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Sample records for i-a represses expression

  1. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  2. Translational repression contributes greater noise to gene expression than transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Michał; Miekisz, Jacek; Kierzek, Andrzej M

    2009-01-01

    Stochastic effects in gene expression may result in different physiological states of individual cells, with consequences for pathogen survival and artificial gene network design. We studied the contributions of a regulatory factor to gene expression noise in four basic mechanisms of negative gene expression control: 1), transcriptional regulation by a protein repressor, 2), translational repression by a protein; 3), transcriptional repression by RNA; and 4), RNA interference with the translation. We investigated a general model of a two-gene network, using the chemical master equation and a moment generating function approach. We compared the expression noise of genes with the same effective transcription and translation initiation rates resulting from the action of different repressors, whereas previous studies compared the noise of genes with the same mean expression level but different initiation rates. Our results show that translational repression results in a higher noise than repression on the promoter level, and that this relationship does not depend on quantitative parameter values. We also show that regulation of protein degradation contributes more noise than regulated degradation of mRNA. These are unexpected results, because previous investigations suggested that translational regulation is more accurate. The relative magnitude of the noise introduced by protein and RNA repressors depends on the protein and mRNA degradation rates, and we derived expressions for the threshold below which the noise introduced by a protein repressor is higher than the noise introduced by an RNA repressor.

  3. PICKLE acts during germination to repress expression of embryonic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Chun; Chuang, King; Henderson, James T.; Rider, Stanley Dean; Bai, Yinglin; Zhang, Heng; Fountain, Matthew; Gerber, Jacob; Ogas, Joe

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY PICKLE (PKL) codes for a CHD3 chromatin remodeling factor that plays multiple roles in Arabidopsis growth and development. Previous analysis of the expression of genes that exhibit PKL-dependent regulation suggested that PKL acts during germination to repress expression of embryonic traits. In this study, we examined the expression of PKL protein to investigate when and where PKL acts to regulate development. A PKL:eGFP translational fusion is preferentially localized in the nucleus of cells, consistent with the proposed role for PKL as a chromatin remodeling factor. A steroid-inducible version of PKL - a fusion of PKL to the glucocorticoid receptor (PKL:GR) - was used to examine when PKL acts to repress expression of embryonic traits. We found that activation of PKL:GR during germination was sufficient to repress expression of embryonic traits in the primary roots of pkl seedlings whereas activation of PKL:GR after germination had little effect. In contrast, we observed that PKL is required continuously after germination to repress expression of PHERES1, a type I MADS box gene that is normally expressed during early embryogenesis in wild-type plants. Thus PKL acts at multiple points during development to regulate patterns of gene expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:16359393

  4. The HTLV-1 Tax Oncoprotein Represses Ku80 Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Ducu, Razvan I.; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax interferes with DNA double strand break repair. Since non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway used to repair DNA double strand breaks we examined the effect of Tax on this pathway, with particular interest in the expression and function of Ku80, a critical component of the NHEJ pathway. Tax expression decreased Ku80 mRNA and protein levels, and repressed transcription from the Ku80 promoter. Conversely, Ku80 mRNA increased following siRNA knockdown of T...

  5. ATF3 represses PPARγ expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation

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    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • ATF3 decrease the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • ATF3 represses the promoter activity of PPARγ2 gene. • ATF/CRE (−1537/−1530) is critical for ATF3-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. • ATF3 binds to the promoter region containing the ATF/CRE. • ER stress inhibits adipocyte differentiation through downregulation of PPARγ by ATF3. - Abstract: Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress-adaptive transcription factor that mediates cellular stress response signaling. We previously reported that ATF3 represses CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) expression and inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored potential role of ATF3 in negatively regulating peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). ATF3 decreased the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ATF3 also repressed the activity of −2.6 Kb promoter of mouse PPARγ2. Overexpression of PPARγ significantly prevented the ATF3-mediated inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation. Transfection studies with 5′ deleted-reporters showed that ATF3 repressed the activity of −2037 bp promoter, whereas it did not affect the activity of −1458 bp promoter, suggesting that ATF3 responsive element is located between the −2037 and −1458. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that ATF3 binds to ATF/CRE site (5′-TGACGTTT-3′) between −1537 and −1530. Mutation of the ATF/CRE site abrogated ATF3-mediated transrepression of the PPARγ2 promoter. Treatment with thapsigargin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, increased ATF3 expression, whereas it decreased PPARγ expression. ATF3 knockdown significantly blocked the thapsigargin-mediated downregulation of PPARγ expression. Furthermore, overexpression of PPARγ prevented inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation by thapsigargin. Collectively, these results suggest that ATF3-mediated

  6. Systematic repression of transcription factors reveals limited patterns of gene expression changes in ES cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Amano, Tomokazu; Hoang, Hien G.; Binder, Bernard Y.; Tapnio, Richard; Bassey, Uwem; Malinou, Justin N.; Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Yu, Hong; Xin, Li; Meyers, Emily; Zalzman, Michal; Nakatake, Yuhki; Stagg, Carole; Sharova, Lioudmila; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood; Sheer, Sarah; Cadet, Jean S.; Hirata, Tetsuya; Yang, Hsih-Te; Goldberg, Ilya; Evans, Michele K.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Networks of transcription factors (TFs) are thought to determine and maintain the identity of cells. Here we systematically repressed each of 100 TFs with shRNA and carried out global gene expression profiling in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unexpectedly, only the repression of a handful of TFs significantly affected transcriptomes, which changed in two directions/trajectories: one trajectory by the repression of either Pou5f1 or Sox2; the other trajectory by the repression of either Esrrb, Sall4, Nanog, or Tcfap4. The data suggest that the trajectories of gene expression change are already preconfigured by the gene regulatory network and roughly correspond to extraembryonic and embryonic fates of cell differentiation, respectively. These data also indicate the robustness of the pluripotency gene network, as the transient repression of most TFs did not alter the transcriptomes. PMID:23462645

  7. Repression of insulin gene expression by adenovirus type 5 E1a proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Insulin gene transcription relies on enhancer and promoter elements which are active in pancreatic beta cells. We showed that adenovirus type 5 infection of HIT T-15 cells, a transformed hamster beta cell line, represses insulin gene transcription and mRNA levels. Using expression plasmids transiently introduced into HIT T-15 cells, we showed that adenovirus type 5 E1a transcription regulatory proteins repress insulin enhancer-promoter element activity as assayed with a surrogate xanthine-gua...

  8. Small RNAs Repress Expression of Polysaccharide Utilization Loci of Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Laurie E

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides species can metabolize numerous plant polysaccharides and host glycans present in the mammalian gut. The regulatory systems governing the induction of particular polysaccharide utilization loci when the cognate glycan is present are known, but how expression is repressed when a higher-priority glycan is present is largely unknown. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Cao et al. (J. Bacteriol. 198:2410-2418, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.00381-16) reveal a conserved mechanism in Bacteroides whereby antisense small RNAs (sRNA) repress expression of genes involved in utilization of host glycans. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-I Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  10. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  11. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  12. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  13. EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1 controls human ES cell differentiation by directly repressing GOOSECOID expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalisz, Mark; Winzi, Maria Karin; Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine;

    2012-01-01

    TGFß signaling patterns the primitive streak, yet little is known about transcriptional effectors that mediate the cell fate choices during streak-like development in mammalian embryos and in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we demonstrate that cross-antagonistic actions of EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1...... (EVX1) and GOOSECOID (GSC) regulate cell fate decisions in streak-like progenitors derived from human ES cells exposed to BMP4 and/or activin. We found that EVX1 repressed GSC expression and promoted formation of posterior streak-like progeny in response to BMP4, and conversely that GSC repressed EVX1...... expression and was required for development of anterior streak-like progeny in response to activin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that EVX1 bound to the GSC 5'-flanking region in BMP4 treated human ES cells, and band shift assays identified two EVX1 binding sites in the GSC 5'-region...

  14. Histone H3K9 methyltransferase G9a represses PPARγ expression and adipogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Shiliyang; Lee, Ji-Eun; Baldridge, Anne; Grullon, Sean; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    2012-01-01

    PPARγ promotes adipogenesis while Wnt proteins inhibit adipogenesis. However, the mechanisms that control expression of these positive and negative master regulators of adipogenesis remain incompletely understood. By genome-wide histone methylation profiling in preadipocytes, we find that among gene loci encoding adipogenesis regulators, histone methyltransferase (HMT) G9a-mediated repressive epigenetic mark H3K9me2 is selectively enriched on the entire PPARγ locus. H3K9me2 and G9a levels dec...

  15. Basic Pentacysteine Proteins Repress Abscisic Acid Insensitive4 Expression via Direct Recruitment of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Zou, Meijuan; Sun, Xuwu; He, Baoye; Xu, Xiumei; Liu, Yini; Zhang, Lixin; Chi, Wei

    2017-01-30

    Plant transcription factors generally act in complex regulatory networks that function at multiple levels to govern plant developmental programs. Dissection of the interconnections among different classes of transcription factors can elucidate these regulatory networks and thus improve our understanding of plant development. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional relationships of the transcription factors ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) and members of the BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BPC) family in lateral root (LR) development of Arabidopsis thaliana Genetic analysis showed that BPCs promote LR development by repressing ABI4 expression. Molecular analysis showed that BPCs bind to the ABI4 promoter and repress ABI4 transcription in roots. BPCs directly recruit the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the ABI4 locus and epigenetically repress ABI4 expression by catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. In addition, BPCs and ABI4 coordinate their activities to fine-tune the levels of PIN-FORMED1, a component of the auxin signaling pathway, and thus modulate LR formation. These results establish a functional relationship between two universal and multiple-role transcription factors and provide insight into the mechanisms of the transcriptional regulatory networks that affect Arabidopsis organogenesis.

  16. Nrf2-dependent repression of interleukin-12 expression in human dendritic cells exposed to inorganic arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macoch, Mélinda; Morzadec, Claudie; Génard, Romain; Pallardy, Marc; Kerdine-Römer, Saadia; Fardel, Olivier; Vernhet, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Inorganic arsenic, a well-known Nrf2 inducer, exerts immunosuppressive properties. In this context, we recently reported that the differentiation of human blood monocytes into immature dendritic cells (DCs), in the presence of low and noncytotoxic concentrations of arsenic, represses the ability of DCs to release key cytokines in response to different stimulating agents. Particularly, arsenic inhibits the expression of human interleukin-12 (IL-12, also named IL-12p70), a major proinflammatory cytokine that controls the differentiation of Th1 lymphocytes. In the present study, we determined if Nrf2 could contribute to these arsenic immunotoxic effects. To this goal, human monocyte-derived DCs were first differentiated in the absence of metalloid and then pretreated with arsenic just before DC stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Under these experimental conditions, arsenic rapidly and stably activates Nrf2 and increases the expression of Nrf2 target genes. It also significantly inhibits IL-12 expression in activated DCs, at both mRNA and protein levels. Particularly, arsenic reduces mRNA levels of IL12A and IL12B genes which encodes the p35 and p40 subunits of IL-12p70, respectively. tert-Butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a reference Nrf2 inducer, mimics arsenic effects and potently inhibits IL-12 expression. Genetic inhibition of Nrf2 expression markedly prevents the repression of both IL12 mRNA and IL-12 protein levels triggered by arsenic and tBHQ in human LPS-stimulated DCs. In addition, arsenic significantly reduces IL-12 mRNA levels in LPS-activated bone marrow-derived DCs from Nrf2+/+ mice but not in DCs from Nrf2-/- mice. Finally, we show that, besides IL-12, arsenic significantly reduces the expression of IL-23, another heterodimer containing the p40 subunit. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that arsenic represses IL-12 expression in human-activated DCs by specifically stimulating Nrf2 activity.

  17. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  18. Rapamycin reveals an mTOR-independent repression of Kv1.1 expression during epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosanya, Natasha M; Brager, Darrin H; Wolfe, Sarah; Niere, Farr; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2015-01-01

    Changes in ion channel expression are implicated in the etiology of epilepsy. However, the molecular leading to long-term aberrant expression of ion channels are not well understood. The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that mediates activity-dependent protein synthesis in neurons. mTOR is overactive in epilepsy, suggesting that excessive protein synthesis may contribute to the neuronal pathology. In contrast, we found that mTOR activity and the microRNA miR-129-5p reduce the expression of the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.1 in an animal model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). When mTOR activity is low, Kv1.1 expression is high and the frequency of behavioral seizures is low. However, as behavioral seizure activity rises, mTOR activity increases and Kv1.1 protein levels drop. In CA1 pyramidal neurons, the reduction in Kv1.1 lowers the threshold for action potential firing. Interestingly, blocking mTOR activity with rapamycin reduces behavioral seizures and temporarily keeps Kv1.1 levels elevated. Overtime, seizure activity increases and Kv1.1 protein decreases in all animals, even those treated with rapamycin. Notably, the concentration of miR-129-5p, the negative regulator of Kv1.1 mRNA translation, increases by 21days post-status epilepticus (SE), sustaining Kv1.1 mRNA translational repression. Our results suggest that following kainic-acid induced status epilepticus there are two phases of Kv1.1 repression: (1) an initial mTOR-dependent repression of Kv1.1 that is followed by (2) a miR-129-5p persistent reduction of Kv1.1.

  19. Cyclic stretch of Embryonic Cardiomyocytes Increases Proliferation, Growth, and Expression While Repressing Tgf-β Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indroneal; Carrion, Katrina; Serrano, Ricardo; Dyo, Jeffrey; Sasik, Roman; Lund, Sean; Willems, Erik; Aceves, Seema; Meili, Rudolph; Mercola, Mark; Chen, Ju; Zambon, Alexander; Hardiman, Gary; Doherty, Taylor A; Lange, Stephan; del Álamo, Juan C.; Nigam, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed biomechanical stimuli are thought to be critical for the pathogenesis of a number of congenital heart defects, including Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome (HLHS). While embryonic cardiomyocytes experience biomechanical stretch every heart beat, their molecular responses to biomechanical stimuli during heart development are poorly understood. We hypothesized that biomechanical stimuli activate specific signaling pathways that impact proliferation, gene expression and myocyte contraction. The objective of this study was to expose embryonic mouse cardiomyocytes (EMCM) to cyclic stretch and examine key molecular and phenotypic responses. Analysis of RNA-Sequencing data demonstrated that gene ontology groups associated with myofibril and cardiac development were significantly modulated. Stretch increased EMCM proliferation, size, cardiac gene expression, and myofibril protein levels. Stretch also repressed several components belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (Tgf-β) signaling pathway. EMCMs undergoing cyclic stretch had decreased Tgf-β expression, protein levels, and signaling. Furthermore, treatment of EMCMs with a Tgf-β inhibitor resulted in increased EMCM size. Functionally, Tgf-β signaling repressed EMCM proliferation and contractile function, as assayed via dynamic monolayer force microscopy (DMFM). Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that biomechanical stimuli play a vital role in normal cardiac development and for cardiac pathology, including HLHS. PMID:25446186

  20. Repression of interferon-γexpression in T cells by prosperorelated Homeobox protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linfang Wang; Jianmei Zhu; Shifang Shan; Yi Qin; Yuying Kong; Jing Liu; Yuan Wang; Youhua Xie

    2008-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a major proinflammatory effector and regulatory cytokine produced by activated T cells and NK cells. IFN-γ has been shown to play pivotal roles in fundamental immunological processes such as inflammatory reactions,cell-mediated immunity and autoimmunity. A variety of human disorders have now been linked to irregular IFN-γ expression. In order to achieve proper IFN-γ-mediated immunological effects,IFN-γ expression in T cells is subject to both positive and negative regulation. In this study,we report for the first time the negative regulation of IFN-γ expression by Prospero-related Homeobox (Prox1). In Jurkat T cells and primary human CD4+ T cells,Proxl expression decreases quickly upon T cell activation,concurrent with a dramatic increase in IFN-γ expression.Reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Proxl associates with and inhibits the transcription activity of IFN-γ promoter in activated Jurkat T cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay demonstrated a direct binding between Proxl and the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ),which is also an IFN-γ repressor in T cells. By introducing deletions and mutations into Proxl,we show that the repression of IFN-γ promoter by Prox1 is largely dependent upon the physical interaction between Prox1 and PPARγ. Furthermore,PPARγ antagonist treatment removes Prox1 from IFN-γ promoter and attenuates repression of IFN-γ expression by Prox1. These findings establish Prox1 as a new negative regulator of IFN-γ expression in T cells and will aid in the understanding of IFN-γ transcription regulation mechanisms.

  1. Controlling expression of genes in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with a vitamin-repressible riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramundo, Silvia; Rochaix, Jean-David

    2015-01-01

    Chloroplast genomes of land plants and algae contain generally between 100 and 150 genes. These genes are involved in plastid gene expression and photosynthesis and in various other tasks. The function of some chloroplast genes is still unknown and some of them appear to be essential for growth and survival. Repressible and reversible expression systems are highly desirable for functional and biochemical characterization of these genes. We have developed a genetic tool that allows one to regulate the expression of any coding sequence in the chloroplast genome of the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Our system is based on vitamin-regulated expression of the nucleus-encoded chloroplast Nac2 protein, which is specifically required for the expression of any plastid gene fused to the psbD 5'UTR. With this approach, expression of the Nac2 gene in the nucleus and, in turn, that of the chosen chloroplast gene artificially driven by the psbD 5'UTR, is controlled by the MetE promoter and Thi4 riboswitch, which can be inactivated in a reversible way by supplying vitamin B12 and thiamine to the growth medium, respectively. This system opens interesting possibilities for studying the assembly and turnover of chloroplast multiprotein complexes such as the photosystems, the ribosome, and the RNA polymerase. It also provides a way to overcome the toxicity often associated with the expression of proteins of biotechnological interest in the chloroplast.

  2. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  3. Polycomb repressive complex 2 epigenomic signature defines age-associated hypermethylation and gene expression changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2015-01-01

    Although age-associated gene expression and methylation changes have been reported throughout the literature, the unifying epigenomic principles of aging remain poorly understood. Recent explosion in availability and resolution of functional/regulatory genome annotation data (epigenomic data), such as that provided by the ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects, provides an opportunity for the identification of epigenomic mechanisms potentially altered by age-associated differentially methylated regions (aDMRs) and regulatory signatures in the promoters of age-associated genes (aGENs). In this study we found that aDMRs and aGENs identified in multiple independent studies share a common Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 signature marked by EZH2, SUZ12, CTCF binding sites, repressive H3K27me3, and activating H3K4me1 histone modification marks, and a “poised promoter” chromatin state. This signature is depleted in RNA Polymerase II-associated transcription factor binding sites, activating H3K79me2, H3K36me3, H3K27ac marks, and an “active promoter” chromatin state. The PRC2 signature was shown to be generally stable across cell types. When considering the directionality of methylation changes, we found the PRC2 signature to be associated with aDMRs hypermethylated with age, while hypomethylated aDMRs were associated with enhancers. In contrast, aGENs were associated with the PRC2 signature independently of the directionality of gene expression changes. In this study we demonstrate that the PRC2 signature is the common epigenomic context of genomic regions associated with hypermethylation and gene expression changes in aging. PMID:25880792

  4. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  5. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  6. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; De Bont, J.A.M.; De Winde, J.H.; Wery, J.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent e

  7. Bile Acids Function Synergistically To Repress Invasion Gene Expression in Salmonella by Destabilizing the Invasion Regulator HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Hung, Chien-Che; Bullard, Brian; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S; Altier, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella spp. are carried by and can acutely infect agricultural animals and humans. After ingestion, salmonellae traverse the upper digestive tract and initiate tissue invasion of the distal ileum, a virulence process carried out by the type III secretion system encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Salmonellae coordinate SPI-1 expression with anatomical location via environmental cues, one of which is bile, a complex digestive fluid that causes potent repression of SPI-1 genes. The individual components of bile responsible for SPI-1 repression have not been previously characterized, nor have the bacterial signaling processes that modulate their effects been determined. Here, we characterize the mechanism by which bile represses SPI-1 expression. Individual bile acids exhibit repressive activity on SPI-1-regulated genes that requires neither passive diffusion nor OmpF-mediated entry. By using genetic methods, the effects of bile and bile acids were shown to require the invasion gene transcriptional activator hilD and to function independently of known upstream signaling pathways. Protein analysis techniques showed that SPI-1 repression by bile acids is mediated by posttranslational destabilization of HilD. Finally, we found that bile acids function synergistically to achieve the overall repressive activity of bile. These studies demonstrate a common mechanism by which diverse environmental cues (e.g., certain short-chain fatty acids and bile acids) inhibit SPI-1 expression. These data provide information relevant to Salmonella pathogenesis during acute infection in the intestine and during chronic infection of the gallbladder and inform the basis for development of therapeutics to inhibit invasion as a means of repressing Salmonella pathogenicity.

