosimetry audit programmes for radiotherapy. The aim was to organize the global database describing the activities of dosimetry audit networks in radiotherapy. A dosimetry audit questionnaire has been designed at an IAEA consultants' meeting held in 2010 for organizations conducting various levels of dosimetry audits for radiotherapy. Using this questionnaire, a survey was conducted for the first time in 2010 and repeated in 2011. Request for information on different aspects of the dosimetry audit was included, such as the audit framework and resources, its coverage and scope, the dosimetry system used and the modes of audit operation, i.e. remotely and through on-site visits. The IAEA questionnaire was sent to over 80 organizations, members of the IAEA/WHO Network of Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) and other organizations known for having operated dosimetry audits for radiotherapy in their countries or internationally. Survey results and discussion: In response to the IAEA survey, 53 organizations in 45 countries confirmed that they operate dosimetry audit services for radiotherapy. Mostly, audits are conducted nationally, however there are five organizations offering audits abroad, with two of them operating in various parts of the world and three of them at the regional level, auditing radiotherapy centres in neighbouring countries. The distribution of dosimetry audit services in the world is given. (author)

  13. IAEA introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeman, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Physics Section supports the IAEA Member States regarding utilization of: Accelerators; Research reactors; Cross-cutting material research; Controlled fusion. The activities in the field of material science include studies of present NPP structural materials; investigation of degradation mechanisms and contribution to research programs of new materials, as well as education and training activities. The Section is participating in the coordinated research projects 'Accelerator Simulation and Theoretical Modeling of Radiation Effects' (Jointly NA-NE) and 'Benchmarking of advanced materials pre-selected for innovative nuclear reactors' (Jointly NA and NE)

  14. The role of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation (TC) programs in enhancing socioeconomic development in Sudan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salih, A Y.S. [Development Studies and Research Institute, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2006-04-15

    The main objective of this study is to reflect the role of nuclear Techniques in development through the IAEA provision of the technical cooperation (TC) projects in Sudan, and to show their impact on socio-economic activities, improvement of infrastructures, technology transfer, and whether the targeted institutes become economically self-reliant. This study as an analytical study uses secondary sources, namely reports from IAEA and coordinators of the projects. The study also uses primary data received mainly through conducting interviews with stake holders. The study has come out with some main findings: that the IAEA technical assistances played a major role in addressing pressing issues such as socio-economic development, sustainable development and management of different fields related to application of nuclear technology. The TC assistance depends on the local component of the country, also it depends on Sudan payments of it is annual share to the IAEA technical cooperation. The important role played by Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) in its capacity as the national coordinating body with respect to Technical Cooperation (TC) is highly appreciated. The total number of projects increased rapidly from 16 projects in 1959 to 55 projects in 2005 in different fields includes human health, agriculture, animal production, waste management, water resources, ... etc. The TC projects are associated with the country's development programmes framework (CPF) and support socio-economic activities. The management of TC projects activated at the national level were successful and have significant impact, particularly in human heath, agriculture, instrumentation and Non Destructive Testing. All the TC projects provided their funds mainly from IAEA, and assistance received from IAEA is highly effective. Sudan TC Programme had achieved a high implementation rate, where most of the projects attained their objectives, showing good results in socio-economic and infra

  15. The role of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Cooperation (TC) programs in enhancing socioeconomic development in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salih, A.Y.S.

    2006-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to reflect the role of nuclear Techniques in development through the IAEA provision of the technical cooperation (TC) projects in Sudan, and to show their impact on socio-economic activities, improvement of infrastructures, technology transfer, and whether the targeted institutes become economically self-reliant. This study as an analytical study uses secondary sources, namely reports from IAEA and coordinators of the projects. The study also uses primary data received mainly through conducting interviews with stake holders. The study has come out with some main findings: that the IAEA technical assistances played a major role in addressing pressing issues such as socio-economic development, sustainable development and management of different fields related to application of nuclear technology. The TC assistance depends on the local component of the country, also it depends on Sudan payments of it is annual share to the IAEA technical cooperation. The important role played by Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) in its capacity as the national coordinating body with respect to Technical Cooperation (TC) is highly appreciated. The total number of projects increased rapidly from 16 projects in 1959 to 55 projects in 2005 in different fields includes human health, agriculture, animal production, waste management, water resources, ... etc. The TC projects are associated with the country's development programmes framework (CPF) and support socio-economic activities. The management of TC projects activated at the national level were successful and have significant impact, particularly in human heath, agriculture, instrumentation and Non Destructive Testing. All the TC projects provided their funds mainly from IAEA, and assistance received from IAEA is highly effective. Sudan TC Programme had achieved a high implementation rate, where most of the projects attained their objectives, showing good results in socio-economic and infra

  16. Co-ordination of the international network of nuclear structure and decay data evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronyaev, V G; Nichols, A L; Tuli, J [eds.

    2004-03-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 15th meeting of the Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, 10-14 November 2003. This meeting was attended by 23 scientists from 11 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, the recommendations, data centre reports and the various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. Nuclear data are essential to the development, implementation and maintenance of all nuclear technologies. The international network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data (NSDD) Evaluators is sponsored by the IAEA, and consists of evaluation groups and data service centers in several countries. This network has the objective of providing up-to-date nuclear structure and decay data for all known nuclides by evaluating all existing experimental data. Data resulting from this international evaluation collaboration is included in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) and published in the journals Nuclear Physics A and Nuclear Data Sheets. The results represent the recommended 'best values' for the various nuclear structure and decay data parameters. Recommended values are made available to users by means of various media, such as the world wide web, CD-ROMs, wall charts of the nuclides, handbooks, nuclear wallet cards and others. Participants discussed a wide range of technical matters, and the recommendations of improving the quality of NSDD evaluations. A list of actions was also prepared for implementation during the course of the next two years. NSDD members prepared many recommendations for the IAEA and the major evaluation centers, which are aimed at improving the technical support towards the network and streamlining the organization of work. These consensus conclusions include: the development and exchange of programming products; revision of

  17. The History and Evolution of the IAEA Technical Assistance Programme on Decommissioning and the International Decommissioning Network as its Highest Point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2009-01-01

    Around the world, but particularly in developing Member States, there are disused nuclear facilities or those approaching the end of their useful lives, for which appropriate decommissioning steps have not been taken, primarily due to limited technical and financial resources or competing priorities. In line with its mission to encourage safe and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) systematically covers the technical, regulatory, radiation protection, planning, management, and economic aspects related to the decommissioning of nuclear installations. The IAEA's overall objective of the decommissioning programme is to assist its Member States in developing the required expertise, equipment, and programmes so that they can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely, and cost-effective manner. Technical Cooperation (TC) with Member States having limited resources is commonly provided in the form of workshops, expert missions, equipment design and procurement, training courses, fellowships and scientific visits. Key examples are provided in this paper to illustrate the start, evolution and current status of TC activities and typical mechanisms by which such activities are implemented. Many of world's nuclear facilities are small and widely distributed geographically, e.g. ∼300 aging or shut-down research reactors. Requests for assistance to address this issue from Member States exceed the capability of IAEA (and others) to deliver. However, integrating individual initiative into a designed-for-purpose network may compensate for these limitations. A new IAEA initiative amongst organizations from both potential 'donor' and 'recipient' Member States has taken the form of an 'International Decommissioning Network (IDN)'. The objectives of the IDN are to improve the flow of knowledge and experience amongst those engaged in decommissioning, and specifically to enhance the 'user-oriented' focus for all IAEA

  18. IAEA monitoring field trials workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, H.H.; Cooley, J.N.; Belew, W.L.

    1995-01-01

    Recent safeguards inspections in Iraq and elsewhere by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have led to the supposition that environmental monitoring can aid in verifying declared and in detecting undeclared nuclear activities or operations. This assumption was most recently examined by the IAEA's Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI), in their reports to the IAEA Board of Governors. In their reports, SAGSI suggested that further assessment and development of environmental monitoring would be needed to fully evaluate its potential application to enhanced IAEA safeguards. Such an inquiry became part of the IAEA ''Programme 93+2'' assessment of measures to enhance IAEA safeguards. In March, 1994, the International Safeguards Group at Oak Ridge hosted an environmental monitoring field trial workshop for IAEA inspectors to train them in the techniques needed for effective environmental sampling. The workshop included both classroom lectures and actual field sampling exercises. The workshop was designed to emphasize the analytical infrastructure needed for an environmental program, practical sampling methods, and suggested procedures for properly planning a sampling campaign. Detailed techniques for swipe, vegetation, soil, biota, and water associated sampling were covered. The overall approach to the workshop, and observed results, are described

  19. Minutes of the 25th meeting of the International Nuclear Data Committee, IAEA, Vienna, Austria, 4-7 May 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.A.

    2004-11-01

    The aim of the meeting was to review the activities of the Nuclear Data Section (NDS) covering the period 2002-2003, to evaluate the NDS program of work for the two-year period of 2004-2005, and to advise on future activities (2006-2007). The presentations and deliberations in plenary and working group sessions led to many conclusions and recommendations which are given in the full report of the meeting. Conclusions of particular significance have been: Specific nuclear data compilation activities undertaken by NDS are unique. INDC members appreciated that more attention is now being devoted to the compilation of charged-particle data for EXFOR. The Committee recommends to consider further improved methods or data storage and compilation for EXFOR. Furthermore, as a result of recent geopolitical changes, especially in Europe, the relevant IAEA and NEA responsibilities need to be slightly readjusted. The Committee took note that the data dissemination and international co-ordination of data exchange represent the most important components of NDS activities, and that improvement of services has always been the top priority. The co-ordination role of NDS for NRDC and NSDD is highly appreciated, and should be further strengthened. The Committee noted with satisfaction that the data dissemination services of NDS are utilized by scientists working in all parts of the world. These requests pertain to data for all branches of nuclear applications. INDC members appreciated that continued efforts are underway in the NDS to update the general purpose libraries. The Committee finds it important that the NDS continues to maintain and update the photonuclear, RIPL, cross-section standards and FENDL-2 libraries (considering that the latter is the Reference Library for the ITER project). The Committee members briefly described on-going nuclear data projects in their countries/regions, and also spelt out nuclear data requirements in various fields. While most of these needs are

  20. IAEA nuclear security program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ek, D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  1. IAEA nuclear security program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, D.

    2006-01-01

    Although nuclear security is a State responsibility, it is nevertheless an international concern, as the consequences of a nuclear security incident would have worldwide impact. These concerns have resulted in the development of numerous international instruments on nuclear security since the terrorist events in the USA on September 11, 2001. The IAEA Office of Nuclear Security has been charged to assist Member States to improvement their nuclear security and to meet the intent of these international obligations in order to ensure a cohesive thread of nuclear security protects the global community. The programs underway and planned by the Office of Nuclear Security will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  2. IAEA at a glance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    1997-12-01

    The publication briefly describes the 'peaceful universe' and the work carries out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), UN organisation responsible for accelerating and enlarging the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The following subjects are presented: Ensuring safe nuclear energy; Protecting against radiation risks; Safeguarding nuclear materials; Assisting developing countries; Nuclear Technologies solving problems; Providing information and technical services

  3. IAEA at a glance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinley, D III

    1997-12-01

    The publication briefly describes the `peaceful universe` and the work carries out by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), UN organisation responsible for accelerating and enlarging the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. The following subjects are presented: Ensuring safe nuclear energy; Protecting against radiation risks; Safeguarding nuclear materials; Assisting developing countries; Nuclear Technologies solving problems; Providing information and technical services

  4. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period 1995/1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oblozinsky, P

    1997-07-01

    This progress report describes the activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in the years 1995 and 1996, including staff and budget, the operation of the Nuclear Data Center, the computer operations, the coordination activities of the Nuclear Data Center Networks, the nuclear data improvements projects, Technical Cooperation and technology transfer, atomic and molecular data activities, and the meetings held in the reporting period. (author). 3 figs, 10 tabs.

  5. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1999-04-01

    This progress report describes the activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in the years 1997 and 1998. The report provides information on the staff and budget, activities of the Nuclear Data Centre, co-ordination of the Nuclear Data Centre Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, computer support, and atomic and molecular data activities. This is complemented by additional information, including meetings, publications and new products that illustrate activities in the reported period. (author)

  6. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period 1995/1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oblozinsky, P.

    1997-07-01

    This progress report describes the activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in the years 1995 and 1996, including staff and budget, the operation of the Nuclear Data Center, the computer operations, the coordination activities of the Nuclear Data Center Networks, the nuclear data improvements projects, Technical Cooperation and technology transfer, atomic and molecular data activities, and the meetings held in the reporting period. (author). 3 figs, 10 tabs

  7. Report on the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January - December 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lone, M.A.; Muir, D.W.

    2000-07-01

    This report describes the activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section in 1999. It provides information on the staff and budget, activities of the Nuclear Data Center, coordination of the Nuclear Data Center Networks, nuclear data development projects, technology transfer, computer support, and atomic and molecular data activities. This is complemented by additional information on activities in the reporting period, including meetings, publications and new data products. (author)

  8. IAEA programme on nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a brief description and the main objectives of IAEA Programme B on Nuclear fuel cycle are given. The coordinated research project on Improvement of Models Used For Fuel Behaviour Simulation (FUMEX II) as well as the changes, trends and main outputs of Sub-programme B.2 for 2006/2007 are discussed. The aim, composition and activities within the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) Database project are also presented

  9. Co-ordination of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators. Summary report of an IAEA technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L; Tuli, J K [International Atomic Energy Agency, Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-09-15

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the 16th meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, 6-10 June 2005. This meeting was attended by 33 scientists from 12 Member States concerned with the compilation, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, recommendations/conclusions, data centre reports, and various proposals considered, modified and agreed by the participants are contained within this document. (author)

  10. Nuclear information: An overview of IAEA's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesi, I.H.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    As stated in this overview of IAEA nuclear information activities the Agency's role in information services is rapidly evolving and multifaceted. The Agency maintains more than 200 computerized files of information. Some 60 of these are part of systems directly related to nuclear activities. Some of these are briefly profiled in this overview such as INIS, the IAEA Nuclear Data Programme, the IAEA Incident Reporting System, the IAEA Energy and Economic Databank, the IAEA Power Reactor Information System, the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System, and the International Uranium Geology Information System. Future directions are pointed out. Different ways to upgrade information systems are listed

  11. The IAEA at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-03-01

    Fifty years ago, Dwight Eisenhower stood before the United Nations to offer both a warning and a vision. The knowledge to build an atomic bomb was in the hands of rival powers and would soon be shared by many countries, the President said. It was time to create a U.N. body that could ensure that the new technology served no military purpose. It was time, moreover, to 'devise methods whereby this fissionable material would be allocated to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind' in agriculture, medicine and other peaceful activities. Eisenhower foresaw a world safe from the destructive power of atomic fission but gaining from its technological advances. Half a century later, the world continues to witness his foresight through the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The IAEA aims at four formidable goals: safeguarding nuclear nonproliferation; enhancing the security of nuclear facilities and radioactive materials; ensuring the safety of nuclear technologies; and promoting nuclear science to meet human needs. As the world's 'nuclear watchdog,' the IAEA's impartial inspectorate verifies the peaceful uses of nuclear energy in scores of countries. By joining the Agency's strengthened safeguards system and concluding an Additional Protocol, countries can assure the world-and the IAEA can verify-that their nuclear activities are not used for weapons purposes. True to Eisenhower's vision, the power of the atom is being tapped for many human benefits, especially in the world's less developed nations. Extreme poverty remains a profound problem today: some 1.2 billion people in the developing world survive marginally on less that US$1 per day. Another 2.8 billion struggle on less than US$2 per day. The IAEA is mobilizing nuclear science to help address these pressing needs. From managing water better, to controlling pests and diseases, to protecting the environment, the IAEA is helping poor countries make sizeable advances. At the same time, the IAEA works

  12. Databases

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    Information on bibliographic as well as numeric/textual databases relevant to coastal geomorphology has been included in a tabular form. Databases cover a broad spectrum of related subjects like coastal environment and population aspects, coastline...

  13. Training tissue bank operators: the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)/National University of Singapore (NUS) 10 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nather, A; Phillips, G O; Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Lee, Chris C W

    2009-05-01

    National University of Singapore (NUS) was appointed by IAEA to become IAEA/NUS Regional Training Centre (RTC) for Asia and the Pacific region in September 1996. The Government of Singapore (represented by the Ministry of Environment) with the National Science and Technology Board as the funding agency awarded a grant of S$225,500 to build a new purpose-built tissue bank to be the Regional Training Centre. National University Hospital provided a space of 2,000 square feet for this purpose. The first Diploma Course was launched on 3 November 1997 with 17 candidates with the first NUS Diploma Examination being held in October 1998. Between November 1997 and April 2007, a total of nine courses were conducted by RTC with a total of 180 tissue bank operators, 133 from Asia and the Pacific region (13 countries including 2 from Iran), 14 from Africa (Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Egypt, South Africa and Zambia), 6 from Latin America (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru and Uruguay), 9 from Europe (Greece, Slovakia, Poland, Ukraine) and 2 from Australia. The last batch (ninth batch) involved twenty students registered in April 2007 and will be due to sit for the terminal examination only in April 2008.

  14. ICCS 2009 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the ICCS 2009 Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brese, Falk; Jung, Michael; Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Schulz, Wolfram; Zuehlke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This document presents Supplement 1 of "The International Civic and Citizenship Education Study (ICCS) 2009 International Database," which includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the ICCS 2009 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the ICCS 2009 questionnaires in the following seven…

  15. IAEA To Launch Centre On Ocean Acidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    activities which are not currently funded at national or international levels. The centre's role will be to facilitate, promote and communicate these activities related to global actions on ocean acidification, including international observation, joint platforms and facilities, collaboration between natural and social sciences, exchange of students and scientists, joint experiments, definition of best practices, open-access bibliographic database, data management, capacity building and dissemination. (IAEA)

  16. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2012 – December 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Noy, Roberto; Forrest, Robin A.

    2014-04-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) during 2012 and 2013, and is provided as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). NDS staff and affiliated consultants have focused their work on analysing and fulfilling data development needs and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. The present information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data projects are presented to the INDC for information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  17. Report of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section to the International Nuclear Data Committee for the period January 2014 – December 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, Arjan J.; Capote Noy, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    This report contains details of the main activities of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section (NDS) during 2014 and 2015, and is provided as information to the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC). NDS staff and affiliated consultants have focused their work on analysing and fulfilling data development needs and ensuring adequate, trouble-free services to all users in Member States. The present information is complemented with descriptions of other related activities in the reporting period, including meetings and publications. The atomic and molecular data projects are presented to the INDC for information only, since these specific activities are reviewed in depth by the Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion Subcommittee of the International Fusion Research Council. (author)

  18. Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Ryan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Databases are deeply embedded in archaeology, underpinning and supporting many aspects of the subject. However, as well as providing a means for storing, retrieving and modifying data, databases themselves must be a result of a detailed analysis and design process. This article looks at this process, and shows how the characteristics of data models affect the process of database design and implementation. The impact of the Internet on the development of databases is examined, and the article concludes with a discussion of a range of issues associated with the recording and management of archaeological data.

  19. An International Peer Review of the Safety Options Dossier of the Project for Disposal of Radioactive Waste in Deep Geological Formations (Cigéo). Final Report of the IAEA International Review Team November 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-07-01

    The French Nuclear Safety Authority (Autorité de sûreté nucléaire, ASN) is preparing the evaluation of a licence application for the creation of a deep geological disposal facility in 2018, called Cigéo, for intermediate level, high level and long lived radioactive waste. This licence is preceded by the submission of a Safety Options Dossier to ASN, which provides the French National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Agence nationale pour la gestion des déchets radioactifs, Andra) the possibility to receive advice from ASN on the preparation of the licence application on the safety principles and approach. The Safety Options Dossier sets out the chosen objectives, concepts and principles for ensuring the safety of the facility. ASN requested the IAEA to organize an international peer review of the Safety Options Dossier. This publication presents the consensus view of the international group of experts convened by the IAEA to conduct the review against the relevant IAEA safety standards and proven international practice and experience. The experts acted in a personal capacity and the views expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the IAEA, the governments of the nominating Member States or the nominating organizations. The basis of this peer review is the set of documents provided by Andra, as the agency responsible for the development of the Cigéo project and for its safety. Consequently, the findings of the reviews are addressed directly to Andra. This publication, however, is primarily submitted to ASN to review the outcomes of the Andra project.

  20. TEDS-M 2008 User Guide for the International Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brese, Falk, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Teacher Education Study in Mathematics or TEDS-M is a study conducted under the aegis of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA). The lead research center for the study is the International Study Center at Michigan State University (ISC/MSU). The ISC/MSU worked from 2006 to 2011 with the International…

  1. A report on the IAEA co-ordinated research programme on the Application of Isotopic Correlation Techniques to international safeguards 1975-1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanatani, S.

    1983-01-01

    A co-ordinated research programme on the Application of Isotopic Correlation Techniques (ICT) to International Safeguards has just ended in the Agency. During the continuation of the programme, scientists from Belgium, Japan, France, United Kingdom, United States and Euratom, engaged in the development of ICT, met periodically to discuss the results obtained by them from both theoretical and experimental investigations. The paper describes the main features of the alternative approaches developed at participating laboratories as well as procedures developed at the IAEA. At the conclusion of the programme, there was an unanimous recommendation from the participants that ICT is a useful tool for verification of input analysis at a chemical reprocessing plant. After the closure of the co-ordinated research programme, the IAEA is now applying data evaluation procedures developed at the Agency and keeping in contact with the progress of work on ICT carried on in laboratories such as JAERI (Japan), CEA (France) and Euratom, through support programmes and through participation in the ESARDA working group dealing with ICT

  2. IAEA meeting: International conference of national regulatory authorities with competence in the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englefield, Chris [UK INTERPOL Environmental Crime (Radioactive Substances) Sub-Group, Environment Agency (United Kingdom)

    2001-06-01

    The meeting was the outcome of one of the actions arising from an IAEA sponsored meeting held in Dijon in 1998 on these issues. The action plan included inter alia the production of a 'Code of Conduct' (published December 2000), the production of a scheme for the 'Categorisation of Sources' (published December 2000) and a meeting to share experience and knowledge about the issues of illicit or inadvertent movements of radioactive materials across international borders. This was the major focus of the meeting held in Buenos Aires. The meeting was attended by 130 delegates representing 70 countries, the EU and the IAEA. This means that over half of the 131 IAEA Member States were present, a measure of the level of significance that is attached to the initiating issue of 'illicit trafficking'.The meeting was chaired by Dan Beninson (Argentina) and the Technical Secretariat was led by Alfonso Bilbao of IAEA. I attended as the UK delegate, in my capacity as Chairman of the UK INTERPOL Environmental Crime (Radioactive Substances) Sub-Group. The national papers were so numerous that it is not practicable to try to summarise them all here. However, a general impression will be given. The majority of papers submitted explained the regulatory structures extant in the speakers' home countries. It was useful to understand the level of development of regulatory arrangements in the Member States represented. These ranged from the highly developed such as those of EU Member States, the US and some South American states, to the very simple. In some cases, speakers frankly admitted that regulatory systems were virtually non-existent, but that as IAEA Members, their countries were ready and willing to improve their arrangements, with the assistance of IAEA . Some general conclusions may be derived: (i) A personal view is that IAEA and Member States have not clarified their risk assessment thinking: as RP practitioners we tend to concentrate on

  3. IAEA and food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machi, Sueo

    1995-01-01

    IAEA was founded in 1957. 122 countries take part in it. It is operated with the yearly ordinary budget of about 20 billion yen and the technical cooperation budget of about 6 billion yen and by 2200 personnel. Its two important roles are the promotion of the peaceful utilization of atomic energy and the prevention of nuclear proliferation. The activities of IAEA are shown. The cooperation with developing countries and the international research cooperation program are the important activities. The securing of foods is an urgent subject, and the utilization of radiation and isotopes has been promoted, aiming at sustaining agriculture. The necessity of food irradiation is explained, and at present, commercial food irradiation is carried out in 28 countries including Japan. The irradiation less than 10 kGy does not cause poisonous effect in any food, according to JECFI. The new international agreement is expected to be useful for promoting the international trade of irradiated foods. The international cooperation for the spread of food irradiation and the public acceptance of food irradiation are reported. (K.I.)

  4. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamero, Emma Castro; Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2009-05-01

    The tissue bank "Rosa Guerzoni Chambergo" (RGCTB) located at the Child's Health Institute was inaugurated in 1996, with the financial and technical support of the IAEA program on radiation and tissue banking. Since 1998, the biological bandage of fresh and lyophilised pigskin, amnion and bone tissue is processed routinely in this bank. In all cases, the tissue is sterilised with the use of Cobalt-60 radiation, process carried out at the Laboratories of Irradiation of the Peruvian Institute of Nuclear Energy (IPEN). The tissue bank in the Child's Health Institute helped to save lives in an accident occurred in Lima, when a New Year's fireworks celebration ran out of control in January 2002. Nearly 300 people died in the tragic blaze and hundreds more were seriously burned and injured. Eight Lima hospitals and clinics suddenly were faced with saving the lives of severely burned men, women and children. Fortunately, authorities were ready to respond to the emergency. More than 1,600 dressings were sterilised and supplied to Lima surgeons. The efforts helped save the lives of patients who otherwise might not have survived the Lima fire. Between 1998 and September 2007, 35,012 tissue grafts were produced and irradiated. Radiation sterilised tissues are used by 20 national medical institutions as well as 17 private health institutions. The tissue bank established in Peru with the support of the IAEA is now producing the following tissues: pigskin dressings, fresh and freeze-dried; bone allografts, chips, wedges and powdered, and amnion dressings air-dried. It is also now leading the elaboration of national standards, assignment being entrusted by ONDT (Organización Nacional de Donación y Transplantes; National Organisation on Donation and Transplant). This among other will permit the accreditation of the tissue bank. In this task is also participating IPEN.

  5. Quality assurance for nuclear power plants. Proceedings of an international symposium organized by the IAEA and held in Paris, 11-15 May 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The International Symposium on Quality Assurance for Nuclear Power Plants, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, was held in Paris from 11 to 15 May 1981. The main objectives of the symposium were the following: (1) To review the present requirements and practices in implementing quality assurance (QA) in nuclear power projects in Member States; (2) To identify the existing similarities and differences and to highlight those aspects of QA in Member States which are controversial and in need of harmonization; (3) To assess the practical use of the established requirements and recommendations of the IAEA Code of Practice on Quality Assurance for Safety in Nuclear Power Plants and the relevant Safety Guides. Because of the interdisciplinary nature of QA and the rather broad scope of its activities, only seven topics of QA were selected for review and discussion. They included, besides a general comparison of QA requirements and practices in IAEA Member States, methodologies for the selection of appropriate QA programme levels for specific items and services; the role of independent inspection in verification activities; economic aspects of QA; manpower requirements for QA in nuclear power projects; training, qualification and certification of QA personnel; and specific aspects of the implementation of QA in countries embarking on nuclear power projects. Each of these topics was treated in a separate session. These Proceedings include the full text of all invited papers and of a large part of the contributed papers. The contributed papers that are not published in full are represented by abstracts in the session summaries. The summaries of the sessions as prepared by the working groups appear at the end of the appropriate sessions. The holding of an international symposium on quality assurance appeared well timed. The importance of QA in the nuclear industry is constantly growing with the increasing requirements for safety and availability of nuclear

  6. IAEA activities on steam generator life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueorguiev, B.; Lyssakov, V.; Trampus, P.

    2002-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) carries out a set of activities in the field of Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) life management. Main activities within this area are implemented through the Technical Working Group on Life Management of NPPs, and mostly concentrated on studies of understanding mechanisms of degradation and their monitoring, optimisation of maintenance management, economic aspects, proven practices of and approaches to plant life management including decommissioning. The paper covers two ongoing activities related to steam generator life management: the International Database on NPP Steam Generators and the Co-ordinated Research Project on Verification of WWER Steam Generator Tube Integrity (WWER is the Russian designed PWR). The lifetime assessment of main components relies on an ability to assess their condition and predict future degradation trends, which to a large extent is dependent on the availability of relevant data. Effective management of ageing and degradation processes requires a large amount of data. Several years ago the IAEA started to work on the International Database on NPP Life Management. This is a multi-module database consisting of modules such as reactor pressure vessels materials, piping, steam generators, and concrete structures. At present the work on pressure vessel materials, on piping as well as on steam generator is completed. The paper will present the concept and structure of the steam generator module of the database. In countries operating WWER NPPs, there are big differences in the eddy current inspection strategy and practice as well as in the approach to steam generator heat exchanger tube structural integrity assessment. Responding to the need for a co-ordinated research to compare eddy current testing results with destructive testing using pulled out tubes from WWER steam generators, the IAEA launched this project. The main objectives of the project are to summarise the operating experiences of WWER

  7. Making a real difference: Working for the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) offers challenging assignments and provides a stimulating multicultural environment for people who are interested in international work experience in a specific area of expertise. This brochure provides general information on the possibilities for employment as a Professional staff member of the IAEA and other information which may be useful to persons interested in joining the IAEA's Professional staff.

  8. IAEA-MEL's contribution to the investigation of the Kara Sea dumping sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osvath, I.; Ballestra, S.; Baxter, M.S.; Gastaud, J.; Hamilton, T.; Harms, I.; Liong Wee Kwong, L.; Parsi, P.; Povinec, P.P.

    1995-01-01

    Since 1992 the International Atomic Energy Agency's Marine Environment Laboratory (IAEA-MEL) has participated in the international programmes devoted to assessment of the environmental and radiological consequences of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the Arctic Seas. Upon invitation from the Russian and Norwegian authorities IAEA-MEL has collaborated in the Scientific work of the international expert groups on board five investigatory cruises to the Kara and Barents Seas and to the site of the sunken Komsomolets submarine. In-situ underwater γ-spectrometric measurements and laboratory-based analytical work on samples collected during these expeditions have been carried out. IAEA-MEL activities also include organisation of intercomparison exercises for radionuclides in sediment, seawater and biota from the Barents and Kara Seas, provision of a global marine radioactivity database facility including a comprehensive Arctic section, radiometric methodological developments, modelling of radionuclide dispersal on local, regional and global scales and dose assessment. 8 refs., 3 figs

  9. The activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) in 1994 and plans for 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the IAEA's International Working Group on Life Management of Nuclear Power Plants (IWG-LMNPP) is to provide the Member States with information and guidance on design aspects, material selection, testing, maintenance, monitoring and mitigation of degradation related to major components with the aim to assure high availability and safe operation of NPPs. Technical documents and reports on proceedings of specialists meetings on many of these topics have been produced or are in preparation. Coordination of research aimed at understanding the phenomena which occur and the consequent degradation mechanisms is an extensive field of the IWG-LMNPP activities. Radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels has been a major subject of concern. Thermal degradation, corrosion and fatigue are also considered to be very significant. In the monitoring field, non-destructive examination techniques and fracture mechanics are areas included in the IWG-LMNPP plans

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) research program to improve safety assessment methodologies for near-surface radioactive waste disposal facilities (ISAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres-Vidal, C.; Kozak, M.W.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) launched a Coordinated Research Program in November 1997 on Improvement of Safety Assessment Methodologies for Near Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities (ISAM). The purpose of this paper is to describe the program and its goals, and to describe achievements of the program to date. The main objectives of the ISAM program are outlined. The primary focus of ISAM is on the practical application of safety assessment methodologies. Three kinds of practical situations are being addressed in the program: safety assessments for large vaults typical of those in Western Europe and North America, smaller vaults for medium and industrial wastes typical in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, and a proposed borehole technology for disposal of spent sources in low-technology conditions. (author)

  11. Man as a safety element in the operation of a nuclear power plant. IAEA international conference on man-machine interface in the nuclear industry - review paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegame, R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear power generation has been steadily developing worldwide and is now playing a very important part in total energy supply. In order to further promote nuclear power generation harmoniously, it is essential to secure the trust of the public by keeping safe and stable operation and to make constant efforts not to repeat such severe accidents as TMI and Chernobyl. These two accidents have caused us to recognize the substantial importance of the Man-Machine interface. With this as a background, the International Conference on the Man-Machine Interface in the Nuclear Industry was held in Tokyo for four days from February 15 th 1988, organized by IAEA and in cooperation with OECD/NEA as well as CEC. I would like to review this conference, for which I was the Vice Chairman of the Japanese Organizing Committee, and to explain my opinion about this issue

  12. Development of radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Li; Xu Cuihua; Li Wenhong; Su Xu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To develop a radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergencies. Methods: By researching the radionuclides composition discharged from different nuclear emergencies, the radionuclide parameters were achieved on physical decay, absorption and metabolism in the body from ICRP publications and some other publications. The database on internal contamination for nuclear incidents was developed by using MS Visual Studio 2005 C and MS Access programming language. Results: The radionuclide parameter database on internal contamination in nuclear emergency was established. Conclusions: The database may be very convenient for searching radionuclides and radionuclide parameter data discharged from different nuclear emergencies, which would be helpful to the monitoring and assessment and assessment of internal contamination in nuclear emergencies. (authors)

  13. INIS: international nuclear information system. World first international database on pacific uses of nuclear sciences and technologies; INIS: International Nuclear Information System. Premiere base de donnees internationale sur les applications pacifiques des sciences et technologies nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surmont, J.; Constant, A.; Guille, N.; Le Blanc, A.; Mouffron, O.; Anguise, P.; Jouve, J.J

    2007-07-01

    This poster, prepared for the 2007 CEA meetings on scientific and technical information, presents the INIS information system, the document-types content and subject coverage of the database, the French contribution to this system thanks to the INIS team of the CEA-Saclay, the input preparation process, and an example of valorization of a scientific and historical patrimony with the CEA/IAEA joint project of digitization of about 2760 CEA reports published between 1948 and 1969. All these reports have been digitized by the IAEA and analyzed by CEA, and entered in the INIS database with a link to the full text. (J.S.)

  14. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 14, no. 1(82). Jan-Feb 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: 2000 Budget Goes Before IAEA Board of Governors, IAEA, Inspectors Relocated from Iraq, Review Meeting of Nuclear Safety Convention Set in April, Statements of IAEA Director General, The IAEA and Y2K Issues: Clearinghouse and Contact Point, Strengthened Safeguards System: Status of Additional Protocols, More States Join International Conventions in Nuclear Fields, IAEA International Scientific Symposia and Seminars in 1999, New IAEA Books, and othe short information

  15. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the TIMSS 2011 Background and Curriculum Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The TIMSS 2011 International Database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the TIMSS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 10 sections: (1) Fourth Grade Student Questionnaire; (2) Fourth Grade Home…

  16. TEDS-M 2008 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the TEDS-M Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brese, Falk, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Teacher Education Study in Mathematics (TEDS-M) International Database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the TEDS-M study. These consisted of questionnaires administered to future teachers, educators, and institutions with teacher preparation programs. This supplement contains the international version of the TEDS-M…

  17. Lessons Learned From Developing Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel Embrittlement Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

    2010-08-01

    Materials behaviors caused by neutron irradiation under fission and/or fusion environments can be little understood without practical examination. Easily accessible material information system with large material database using effective computers is necessary for design of nuclear materials and analyses or simulations of the phenomena. The developed Embrittlement Data Base (EDB) at ORNL is this comprehensive collection of data. EDB database contains power reactor pressure vessel surveillance data, the material test reactor data, foreign reactor data (through bilateral agreements authorized by NRC), and the fracture toughness data. The lessons learned from building EDB program and the associated database management activity regarding Material Database Design Methodology, Architecture and the Embedded QA Protocol are described in this report. The development of IAEA International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials (IDRPVM) and the comparison of EDB database and IAEA IDRPVM database are provided in the report. The recommended database QA protocol and database infrastructure are also stated in the report.

  18. An international overview of database on R and D techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, S.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: At the early stage of decommissioning activities regarding relatively small nuclear facilities, various techniques for the decommissioning and dismantling (D and D) process had been developed to be applied to D and D projects in 1980's. It was then confirmed that the present techniques are available for decommissioning nuclear facilities by demonstrating successful completion of the projects. However, improvement of the present techniques is necessary for efficient adaptation to D and D process in cost efficient and safe manner when decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities with large scale and higher level contamination. By the review of present status of D and D projects and decommissioning strategies, it was cleared that cost saving is one of important aspect in the D and D projects. From technical points of view in efficiency, techniques such as laser beam cutting, automated remote control of devices and computer simulation are expected to be useful tools for future use in cost saving process. In addition, techniques should be properly applied to D and D projects within wide range of areas such as dismantling and decontamination process, project planning, waste management, communication with regulatory body and public, safety evaluation and environmental impacts. To cope with overall D and D activities, it might be necessary to make continuous efforts to improve the techniques and construct database for evaluation from wide range of views of D and D projects. (author)

  19. IAEA yearbook 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The IAEA Yearbook 1991 contains the following 6 chapters: Transfer of Nuclear Technology; Applications of Nuclear Techniques and Research (Also published separately as Part B of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management (Also published separately as Part C of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); Nuclear Safety Review (Also published separately as Part D of the IAEA Yearbook 1991); IAEA Safeguards; The IAEA (operating framework and functions). A separate abstract and indexing was provided for each chapter. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Experience within international transport and direct rail services in meeting the IAEA requirement for a radiation protection programme(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billing, D.

    2003-01-01

    BNFL International Transport and Direct Rail Services have successfully developed appropriate Radiation Protection Programmes for their business. The business supports BNFL's worldwide Nuclear Fuel Services with key customer bases in Europe, Japan and the UK, utilising marine, rail and road modal transports. Experience in this business spans over 4 decades. The preparation of RPP's for each aspect of its operations has been made relatively straight forward in that the key elements within the internationally recognised model RPP (by WNTI) were already in place in BNFL's procedures to satisfy current National UK and International Regulations and supported by Management systems which comply with International Standards for Quality Assurance. (author)

  1. The Reuse of Decommissioned Facilities and Sites as an Emerging Means to Alleviate the Decommissioning Burden and its Potential Applications within IAEA's International Decommissioning Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2009-01-01

    Around the world, but particularly in developing Member States, there are disused nuclear facilities or those approaching the end of their useful lives, for which appropriate decommissioning steps have not been taken, primarily due to limited technical and financial resources or competing priorities. One way of alleviating the financial and social burden associated with the final shutdown and decommissioning of nuclear facilities is the redevelopment of decommissioned facilities and sites for new, productive uses, either nuclear or non-nuclear. Sustainable development implies economic development with maintenance of social and community integrity. This objective can best be served by the sensitive redevelopment of sites to provide continuity of employment and new productive activity. Finally, experience to date with redevelopment both inside and outside the nuclear field suggests that successful engagement of the stakeholders can be a key success factor in promoting outcomes which are both profitable for the operator and recognised as responsible and worthwhile by the wider community. Following a generic discussion on factors and issues inherent to the re-development of decommissioned sites, this paper expands on several examples. It is noted that experience from the non-nuclear industrial sector is much more extensive than from the nuclear sector, and lessons from this sector should not be neglected. Many of world's nuclear facilities are small and widely distributed geographically, e.g. ∼300 aging or shut-down research reactors. Requests for assistance to address this issue from Member States exceed the capability of IAEA (and others) to deliver. However, integrating individual initiative into a designed-for-purpose network may compensate for these limitations. A new IAEA initiative amongst organizations from both potential 'donor' and 'recipient' Member States has taken the form of an 'International Decommissioning Network (IDN)'. The objectives of the IDN are

  2. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): study on opportunities and challenges of large-scale nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshev, M.; Subbotin, S.

    2006-01-01

    Existing scenarios for global energy use project that demand will at least double over the next 50 years. Electricity demand is projected to grow even faster. These scenarios suggest that the use of all available generating options, including nuclear energy, will inevitably be required to meet those demands. If nuclear energy is to play a meaningful role in the global energy supply in the foreseeable future, innovative approaches will be required to address concerns about economic competitiveness, environment, safety, waste management, potential proliferation risks and necessary infrastructure. In the event of a renaissance of nuclear energy, adequate infrastructure development will become crucial for Member States considering the future use of nuclear power. The IAEA should be ready to provide assistance in this area. A special resolution was adopted by the General Conference in September 2005 on 'Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications: Approaches to Supporting Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development'. Previously, in 2000, taking into account future energy scenarios and the needs of Member States, the IAEA General Conference had adopted a resolution initiating the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Based on scenarios for the next fifty years, INPRO identified requirements for different aspects of future nuclear energy systems, such as economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and infrastructure and developed a methodology to assess innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles. Using this assessment tool, the need for innovations in nuclear technology can be defined, which can be achieved through research, development and demonstration (RD and D). INPRO developed these requirements during its first stage, Phase 1A, which lasted from 2001 to mid-2003. In the second stage, Phase 1B (first part), INPRO organized 14 case studies (8 by

  3. USING THE INTERNATIONAL SCIENTOMETRIC DATABASES OF OPEN ACCESS IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Galchevska

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article the problem of the use of international scientometric databases in research activities as web-oriented resources and services that are the means of publication and dissemination of research results is considered. Selection criteria of scientometric platforms of open access in conducting scientific researches (coverage Ukrainian scientific periodicals and publications, data accuracy, general characteristics of international scientometrics database, technical, functional characteristics and their indexes are emphasized. The review of the most popular scientometric databases of open access Google Scholar, Russian Scientific Citation Index (RSCI, Scholarometer, Index Copernicus (IC, Microsoft Academic Search is made. Advantages of usage of International Scientometrics database Google Scholar in conducting scientific researches and prospects of research that are in the separation of cloud information and analytical services of the system are determined.

  4. The nuclear techniques and IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2006-01-01

    The International atomic energy agency (IAEA) and its member states help hundred of development projects using nuclear science and technology. Specialists are sent in centers and research laboratories as counselors or speaker, activities of collective and personal training are organised with national institutes, material is supplied for research works or technical projects executed locally. (N.C.)

  5. GEOSAF Part II. Demonstration of the operational and long-term safety of geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste. IAEA international intercomparison and harmonization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Yumiko; Bruno, Gerard [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Vienna International Centre; Tichauer, Michael [IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hedberg, Bengt [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    International intercomparison and harmonization projects are one of the mechanisms developed by the IAEA for examining the application and use of safety standards, with a view to ensuring their effectiveness and working towards harmonization of approaches to the safety of radioactive waste management. The IAEA has organized a number of international projects on the safety of radioactive waste management; in particular on the issues related to safety demonstration for radioactive waste management facilities. In 2008, GEOSAF, Demonstration of The Operational and Long-Term Safety of Geological Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste, project was initiated. This project was completed in 2011 by delivering a project report focusing on the safety case for geological disposal facilities, a concept that has gained in recent years considerable prominence in the waste management area and is addressed in several international safety standards. During the course of the project, it was recognized that little work was undertaken internationally to develop a common view on the safety approach related to the operational phase of a geological disposal although long-term safety of disposal facility has been discussed for several decades. Upon completion of the first part of the GEOSAF project, it was decided to commence a follow-up project aiming at harmonizing approaches on the safety of geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste through the development of an integrated safety case covering both operational and long-term safety. The new project was named as GEOSAF Part II, which was initiated in 2012 initially as 2-year project, involving regulators and operators. GEOSAF Part II provides a forum to exchange ideas and experience on the development and review of an integrated operational and post-closure safety case for geological disposal facilities. It also aims at providing a platform for knowledge transfer. The project is of particular interest to regulatory

  6. The impact of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program on radiation and tissue banking in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pardo, María Esther; Morales Pedraza, Jorge; Sánchez Ramírez, Omar

    2009-05-01

    Tissue banking started in Mexico in 1948-1949, when two bone banks were established, one at the Infantile Hospital of Mexico and other at the Central Military Hospital. Mexico has benefited for the implementation of the IAEA program since through it has been able to settle down and to consolidate the Tissue Bank at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares ININ (National Institute for Nuclear Research). This is the only bank in Latin America that has a Quality Management System in force, certified under ISO 9001:2000 since August 1, 2003. The first tissue processed was amnion. The main products of the BTR are amnion and pig skin. Both are biological tissues which their main use is as a wound dressing in patients with burns, scars, diabetic ulcers, epidermolysis bullosa, damaged ocular surface, etc. The General Health Law, published in 1984 and reformed in June 19, 2007, describes the procedure for the disposal of organs, tissues and human cadavers in its fourteenth title and in the Regulation for Sanitary Control. During the period 2001-2005, the ININ Tissue Bank produced 292 sterilised tissues (amnion, 86,668 cm(2), and frozen pig skin, 164,220 cm(2), at an estimated cost of 1,012,668 Mexican pesos. Until 2006, one hundred eighty five (185) patients have been treated with the use of sterilised tissues produced by the ININ Tissue Bank. The radiation source used for sterilisation of tissues is an industrial Cobalt-60 irradiator model JS-6500 AECL, which belongs to ININ. This equipment is located in other building, close to the BTR, in the Centro Nuclear de México "Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores" (Nuclear Center of Mexico). Until 2006, six hospitals use in a routine way the sterilised tissues produced by the ININ Tissue Bank, for the treatment of burns originated by diverse agents like flame, electricity, liquids in boil, chemical reagents, as well as for the reconstruction of the ocular surface. Two of these hospitals treat patients of very low economic

  7. IAEA's role in nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamis, I.; )

    2010-01-01

    Currently, several Member States have shown interest in the utilization of the nuclear energy for seawater desalination not only because recent studies have demonstrated that nuclear desalination is feasible, but also economical and has been already demonstrated in several countries. Therefore, the article will provide a highlight on sea water desalination using nuclear energy as a potential for a sustainable development around the world and the IAEA role in this regards. Special emphasis is placed on past, present, and future nuclear desalination experience in various IAEA Member States. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) role could be summarized in facilitating cutting-edge developments in the area of seawater desalination using nuclear energy, and establishing a framework for facilitating activities in Member States through information exchange and provision of technical assistance. (author)

  8. FEPs and scenarios auditing of TVO-92 and TILA-96 against international FEP database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieno, T.; Nordman, H. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-01

    The NEA International Database of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) relevant to the assessment of post-closure safety of radioactive waste repositories has been compiled by a working group within the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD. The main parts of the database are a master list of 150 generalized FEPs and the original project-specific databases containing descriptions, comments and references on the FEPs. The first version of the database includes in total 1261 FEPs from seven national or international performance assessment projects. All project FEPs are mapped to one or more of the FEPs in the master list. The aim of the auditing was to discuss how the FEBs in the international database have been treated in the TVO-92 and TILA-96 safety assessments on spent fuel disposal (in Finland), where no formal methods were applied to develop scenarios. The auditing was made against all the 1261 projectspecific FEPs in the international database. The FEPs were discussed one by one and classified into categories according to their treatment in TVO-92 and TILA-96 or in the technical design of the disposal system. 37 refs.

  9. FEPs and scenarios auditing of TVO-92 and TILA-96 against international FEP database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Nordman, H.

    1997-12-01

    The NEA International Database of Features, Events and Processes (FEPs) relevant to the assessment of post-closure safety of radioactive waste repositories has been compiled by a working group within the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD. The main parts of the database are a master list of 150 generalized FEPs and the original project-specific databases containing descriptions, comments and references on the FEPs. The first version of the database includes in total 1261 FEPs from seven national or international performance assessment projects. All project FEPs are mapped to one or more of the FEPs in the master list. The aim of the auditing was to discuss how the FEBs in the international database have been treated in the TVO-92 and TILA-96 safety assessments on spent fuel disposal (in Finland), where no formal methods were applied to develop scenarios. The auditing was made against all the 1261 projectspecific FEPs in the international database. The FEPs were discussed one by one and classified into categories according to their treatment in TVO-92 and TILA-96 or in the technical design of the disposal system

  10. IAEA TECDOC 055 Outline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shull, Doug [Gregg Protection Services, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (United States)

    2015-07-13

    An outline of suggestions for updating a version of IAEA-TECDOC-1276 is provided. This update will become IAEA-TECDOC-055, titled ''IAEA handbook for designing and implementing physical protection systems for nuclear material and nuclear facilities.''

  11. IAEA safeguard system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontes, B.C.

    1987-01-01

    The intents of IAEA safeguards, analysing into the IAEA statutes, are presented. The different types of safeguard agreements; the measurements of accounting, containment and caution used by the operator and; the information to be provided and the verification to be developed by IAEA are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  12. Nuclear Power Plant Operating Experience from the IAEA/NEA International Reporting System for Operating Experience 2012-2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-03-01

    The International Reporting System for Operating Experience (IRS) is an essential element of the international operating experience feedback system for nuclear power plants. Its fundamental objective is to contribute to improving safety of commercial nuclear power plants which are operated worldwide. IRS reports contain information on events of safety significance with important lessons learned which assist in reducing recurrence of events at other plants. This sixth publication, covering the period 2012 - 2014, follows the structure of the previous editions. It highlights important lessons based on a review of the approximately 240 event reports received from the participating countries over this period.