  8. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  9. Bordetella pertussis risA, but not risS, is required for maximal expression of Bvg-repressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, Trevor H; Allen, Andrew G; Al-Meer, Jehan A; Maskell, Duncan; Peppler, Mark S

    2005-09-01

    Expression of virulence determinants by Bordetella pertussis, the primary etiological agent of whooping cough, is regulated by the BvgAS two-component regulatory system. The role of a second two-component regulatory system, encoded by risAS, in this process is not defined. Here, we show that mutation of B. pertussis risA does not affect Bvg-activated genes or proteins. However, mutation of risA resulted in greatly diminished expression of Bvg-repressed antigens and decreased transcription of Bvg-repressed genes. In contrast, mutation of risS had no effect on the expression of Bvg-regulated molecules. Mutation of risA also resulted in decreased bacterial invasion in a HeLa cell model. However, decreased invasion could not be attributed to the decreased expression of Bvg-repressed products, suggesting that mutation of risA may affect the expression of a variety of genes. Unlike the risAS operons in B. parapertussis and B. bronchiseptica, B. pertussis risS is a pseudogene that encodes a truncated RisS sensor. Deletion of the intact part of the B. pertussis risS gene does not affect the expression of risA-dependent, Bvg-repressed genes. These observations suggest that RisA activation occurs through cross-regulation by a heterologous system.

  10. Cyclin D1 repression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenguang; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Zhou, Jian Nian; Fu, Maofu; Sakamaki, Toshiyuki; Albanese, Chris; Li, Zhiping; Wu, Kongming; Hulit, James; Neumeister, Peter; Novikoff, Phyllis M; Brownlee, Michael; Scherer, Philipp E; Jones, Joan G; Whitney, Kathleen D; Donehower, Lawrence A; Harris, Emily L; Rohan, Thomas; Johns, David C; Pestell, Richard G

    2003-09-01

    The cyclin D1 gene is overexpressed in human breast cancers and is required for oncogene-induced tumorigenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) is a nuclear receptor selectively activated by ligands of the thiazolidinedione class. PPAR gamma induces hepatic steatosis, and liganded PPAR gamma promotes adipocyte differentiation. Herein, cyclin D1 inhibited ligand-induced PPAR gamma function, transactivation, expression, and promoter activity. PPAR gamma transactivation induced by the ligand BRL49653 was inhibited by cyclin D1 through a pRB- and cdk-independent mechanism, requiring a region predicted to form an helix-loop-helix (HLH) structure. The cyclin D1 HLH region was also required for repression of the PPAR gamma ligand-binding domain linked to a heterologous DNA binding domain. Adipocyte differentiation by PPAR gamma-specific ligands (BRL49653, troglitazone) was enhanced in cyclin D1(-/-) fibroblasts and reversed by retroviral expression of cyclin D1. Homozygous deletion of the cyclin D1 gene, enhanced expression by PPAR gamma ligands of PPAR gamma and PPAR gamma-responsive genes, and cyclin D1(-/-) mice exhibit hepatic steatosis. Finally, reduction of cyclin D1 abundance in vivo using ponasterone-inducible cyclin D1 antisense transgenic mice, increased expression of PPAR gamma in vivo. The inhibition of PPAR gamma function by cyclin D1 is a new mechanism of signal transduction cross talk between PPAR gamma ligands and mitogenic signals that induce cyclin D1.

  11. A jumonji (Jarid2) protein complex represses cyclin D1 expression by methylation of histone H3-K9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Haruki; Ogawa, Satoko; Nakajima, Kuniko; Inagawa, Masayo; Kojima, Mizuyo; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2009-01-09

    Covalent modifications of histone tails have critical roles in regulating gene expression. Previously, we identified the jumonji (jmj, Jarid2) gene, the jmjC domain, and a Jmj family. Recently, many Jmj family proteins have been shown to be histone demethylases, and jmjC is the catalytic domain. However, Jmj does not have histone demethylase activity because the jmjC domain lacks conserved residues for binding to cofactors. Independently of these studies, we previously showed that Jmj binds to the cyclin D1 promoter and represses the transcription of cyclin D1. Here, we show the mechanisms by which Jmj represses the transcription of cyclin D1. We found that a protein complex of Jmj had histone methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 lysine 9 (H3-K9). We also found that Jmj bound to the H3-K9 methyltransferases G9a and GLP. Expression of Jmj recruited G9a and GLP to the cyclin D1 promoter and increased H3-K9 methylation. Inactivation of both G9a and GLP, but not of only G9a, inhibited the methylation of H3-K9 in the cyclin D1 promoter and repression of cyclin D1 expression by Jmj. These results suggest that Jmj methylates H3-K9 and represses cyclin D1 expression through G9a and GLP, and that Jmj family proteins can regulate gene expression by not only histone demethylation but also other histone modification.

  12. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  13. Repression of Salmonella enterica phoP expression by small molecules from physiological bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, L Caetano M; Wang, Melody; Andersen, Sarah K; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-05-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in humans causes the life-threatening disease typhoid fever. In the laboratory, typhoid fever can be modeled through the inoculation of susceptible mice with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. Using this murine model, we previously characterized the interactions between Salmonella Typhimurium and host cells in the gallbladder and showed that this pathogen can successfully invade gallbladder epithelial cells and proliferate. Additionally, we showed that Salmonella Typhimurium can use bile phospholipids to grow at high rates. These abilities are likely important for quick colonization of the gallbladder during typhoid fever and further pathogen dissemination through fecal shedding. To further characterize the interactions between Salmonella and the gallbladder environment, we compared the transcriptomes of Salmonella cultures grown in LB broth or physiological murine bile. Our data showed that many genes involved in bacterial central metabolism are affected by bile, with the citric acid cycle being repressed and alternative respiratory systems being activated. Additionally, our study revealed a new aspect of Salmonella interactions with bile through the identification of the global regulator phoP as a bile-responsive gene. Repression of phoP expression could also be achieved using physiological, but not commercial, bovine bile. The biological activity does not involve PhoPQ sensing of a bile component and is not caused by bile acids, the most abundant organic components of bile. Bioactivity-guided purification allowed the identification of a subset of small molecules from bile that can elicit full activity; however, a single compound with phoP inhibitory activity could not be isolated, suggesting that multiple molecules may act in synergy to achieve this effect. Due to the critical role of phoP in Salmonella virulence, further studies in this area will likely reveal aspects of the interaction between Salmonella

  14. PINCH1 is transcriptional regulator in podocytes that interacts with WT1 and represses podocalyxin expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PINCH1, an adaptor protein containing five LIM domains, plays an important role in regulating the integrin-mediated cell adhesion, migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PINCH1 is induced in the fibrotic kidney after injury, and it primarily localizes at the sites of focal adhesion. Whether it can translocate to the nucleus and directly participate in gene regulation is completely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using cultured glomerular podocytes as a model system, we show that PINCH1 expression was induced by TGF-β1, a fibrogenic cytokine that promotes podocyte dysfunction. Interestingly, increased PINCH1 not only localized at the sites of focal adhesions, but also underwent nuclear translocation after TGF-β1 stimulation. This nuclear translocation of PINCH1 was apparently dependent on the putative nuclear export/localization signals (NES/NLS at its C-terminus, as deletion or site-directed mutations abolished its nuclear shuttling. Co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments revealed that PINCH1 interacted with Wilms tumor 1 protein (WT1, a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for regulating podocyte-specific gene expression in adult kidney. Interaction of PINCH1 and WT1 was mediated by the LIM1 domain of PINCH1 and C-terminal zinc-finger domain of WT1, which led to the suppression of the WT1-mediated podocalyxin expression in podocytes. PINCH1 also repressed podocalyxin gene transcription in a promoter-luciferase reporter assay. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PINCH1 can shuttle into the nucleus from cytoplasm in podocytes, wherein it interacts with WT1 and suppresses podocyte-specific gene expression. Our studies reveal a previously unrecognized, novel function of PINCH1, in which it acts as a transcriptional regulator through controlling specific gene expression.

  15. Sulforaphane causes epigenetic repression of hTERT expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast

  16. The LBD12-1 Transcription Factor Suppresses Apical Meristem Size by Repressing Argonaute 10 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Weiwei; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Wang, Xiaole; Zhang, Zhe; Zhou, Kunneng; Zhang, Huan; Hu, Jinlong; Lin, Qibin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jiulin; Zhu, Shanshan; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Haiyang; Wu, Chuanyin; Zhai, Huqu; Wan, Jianmin

    2017-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) consists of a population of multipotent cells that generates all aerial structures and regenerates itself. SAM maintenance and lateral organ development are regulated by several complex signaling pathways, in which the Argonaute gene-mediated pathway plays a key role. One Argonaute gene, AGO10, functions as a microRNA locker that attenuates miR165/166 activity and positively regulates shoot apical meristem development, but little is known about when and how AGO10 is regulated at the transcriptional level. In this work, we showed that transgenic rice plants overexpressing LBD12-1, an LBD family transcription factor, exhibited stunted growth, twisted leaves, abnormal anthers, and reduced SAM size. Further research revealed that LBD12-1 directly binds to the promoter region and represses the expression of AGO10. Overexpression of AGO10 in an LBD12-1 overexpression background rescued the growth defect phenotype of LBD12-1-overexpressing plants. The expression of LBD12-1 and its binding ability to the AGO10 promoter is induced by stress. lbd12-1 loss-of-function mutants showed similar phenotypes and SAM size to the wild type under normal conditions, but lbd12-1 had a larger SAM under salt stress. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulatory mechanism of AGO10 by which SAM size is controlled under stress conditions. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Antagonism between MES-4 and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Promotes Appropriate Gene Expression in C. elegans Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Gaydos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans MES proteins are key chromatin regulators of the germline. MES-2, MES-3, and MES-6 form the C. elegans Polycomb repressive complex 2 and generate repressive H3K27me3. MES-4 generates H3K36me3 on germline-expressed genes. Transcript profiling of dissected mutant germlines revealed that MES-2/3/6 and MES-4 cooperate to promote the expression of germline genes and repress the X chromosomes and somatic genes. Results from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that H3K27me3 and H3K36me3 occupy mutually exclusive domains on the autosomes and that H3K27me3 is enriched on the X. Loss of MES-4 from germline genes causes H3K27me3 to spread to germline genes, resulting in reduced H3K27me3 elsewhere on the autosomes and especially on the X. Our findings support a model in which H3K36me3 repels H3K27me3 from germline genes and concentrates it on other regions of the genome. This antagonism ensures proper patterns of gene expression for germ cells, which includes repression of somatic genes and the X chromosomes.

  18. Salidroside alleviates paraquat-induced rat acute lung injury by repressing TGF-β1 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuoyi; Ding, Limin; Wu, Liqun; Xu, Liying; Zheng, Lanzhi; Huang, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of salidroside (SDS) via suppressing the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rat acute lung injury (ALI) induced by paraquat (PQ) and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. Methods: A total of 90 male rats (190-210 g) were randomly and evenly divided into 9 groups: control group, PQ groups (4 groups), and PQ + SDS groups (4 groups). The rats in control group were treated with equal volume of saline intraperitoneally. The rats in PQ groups were exposed to PQ solution (20 mg/kg) by gastric gavage for 1, 6, 24, and 72 hours, respectively. The rats in PQ + SDS groups were intraperitoneally injected once with SDS (10 mg/kg) every 12 hours after PQ perfusion. Pulmonary pathological changes were observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The expression of TGF-β1 and the mRNA were evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) scoring and real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR), respectively. Results: SDS alleviated the symptoms of PQ induced ALI. Moreover, SDS reduced the expression of the inflammatory cytokine TGF-β1 including TGF-β1 IHC scores (at each time point from 6 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) and mRNA level (at each time point from 1 to 72 hours after PQ perfusion) compared with PQ groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: SDS alleviated the pulmonary symptoms of PQ-induced ALI, at least partially, by repressing inflammatory cell infiltration and the expression of TGF-β1 resulting in delayed lung fibrosis. PMID:25674253

  19. High Glucose Represses hERG K+ Channel Expression through Trafficking Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Qi Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Abnormal QT prolongation is the most prominent cardiac electrical disturbance in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. It is well known that the human ether-ago-go-related gene (hERG controls the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr in cardiac cells. The expression of the hERG channel is severely down-regulated in diabetic hearts, and this down-regulation is a critical contributor to the slowing of repolarization and QT prolongation. However, the intracellular mechanisms underlying the diabetes-induced hERG deficiency remain unknown. Methods: The expression of the hERG channel was assessed via western blot analysis, and the hERG current was detected with a patch-clamp technique. Results: The results of our study revealed that the expression of the hERG protein and the hERG current were substantially decreased in high-glucose-treated hERG-HEK cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that the high-glucose-mediated damage to the hERG channel depended on the down-regulation of protein levels but not the alteration of channel kinetics. These discoveries indicated that high glucose likely disrupted hERG channel trafficking. From the western blot and immunoprecipitation analyses, we found that high glucose induced trafficking inhibition through an effect on the expression of Hsp90 and its interaction with hERG. Furthermore, the high-glucose-induced inhibition of hERG channel trafficking could activate the unfolded protein response (UPR by up-regulating the expression levels of activating transcription factor-6 (ATF-6 and the ER chaperone protein calnexin. In addition, we demonstrated that 100 nM insulin up-regulated the expression of the hERG channel and rescued the hERG channel repression caused by high glucose. Conclusion: The results of our study provide the first evidence of a high-glucose-induced hERG channel deficiency resulting from the inhibition of channel trafficking. Furthermore, insulin promotes the expression of the hERG channel

  20. Forced IFIT-2 expression represses LPS induced TNF-alpha expression at posttranscriptional levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Autenrieth Ingo B

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon induced tetratricopeptide repeat protein 2 (IFIT-2, P54 belongs to the type I interferon response genes and is highly induced after stimulation with LPS. The biological function of this protein is so far unclear. Previous studies indicated that IFIT-2 binds to the initiation factor subunit eIF-3c, affects translation initiation and inhibits protein synthesis. The aim of the study was to further characterize the function of IFIT-2. Results Stimulation of RAW264.7 macrophages with LPS or IFN-γ leads to the expression of IFIT-2 in a type I interferon dependent manner. By using stably transfected RAW264.7 macrophages overexpressing IFIT-2 we found that IFIT-2 inhibits selectively LPS induced expression of TNF-α, IL-6, and MIP-2 but not of IFIT-1 or EGR-1. In IFIT-2 overexpressing cells TNF-α mRNA expression was lower after LPS stimulation due to reduced mRNA stability. Further experiments suggest that characteristics of the 3'UTR of transcripts discriminate whether IFIT-2 has a strong impact on protein expression or not. Conclusion Our data suggest that IFIT-2 may affect selectively LPS induced protein expression probably by regulation at different posttranscriptional levels.

  1. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook, E-mail: mwhur2@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  2. pH-Dependent DNA Distortion and Repression of Gene Expression by Pectobacterium atrosepticum PecS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deochand, Dinesh K; Meariman, Jacob K; Grove, Anne

    2016-07-15

    Transcriptional activity is exquisitely sensitive to changes in promoter DNA topology. Transcription factors may therefore control gene activity by modulating the relative positioning of -10 and -35 promoter elements. The plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes soft rot in potatoes, must alter gene expression patterns to ensure growth in planta. In the related soft-rot enterobacterium Dickeya dadantii, PecS functions as a master regulator of virulence gene expression. Here, we report that P. atrosepticum PecS controls gene activity by altering promoter DNA topology in response to pH. While PecS binds the pecS promoter with high affinity regardless of pH, it induces significant DNA distortion only at neutral pH, the pH at which the pecS promoter is repressed in vivo. At pH ∼8, DNA distortions are attenuated, and PecS no longer represses the pecS promoter. A specific histidine (H142) located in a crevice between the dimerization- and DNA-binding regions is required for pH-dependent changes in DNA distortion and repression of gene activity, and mutation of this histidine renders the mutant protein incapable of repressing the pecS promoter. We propose that protonated PecS induces a DNA conformation at neutral pH in which -10 and -35 promoter elements are suboptimally positioned for RNA polymerase binding; on deprotonation of PecS, binding is no longer associated with significant changes in DNA conformation, allowing gene expression. We suggest that this mode of gene regulation leads to differential expression of the PecS regulon in response to alkalinization of the plant apoplast.

  3. ChREBP Mediates Glucose Repression of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor {alpha} Expression in Pancreatic {beta}-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Poulsen, Lars la Cour; Schmidt, Søren Fisker;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids leads to dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells by mechanisms that are only partly understood. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is an important regulator of genes involved in fatty acid metaboli...... of glucose repression of PPARα gene expression in pancreatic β-cells, suggesting that ChREBP may be important for glucose suppression of the fatty acid oxidation capacity of β-cells....

  4. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  5. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  6. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) Represses Oct4 Expression and Globally Modulates Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem (hES) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Kyba, Michael; Cooney, Austin J

    2016-04-15

    Oct4 is considered a key transcription factor for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal. It binds to specific regions within target genes to regulate their expression and is downregulated upon induction of differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; however, the mechanisms that regulate the levels of human Oct4 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that expression of human Oct4 is directly repressed by germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), an orphan nuclear receptor, in hES cells. Knockdown of GCNF by siRNA resulted in maintenance of Oct4 expression during RA-induced hES cell differentiation. While overexpression of GCNF promoted repression of Oct4 expression in both undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. The level of Oct4 repression was dependent on the level of GCNF expression in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA microarray analysis demonstrated that overexpression of GCNF globally regulates gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. Within the group of altered genes, GCNF down-regulated 36% of the genes, and up-regulated 64% in undifferentiated hES cells. In addition, GCNF also showed a regulatory gene pattern that is different from RA treatment during hES cell differentiation. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain hES cell pluripotency and regulate gene expression during the differentiation process.

  7. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K

    2000-01-01

    . To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a luciferase gene...... E2F4-Rb DNA binding complexes. Importantly, these experiments revealed that HPV-induced alterations in E2F transcription complexes that occur during cervical carcinogenesis are reversed by repression of HPV E6/E7 expression....

  8. TWIST Represses Estrogen Receptor-alpha Expression by Recruiting the NuRD Protein Complex in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjiang Fu, Lianmei Zhang, Tao He, Xiuli Xiao, Xiaoyan Liu, Li Wang, Luquan Yang, Manman Yang, Tiandan Zhang, Rui Chen, Jianming Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of estrogen receptor α (ERα expression and gain of TWIST (TWIST1 expression in breast tumors correlate with increased disease recurrence and metastasis and poor disease-free survival. However, the molecular and functional regulatory relationship between TWIST and ERα are unclear. In this study, we found TWIST was associated with a chromatin region in intron 7 of the human ESR1 gene coding for ERα. This association of TWIST efficiently recruited the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD repressor complex to this region, which subsequently decreased histone H3K9 acetylation, increased histone H3K9 methylation and repressed ESR1 expression in breast cancer cells. In agreement with these molecular events, TWIST expression was inversely correlated with ERα expression in both breast cancer cell lines and human breast ductal carcinomas. Forced expression of TWIST in TWIST-negative and ERα-positive breast cancer cells such as T47D and MCF-7 cells reduced ERα expression, while knockdown of TWIST in TWIST-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells such as MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells increased ERα expression. Furthermore, inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC activity including the one in NuRD complex significantly increased ERα expression in MDA-MB-435 and 4T1 cells. HDAC inhibition together with TWIST knockdown did not further increase ERα expression in 4T1 and MDA-MB-435 cells. These results demonstrate that TWIST/NuRD represses ERα expression in breast cancer cells. Therefore, TWIST may serve as a potential molecular target for converting ERα-negative breast cancers to ERα-positive breast cancers, allowing these cancers to restore their sensitivity to endocrine therapy with selective ERα antagonists such as tamoxifen and raloxifene.

  9. miR-34a inhibits the metastasis of osteosarcoma cells by repressing the expression of CD44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haien; Ma, Baoan; Wang, Yucai; Han, Tao; Zheng, Lianhe; Sun, Cong; Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yinglong; Qiu, Xiuchun; Fan, Qingyu

    2013-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common type of malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents and approximately 30% of patients develop lung metastasis, which is the leading cause of mortality. In this study, we investigated the role of miR-34a in the invasion and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells by examining its expression level and functional pattern in these cells. miR-34a mimics were transfected into the highly metastatic subline, F5M2, and into the F4 subline with low metastatic potential of the paired human osteosarcoma cell line, SOSP‑9607. Cell viability patterns, cell migration and alterations in gene expression levels were assessed by real-time PCR, and changes in protein levels were assessed by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. The ectopic overexpression of miR-34a significantly inhibited the migration and invasive ability of osteosarcoma cells by repressing the expression of CD44. These data suggest that miR-34a plays a tumor suppressor role in the metastasis of osteosarcoma cells by repressing the expression of CD44. Of note, studies have also suggested that the CD44 protein correlates with the metastatic potential of several malignant tumors. Therefore, it can be concluded that through the inhibition of CD44 expression levels, miR-34a plays a significant role in the migration and invasion of osteosarcoma cells.

  10. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2013-12-13

    Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  11. Copper stress induces a global stress response in Staphylococcus aureus and represses sae and agr expression and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jonathan; Sitthisak, Sutthirat; Sengupta, Mrittika; Johnson, Miranda; Jayaswal, R K; Morrissey, Julie A

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes; however, high levels of copper are toxic. Therefore, bacteria must ensure there is sufficient copper for use as a cofactor but, more importantly, must limit free intracellular levels to prevent toxicity. In this study, we have used DNA microarray to identify Staphylococcus aureus copper-responsive genes. Transcriptional profiling of S. aureus SH1000 grown in excess copper identified a number of genes which fall into four groups, suggesting that S. aureus has four main mechanisms for adapting to high levels of environmental copper, as follows: (i) induction of direct copper homeostasis mechanisms; (ii) increased oxidative stress resistance; (iii) expression of the misfolded protein response; and (iv) repression of a number of transporters and global regulators such as Agr and Sae. Our experimental data confirm that resistance to oxidative stress and particularly to H2O2 scavenging is an important S. aureus copper resistance mechanism. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Eap and Emp proteins, which are positively regulated by Agr and Sae, are required for biofilm formation under low-iron growth conditions. Our transcriptional analysis has confirmed that sae, agr, and eap are repressed under high-copper conditions and that biofilm formation is indeed repressed under high-copper conditions. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for how copper films can prevent biofilm formation on catheters.

  12. A Herpesviral induction of RAE-1 NKG2D ligand expression occurs through release of HDAC mediated repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Trever T; Tokuyama, Maria; Knudsen, Giselle M; Kunz, Michele; Lin, James; Greninger, Alexander L; DeFilippis, Victor R; DeRisi, Joseph L; Raulet, David H; Coscoy, Laurent

    2016-11-22

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are essential for control of viral infection and cancer. NK cells express NKG2D, an activating receptor that directly recognizes NKG2D ligands. These are expressed at low level on healthy cells, but are induced by stresses like infection and transformation. The physiological events that drive NKG2D ligand expression during infection are still poorly understood. We observed that the mouse cytomegalovirus encoded protein m18 is necessary and sufficient to drive expression of the RAE-1 family of NKG2D ligands. We demonstrate that RAE-1 is transcriptionally repressed by histone deacetylase inhibitor 3 (HDAC3) in healthy cells, and m18 relieves this repression by directly interacting with Casein Kinase II and preventing it from activating HDAC3. Accordingly, we found that HDAC inhibiting proteins from human herpesviruses induce human NKG2D ligand ULBP-1. Thus our findings indicate that virally mediated HDAC inhibition can act as a signal for the host to activate NK-cell recognition.

  13. Epoxide-Mediated CifR Repression of cif Gene Expression Utilizes Two Binding Sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Ballok, Alicia E.; Bahl, Christopher D.; Dolben, Emily L.; Lindsay, Allia K.; St. Laurent, Jessica D.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Madden, Dean R.; O'Toole, George A.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon contain...

  14. The defense-responsive genes showing enhanced and repressed expression after pathogen infection in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌; 彭开蔓; 储昭晖; 王石平; 张启发

    2002-01-01

    Despite large numbers of studies about defense response, processes involved in the resistance of plants to incompatible pathogens are still largely uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to identify genes involved in defense response by cDNA array analysis and to gain knowledge about the functions of the genes involved in defense response. Approximately 20000 rice cDNA clones were arrayed on nylon filters. RNA samples isolated from different rice lines after infection with incompatible strains or isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae or Pyricularia grisea, respectively, were used to synthesize cDNA as probes for screening the cDNA arrays. A total of 100 differentially expressed unique sequences were identified from 5 pathogen-host combinations. Fifty-three sequences were detected as showing enhanced expression and 47 sequences were detected as showing repressed expression after pathogen infection. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the 100 sequences had various degrees of homology with genes in databases which encode or putatively encode transcription regulating proteins, translation regulating proteins, transport proteins, kinases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins involved in other functions. Most of the genes have not been previously reported as being involved in the disease resistance response in rice. The results from cDNA arrays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and RNA gel blot analysis suggest that activation or repression of most of these genes might occur commonly in the defense response.

  15. MiR144/451 Expression Is Repressed by RUNX1 During Megakaryopoiesis and Disturbed by RUNX1/ETO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Kohrs

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A network of lineage-specific transcription factors and microRNAs tightly regulates differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells along the distinct lineages. Deregulation of this regulatory network contributes to impaired lineage fidelity and leukemogenesis. We found that the hematopoietic master regulator RUNX1 controls the expression of certain microRNAs, of importance during erythroid/megakaryocytic differentiation. In particular, we show that the erythorid miR144/451 cluster is epigenetically repressed by RUNX1 during megakaryopoiesis. Furthermore, the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion protein transcriptionally represses the miR144/451 pre-microRNA. Thus RUNX1/ETO contributes to increased expression of miR451 target genes and interferes with normal gene expression during differentiation. Furthermore, we observed that inhibition of RUNX1/ETO in Kasumi1 cells and in RUNX1/ETO positive primary acute myeloid leukemia patient samples leads to up-regulation of miR144/451. RUNX1 thus emerges as a key regulator of a microRNA network, driving differentiation at the megakaryocytic/erythroid branching point. The network is disturbed by the leukemogenic RUNX1/ETO fusion product.

  16. Transgenic Expression of a Functional Fragment of Harpin Protein Hpa1 in Wheat Represses English Grain Aphid Infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Man-yu; ZHOU Ting; ZHAO Yan-ying; LI Jia-bao; XU Heng; DONG Han-song; ZHANG Chun-ling

    2014-01-01

    The harpin protein Hpa1 produced by the rice bacterial blight pathogen promotes plant growth and induces plant resistance to pathogens and insect pests. The region of 10-42 residues (Hpa110-42) in the Hpa1 sequence is critical as the isolated Hpa110-42 fragment is 1.3-7.5-fold more effective than the full length in inducing plant growth and resistance. Here we report that transgenic expression of Hpa110-42 in wheat induces resistance to English grain aphid, a dominant species of wheat aphids. Hpa110-42-induced resistance is effective to inhibit the aphid behavior in plant preference at the initial colonization stage and repress aphid performances in the reproduction, nymph growth, and instar development on transgenic plants. The resistance characters are correlated with enhanced expression of defense-regulatory genes (EIN2, PP2-A, and GSL10) and consistent with induced expression of defense response genes (Hel, PDF1.2, PR-1b, and PR-2b). As a result, aphid infestations are alleviated in transgenic plants. The level of Hpa110-42-induced resistance in regard to repression of aphid infestations is equivalent to the effect of chemical control provided by an insecticide. These results suggested that the defensive role of Hpa110-42 can be integrated into breeding germplasm of the agriculturally signiifcant crop with a great potential of the agricultural application.

  17. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  18. Epoxide-mediated CifR repression of cif gene expression utilizes two binding sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballok, Alicia E; Bahl, Christopher D; Dolben, Emily L; Lindsay, Allia K; St Laurent, Jessica D; Hogan, Deborah A; Madden, Dean R; O'Toole, George A

    2012-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon containing the cif gene. We have mapped these binding sites and found they are 27 bp in length, and they overlap the -10 and +1 sites of both the cifR and morB regulatory region and the start of transcription, respectively. In addition, we found that CifR binds to each repression site with differing affinity. Mutagenesis of these binding sites resulted in a loss of DNA binding in vitro, and mutation of one of these sites in vivo resulted in an increase in transcription of both the cif and cifR genes. We characterized cif and cifR gene expression in sputum and found that, whereas cif gene expression varied relative to an in vitro coculture control, cifR gene expression was consistently higher. Analysis of a longitudinal sample of CF isolates from nine patients revealed that Cif protein was expressed over time, although variably, and these changes could not be linked to mutations in the cifR gene or the promoters of these genes. Finally, we tested CifR responsiveness to other epoxides and showed that CifR can respond to multiple epoxides to various degrees.

  19. Abundant Early Expression of gpUL4 from a Human Cytomegalovirus Mutant Lacking a Repressive Upstream Open Reading Frame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, John P.; Child, Stephanie J.; Geballe, Adam P.

    2001-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus UL4 gene encodes a 48-kDa glycoprotein, expression of which is repressed at the translational level by a short upstream open reading frame (uORF2) within the UL4 transcript leader. Mutation of the uORF2 initiation codon in the viral genome eliminates ribosomal stalling at the uORF2 termination site, resulting in early and abundant gpUL4 protein synthesis. This mutation does not appear to affect viral replication kinetics in human fibroblasts. These results reveal that the unusual uORF2 inhibitory mechanism is a principal determinant of the abundance and timing of gpUL4 expression but is nonessential for replication in cell culture. PMID:11435600

  20. Inhibition of SIRT1 Increases EZH2 Protein Level and Enhances the Repression of EZH2 on Target Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Lu; Lei Li; Xiang Lü; Xue-song Wu; De-pei Liu; Chih-chuan Liang

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the regulatory roles of SIRT1 on EZH2 expression and the further effects on EZH2's repression of target gene expression. Methods The stable SIRT1 RNAi and Control RNAi HeLa cells were established by infection with retroviruses expressing shSIRT1 and shLuc respectively followed by puromycin selection. EZH2 protein level was detected by Western blot in either whole cell lysate or the fractional cell extract. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the mRNA level of EZH2. Cycloheximide was used to treat SIRT1 RNAi and Control RNAi cells for protein stability assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (CHIP) assay was applied to measure enrichment of SIRT1, EZH2, and trimethylated H3K27 (H3K27me3) at SATB1 promoter in SIRT1 RNAi and Control RNAi cells.Results Western blot results showed that EZH2 protein level increased upon SIRT1 depletion. Fractional extraction results showed unchanged cytoplasmic fraction and increased chromatin fraction of EZH2 protein in SIRTI RNAi cells. The mRNA level of EZH2 was not affected by knockdown of SIRT1. SIRT1 recruitment was not detected at the promoter region of EZH2 gene locus. The protein stability assay showed that the protein stability of EZH2 increases upon SIRTI knockdown. Upon SIRT1 depletion, EZH2 and H3K27me3 recruitment at SATB1 promoter increases and the mRNA level of SATB1 decreases.Conclusions Depletion of SIRT1 increases the protein stability of EZH2. The regulation of EZH2 protein level by SIRTI affects the repressive effects of EZH2 on the target gene expression.

  1. The homeodomain protein Cux1 interacts with Grg4 to repress p27 kip1 expression during kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Madhulika; Brantley, Jennifer G; Vassmer, Dianne; Chaturvedi, Gaurav; Baas, Jennifer; Vanden Heuvel, Gregory B

    2009-06-15

    The homeodomain protein Cux1 is highly expressed in the nephrogenic zone of the developing kidney where it functions to regulate cell proliferation. Here we show that Cux1 directly interacts with the co-repressor Grg4 (Groucho 4), a known effector of Notch signaling. Promoter reporter based luciferase assays revealed enhanced repression of p27(kip1) promoter activity by Cux1 in the presence of Grg4. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays demonstrated the direct interaction of Cux1 with p27(kip1) in newborn kidney tissue in vivo. ChIP assays also identified interactions of Cux1, Grg4, HDAC1, and HDAC3 with p27(kip1) at two separate sites in the p27(kip1) promoter. DNAse1 footprinting experiments revealed that Cux1 binds to the p27(kip1) promoter on the sequence containing two Sp1 sites and a CCAAT box approximately 500 bp from the transcriptional start site, and to an AT rich sequence approximately 1.5 kb from the transcriptional start site. Taken together, these results identify Grg4 as an interacting partner for Cux1 and suggest a mechanism of p27(kip1) repression by Cux1 during kidney development.

  2. Forced FOG1 expression in erythroleukemia cells: Induction of erythroid genes and repression of myelo-lymphoid transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Sasaki, Katsuyuki; Saito, Kei; Hatta, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-02-16

    The transcription factor GATA-1-interacting protein Friend of GATA-1 (FOG1) is essential for proper transcriptional activation and repression of GATA-1 target genes; yet, the mechanisms by which FOG1 exerts its activating and repressing functions remain unknown. Forced FOG1 expression in human K562 erythroleukemia cells induced the expression of erythroid genes (SLC4A1, globins) but repressed that of GATA-2 and PU.1. A quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated increased GATA-1 chromatin occupancy at both FOG1-activated as well as FOG1-repressed gene loci. However, while TAL1 chromatin occupancy was significantly increased at FOG1-activated gene loci, it was significantly decreased at FOG1-repressed gene loci. When FOG1 was overexpressed in TAL1-knocked down K562 cells, FOG1-mediated activation of HBA, HBG, and SLC4A1 was significantly compromised by TAL1 knockdown, suggesting that FOG1 may require TAL1 to activate GATA-1 target genes. Promoter analysis and quantitative ChIP analysis demonstrated that FOG1-mediated transcriptional repression of PU.1 would be mediated through a GATA-binding element located at its promoter, accompanied by significantly decreased H3 acetylation at lysine 4 and 9 (K4 and K9) as well as H3K4 trimethylation. Our results provide important mechanistic insight into the role of FOG1 in the regulation of GATA-1-regulated genes and suggest that FOG1 has an important role in inducing cells to differentiate toward the erythroid lineage rather than the myelo-lymphoid one by repressing the expression of PU.1.

  3. Prioritized Expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Pronounced Translation Repression Induced by Severe Ethanol Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yukina; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v) as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration. PMID:27602028

  4. Prioritized expression of BTN2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under pronounced translation repression induced by severe ethanol stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukina Yamauchi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe ethanol stress (>9% ethanol, v/v as well as glucose deprivation rapidly induces a pronounced repression of overall protein synthesis in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, transcriptional activation in yeast cells under severe ethanol stress does not always indicate the production of expected protein levels. Messenger RNAs of genes containing heat shock elements can be intensively translated under glucose deprivation, suggesting that some mRNAs are preferentially translated even under severe ethanol stress. In the present study, we tried to identify the mRNA that can be preferentially translated under severe ethanol stress. BTN2 encodes a v-SNARE binding protein, and its null mutant shows hypersensitivity to ethanol. We found that BTN2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe ethanol stress but not under mild ethanol stress. Moreover, the increased Btn2 protein levels caused by severe ethanol stress were smoothly decreased with the elimination of ethanol stress. These findings suggested that severe ethanol stress extensively induced BTN2 expression. Further, the BTN2 promoter induced protein synthesis of non-native genes such as CUR1, GIC2, and YUR1 in the presence of high ethanol concentrations, indicating that this promoter overcame severe ethanol stress-induced translation repression. Thus, our findings provide an important clue about yeast response to severe ethanol stress and suggest that the BTN2 promoter can be used to improve the efficiency of ethanol production and stress tolerance of yeast cells by modifying gene expression in the presence of high ethanol concentration.

  5. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Matsumura, Rie; Hoshino, Naomi; Tsuzuki, Mikio; Sato, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Triacylglycerol (TG) synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N)-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S)-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P)-starved cells. S- and N- starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N- starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of DGAT genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  6. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol (TG synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P-starved cells. S- and N-starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N-starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  7. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Gia-Ming [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Present address: The University of Chicago, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 900 E. 57th Street, Room 7134, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bain, Lisa J., E-mail: lbain@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, 132 Long Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  8. Glucose-induced repression of PPARalpha gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells involves PP2A activation and AMPK inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Boergesen, Michael; Dalgaard, Louise T;

    2006-01-01

    Tight regulation of fatty acid metabolism in pancreatic beta-cells is important for beta-cell viability and function. Chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fatty acid is associated with beta-cell lipotoxicity. Glucose is known to repress fatty acid oxidation and hence to augment the toxi......Tight regulation of fatty acid metabolism in pancreatic beta-cells is important for beta-cell viability and function. Chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of fatty acid is associated with beta-cell lipotoxicity. Glucose is known to repress fatty acid oxidation and hence to augment...... but not AMPKalpha1 using RNAi suppressed PPARalpha expression, thereby mimicking the effect of glucose. These results indicate that activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent inactivation of AMPK is necessary for glucose repression of PPARalpha expression in pancreatic beta-cells....

  9. Somatically expressed germ-granule components, PGL-1 and PGL-3, repress programmed cell death in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Min, Hyemin; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Kawasaki, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that germline apoptosis in C. elegans increased by loss of PGL-1 and PGL-3, members of a family of constitutive germ-granule components, from germ cells in adult hermaphrodite gonads. In this study, we found that somatic apoptosis was reduced in synthetic multivulva class B (synMuv B) mutants due to ectopic expression of PGL-1 and PGL-3 in the soma. In synMuv B-mutant somatic cells, CED-4 expression level was reduced due to ectopic expression of PGL-1. Furthermore, in contrast to wild type, somatic apoptosis in synMuv B mutants increased following DNA damage in a SIR-2.1-dependent manner. Intriguingly, somatic apoptosis was repressed not only in synMuv B mutants but also by ectopically expressing pgl-1 and/or pgl-3 transgenes in wild-type somatic cells. Our study demonstrates that germ-granule components, PGL-1 and PGL-3, can serve as negative regulators of apoptosis not only in the germline but also in the soma in C. elegans. PMID:27650246

  10. colgate/hdac1 Repression of foxd3 expression is required to permit mitfa-dependent melanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Myron S; Moose, Holly E; El-Hodiri, Heithem M; Henion, Paul D

    2008-01-15

    Neural crest-derived pigment cell development has been used extensively to study cell fate specification, migration, proliferation, survival and differentiation. Many of the genes and regulatory mechanisms required for pigment cell development are conserved across vertebrates. The zebrafish mutant colgate (col)/histone deacetylase1 (hdac1) has reduced numbers, delayed differentiation and decreased migration of neural crest-derived melanophores and their precursors. In hdac1(col) mutants normal numbers of premigratory neural crest cells are induced. Later, while there is only a slight reduction in the number of neural crest cells in hdac1(col) mutants, there is a severe reduction in the number of mitfa-positive melanoblasts suggesting that hdac1 is required for melanoblast specification. Concomitantly, there is a significant increase in and prolonged expression of foxd3 in neural crest cells in hdac1(col) mutants. We found that partially reducing Foxd3 expression in hdac1(col) mutants rescues mitfa expression and the melanophore defects in hdac1(col) mutants. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ability of Foxd3 to physically interact at the mitfa promoter. Because mitfa is required for melanoblast specification and development, our results suggest that hdac1 is normally required to suppress neural crest foxd3 expression thus de-repressing mitfa resulting in melanogenesis by a subset of neural crest-derived cells.