  13. Maximizing the use of Special Olympics International's Healthy Athletes database: A call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meghann; Foley, John T; Temple, Viviene A

    2018-02-01

    There is a critical need for high-quality population-level data related to the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. For more than 15 years Special Olympics International has been conducting free Healthy Athletes screenings at local, national and international events. The Healthy Athletes database is the largest known international database specifically on the health of people with intellectual disabilities; however, it is relatively under-utilized by the research community. A consensus meeting with two dozen North American researchers, stakeholders, clinicians and policymakers took place in Toronto, Canada. The purpose of the meeting was to: 1) establish the perceived utility of the database, and 2) to identify and prioritize 3-5 specific priorities related to using the Healthy Athletes database to promote the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. There was unanimous agreement from the meeting participants that this database represents an immense opportunity both from the data already collected, and data that will be collected in the future. The 3 top priorities for the database were deemed to be: 1) establish the representativeness of data collected on Special Olympics athletes compared to the general population with intellectual disabilities, 2) create a scientific advisory group for Special Olympics International, and 3) use the data to improve Special Olympics programs around the world. The Special Olympics Healthy Athletes database includes data not found in any other source and should be used, in partnership with Special Olympics International, by researchers to significantly increase our knowledge and understanding of the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests: Integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The successful implementation of area-wide pest control programmes integrating the use of sterile insects with other control technologies against a number of key veterinary, medical and plant insect pests, such as various fruit flies, moths, screwworms, and tsetse species, clearly demonstrates a peaceful application of nuclear technology. Over the last 40 years, FAO and IAEA have played, and they will continue to play, a critical role in supporting their Member States in the development and application of these environment-friendly pest control methods. The concept of area-wide integrated pest management, in which the total population of a pest in an area or region is targeted, is central to the effective application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and is increasingly being considered for related genetic, biological and other pest control technologies. Insect movement, occurring sometimes over long distances, is generally underestimated. As a consequence, most conventional pest control can be described as localized, un-coordinated action against segments of a pest population, resulting very often in an unsustainable spiral of insecticide application and eventual resistance. However, an area-wide integrated approach adopts a preventive rather than a reactive tactic, whereby all individuals of the pest population are targeted, requiring fewer inputs and resulting in more cost effective and sustainable control. In June 1998 FAO and IAEA sponsored the First International Conference on Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and other Techniques in Penang, Malaysia with the participation of almost 300 participants from 63 Member States and 5 international organizations. This Conference greatly increased awareness concerning the area-wide approach for insect pest control programmes. Since then, many new technical innovations have been introduced and a better regulatory framework is being developed for integrating SIT

  15. FAO/IAEA international conference on area-wide control of insect pests: Integrating the sterile insect and related nuclear and other techniques. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The successful implementation of area-wide pest control programmes integrating the use of sterile insects with other control technologies against a number of key veterinary, medical and plant insect pests, such as various fruit flies, moths, screwworms, and tsetse species, clearly demonstrates a peaceful application of nuclear technology. Over the last 40 years, FAO and IAEA have played, and they will continue to play, a critical role in supporting their Member States in the development and application of these environment-friendly pest control methods. The concept of area-wide integrated pest management, in which the total population of a pest in an area or region is targeted, is central to the effective application of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) and is increasingly being considered for related genetic, biological and other pest control technologies. Insect movement, occurring sometimes over long distances, is generally underestimated. As a consequence, most conventional pest control can be described as localized, un-coordinated action against segments of a pest population, resulting very often in an unsustainable spiral of insecticide application and eventual resistance. However, an area-wide integrated approach adopts a preventive rather than a reactive tactic, whereby all individuals of the pest population are targeted, requiring fewer inputs and resulting in more cost effective and sustainable control. In June 1998 FAO and IAEA sponsored the First International Conference on Area-Wide Control of Insect Pests Integrating the Sterile Insect and Related Nuclear and other Techniques in Penang, Malaysia with the participation of almost 300 participants from 63 Member States and 5 international organizations. This Conference greatly increased awareness concerning the area-wide approach for insect pest control programmes. Since then, many new technical innovations have been introduced and a better regulatory framework is being developed for integrating SIT

  16. IAEA laboratory activities. The IAEA laboratories at Vienna and Seibersdorf, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity at Monaco, the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste, the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries, Cairo. 1st report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    Since 1958 the General Conferences of the International Atomic Energy Agency have discussed the establishment of scientific centres which would help the Agency to carry out its statutory functions. Subsequently, decisions were taken which have led to the foundation of two laboratories and the establishment under the Agency's auspices of an isotope centre. The plans for the setting up of the Agency's Laboratory Vienna - Seibersdorf were approved by the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency in April 1 959, and the agreement on the Marine Biological Project at Monaco came into force in March 1961. In March 1963 the Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab countries was opened. The first comprehensive report on the activities of the laboratories and the isotope centre is now published; it contains information on the development of the centres and their activities carried out in 1963. The Agency expresses its gratitude to the Governments of Austria, Monaco and the United Arab Republic for the generous assistance offered in connection with the establishment of the laboratories and the isotope centre

  17. Synthesis of the report from the IRRS evaluation mission performed at the ASN in April 2009 by 12 international experts under the IAEA coordination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    At the request of the Government authorities of France, an international team of 24 experts visited the Autorite de Surete Nucleaire (ASN), the French regulatory authority for nuclear and radiation safety, in November 2006 to conduct the first full scope Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission. The purpose of the mission was to undertake a peer review of the regulatory body of France against the IAEA Safety Standards and to exchange information and experience on safety regulation. In March 2008 the Government authorities of France requested a follow-up mission to review the measures undertaken following the recommendations and suggestions presented in the report of the November 2006 IRRS mission. The scope of the IRRS follow-up mission covered the regulatory aspects of the facilities and practices regulated by ASN, nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle facilities, medical practices with further review of radiotherapy, industrial and research activities, waste facilities, decommissioning, remediation, public information and communication and, in addition, it was also extended to cover the application of the Code of Conduct of Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources. The review was conducted from March 29 to April 3 2009 by an IRRS team consisting of 12 senior regulatory experts from 11 Member States, two staff members from the IAEA, one IAEA observer and an IAEA administrative assistant. During the review the team recognized that ASN has taken a number of initiatives to improve its effectiveness and efficiency and that ASN faces new challenges. ASN supplied a package of documentation and a well prepared self-assessment, in advance of the mission, including a status report and an action plan to improve its regulatory effectiveness. Both regulatory technical and policy issues were addressed. The policy issues discussed were: regulatory independence, the relationship between ASN and IRSN and medical issues. The IRRS follow-up mission

  18. The IAEA '97 Pacific Ocean expedition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Povinec, P.P.; Huynh-Ngoc, L.; Liong Wee Kwong, L.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's Marine Environment Laboratory (IAEA-MEL) started in 1995 a five-year project 'Research on World-wide Marine Radioactivity', generously supported by the Government of Japan. In the framework of the project, IAEA-MEL conducted the 'IAEA '97 Pacific Ocean Expedition' to the NW Pacific Ocean from 21 October to 20 November, 1997. The objectives of the expedition were to provide new data on the current marine radioactivity in order to compare them with data sets obtained during national and international surveys at sites used for radioactive waste dumping or nuclear bomb testing in the NW Pacific Ocean and its marginal seas

  19. The International Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Systems database – TIETHYS: A new NEA validation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, Upendra S.

    2018-07-22

    Nuclear reactor codes require validation with appropriate data representing the plant for specific scenarios. The thermal-hydraulic data is scattered in different locations and in different formats. Some of the data is in danger of being lost. A relational database is being developed to organize the international thermal hydraulic test data for various reactor concepts and different scenarios. At the reactor system level, that data is organized to include separate effect tests and integral effect tests for specific scenarios and corresponding phenomena. The database relies on the phenomena identification sections of expert developed PIRTs. The database will provide a summary of appropriate data, review of facility information, test description, instrumentation, references for the experimental data and some examples of application of the data for validation. The current database platform includes scenarios for PWR, BWR, VVER, and specific benchmarks for CFD modelling data and is to be expanded to include references for molten salt reactors. There are place holders for high temperature gas cooled reactors, CANDU and liquid metal reactors. This relational database is called The International Experimental Thermal Hydraulic Systems (TIETHYS) database and currently resides at Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the OECD and is freely open to public access. Going forward the database will be extended to include additional links and data as they become available. https://www.oecd-nea.org/tiethysweb/

  20. Discrete Optimization of Internal Part Structure via SLM Unit Structure-Performance Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural optimization of the internal structure of parts based on three-dimensional (3D printing has been recognized as being important in the field of mechanical design. The purpose of this paper is to present a creation of a unit structure-performance database based on the selective laser melting (SLM, which contains various structural units with different functions and records their structure and performance characteristics so that we can optimize the internal structure of parts directly, according to the database. The method of creating the unit structure-performance database was introduced in this paper and several structural units of the unit structure-performance database were introduced. The bow structure unit was used to show how to create the structure-performance database of the unit as an example. Some samples of the bow structure unit were designed and manufactured by SLM. These samples were tested in the WDW-100 compression testing machine to obtain their performance characteristics. After this, the paper collected all data regarding unit structure parameters, weight, performance characteristics, and other data; and, established a complete set of data from the bow structure unit for the unit structure-performance database. Furthermore, an aircraft part was reconstructed conveniently to be more lightweight according to the unit structure-performance database. Its weight was reduced by 36.8% when compared with the original structure, while the strength far exceeded the requirements.

  1. The dosimetry programme of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Describes the activities of the IAEA's Dosimetry Laboratory which provides calibration and comparison services for secondary standard dosimetry laboratories (SSDLs) of Member States. In addition, a joint IAEA/WHO postal dosimetry service has been established for radiotherapy centers. The International Measurement System and the calibration ''chain'' from measurement standard instruments of the International Bureau of Weights and Measurements (BIPM) through the primary and secondary standards to the dosimeters of the users are presented as well

  2. Ministers at IAEA Conference Call for Stronger Nuclear Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Declaration says. The Declaration recognizes the threat to international security posed by theft and smuggling of nuclear material and affirms the responsibility of States to keep all nuclear material secure. It also encourages all States to join and participate in the IAEA Incident and Trafficking Database, the international repository of information about nuclear and other radioactive material that has fallen out of regulatory control. It invites States that have not yet done so to become party to, and fully implement, the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) and its 2005 Amendment, which broadens the scope of that Convention. Many ministers at the Conference stated that entry into force of the Amendment would make a big difference. Among a number of other issues that are addressed, the Declaration also encourages States to use, on a voluntary basis, the IAEA's nuclear security advisory services and peer reviews such as International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) missions, which are based on internationally accepted guidance and tailored to national needs. The Ministers welcomed the IAEA's work in nuclear forensics, and recognized its efforts to raise awareness of the growing threat of cyber-attacks and their potential impact on nuclear security. The work of the Conference will contribute to the IAEA's Nuclear Security Plan for 2014 to 2017. Consultations on the Declaration among IAEA Member States were coordinated by Ambassador Balazs Csuday, Resident Representative of Hungary, and Ambassador Laercio Antonio Vinhas, Resident Representative of Brazil. (IAEA)

  3. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation: Report to the NNSA DOE Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, Susan E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pickett, Chris A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Queirolo, Al [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bachner, Katherine M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Worrall, Louise G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-07

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened a workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. Safeguards instrumentation software must be sustained in a changing environment to ensure existing instruments can continue to perform as designed, with improved security. The approaches to the development and maintenance of instrument software used in the past may not be the best model for the future and, therefore, the organizers’ goal was to investigate these past approaches and to determine an optimal path forward. The purpose of this report is to provide input for the DOE NNSA Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) and other stakeholders that can be utilized when making decisions related to the development and maintenance of software used in the implementation of international nuclear safeguards. For example, this guidance can be used when determining whether to fund the development, upgrade, or replacement of a particular software product. The report identifies the challenges related to sustaining software, and makes recommendations for addressing these challenges, supported by summaries and detailed notes from the workshop discussions. In addition the authors provide a set of recommendations for institutionalizing software sustainability practices in the safeguards community. The term “software sustainability” was defined for this workshop as ensuring that safeguards instrument software and algorithm functionality can be maintained efficiently throughout the instrument lifecycle, without interruption and providing the ability to continue to improve that software as needs arise.

  4. The U.S./IAEA Workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation: Report to the NNSA DOE Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, Susan E.; Pickett, Chris A.; Queirolo, Al; Bachner, Katherine M.; Worrall, Louise G.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened a workshop on Software Sustainability for Safeguards Instrumentation in Vienna, Austria, May 6-8, 2014. Safeguards instrumentation software must be sustained in a changing environment to ensure existing instruments can continue to perform as designed, with improved security. The approaches to the development and maintenance of instrument software used in the past may not be the best model for the future and, therefore, the organizers' goal was to investigate these past approaches and to determine an optimal path forward. The purpose of this report is to provide input for the DOE NNSA Office of International Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241) and other stakeholders that can be utilized when making decisions related to the development and maintenance of software used in the implementation of international nuclear safeguards. For example, this guidance can be used when determining whether to fund the development, upgrade, or replacement of a particular software product. The report identifies the challenges related to sustaining software, and makes recommendations for addressing these challenges, supported by summaries and detailed notes from the workshop discussions. In addition the authors provide a set of recommendations for institutionalizing software sustainability practices in the safeguards community. The term ''software sustainability'' was defined for this workshop as ensuring that safeguards instrument software and algorithm functionality can be maintained efficiently throughout the instrument lifecycle, without interruption and providing the ability to continue to improve that software as needs arise.

  5. IAEA Expert Team Concludes Mission to Onagawa NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: An IAEA team of international experts today delivered its initial report at the end of a two-week mission to gather information about the effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake on the Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS), saying the plant was 'remarkably undamaged'. Findings from the visual investigation will be added to an IAEA data base being compiled by its International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC) to provide knowledge for Member States about the impact of external hazards on nuclear power plants. The ISSC data bank makes an important contribution to the IAEA's Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, which was unanimously endorsed by the Agency's Member States following last year's nuclear accident at Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Onagawa, facing the Pacific Ocean on Japan's north-east coast, was the nuclear power plant closest to the epicentre of the 11 March 2011 magnitude 9.0 earthquake that struck Japan and resulted in a devastating tsunami. The plant experienced very high levels of ground shaking - among the strongest of any plant affected by the earthquake - and some flooding from the tsunami that followed, but was able to shut down safely. In its draft report the team said that 'the structural elements of the NPS were remarkably undamaged given the magnitude of ground motion experienced and the duration and size of this great earthquake'. The mission's objective was to observe how structures, systems and components with significance to the safety of the plant responded to the earthquake and heavy shaking. At the damaged Fukushima Daiichi NPS, nearly 120 km south of Onagawa NPS, the effects of the earthquake, tsunami and hydrogen explosions make it impossible to single out the impact of external hazards on safety-related parts of the power station. The Government of Japan and the IAEA therefore agreed to deploy a mission to the three-unit Onagawa NPS. The team's 19 members from six countries, including IAEA staff, held discussions with the operators of the

  6. Stability of reference class ionization chambers used for radiotherapy dosimetry: IAEA experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czap, L.; Meghzifene, A.; Shortt, K.R.; Andreo, P.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA calibrates ionization chambers, used in radiotherapy, for its Member States. The calibrations are either for Secondary Standards Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) or hospitals from countries without a SSDL. For that purpose, the IAEA calibrates mainly reference class instruments that are in turn used to cross-calibrate field class instruments at the hospital. Typically, the IAEA calibrates about 30-40 ionization chambers per year, of which about half are new chambers purchased by the IAEA for its Member States using Technical Cooperation funds. The IAEA database includes the calibration coefficients of 189 reference class ionization chambers of the following types: NE-2561/2611, NE-2571, W-30001/W-30010. The results of the calibrations and recalibrations of the ionization chambers in terms of air kerma and absorbed dose to water are presented and discussed. The ratio of 60 Co calibration coefficients N D,w /N K , labelled C K , was determined for all chambers. The use of C K as a chamber dependent parameter and quality control indicator to check the results of the routine IAEA calibrations is discussed. In the process of its routine calibrations, the IAEA identified a specific problem related to the W- 30001 ionization chambers. The stability of these chambers was found to exceed the 0.5% tolerance limit set by the International IEC standard. Other SSDLs reported similar findings. The manufacturer stopped the production of these W-30001 chambers to investigate the reasons for this anomalous behaviour. After identifying and correcting the problem, the manufacturer produced a new type of ionization chamber. Five of these chambers were tested at the IAEA and found to be within the tolerance limit

  7. International shock-wave database project : report of the requirements workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, John Bahram (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Lomonosov, Igor V. (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Levashov, Pavel R. (Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences)

    2012-03-01

    We report on the requirements workshop for a new project, the International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb), which was held October 31 - November 2, 2011, at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. Participants considered the idea of this database, its structure, technical requirements, content, and principles of operation. This report presents the consensus conclusions from the workshop, key discussion points, and the goals and plan for near-term and intermediate-term development of the ISWdb. The main points of consensus from the workshop were: (1) This international database is of interest and of practical use for the shock-wave and high pressure physics communities; (2) Intermediate state information and off-Hugoniot information is important and should be included in ISWdb; (3) Other relevant high pressure and auxiliary data should be included to the database, in the future; (4) Information on the ISWdb needs to be communicated, broadly, to the research community; and (5) Operating structure will consist of an Advisory Board, subject-matter expert Moderators to vet submitted data, and the database Project Team. This brief report is intended to inform the shock-wave research community and interested funding agencies about the project, as its success, ultimately, depends on both of these groups finding sufficient value in the database to use it, contribute to it, and support it.

  8. Scientific Meetings Database: A New Tool for CTBT-Related International Cooperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapik, Jerzy F.; Girven, Mary L.

    1999-08-20

    The mission of international cooperation is defined in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Ways and means of implementation were the subject of discussion during the International Cooperation Workshop held in Vienna in November 1998, and during the Regional Workshop for CTBTO International Cooperation held in Cairo, Egypt in June 1999. In particular, a database of ''Scientific and Technical Meetings Directly or Indirectly Related to CTBT Verification-Related Technologies'' was developed by the CTBTO PrepCom/PTS/International Cooperation section and integrated into the organization's various web sites in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy CTBT Research and Development Program. This database, the structure and use of which is described in this paper/presentation is meant to assist the CTBT-related scientific community in identifying worldwide expertise in the CTBT verification-related technologies and should help experts, particularly those of less technologically advanced States Signatories, to strengthen contacts and to pursue international cooperation under the Tredy regime. Specific opportunities for international cooperation, in particular those provided by active participation in the use and further development of this database, are presented in this paper and/or presentation.

  9. Comparison of characteristics of international and national databases for rheumatoid arthritis: a systematic literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gvozdenović, E.; Koevoets, R.; Langenhoff, J.; Allaart, C. F.; Landewé, R. B. M.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate current (inter)national registers and observational cohorts in Europe, and to compare inclusion criteria, aims, collected data, and participation in the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) repository. We performed a systematic search strategy in six literature databases for

  10. Growth hormone treatment in aarskog syndrome: analysis of the KIGS (Pharmacia International Growth Database) data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darendeliler, F.; Larsson, P.; Neyzi, O.; Price, A.D.; Hagenas, L.; Sipila, I.; Lindgren, A.; Otten, B.J.; Bakker, B.

    2003-01-01

    Aarskog syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by faciogenital dysplasia and short stature. The present study set out to determine the effect of growth hormone (GH) therapy in patients with Aarskog syndrome enrolled in KIGS--the Pharmacia International Growth Database. Twenty-one patients

  11. IAEA safeguards and classified materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilat, J.F.; Eccleston, G.W.; Fearey, B.L.; Nicholas, N.J.; Tape, J.W.; Kratzer, M.

    1997-01-01

    The international community in the post-Cold War period has suggested that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) utilize its expertise in support of the arms control and disarmament process in unprecedented ways. The pledges of the US and Russian presidents to place excess defense materials, some of which are classified, under some type of international inspections raises the prospect of using IAEA safeguards approaches for monitoring classified materials. A traditional safeguards approach, based on nuclear material accountancy, would seem unavoidably to reveal classified information. However, further analysis of the IAEA's safeguards approaches is warranted in order to understand fully the scope and nature of any problems. The issues are complex and difficult, and it is expected that common technical understandings will be essential for their resolution. Accordingly, this paper examines and compares traditional safeguards item accounting of fuel at a nuclear power station (especially spent fuel) with the challenges presented by inspections of classified materials. This analysis is intended to delineate more clearly the problems as well as reveal possible approaches, techniques, and technologies that could allow the adaptation of safeguards to the unprecedented task of inspecting classified materials. It is also hoped that a discussion of these issues can advance ongoing political-technical debates on international inspections of excess classified materials

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Activity on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX Water Reactor Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovasic, Z.; Einziger, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on spent fuel management. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding spent fuel management, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR)s and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. These properties are reviewed. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, re-fabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. Data gaps were also identified during this investigation. The pros and cons of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed.. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, re-fabrication, and

  13. The NEA International FEP Database and its use in support of regulatory review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumerling, T.

    1999-01-01

    A working group of the Nuclear Energy Agency has developed a database of features, events and processes (FEPs) relevant to the assessment of the long-term safety of radioactive waste disposal facilities. The Environment Agency participated in this work as described in a previous report, R and D Technical Report P97. This report describes work done in order to (i) provide an electronic version of the NEA International FEP Database in a convenient form suited to the Agency's needs; (ii) determine procedures for use of the Database in support of the Agency's review of an applicant's safety case for solid radioactive disposal, and in other appropriate Agency activities. Section 1 of the report outlines the objectives and work done. Section 2 gives an overview of the current status, development and international use of the NEA FEP Database. Alternative uses of the Database by the Agency, and procedures for use, are discussed in Section 3. Two alternative procedures for use of the Database in scientific and technical review of an applicant's safety case are outlined and compared; these provide a framework for orderly identification and discussion of technical issues within the review. It is concluded that the way in which the Database is used will depend on the circumstances and also the aims and preferences of the Agency. Detailed procedures for the use of the Database are best defined for the specific circumstances, taking account of the level of information available from the applicant, and the time and resources which the Agency may wish to devote to a given phase of review. The NEA FEP Database has been developed as a tool to assist in performing or reviewing safety assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. The principle of the Database, and also the software framework, may be equally applicable to other technical or scientific assessments, e.g. of landfill facilities or river catchment pollution studies. Since the Database is now available to the Agency

  14. The IAEA's activities in safeguarding nuclear materials and in developing internationally acceptable safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rometsch, Rudolf; Specter, Herschel

    1977-01-01

    Promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy and aiming at the international sharing of its benefits are objectives that guide the activities of the Agency. But this promotional work is carried out on condition that security and safety are provided for. All Agency assistance involving nuclear facilities will be subjected to standards of safety or other standards, which are proposed by a State the Agency finds essentially equivalent. Safeguards are always applied on the basis of agreement. States party to NPT are obligated to negotiate and conclude with the Agency agreements which cover all their peaceful nuclear activities. Safeguards agreements concluded outside NPT are applied to specific supplies of facilities, equipment and material. To assist countries in laying down their nuclear safety regulations the Agency's program for the developing of codesof practice and safety guides for nuclear power plants draws up guidelines for governmental organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Codes are the fundamental documents laying down the objectives of each field of nuclear safety

  15. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 15, no. 4(89). Oct-Nov 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This issue gives information about the following topics: IAEA 2000 General Conference; IAEA Board for 2000-2001; Scientific forum on radioactive waste management: turning options into solutions; the Director General's statement to the General Conference; National case studies on nuclear power and sustainable development; Progress toward IAEA verification under Trilateral Initiative with Russia and the USA; Uranium production and the environment; IAEA publications; States joining international conventions in nuclear fields; Upcoming IAEA international symposia and seminars, and other short information

  16. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 15, no. 4(89). Oct-Nov 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This issue gives information about the following topics: IAEA 2000 General Conference; IAEA Board for 2000-2001; Scientific forum on radioactive waste management: turning options into solutions; the Director General's statement to the General Conference; National case studies on nuclear power and sustainable development; Progress toward IAEA verification under Trilateral Initiative with Russia and the USA; Uranium production and the environment; IAEA publications; States joining international conventions in nuclear fields; Upcoming IAEA international symposia and seminars, and other short information.

  17. Public information activities of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, Hand-Friedrich

    1998-01-01

    Since the accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 and increasingly since the Chernobyl accident 1986, the Division of Public Information (DPI) of the IAEA has become a contact point for journalists on all questions related to the nuclear energy and nuclear applications. The IAEA receives a continuously growing number of hits on its Internet Homepage. This is followed by an increasing number of E-mail letters from all over the world. The three main fields of general information activities of the IAEA's DPI are: 1 - the verification system of IAEA in the framework of international treaties concerning non-proliferation of nuclear weapons; 2 - the IAEA's work for safe operation of nuclear installations and its many services to improve the safe application of radiation and isotopes as well as safe operation of nuclear power plants. Questions on illicit trafficking and dangers of wrongly applied radiation sources play an important factor in our public information work in the field of nuclear safety; 3 - the IAEA's activities in the transfer of technology and the application of radiation and isotopes in agriculture, health, industry, hydrology and research. In addition to the new ways of providing information on the IAEA there is still the long established means of contact through periodicals like 'IAEA Bulletin' and 'IAEA Newsbriefs' or general information films like, for instance, 'The International Atom', 'The Nuclear Age', 'How a nuclear power plant works', 'Nuclear Energy and the Environment', 'The Safe Transport of Radioactive Material', 'The International Chernobyl Project', 'Mission Iraq' and others. Besides, there are aspects on longer lasting perspectives which should be considered: - physics teaching at schools; - information on nuclear fission, nuclear power, radiation and isotopes in a science museum in the capital; an information center at nuclear research facilities in the country. Nuclear has many advantages but it is difficult these days to convince normal

  18. IAEA Clarification on Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Director General Amano has been quoted in a news story as saying today that a site in Syria allegedly destroyed by Israel was a nuclear reactor under construction. The Director General did not say that the IAEA has reached the conclusion that the site was definitely a nuclear reactor. The IAEA continues to seek further information on the nature of the Dair Alzour site. (IAEA)

  19. IAEA safeguards approaches and goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    IAEA safeguards provide a technical means of verifying that political obligations undertaken by States party to international agreements relating to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy are being honored. The Agency assures the international community that States party to Safeguards Agreements are complying with their undertaking not to use facilities and divert nuclear materials from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear explosive devices. The task of IAEA safeguards can be summed up as to detect diversion of nuclear materials committed to peaceful uses of nuclear energy, or the misuse of equipment or facilities subject to certain safeguards agreements, and to deter such diversion or misuse through the risk of early detection. This lecture concentrates on the factors the Agency takes into account in designing and implementing safeguards approaches at facilities. (author)

  20. The role of the IAEA in the London Convention 1972 on Dumping of Wastes at Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telleria, Diego; Berkovsky, Volodymyr; Jova Sed, Luis; Louvat, Didier

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter was adopted after an Inter-Governmental Conference, held in London in 1972, following the principles for environmental protection enunciated in the Report of the United Nations Conference on Human Environment, held the same year in Stockholm. The IAEA has been involved since the early days of the London Convention when the Contracting Parties designated the IAEA as the competent international authority in matters related to sea disposal of radioactive waste, providing technical advice and services. The IAEA developed, for the Convention, the definition of 'radioactive wastes or radioactive matters unsuitable for dumping at sea' (e.g., high level radioactive waste) and recommended the technical basis applicable by the national authorities to issue special permits for those radioactive materials which could be dumped (mainly low and intermediate level radioactive waste, properly conditioned and 'de minimis' quantities). However, in 1985, based more on political reasons than on the existing radiation protection principles and policies, the Contracting Parties to the London Convention introduced a 'voluntary moratorium' on the disposal of low level radioactive wastes at sea, and later in 1993, a total ban of radioactive waste disposal at sea. The IAEA continues to support the objectives of the London Convention by providing scientific advice. Since 1989, at the request of the Contracting Parties, the IAEA has developed and maintained global databases on radioactive waste disposed of at sea in the past and on accidents and losses at sea involving radioactive material. The purpose of these databases is to serve as the basis for radiological impact assessment on the marine environment. The last revised reports on the above mentioned inventories were published in 1999 and in 2001 respectively. The databases are currently in the process of being updated. The paper presents

  1. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of International Background Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    This supplement describes national adaptations made to the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires. This information provides users with a guide to evaluate the availability of internationally comparable data for use in secondary analyses involving the TIMSS 2011 background variables. Background questionnaire adaptations…

  2. Nuclear data: IAEA activity overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchezi, A.Kh.; Konstantinov, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    The IAEA data banks, aimed at expanding information exchange and maintaining science and technology development in the whole world are briefly described. The following items are are considered: INIS; power reactor information system (PRIS); NPP incident information system (IRS); research reactor data base (RRDB); nuclear fuel cycle information system (NFCIS); nuclear data system (NDS); International uranium geology information system (INTURGEO); power engineering and economy data bank (PEEDB); radioactive material shipment data base; isotopic hydrology data base

  3. IAEA '77: between politics and factual constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, A.

    1976-01-01

    The IAEA's organization of its 20th General Conference at Rio de Janeiro clearly underlined the importance of a comprehensive international transfer of nuclear technology. Despite all efforts to keep the Agency out of general political confrontations, the Conference was tinged politically by the PLO and South Africa problems. Besides the next five year program, which was agreed upon in the light of existing factual constraints, the support and control functions of the IAEA and next year's Salzburg Fuel Cycle Conference were other main topics of discussion. The 1977 IAEA budget was approved at a level of 43.5 million, the General Fund at 6.5 million. (orig.) [de

  4. Communication dated 18 December 2013 received from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna on the European Union's Support for the IAEA Activities in the Areas of Nuclear Security and Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a note verbale dated 18 December 2013 from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna with Council Decision 2013/517/CFSP of 21 October 2013, in support of the IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. As requested in that communication, the note verbale and the enclosure are circulated herewith for information

  5. International Nuclear Safety Center database on thermophysical properties of reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.K.; Sofu, T.; Ley, H.