  11. Histone H3K9 methyltransferase G9a represses PPARγ expression and adipogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Lifeng; Xu, Shiliyang; Lee, Ji‐Eun; Baldridge, Anne; Grullon, Sean; Peng, Weiqun; Ge, Kai

    PPARγ promotes adipogenesis while Wnt proteins inhibit adipogenesis. However, the mechanisms that control expression of these positive and negative master regulators of adipogenesis remain incompletely understood. By genome...

  12. A nitrogen source-dependent inducible and repressible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki eFujiwara

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is a model organism for studying the basic biology of photosynthetic organisms. The C. merolae cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles. The genome is completely sequenced. Gene targeting and a heat-shock inducible gene expression system has been recently established. However, a conditional gene knockdown system has not been established, which is required for the examination of function of genes that are essential to cell viability and primary mutant defects. In the current study, we first evaluated the expression of a transgene from two chromosomal neutral loci located in the intergenic region between CMD184C and CMD185C, and a region upstream of the URA5.3 gene. There was no significant difference in expression between them and this result suggests that both may be used as neutral loci. We then designed an inducible and repressible gene expression by using promoters of nitrate-assimilation genes. The expression of nitrate-assimilation genes such as NR (nitrate reductase, NIR (nitrite reductase and NRT (the nitrate/nitrite transporter are reversibly regulated by their dependence on nitrogen sources. We constructed stable strains in which a cassette containing the NR, NIR or NRT promoter and sfGFP gene was inserted in a region upstream of URA5.3 and examined the efficacy of the promoters. The NR, NIR, and NRT promoters were constitutively activated in the nitrate medium, whereas their activities were extremely low in presence of ammonium. The activation of each promoter was immediately inhibited within a period of 1 hour by the addition of ammonium. Thus, a conditional knockdown system in C. merolae was successfully established. The activity varies among the promoters, and each is selectable according to the expression level of a target gene estimated by RNA-sequencing. This method is applicable to defects in genes of interest in photosynthetic organism.

  13. A nitrogen source-dependent inducible and repressible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kanesaki, Yu; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Era, Atsuko; Sumiya, Nobuko; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Kan; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    The unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae is a model organism for studying the basic biology of photosynthetic organisms. The C. merolae cell is composed of an extremely simple set of organelles. The genome is completely sequenced. Gene targeting and a heat-shock inducible gene expression system has been recently established. However, a conditional gene knockdown system has not been established, which is required for the examination of function of genes that are essential to cell viability and primary mutant defects. In the current study, we first evaluated the expression of a transgene from two chromosomal neutral loci located in the intergenic region between CMD184C and CMD185C, and a region upstream of the URA5.3 gene. There was no significant difference in expression between them and this result suggests that both may be used as neutral loci. We then designed an inducible and repressible gene expression by using promoters of nitrate-assimilation genes. The expression of nitrate-assimilation genes such as NR (nitrate reductase), NIR (nitrite reductase), and NRT (the nitrate/nitrite transporter) are reversibly regulated by their dependence on nitrogen sources. We constructed stable strains in which a cassette containing the NR, NIR, or NRT promoter and sfGFP gene was inserted in a region upstream of URA5.3 and examined the efficacy of the promoters. The NR, NIR, and NRT promoters were constitutively activated in the nitrate medium, whereas their activities were extremely low in presence of ammonium. The activation of each promoter was immediately inhibited within a period of 1 h by the addition of ammonium. Thus, a conditional knockdown system in C. merolae was successfully established. The activity varies among the promoters, and each is selectable according to the expression level of a target gene estimated by RNA-sequencing. This method is applicable to defects in genes of interest in photosynthetic organism.

  14. Enhanced recombinant protein production and differential expression of molecular chaperones in sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells after baculovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yiu-Kay

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that have examined the potential of RNA inference (RNAi to increase protein production in the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS. Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm (Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells exhibit resistance to apoptosis and enhancement of recombinant protein production. However, the mechanism of recombinant protein augmentation in baculovirus-infected Caspase-repressed insect cells has not been elucidated. Results In the current study, we utilized RNAi-mediated Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells to clarify how the resistance to apoptosis can enhance both intracellular (firefly luciferase and extracellular (secreted alkaline phosphatase [SEAP] recombinant protein production in BEVS. Since the expression of molecular chaperones is strongly associated with the maximal production of exogenous proteins in BEVS, the differential expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected stable cells was also analyzed in this study. Conclusion The data indicated that the retention of expression of molecular chaperones in baculovirus-infected Sf-caspase-1-repressed stable cells give the higher recombinant protein accumulation.

  15. The transcription factor TEAD1 represses smooth muscle-specific gene expression by abolishing myocardin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaobo; Hu, Guoqing; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Jiliang

    2014-02-07

    The TEAD (transcriptional enhancer activator domain) proteins share an evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding TEA domain, which binds to the MCAT cis-acting regulatory element. Previous studies have shown that TEAD proteins are involved in regulating the expression of smooth muscle α-actin. However, it remains undetermined whether TEAD proteins play a broader role in regulating expression of other genes in vascular smooth muscle cells. In this study, we show that the expression of TEAD1 is significantly induced during smooth muscle cell phenotypic modulation and negatively correlates with smooth muscle-specific gene expression. We further demonstrate that TEAD1 plays a novel role in suppressing expression of smooth muscle-specific genes, including smooth muscle α-actin, by abolishing the promyogenic function of myocardin, a key mediator of smooth muscle differentiation. Mechanistically, we found that TEAD1 competes with myocardin for binding to serum response factor (SRF), resulting in disruption of myocardin and SRF interactions and thereby attenuating expression of smooth muscle-specific genes. This study provides the first evidence demonstrating that TEAD1 is a novel general repressor of smooth muscle-specific gene expression through interfering with myocardin binding to SRF.

  16. TBX1 Represses Vegfr2 Gene Expression and Enhances the Cardiac Fate of VEGFR2+ Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lania, Gabriella; Ferrentino, Rosa; Baldini, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The T-box transcription factor TBX1 has critical roles in maintaining proliferation and inhibiting differentiation of cardiac progenitor cells of the second heart field (SHF). Haploinsufficiency of the gene that encodes it is a cause of congenital heart disease. Here, we developed an embryonic stem (ES) cell-based model in which Tbx1 expression can be modulated by tetracycline. Using this model, we found that TBX1 down regulates the expression of VEGFR2, and we confirmed this finding in vivo during embryonic development. In addition, we found a Vegfr2 domain of expression, not previously described, in the posterior SHF and this expression is extended by loss of Tbx1. VEGFR2 has been previously described as a marker of a subpopulation of cardiac progenitors. Clonal analysis of ES-derived VEGFR2+ cells indicated that 12.5% of clones expressed three markers of cardiac lineage (cardiomyocyte, smooth muscle and endothelium). However, a pulse of Tbx1 expression was sufficient to increase the percentage to 20.8%. In addition, the percentage of clones expressing markers of multiple cardiac lineages increased from 41.6% to 79.1% after Tbx1 pulse. These results suggest that TBX1 plays a role in maintaining a progenitor state in VEGFR2+ cells. PMID:26382615

  17. Gro/TLE enables embryonic stem cell differentiation by repressing pluripotent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laing, Adam F; Lowell, Sally; Brickman, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Gro/TLE proteins (TLE1-4) are a family of transcriptional corepressors acting downstream of multiple signalling pathways. Several TLEs are expressed in a dynamic manner throughout embryonic development and at high levels in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Here we find that Gro/TLE is not required...... in ESC for sustaining pluripotency and suppressing differentiation genes, but rather is important for the shutting down of the pluripotency network in differentiation. Consistent with this view, we found that one of the Gro/TLE family, TLE4 is expressed heterogeneously in ESCs in a population...... that corresponds to a Nanog low subset of ESC culture. TLE4 expression is also increased in response to LIF withdrawal and Fgf/Mek/Erk stimulation. To explore the role of Gro/TLE in more detail we generated an allelic series of knockout ESCs of two TLE genes expressed most dynamically in early differentiation, TLE...

  18. The microRNAs in an ancient protist repress the variant-specific surface protein expression by targeting the entire coding sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashesh A Saraiya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available microRNAs (miRNA have been detected in the deeply branched protist, Giardia lamblia, and shown to repress expression of the family of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs, only one of which is expressed in Giardia trophozoite at a given time. Three next-generation sequencing libraries of Giardia Argonaute-associated small RNAs were constructed and analyzed. Analysis of the libraries identified a total of 99 new putative miRNAs with a size primarily in the 26 nt range similar to the size previously predicted by the Giardia Dicer crystal structure and identified by our own studies. Bioinformatic analysis identified multiple putative miRNA target sites in the mRNAs of all 73 VSPs. The effect of miRNA target sites within a defined 3'-region were tested on two vsp mRNAs. All the miRNAs showed partial repression of the corresponding vsp expression and were additive when the targeting sites were separately located. But the combined repression still falls short of 100%. Two other relatively short vsp mRNAs with 15 and 11 putative miRNA target sites identified throughout their ORFs were tested with their corresponding miRNAs. The results indicate that; (1 near 100% repression of vsp mRNA expression can be achieved through the combined action of multiple miRNAs on target sites located throughout the ORF; (2 the miRNA machinery could be instrumental in repressing the expression of vsp genes in Giardia; (3 this is the first time that all the miRNA target sites in the entire ORF of a mRNA have been tested and shown to be functional.

  19. TcdC does not significantly repress toxin expression in Clostridium difficile 630ΔErm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bakker

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Clostridium difficile has emerged as an important gut pathogen. Symptoms of C. difficile infection range from mild diarrhea to pseudomembranous colitis, sometimes resulting in colectomy or death. The main virulence factors of C. difficile are toxin A and toxin B. Besides the genes encoding these toxins (tcdA and tcdB, the pathogenicity locus (PaLoc also contains genes encoding a sigma factor (tcdR and a putative anti-sigma factor (tcdC. The important role of TcdR as a sigma factor for toxin expression is undisputed, whereas the role of TcdC as an anti-sigma factor, inhibiting toxin expression, is currently the subject of debate. To clarify the role of TcdC in toxin expression, we generated an isogenic ClosTron-based mutant of tcdC in Clostridium difficile strain 630Δ Erm (CT::tcdC and determined the transcription levels of the PaLoc genes and the expression levels of the toxins in the wild type strain and the tcdC mutant strain. We found only minor differences in transcription levels of the PaLoc genes between the wild type and CT::tcdC strains and total toxin levels did not significantly differ either. These results suggest that in C. difficile 630Δerm TcdC is not a major regulator of toxin expression under the conditions tested.

  20. The ribosomal protein Rpl22 controls ribosome composition by directly repressing expression of its own paralog, Rpl22l1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique N O'Leary

    Full Text Available Most yeast ribosomal protein genes are duplicated and their characterization has led to hypotheses regarding the existence of specialized ribosomes with different subunit composition or specifically-tailored functions. In yeast, ribosomal protein genes are generally duplicated and evidence has emerged that paralogs might have specific roles. Unlike yeast, most mammalian ribosomal proteins are thought to be encoded by a single gene copy, raising the possibility that heterogenous populations of ribosomes are unique to yeast. Here, we examine the roles of the mammalian Rpl22, finding that Rpl22(-/- mice have only subtle phenotypes with no significant translation defects. We find that in the Rpl22(-/- mouse there is a compensatory increase in Rpl22-like1 (Rpl22l1 expression and incorporation into ribosomes. Consistent with the hypothesis that either ribosomal protein can support translation, knockdown of Rpl22l1 impairs growth of cells lacking Rpl22. Mechanistically, Rpl22 regulates Rpl22l1 directly by binding to an internal hairpin structure and repressing its expression. We propose that ribosome specificity may exist in mammals, providing evidence that one ribosomal protein can influence composition of the ribosome by regulating its own paralog.

  1. Repression of p15INK4b expression by Myc through association with Miz-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staller, P; Peukert, K; Kiermaier, A

    2001-01-01

    in G1 phase and inhibits cyclin D-associated kinase activity. Miz-1 upregulates expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) inhibitor p15INK4b by binding to the initiator element of the p15INK4b promoter. Myc and Max form a complex with Miz-1 at the p15 initiator and inhibit transcriptional...... activation by Miz-1. Expression of Myc in primary cells inhibits the accumulation of p15INK4b that is associated with cellular senescence; conversely, deletion of c-myc in an established cell line activates p15INK4b expression. Alleles of c-myc that are unable to bind to Miz-1 fail to inhibit accumulation...... of p15INK4b messenger RNA in primary cells and are, as a consequence, deficient in immortalization....

  2. High glucose-induced oxidative stress represses sirtuin deacetylase expression and increases histone acetylation leading to neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Yang, Peixin

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetic modifications are implicated in maternal diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs). Because cellular stress plays a causal role in diabetic embryopathy, we investigated the possible role of the stress-resistant sirtuin (SIRT) family histone deacetylases. Among the seven sirtuins (SIRT1-7), pre-gestational maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro significantly reduced the expression of SIRT 2 and SIRT6 in the embryo or neural stem cells, respectively. The down-regulation of SIRT2 and SIRT6 was reversed by superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) over-expression in the in vivo mouse model of diabetic embryopathy and the SOD mimetic, tempol and cell permeable SOD, PEGSOD in neural stem cell cultures. 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ), a superoxide generating agent, mimicked high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression. The acetylation of histone 3 at lysine residues 56 (H3K56), H3K14, H3K9, and H3K27, putative substrates of SIRT2 and SIRT6, was increased by maternal diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro, and these increases were blocked by SOD1 over-expression or tempol treatment. SIRT2 or SIRT6 over-expression abrogated high glucose-suppressed SIRT2 or SIRT6 expression, and prevented the increase in acetylation of their histone substrates. The potent sirtuin activator (SRT1720) blocked high glucose-increased histone acetylation and NTD formation, whereas the combination of a pharmacological SIRT2 inhibitor and a pan SIRT inhibitor mimicked the effect of high glucose on increased histone acetylation and NTD induction. Thus, diabetes in vivo or high glucose in vitro suppresses SIRT2 and SIRT6 expression through oxidative stress, and sirtuin down-regulation-induced histone acetylation may be involved in diabetes-induced NTDs. The mechanism underlying pre-gestational diabetes-induced neural tube defects (NTDs) is still elusive. Our study unravels a new epigenetic mechanism in which maternal diabetes-induced oxidative stress represses

  3. SOX9 governs differentiation stage-specific gene expression in growth plate chondrocytes via direct concomitant transactivation and repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y L Leung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and endochondral bone development require SOX9 activity to regulate chondrogenesis, chondrocyte proliferation, and transition to a non-mitotic hypertrophic state. The restricted and reciprocal expression of the collagen X gene, Col10a1, in hypertrophic chondrocytes and Sox9 in immature chondrocytes epitomise the precise spatiotemporal control of gene expression as chondrocytes progress through phases of differentiation, but how this is achieved is not clear. Here, we have identified a regulatory element upstream of Col10a1 that enhances its expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vivo. In immature chondrocytes, where Col10a1 is not expressed, SOX9 interacts with a conserved sequence within this element that is analogous to that within the intronic enhancer of the collagen II gene Col2a1, the known transactivation target of SOX9. By analysing a series of Col10a1 reporter genes in transgenic mice, we show that the SOX9 binding consensus in this element is required to repress expression of the transgene in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. Forced ectopic Sox9 expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vitro and in mice resulted in down-regulation of Col10a1. Mutation of a binding consensus motif for GLI transcription factors, which are the effectors of Indian hedgehog signaling, close to the SOX9 site in the Col10a1 regulatory element, also derepressed transgene expression in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. GLI2 and GLI3 bound to the Col10a1 regulatory element but not to the enhancer of Col2a1. In addition to Col10a1, paired SOX9-GLI binding motifs are present in the conserved non-coding regions of several genes that are preferentially expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes and the occurrence of pairing is unlikely to be by chance. We propose a regulatory paradigm whereby direct concomitant positive and negative transcriptional control by SOX9 ensures differentiation phase-specific gene expression in chondrocytes. Discrimination between

  4. Repressive Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Jarlbæk

    2016-01-01

    to an administrative culture of repressive tolerance of organised interests: authorities listen but only reacts in a very limited sense. This bears in it the risk of jeopardising the knowledge transfer from societal actors to administrative ditto thus harming the consultation institutions’ potential for strengthening...

  5. Phosphorylation of FOXP3 by LCK downregulates MMP9 expression and represses cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Nakahira

    Full Text Available Forkhead Box P3 (FOXP3 is a member of the forkhead/winged helix family of the transcription factors and plays an important role not only as a master gene in T-regulatory cells, but also as a tumor suppressor. In this study, we identified lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (LCK, which correlates with cancer malignancy, as a binding partner of FOXP3. FOXP3 downregulated LCK-induced MMP9, SKP2, and VEGF-A expression. We observed that LCK phosphorylated Tyr-342 of FOXP3 by immunoprecipitation and in vitro kinase assay, and the replacement of Tyr-342 with phenylalanine (Y342F abolished the ability to suppress MMP9 expression. Although FOXP3 decreased the invasive ability induced by LCK in MCF-7 cells, Y342F mutation in FOXP3 diminished this suppressive effect. Thus we demonstrate for the first time that LCK upregulates FOXP3 by tyrosine phosphorylation, resulting in decreased MMP9, SKP2, and VEGF-A expression, and suppressed cellular invasion. We consider that further clarification of transcriptional mechanism of FOXP3 may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic approaches to suppress cancer malignancy.

  6. A bipartite U1 site represses U1A expression by synergizing with PIE to inhibit nuclear polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Fei; Caratozzolo, Rose M; Goraczniak, Rafal; Ho, Eric S; Gunderson, Samuel I

    2007-12-01

    U1A protein negatively autoregulates itself by polyadenylation inhibition of its own pre-mRNA by binding as two molecules to a 3'UTR-located Polyadenylation Inhibitory Element (PIE). The (U1A)2-PIE complex specifically blocks U1A mRNA biosynthesis by inhibiting polyA tail addition, leading to lower mRNA levels. U1 snRNP bound to a 5'ss-like sequence, which we call a U1 site, in the 3'UTRs of certain papillomaviruses leads to inhibition of viral late gene expression via a similar mechanism. Although such U1 sites can also be artificially used to potently silence reporter and endogenous genes, no naturally occurring U1 sites have been found in eukaryotic genes. Here we identify a conserved U1 site in the human U1A gene that is, unexpectedly, within a bipartite element where the other part represses the U1 site via a base-pairing mechanism. The bipartite element inhibits U1A expression via a synergistic action with the nearby PIE. Unexpectedly, synergy is not based on stabilizing binding of the inhibitory factors to the 3'UTR, but rather is a property of the larger ternary complex. Inhibition targets the biosynthetic step of polyA tail addition rather than altering mRNA stability. This is the first example of a functional U1 site in a cellular gene and of a single gene containing two dissimilar elements that inhibit nuclear polyadenylation. Parallels with other examples where U1 snRNP inhibits expression are discussed. We expect that other cellular genes will harbor functional U1 sites.

  7. Neuregulin 1 represses limbic epileptogenesis through ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guo-He; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Xiao-Ling; Yin, Dong-Min; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2011-12-11

    Epilepsy is a common and refractory neurological disorder, but the neuronal regulatory mechanisms of epileptogenesis remain largely unclear. Activity-dependent transcription of genes for neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to promote epileptogenesis; however, little is known about factors that may act as intrinsic, homeostatic or counterbalancing mechanisms. Using rodent models, here we show that limbic seizure activity upregulated NRG1-ErbB4 signaling and that epileptogenesis was inhibited by infusing NRG1 intracerebrally but exacerbated by neutralizing endogenous NRG1 with soluble ErbB4 extracellular domain, by inhibiting ErbB4 activation or by deleting the Erbb4 gene. Furthermore, specific depletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons abolished NRG1-mediated inhibition of epileptogenesis and promoted kindling progression, resulting in increased spontaneous seizures and exuberant mossy fiber sprouting. In contrast, depleting ErbB4 in CaMKIIα-positive pyramidal neurons had no effect. Thus, NRG1-induced activation of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons may serve as a critical endogenous negative-feedback mechanism to suppress limbic epileptogenesis.

  8. ClpE from Lactococcus lactis promotes repression of CtsR-dependent gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varmanen, P.; Vogensen, F.K.; Hammer, Karin;

    2003-01-01

    The heat shock response in bacterial cells is characterized by rapid induction of heat shock protein expression, followed by an adaptation period during which heat shock protein synthesis decreases to a new steady-state level. In this study we found that after a shift to a high temperature the Clp...... ATPase (ClpE) in Lactococcus lactis is required for such a decrease in expression of a gene negatively regulated by the heat shock regulator (CtsR). Northern blot analysis showed that while a shift to a high temperature in wild-type cells resulted in a temporal increase followed by a decrease......E by Western blot analysis revealed that at a high temperature CIpE is subjected to ClpP-dependent processing and that disruption of the zinc finger domain renders GpE more susceptible. Interestingly, this domain resembles the N-terminal region of McsA, which was recently reported to interact with the Cts...

  9. Cdc6 expression is induced by HPV16 E6 and E7 oncogenes and represses E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihloo, E; Sadeghizadeh, M; Shahmahmoodi, S; Mokhtari-Azad, T

    2016-11-11

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide, and its development is related to two viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 from high-risk human papillomaviruses. Aberrant expression of E-cadherin is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and it is frequently seen in cervical cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in E-cadherin suppression in cervical cancer are not clear. We studied the effects of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 on E-cadherin and Cdc6 (cell division cycle 6) expression in the HCT-116 cell line. We also assessed the relationship between Cdc6 and E-cadherin expression in cells expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins. The results showed that HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins reduce E-cadherin expression, and HPV16 E6-expressing cells undergo a more profound suppression of E-cadherin compared with cells expressing HPV16 E7. Our results also revealed that HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins induce Cdc6 expression, whereas suppression of Cdc6 protein by short hairpin RNA restores E-cadherin expression. Induction of Cdc6 expression in HCT-116 cells was greater with E6 than with E7, a finding that was consistent with the corresponding changes in E-cadherin expression. These observations suggest that Cdc6 overexpression is an important factor for E-cadherin reduction in cells expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins and may have an important role in the metastasis of HPV-associated cancers.Cancer Gene Therapy advance online publication, 11 November 2016; doi:10.1038/cgt.2016.51.

  10. Increased intragenic IGF2 methylation is associated with repression of insulator activity and elevated expression in serous ovarian carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing eHuang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF2 is a prominent characteristic of many epithelial ovarian malignancies. IGF2 imprinting and transcription are regulated in part through DNA methylation, which in turn regulates binding of the insulator protein, CTCF, within the IGF2/H19 imprint center. We have shown that IGF2 overexpression in ovarian cancer is associated with hypermethylation of CTCF binding sites within the IGF2/H19 imprint center. The aim of this study was to investigate the methylation and binding capacity of a novel putative CTCF binding motif located intragenic to IGF2 and determine how this relates to IGF2 expression. In 35 primary serous epithelial ovarian cancer specimens, methylation of two CpGs, including one within the core binding motif and another adjacent to this motif, was higher in the 18 cancers with elevated IGF2 expression versus 10 with low expression (avg. 68.2% vs. 38.5%; p<0.0001. We also found that the CpG site within the CTCF binding motif is hypermethylated in male gametes (>92%; avg. 93.2%; N=16. We confirmed binding of CTCF to this region in ovarian cancer cells, as well as the paralog of CTCF, BORIS, which is frequently overexpressed in cancers. The unmethylated CTCF binding motif has insulator activity in cells that express CTCF or BORIS, but not in cells that express both CTCF and BORIS. These intragenic CpG dinucleotides comprise a novel paternal germline imprint mark and are located in a binding motif for the insulator protein CTCF. Methylation of the CpG dinucleotides is positively correlated with IGF2 transcription, supporting that increased methylation represses insulator function. These combined results suggest that methylation and CTCF binding at this region play important roles in regulating the level of IGF2 transcription. Our data have revealed a novel epigenetic regulatory element within the IGF2/H19 imprinted domain that is highly relevant to aberrant IGF2 expression in ovarian

  11. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T. G.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupt...

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwayong; Song, Kwang Hoon; Jung, Pil Mun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Ro, Hyunju; Kim, Mi Yoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α -melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hwayong; Song, Kwang Hoon; Jung, Pil Mun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Mi Yoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content. PMID:23781272

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwayong Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content.

  15. MART-10 represses cholangiocarcinoma cell growth and high vitamin D receptor expression indicates better prognosis for cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Chang, Yu-Chan; Juang, Horng-Heng; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Hsu, Jun-Te; Takano, Masashi; Chen, Tai C.; Kittaka, Atsushi; Hsiao, Michael; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a devastating disease due to no effective treatments available. Since the non-mineral functions of vitamin D emerges, 1α,25(OH)2D3, the active form of vitamin D, has been applied in anti-cancer researches. In this study, we demonstrated that both the 1α,25(OH)2D3 analog, MART-10, and 1α,25(OH)2D3 possessed anti-growth effect on human CCA cells with MART-10 much more potent than 1α,25(OH)2D3. The growth inhibition of both drugs were mediated by induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest through upregulation of p27 and downregulation of CDK4, CDK6, and cyclin D3. Human neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) was found to be involved in 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 meditated growth inhibition for CCA as knockdown of NGAL decreased Ki-67 expression in SNU308 cells and rendered SNU308 cells less responsive to 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 treatment. Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockdown partly abolished MART-10-induced inhibition of NGAL and cell growth in SNU308 cells. The xenograft animal study demonstrated MART-10 could effectively repressed CCA growth in vivo without inducing obvious side effects. The IHC examination of human CCA specimen for VDR revealed that higher VDR expression was linked with better prognosis. Collectively, our results suggest that MART-10 could be a promising regimen for CCA treatment. PMID:28256614

  16. Ectopic expression of miR156 represses nodulation and causes morphological and developmental changes in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Zhishuo; Amyot, Lisa; Tian, Lining; Xu, Ziqin; Gruber, Margaret Y; Hannoufa, Abdelali

    2015-04-01

    The effects of microRNA156 overexpression on general plant architecture, branching, flowering time and nodulation were investigated in the model legume, Lotus japonicus. We cloned an miR156 homolog, LjmiR156a, from L. japonicus, and investigated its SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN LIKE (SPL) genes and its biological function at enhancing vegetative biomass yield, extending flowering time, and its impact on nodulation. Thirteen potential targets for LjmiR156 were identified in vitro and their expression profiles were determined in aerial and underground parts of mature plants, including genes coding for eight SPLs, one WD-40, one RNA-directed DNA polymerase, two transport proteins, and one histidine-phosphotransfer protein. Two SPL and one WD-40 cleavage targets for LjmiR156-TC70253, AU089191, and TC57859-were identified. Transgenic plants with ectopic expression of LjmiR156a showed enhanced branching, dramatically delayed flowering, underdeveloped roots, and reduced nodulation. We also examined the transcript levels of key genes involved in nodule organogenesis and infection thread formation to determine the role of miR156 in regulating symbiosis. Overexpression of LjmiR156a led to repression of several nodulation genes during the early stages of root development such as three ENOD genes, SymPK, POLLUX, CYCLOPS, Cerberus, and Nsp1, and the stimulation of NFR1. Our results show that miR156 regulates vegetative biomass yield, flowering time and nodulation by silencing downstream target SPLs and other genes, suggesting that the miR156 regulatory network could be modified in forage legumes (such as alfalfa and trefoils) and in leafy vegetables (like lettuce and spinach) to positively impact economically valuable crop species.

  17. Chronic expression of Ski induces apoptosis and represses autophagy in cardiac myofibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeglinski, Matthew R; Davies, Jared J L; Ghavami, Saeid; Rattan, Sunil G; Halayko, Andrew J; Dixon, Ian M C

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate cardiac interstitial remodeling is mediated by activated phenoconverted myofibroblasts. The synthesis of matrix proteins by these cells is triggered by both chemical and mechanical stimuli. Ski is a repressor of TGFβ1/Smad signaling and has been described as possessing anti-fibrotic properties within the myocardium. We hypothesized that overexpression of Ski in myofibroblasts will induce an apoptotic response, which may either be supported or opposed by autophagic flux. We used primary myofibroblasts (activated fibroblasts) which were sourced from whole heart preparations that were only passaged once. We found that overexpression of Ski results in distinct morphological and biochemical changes within primary cardiac myofibroblasts associated with apoptosis. Ski treatment was associated with the expression of pro-apoptotic factors such as Bax, caspase-7, and -9. Our results indicate that Ski triggers a pro-death mechanism in primary rat cardiac myofibroblasts that is mediated through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Myofibroblast survival is prolonged by an autophagic response, as the dataset indicate that apoptosis is hastened when autophagy is inhibited. We suggest that the apoptotic death response of myofibroblasts is working in parallel with the previously observed anti-fibrotic properties of Ski within this cell type. As myofibroblasts are the sole mediators of matrix expansion in heart failure, we suggest that Ski, or a putative Ski-mimetic, may induce graded apoptosis in myofibroblasts within the failing heart and may be a novel therapeutic approach towards controlling cardiac fibrosis. Future studies are needed to examine the potential effects of Ski overexpression on other cell types in the heart.

  18. Spo0A positively regulates epr expression by negating the repressive effect of co-repressors, SinR and ScoC, in Bacillus subtilis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monica Gupta; Madhulika Dixit; K Krishnamurthy Rao

    2013-06-01

    Bacillus subtilis under nutritional deprivation exhibits several physiological responses such as synthesis of degradative enzymes, motility, competence, sporulation, etc. At the onset of post-exponential phase the global response regulator, Spo0A, directly or indirectly activates the expression of genes involved in the above processes. These genes are repressed during the exponential phase by a group of proteins called transition state regulators, e.g. AbrB, ScoC and SinR. One such post-exponentially expressed gene is epr, which encodes a minor extracellular serine protease and is involved in the swarming motility of B. subtilis. Deletion studies of the upstream region of epr promoter revealed that epr is co-repressed by transition state regulators, SinR and ScoC. Our study shows that Spo0A positively regulates epr expression by nullifying the repressive effect of co-repressors, SinR and ScoC. We demonstrate via in vitro mobility shift assays that Spo0A binds to the upstream region of epr promoter and in turn occludes the binding site of one of the co-repressor, SinR. This explains the mechanism behind the positive regulatory effect of Spo0A on epr expression.

  19. HDAC4 mediates IFN-γ induced disruption of energy expenditure-related gene expression by repressing SIRT1 transcription in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingming; Fan, Zhiwen; Tian, Wenfang; Zhao, Yuhao; Li, Ping; Xu, Huihui; Zhou, Bisheng; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved through balanced energy storage and output. Impairment of energy expenditure is a hallmark event in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Previously we have shown that the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) disrupts energy expenditure in skeletal muscle cells via hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1)-class II transactivator (CIITA) dependent repression of SIRT1 transcription. Here we report that repression of SIRT1 transcription by IFN-γ paralleled loss of histone acetylation on the SIRT1 promoter region with simultaneous recruitment of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). IFN-γ activated HDAC4 in vitro and in vivo by up-regulating its expression and stimulating its nuclear accumulation. HIC1 and CIITA recruited HDAC4 to the SIRT1 promoter and cooperated with HDAC4 to repress SIRT1 transcription. HDAC4 depletion by small interfering RNA or pharmaceutical inhibition normalized histone acetylation on the SIRT1 promoter and restored SIRT1 expression in the presence of IFN-γ. Over-expression of HDAC4 suppressed the transcription of genes involved in energy expenditure in a SIRT1-dependent manner. In contrast, HDAC4 knockdown/inhibition neutralized the effect of IFN-γ on cellular metabolism by normalizing SIRT1 expression. Therefore, our data reveal a role for HDAC4 in regulating cellular energy output and as such provide insights into rationalized design of novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  20. Retinoic acid represses CYP7A1 expression in human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells by FXR/RXR-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shi-Ying; He, Hongwei; Nguyen, Trong; Mennone, Albert; Boyer, James L

    2010-08-01

    Cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) plays a key role in maintaining lipid and bile salt homeostasis as it is the rate-limiting enzyme converting cholesterol to bile acids. Deficiency of CYP7A1 leads to hyperlipidemia in man and mouse. Hyperlipidemia is often seen in patients when treated with high-dose retinoic acid (RA), but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Our present study revealed that CYP7A1 mRNA expression is greatly repressed by RA in both human hepatocytes and HepG2 cells where increased fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and small heterodimer partner (SHP) expressions were also observed, suggesting farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) were activated. Promoter reporter assays demonstrate that all-trans RA (atRA) specifically activated FXR/RXR. However, detailed molecular analyses indicate that this activation is through RXR, whose ligand is 9-cis RA. Knocking down of FXR or RXRalpha by small interference RNA (siRNA) in human hepatocytes increased CYP7A1 basal expression, but the repressive effect of atRA persisted, suggesting there are also FXR/RXR-independent mechanisms mediating atRA repression of CYP7A1 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and cell transfection results indicate that PGC-1alpha plays a role in the FXR/RXR-independent mechanism. Our findings may provide a potential explanation for hyperlipidemic side effects observed in some patients treated with high-dose RA.

  1. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries.

  2. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo [College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Chen, Linfeng [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Baniahmad, Aria, E-mail: aban@mti.uni-jena.de [Institute for Human Genetics, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  3. The role of promoter cis-element, mRNA capping, and ROS in the repression and salt-inducible expression of AtSOT12 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Inducible gene expression is a gene regulatory mechanism central to plant response to environmental cues. The inducible genes are often repressed under normal growth conditions while their expression levels are significantly elevated by conditions such as abiotic stresses. Induction of gene expression requires both cis-acting DNA elements and trans-acting proteins that are modulated through signal transduction pathways. Here we report several molecular events that affect salt induced expression of the Arabidopsis AtSOT12 gene. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that DNA elements residing in the 5’ UTR are required for the salt induced expression of AtSOT12. Cytosine methylation in the promoter was low and salt stress slightly increased the DNA methylation level, suggesting that DNA methylation may not contribute to AtSOT12 gene repression. Co-transcriptional processing of AtSOT12 mRNA including capping and polyadenylation site selection was also affected by salt stress. The percentage of capped mRNA increased by salt treatment, and the polyadenylation sites were significantly different before and after exposure to salt stress. The expression level of AtSOT12 under normal growth conditions was markedly higher in the oxi1 mutant defective of ROS signaling than in the wild type. Moreover, AtSOT12 transcript level was elevated by treatments with DPI and DMTU, two chemicals preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. These results suggest that repression of AtSOT12 expression may require physiological level of ROS and ROS signaling.

  4. Transcriptional repression of Caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene expression by GATA-6 in bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy in mice and human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Goldfarb, Robert; John, Mary; Srinivasan, Vittala Gopal; Alanzi, Jaber; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Kathuria, Hasmeena; Zderic, Stephen A; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophy occurs in urinary bladder wall smooth muscle (BSM) in men with partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in animal models of PBOO. Hypertrophied BSM from the rabbit model exhibits down-regulation of caveolin-1, a structural and functional protein of caveolae that function as signaling platforms to mediate interaction between receptor proteins and adaptor and effector molecules to regulate signal generation, amplification, and diversification. Caveolin-1 expression is diminished in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in mice and in men with BPH. The proximal promoter of the human and mouse caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene was characterized, and it was observed that the transcription factor GATA-6 binds this promoter, causing reduced expression of caveolin-1. Furthermore, caveolin-1 expression levels inversely correlate with the abundance of GATA-6 in BSM hypertrophy in mice and human beings. Silencing of GATA6 gene expression up-regulates caveolin-1 expression, whereas overexpression of GATA-6 protein sustains the transcriptional repression of caveolin-1 in bladder smooth muscle cells. Together, these data suggest that GATA-6 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CAV1 gene expression in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in men and mice. GATA-6-induced transcriptional repression represents a new regulatory mechanism of CAV1 gene expression in pathologic BSM, and may serve as a target for new therapy for BPH-induced bladder dysfunction in aging men.

  5. A +220 GATA motif mediates basal but not endotoxin-repressible expression of the von Willebrand factor promoter in Hprt-targeted transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, J.; KANKI, Y.; OKADA, Y.; JIN, E.; YANO, K.; SHIH, S.-C.; MINAMI, T.; AIRD, W. C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene is a marker for spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the endothelium. A GATA motif at +220 has been implicated in basal VWF expression in vitro. Other studies have shown that GATA3 and VWF are transcriptionally downregulated in response to inflammatory mediators. Objectives Our goal was to determine the importance of the +220 GATA motif in mediating expression of VWF promoter in vivo, and to elucidate whether the GATA element plays a role in spatial and/or temporal regulation of VWF expression. Methods ChIP and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were carried out in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Reporter gene constructs containing 3.6 kb of the human VWF promoter with and without amutation of the +220 GATA element were transfected into cultured endothelial cells or targeted to the Hprt locus of mice. The Hprt-targeted mice were subjected to endotoxemia. Results In protein-DNA binding assays, the +220 GATA motif bound GATA-2, -3 and -6. Mutation of the GATA site resulted in reduced basal promoter activity in HUVEC. When targeted to the Hprt locus of mice, the GATA mutation resulted in a significant, proportionate reduction of promoter activity in LacZ expressing vascular beds. Systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in a widespread reduction in VWF mRNA expression and promoter activity. LPS-mediated repression of the VWF promoter was unaffected by the GATA mutation. Conclusions A region of the VWF promoter between −2182 and the end of the first intron contains information for LPS-mediated gene repression. The +220 GATA motif is important for basal, but not LPS-repressible expression of the VWF gene. PMID:19496923

  6. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.

  7. Expression of I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens on functional B cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frelinger, J A; Hibbler, F J; Hill, S W

    1978-12-01

    Ia antigens from specific subregions have been examined on functional B cell populations. Expression of both I-A and I-E,C region antigens was demonstrated on cells required for both lipopolysaccharide mitogenesis and polyclonal activation. Similar I-A and I-E,C subregion expression was found on cells required for response to the T-independent antigen, polyvinylpyrrolidone. TNP-specific IgM and hen egg lysozyme-specific IgG plaque-forming cells also express I-A and I-E,C region antigens. No evidence was found for an Ia- population responsive in the systems tested. Further, no evidence of preferential expression of I-A or I-E,C region antigens was observed in any system examined. Therefore, it appears that B cells express both I-A and I-E,C region-coded Ia antigens.

  8. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Garcia

    Full Text Available The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind, a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box" present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh, a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator and Cic (repressor may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  9. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  10. Herpes simplex virus is equipped with RNA- and protein-based mechanisms to repress expression of ATRX, an effector of intrinsic immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Igor; Silverstein, Leah B; Sharma, Mayuri; Coen, Donald M

    2012-09-01

    Intrinsic immunity is a first-line intracellular defense against virus infection, and viruses have evolved mechanisms to counteract it. During herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection, nuclear domain 10 (ND10) components localize adjacent to incoming viral genomes and generate a repressive environment for viral gene expression. Here, we found that the ND10 component, alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) protein, is predicted to be a target of HSV-1 miR-H1 and HSV-2 miR-H6. These microRNAs (miRNAs) share a seed sequence and are abundant during lytic infection. Mimics of both miRNAs could deplete endogenous ATRX, and an miR-H1 mimic could repress the expression of a reporter linked to the 3' untranslated region of ATRX mRNA, identifying a cellular mRNA targeted by an HSV miRNA. Interestingly, ATRX protein and its mRNA were depleted in cells lytically infected with HSV, and ATRX protein was also depleted in cells infected with human cytomegalovirus. However, infection with an HSV-1 mutant lacking miR-H1 still resulted in ATRX depletion. This depletion was sensitive to a proteasome inhibitor and was largely ablated by a deletion of the gene encoding the immediate-early ICP0 protein. Additionally, a deletion of the gene encoding the tegument protein Vhs ablated most of the depletion of ATRX mRNA. Thus, HSV is equipped with multiple mechanisms to limit the expression of ATRX. As ATRX is implicated in repression of lytic viral gene expression, our results suggest roles for these different mechanisms during various phases of HSV infection.