    1997-01-01

    The International Nuclear Safety Center (INSC) database has been established at Argonne National Laboratory to provide easily accessible data and information necessary to perform nuclear safety analyses and to promote international collaboration through the exchange of nuclear safety information. The INSC database, located on the World Wide Web at http://www.insc.anl.gov, contains critically assessed recommendations for reactor material properties for normal operating conditions, transients, and severe accidents. The initial focus of the database is on thermodynamic and transport properties of materials for water reactors. Materials that are being included in the database are fuel, absorbers, cladding, structural materials, coolant, and liquid mixtures of combinations of UO 2 , ZrO 2 , Zr, stainless steel, absorber materials, and concrete. For each property, the database includes: (1) a summary of recommended equations with uncertainties; (2) a detailed data assessment giving the basis for the recommendations, comparisons with experimental data and previous recommendations, and uncertainties; (3) graphs showing recommendations, uncertainties, and comparisons with data and other equations; and (4) property values tabulated as a function of temperature

  6. The role of the IAEA in advanced technologies for water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    The role of the IAEA in advanced technologies for water-cooled reactors is described, including the following issues: international collaboration ways through international working group activities; IAEA coordinated research programmes; cooperative research in advanced water-cooled reactor technology

  7. An international database of radionuclide concentration ratios for wildlife: development and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copplestone, D; Beresford, N A; Brown, J E; Yankovich, T

    2013-12-01

    A key element of most systems for assessing the impact of radionuclides on the environment is a means to estimate the transfer of radionuclides to organisms. To facilitate this, an international wildlife transfer database has been developed to provide an online, searchable compilation of transfer parameters in the form of equilibrium-based whole-organism to media concentration ratios. This paper describes the derivation of the wildlife transfer database, the key data sources it contains and highlights the applications for the data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Database INIS and up-grade of the INIS Slovak National Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Rajec, P.

    2009-01-01

    The INIS (International Nuclear Information System) is the information system on peaceful use of nuclear energy. The INIS database is managing by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The INIS database covers wide area of science and technology in different scope of interests of the IAEA in nuclear sciences, technologies, non-nuclear techniques of energy production as well as environmental and economical aspects, in life sciences, the environment and the Earth. The INIS is operated in collaboration with, at present time, 119 Member States and 23 International Organizations. (authors)

  9. Database INIS and up-grade of the INIS Slovak National Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.; Rajec, P.

    2008-01-01

    The INIS (International Nuclear Information System) is the information system on peaceful use of nuclear energy. The INIS database is managing by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The INIS database covers wide area of science and technology in different scope of interests of the IAEA in nuclear sciences, technologies, non-nuclear techniques of energy production as well as environmental and economical aspects, in life sciences, the environment and the Earth. The INIS is operated in collaboration with, at present time, 119 Member States and 23 International Organizations. (authors)

  10. International integral experiments databases in support of nuclear data and code validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gado, Janos; Hunter, Hamilton; Kodeli, Ivan; Salvatores, Massimo; Sartori, Enrico

    2002-01-01

    The OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) has identified the need to establish international databases containing all the important experiments that are available for sharing among the specialists. The NSC has set up or sponsored specific activities to achieve this. The aim is to preserve them in an agreed standard format in computer accessible form, to use them for international activities involving validation of current and new calculational schemes including computer codes and nuclear data libraries, for assessing uncertainties, confidence bounds and safety margins, and to record measurement methods and techniques. The databases so far established or in preparation related to nuclear data validation cover the following areas: SINBAD - A Radiation Shielding Experiments database encompassing reactor shielding, fusion blanket neutronics, and accelerator shielding. ICSBEP - International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments Project Handbook, with more than 2500 critical configurations with different combination of materials and spectral indices. IRPhEP - International Reactor Physics Experimental Benchmarks Evaluation Project. The different projects are described in the following including results achieved, work in progress and planned. (author)

  11. DOE, IAEA collaborate to put decades of nuclear research online

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Decades of nuclear research supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies are being made searchable on the World Wide Web, as part of a collaborative effort between the DOE and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The project aims to give researchers, academics, and the general public access to vast volumes of valuable nuclear-related research over the internet. As part of its knowledge preservation mandate, the IAEA' s International Nuclear Information System(INIS) works to preserve nuclear knowledge by digitizing historic nuclear energy research documents dating from 1970 through the early 1990s. Collections from over 29 countries are now digitally available and several additional digital preservation projects are ongoing or are being established, particularly in the Latin America and Caribbean regions. ''Thanks to the collaborative work of the IAEA and its Member States, scientists and students in the nuclear field now have instant access to important research and technical information over the internet,'' said IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Energy Yury Sokolov. ''Our INIS programme continues to work to preserve and provide access to publications and documents on the peaceful applications of nuclear technology.'' The DOE project is one of the larger programmes in the INIS project, and includes more than 180,000 documents from the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). OSTI is the U.S. representative to INIS and has had its own digitization focus in recent years. The novel partnership highlights the longstanding mutual benefits of DOE participation in INIS. In essence, it opens up previous research on the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy by making it freely and quickly available to scientists and engineers. By making scientific data electronically available, the INIS database helps scientists and students to attain volumes of data that are otherwise inaccessible

  12. IAEA Statement After Iran Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Senior International Atomic Energy Agency officials met an Iranian delegation in Vienna today to seek agreement on a structured approach document to resolve outstanding issues relating to Iran's nuclear programme. The following is a statement by IAEA Deputy Director General Herman Nackaerts after the meeting: ''As announced by the Director General earlier this week, we met today to discuss the structured approach paper. The Agency team came to the meeting in a constructive spirit with the desire and intention of finalising the paper. We presented a revised draft which addressed Iran's earlier stated concerns. However, there has been no progress and, indeed, Iran raised issues that we have already discussed and added new ones. This is disappointing. A date for a follow-on meeting has yet to be fixed.'' (IAEA)

  13. The International System on Occupational Exposure. An ALARA Success Story Relying on Strong Individual Commitments, Effective International Feedback and Exchanges, and a Robust Database - 20 years of progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefaure, Christian; Doty, Richard

    2013-06-01

    Why, more than 20 years ago, did there emerge the need for an International System on Occupational Exposure (ISOE)? How was it created? What were the problems and their possible solutions? Who were the main stakeholders? These are a few of the questions that the ISOE NEA Secretariat and Bureau asked Christian Lefaure, ex CEPN Deputy Director, to address in preparing a report on the history of ISOE and its progress. He had been directly involved in the brainstorming that preceded ISOE establishment, and he became the first head of the ISOE European Technical Centre, in charge of the world database development and management from 1991 to 2007. For writing this report, he made use of his own souvenirs and documentation as well as of those of tens of ISOE participants, both from major international and regional organisations (OECD/NEA, IAEA, EC and BNL), nuclear power plant utilities and national regulatory authorities. He voluntarily focused not only on the technical aspects but also on the human components of that story. This was done through personal interviews with many individuals who have played an important role at one moment of ISOE life, the analysis of answers to a questionnaire, and reviews of the minutes of many ISOE meetings that were held before and after the official establishment of the ISOE, along its lifespan to date. The most important inputs were the accounts from many individuals having very actively participated in the ISOE life at one step or another. The contacts were not always easy to make 15 or 20 years later. But in general, the questions were welcomed and the answers to the interviews and to a short questionnaire have fed this report. More than 50 individuals have answered these requests one way or another. Some have followed ISOE birth and premises; some have not seen the first steps of ISOE but have participated later on or are still participating. Some have been able to provide pictures, drawings or relevant publications. All their

  14. An International Peer Review of the Programme for the Deep Geological Disposal of High Level Radioactive Waste from Pyro-Processing in the Republic of Korea. Report of an IAEA International Review Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    The development of a radioactive waste disposal system is indispensable in maintaining the sustainability of nuclear energy. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has studied the direct geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel since 1997. KAERI has also focused on the development of processes suitable for reducing the volume of spent nuclear fuel and the recycling of valuable fissile material. One of the most promising technologies investigated by KAERI is the pyro-processing of spent nuclear fuel followed by the geological disposal of the generated high level waste (HLW). Since 2007, KAERI has been running a research programme focusing on the recycling of spent nuclear fuel, as well as studies aimed at the development of a relevant geological disposal system able to accept the resulting HLW. The core aims of the KAERI study were to characterize the geological media, design a repository system and assess the overall safety of the disposal system. The development of pyro-processing technology is ongoing and has not yet been demonstrated at the commercial level. Thus, the government of the Republic of Korea requested an assessment of the technical feasibility of this technology. The assessment also included the appraisal of a disposal solution for waste generated by pyro-processing. With regard to the latter, KAERI requested that the IAEA review the status of the disposal project within the Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP). Peer reviews are increasingly being acknowledged as an important element in building broader stakeholder confidence in the safety and viability of related facilities. This report presents the consensus view of the international group of experts convened by the IAEA to perform the review

  15. IAEA Orientation for Diplomats 2013. The IAEA in Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-02-01

    their ives. The Agency supports over 130 projects in cancer diagnosis, management and treatment and helps to mprove access to life-saving radiotherapy services in developing countries. Our work in nuclear non-proliferation is generally the best known area of our activities. IAEA inspectors conduct about 2000 inspection missions annually to over 1200 sites in 78 states to verify that nuclear material is not being diverted from peaceful purposes. This is an important contribution to international peace and security. Hope you will enjoy our seminar for Diplomats and that this Brochure will provide a useful overview of IAEA activities.

  16. IAEA Orientation for Diplomats 2013. The IAEA in Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-02-15

    their ives. The Agency supports over 130 projects in cancer diagnosis, management and treatment and helps to mprove access to life-saving radiotherapy services in developing countries. Our work in nuclear non-proliferation is generally the best known area of our activities. IAEA inspectors conduct about 2000 inspection missions annually to over 1200 sites in 78 states to verify that nuclear material is not being diverted from peaceful purposes. This is an important contribution to international peace and security. Hope you will enjoy our seminar for Diplomats and that this Brochure will provide a useful overview of IAEA activities.

  17. IAEA statement on Iranian enrichment announcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text: The following is a statement attributable to IAEA Spokesperson Gill Tudor: 'The IAEA can confirm that it has received a letter from the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI) on 8 February 2010, in which the AEOI informed the Agency that production of less than 20% enriched uranium is being foreseen at the Pilot Fuel Enrichment Plant at Natanz for fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor'. 'IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano noted with concern this decision, as it may affect, in particular, ongoing international efforts to ensure the availability of nuclear fuel for the Tehran Research Reactor.' 'The Director General reiterated the Agency's readiness to play an intermediary role on the issue of the Tehran Research Reactor.' (IAEA)

  18. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  19. Radiation and society: Comprehending radiation risk. V. 1. A report to the IAEA with collected papers. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The report includes 10 papers prepared by the Swedish Risk Academy for the IAEA Conference on Radiation and Society: Comprehending Radiation Risk, held in Paris between 24-28 October 1994. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Materials data through a bibliographic database INIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Itabashi, Keizo; Nakajima, Hidemitsu

    1992-01-01

    INIS (International Nuclear Information System) is a bibliographic database produced by collaboration of IAEA and its member countries, holding 1,500,000 records as of 1991. Although a bibliographic database does not provide numerical data itself, specific materials information can be obtained through retrieval specifying materials, properties conditions, measuring methods, etc. Also, 'data flagging' facilitates searching a record containing data. INIS has also a function of clearing house that provides original documents of scarce distribution. Hard copies of the technical reports or other non-conventional literatures are available. An efficient use of INIS database for the materials data is presented using an on-line terminal. (author)

  1. The IAEA programme of action for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, L. D.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on 10 December 2005. To acknowledge receiving this prestigious award, the IAEA arranged three special workshops in the regions of Asia, Africa and South America. These special events brought together high-ranking delegates from IAEA member countries within their regions. The theme of the workshop was on human resources development in radiation oncology in the context mmcer control programs. This paper presents information on the world cancer incidence provided the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Details of the IAEA Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) 2 are also presented.

  2. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data. IAEA, Vienna 21-25 April 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1980-10-01

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fourth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, from 21-25 April 1980. The meeting was attended by 23 Scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  3. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 9, no. 4(66). Oct 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Analyzing effect of US-DPRK Agreed Framework, Statement to General Assembly in New-York, Council on Foreign Relations, 19 October 1994, Congress of the European Nuclear Society, 4 October 1994, IAEA General Conference, 19 September 1994, Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear Materials, IAEA Director General Blix honoured, Ukraine and IAEA sign Safeguards Agreement, International Convention on Nuclear Safety, Highlights of the 1994 General Conference, IAEA safeguards in the DPRK, Monitoring and verification in Iraq, IAEA safeguards system, Measures against illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, African nuclear-weapon-free zone, South Africa's participation in IAEA activities, Application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East, IAEA technical co-operation activities, Technical assistance in the Middle East, Radioactive waste management, Water resources and production, IAEA budget and extrabudgetary resources for 1995, Staffing of the IAEA Secretariat, Nuclear safety and radiological protection, Scientific Programme at the General Conference, Environmental monitoring, High-energy accelerators and radioactive waste management, Global food security and sustainability, Other meetings, Air Transport of Radioactive materials, Accelerators for Research, Water Resources, Radiation Technologies in Health Care, Spent Fuel Storage, Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture, Comprehending Radiation Risks, Environmental Impact of Radioactive Releases, Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures, and other short information

  4. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 9, no. 4(66). Oct 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA Analyzing effect of US-DPRK Agreed Framework, Statement to General Assembly in New-York, Council on Foreign Relations, 19 October 1994, Congress of the European Nuclear Society, 4 October 1994, IAEA General Conference, 19 September 1994, Illicit Trafficking in Nuclear Materials, IAEA Director General Blix honoured, Ukraine and IAEA sign Safeguards Agreement, International Convention on Nuclear Safety, Highlights of the 1994 General Conference, IAEA safeguards in the DPRK, Monitoring and verification in Iraq, IAEA safeguards system, Measures against illicit trafficking in nuclear materials, African nuclear-weapon-free zone, South Africa`s participation in IAEA activities, Application of IAEA safeguards in the Middle East, IAEA technical co-operation activities, Technical assistance in the Middle East, Radioactive waste management, Water resources and production, IAEA budget and extrabudgetary resources for 1995, Staffing of the IAEA Secretariat, Nuclear safety and radiological protection, Scientific Programme at the General Conference, Environmental monitoring, High-energy accelerators and radioactive waste management, Global food security and sustainability, Other meetings, Air Transport of Radioactive materials, Accelerators for Research, Water Resources, Radiation Technologies in Health Care, Spent Fuel Storage, Nuclear Techniques in Agriculture, Comprehending Radiation Risks, Environmental Impact of Radioactive Releases, Strengthening Radiation Protection Infrastructures, and other short information

  5. The CTBTO Link to the database of the International Seismological Centre (ISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, I.; Storchak, D. A.; Dando, B.; Harris, J.; Di Giacomo, D.

    2011-12-01

    The CTBTO Link to the database of the International Seismological Centre (ISC) is a project to provide access to seismological data sets maintained by the ISC using specially designed interactive tools. The Link is open to National Data Centres and to the CTBTO. By means of graphical interfaces and database queries tailored to the needs of the monitoring community, the users are given access to a multitude of products. These include the ISC and ISS bulletins, covering the seismicity of the Earth since 1904; nuclear and chemical explosions; the EHB bulletin; the IASPEI Reference Event list (ground truth database); and the IDC Reviewed Event Bulletin. The searches are divided into three main categories: The Area Based Search (a spatio-temporal search based on the ISC Bulletin), the REB search (a spatio-temporal search based on specific events in the REB) and the IMS Station Based Search (a search for historical patterns in the reports of seismic stations close to a particular IMS seismic station). The outputs are HTML based web-pages with a simplified version of the ISC Bulletin showing the most relevant parameters with access to ISC, GT, EHB and REB Bulletins in IMS1.0 format for single or multiple events. The CTBTO Link offers a tool to view REB events in context within the historical seismicity, look at observations reported by non-IMS networks, and investigate station histories and residual patterns for stations registered in the International Seismographic Station Registry.

  6. Training the IAEA Inspectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potterton, L.

    2010-01-01

    Newly recruited safeguards inspectors take to the field. There are currently 250 inspectors and every year the IAEA runs an introductory course on the safeguards systems for the organisation's newly appointed inspectors.

  7. IAEA Monitors Marine Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixit, Aabha; Kaiser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA assists Member States in using scientific tools to precisely identify and track nuclear and nonnuclear contaminants, as well as to investigate their biological effects on the marine ecosystem

  8. IAEA Supports World Cancer Day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cancer can strike anyone at anytime, young or old, rich or poor. It knows no borders. World Cancer Day, on 4 February, was initiated to raise global awareness of cancer issues and stimulate new strategies and thinking to combat the killer disease. Nowhere is the need greater than in the developing world, where millions of people are suffering and dying due to lack of cancer prevention and treatment. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 84 million people will die of cancer in the next 10 years, more than 70% of them in low-income countries, unless action is taken now. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) was created to help poorer countries confront the growing cancer crisis by integrating radiotherapy into comprehensive cancer control programmes. As it celebrates its third birthday on World Cancer Day, PACT can claim significant progress in building effective relationships with a broad array of stakeholders, initiating six pilot projects and gaining increasing support from Member States. The IAEA commends all organizations, agencies and individuals engaged in the battle to defeat this dreadful disease. We look forward to continued collaboration with international partners to help bring hope to cancer patients, to relieve their suffering and to save lives. (IAEA)

  9. The Follow-up IAEA International Mission on Remediation of Large Contaminated Areas Off-Site the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, Tokyo and Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, 14-21 October 2013. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    In October 2011, the IAEA conducted an International Mission to Japan to support the remediation of large contaminated areas off-site TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). In response to the request made by the Government of Japan, in October 2013, the IAEA organized a follow-up International Mission on remediation of large contaminated areas off-site TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi NPP (hereinafter referred to as the 'Follow-up Mission' or the 'Mission') with the main purpose of evaluating the progress of the on-going remediation works achieved since the previous mission in October 2011. The Follow-up Mission Team involved 13 international experts. Additionally, 3 experts of the Working Group 5 (Subgroup 5.2, Remediation) in charge of preparing the IAEA Report on TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Accident accompanied the Mission as observers to obtain first-hand information for the report. The Follow-up Mission had the following three objectives: 1. To provide assistance to Japan in assessing the progress made with the remediation of the Special Decontamination Area (not included in the previous mission of 2011) and the Intensive Contamination Survey Areas; 2. To review remediation strategies, plans and works, in view of the advice provided by the previous mission on remediation of large contaminated off-site areas; and 3. To share its findings with the international community as lessons learned. The Mission was conducted through the assessment of information provided to the Team and by means of professional and open discussions with the relevant institutions in Japan, including national, prefectural and local institutions. The Japanese authorities provided comprehensive information on their remediation programme. The Mission Team visited the affected areas, including several sites where activities on remediation were conducted. The Team also visited some temporary storage sites for radioactive waste and soil generated in the remediation activities, as well as a

  10. IAEA A+M Unit Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braams, B. J.; Chung, H.-K.; Sheikh, K.

    2011-01-01

    Research on fusion energy devices requires a large amount of data for atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interactions. As current machines are updated and future machines are designed, data for a variety of different materials for a wide range of plasma parameters arise. The Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency works to coordinate efforts to establish databases for this fusion research effort. Current activities for database development include a number of Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Meetings, Consultant Meetings and a number of collaborations. These activities generate significant new data in support of fusion research. These data are published in journals as well as IAEA publications and are included in numerical databases ALADDIN accessible by all fusion researchers. Historically a number of institutions have contributed to development of such databases and continue to participate in a Data Centre Network, supported by the A+M Unit. Members of this network maintain individual databases, many of which can be searched using the GENIE search engine. The A+M Unit host the OPEN-ADAS system that allows access to most of the numerical data stored within the ADAS system. An effort on development of an XML schema for data exchange among the databases is underway. Many numerical data for specific processes in fusion relevant materials are not available. In many cases computer codes exist with the capability of generating such data as needed. An informal network of institutions with such capabilities is in the process of formation to provide a means quickly generating such data. The A+M Unit maintains on-line code capabilities to generate atomic and molecular data and serves as an access point to LANL atomic physics codes and FLYCHK, Non-LTE kinetics codes at NIST. Currently, a wiki-style knowledge base is under the development. It will host a wealth of information on atomic, molecular, plasma-surface data for

  11. Internal dose assessments: Uncertainty studies and update of ideas guidelines and databases within CONRAD project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, J. W.; Castellani, C. M.; Hurtgen, C.; Lopez, M. A.; Andrasi, A.; Bailey, M. R.; Birchall, A.; Blanchardon, E.; Desai, A. D.; Dorrian, M. D.; Doerfel, H.; Koukouliou, V.; Luciani, A.; Malatova, I.; Molokanov, A.; Puncher, M.; Vrba, T.

    2008-01-01

    The work of Task Group 5.1 (uncertainty studies and revision of IDEAS guidelines) and Task Group 5.5 (update of IDEAS databases) of the CONRAD project is described. Scattering factor (SF) values (i.e. measurement uncertainties) have been calculated for different radionuclides and types of monitoring data using real data contained in the IDEAS Internal Contamination Database. Based upon this work and other published values, default SF values are suggested. Uncertainty studies have been carried out using both a Bayesian approach as well as a frequentist (classical) approach. The IDEAS guidelines have been revised in areas relating to the evaluation of an effective AMAD, guidance is given on evaluating wound cases with the NCRP wound model and suggestions made on the number and type of measurements required for dose assessment. (authors)

  12. INF and IAEA: A comparative analysis of verification strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheinman, L.; Kratzer, M.

    1992-07-01

    This is the final report of a study on the relevance and possible lessons of Intermediate Range Nuclear Force (INF) verification to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) international safeguards activities

  13. The Net Enabled Waste Management Database in the context of radioactive waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Burcl, R.; Tonkay, D.; Petoe, A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an emerging, international consensus that a common, comprehensive radioactive waste classification system is needed, which derives from the fact that the implementation of radioactive waste classification within countries is highly diverse. Within IAEA Member States, implementation ranges from none to complex systems that vary a great deal from one another. Both the IAEA and the European Commission have recommended common classification schemes but only for the purpose of facilitating communication with the public and national- and international-level organizations and to serve as the basis for developing comprehensive, national waste classification schemes. In the context described above, the IAEA's newly developed Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB) contains a feature, the Waste Class Matrix, that Member States use to describe the waste classification schemes they use and to compare them with the IAEA's proposed waste classification scheme. Member States then report waste inventories to the NEWMDB according to their own waste classification schemes, allowing traceability back to nationally based reports. The IAEA uses the information provided in the Waste Class Matrix to convert radioactive waste inventory data reported according to a wide variety of classifications into an single inventory according to the IAEA's proposed scheme. This approach allows the international community time to develop a comprehensive, common classification scheme and allows Member States time to develop and implement effective, operational waste classification schemes while, at the same time, the IAEA can collect the information needed to compile a comprehensive, international radioactive waste inventory. (author)

  14. TEDS-M 2008 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 2: National Adaptations of the TEDS-M Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brese, Falk, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This supplement contains all adaptations made by countries to the international version of the TEDS-M questionnaires under careful supervision of and approval by the TEDS-M International Study Center at Michigan State University. This information provides users of the TEDS-M International Database with a guide to evaluate the availability of…

  15. Have IAEA safety precautions failed in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruemm, H.

    1981-01-01

    Israel's air raid on the Tamuz-1 research reactor (Osirak) in Iraq has given new impetus to the discussion of the potential and limits of international control as carried out by the IAEA in the framework of the non-proliferation treaty. A lack of faith in the effectiveness of IAEA control must be assuemd to be one of the main reasons for this attack. Prof. Grimm, vice chairman of the nuclear safeguards department of the International Atomic Energy Agency, comments on the possibility of producing nuclear weapons with the aid of this reactor and on the efficiency of present and projected nuclear safeguards measures. (orig.) [de

  16. IAEA Safeguards: Past, Present, and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santi, Peter A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hypes, Philip A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-14

    This talk will present an overview of the International Atomic Energy Agency with a specific focus on its international safeguards mission and activities. The talk will first present a brief history of the IAEA and discuss its current governing structure. It will then focus on the Safeguards Department and its role in providing assurance that nuclear materials are being used for peaceful purposes. It will then look at how the IAEA is currently evolving the way in which it executes its safeguards mission with a focus on the idea of a state-level approach.