  11. The AbrB2 autorepressor, expressed from an atypical promoter, represses the hydrogenase operon to regulate hydrogen production in Synechocystis strain PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutheil, Jérémy; Saenkham, Panatda; Sakr, Samer; Leplat, Christophe; Ortega-Ramos, Marcia; Bottin, Hervé; Cournac, Laurent; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2012-10-01

    We have thoroughly investigated the abrB2 gene (sll0822) encoding an AbrB-like regulator in the wild-type strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis strain PCC6803. We report that abrB2 is expressed from an active but atypical promoter that possesses an extended -10 element (TGTAATAT) that compensates for the absence of a -35 box. Strengthening the biological significance of these data, we found that the occurrence of an extended -10 promoter box and the absence of a -35 element are two well-conserved features in abrB2 genes from other cyanobacteria. We also show that AbrB2 is an autorepressor that is dispensable to cell growth under standard laboratory conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that AbrB2 also represses the hox operon, which encodes the Ni-Fe hydrogenase of biotechnological interest, and that the hox operon is weakly expressed even though it possesses the two sequences resembling canonical -10 and -35 promoter boxes. In both the AbrB2-repressed promoters of the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, we found a repeated DNA motif [TT-(N(5))-AAC], which could be involved in AbrB2 repression. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that a TT-to-GG mutation of one of these elements increased the activity of the abrB2 promoter. We think that our abrB2-deleted mutant with increased expression of the hox operon and hydrogenase activity, together with the reporter plasmids we constructed to analyze the abrB2 gene and the hox operon, will serve as useful tools to decipher the function and the regulation of hydrogen production in Synechocystis.

  12. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells. PMID:25613934

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax oncoprotein represses the expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor in T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takachi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Takahashi-Yoshita, Manami; Higuchi, Masaya; Obata, Miki; Mishima, Yukio; Okuda, Shujiro; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Matsuoka, Masao; Saitoh, Akihiko; Green, Patrick L; Fujii, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiological agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL), which is an aggressive form of T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 oncoproteins, Tax and HBZ, play crucial roles in the immortalization of T-cells and/or leukemogenesis by dysregulating the cellular functions in the host. Recent studies show that HTLV-1-infected T-cells have reduced expression of the BCL11B tumor suppressor protein. In the present study, we explored whether Tax and/or HBZ play a role in downregulating BCL11B in HTLV-1-infected T-cells. Lentiviral transduction of Tax in a human T-cell line repressed the expression of BCL11B at both the protein and mRNA levels, whereas the transduction of HBZ had little effect on the expression. Tax mutants with a decreased activity for the NF-κB, CREB or PDZ protein pathways still showed a reduced expression of the BCL11B protein, thereby implicating a different function of Tax in BCL11B downregulation. In addition, the HTLV-2 Tax2 protein reduced the BCL11B protein expression in T-cells. Seven HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines, including three ATL-derived cell lines, showed reduced BCL11B mRNA and protein expression relative to an uninfected T-cell line, and the greatest reductions were in the cells expressing Tax. Collectively, these results indicate that Tax is responsible for suppressing BCL11B protein expression in HTLV-1-infected T-cells; Tax-mediated repression of BCL11B is another mechanism that Tax uses to promote oncogenesis of HTLV-1-infected T-cells.

  14. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  15. The varicella-zoster virus-mediated delayed host shutoff: open reading frame 17 has no major function, whereas immediate-early 63 protein represses heterologous gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desloges, Nathalie; Rahaus, Markus; Wolff, Manfred H

    2005-12-01

    We reported that varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes a delayed host shutoff during its replicative cycle. VZV open reading frame 17 (ORF17) is the homologue of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL41 gene encoding the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein which is responsible for the shutoff effect observed in HSV-infected cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that ORF17 is expressed as a late protein during the VZV replicative cycle in different infected permissive cell lines which showed a delayed shutoff of cellular RNA. A cell line with stable expression of VZV ORF17 was infected with VZV. In these cells, VZV replication and delayed host shutoff remained unchanged when compared to normal infected cells. ORF17 was not capable of repressing the expression of the beta-gal reporter gene under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene promoter or to inhibit the expression of a CAT reporter gene under the control of the human GAPDH promoter, indicating that ORF17 has no major function in the VZV-mediated delayed host shutoff. To determine whether other viral factors are involved in the host shutoff, a series of cotransfection assays was performed. We found that the immediate-early 63 protein (IE63) was able to downregulate the expression of reporter genes under the control of the two heterologous promoters, indicating that this viral factor can be involved in the VZV-mediated delayed host shutoff. Other factors can be also implicated to modulate the repressing action of IE63 to achieve a precise balance between the viral and cellular gene expression.

  16. The two-component system CpxR/A represses the expression of Salmonella virulence genes by affecting the stability of the transcriptional regulator HilD

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Palacios, Irene J.; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Calva, Edmundo; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica can cause intestinal or systemic infections in humans and animals mainly by the presence of pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, containing 39 and 44 genes, respectively. The AraC-like regulator HilD positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as many other Salmonella virulence genes including those located in SPI-2. A previous report indicates that the two-component system CpxR/A regulates the SPI-1 genes: the absence of the sensor kinase CpxA, but not the absence of its cognate response regulator CpxR, reduces their expression. The presence and absence of cell envelope stress activates kinase and phosphatase activities of CpxA, respectively, which in turn controls the level of phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P). In this work, we further define the mechanism for the CpxR/A-mediated regulation of SPI-1 genes. The negative effect exerted by the absence of CpxA on the expression of SPI-1 genes was counteracted by the absence of CpxR or by the absence of the two enzymes, AckA and Pta, which render acetyl-phosphate that phosphorylates CpxR. Furthermore, overexpression of the lipoprotein NlpE, which activates CpxA kinase activity on CpxR, or overexpression of CpxR, repressed the expression of SPI-1 genes. Thus, our results provide several lines of evidence strongly supporting that the absence of CpxA leads to the phosphorylation of CpxR via the AckA/Pta enzymes, which represses both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes. Additionally, we show that in the absence of the Lon protease, which degrades HilD, the CpxR-P-mediated repression of the SPI-1 genes is mostly lost; moreover, we demonstrate that CpxR-P negatively affects the stability of HilD and thus decreases the expression of HilD-target genes, such as hilD itself and hilA, located in SPI-1. Our data further expand the insight on the different regulatory pathways for gene expression involving CpxR/A and on the complex regulatory network governing virulence in Salmonella. PMID:26300871

  17. HP1a, Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and POF stimulate or repress gene expression depending on genomic position, gene length and expression pattern in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Lina E; Stenberg, Per; Larsson, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a) is a chromatin-associated protein important for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin. In Drosophila, the two histone methyltransferases SETDB1 and Su(var)3-9 mediate H3K9 methylation marks that initiates the establishment and spreading of HP1a-enriched chromatin. Although HP1a is generally regarded as a factor that represses gene transcription, several reports have linked HP1a binding to active genes, and in some cases, it has been shown to stimulate transcriptional activity. To clarify the function of HP1a in transcription regulation and its association with Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and the chromosome 4-specific protein POF, we conducted genome-wide expression studies and combined the results with available binding data in Drosophila melanogaster. The results suggest that HP1a, SETDB1 and Su(var)3-9 repress genes on chromosome 4, where non-ubiquitously expressed genes are preferentially targeted, and stimulate genes in pericentromeric regions. Further, we showed that on chromosome 4, Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and HP1a target the same genes. In addition, we found that transposons are repressed by HP1a and Su(var)3-9 and that the binding level and expression effects of HP1a are affected by gene length. Our results indicate that genes have adapted to be properly expressed in their local chromatin environment.

  18. Pax4 is not essential for beta-cell differentiation in zebrafish embryos but modulates alpha-cell generation by repressing arx gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djiotsa, Joachim; Verbruggen, Vincianne; Giacomotto, Jean; Ishibashi, Minaka; Manning, Elisabeth; Rinkwitz, Silke; Manfroid, Isabelle; Voz, Marianne L; Peers, Bernard

    2012-12-17

    Genetic studies in mouse have demonstrated the crucial function of PAX4 in pancreatic cell differentiation. This transcription factor specifies β- and δ-cell fate at the expense of α-cell identity by repressing Arx gene expression and ectopic expression of PAX4 in α-cells is sufficient to convert them into β-cells. Surprisingly, no Pax4 orthologous gene can be found in chicken and Xenopus tropicalis raising the question of the function of pax4 gene in lower vertebrates such as in fish. In the present study, we have analyzed the expression and the function of the orthologous pax4 gene in zebrafish. pax4 gene is transiently expressed in the pancreas of zebrafish embryos and is mostly restricted to endocrine precursors as well as to some differentiating δ- and ε-cells but was not detected in differentiating β-cells. pax4 knock-down in zebrafish embryos caused a significant increase in α-cells number while having no apparent effect on β- and δ-cell differentiation. This rise of α-cells is due to an up-regulation of the Arx transcription factor. Conversely, knock-down of arx caused to a complete loss of α-cells and a concomitant increase of pax4 expression but had no effect on the number of β- and δ-cells. In addition to the mutual repression between Arx and Pax4, these two transcription factors negatively regulate the transcription of their own gene. Interestingly, disruption of pax4 RNA splicing or of arx RNA splicing by morpholinos targeting exon-intron junction sites caused a blockage of the altered transcripts in cell nuclei allowing an easy characterization of the arx- and pax4-deficient cells. Such analyses demonstrated that arx knock-down in zebrafish does not lead to a switch of cell fate, as reported in mouse, but rather blocks the cells in their differentiation process towards α-cells. In zebrafish, pax4 is not required for the generation of the first β- and δ-cells deriving from the dorsal pancreatic bud, unlike its crucial role in the

  19. TNFα cooperates with IFN-γ to repress Bcl-xL expression to sensitize metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis.

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    Feiyan Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is an immune effector molecule that functions as a selective anti-tumor agent. However, tumor cells, especially metastatic tumor cells often exhibit a TRAIL-resistant phenotype, which is currently a major impediment in TRAIL therapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the synergistic effect of TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The efficacy and underlying molecular mechanism of cooperation between TNFα and IFN-γ in sensitizing metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-mediated apoptosis were examined. The functional significance of TNFα- and IFN-γ-producing T lymphocyte immunotherapy in combination with TRAIL therapy in suppression of colon carcinoma metastasis was determined in an experimental metastasis mouse model. We observed that TNFα or IFN-γ alone exhibits minimal sensitization effects, but effectively sensitized metastatic colon carcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis when used in combination. TNFα and IFN-γ cooperate to repress Bcl-xL expression, whereas TNFα represses Survivin expression in the metastatic colon carcinoma cells. Silencing Bcl-xL expression significantly increased the metastatic colon carcinoma cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Conversely, overexpression of Bcl-xL significantly decreased the tumor cell sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, TNFα and IFN-γ also synergistically enhanced TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation. TNFα and IFN-γ was up-regulated in activated primary and tumor-specific T cells. TRAIL was expressed in tumor-infiltrating immune cells in vivo, and in tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL ex vivo. Consequently, TRAIL therapy in combination with TNFα/IFN-γ-producing CTL adoptive transfer immunotherapy effectively suppressed colon carcinoma metastasis in vivo. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: TNFα and IFN

  20. Regulatory circuit for responses of nitrogen catabolic gene expression to the GLN3 and DAL80 proteins and nitrogen catabolite repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, J R; Rai, R; el Berry, H M; Cooper, T G

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate that expression of the UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, PUT1, PUT2, PUT4, and DAL4 genes is sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression. The expression of all these genes, with the exception of UGA1 and PUT2, also required a functional GLN3 protein. In addition, GLN3 protein was required for expression of the DAL1, DAL2, DAL7, GDH1, and GDH2 genes. The UGA1, CAN1, GAP1, and DAL4 genes markedly increased their expression when the DAL80 locus, encoding a negative regulatory element, was disrupted. Expression of the GDH1, PUT1, PUT2, and PUT4 genes also responded to DAL80 disruption, but much more modestly. Expression of GLN1 and GDH2 exhibited parallel responses to the provision of asparagine and glutamine as nitrogen sources but did not follow the regulatory responses noted above for the nitrogen catabolic genes such as DAL5. Steady-state mRNA levels of both genes did not significantly decrease when glutamine was provided as nitrogen source but were lowered by the provision of asparagine. They also did not respond to disruption of DAL80.

  1. Genome-wide expression profiling in the Drosophila eye reveals unexpected repression of Notch signaling by the JAK/STAT pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Maria Sol; Zavadil, Jiri; Ekas, Laura A.; Bach, Erika A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the JAK/STAT pathway regulates numerous processes in vertebrates and invertebrates through modulating transcription, its functionally-relevant transcriptional targets remain largely unknown. With one jak and one stat (stat92E), Drosophila provides a powerful system for finding new JAK/STAT target genes. Genome-wide expression profiling on eye discs in which Stat92E is hyperactivated, revealed 584 differentially-regulated genes, including known targets domeless, socs36E and wingless. Other differentially-regulated genes (chinmo, lama, Mo25, Imp-L2, Serrate, Delta) were validated and may represent new Stat92E targets. Genetic experiments revealed that Stat92E cell-autonomously represses Serrate, which encodes a Notch ligand. Loss of Stat92E led to de-repression of Serrate in the dorsal eye, resulting in ectopic Notch signaling and aberrant eye growth there. Thus, our micro-array documents a new Stat92E target gene and a previously-unidentified inhibitory action of Stat92E on Notch signaling. These data suggest that this study will be a useful resource for the identification of additional Stat92E targets. PMID:19504457

  2. In conditions of over-expression, WblI, a WhiB-like transcriptional regulator, has a positive impact on the weak antibiotic production of Streptomyces lividans TK24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lan; Zhang, Qizhong

    2017-01-01

    Regulators of the WhiB-like (wbl) family are playing important role in the complex regulation of metabolic and morphological differentiation in Streptomyces. In this study, we investigated the role of wblI, a member of this family, in the regulation of secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces lividans. The over-expression of wblI was correlated with an enhanced biosynthesis of undecylprodigiosin and actinorhodin and with a reduction of the biosynthesis of yCPK and of the grey spore pigment encoded by the whiE locus. Five regulatory targets of WblI were identified using in vitro formaldehyde crosslinking and confirmed by EMSA and qRT-PCR. These included the promoter regions of wblI itself, two genes of the ACT cluster (actVA3 and the intergenic region between the divergently orientated genes actII-1 and actII-2) and that of wblA, another member of the Wbl family. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that the expression of actVA3 encoding a protein of unknown function as well as that of actII-1, a TetR regulator repressing the expression of actII-2, encoding the ACT transporter, were down regulated in the WblI over-expressing strain. Consistently the expression of the transporter actII-2 was up-regulated. The expression of WblA, that is known to have a negative impact on ACT biosynthesis, was strongly down regulated in the WblI over-expressing strain. These data are consistent with the positive impact that WblI over-expression has on ACT biosynthesis. The latter might result from direct activation of ACT biosynthesis and export and from repression of the expression of WblA, a likely indirect, repressor of ACT biosynthesis. PMID:28358920

  3. Gene Expression Analyses during Spontaneous Reversal of Cardiomyopathy in Mice with Repressed Nuclear CUG-BP, Elav-Like Family (CELF) Activity in Heart Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Twishasri; Coram, Ryan J; Stillwagon, Samantha J; Ladd, Andrea N

    2015-01-01

    CUG-BP, Elav-like family (CELF) proteins regulate cell type- and developmental stage-specific alternative splicing in the heart. Repression of CELF-mediated splicing activity via expression of a nuclear dominant negative CELF protein in heart muscle was previously shown to induce dysregulation of alternative splicing, cardiac dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, and dilated cardiomyopathy in MHC-CELFΔ transgenic mice. A "mild" line of MHC-CELFΔ mice that expresses a lower level of the dominant negative protein exhibits cardiac dysfunction and myopathy at a young age, but spontaneously recovers normal cardiac function and heart size with age despite the persistence of splicing defects. To the best of our knowledge, this was the first example of a genetically induced cardiomyopathy that spontaneously recovers without intervention. In this study, we explored the basis for this recovery. We examined whether a transcriptional program regulated by serum response factor (SRF) that is dysregulated in juvenile MHC-CELFΔ mice is restored in the mild line with age, and evaluated global changes in gene expression by microarray analyses. We found that differences in gene expression between the mild line and wild type hearts are greatly reduced in older animals, including a partial recovery of SRF target gene expression. We did not find evidence of a new compensatory pathway being activated in the mild line with age, and propose that recovery may occur due to developmental stage-specific compatibility of CELF-dependent splice variants with the cellular environment of the cardiomyocyte.

  4. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Kale S; Fox, Daniel K; Kunkel, Steven D; Stebounova, Larissa V; Murry, Daryl J; Pufall, Miles A; Ebert, Scott M; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Adams, Christopher M

    2015-01-15

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  5. Spermine oxidase maintains basal skeletal muscle gene expression and fiber size and is strongly repressed by conditions that cause skeletal muscle atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Kale S.; Fox, Daniel K.; Kunkel, Steven D.; Stebounova, Larissa V.; Murry, Daryl J.; Pufall, Miles A.; Ebert, Scott M.; Dyle, Michael C.; Bullard, Steven A.; Dierdorff, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common and debilitating condition that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. To better understand the mechanisms of muscle atrophy, we used mouse models to search for a skeletal muscle protein that helps to maintain muscle mass and is specifically lost during muscle atrophy. We discovered that diverse causes of muscle atrophy (limb immobilization, fasting, muscle denervation, and aging) strongly reduced expression of the enzyme spermine oxidase. Importantly, a reduction in spermine oxidase was sufficient to induce muscle fiber atrophy. Conversely, forced expression of spermine oxidase increased muscle fiber size in multiple models of muscle atrophy (immobilization, fasting, and denervation). Interestingly, the reduction of spermine oxidase during muscle atrophy was mediated by p21, a protein that is highly induced during muscle atrophy and actively promotes muscle atrophy. In addition, we found that spermine oxidase decreased skeletal muscle mRNAs that promote muscle atrophy (e.g., myogenin) and increased mRNAs that help to maintain muscle mass (e.g., mitofusin-2). Thus, in healthy skeletal muscle, a relatively low level of p21 permits expression of spermine oxidase, which helps to maintain basal muscle gene expression and fiber size; conversely, during conditions that cause muscle atrophy, p21 expression rises, leading to reduced spermine oxidase expression, disruption of basal muscle gene expression, and muscle fiber atrophy. Collectively, these results identify spermine oxidase as an important positive regulator of muscle gene expression and fiber size, and elucidate p21-mediated repression of spermine oxidase as a key step in the pathogenesis of skeletal muscle atrophy. PMID:25406264

  6. microRNA-155, induced by interleukin-1ß, represses the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Arts

    Full Text Available Loss of expression of surface antigens represents a significant problem for cancer immunotherapy. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M regulates melanocyte fate by driving expression of many differentiation genes, whose protein products can be recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes. We previously reported that interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß can downregulate MITF-M levels. Here we show that downregulation of MITF-M expression by IL-1ß was paralleled by an upregulation of miR-155 expression in four melanoma lines. We confirmed that miR-155 was able to target endogenous MITF-M in melanoma cells and demonstrated a role for miR-155 in the IL-1ß-induced repression of MITF-M by using an antagomiR. Notably, we also observed a strong negative correlation between MITF-M and miR-155 levels in a mouse model of melanoma. Taken together, our results indicate that MITF-M downregulation by inflammatory stimuli might be partly due to miR-155 upregulation. This could represent a novel mechanism of melanoma immune escape in an inflammatory microenvironment.