  17. Status and trends in IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipar, M.

    2004-01-01

    While safety is a national responsibility, international standards and approaches to safety promote consistency and facilitate international technical co-operation and trade, and help to provide assurance that nuclear and radiation related technologies are used safely. The standards also provide support for States in meeting their international obligations. One general international obligation is that a State must not pursue activities that cause damage in another State. More specific obligations on Contracting States are set out in international safety related conventions. The internationally agreed IAEA safety standards provide the basis for States to demonstrate that they are meeting these obligations. These standards are founded in the IAEA's Statute, which authorizes the Agency to establish standards of safety for nuclear and radiation related facilities and activities and to provide for their application. The safety standards reflect an international consensus on what constitutes a high level of safety for protecting people and the environment. (orig.) [de

  18. Improving the Transparency of IAEA Safeguards Reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomey, Christopher; Hayman, Aaron M.; Wyse, Evan T.; Odlaug, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) indicated that the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Safeguards Implementation Report (SIR) has not kept pace with the evolution of safeguards and provided the IAEA with a set of recommendations for improvement. The SIR is the primary mechanism for providing an overview of safeguards implementation in a given year and reporting on the annual safeguards findings and conclusions drawn by the Secretariat. As the IAEA transitions to State-level safeguards approaches, SIR reporting must adapt to reflect these evolutionary changes. This evolved report will better reflect the IAEA's transition to a more qualitative and information-driven approach, based upon State-as-a-whole considerations. This paper applies SAGSI's recommendations to the development of multiple models for an evolved SIR and finds that an SIR repurposed as a 'safeguards portal' could significantly enhance information delivery, clarity, and transparency. In addition, this paper finds that the 'portal concept' also appears to have value as a standardized information presentation and analysis platform for use by Country Officers, for continuity of knowledge purposes, and the IAEA Secretariat in the safeguards conclusion process. Accompanying this paper is a fully functional prototype of the 'portal' concept, built using commercial software and IAEA Annual Report data.

  19. IAEA Technical Meeting on Status of IAEA Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Initiative. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of the technical meeting were to: • exchange information between the Member States/International Organizations on national and international initiatives addressing knowledge preservation and data retrieval/collection in the field of fast neutron systems; • present and discuss the Member States’/International Organizations’ policies and conditions for releasing to the IAEA both publicly available and confidential information on fast neutron systems; • collect data on fast neutron systems provided by participating Member States/International Organizations and encourage participants to contribute in data collection; • provide recommendations for further IAEA initiatives in the field of fast reactor knowledge preservation

  20. IAEA, Fukushima Prefecture Sign Cooperation Memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano and the Governor of Fukushima Prefecture, Yuhei Sato, today signed a Memorandum of Cooperation confirming their willingness to implement concrete projects to help alleviate the consequences of the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. The Memorandum, signed on the sidelines of the three-day Fukushima Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Safety, includes arrangements to promote cooperation in two key areas: one on radiation monitoring and remediation between the IAEA and Fukushima Prefecture, and the other on human health between the IAEA and Fukushima Medical University. The Memorandum also highlights plans for a training centre in Fukushima Prefecture to help reinforce emergency preparedness and response activities, supported by the Government of Japan and Fukushima Prefecture. An IAEA Response and Assistance Network (RANET) Capacity Building Centre will be designated, with IAEA radiation monitoring equipment to be deployed in case of need, and to provide training in emergency preparedness and response in Japan and the Asia Pacific region. 'With this framework, the wisdom of the international community as well as the IAEA will be utilised in the process of reconstruction in Fukushima', said Japan's Minister of Foreign Affairs, Koichiro Gemba, who attended the signing ceremony. 'I'm very much encouraged by the conclusion of this Memorandum and I believe this will serve to promote reconstruction in Fukushima', said Governor Sato. 'We will also be able to disseminate to the rest of the world the knowledge and experience to be gained from the activities that we are conducting, and we hope this will be a symbol of Fukushima'. 'The IAEA has expertise in the areas of remediation and decontamination, as well as environmental monitoring and human health'. said Director General Amano. 'It is our hope that we will support Fukushima and at the same time serve as a bridge connecting the Prefecture and the world

  1. Report of the international workshop on safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials. (Supplement to IAEA-TECDOC-1074)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to Address the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at their ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat 'within existing resources to act as a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. To foster exchange of information and experience and to develop more specific advice based on this experience, the IAEA, in co-operation with the World Health Organization, conducted an International Workshop on Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Medical Facilities Which Use Radiation Generators and Radioactive Materials, held in Vienna, 28-30 June 1999. Whereas the focus in IAEA-TECDOC-1074 had been on identifying what might go wrong as a result of Y2K problems and on proposing methods to address them, the focus of the International Workshop was on sharing the experience gained in implementing the proposed methods - an approach consistent with the role of the Secretariat as 'a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions'

  2. Active control of internal transport barrier and confinement database in JT-60U reversed shear plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Yoshiteru; Takizuka, Tomonori; Shirai, Hiroshi; Fujita, Takaaki; Kamada, Yutaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Takeshi; Koide, Yoshihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-07-01

    Active control of internal transport barrier (ITB) and confinement properties of plasma with ITB have been studied in reversed shear plasmas. Modifications of the radial electric field (E{sub r}) profile by changing the combination of tangential neutral beams can control the ITB strength, where the contribution to E{sub r} from the toroidal rotation plays an important role. The ITB confinement database of reversed shear plasmas has been constructed. Stored energy is strongly correlated with poloidal magnetic field at the ITB foot. (author)

  3. International Intercomparison of Calorimeters. A Report of Measurements Made in the Reactor Melusine at C.E.N. Grenoble March 1970 by Eight Reactor Calorimetry Groups from Six Member States of the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, A.W.

    1970-01-01

    The Working Group on Reactor Radiation Measurements has recommended an international intercomparison of calorimeters through its Subgroup 5 on calorimetric methods. Through the cooperation of the IAEA and the Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Grenoble of the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique of France, the intercomparison was arranged. Representatives of eight dosimetry groups from six countries took part in this intercomparison which was carried out during the period 9-17 March 1970. This document will help workers in the field of absorbed dose measurements in reactors in choosing consistent and accurate procedures of experimentation and reporting data

  4. Communication dated 18 December 2013 received from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna on the European Union's Support for the IAEA Activities in the Areas of Nuclear Security and Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a note verbale dated 18 December 2013 from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna with Council Decision 2013/517/CFSP of 21 October 2013, in support of the IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. As requested in that communication, the note verbale and the enclosure are circulated herewith for information [fr

  5. Communication dated 18 December 2013 received from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna on the European Union's Support for the IAEA Activities in the Areas of Nuclear Security and Verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a note verbale dated 18 December 2013 from the Delegation of the European Union to the International Organisations in Vienna with Council Decision 2013/517/CFSP of 21 October 2013, in support of the IAEA activities in the areas of nuclear security and verification and in the framework of the implementation of the EU Strategy against Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. As requested in that communication, the note verbale and the enclosure are circulated herewith for information [es

  6. IAEA fundamental standards for protection against radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The Governor's Counsel of the IAEA has just approved the revision of existing norms, previously prepared in cooperation with the ILO, WHO and OECD. The revised norms represent a great advance in the efforts to reduce risks for which there is no threshold value. A further initiative of the IAEA is the program of radiation protection standards for nuclear power stations. They form the first international instructions for a normalised basis of safety in nuclear power stations. The need for exchange of information was emphasised at the International Conference in Stockholm in 1980. The existing safety norms were considered adequate at the time. The IAEA activities in the field of standards, advice and technical help, exchange of information and training and emergency planning are also mentioned. (Auth.)

  7. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeun Seung; Eom, Young Sam; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryu, Seung Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation`s integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi`s NUWINGS (Japan), AECL`s CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power`s PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  8. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeun Seung; Eom, Young Sam; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryu, Seung Hyun

    1996-06-01

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation's integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi's NUWINGS (Japan), AECL's CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power's PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new

  9. Joint IAEA/NNSA International Workshop Nuclear Forensics Methodologies for Practitioners 2013 Scenario Based Exercise – Version 4.0 Instructor’s Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Douglas, Matthew [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morley, Shannon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hill, David [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, New South Wales (Australia); Thompson, Paul [AWE, Aldermasten (United Kingtom); Santi, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gassman, Paul L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierson, Richard M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wallenius, Maria [European Commission, Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe, (Germany); Marks, Naomi [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01

    [Participants will serve as border guards for Reimerland. They will be given brief instruction on the operation of hand-held RadioIsotope DetectorS (RIDS) and be provided an intelligence briefing that tells them to be on the lookout for suspicious activity at their post. Their instruction will include directing suspicious vehicles to a location for secondary screening. If, after secondary screening, suspicions of a criminal act involving nuclear and or radioactive materials remain, participants have been instructed to request assistance from the NLEA, who will then setup and manage a radiological crime scene. Participants will watch a demonstration of two vehicles containing radioactive materials driving through and setting off a portal monitor. The first vehicle, a semi-tractor trailer, sets off only a gamma alarm. After the driver provides a shipping manifest of fertilizer, participants, posing as border guards, are expected to waive this vehicle through inspection. The second vehicle, an SUV, set off both gamma and 2 neutron alarms. The alarming of the neutron monitor should prompt participants to set up a secondary inspection of the vehicle immediately. The driver of the vehicle indicates he is in legal possession of an industrial instrument containing an old 133Ba source that has decayed to a level no longer requiring official paperwork according to the IAEA and internationally accepted transportation regulations. Authorities have verified that the industrial source does fit the description of one that is sold commercially. However, upon setting up a secondary screening, participants will use hand-held detectors to locate several other radioactive sources emanating from a black duffle bag in the rear of the vehicle (Figure 1). Hand held detectors detect the presence of 133Ba, and Pu. Upon questioning, the driver only commits to having the 133Ba industrial source and cannot account for the detection of neutrons within his vehicle. Since neutron alarms also

  10. Joint IAEA/NNSA International Workshop Nuclear Forensics Methodologies for Practitioners 2013 Scenario Based Exercise - Version 4.0 Instructor's Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwantes, Jon M.; Douglas, Matthew; Morley, Shannon M.; Hill, David; Thompson, Paul; Santi, Peter; Gassman, Paul L.; Meier, David E.; Pierson, Richard M.; Wallenius, Maria; Marks, Naomi

    2013-01-01

    [Participants will serve as border guards for Reimerland. They will be given brief instruction on the operation of hand-held RadioIsotope DetectorS (RIDS) and be provided an intelligence briefing that tells them to be on the lookout for suspicious activity at their post. Their instruction will include directing suspicious vehicles to a location for secondary screening. If, after secondary screening, suspicions of a criminal act involving nuclear and or radioactive materials remain, participants have been instructed to request assistance from the NLEA, who will then setup and manage a radiological crime scene. Participants will watch a demonstration of two vehicles containing radioactive materials driving through and setting off a portal monitor. The first vehicle, a semi-tractor trailer, sets off only a gamma alarm. After the driver provides a shipping manifest of fertilizer, participants, posing as border guards, are expected to waive this vehicle through inspection. The second vehicle, an SUV, set off both gamma and 2 neutron alarms. The alarming of the neutron monitor should prompt participants to set up a secondary inspection of the vehicle immediately. The driver of the vehicle indicates he is in legal possession of an industrial instrument containing an old 133Ba source that has decayed to a level no longer requiring official paperwork according to the IAEA and internationally accepted transportation regulations. Authorities have verified that the industrial source does fit the description of one that is sold commercially. However, upon setting up a secondary screening, participants will use hand-held detectors to locate several other radioactive sources emanating from a black duffle bag in the rear of the vehicle (Figure 1). Hand held detectors detect the presence of 133Ba, and Pu. Upon questioning, the driver only commits to having the 133Ba industrial source and cannot account for the detection of neutrons within his vehicle. Since neutron alarms also

  11. Construction of the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S. J.; Tatge, C. B.; Slater, T. F.; Bretones, P. S.; Schleigh, S.

    2016-12-01

    Perhaps more than any other science discipline-based education research field, the scholarly literature base describing and documenting astronomy education research is highly fragmented and widely dispersed across numerous journals. The resulting wide diversity of journals that publish astronomy education research presents an arduous challenge for scholars trying to best understand what work has been done and what work still needs to be done. Moreover, a vast amount of education research on the teaching and learning of astronomy exists in dissertations that were never published and even more exists in the realm of un-disseminated grey literature hosted in conference proceedings and society newsletters going back decades. With a few notable exceptions far less extensive than the current project, there has been no comprehensive repository for cataloging astronomy education research methods and results to date. In response, an international cadre of scholars coordinated by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are creating the underlying structure for an online database in order to conduct an international Study of Astronomy Reasoning, iSTAR, project. The online iSTAR database serves as an online host to bring together in one place digital copies of hard to locate journal articles, isolated dissertations and theses, and professional meeting contributions to extend the world's scholars abilities to more easily find and utilize a far broader collection of astronomy education research literature than has been previously available. Works are categorized by research method, nature of study-participants, educational learning venue studied, country and language of the study, and other fruitfully useful categories. Scholars wishing to add their own literature resources are encouraged to contribute to the online database located at istardatabase.org

  12. IAEA Nuclear Security Human Resource Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, A.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA is at the forefront of international efforts to strengthen the world's nuclear security framework. The current Nuclear Security Plan for 2006-2009 was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors in September 2005. This Plan has three main points of focus: needs assessment, prevention, detection and response. Its overall objective is to achieve improved worldwide security of nuclear and other radioactive material in use, storage and transport, and of their associated facilities. This will be achieved, in particular, through the provision of guidelines and recommendations, human resource development, nuclear security advisory services and assistance for the implementation of the framework in States, upon request. The presentation provides an overview of the IAEA nuclear security human resource development program that is divided into two parts: training and education. Whereas the training program focuses on filling gaps between the actual performance of personnel working in the area of nuclear security and the required competencies and skills needed to meet the international requirements and recommendations described in UN and IAEA documents relating to nuclear security, the Educational Program in Nuclear Security aims at developing nuclear security experts and specialists, at fostering a nuclear security culture and at establishing in this way sustainable knowledge in this field within a State. The presentation also elaborates on the nuclear security computer based learning component and provides insights into the use of human resource development as a tool in achieving the IAEA's long term goal of improving sustainable nuclear security in States. (author)

  13. Contribution of the Member State Support Programmes to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortakov, V.; Gardiner, D.; Rautjaervi, J.

    1999-01-01

    Over the last twenty years, Member States of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have provided invaluable technical support to IAEA Safeguards. This support has covered practically all aspects of traditional safeguards activities and also those activities recently proposed and introduced for strengthening the safeguards system. As of August 1997, there were fourteen Member States, plus EURATOM, with active programmes in support of IAEA safeguards and the activities conducted under these Member State Support Programmes (MSSPs) are currently valued at an annual twenty million dollars of extra-budgetary contribution to the IAEA. The overall administration in the IAEA of the support programmes is the responsibility of Support Programmes Administration (SPA) in the Safeguards Division of Technical Services. This paper describes the roles and the contributions of the MSSPs, the functions of the MSSP administration activities, and the vital importance the IAEA attaches to the MSSPs. (author)

  14. IAEA safeguards for the Fissile Materials Disposition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, D.A.

    1995-06-01

    This document is an overview of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards and the basic requirements or elements of an IAEA safeguards regime. The primary objective of IAEA safeguards is the timely detection of the diversion of a significant quantity of material and the timely detection of undeclared activities. The two important components of IAEA safeguards to accomplish their primary objective are nuclear material accountancy and containment and surveillance. This overview provides guidance to the Fissile Materials Disposition Project for IAEA inspection requirements. IAEA requirements, DOE Orders, and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations will be used as the basis for designing a safeguards and security system for the facilities recommended by the Fissile Materials Disposition Project

  15. A strategy study on the effective participation in the IAEA technical cooperation programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Joon Keuk; Choi, P. H.; Kim, K. P.; Hong, Y. D.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Chung, H. S.; Han, B. O.; Seo, M. W.; Chung, J. M.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are to seek the most effective means of participation in implementing IAEA technical cooperation programs, to seek and establish a desirable role for Korea in these program, to predict future opportunities among IAEA programs, to enhance the status of Korea within the international society and to keep up with rapidly changing international nuclear developments in effective and positive ways. Participation in IAEA programs are to coincide with our efforts to upgrade and achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Seven activities should be considered in Korea's future directions regarding the IAEA. These include strengthening our diplomatic activities, expanding coordinated research programs (CRP's), domestic personnel becoming IAEA staff members, encouraging domestic experts to participate as members of IAEA advisory groups, increasing participation in international meetings, implementing footnote a/ projects, strengthening cooperation with the IAEA-operational research laboratories and actively implementing technology transfer to developing countries and encouraging IAEA fellowships. (author). 57 refs., 74 tabs., 17 figs

  16. 17. IAEA fusion energy conference. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Book of extended synopses of the papers, accepted by a international programme committee for presentation at the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, Japan. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory

  17. Inspections talks with IAEA again broken off

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    North Korea again appears likely to resist more detailed safeguards inspections of its disputed nuclear facilities by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The country's loner status was reinforced during the IAEA General Conference in September, when no other nation joined North Korea in voting against the placement of the inspection issue on the conference's agenda

  18. 17. IAEA fusion energy conference. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    Book of extended synopses of the papers, accepted by a international programme committee for presentation at the 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Yokohama, Japan. The subjects covered are magnetic confinement experiments, plasma heating and current drive, ITER EDA, inertial fusion energy, innovative concepts, fusion technology and theory Refs, figs, tabs

  19. Holy See participation in the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Holy See has participated in every General Conference of the IAEA and has made a special contribution in Vienna to international co-operation and the development of the peaceful atom. On August 20, 1957 the Holy See became a full member of the Agency. (author)

  20. IAEA Safeguards: Present status and experience gained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, L.; Buechler, C.; Haegglund, E.

    1983-01-01

    IAEA safeguards are at the present under critical review with regard to their purpose and effectiveness. This paper describes the development of the IAEA Safeguards System from the early days, when procedures were developed on an ad hoc basis, to the present day. The development of State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material (SSAC), and of sophisticated instrumentation, has been necessary to deal with the rapid growth in the quantities of nuclear material and in the number of facilities under safeguards. The paper also discusses some of the managerial and organizational issues that are inherent in such a large international inspectorate. (author)

  1. IAEA coaches new entrants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouette, I.

    2016-01-01

    IAEA provides new entrants in nuclear electricity production with a broad and integrated range of services. The aim is to make the new entrant full aware of the commitments and obligations linked to the development of a civil nuclear program. IAEA offers a 3-step approach. The first step assesses the elements the new entrants has to take into account to launch a nuclear program. The second step deals with the preliminary works before the construction starts but after the political decision to launch a nuclear program has been taken. At the end of the second step the national authorities are able to launch tenders and negotiate contracts for the construction of a nuclear power plant. The third step is dedicated to the necessary activities to implement the first nuclear power plant. The end of the third step means that national authorities are able to issue exploitation licenses for operating nuclear power stations. All along the IAEA accompaniment numerous meetings are scheduled in which IAEA experts meet the 3 organisations that represent the new entrant: the government, the plant operator and the national safety authority. An important element of the first step is to help the country to assess the necessary human resource in terms of qualified staff. (A.C.)

  2. The IAEA laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    While nuclear technology continues to expand in all scientific fields, both research and analysis become increasingly important aspects of the work carried out at the IAEA's two principal laboratories at Seibersdorf and Monaco. They also provide training facilities for students and graduates from many Member States. The following outlines give a brief history of their development, and their present work. (author)

  3. IAEA Safety Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-09-01

    The IAEA Safety Standards Series comprises publications of a regulatory nature covering nuclear safety, radiation protection, radioactive waste management, the transport of radioactive material, the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and management systems. These publications are issued under the terms of Article III of the IAEA’s Statute, which authorizes the IAEA to establish “standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property”. Safety standards are categorized into: • Safety Fundamentals, stating the basic objective, concepts and principles of safety; • Safety Requirements, establishing the requirements that must be fulfilled to ensure safety; and • Safety Guides, recommending measures for complying with these requirements for safety. For numbering purposes, the IAEA Safety Standards Series is subdivided into General Safety Requirements and General Safety Guides (GSR and GSG), which are applicable to all types of facilities and activities, and Specific Safety Requirements and Specific Safety Guides (SSR and SSG), which are for application in particular thematic areas. This booklet lists all current IAEA Safety Standards, including those forthcoming

  4. The IAEA laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1973-07-01

    While nuclear technology continues to expand in all scientific fields, both research and analysis become increasingly important aspects of the work carried out at the IAEA's two principal laboratories at Seibersdorf and Monaco. They also provide training facilities for students and graduates from many Member States. The following outlines give a brief history of their development, and their present work. (author)

  5. IAEA Sampling Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geist, William H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-15

    The objectives for this presentation are to describe the method that the IAEA uses to determine a sampling plan for nuclear material measurements; describe the terms detection probability and significant quantity; list the three nuclear materials measurement types; describe the sampling method applied to an item facility; and describe multiple method sampling.

  6. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the PIRLS 2011, Background Questionnaires and Curriculum Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The PIRLS 2011 international database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the PIRLS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the PIRLS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 5 sections: (1) Student Questionnaire; (2) Home Questionnaire (Learning to Read…

  7. Total internal partition sums for molecular species in the 2000 edition of the HITRAN database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, J.; Gamache, R.R.; Goldman, A.; Rothman, L.S.; Perrin, A.

    2003-01-01

    Total internal partition sums (TIPS) are calculated for all molecular species in the 2000 HITRAN database. In addition, the TIPS for 13 other isotopomers/isotopologues of ozone and carbon dioxide are presented. The calculations address the corrections suggested by Goldman et al. (JQSRT 66 (2000) 455). The calculations consider the temperature range 70-3000 K to be applicable to a variety of remote sensing needs. The method of calculation for each molecular species is stated and comparisons with data from the literature are discussed. A new method of recall for the partition sums, Lagrange 4-point interpolation, is developed. This method, unlike previous versions of the TIPS code, allows all molecular species to be considered

  8. International patent analysis of water source heat pump based on orbit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na

    2018-02-01

    Using orbit database, this paper analysed the international patents of water source heat pump (WSHP) industry with patent analysis methods such as analysis of publication tendency, geographical distribution, technology leaders and top assignees. It is found that the beginning of the 21st century is a period of rapid growth of the patent application of WSHP. Germany and the United States had done researches and development of WSHP in an early time, but now Japan and China have become important countries of patent applications. China has been developing faster and faster in recent years, but the patents are concentrated in universities and urgent to be transferred. Through an objective analysis, this paper aims to provide appropriate decision references for the development of domestic WSHP industry.

  9. The International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA): A New Resource for Global Efficiency Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F; McNeil, Michael A; Tu, Thomas; Xu, Feiyang

    2017-09-06

    A major barrier to effective appliance efficiency program design and evaluation is a lack of data for determination of market baselines and cost-effective energy savings potential. The data gap is particularly acute in developing countries, which may have the greatest savings potential per unit GDP. To address this need, we are developing the International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA), which automatically compiles data from a wide variety of online sources to create a unified repository of information on efficiency, price, and features for a wide range of energy-consuming products across global markets. This paper summarizes the database framework and demonstrates the power of IDEA as a resource for appliance efficiency research and policy development. Using IDEA data for refrigerators in China and India, we develop robust cost-effectiveness indicators that allow rapid determination of savings potential within each market, as well as comparison of that potential across markets and appliance types. We discuss implications for future energy efficiency policy development.

  10. Characteristics of internal transport barriers from the JET optimised shear database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochard, F.; Litaudon, X.; Soeldner, F.

    2000-02-01

    The general features of the Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) obtained in the JET 'Optimised Shear' regime are deduced from the analyses of a large database of discharges including the experiments performed with a mixture of Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) ions. The coupled and complex spatio-temporal dynamics of the ITBs are studied from the radial profiles measurements of the thermal ion and electron temperatures. The spatial locations of the ITBs inside the plasma column are deduced from the radial derivatives of the plasmas profiles. In particular, our analyses show that the radial positions of the ITB follow the same evolution for both the electron and ion temperature profiles. Among the JET 'Optimised Shear' database, we propose to distinguish two categories of discharges depending on the edge conditions: the ITBs are triggered either with an L-mode edge or simultaneously with an edge transport barrier (H-mode). The characteristics of the ITBs and plasma performances of these two categories are compared. Experimental conditions to successfully combine the edge and core transport barriers are given. In particular, emphasis is given on the description and analyses of the 'Optimised Shear' discharges which combine an ITB with an ELMy edge since this operating mode opens the route to high performance regimes which could be extrapolated towards steady-state conditions. (author)

  11. Application of the International Union of Radioecologists soil-to-plant database to Canadian settings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppard, S C [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1995-12-01

    The International Union of Radioecologists (IUR) has compiled a very large database of soil-to-plant transfer factors. These factors are ratios of the radionuclide concentrations in dry plants divided by the corresponding concentrations in dry soil to a specified depth or thickness. In this report the factors are called CR values, for concentration ratio. The CR values are empirical and are considered element-specific. The IUR database has a lot of data for Cs, Sr, Co, Pu and Np, and contains records for Am, Ce, Cm, I, La, Mn, Ni, Pb, Po, Ra, Ru, Sb, Tc, Th, U and Zn. Where there was a large amount of data, interpolation for ranges of soil conditions was possible. The tables presented here summarize the data in a way that should be immediately useful to modellers. Values are averaged for a number of crop types and species. Correction factors are developed to facilitate interpolation among soil conditions. The data tables in this report do not substitute for site-specific measurements, but they will provide data where measurement is impossible and give a background to check more recent data. (author) 4 refs ., 48 tabs.