  7. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  8. Altered gene expression and repressed markers of autophagy in skeletal muscle of insulin resistant patients with type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Andreas Buch; Kampmann, Ulla; Hedegaard, Jakob; Thorsen, Kasper; Nordentoft, Iver; Vendelbo, Mikkel Holm; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This case-control study was designed to investigate the gene expression profile in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with long-standing type 2 diabetes (T2D), and to determine associated signaling pathways. Gene expression profiles were examined by whole transcriptome, strand-specific RNA-sequencing and associated signaling was determined by western blot. We identified 117 differentially expressed gene transcripts. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis related these differences to abnormal muscle morphology and mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite a ~5-fold difference in plasma insulin, we did not observe any difference in phosphorylation of AKT or AS160, although other insulin-sensitive cascades, as mTOR/4EBP1, had retained their sensitivity. Autophagy-related gene (ATG14, RB1CC1/FIP200, GABARAPL1, SQSTM1/p62, and WIPI1) and protein (LC3BII, SQSTM1/p62 and ATG5) expression were decreased in skeletal muscle from the patients, and this was associated with a trend to increased phosphorylation of the insulin-sensitive regulatory transcription factor FOXO3a. These data show that gene expression is highly altered and related to mitochondrial dysfunction and abnormal morphology in skeletal muscle from severely insulin resistant patients with T2D, and that this is associated with decreased expression of autophagy-related genes and proteins. We speculate that prolonged treatment with high doses of insulin may suppress autophagy thereby generating a vicious cycle maintaining insulin resistance. PMID:28252104

  9. Long Non-coding RNA Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: In Relation to Polycomb Repressive Complex Pathway Proteins and H3K27 Trimethylation

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    Eun Ji Oh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background A long non-coding RNA hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR is involved in epigenetic regulation through chromatin remodeling by recruiting polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, and EED that induce histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me3. Deregulation of c-MYC and interaction between c-MYC and EZH2 are well known in lymphomagenesis; however, little is known about the expression status of HOTAIR in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs. Methods The expression status of PRC2 (EZH2, SUZ12, and EED, H3K27me3, c-MYC, and BCL2 was analyzed using immunohistochemistry (n = 231, and HOTAIR was investigated by a quantification real-time polymerase chain reaction method (n = 164 in DLBCLs. Results The present study confirmed the positive correlation among PRC2 proteins, H3K27me3, and c-MYC in DLBCLs. Expression level of HOTAIR was also positively correlated to EZH2 (p < .05, respectively. Between c-MYC and HOTAIR, and between c- MYC/BCL2 co-expression and HOTAIR, however, negative correlation was observed in DLBCLs (p < .05, respectively. High level of H3K27me3 was determined as an independent prognostic marker in poor overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.0; p = .023 of DLBCL patients. High expression of HOTAIR, however, was associated with favorable overall survival (p = .004 in the univariate analysis, but the impact was not significant in the multivariate analysis. The favorable outcome of DLBCL with HOTAIR high expression levels may be related to the negative correlation with c- MYC expression or c-MYC/BCL2 co-expression. Conclusions HOTAIR expression could be one of possible mechanisms for inducing H3K27me3 via EZH2-related PRC2 activation, and induced H3K27me3 may be strongly related to aggressive DLBCLs which show poor patient outcome.

  10. 9-CIS-RETINOIC ACID REPRESSES ESTROGEN-INDUCED EXPRESSION OF THE VERY-LOW-DENSITY APOLIPOPROTEIN-II GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPERS, IJ; KLOPPENBURG, M; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene is estrogen-inducible and specifically expressed in liver. We examined the possible involvement of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) in the activation of the apoVLDLII promoter. We first concent

  11. 9-CIS-RETINOIC ACID REPRESSES ESTROGEN-INDUCED EXPRESSION OF THE VERY-LOW-DENSITY APOLIPOPROTEIN-II GENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHIPPERS, IJ; KLOPPENBURG, M; SNIPPE, L; AB, G

    1994-01-01

    The chicken very low density apolipoprotein II (apoVLDLII) gene is estrogen-inducible and specifically expressed in liver. We examined the possible involvement of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) and its ligand 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) in the activation of the apoVLDLII promoter. We first concent

  12. Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) protein ESC regulates insect developmental timing by mediating H3K27me3 and activating prothoracicotropic hormone gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yu-Xuan; Denlinger, David L; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2013-08-09

    The decision made by insects to develop into adults or halt development (enter diapause and prolong lifespan) is commonly based on environmental signals that provide reliable predictors of future seasons of adversity. For example, the short day lengths of early autumn accurately foretell the advent of winter, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that preside over the hormonal events dictating whether the insect proceeds with development or enters diapause. In Helicoverpa armigera we show that day length affects H3K27me3 by affecting polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) protein extra sex comb (ESC) and regulates the prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) gene, thus directly influencing developmental timing. ESC expression in brains of developing (nondiapause) pupae is higher than in brains from diapausing pupae. High ESC expression is localized in two pairs of PTTH neurosecretory cells, and H3K27me3 recruits on the PTTH promoter. Double strand ESC and PRC2 inhibitor (DzNep) treatment in vitro show that ESC triggers PTTH promoter activity, which in turn depends on PRC2 methyltransferase activity. Injection of DzNep into pupae programmed for development reduces the H3K27me3 mark and PTTH gene expression, thereby delaying development. Although ESC is best known as a transcriptional repressor, our results show that ESC prompts development and metamorphosis. We believe this is the first report showing that the PRC2 complex functions as an activator and that a low level of H3K27me3 can prolong lifespan (i.e. induce diapause) by controlling PTTH gene expression in insects.

  13. Xingshentongqiao Decoction Mediates Proliferation, Apoptosis, Orexin-A Receptor and Orexin-B Receptor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Expression and Represses Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanli Dong; Mei Li; Shaojie Wang; Yuwei Dong; Hongxia Zhao; Zhong Dai

    2015-01-01

    Background:Hypocretin (HCRT) signaling plays an important role in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy and can be significantly influenced by Chinese herbal therapy.Our previous study showed that xingshentongqiao decoction (XSTQ) is clinically effective for the treatment of narcolepsy.To determine whether XSTQ improves narcolepsy by modulating HCRT signaling,we investigated its effects on SH-SY5Y cell proliferation,apoptosis,and HCRT receptor 1/2 (orexin receptor 1 [OXl R] and orexin receptor 2 [OX2R]) expression.The signaling pathways involved in these processes were also assessed.Methods:The effects of XSTQ on proliferation and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells were assessed using cell counting kit-8 and annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate assays.OX1R and OX2R expression was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis.Western blotting for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation was performed to further assess the signaling mechanism of XSTQ.Results:XSTQ reduced the proliferation and induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells.This effect was accompanied by the upregulation of OX 1R and OX2R expression and the reduced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) 1/2,p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK).Conclusions:XSTQ inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells.XSTQ also promotes OX1R and OX2R expression.These effects are associated with the repression of the Erkl/2,p38 MAPK,and JNK signaling pathways.These results define a molecular mechanism for XSTQ in regulating HCRT and MAPK activation,which may explain its ability to treat narcolepsy.

  14. Expression of the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ gene is repressed by DNA methylation in visceral adipose tissue of mouse models of diabetes

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    Shiota Kunio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose tissues serve not only as a store for energy in the form of lipid, but also as endocrine tissues that regulates metabolic activities of the organism by secreting various kinds of hormones. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ is a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation that induces the expression of adipocyte-specific genes in preadipocytes and mediates their differentiation into adipocytes. Furthermore, PPARγ has an important role to maintain the physiological function of mature adipocyte by controlling expressions of various genes properly. Therefore, any reduction in amount and activity of PPARγ is linked to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. Results In this study, we investigated the contribution of epigenetic transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, such as DNA methylation, to the expression of the PPARγ gene, and further evaluated the contribution of such epigenetic regulatory mechanisms to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, the promoter of the PPARγ2 gene was hypermethylated, but was progressively demethylated upon induction of differentiation, which was accompanied by an increase of mRNA expression. Moreover, treatment of cells with 5'-aza-cytideine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, increased expression of the PPARγ gene in a dose-dependent manner. Methylation in vitro of a PPARγ promoter-driven reporter construct also repressed the transcription of a downstream reporter gene. These results suggest that the expression of the PPARγ gene is inhibited by methylation of its promoter. We next compared the methylation status of the PPARγ promoters in adipocytes from wild-type (WT mice with those from two diabetic mouse models: +Leprdb/+Leprdb and diet-induced obesity mice. Interestingly, we found increased methylation of the PPARγ promoter in visceral adipose tissues (VAT of the mouse models of diabetes, compared to that observed in wild-type mice. We

  15. YvoA and CcpA Repress the Expression of chiB in Bacillus thuringiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kun; Li, Li-na; Pan, Jin-hua; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Yue-hua

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces chitinases, which are involved in its antifungal activity and facilitate its insecticidal activity. In our recent work, we found that a 16-bp sequence, drechiB (AGACTTCGTGATGTCT), downstream of the minimal promoter region of the chitinase B gene (chiB) was a critical site for the inducible expression of chiB in B. thuringiensis Bti75. In this work, we show that a GntR family transcriptional regulator (named YvoABt), which is homologous to YvoA of Bacillus subtilis, can specifically bind to the drechiB oligonucleotide sequences in vitro by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting indicated that deletion of yvoA caused an ∼7.5-fold increase in the expression level of chiB. Furthermore, binding of purified YvoABt to its target DNA could be abolished by glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P). We also confirmed, in the presence of the phosphoprotein Hpr-Ser45-P, that purified CcpABt bound specifically to the promoter of chiB, which contains the “crechiB” sequence (ATAAAGCGTTTACA). According to the results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting, deletion of ccpA resulted in a 39-fold increase in the chiB expression level, and glucose no longer influenced the expression of chiB. We confirm that chiB is negatively controlled by both CcpABt and YvoABt in Bti75. PMID:26162881

  16. YvoA and CcpA Repress the Expression of chiB in Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kun; Li, Li-na; Pan, Jin-hua; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Yue-hua; Cai, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces chitinases, which are involved in its antifungal activity and facilitate its insecticidal activity. In our recent work, we found that a 16-bp sequence, drechiB (AGACTTCGTGATGTCT), downstream of the minimal promoter region of the chitinase B gene (chiB) was a critical site for the inducible expression of chiB in B. thuringiensis Bti75. In this work, we show that a GntR family transcriptional regulator (named YvoABt), which is homologous to YvoA of Bacillus subtilis, can specifically bind to the drechiB oligonucleotide sequences in vitro by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assays. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting indicated that deletion of yvoA caused an ∼7.5-fold increase in the expression level of chiB. Furthermore, binding of purified YvoABt to its target DNA could be abolished by glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN-6-P). We also confirmed, in the presence of the phosphoprotein Hpr-Ser₄₅-P, that purified CcpABt bound specifically to the promoter of chiB, which contains the "crechiB" sequence (ATAAAGCGTTTACA). According to the results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting, deletion of ccpA resulted in a 39-fold increase in the chiB expression level, and glucose no longer influenced the expression of chiB. We confirm that chiB is negatively controlled by both CcpABt and YvoABt in Bti75.

  17. ANDROGEN REPRESSION OF CYTOKERATIN GENE EXPRESSION DURING RAT PROSTATE DIFFERENTIATION: EVIDENCE FOR ANEPITHELIAL STEM CELL-ASSOCIATED MARKER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓怀; Jer-TsongHsieh

    1994-01-01

    Cytokeratin(CK) 8 mRNA expression in developing and degenerating rat prostate was studied using in situhybridization with an antisense RNA-probe.It was found that:1) the CK 8 antisense probe was accumulated only within prostatic epithelial cells;2)after castration,CK 8mRNA signals in vetral prostate(VP) sections were significantly increased,and elevated CK 8 mRNA expression persisted even long after prostate involution was complete;and 3)during prostate development,the strongest CK 8 mRNA staining was found in the early neonatal prostatic epithelia which were composed mainly of prostatic stem cells.Thereafer,a shift of CK 8 mRNA staining to peripheral regions and decreased overall CK 8 mRNA levels were noted .These data indicate that excessive expression of CK-8 mRNA is a characteristic of prostatic stem cells,and CK molecules are excellent markers for determing the hierarchical pathway of cell differentiation in prostate epithelium.

  18. Glucose 6P binds and activates HlyIIR to repress Bacillus cereus haemolysin hlyII gene expression.

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    Elisabeth Guillemet

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive spore-forming bacterium causing food poisoning and serious opportunistic infections. These infections are characterized by bacterial accumulation despite the recruitment of phagocytic cells. We have previously shown that B. cereus Haemolysin II (HlyII induces macrophage cell death by apoptosis. In this work, we investigated the regulation of the hlyII gene. We show that HlyIIR, the negative regulator of hlyII expression in B. cereus, is especially active during the early bacterial growth phase. We demonstrate that glucose 6P directly binds to HlyIIR and enhances its activity at a post-transcriptional level. Glucose 6P activates HlyIIR, increasing its capacity to bind to its DNA-box located upstream of the hlyII gene, inhibiting its expression. Thus, hlyII expression is modulated by the availability of glucose. As HlyII induces haemocyte and macrophage death, two cell types that play a role in the sequestration of nutrients upon infection, HlyII may induce host cell death to allow the bacteria to gain access to carbon sources that are essential components for bacterial growth.

  19. Activation of PKR Causes Amyloid ß-Peptide Accumulation via De-Repression of BACE1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ILL-Raga, Gerard; Palomer, Ernest; Wozniak, Matthew A.; Ramos-Fernández, Eva; Bosch-Morató, Mònica; Tajes, Marta; Guix, Francesc X.; Galán, José J.; Clarimón, Jordi; Antúnez, Carmen; Real, Luis M.; Boada, Mercé; Itzhaki, Ruth F.; Fandos, César; Muñoz, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    BACE1 is a key enzyme involved in the production of amyloid ß-peptide (Aß) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Normally, its expression is constitutively inhibited due to the presence of the 5′untranslated region (5′UTR) in the BACE1 promoter. BACE1 expression is activated by phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)2-alpha, which reverses the inhibitory effect exerted by BACE1 5′UTR. There are four kinases associated with different types of stress that could phosphorylate eIF2-alpha. Here we focus on the double-stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). PKR is activated during viral infection, including that of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1), a virus suggested to be implicated in the development of AD, acting when present in brains of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene. HSV1 is a dsDNA virus but it has genes on both strands of the genome, and from these genes complementary RNA molecules are transcribed. These could activate BACE1 expression by the PKR pathway. Here we demonstrate in HSV1-infected neuroblastoma cells, and in peripheral nervous tissue from HSV1-infected mice, that HSV1 activates PKR. Cloning BACE1 5′UTR upstream of a luciferase (luc) gene confirmed its inhibitory effect, which can be prevented by salubrinal, an inhibitor of the eIF2-alpha phosphatase PP1c. Treatment with the dsRNA analog poly (I∶C) mimicked the stimulatory effect exerted by salubrinal over BACE1 translation in the 5′UTR-luc construct and increased Aß production in HEK-APPsw cells. Summarizing, our data suggest that PKR activated in brain by HSV1 could play an important role in the development of AD. PMID:21738672

  20. Activity-dependent repression of Cbln1 expression: mechanism for developmental and homeostatic regulation of synapses in the cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Takatoshi; Emi, Kyoichi; Yuzaki, Michisuke

    2009-04-29

    Cbln1, which belongs to the C1q/tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is released from cerebellar granule cells and plays a crucial role in forming and maintaining excitatory synapses between parallel fibers (PFs; axons of granule cells) and Purkinje cells not only during development but also in the adult cerebellum. Although neuronal activity is known to cause morphological changes at synapses, how Cbln1 signaling is affected by neuronal activity remains unclear. Here, we show that chronic stimulation of neuronal activity by elevating extracellular K(+) levels or by adding kainate decreased the expression of cbln1 mRNA within several hours in mature granule cells in a manner dependent on L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and calcineurin. Chronic activity also reduced Cbln1 protein levels within a few days, during which time the number of excitatory synapses on Purkinje cell dendrites was reduced; this activity-induced reduction of synapses was prevented by the addition of exogenous Cbln1 to the culture medium. Therefore, the activity-dependent downregulation of cbln1 may serve as a new presynaptic mechanism by which PF-Purkinje cell synapses adapt to chronically elevated activity, thereby maintaining homeostasis. In addition, the expression of cbln1 mRNA was prevented when immature granule cells were maintained in high-K(+) medium. Since immature granule cells are chronically depolarized before migrating to the internal granule layer, this depolarization-dependent regulation of cbln1 mRNA expression may also serve as a developmental switch to facilitate PF synapse formation in mature granule cells in the internal granule layer.

  1. Rapidly acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in NSCLC cell lines through de-repression of FGFR2 and FGFR3 expression.

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    Kathryn E Ware

    Full Text Available Despite initial and sometimes dramatic responses of specific NSCLC tumors to EGFR TKIs, nearly all will develop resistance and relapse. Gene expression analysis of NSCLC cell lines treated with the EGFR TKI, gefitinib, revealed increased levels of FGFR2 and FGFR3 mRNA. Analysis of gefitinib action on a larger panel of NSCLC cell lines verified that FGFR2 and FGFR3 expression is increased at the mRNA and protein level in NSCLC cell lines in which the EGFR is dominant for growth signaling, but not in cell lines where EGFR signaling is absent. A luciferase reporter containing 2.5 kilobases of fgfr2 5' flanking sequence was activated after gefitinib treatment, indicating transcriptional regulation as a contributing mechanism controlling increased FGFR2 expression. Induction of FGFR2 and FGFR3 protein as well as fgfr2-luc activity was also observed with Erbitux, an EGFR-specific monoclonal antibody. Moreover, inhibitors of c-Src and MEK stimulated fgfr2-luc activity to a similar degree as gefitinib, suggesting that these pathways may mediate EGFR-dependent repression of FGFR2 and FGFR3. Importantly, our studies demonstrate that EGFR TKI-induced FGFR2 and FGFR3 are capable of mediating FGF2 and FGF7 stimulated ERK activation as well as FGF-stimulated transformed growth in the setting of EGFR TKIs. In conclusion, this study highlights EGFR TKI-induced FGFR2 and FGFR3 signaling as a novel and rapid mechanism of acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs and suggests that treatment of NSCLC patients with combinations of EGFR and FGFR specific TKIs may be a strategy to enhance efficacy of single EGFR inhibitors.

  2. Mir-190b negatively contributes to the Trypanosoma cruzi- infected cell survival by repressing PTEN protein expression

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    Cíntia Júnia Monteiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, which is caused by the intracellular protozoanTrypanosoma cruzi, is a serious health problem in Latin America. The heart is one of the major organs affected by this parasitic infection. The pathogenesis of tissue remodelling, particularly regarding cardiomyocyte behaviour after parasite infection, and the molecular mechanisms that occur immediately following parasite entry into host cells are not yet completely understood. Previous studies have reported that the establishment of parasitism is connected to the activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K, which controls important steps in cellular metabolism by regulating the production of the second messenger phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate. Particularly, the tumour suppressor PTEN is a negative regulator of PI3K signalling. However, mechanistic details of the modulatory activity of PTEN on Chagas disease have not been elucidated. To address this question, H9c2 cells were infected with T. cruzi Berenice 62 strain and the expression of a specific set of microRNAs (miRNAs were investigated. Our cellular model demonstrated that miRNA-190b is correlated to the decrease of cellular viability rates by negatively modulating PTEN protein expression in T. cruzi-infected cells.

  3. MicroRNA-450a-3p represses cell proliferation and regulates embryo development by regulating Bub1 expression in mouse.