  12. Intercalibration of radiological measurements for surveillance purposes of the internal dosimetry laboratory coordinated by the IAEA; Intercalibracion de mediciones radiologicas para fines de vigilancia del laboratorio de dosimetria interna coordinada por el OIEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro L, M.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2002-07-15

    The ININ of Mexico participated in this intercomparison organized by the IAEA in 2000. The objective of this activity is that the dosimetry laboratories that participate can validate the programs of internal dosimetry, with the purpose of improving its capacity in the evaluation of the internal dose and have access to a mechanism to evaluate its dosimetry system under real conditions. The specific objectives of this intercomparison were: 1. To evaluate the participant's capacity to manage the measurements of individual monitoring in terms of the activity in the phantom. 2. To provide the access to the unique calibration resources that otherwise would not be available. 3. To compare the operation of several detection systems, the geometry, phantoms, calibration methods and methods for the evaluation of activity of the radionuclide used by each institution. 4. To provide the independent verification of the direct measurement methods of the dosimetry service. (Author)

  13. Development of a national anthropogenic heating database with an extrapolation for international cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailor, David J.; Georgescu, Matei; Milne, Jeffrey M.; Hart, Melissa A.

    2015-10-01

    Given increasing utility of numerical models to examine urban impacts on meteorology and climate, there exists an urgent need for accurate representation of seasonally and diurnally varying anthropogenic heating data, an important component of the urban energy budget for cities across the world. Incorporation of anthropogenic heating data as inputs to existing climate modeling systems has direct societal implications ranging from improved prediction of energy demand to health assessment, but such data are lacking for most cities. To address this deficiency we have applied a standardized procedure to develop a national database of seasonally and diurnally varying anthropogenic heating profiles for 61 of the largest cities in the United Stated (U.S.). Recognizing the importance of spatial scale, the anthropogenic heating database developed includes the city scale and the accompanying greater metropolitan area. Our analysis reveals that a single profile function can adequately represent anthropogenic heating during summer but two profile functions are required in winter, one for warm climate cities and another for cold climate cities. On average, although anthropogenic heating is 40% larger in winter than summer, the electricity sector contribution peaks during summer and is smallest in winter. Because such data are similarly required for international cities where urban climate assessments are also ongoing, we have made a simple adjustment accounting for different international energy consumption rates relative to the U.S. to generate seasonally and diurnally varying anthropogenic heating profiles for a range of global cities. The methodological approach presented here is flexible and straightforwardly applicable to cities not modeled because of presently unavailable data. Because of the anticipated increase in global urban populations for many decades to come, characterizing this fundamental aspect of the urban environment - anthropogenic heating - is an essential

  14. IAEA safeguards and non-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harry, R J.S.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is given of efforts to contain the nuclear weapons proliferation during half a century of man-controlled nuclear fission. An initial policy of denial did not work, a following period of cooperation needed a gradual strengthening of international assurances on the peaceful character of the flourishing use of nuclear techniques for power generation and of other applications. The focus of the nuclear weapon proliferation concern changed from the highly developed states to developing states. The Non-Proliferation Treaty laid the basis for a unique system of voluntarily accepted international inspections to verify the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA got the task to implement this `Full Scope Safeguards` on all nuclear material and all nuclear activities in the non-nuclear weapon states. Thanks to the structure of the IAEA, in which both proponent and states with a critical attitude take part in the decision making process on the IAEA execution of its tasks, a balanced, and widely acceptable system emerged. International developments necessitated additional improvements of the non-proliferation system. The increase of strength of sub-national groups triggered international cooperation on physical protection, about a quarter of a century ago. More recently, it appeared that NPT states with assumed nuclear weapon ambitions operated in the margins between the interpretation of IAEA safeguards and the spirit and purpose of NPT. Improvements of the IAEA safeguards and a stronger cooperation between states, including the constraints which exporting states have imposed on nuclear supplies, strengthen the safeguards system. The important reductions in the two largest nuclear weapon arsenals lead, together with the delay in the fast breeder implementation, to large stockpiles of nuclear weapon usable materials. Also in this areas new internationally credible assurances have to be obtained, that these materials will never return to nuclear weapon applications.

  15. IAEA safeguards and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, R.J.S.

    1995-02-01

    An overview is given of the efforts to contain the nuclear weapons proliferation during half a century of man-controlled nuclear fission. An initial policy of denial did not work, a following period of cooperation needed a gradual strengthening of international assurances on the exclusively peaceful character of the flourishing use of nuclear techniques for power generation and of other applications. The focus of the nuclear weapon proliferation concern changed from the highly developed states to developing states. The Non-Proliferation Treaty laid the basis for a unique system of voluntarily accepted international inspections to verify the peaceful use of nuclear energy. The IAEA got the task to implement this 'Full Scope Safeguards' on all nuclear material and all nuclear activities in the non-nuclear weapon states. Thanks to the structure of the IAEA, in which both proponent and states with a critical attitude take part in the decision making process on the IAEA execution of its tasks, a balanced, and widely acceptable system emerged. International developments necessitated additional improvements of the non-proliferation system. The increase of strength of sub-national groups triggered international cooperation on physical protection, about a quarter of a century ago. More recently, it appeared that NPT states with assumed nuclear weapon ambitions operated in the margins between the interpretation of IAEA safeguards and the spirit and purpose of NPT. Improvements of the IAEA safeguards and a stronger cooperation between states, including the constraints which exporting states have imposed on nuclear supplies, strengthen the safeguards system. The important reductions in the two largest nuclear weapon arsenals lead, together with the delay in the fast breeder implementation, to large stockpiles of nuclear weapon usable materials. Also in this areas new internationally credible assurances have to be obtained, that these materials will never return to nuclear

  16. Safety standards of IAEA for management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincze, P.

    2005-01-01

    IAEA has developed a new series of safety standards which are assigned for constitution of the conditions and which give the instruction for setting up the management systems that integrate the aims of safety, health, life environment and quality. The new standard shall replace IAEA 50-C-Q - Requirements for security of the quality for safety in nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities as well as 14 related safety instructions mentioned in the Safety series No. 50-C/SG-Q (1996). When developing of this complex, integrated set of requirements for management systems, the IAEA requirements 50-C-Q (1996) were taken into consideration as well as the publications developed within the International organisation for standardization (ISO) ISO 9001:2000 and ISO14001: 1996. The experience of European Union member states during the development, implementation and improvement of the management systems were also taken into consideration

  17. IAEA film library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-01-15

    Most of the scientific and technical films shown during the Second Geneva Conference for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy were donated to IAEA by the producing countries at the end of the Conference. They will form the basic stock for the Agency's loan service intended to provide atomic energy institutions in Member States with film material. A detailed catalogue of the films, classified according to subject and giving conditions of loan or purchase, is now being prepared. In addition to this, information on all films produced in Member Countries dealing with the peaceful uses cf atomic energy is being assembled. The documentary information contained in the films in IAEA's possession relates to the following subjects: national programmes; nuclear physics; accelerators; plasma and fusion; reactors (power, research, material testing and experimental); prospecting and mining; ore dressing; metallurgy; production of fuel elements; treatment of irradiated fuel elements; protection against radiation; detection and counting; uses of radiation in medicine, biochemistry, agriculture and industry; industrial application of nuclear explosions. Most of the commentaries are in the language of the producing country. A few films are available in a choice of two languages. The films donated to the Agency total 82, two of which have been produced in Canada, 13 in France, one in India, one in Romania, one in Spain, 14 in the United Kingdom, one in the Union of South Africa, 47 in the United States of America and two in the USSR: they are mostly illustrations of papers presented at the Second Geneva Conference. In arranging for the circulation of scientific and technical films IAEA wishes to help meet some of the training and information needs of Member States. It is hoped that all organizations producing films on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will entrust copies to the IAEA with a view to their widest possible circulation. In the meantime, the Agency's films have been given

  18. IAEA film library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Most of the scientific and technical films shown during the Second Geneva Conference for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy were donated to IAEA by the producing countries at the end of the Conference. They will form the basic stock for the Agency's loan service intended to provide atomic energy institutions in Member States with film material. A detailed catalogue of the films, classified according to subject and giving conditions of loan or purchase, is now being prepared. In addition to this, information on all films produced in Member Countries dealing with the peaceful uses cf atomic energy is being assembled. The documentary information contained in the films in IAEA's possession relates to the following subjects: national programmes; nuclear physics; accelerators; plasma and fusion; reactors (power, research, material testing and experimental); prospecting and mining; ore dressing; metallurgy; production of fuel elements; treatment of irradiated fuel elements; protection against radiation; detection and counting; uses of radiation in medicine, biochemistry, agriculture and industry; industrial application of nuclear explosions. Most of the commentaries are in the language of the producing country. A few films are available in a choice of two languages. The films donated to the Agency total 82, two of which have been produced in Canada, 13 in France, one in India, one in Romania, one in Spain, 14 in the United Kingdom, one in the Union of South Africa, 47 in the United States of America and two in the USSR: they are mostly illustrations of papers presented at the Second Geneva Conference. In arranging for the circulation of scientific and technical films IAEA wishes to help meet some of the training and information needs of Member States. It is hoped that all organizations producing films on the peaceful uses of atomic energy will entrust copies to the IAEA with a view to their widest possible circulation. In the meantime, the Agency's films have been given

  19. IAEA Technical Meeting on Status of IAEA Fast Reactor Knowledge Preservation Initiative. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to needs expressed by Member States and within a broader IAEA-wide effort in nuclear knowledge preservation, the IAEA has been carrying out a dedicated initiative on Fast Reactor Data Knowledge Preservation (FRKP). The main objectives of the FRKP initiative are to: • Halt the on-going loss of information related to Fast Reactors (FR); • Collect, retrieve, preserve and make accessible already existing data and information on FR. These objectives require the implementation of activities supporting digital document archival, exchange, search and retrieval and facilitating, by developing and using suitable standards and IT tools, the knowledge preservation over the next decades. To this purpose the IAEA has developed the Fast Reactor Knowledge Organization System (FRKOS), a web-based application employing IAEA methodology and approach for categorization of FR knowledge domain, which allows creating a comprehensive and well-structured international inventory of fast reactor data and information provided by different Member States. The resulting Web Portal is established and maintained by the IAEA. The IAEA knowledge preservation initiatives and tools in the field of fast neutron systems - which were presented and very well received during the recent IAEA Fast Reactor and Related Fuel Cycles Conference (FR13) - are supposed to be of interest for national nuclear authorities, regulators, scientific and research organizations, commercial companies and all other stakeholders involved in fast reactor activities at national or international level. The objectives of the technical meeting were to: • Exchange information between the member states/international organizations on national and international initiatives addressing knowledge preservation and data retrieval/collection in the field of fast neutron systems; • Present and discuss the member states’/international organizations’ policies and conditions for releasing to the IAEA both publicly

  20. NIRS inaugurated as IAEA Collaborating Centre. Its presence and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Sakai, Kazuo; Kamada, Tadashi; Imai, Reiko; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Nakane, Takeshi; Burkart, W.; Chhem, R.; Matsuura, Shojiro

    2010-01-01

    The feature article is the collection of documents commemorating the 2010 designation of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) as one of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Collaborating Centres (CC) again, involving 4 introductory chapters containing 9 sections in total. The IAEA-CC concept, essentially for the 4-year project, started to globally give shape by designating 3 organizations in some countries in 2004, NIRS as a CC worked from 2006 and the present designation is the renewed one. There are 17 IAEA-CCs at present. The title of Chapter 1 of the article is the same as above title by NIRS President and of Chapter 2, ''IAEA-CC scheme'' by NIRS Senior Specialist/ professor of Gunma Pref. College of Health Sciences/ former IAEA staff. Chapter 3 entitled ''Research Development of Next Four Years in Three Collaboration Areas'', contains 3 topics of the very areas mainly responsible to the project, of biological effect and mechanism of low dose radiation by NIRS Director of Res. Center for Radiation Protection, IAEA-CC plan (radiotherapy) by the Director for Charged Particle Therapy, and IAEA-CC activity and research at Molecular Imaging Center by its Director. Chapter 4 entitled ''Expectation to NIRS'' contains four topics; Expectations for the reinforcement of collaboration with IAEA whose new priority is cancer control by the Japanese Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary in Vienna; Welcoming NIRS to join IAEA-CC network (an interview with IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of Nuclear Sciences and Applications); Honoured to invite NIRS to establish a new partnership with IAEA (an interview with IAEA Director of Division of Human Health, Dept. of Nuclear Sciences and Applications); Expectation to NIRS in peaceful use of nuclear and radiation by President of the Nuclear Safety Research Association. (T.T.)

  1. National intercomparison on in vivo measurement of Iodine-131 in the thyroid within a Brazilian Internal Dosimetry Laboratory Network - IAEA PROJECT BRA9055; Intercomparacao nacional de medicao in vivo de Iodo-131 na tireoide - Projeto TC IAEA BRA 9055

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dantas, B.M.; Dantas, A.L.A.; Lucena, E.A., E-mail: bmdantas@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Cardoso, J.S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramos, M.A.P.; Sa, M.S. [Eletrobras Eletronuclear, Angra dos Reis, RJ (Brazil); Alonso, T.C.; Silva, T.V.; Oliveira, C.M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, F.F.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lacerda, I.V.B. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Fajgelj, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    In 2011, in Brazil, a National Intercalibration and Intercomparison exercise on in vivo measurement of iodine-131 in the thyroid was carried out in the scope of the Project IAEABRA9055 'Establishing a National Laboratory Network for Internal Individual Monitoring'. The exercise was conducted by the Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) and the Institute for Nuclear and Energetic Research (IPEN), from National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). The objectives of the exercise were to (i) update information on current instrumentation resources available in the in vivo monitoring laboratories in operation in Brazil and to (ii) verify the reliability of the results of measurements of iodine-131 in thyroid provided by those laboratories. The procedure consisted on the measurement of a neck-thyroid anthropomorphic phantom provided by the In Vivo Monitoring Laboratory of IRD, containing two barium-133 standard sources certified by the National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation. Each participant should measure the phantom in a period of five days. The five laboratories are located in the States of Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Minas Gerais and Pernambuco, in the following Institutions: Institute for Radiation Protection and Dosimetry, Nuclear Power Station Almirante Alvaro Alberto, Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology, Institute for Nuclear and Energetic Research, and Regional Center for Nuclear Sciences. The results reported included: activity measured, minimum detectable activity, accuracy and precision. The performance of the laboratories was evaluated according to the criteria suggested by ANSI 13.30 indicating their capacity to provide reliable results of iodine-131 content in the thyroid. (author)

  2. Astronomy Education Research Observations from the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatge, C. B.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.; Schleigh, S.; McKinnon, D.

    2016-12-01

    Historically, an important part of the scientific research cycle is to situate any research project within the landscape of the existing scientific literature. In the field of discipline-based astronomy education research, grappling with the existing literature base has proven difficult because of the difficulty in obtaining research reports from around the world, particularly early ones. In order to better survey and efficiently utilize the wide and fractured range and domain of astronomy education research methods and results, the iSTAR international Study of Astronomical Reasoning database project was initiated. The project aims to host a living, online repository of dissertations, theses, journal articles, and grey literature resources to serve the world's discipline-based astronomy education research community. The first domain of research artifacts ingested into the iSTAR database were doctoral dissertations. To the authors' great surprise, nearly 300 astronomy education research dissertations were found from the last 100-years. Few, if any, of the literature reviews from recent astronomy education dissertations surveyed even come close to summarizing this many dissertations, most of which have not been published in traditional journals, as re-publishing one's dissertation research as a journal article was not a widespread custom in the education research community until recently. A survey of the iSTAR database dissertations reveals that the vast majority of work has been largely quantitative in nature until the last decade. We also observe that modern-era astronomy education research writings reaches as far back as 1923 and that the majority of dissertations come from the same eight institutions. Moreover, most of the astronomy education research work has been done covering learners' grasp of broad knowledge of astronomy rather than delving into specific learning targets, which has been more in vogue during the last two decades. The surprisingly wide breadth

  3. The standards of Radiation Protection of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butragueno, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection are technological disciplines whose international character have been recognised since the very beginning. Safety culture and the defense in depth criterium address in the same way this international collaboration. The International Atomic Energy Agency, with headquater in Vienna, is specially sensitive to this aspect and a significant amount of resources has been dedicated to the promotion of a closer international collaboration through the promotion of two complementary programs: the Convention on Nuclear Safety and the Convention on Rad waste Management, and the reconstruction of a great piramide of standards, that staring with Fundamental Principles, is followed with a set of Basic Safety Standards and completed with Safety Requirements and additional technical information, that provide practical ways to implement the Fundamental Principles. This article describe briefly the RASS Program of the IAEA (Radiation Safety Standards) and the work of the Technical Committees established to assess the Director General of the IAEA in this task. (Author)

  4. IAEA Remediation Mission Issues Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Full text: A team of international experts today completed their assessment of the strategy and plans being considered by the Japanese authorities to remediate the areas off-site TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Their Final Report, delivered to the Japanese authorities, is available here. ''A lot of good work, done at all levels, is on-going in Japan in the area of environmental remediation,'' said Juan Carlos Lentijo, Team Leader and General Director for Radiation Protection at Spain's nuclear regulatory authority. In the report, Japan is encouraged to continue its remediation efforts, taking into account the advice provided by the Mission. ''In the early phases of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, a very cautious approach was adopted by the Japanese authorities in terms of dealing with the handling of residue materials. It is considered right to do so,'' Lentijo said. ''However, at this point in time, we see that there is room to take a more balanced approach, focussing on the real priority areas, classifying residue materials and adopting appropriate remediation measures on the basis of the results of safety assessments for each specific situation.'' The IAEA stands ready to support Japan as it continues its efforts to remediate the environment in the area off-site the Fukushima Daiichi NPP. The IAEA sent the mission to Japan from 7 to 15 October 2011 following a request from the country's government. The mission, comprising 12 international and IAEA experts from several countries, visited numerous locations in the Fukushima Prefecture and conducted meetings in Tokyo and Fukushima with Japanese officials from several ministries and institutions. A Preliminary Summary Report was issued on 14 October. Background The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP has led to elevated levels of radiation over large areas. The Government of Japan has been formulating a strategy and plans to implement countermeasures to remediate these areas. The IAEA

  5. The IAEA technical Co-operation a partner in development in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Saiedi, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Div. of Public Information

    1995-10-01

    Each country was to find means of achieving sustainable development, and for this, technology within a framework of regional and international co-operation are of utmost importance. The IAEA plays a major role in promoting nuclear technologies for development. Highlights of the IAEA`s technical cooperation programme are given in this paper.

  6. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1999-03-01

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to

  7. Future direction for implementing the multilateral cooperation with the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Pyo; Hong, Young Don

    1999-03-01

    Korea has achieved remarkable results in the development of nuclear technology over the past years. Nuclear R and D programs have been actively pursued with the aim of enhancing nuclear technological capability to the level of nuclear advanced countries by early 2000. Worth noting is the fact that the IAEA has played an important role in facilitating Korea's acquisition of advanced nuclear technologies by participating in IAEA technical cooperation programmes, and technical cooperation with the IAEA has laid a firm groundwork for Korea to achieve self-reliance in nuclear technology. Technical cooperation with the IAEA should be steadily pursued so that Korea can play a leading role in the international nuclear arena in the years to come. Up to now, the study of major programmes and of the current status of overall technical cooperation projects, which have been implemented by the IAEA, has been insufficient. It should be noted that analysis of the assistance provided by the IAEA leaves something to be desired. In this regard, analyzing the current status of technical cooperation projects as well as recommending policy direction is required in a bid to implement IAEA technical cooperation projects systematically. Korea's status within the IAEA, including activities in the Advisory Committee and the current status of its participation in Coordinated Research Programmes (CRP) and other major programmes underway, is presented in this report. The policy direction for and implementation status of IAEA technical cooperation programmes are explained at length. The current status of technical cooperation programmes carried out in the 1997-1998 cycle and those to be implemented in the 1992-2000 cycle are also described in this report. Strategies for upgrading Korea's status within the IAEA as well as directions for nuclear cooperation through the IAEA were presented in this study to positively deal with rapid changes in the international nuclear arena and to efficiently

  8. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H.

    1993-01-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.)

  9. The IAEA Accident Management Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, L.; Jankowski, M.; Mauersberger, H. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

    1993-02-01

    Accident prevention and mitigation programmes and the Emergency Response System (ERS) are important elements of the Agency's activities in the area of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety. Safety Codes and Guides on siting, design, quality assurance and the operation of NPPs have been produced and are used by NPP operating organizations. Nuclear safety evaluation services are provided by the IAEA. The Emergency Response System and the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) have been developed. The framework for the development of an accident management programme has been set up. The main goal is to develop an Accident Management Manual to provide a systematic, structured approach to the development and implementation of an accident management programme at NPPs. An outline of the Manual has been distributed and the first draft is available. The component parts are: Co-ordinated research programmes (CRPs) on severe accident management and containment behaviour; the use of vulnerability analysis; mitigation of the effects of hydrogen, and generic symptom oriented emergency operating procedures. The IAEA provides guidance by the dissemination of information on methods for accident management; collates information on approaches in this field in different organizations and countries; and arranges exchange of experience and the promulgation of knowledge through the training of NPP managers and senior technical staff. (orig.).

  10. Vitis International Variety Catalogue (VIVC: A cultivar database referenced by genetic profiles and morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maul Erika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the Vitis International Variety Catalogue (VIVC dates back to 1984. The idea was to virtually assemble all accessions maintained in the worldwide existing collections to face genetic erosion. In many cases synonymy, homonymy and misnaming hampered the clear assignment of cultivars/accessions to prime names. In the past 15 years nuclear microsatellites, in particular the nine SSR-markers VVS2, VVMD5, VVMD7, VVMD25, VVMD27, VVMD28, VVMD32, VrZAG62 and VrZAG79 were extensively applied for cultivar recognition in combination with ampelography. Genetic fin- gerprints of more than 15,000 cultivars/accessions were collected. They were taken from more than 300 articles and from microsatellite databases on the web. Allele sizes were adapted according to own internal reference varieties. Comparison of profiles revealed new identities like: “Corbeau” = “Sevilhao”, “Gragnelut” = “Fer”, “Beretinjak” = “Bianco d’Alessano”. The activities aim to equip the prime names of VIVC with reliable genetic profiles combined with the validation of their identity by ampelography. Fingerprints from 1,500 cultivars were already uploaded in VIVC. Two distinct search modules were imple- mented: “Microsatellites by varieties” and “Microsatellites by profiles”. The implementation assists the management of grape- vine genetic resources, e.g. trueness to type assessment in grapevine collections and serves research and breeding.

  11. Analytical quality assessment and interpretation of the trace element data obtained in the frame of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the significance of hair mineral analysis as a means for assessing internal body burdens of environmental pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeij, J.J.M. de; Blaauw, M.; Zegers, C.

    1993-01-01

    At the request of the IAEA, the authors have performed an assessment of the analytical quality and the interpretation of the trace element data obtained within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme (CRP) on The Significance of Hair Mineral Analysis as a Means of Assessing Internal Body Burdens of Environmental Pollutants. In this CRP research groups from various countries participated, using different analytical procedures, based on NAA, XRF and AAS. Data have been collected for Zn, CU, Pb, Cd, As, Hg, and Se in male human hair, liver, kidney, lung, brain, and bone. The samples analyzed originated from China, Hungary, Bulgaria, Japan, the former GDR, Sweden and Norway. The analytical quality of the data has been assessed on basis of the calculated limits of quantitation per trace element determined, per tissue analyzed and per participant, as well as from the trace element values found for reference materials and ''blind'' materials. The analytical quality of the data differs widely, from generally good to reasonable (Zn, Cu, and Se) to generally inadequate to strongly inadequate (Pb, Cd, As, and Hg). 15 refs, 29 tabs

  12. Document control system as an integral part of RA documentation database application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steljic, M.M; Ljubenov, V.Lj. . E-mail address of corresponding author: milijanas@vin.bg.ac.yu; Steljic, M.M.)

    2005-01-01

    The decision about the final shutdown of the RA research reactor in Vinca Institute has been brought in 2002, and therefore the preparations for its decommissioning have begun. All activities are supervised by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which also provides technical and experts' support. This paper describes the document control system is an integral part of the existing RA documentation database. (author)

  13. The safety activities of the ICAO and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, L.F.; Iansiti, E.

    1983-01-01

    The article presents a comparative analysis of the safety activities of the IAEA and the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), from which possible solutions for the problems faced by the nuclear community are suggested

  14. Radionuclide transfer to fruit in the IAEA TRS No. 472

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giosuè S.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the approach taken to present the information on fruits in the IAEA report TRS No. 472, supported by the IAEA-TECDOC-1616, which describes the key transfer processes, concepts and conceptual models regarded as important for dose assessment, as well as relevant parameters for modelling radionuclide transfer in fruits. Information relate to fruit plants grown in agricultural ecosystems of temperate regions. The relative significance of each pathway after release of radionuclides depends upon the radionuclide, the kind of crop, the stage of plant development and the season at time of deposition. Fruit intended as a component of the human diet is borne by plants that are heterogeneous in habits, and morphological and physiological traits. Information on radionuclides in fruit systems has therefore been rationalised by characterising plants in three groups: woody trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants. Parameter values have been collected from open literature, conference proceedings, institutional reports, books and international databases. Data on root uptake are reported as transfer factor values related to fresh weight, being consumption data for fruits usually given in fresh weight.

  15. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ''Knowledge Acquisition Skills'' in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively

  16. Private sector involvement in the US program of technical assistance to IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, S.E.; Epel, L.; Maise, G.; Reisman, A.; Skalyo, J.

    1995-01-01

    The US Program of Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS) relies on technical expertise found in the U. S private and public sectors. Since 1993, the international Safeguards Project Office (ISPO) has sought to increase the role of the private sector in POTAS. ISPO maintains and continues to develop a database of US companies interested in providing technical expertise to the IAEA. This database is used by ISPO to find appropriate contractors to respond to IAEA requests for technical assistance when the assistance can be provided by the private sector. The private sector is currently providing support in the development of equipment, training, and procedure preparation. POTAS also supports the work of private consultants. This paper discusses ISPO's efforts to identify suitable vendors and discusses conditions that hinder more substantial involvement by the private sector. In addition, the paper will discuss selected projects that are currently in progress and identify common problems that impede the progress and success of tasks performed by the private sector

  17. Probabilistic Determination of Green Infrastructure Pollutant Removal Rates from the International Stormwater BMP Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliom, R.; Hogue, T. S.; McCray, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    There is a need for improved parameterization of stormwater best management practices (BMP) performance estimates to improve modeling of urban hydrology, planning and design of green infrastructure projects, and water quality crediting for stormwater management. Percent removal is commonly used to estimate BMP pollutant removal efficiency, but there is general agreement that this approach has significant uncertainties and is easily affected by site-specific factors. Additionally, some fraction of monitored BMPs have negative percent removal, so it is important to understand the probability that a BMP will provide the desired water quality function versus exacerbating water quality problems. The widely used k-C* equation has shown to provide a more adaptable and accurate method to model BMP contaminant attenuation, and previous work has begun to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the k-C* method. However, no systematic method exists for obtaining first-order removal rate constants needed to use the k-C* equation for stormwater BMPs; thus there is minimal application of the method. The current research analyzes existing water quality data in the International Stormwater BMP Database to provide screening-level parameterization of the k-C* equation for selected BMP types and analysis of factors that skew the distribution of efficiency estimates from the database. Results illustrate that while certain BMPs are more likely to provide desired contaminant removal than others, site- and design-specific factors strongly influence performance. For example, bioretention systems show both the highest and lowest removal rates of dissolved copper, total phosphorous, and total nitrogen. Exploration and discussion of this and other findings will inform the application of the probabilistic pollutant removal rate constants. Though data limitations exist, this research will facilitate improved accuracy of BMP modeling and ultimately aid decision-making for stormwater quality

  18. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 15, no. 3(88). Jul-Aug 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This issue gives information about the following topics: the IAEA General Conference (opening on 18 September 2000 in Vienna), IAEA's Director General welcoming of the consensus at NPT review conference, reviews of the IAEA Safeguards' implementation at the June 2000 Board of Governors, upcoming IAEA international symposia and seminars, radiation monitoring of the Irish Sea, the status of states joining international conventions in nuclear fields, survey of radiation sources in Georgia, review of the 'Nuclear World' in the IAEA Annual Report, African partnerships, the evaluation of the radiological impact of Chernobyl accident by the UNSCEAR report, and other short information

  19. International conference on security of nuclear material and radioactive sources opens in Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The IAEA develops basic guidelines that have proven to be of significant importance in the development of national physical protection systems and international agreements. The IAEA has initiated a number of activities, including training, technology transfer and peer review, to support Member States in improving their nuclear material accountancy and physical protection systems at State and facility levels. The Agency also maintains a database of reported incidents. The Conference is organized by the IAEA, hosted by Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and held in co-operation with the World Customs Organization, the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL) and the European Police Office

  20. Ageing Management Program Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic, I.; Vrbanic, I.; Zabric, I.; Savli, S.

    2008-01-01

    The aspects of plant ageing management (AM) gained increasing attention over the last ten years. Numerous technical studies have been performed to study the impact of ageing mechanisms on the safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. National research activities have been initiated or are in progress to provide the technical basis for decision making processes. The long-term operation of nuclear power plants is influenced by economic considerations, the socio-economic environment including public acceptance, developments in research and the regulatory framework, the availability of technical infrastructure to maintain and service the systems, structures and components as well as qualified personnel. Besides national activities there are a number of international activities in particular under the umbrella of the IAEA, the OECD and the EU. The paper discusses the process, procedure and database developed for Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) surveillance of ageing process of Nuclear power Plant Krsko.(author)

  1. United States Program for Technical assistance to IAEA Standards. Concept Paper: Knowledge Acquisition, Skills training for enhanced IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F.A.; Toquam, J.L.

    1993-11-01

    This concept paper explores the potential contribution of ``Knowledge Acquisition Skills`` in enhancing the effectiveness of international safeguards inspections by the International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA, or Agency) and identifies types of training that could be provided to develop or improve such skills. For purposes of this concept paper, Knowledge Acquisition Skills are defined broadly to include all appropriate techniques that IAEA safeguards inspectors can use to acquire and analyze information relevant to the performance of successful safeguards inspections. These techniques include a range of cognitive, analytic, judgmental, interpersonal, and communications skills that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively.

  2. IAEA receives Iraq's nuclear-related declaration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Mohamed ElBaradei, announced that the IAEA received this evening, Sunday, 8 December 2002, at its Headquarters in Vienna, an approximately 2400 page declaration on Iraq's nuclear programme. The declaration consists of about 2100 pages in English and 300 pages in Arabic. The declaration was submitted by the Government of Iraq in response to paragraph 3 of Security Council resolution 1441 (8 November 2002), which requires Iraq to provide to UNMOVIC, the IAEA and to the Security Council, not later than 30 days of the date of that resolution, with 'currently accurate, full, and complete declaration of all aspects of its programmes to develop chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, ballistic missiles, and other delivery systems... as well as all other chemical, biological, and nuclear programmes, including any which it claims are for purposes not related to weapon production or material'. 'The IAEA will immediately begin to assess this important new document,' said Mr. ElBaradei, 'including the painstaking and systematic cross-checking of the information provided by Iraq against information which the IAEA already has, information that it expects to receive from other Member States, as contemplated in resolution 1441, and results of past and present Agency verification activities.' Complete assessment of the declaration will be time consuming, particularly in light of the need to translate the 300 pages of Arabic text into English. However, the IAEA expects to be able to provide a preliminary analysis of the document to the Security Council within the next ten days, with a fuller assessment to be provided when it reports to the Council at the end of January. (IAEA)

  3. The IAEA as a publisher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    One of the largest publishing enterprises in Vienna has developed in then Agency, incidental to its function of disseminating scientific information. The Agency recently completed its sixth year of scientific publication of literature dealing with the peaceful uses of atomic energy. Quite early in the history of IAEA, this work grew to considerable dimensions. In 1959 the programme consisted of two volumes in the Proceedings series, one in the Safety series, and four Technical Directories, making a total in that year of 18 000 books, in addition to those prepared for free distribution. In the following year, as Agency meetings and other activities developed, the list was much longer consisting of six volumes in the Proceedings series, two in the Safety series, two in the Technical Directory series, eight in the Review series, two in the Bibliographical series, three panel reports, one volume in the legal series and the first issue of 'Nuclear Fusion'. The total number of volumes sold was 24 000, in addition to the large number for free distribution. Thereafter, there was some difficulty in keeping up with the expanding demands, and some arrears of contract printing began to accumulate. It was therefore decided to introduce internal printing of Agency publications. The adoption of the 'cold type' method in 1962 led to considerable savings and faster production. During 1963, printing and binding equipment was installed which rendered the Agency independent of contractual services. Current policy is to print and bind internally all IAEA publications except the journal, 'Nuclear Fusion', Average annual production now consists of about twenty volumes of the proceedings of scientific meetings, six technical directories (the Directory of Nuclear Reactors has been published in its fifth edition), several bibliographies and numerous technical reports

  4. Operating Experience from Events Reported to the IAEA Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-03-01

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism in providing lessons learned from events and the associated corrective actions to prevent them, helping to improve safety at nuclear installations. The Incident Reporting System for Research Reactors (IRSRR), which is operated by the IAEA, is an important tool for international exchange of operating experience feedback for research reactors. The IRSRR reports contain information on events of safety significance with their root causes and lessons learned which help in reducing the occurrence of similar events at research reactors. To improve the effectiveness of the system, it is essential that national organizations demonstrate an appropriate interest for the timely reporting of events important to safety and share the information in the IRSRR database. At their biennial technical meetings, the IRSRR national coordinators recommended collecting the operating experience from the events reported to the IRSRR and disseminating it in an IAEA publication. This publication highlights the root causes, safety significance, lessons learned, corrective actions and the causal factors for the events reported to the IRSRR up to September 2014. The publication also contains relevant summary information on research reactor events from sources other than the IRSRR, operating experience feedback from the International Reporting System for Operating Experience considered relevant to research reactors, and a description of the elements of an operating experience programme as established by the IAEA safety standards. This publication will be of use to research reactor operating organizations, regulators and designers, and any other organizations or individuals involved in the safety of research reactors

  5. Radiation protection glossary. Selected basic terms used in IAEA publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation.

  6. IAEA Nuclear Security - Achievements 2002-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    The possibility that nuclear or other radioactive material could be used for malicious purposes is real. This calls for a collective commitment to the control of, and accountancy for, material, as well as to adequate levels of protection in order to prevent criminal or unauthorized access to the material or associated facilities. Sharing of knowledge and experience, coordination among States and collaboration with other international organizations, initiatives and industries supports an effective international nuclear security framework. In 2001, the Board of Governors tasked the IAEA with improving nuclear security worldwide. The report that follows provides an overview of accomplishments over the last decade and reflects the importance that States assign to keeping material in the right hands. The IAEA has established a comprehensive nuclear security programme, described first in the Nuclear Security Plan of 2002-2005 and subsequently in the second plan of 2006- 2009. Activities included developing internationally accepted nuclear security guidance, supporting international legal instruments, protecting material and facilities, securing transport and borders, detecting and interdicting illicit nuclear trafficking, strengthening human resource capacity and preparing response plans should a nuclear security event occur. The IAEA has begun the implementation of its third Nuclear Security Plan, to be completed at the end of 2013. This approach to nuclear security recognizes that an effective national nuclear security regime builds on a number of factors: the implementation of relevant international legal instruments; IAEA guidance and standards; information protection; physical protection; material accounting and control; detection of, and response to, trafficking in such material; national response plans and contingency measures. Implemented in a systematic manner, these building blocks make up a sustainable national nuclear security regime and contribute to global

  7. IAEA Status Report, 2011-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abriola, D. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-08-15

    Three staff members are engaged in activities related to NSDD. The software tool LiveChart parses and transforms the ENSDF adopted levels and gamma datasets into a relational database. During the 2011-2012 period the decay datasets were also included. Plotting capabilities were expanded. For the next period the XUNDL files will be processed as well. ENSDF mass chain evaluations: update of most neutron deficient nuclides of A=148. Mass chain A=211 as an exercise of the IAEA-ICTP ENSDF workshop. Mass chain A=215 as an exercise of the VECC (Kolkata) ENSDD-2012 workshop. Mass chain A=144 to be submitted for review. Training: Joint IAEA-ICTP Workshop 'Nuclear Structure and Decay Data: Theory and Evaluation', ICTP, Trieste, 6-17 August 2012; ENSDD-2012 Workshop, VECC, Kolkata, 26-29 November 2012.

  8. Blood pressure variability in relation to outcome in the International Database of Ambulatory blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Thijs, Lutgarde; Richart, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) monitoring provides information not only on the BP level but also on the diurnal changes in BP. In the present review, we summarized the main findings of the International Database on Ambulatory BP in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome (IDACO) with regard to risk...

  9. Impacts of European drought events: insights from an international database of text-based reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Kerstin; Kohn, Irene; Blauhut, Veit; Urquijo, Julia; De Stefano, Lucia; Acácio, Vanda; Dias, Susana; Stagge, James H.; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Kampragou, Eleni; Van Loon, Anne F.; Barker, Lucy J.; Melsen, Lieke A.; Bifulco, Carlo; Musolino, Dario; de Carli, Alessandro; Massarutto, Antonio; Assimacopoulos, Dionysis; Van Lanen, Henny A. J.

    2016-03-01

    Drought is a natural hazard that can cause a wide range of impacts affecting the environment, society, and the economy. Providing an impact assessment and reducing vulnerability to these impacts for regions beyond the local scale, spanning political and sectoral boundaries, requires systematic and detailed data regarding impacts. This study presents an assessment of the diversity of drought impacts across Europe based on the European Drought Impact report Inventory (EDII), a unique research database that has collected close to 5000 impact reports from 33 European countries. The reported drought impacts were classified into major impact categories, each of which had a number of subtypes. The distribution of these categories and types was then analyzed over time, by country, across Europe and for particular drought events. The results show that impacts on agriculture and public water supply dominate the collection of drought impact reports for most countries and for all major drought events since the 1970s, while the number and relative fractions of reported impacts in other sectors can vary regionally and from event to event. The analysis also shows that reported impacts have increased over time as more media and website information has become available and environmental awareness has increased. Even though the distribution of impact categories is relatively consistent across Europe, the details of the reports show some differences. They confirm severe impacts in southern regions (particularly on agriculture and public water supply) and sector-specific impacts in central and northern regions (e.g., on forestry or energy production). The protocol developed thus enabled a new and more comprehensive view on drought impacts across Europe. Related studies have already developed statistical techniques to evaluate the link between drought indices and the categorized impacts using EDII data. The EDII is a living database and is a promising source for further research on

  10. OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-05-01

    It is important for nuclear power plant designers, operators and regulators to effectively use lessons learned from events occurring at nuclear power plants since, in general, it is impossible to reproduce the event using experimental facilities. In particular, evaluation of the event using accident analysis codes is expected to contribute to improving understanding of phenomena during the events and to facilitate the validation of computer codes through simulation analyses. The information presented in this publication will be of use in future revisions of safety guides on accident analysis. During a fuel crud removal operation on the Paks-2 unit of the Paks nuclear power plant, Hungary on 10 April 2003, several fuel assemblies were severely damaged. The assemblies were being cleaned in a special tank under deep water in a service pit connected to the spent fuel storage pool. The first sign of fuel failures was the detection of some fission gases released from the cleaning tank. Later, visual inspection revealed that most of the 30 fuel assemblies suffered heavy oxidation and fragmentation. The first evaluation of the event showed that the severe fuel damage had been caused by inadequate cooling. The Paks-2 event was discussed in various committees of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) and of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recommendations were made to undertake actions to improve the understanding of the incident sequence and of the consequence this had on the fuel. It was considered that the Paks-2 event may constitute a useful case for a comparative exercise on safety codes, in particular for models devised to predict fuel damage and potential releases under abnormal cooling conditions and the analyses of the Paks-2 event may provide information which is relevant for in-reactor and spent fuel storage safety evaluations. The OECD-IAEA Paks Fuel Project was established in 2005 as a joint project between the IAEA and the OECD/NEA. The IAEA

  11. FORATOM - IAEA Workshop, Mamaia 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florescu, Nicolai

    2006-01-01

    The FORATOM Workshop was organized on May 16-19, 2006 by IAEA and FORATOM in the frame of common actions of experience exchange planned to take place every 18 months. At the same time at Mamaia, Romania, a meeting of the Business Excellence FORATOM group took place in which the Romanian organization ROMATOM is represented by the author of the paper from behalf of the Quality Management Group. Romanian Atomic Forum, ROMATOM as a member of European Atomic Forum, FORATOM, plays an active role in nuclear field in Romania. The Business Excellence Working Group, as the most active group in FORATOM, has the following objectives: - to promote and support the safe and effective performance of nuclear facilities to encourage the common of high level business standards; - to support FORATOM to enable decision makers and the public at large to get informed; - to facilities the exchange of best practices for management systems in order to raise the level of awareness and understanding so that members can better support the improvement within the member organizations, the other nuclear facilities in the BEx -WG member countries, the regular organization in the member countries, and international organizations active in the same fields of interest; - to provide a focus for influencing the development and harmonization of nuclear industry standards and practices to achieve improved business effectiveness and quality and safety management of nuclear facilities; - to advise FORATOM on management system issues. The FORATOM Workshop organized at Mamaia was held under the topics 'Successful Management of Organizational Change'. Three key issues for debate were established as follows: - key issue 1, effective handling of organizational change: drivers for change; managing change: the IAEA perspective; managing change within a utility; managing outsourcing; - key issue 2, organizational culture and safety culture: management systems and safety culture; proactive management; developing

  12. IAEA Board of Governors approves IAEA action plan to combat nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA Board of Governors today approved in principal an action plan designed to upgrade worldwide protection against acts of terrorism involving nuclear and other radioactive materials. In approving the plan, the Board has recognized that the first line of defense against nuclear terrorism is the strong physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials. 'National measures for protecting nuclear material and facilities are uneven in their substance and application,' the IAEA says. 'There is wide recognition that the international physical protection regime needs to be strengthened.'

  13. The IAEA and Control of Radioactive Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation discusses the authoritative functions and the departments of the IAEA, especially the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security and its Safety and Security of Radiation Sources Unit. IAEA safety series and IAEA safety standards series inform about international standards, provide underlying principles, specify obligations and responsibilities and give recommendations to support requirements. Other IAEA relevant publications comprise safety reports, technical documents (TECDOCs), conferences and symposium papers series and accident reports. Impacts of loss of source control is discussed, definitions of orphan sources and vulnerable sources is given. Accidents with orphan sources, radiological accidents statistic (1944-2000) and its consequences are discussed. These incidents lead to development of the IAEA guidance. The IAEA's action plan for the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive material was approved by the IAEA Board of Governors and the General Conference in September 1999. This led to the 'Categorization of Radiation Sources' and the 'Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources'. After 0911 the IAEA developed a nuclear security plan of activities including physical protection of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, detection of malicious activities involving nuclear and other radioactive materials, state systems for nuclear material accountancy and control, security of radioactive material other than nuclear material, assessment of safety and security related vulnerability of nuclear facilities, response to malicious acts, or threats thereof, adherence to and implementation of international agreements, guidelines and recommendations and nuclear security co-ordination and information management. The remediation of past problems comprised collection and disposal of known disused sources, securing vulnerable sources and especially high-risk sources (Tripartite initiative), searching for

  14. A study of a zone approach to IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches

  15. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  16. The IAEA radioactive waste safety standards programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourtellotte, James R.

    1995-01-01

    The IAEA is currently reviewing more than thirty publications in its Safety Series with a view toward consolidating and organizing information pertaining to radioactive waste. the effort is entitled Radioactive Waste Safety Standards programme (RADWASS). RADWASS is a significant undertaking and may have far reaching effects on radioactive waste management both in the international nuclear community and in individual nuclear States. This is because IAEA envisions the development of a consensus on the final document. In this circumstance, the product of RADWASS may ultimately be regarded as an international norm against which future actions of Member States may be measured. This program is organized in five subjects: planning, pre-disposal, disposal, uranium and thorium waste management and decommissioning, which has four levels: safety fundamentals, safety standards, safety guides and safety practices. (author)

  17. Joint IAEA/NEA IRS guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Incident Reporting System (IRS) is an international system jointly operated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The fundamental objective of the IRS is to contribute to improving the safety of commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) which are operated worldwide. This objective can be achieved by providing timely and detailed information on both technical and human factors related to events of safety significance which occur at these plants. The purpose of these guidelines, which supersede the previous IAEA Safety Series No. 93 (Part II) and the NEA IRS guidelines, is to describe the system and to give users the necessary background and guidance to enable them to produce IRS reports meeting a high standard of quality while retaining the high efficiency of the system expected by all Member States operating nuclear power plants

  18. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  19. IAEA International Peer Review Mission on Mid-and-Long-Term Roadmap Towards the Decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Units 1-4, Tokyo and Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, 15-22 April 2013. Mission Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Following the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) on 11 March 2011, the ''Mid-and-Long-Term Roadmap towards the Decommissioning of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Units 1-4'' was adopted by the Government of Japan and TEPCO Council on Mid-to-Long-Term Response for Decommissioning in December 2011 and revised in July 2012. The Roadmap, which is scheduled for an additional update in June 2013, describes the main steps and activities to be implemented for the decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS through the combined efforts of the Government of Japan and TEPCO. Within the framework of the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety, the Government of Japan invited the IAEA to conduct an independent peer review of the Roadmap with two main objectives: - To improve the decommissioning planning and the implementation of pre-decommissioning activities at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi NPS; and - To share with the international community the good practices and lessons learned by the review. The review has been organized in two steps, and the IAEA conducted the first part in Japan from 15 to 22 April 2013. The objective of the first mission was to undertake an initial review of the Roadmap, including assessments of decommissioning strategy, planning and timing of decommissioning phases and a review of several specific short-term issues and recent challenges. Specifically, it covered the assessment of current reactor conditions, assessment of management of radioactive releases and associated doses, control of radioactive exposure of employees and decontamination within the site for improvement of working environment, structural integrity of reactor buildings and other constructions. The incidents recently experienced at the site, related with failures of the power supply and leakages of water from the underground reservoirs, were also included in the review of the specific short-term issues. The Government of Japan and TEPCO have

  20. Radiation safety - an IAEA perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1993-01-01

    The activities of the IAEA relating to radiation safety cover: The preparation of International Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - it is expected that the new Basic Safety Standards will be adopted by the sponsoring organizations in 1994. The radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident: the thyroid cancer controversy - the hypothesis that must be tested is whether the reported increased incidence of thyroid cancer due to exposure to radioactive iodine released in the Chernobyl accident, and there are several questions that must be answered before a firm conclusion can be reached. Emergency Response Services (ERS): In March 1993, at the request of Viet Nam, which invoked the Energency Assistance Convention, a medical team organized by the IAEA went to Hanoi and assisted in arranging for an overexposed person to be transferred from Viet Nam to Paris for specialized medical treatment. In April 1993, the ERS was used to inform Member States of the consequences of an explosion at the Tomsk 7 fuel reprocessing plant in Siberia, Russia, which caused a radiation leak. Reassessing the long range transport of radioactive material through the environment: Data from the Chernobyl accident have been used for model validation in the Atmospheric Transport Model Evaluation Study (ATMES). A follow-up programme, the European Tracer Experiment (ETEX) with experimental studies of long range atmospheric movements over Europe has been established in order to increase knowledge and prediction capability. As part of the programme, a non-toxic atmospheric tracer will be released under suitable conditions in 1994. The Radiation Protection Advisory Teams Service (RAPAT): In many of the developing countries visited, the lack of an adequate infrastructure for radiation protection is the main obstacle to improved radiation protection. Strengthening radiation and nuclear safety infrastructures in successor states of the USSR: The

  1. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in youth: the International children's accelerometry database (ICAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Ashley R; Goodman, Anna; Page, Angie S; Sherar, Lauren B; Esliger, Dale W; van Sluijs, Esther M F; Andersen, Lars Bo; Anderssen, Sigmund; Cardon, Greet; Davey, Rachel; Froberg, Karsten; Hallal, Pedro; Janz, Kathleen F; Kordas, Katarzyna; Kreimler, Susi; Pate, Russ R; Puder, Jardena J; Reilly, John J; Salmon, Jo; Sardinha, Luis B; Timperio, Anna; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-09-17

    Physical activity and sedentary behaviour in youth have been reported to vary by sex, age, weight status and country. However, supporting data are often self-reported and/or do not encompass a wide range of ages or geographical locations. This study aimed to describe objectively-measured physical activity and sedentary time patterns in youth. The International Children's Accelerometry Database (ICAD) consists of ActiGraph accelerometer data from 20 studies in ten countries, processed using common data reduction procedures. Analyses were conducted on 27,637 participants (2.8-18.4 years) who provided at least three days of valid accelerometer data. Linear regression was used to examine associations between age, sex, weight status, country and physical activity outcomes. Boys were less sedentary and more active than girls at all ages. After 5 years of age there was an average cross-sectional decrease of 4.2% in total physical activity with each additional year of age, due mainly to lower levels of light-intensity physical activity and greater time spent sedentary. Physical activity did not differ by weight status in the youngest children, but from age seven onwards, overweight/obese participants were less active than their normal weight counterparts. Physical activity varied between samples from different countries, with a 15-20% difference between the highest and lowest countries at age 9-10 and a 26-28% difference at age 12-13. Physical activity differed between samples from different countries, but the associations between demographic characteristics and physical activity were consistently observed. Further research is needed to explore environmental and sociocultural explanations for these differences.

  2. News from IAEA Headquarters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-01-01

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  3. News from IAEA Headquarters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-06-15

    Full text: Two more countries have joined the Agency - Panama and Jordan - bringing IAEA membership up to 96. Mr. Ginige Richard Walter de Silva (Ceylon) has been appointed Director of the Division of Conference and General Services of the Agency. Born in 1911 at Nugegeda, Ceylon, Mr. de Silva obtained his B.Sc. in Physics at London University and his M.A. in Physics and Mathematics at Cambridge University. He has had a long career in the Civil Service, mainly in the administrative, commercial and finance branches of government. Mr.de Silva took over from Mr. Arthur E. Barrett, Chief of the Conference and Engineering Services, who had been Acting Director of the Division for a long period of time, and who will be leaving the Agency later this year to take up work elsewhere. From the early days of IAEA in 1957, Mr. Barrett has been closely associated with the establishment of the Agency's temporary headquarters in Vienna. He has been in charge of the planning and design of the technical facilities for the various conference installations and responsible for the servicing of all the General Conference sessions since 1958. In fact, Mr. Barrett has played an essential part in the creation of the Vienna Congress Centre in the former Hofburg Imperial Palace. Educated at Cambridge and London Universities, Mr. Barrett has had some 35 years of public service, first in the BBC in London and subsequently with the United Nations in New York. (author)

  4. IAEA activities in nuclear reactor simulation for educational purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badulescu, A.; Lyon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established a programme in nuclear reactor simulation computer programs to assist its Member States in education and training. The objective is to provide, for a variety of advanced reactor types, insight and practice in their operational characteristics and their response to perturbations and accident situations. To achieve this, the IAEA arranges for the supply or development of simulation programs and training material, sponsors training courses and workshops, and distributes documentation and computer programs. Currently, the IAEA has simulation programs available for distribution that simulate the behaviour of BWR, PWR and HWR reactor types. (authors)

  5. IAEA wants data, access for two Yongbyon facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    At a meeting of the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency held February 22-25, a resolution was passed calling upon the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK; more commonly known as North Korea) to respond positively and without delay to IAEA Director General Hans Blix's February 9 request for access to additional information and two additional sites related to North Korea's nuclear energy program. IAEA inspectors had been given access to some of the nuclear facilities in 1992, but early this year the North Korean government refused to let the IAEA see these other facilities

  6. Establishing a Nuclear Power Programme: IAEA Recommended approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sickle, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    IAEA Recommended approach: All newcomers are working closely with the IAEA, using IAEA guidance and hosting international peer review missions. Newcomers’ Top Issues: • How do I start? • Is there public support? • Do I have the people? • Can I find the money? • What am I going to do with the waste? • Is it safe? Can I manage if there is an accident? A pre-feasibility study should provide high level answers to all these questions and allow a knowledgeable decision

  7. The IAEA and non-proliferation: is quiescence progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herron, L.W.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current status of more important non-proliferation aspects affecting or involving the IAEA. The questions dealt with cover in particular the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Tlatelolco Treaty, the Committee on Assurances of Supply established by the IAEA in 1980 and the International Plutonium Storage Study prepared by an IAEA expert group. The author concludes that in a number of areas involving this Agency, recent considerable activity at both political and technical levels has produced few tangible results althrough the situation is not static. (NEA) [fr

  8. GGDC Productivity Level Database : International Comparisons of Output, Inputs and Productivity at the Industry Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Inklaar, Robert; Timmer, Marcel P.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the GGDC Productivity Level database. This database provides comparisons of output, inputs and productivity at a detailed industry level for a set of thirty OECD countries. It complements the EU KLEMS growth and productivity accounts by providing comparative levels and

  9. Improvements to the IAEA`s electric generation expansion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoytchev, D; Georgiev, S [Committee of Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    1997-09-01

    This paper deals with the implementation of the IAEA`s planning approach and software in Bulgaria. The problems encountered in the process are summarized, with emphasis on two of the limitations of the electric generation expansion model (WASP). The solutions found by Bulgarian experts to overcome these problems are also described, together with some comparative results of the tests performed. (author).

  10. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in open-quotes Observational Skillsclose quotes. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector's job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector's job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA's consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program

  11. The operation of the CIPM mutual recognition arrangement and its relevance to the SSDL members of the IAEA/WHO network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allisy-Roberts, P.J.; Thomas, C.; Shortt, K.R.; Meghzifene, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the background, history and current operation of the arrangement for the mutual recognition of national measurement standards and of calibration and measurement certificates issued by national metrology institutes (MRA). The organization of key comparisons and the operation of the BIPM key comparison database resulting from the MRA are described and the relevant roles of the International Committee, the regional metrology organizations and the IAEA are outlined. (author)

  12. The IAEA and Y2K. The Agency's action plan on the year 2000 problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherif, H.S.; Winkels, J.

    1999-01-01

    The article describes the aims of it IAEA action plan concerned with Year 2000 (Y2K) problem and the results achieved during four years of work, including the technical documents dealing with the Y2K computer problem, published by IAEA. This include IAEA systems and operations, contingency plans, coordination in the United Nations system. Through the IAEA Internet site, a series of Web pages were developed by the Division of Public Information to co-ordinate the global exchange of information on the IAEA Y2K activities and related topics. The site is open to Member States and international organisations within and outside United Nations system

  13. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 10, no. 2(68). Jun-Jul 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference opens in September in Vienna, IAEA Board of Governors' June meetings (Safeguards proposals, Technical cooperation, Radiation safety, Radioactive waste management, Liability for nuclear damage, IAEA regular budget for 1996), NPT Conference reaffirms support for IAEA roles, Director General addresses NPT Conference, Seminar on nuclear waste management in Russian Federation, Safety Reviews of Medzamor in Armenia, Update on Nuclear Safety Convention, Cuba and Brazil: Public information seminars, India: Donation to the IAEA Laboratories, Simulated emergency tests global procedures, INIS: Happy Anniversary, China hosts international isotope conference, Nuclear power: Status and outlook, and other short information

  14. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 13, no. 3(80). Jul-Aug 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: IAEA General Conference Opens 21 September in Vienna, IAEA Board Concludes Mid-Year Review: Approves Six More Protocols to Safeguards Agreements, Safeguards Implementation in 1997 Reported, Study of Radiological Situation at Mururoa and Fangataufa Atolls, Nuclear Inspections in Iraq Seeking Further Clarification, Pioneering Waste Repository Gets 'Green Light' in the USA, Status of International Conventions, Nuclear Techniques Targeted for Studying Water Pollution, Zimbabwe Farmers Realize Benefits from Nuclear Techniques, Waging a War Against Insect Pests, IAEA and WCO Formally Join Forces Against Illicit Trafficking, Annual Report for 1997, Range of Topics on IAEA Meeting Agenda, New IAEA Books, and other short information

  15. Development of Non-Compliance (NC) and Corrective Actions of Internal Audit Database from Year 2005 to 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Fairuz Faisal; Nurhanisah Adnan; Periasamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a systematic process and independent assessment carried out to ensure that all activities related to the Quality Management System is functional and effective in achieving the objectives set . A database using Microsoft Access was developed to record details of each noncompliance and corrective actions taken. Data recorded were the result of internal audit from year 2005 to 2014. The database can be used as a reference platform and guidelines to prevent a similar breach is repeated and help other process owners deal with non-compliance process derived. (author)

  16. Information system for IAEA inspectors at a centrifuge enrichment plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.L.; Tape, J.W.; Picard, R.R.; Strittmatter, R.B.

    1985-01-01

    An information system has been developed to aid International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors at the Portsmouth Gas Centrifuge Plant in the US. This system is designed to provide the inspectors with data storage, data analysis, and data evaluation and decision capabilities with minimal impact on the plant operations. The techniques and methodologies developed for this specific case are described with discussion of their general applicability to IAEA inspections at all types of facilities. 7 refs

  17. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 14, no. 3(84). Jul-Aug 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Tis issue gives brief information on the following topics: Global Nuclear Issues on IAEA General Conference Agenda (27 September 1999, Vienna), Scientific Forum Looks At Nuclear Energy and Sustainable Development, IAEA Board Approves Year 2000 Budget, More Safeguards Protocols, Nuclear's Future: Director General Looks At Global Developments, Nuclear Plant Safety In Eastern Europe, Nuclear Law, International Symposium: The Mox Fuel Cycle, IAEA Teams With Partners On World Water Issues, The Y2K Computer Bug, Strengthened Safeguards System: Status of Additional Protocols, States Join International Conventions in Nuclear Fields, Upcoming IAEA International Seminars and Symposia, and other short information

  18. Designing an international industrial hygiene database of exposures among workers in the asphalt industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstyn, I; Kromhout, H; Cruise, P J; Brennan, P

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this project was to construct a database of exposure measurements which would be used to retrospectively assess the intensity of various exposures in an epidemiological study of cancer risk among asphalt workers. The database was developed as a stand-alone Microsoft Access 2.0 application, which could work in each of the national centres. Exposure data included in the database comprised measurements of exposure levels, plus supplementary information on production characteristics which was analogous to that used to describe companies enrolled in the study. The database has been successfully implemented in eight countries, demonstrating the flexibility and data security features adequate to the task. The database allowed retrieval and consistent coding of 38 data sets of which 34 have never been described in peer-reviewed scientific literature. We were able to collect most of the data intended. As of February 1999 the database consisted of 2007 sets of measurements from persons or locations. The measurements appeared to be free from any obvious bias. The methodology embodied in the creation of the database can be usefully employed to develop exposure assessment tools in epidemiological studies.

  19. IAEA Director General to visit Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei announced today that he will visit the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (Libya) in the immediate future with a team of senior IAEA technical experts. 'The purpose of my visit will be to initiate an in-depth process of verification of all of Libya's past and present nuclear activities', Dr. ElBaradei said in a news conference. 'We shall define the corrective actions that need to be taken and consult on the necessary steps to eliminate any weapons related activities.' The announcement follows a meeting held in Vienna on 20 December 2003 between Dr. ElBaradei and H.E. Engineer Matooq Mohamed Matooq, Assistant Secretary for Services Affairs of the General People's Committee of Libya. In that meeting, Mr. Matooq informed Dr. ElBaradei of Libya's decision to eliminate 'materials, equipments and programmes which lead to the production of internationally proscribed weapons'. The Agency was also informed that Libya had been engaged for more than a decade in the development of a uranium enrichment capability. This included importing natural uranium and centrifuge and conversion equipment and the construction of now dismantled pilot scale centrifuge facilities. Some of these activities should have been, but were not, reported to the IAEA under Libya's Safeguards Agreement with the IAEA. Mr. Matooq stated, however, that Libya's nuclear enrichment programme was at an early stage of development and that no industrial scale facility had been built, nor any enriched uranium produced. Libya has asked the IAEA to ensure through verification that all of Libya's nuclear activities will henceforth be under safeguards and exclusively for peaceful purposes. In that regard, Libya has agreed to take the necessary steps to conclude an Additional Protocol to its NPT Safeguards Agreement, which will provide the IAEA with broader inspection rights, and to pursue with the IAEA a policy of full transparency and active co-operation. Dr. ElBaradei said, 'Libya's decision to

  20. IAEA support for the establishment of nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunegger-Guelich, Andrea; Rukhlo, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA has developed - together with academics and nuclear security experts from Member States - a technical guidance entitled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model Master of Science (M.Sc.) and a certificate programme in nuclear security. The paper sets out IAEA efforts to support the establishment of nuclear security at educational institutions, underlines particularly the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 and discusses the efforts made by the IAEA to establish a network among educational and research institutions, and other stakeholders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (orig.)

  1. The IAEA moves forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-12-15

    At the opening of the Ninth Regular Session of the Agency's General Conference in Tokyo on 21 September, the Director General, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, made a brief survey of some of the current developments in the Agency's activities. The implementation of the Special Fund project for the eradication in Central America of the Mediterranean Fruit Fly by using the sterile male technique has commenced. This project is technically directed by the Joint IAEA/FAO Division of Atomic Energy in Agriculture. This division will also implement the latest project entrusted to the Agency by the Special Fund concerning the establishment in Turkey of a pilot plant for grain disinfestation by radiation. It is anticipated that this pilot plant will demonstrate successfully the feasibility and economic practicability of using radiation on a commercial scale to eliminate considerable losses of stored grain by damage inflicted by insect pests

  2. IAEA fellows report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-04-15

    More than 500 scientists and technicians had completed their studies abroad under IAEA's fellowship programme at the end of 1961. At the same time, some 300 fellows were studying at universities, research institutions and atomic energy establishments in Member States. It is the policy of the Agency to keep in touch with fellows also after their training has been completed and they have returned home to put into practice what they have learnt during their time of study. The short reports which most of the former fellowship holders send to the Agency's secretariat give a good indication of the usefulness of the training and the extent to which the newly acquired knowledge is being constructively absorbed in the fellow's native country

  3. Special symposium for the IAEA 50th anniversary: Global challenges for the future of nuclear energy and the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The objective of the symposium was to review the 50 years history of the activities of the IAEA and the current status of nuclear power and fuel cycle in the world and discuss the future vision regarding development and safety of nuclear power and fuel cycle and international cooperation. Topics covered were nuclear power and fuel cycle, nuclear safety and security, non proliferation, and national, regional, and IAEA's challenges for the future

  4. IAEA Perspectives on Radiological Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ljubenov, Vladan

    2012-01-01

    Requirements for characterization of radiological and other hazards in nuclear facilities are reflected in the IAEA Safety Standards. WS-R-5, Safety Requirements for Decommissioning of Facilities using Radioactive Material, includes a requirement that 'During the preparation of the final decommissioning plan, the extent and type of radioactive material (irradiated and contaminated structures and components) at the facility shall be determined by means of a detailed characterization survey and on the basis of records collected during the operational period'. The subsidiary Safety Guide WS-G-2.1, Decommissioning of Nuclear Power Plants and Research Reactors, further elaborates that 'A survey of radiological and non-radiological hazards provides an important input for the safety assessment and for implementing a safe approach during the work'. Although the characterisation requirements addressed in the Safety Standards relate primarily to the detailed survey activities undertaken following the shutdown of the facility, it is evident that radiological characterization is of relevance to all major phases of the lifetime of a nuclear facility, including: - the siting phase - baseline surveys are undertaken to determine background radiation levels; - the construction phase - construction materials are retained to support future calculations of radioactivity distributions; - the operational phase - surveys are done regularly, with additional surveys being required following incidents involving plant contamination; - the transition phase - detailed radiological surveys are required to support the development of the final decommissioning plan; and - the closure phase - a final survey of the site and any remaining structures will be needed to support an application for release of the site from regulatory control. In the case of facilities that are already shut down, the main purpose of radiological characterisation is to provide a reliable database of information on the

  5. OSART Guidelines. 2015 Edition. Reference Report for IAEA Operational Safety Review Teams (OSARTs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The IAEA works to provide a global nuclear safety and security framework for the protection of people and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation, the minimization of the likelihood of accidents that could endanger life and property, and effective mitigation of the effects of any such events, should they occur. The strategic approach to achieving such a framework involves continual improvement in four areas: national and international safety infrastructures; the establishment and global acceptance of IAEA safety standards; an integrated approach to the provision for the application of the safety standards; and a global network of knowledge and experience. The IAEA Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) programme provides advice and assistance to Member States to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants during commissioning and operation. The OSART programme, initiated in 1982, is available to all Member States with nuclear power plants under commissioning or in operation. Conservative design, careful manufacture and sound construction are all prerequisites for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. However, the safety of the plant also depends ultimately on: sound management, policies, procedures, processes and practices; the capability and reliability of commissioning and operating personnel; comprehensive instructions; sound accident management and emergency preparedness; and adequate resources. Finally, a positive attitude and conscientiousness on the part of all staff in discharging their responsibilities is important to safety. The OSART programme is based on the safety standards applicable to nuclear power plants. IAEA safety standards reflect the consensus of Member States on nuclear safety matters. The reports of the International Nuclear Safety Group identify important current nuclear safety issues and also serve as references during an OSART review. The publication OSART Guidelines provides overall guidance on the conduct of OSART

  6. From high to low. The IAEA is helping to reduce the use of high-risk nuclear fuel at the world's research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.

    2006-01-01

    Research reactors play a key role in the development of peaceful uses of atomic energy. They are used for the production of isotopes for medicine and industry, for research in physics, biology and materials science, and for scientific education and training. They also continue to play an important role in support of nuclear power programmes. The IAEA's data shows there are 249 operational research reactors worldwide. Of these, more than 100 reactors are still fuelled with highly enriched uranium (HEU). It is considered high-risk nuclear material since it can be easily used for a nuclear explosive device. As part of a developing international norm to minimize and eventually eliminate HEU in civilian nuclear applications, research reactor operators increasingly are working with national and international agencies. They are being encouraged and supported to improve their physical security arrangements, convert their reactors to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and ship irradiated fuel back to the country of origin.For more than twenty years the IAEA has been supporting international efforts associated with reducing the amount of HEU in international commerce. Projects and activities have directly supported a programme the United States initiated in 1978, called Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). The IAEA's work additionally supports efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched so-called take back activities. IAEA initiatives have included the development and maintenance of several databases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories. These databases have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and take-back programmes. Other Agency activities through technical cooperation and other channels have supported the conversion of research reactors to using lower enriched fuels. In other ways, the IAEA supports the exchange of information among experts

  7. The IAEA/WHO TLD postal programme for radiotherapy hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izewska, J.; Andreo, P.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1969 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), together with the World Health Organization (WHO), has performed postal TLD audits to verify the calibration of radiotherapy beams in developing countries. A number of changes have recently been implemented to improve the efficiency of the IAEA/WHO TLD programme. The IAEA has increased the number of participants and reduced significantly the total turn-around time to provide results to the hospitals within the shortest possible time following the TLD irradiations. The IAEA has established a regular follow-up programme for hospitals with results outside acceptance limits of ±5%. The IAEA has, over 30 years, verified the calibration of more than 3300 clinical photon beams at approximately 1000 radiotherapy hospitals. Only 65% of those hospitals who receive TLDs for the first time have results within the acceptance limits, while more than 80% of the users that have benefited from a previous TLD audit are successful. The experience of the IAEA in TLD audits has been transferred to the national level. The IAEA offers a standardized TLD methodology, provides Guidelines and gives technical back-up to the national TLD networks. The unsatisfactory status of the dosimetry for radiotherapy, as noted in the past, is gradually improving however, the dosimetry practices in many hospitals in developing countries need to be revised in order to reach adequate conformity to hospitals that perform modern radiotherapy in Europe, USA and Australia. (author)

  8. Summary of high level international symposium on ''the role of the IAEA: future directions and challenges'' Hofburg, Vienna, 20 October 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Austrian Federal Government, in collaboration with the Agency, convened a Symposium on the Agency's future at which a number of distinguished speakers took part in a panel discussion in the presence of an invited audience. This brochure contains a summary overview of the event

  9. Communication received from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation to the IAEA on the establishment, structure and operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 7 June 2007 from the Resident Representative of the Russian Federation, with an attachment entitled 'Establishment, Structure and Operation of the International Uranium Enrichment Centre'. As requested in that communication, the letter and its attachment are circulated for the information of Member States

  10. The Net Enabled Waste Management Database in the context of an indicator of sustainable development for radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csullog, G.W.; Selling, H.; Holmes, R.; Benitez, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    The IAEA was selected by the UN to be the lead agency for the development and implementation of indicators of sustainable development for radioactive waste management (ISD-RW). Starting in late 1999, the UN initiated a program to consolidate a large number of indicators into a smaller set and advised the IAEA that a single ISD-RW was needed. In September 2001, a single indicator was developed by the IAEA and subsequently revised in February 2002. In parallel with its work on the ISD-RW, the IAEA developed and implemented the Net Enabled Waste Management Database (NEWMDB). The NEWMDB is an international database to collect, compile and disseminate information about nationally-based radioactive waste management programmes and waste inventories. The first data collection cycle with the NEWMDB (July 2001 to March 2002) demonstrated that much of the information needed to calculate the ISD-RW could be collected by the IAEA for its international database. However, the first data collection cycle indicated that capacity building, in the area of identifying waste classification schemes used in countries, is required. (author)

  11. IAEA safeguards for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The publication includes the lectures held during the seminar on IAEA safeguards for the 21st century. The topics covered are as follows: the nuclear non-proliferation regime; Legal instruments related to the application of safeguards; multilateral nuclear export controls; physical protection and its role in nuclear non-proliferation; the evolution of safeguards; basis for the strengthening of safeguards; information required from states, including 'small quantities protocol'; processing and evaluation of new information for strengthened safeguards; additional physical access and new technologies for strengthened safeguards; equipping the IAEA Inspectorate with new skills; achievements to date the strengthened safeguards; complement of regional non-proliferation arrangements in international nuclear verification; promotion of transparency through Korean experience; and the future prospects of safeguards

  12. IAEA safeguards for the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The publication includes the lectures held during the seminar on IAEA safeguards for the 21st century. The topics covered are as follows: the nuclear non-proliferation regime; Legal instruments related to the application of safeguards; multilateral nuclear export controls; physical protection and its role in nuclear non-proliferation; the evolution of safeguards; basis for the strengthening of safeguards; information required from states, including 'small quantities protocol'; processing and evaluation of new information for strengthened safeguards; additional physical access and new technologies for strengthened safeguards; equipping the IAEA Inspectorate with new skills; achievements to date the strengthened safeguards; complement ofregional non-proliferation arrangements in international nuclear verification; promotion of transparency through Korean experience; and the future prospects of safeguards.

  13. Construction of Electronics Database for East Asian Countries and Empirical Analysis of International Competitiveness of Japanese Companies (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    MOTOHASHI Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    The international competitiveness of Japanese electronics firms is fading as firms in East Asian countries such as China, Korea, and Taiwan catch up. In this paper, we have constructed an electronics industry database from 1996 to 2005 for China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the United States. It covers industrial statistics in these countries including trade and overseas production statistics, which makes it possible to control for global production activities of electronics firms. We have also...

  14. Optimizing the IAEA safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drobysz, Sonia; Sitt, Bernard

    2011-09-01

    During the 2010 Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference, States parties recognized that the Additional Protocol (AP) provides increased confidence about the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities in a State as a whole. They agreed in action 28 of the final document to encourage 'all States parties that have not yet done so to conclude and bring into force an AP as soon as possible and to implement them provisionally pending their entry into force'. Today, 109 out of 189 States parties to the NPT have brought an AP in force. The remaining outliers have not yet done so for three types of reasons: they do not clearly understand what the AP entails; when they do, they refuse to accept new non-proliferation obligations either on the ground of lack of progress in the realm of disarmament, or simply because they are not ready to bear the burden of additional safeguards measures. Strong incentives are thus needed in order to facilitate universalization of the AP. While external incentives would help make the AP a de facto norm and encourage its conclusion by reducing the deplored imbalanced implementation of non-proliferation and disarmament obligations, internal incentives developed by the Agency and its member States can also play an important role. In this respect, NPT States parties recommended in action 32 of the Review Conference final document 'that IAEA safeguards should be assessed and evaluated regularly. Decisions adopted by the IAEA policy bodies aimed at further strengthening the effectiveness and improving the efficiency of IAEA safeguards should be supported and implemented'. The safeguards system should therefore be optimized: the most effective use of safeguards measures as well as safeguards human, financial and technical resources would indeed help enhance the acceptability and even attractiveness of the AP. Optimization can be attractive for States committed to a stronger verification regime independently from other claims, but still

  15. IAEA Newsbriefs. V. 15, no. 1(86). Jan-Feb 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This issue gives brief information on the following topics: the review of the 2001 draft budget, the return of the IAEA safeguards inspectors from Iraq, the strengthened safeguards system including the signature status of additional protocols as of February 2000, the nomination of the former IAEA Director General H. Blix as head of the new monitoring commission for Iraq, recent statements of the IAEA Director General, the sixth NPT review conference which will open in April 2000, IAEA symposia and seminars in the year 2000, states joining international conventions in nuclear fields, the industry forum convened by the IAEA on nuclear energy issues, cooperation of states against the Y2K problem, IAEA strategy to 2005, sharing lessons from Tokaimura accident, in memoriam of the former IAEA Director General Sigvard Eklund, and other short information

  16. FAO/IAEA International Symposium on Food Safety and Quality: Applications of Nuclear and Related Techniques, Vienna, Austria, 10−13 November 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Ensuring food supply integrity is of the utmost importance in relation to food security, safety and quality, consumer protection and international trade. Control measures throughout the entire food production and supply chain are essential to maintain and assure this integrity. The fundamental purpose of the controls is to support food safety and quality, because both are essential and set the foundation for food security and consumer protection as well as facilitating both domestic and international trade. The need for methods to monitor and verify food safety and quality is evidenced by the ever growing list of food product recalls and incidents such as melamine, antibiotic and dioxin contamination. Food fraud (e.g. the adulteration of beef products with horse meat), the introduction of new technologies with potential food safety implications (e.g. nanotechnology) and environmental factors (e.g. climate change) further highlight the importance of continued refinement, development and innovation to improve food control measures. Effective techniques are necessary to help assess and manage risks and protect the consumer. These include food irradiation to treat food directly, as well as other nuclear and related technologies for tracing food products in order to verify their provenance or to detect and control contaminants. To explore some of these challenges experienced by many Member States, an International Symposium on Food Safety and Quality: Applications of Nuclear and Related Techniques was held in Vienna, Austria, from 10 to 13 November 2014, under the auspices of the Food and Environmental Protection Subprogramme.

  17. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; James, W.P.T.

    1993-01-01

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  18. National report for United Kingdom. 32nd annual meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors, Vienna, 18-19 May 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abram, T.; Picker, C.

    1999-01-01

    Much of the UK nuclear industry has now completed the transition from state to private ownership. The UK continues to support international development of fast reactor technology, mainly through participation in the European Fast Reactor collaboration, with all funding provided by BNFL. Inactive commissioning is about to begin on the PFR Sodium Disposal Plant, which includes a caesium removal plant. The defuelling machine is being refurbished to permit the control and shutdown rods to be removed. No further reprocessing of fuel has taken place. (author)

  19. IAEA activities related to ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.; Schneider, U.

    2001-01-01

    As agreed between the IAEA and the ITER Parties, special sessions are dedicated to ITER at the IAEA Fusion Energy Conferences. At the 18th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference, held on 4-10 October 2000 in Sorrento, Italy, in the Artsimovich-Kadomtsev Memorial opening session there were special lectures by Carlo Rubbia (President, ENEA, Italy), A. Arima (Japan), and E.P. Velikhov (Russia); an overview talk on ITER by R. Aymar (ITER Director); and a talk on the FTU experiment by F. Romanelli. In total, 573 participants from 34 countries presented 389 papers (including 11 post-deadline papers and the 4 summaries)

  20. ITDB Cooperation With International Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    IAEA illicit trafficking database cooperates with many international organizations. Among these organizations are Interpol, Universal Postal Union,and World Customs Organization. Other organizations are Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, UN Economic Commission for Europe, UN-Department of Disarmament Affairs and UN office for Drug and Crime. The cooperation with Interpol involves consultations on issues of training and technical assistance and other matters of common interest.