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    Min Luo

    Full Text Available Bub1 is a critical component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC and closely linked to cell proliferation and differentiation. We previously found that spontaneous abortion embryos contained a low level of Bub1 protein but normal mRNA level, while the knockdown of Bub1 leads to abnormal numerical chromosomes in embryonic cells. Here, we investigated the mechanism through which governs the post-transcriptional regulation of Bub1 protein expression level. We first conducted bioinformatics analysis and identified eight putative miRNAs that may target Bub1. Luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-450a-3p can directly regulate Bub1 by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of Bub1 mRNA. We found that the overexpression of miR-450a-3p in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells down-regulated Bub1 protein level, repressed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis and restricted most cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, when the fertilized eggs were microinjected with miR-450a-3p mimics, the cleavage of zygotes was effectively suppressed. Our results strongly suggest that an abnormally decreased Bub1 level regulated by miRNAs may be implicated in the pathogenesis of spontaneous miscarriage. Therefore, the blockade of miR-450a-3p may be explored as a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing spontaneous miscarriages.

  4. CAP-D3 Promotes Bacterial Clearance in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells by Repressing Expression of Amino Acid Transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Jacqueline R.; Nickerson, Kourtney P.; Deutschman, Emily; Kim, Yeojung; West, Gail; Sadler, Tammy; Stylianou, Eleni; Krokowski, Dawid; Hatzoglou, Maria; de la Motte, Carol; Rubin, Brian P.; Fiocchi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Defects in colonic epithelial barrier defenses are associated with ulcerative colitis (UC). The proteins that regulate bacterial clearance in the colonic epithelium have not been completely identified. The chromosome-associated protein D3 (dCAP-D3), regulates responses to bacterial infection. We examined whether CAP-D3 promotes bacterial clearance in human colonic epithelium. METHODS Clearance of Salmonella or adherent-invasive Escherichia coli LF82 was assessed by gentamycin protection assays in HT-29 and Caco-2 cells expressing small hairpin RNAs against CAP-D3. We used immunoblot assays to measure levels of CAP-D3 in colonic epithelial cells from patients with UC and healthy individuals (controls). RNA sequencing identified genes activated by CAP-D3. We analyzed the roles of CAP-D3 target genes in bacterial clearance using gentamycin protection and immunofluorescence assays and studies with pharmacologic inhibitors. RESULTS CAP-D3 expression was reduced in colonic epithelial cells from patients with active UC. Reduced CAP-D3 expression decreased autophagy and impaired intracellular bacterial clearance by HT-29 and Caco-2 colonic epithelial cells. Lower levels of CAP-D3 increased transcription of genes encoding SLC7A5 and SLC3A2, whose products heterodimerize to form an amino acid transporter in HT-29 cells following bacterial infection; levels of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 were increased in tissues from patients with UC, compared with controls. Reduced CAP-D3 in HT-29 cells resulted in earlier recruitment of SLC7A5 to Salmonella-containing vacuoles, increased activity of mTORC1, and increased survival of bacteria. Inhibition of SLC7A5–SLC3A2 or mTORC1 activity rescued the bacterial clearance defects of CAP-D3– deficient cells. CONCLUSIONS CAP-D3 downregulates transcription of genes that encode amino acid transporters (SLC7A5 and SLC3A2) to promote bacterial autophagy by colon epithelial cells. Levels of CAP-D3 protein are reduced in patients with

  5. Targeting oncogene expression to endothelial cells induces proliferation of the myelo-erythroid lineage by repressing the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghisi, E; Distel, M; Malagola, M; Anelli, V; Santoriello, C; Herwig, L; Krudewig, A; Henkel, C V; Russo, D; Mione, M C

    2013-11-01

    Human oncogenes involved in the development of hematological malignancies have been widely used to model experimental leukemia. However, models of myeloid leukemia rarely reproduce the human disease in full, due to genetic complexity or to difficulties in targeting leukemia initiating cells. Here, we used a zebrafish genetic model to induce the expression of oncogenic RAS in endothelial cells, including the hemogenic endothelium of the dorsal aorta that generates hematopoietic cells, and observed the development of a myelo-erythroid proliferative disorder. In larvae, the phenotype is characterized by disruption of the vascular system and prominent expansion of the caudal hematopoietic tissue. In few surviving juveniles, increased number of immature hematopoietic cells and arrest of myeloid maturation was found in kidney marrow. Peripheral blood showed increased erythroblasts and myeloid progenitors. We found that the abnormal phenotype is associated with a downregulation of the Notch pathway, whereas overexpressing an activated form of Notch together with the oncogene prevents the expansion of the myelo-erythroid compartment. This study identifies the downregulation of the Notch pathway following an oncogenic event in the hemogenic endothelium as an important step in the pathogenesis of myelo-erythroid disorders and describes a number of potential effectors of this transformation.

  6. The Wnt-β-catenin pathway represses let-7 microRNA expression through transactivation of Lin28 to augment breast cancer stem cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wang-Yu; Wei, Tong-Zhen; Luo, Qi-Cong; Wu, Qiu-Wan; Liu, Qing-Feng; Yang, Meng; Ye, Guo-Dong; Wu, Jia-Fa; Chen, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Guang-Bin; Liu, Yun-Jia; Zhao, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Li, Bo-An

    2013-07-01

    Wnt signalling through β-catenin and the lymphoid-enhancing factor 1/T-cell factor (LEF1/TCF) family of transcription factors maintains stem cell properties in both normal and malignant tissues; however, the underlying molecular pathway involved in this process has not been completely defined. Using a microRNA microarray screening assay, we identified let-7 miRNAs as downstream targets of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. Expression studies indicated that the Wnt-β-catenin pathway suppresses mature let-7 miRNAs but not the primary transcripts, which suggests a post-transcriptional regulation of repression. Furthermore, we identified Lin28, a negative let-7 biogenesis regulator, as a novel direct downstream target of the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. Loss of function of Lin28 impairs Wnt-β-catenin-pathway-mediated let-7 inhibition and breast cancer stem cell expansion; enforced expression of let-7 blocks the Wnt-β-catenin pathway-stimulated breast cancer stem cell phenotype. Finally, we demonstrated that the Wnt-β-catenin pathway induces Lin28 upregulation and let-7 downregulation in both cancer samples and mouse tumour models. Moreover, the delivery of a modified lin28 siRNA or a let-7a agomir into the premalignant mammary tissues of MMTV-wnt-1 mice resulted in a complete rescue of the stem cell phenotype driven by the Wnt-β-catenin pathway. These findings highlight a pivotal role for Lin28/let-7 in Wnt-β-catenin-pathway-mediated cellular phenotypes. Thus, the Wnt-β-catenin pathway, Lin28 and let-7 miRNAs, three of the most crucial stem cell regulators, connect in one signal cascade.

  7. Prioritized Expression of BDH2 under Bulk Translational Repression and Its Contribution to Tolerance to Severe Vanillin Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yoko; Nguyen, Trinh T M; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Vanillin is a potent fermentation inhibitor derived from the lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production, and high concentrations of vanillin result in the pronounced repression of bulk translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on genes that are efficiently translated even in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin will be useful for improving yeast vanillin tolerance and fermentation efficiency. The BDH1 and BDH2 genes encode putative medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductases and their amino acid sequences are very similar to each other. Although BDH2 was previously suggested to be involved in vanillin tolerance, it has yet to be clarified whether Bdh1/Bdh2 actually contribute to vanillin tolerance and reductions in vanillin. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of Bdh1 and Bdh2 on vanillin tolerance. bdh2Δ cells exhibited hypersensitivity to vanillin and slower reductions in vanillin than wild-type cells and bdh1Δ cells. Additionally, the overexpression of the BDH2 gene improved yeast tolerance to vanillin more efficiently than that of BDH1. Only BDH2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe vanillin stress, however, both BDH genes were transcriptionally up-regulated. These results reveal the importance of Bdh2 in vanillin detoxification and confirm the preferential translation of the BDH2 gene in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. The BDH2 promoter also enabled the expression of non-native genes under severe vanillin stress and furfural stress, suggesting its availability to improve of the efficiency of bioethanol production through modifications in gene expression in the presence of fermentation inhibitors.

  8. Prioritized Expression of BDH2 under Bulk Translational Repression and Its Contribution to Tolerance to Severe Vanillin Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Yoko; Nguyen, Trinh T. M.; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Vanillin is a potent fermentation inhibitor derived from the lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production, and high concentrations of vanillin result in the pronounced repression of bulk translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on genes that are efficiently translated even in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin will be useful for improving yeast vanillin tolerance and fermentation efficiency. The BDH1 and BDH2 genes encode putative medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reductases and their amino acid sequences are very similar to each other. Although BDH2 was previously suggested to be involved in vanillin tolerance, it has yet to be clarified whether Bdh1/Bdh2 actually contribute to vanillin tolerance and reductions in vanillin. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of Bdh1 and Bdh2 on vanillin tolerance. bdh2Δ cells exhibited hypersensitivity to vanillin and slower reductions in vanillin than wild-type cells and bdh1Δ cells. Additionally, the overexpression of the BDH2 gene improved yeast tolerance to vanillin more efficiently than that of BDH1. Only BDH2 mRNA was efficiently translated under severe vanillin stress, however, both BDH genes were transcriptionally up-regulated. These results reveal the importance of Bdh2 in vanillin detoxification and confirm the preferential translation of the BDH2 gene in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin. The BDH2 promoter also enabled the expression of non-native genes under severe vanillin stress and furfural stress, suggesting its availability to improve of the efficiency of bioethanol production through modifications in gene expression in the presence of fermentation inhibitors. PMID:27458450

  9. Expression of the Adenovirus Early Gene 1A Transcription-Repression Domain Alone Downregulates HER2 and Results in the Death of Human Breast Cancer Cells Upregulated for the HER2 Proto-Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2011-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) early gene 1A 243 residue protein (E1A 243R) possesses a potent transcription-repression function within the N-terminal 80 amino acids (E1A 1-80). We examined the ability of E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 to repress transcription of both an exogenous and the endogenous HER2 promoter in a human breast cancer cell line upregulated for the HER2 proto-oncogene (SK-BR-3). Both moieties repressed HER2 expression by over 90%. When E1A 1-80 was expressed from a nonreplicative Ad vector, levels of expression were lower than anticipated. Addition of nonspecific sequences to the E1A 1-80 C-terminus (E1A 1-80 C+) enhanced its expression 10- to 20-fold. Because "oncogene addiction" suggests that repression of HER2 could kill HER2 upregulated cells, we examined the ability of full-length E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ delivered by an Ad vector to kill HER2 upregulated SK-BR-3 cells. Expression of both E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ killed SK-BR-3 cells but not normal breast cells. E1A 1-80 C+ is a particularly effective killer of SK-BR-3 cells. At 144 h post infection, over 85% of SK-BR-3 cells were killed by a 100 moi of the Ad vector expressing E1A 1-80 C+. As controls, Ad vectors expressing E1A 243R with deletion of all known functional domains or expressing unrelated β-galactosidase had no effect. Three additional human breast cancer cells lines reported to be upregulated for HER2 or another EGF family member (EGFR) were found to be efficiently killed by expression of E1A 1-80 C+, whereas three additional "normal" cell lines (two derived from breast and one from foreskin) were not. The ability of the E1A transcription-repression domain alone to kill HER2 upregulated breast cancer cells has potential for development of therapies for treatment of aggressive human breast cancers and potentially other human cancers that overexpress HER2.

  10. Low Fluid Shear Culture of Staphylococcus Aureus Represses hfq Expression and Induces an Attachment-Independent Biofilm Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, C. Mark; Castro, S. L.; Nickerson, C. A.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The opportunistic pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, experiences fluctuations in fluid shear during infection and colonization of a human host. Colonization frequently occurs at mucus membrane sites such as in the gastrointestinal tract where the bacterium may experience low levels of fluid shear. The response of S. aureus to low fluid shear remains unclear. Methods: S. aureus was cultured to stationary phase using Rotating-Wall Vessel (RWV) bioreactors which produce a physiologically relevant low fluid shear environment. The bacterial aggregates that developed in the RWV were evaluated by electron microscopy as well as for antibiotic resistance and other virulence-associated stressors. Genetic expression profiles for the low-shear cultured S. aureus were determined by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Planktonic S. aureus cultures in the low-shear environment formed aggregates completely encased in high amounts of extracellular polymeric substances. In addition, these aggregates demonstrated increased antibiotic resistance indicating attachment-independent biofilm formation. Carotenoid production in the low-shear cultured S. aureus was significantly decreased, and these cultures displayed an increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and killing by whole blood. The hfq gene, associated with low-shear growth in Gram negative organisms, was also found to be down-regulated in S. aureus. Conclusions: Collectively, this data suggests that S. aureus decreases virulence characteristics in favor of a biofilm-dwelling colonization phenotype in response to a low fluid shear environment. Furthermore, the identification of an Hfq response to low-shear culture in S. aureus, in addition to the previously reported responses in Gram negative organisms, strongly suggests an evolutionarily conserved response to mechanical stimuli among structurally diverse prokaryotes.

  11. Suppression of RNA silencing by a plant DNA virus satellite requires a host calmodulin-like protein to repress RDR6 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in antiviral defense. To counteract host defense, plant viruses encode viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs that target different effector molecules in the RNA silencing pathway. Evidence has shown that plants also encode endogenous suppressors of RNA silencing (ESRs that function in proper regulation of RNA silencing. The possibility that these cellular proteins can be subverted by viruses to thwart host defense is intriguing but has not been fully explored. Here we report that the Nicotiana benthamiana calmodulin-like protein Nbrgs-CaM is required for the functions of the VSR βC1, the sole protein encoded by the DNA satellite associated with the geminivirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV. Nbrgs-CaM expression is up-regulated by the βC1. Transgenic plants over-expressing Nbrgs-CaM displayed developmental abnormities reminiscent of βC1-associated morphological alterations. Nbrgs-CaM suppressed RNA silencing in an Agrobacterium infiltration assay and, when over-expressed, blocked TYLCCNV-induced gene silencing. Genetic evidence showed that Nbrgs-CaM mediated the βC1 functions in silencing suppression and symptom modulation, and was required for efficient virus infection. Moreover, the tobacco and tomato orthologs of Nbrgs-CaM also possessed ESR activity, and were induced by betasatellite to promote virus infection in these Solanaceae hosts. We further demonstrated that βC1-induced Nbrgs-CaM suppressed the production of secondary siRNAs, likely through repressing RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6 expression. RDR6-deficient N. benthamiana plants were defective in antiviral response and were hypersensitive to TYLCCNV infection. More significantly, TYLCCNV could overcome host range restrictions to infect Arabidopsis thaliana when the plants carried a RDR6 mutation. These findings demonstrate a distinct mechanism of VSR for suppressing PTGS through usurpation of a host ESR, and

  12. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization.

  13. Expression of the Type VI Secretion System 1 Component Hcp1 Is Indirectly Repressed by OpaR in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The type VI secretion system (T6SS is bacterial protein injection machinery with roles in virulence, symbiosis, interbacterial interaction, antipathogenesis, and environmental stress responses. There are two T6SS loci, T6SS1 and T6SS2, in the two chromosomes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, respectively. This work disclosed that the master quorum sensing (QS regulator OpaR repressed the transcription of hcp1 encoding the structural component Hcp1 of T6SS1 in V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that QS had a negative regulatory action on T6SS1. A single σ54-dependent promoter was transcribed for hcp1 in V. parahaemolyticus, and its activity was repressed by the OpaR regulator. Since the OpaR protein could not bind to the upstream region of hcp1, OpaR would repress the transcription of hcp1 in an indirect manner.

  14. IFI16 restricts HSV-1 replication by accumulating on the hsv-1 genome, repressing HSV-1 gene expression, and directly or indirectly modulating histone modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Johnson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ inducible factor 16 (IFI16 is a multifunctional nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, induction of interferon-β (IFN-β, and activation of the inflammasome response. It interacts with the sugar-phosphate backbone of dsDNA and modulates viral and cellular transcription through largely undetermined mechanisms. IFI16 is a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1, though the mechanisms of HSV-1 restriction are not yet understood. Here, we show that IFI16 has a profound effect on HSV-1 replication in human foreskin fibroblasts, osteosarcoma cells, and breast epithelial cancer cells. IFI16 knockdown increased HSV-1 yield 6-fold and IFI16 overexpression reduced viral yield by over 5-fold. Importantly, HSV-1 gene expression, including the immediate early proteins, ICP0 and ICP4, the early proteins, ICP8 and TK, and the late proteins gB and Us11, was reduced in the presence of IFI16. Depletion of the inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, or the IFN-inducing transcription factor, IRF-3, did not affect viral yield. ChIP studies demonstrated the presence of IFI16 bound to HSV-1 promoters in osteosarcoma (U2OS cells and fibroblasts. Using CRISPR gene editing technology, we generated U2OS cells with permanent deletion of IFI16 protein expression. ChIP analysis of these cells and wild-type (wt U2OS demonstrated increased association of RNA polymerase II, TATA binding protein (TBP and Oct1 transcription factors with viral promoters in the absence of IFI16 at different times post infection. Although IFI16 did not alter the total histone occupancy at viral or cellular promoters, its absence promoted markers of active chromatin and decreased those of repressive chromatin with viral and cellular gene promoters. Collectively, these studies for the first time demonstrate that IFI16 prevents association of important transcriptional activators with wt HSV-1 promoters and suggest potential

  15. Potential toxicity of quercetin: The repression of mitochondrial copy number via decreased POLG expression and excessive TFAM expression in irradiated murine bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiqing Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytotoxicity of quercetin is not well understood. Using an ICR murine model, we unexpectedly found that mice exposed to 7 Gy total body irradiation (TBI exhibited general in vivo toxicity after receiving quercetin (100 mg/kg PO, whereas this result was not observed in mice that received TBI only. In order to understand the involvement of alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, we used a real-time qPCR to analyze the mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn by amplifying the MTRNR1 (12S rRNA gene in murine bone marrow. We also utilized reverse transcription qPCR to determine the mRNA amounts transcribed from the polymerase gamma (POLG, POLG2, and mammalian mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM genes in the tissue. In the mice exposed to TBI combined with quercetin, we found: (1 the radiation-induced increase of mtDNAcn was inhibited with a concurrent significant decrease in POLG expression; (2 TFAM expression was significantly increased; and (3 the expression of POLG2 was not influenced by the treatments. These data suggest that the overall toxicity was in part associated with the decrease in mtDNAcn, an effect apparently caused by the inhibition of POLG expression and overexpression of TFAM; unaltered POLG2 expression did not seem to contribute to toxicity.

  16. Repression of global protein synthesis by Eif1a-like genes that are expressed specifically in the two-cell embryos and the transient Zscan4-positive state of embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S C; Wong, Raymond C B; Sharov, Alexei A; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S H

    2013-08-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are prototypical stem cells that remain undifferentiated in culture for long periods, yet maintain the ability to differentiate into essentially all cell types. Previously, we have reported that ES cells oscillate between two distinct states, which can be distinguished by the transient expression of Zscan4 genes originally identified for its specific expression in mouse two-cell stage embryos. Here, we report that the nascent protein synthesis is globally repressed in the Zscan4-positive state of ES cells, which is mediated by the transient expression of newly identified eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A (Eif1a)-like genes. Eif1a-like genes, clustered on Chromosome 12, show the high sequence similarity to the Eifa1 and consist of 10 genes (Eif1al1-Eif1al10) and 9 pseudogenes (Eif1al-ps1-Eif1al-ps9). The analysis of the expressed sequence tag database showed that Eif1a-like genes are expressed mostly in the two-cell stage mouse embryos. Microarray analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses show that Eif1a-like genes are expressed specifically in the Zscan4-positive state of ES cells. These results indicate a novel mechanism to repress protein synthesis by Eif1a-like genes and a unique mode of protein synthesis regulation in ES cells, which undergo a transient and reversible repression of global protein synthesis in the Zscan4-positive state.

  17. Repression of Global Protein Synthesis by Eif1a-Like Genes That Are Expressed Specifically in the Two-Cell Embryos and the Transient Zscan4-Positive State of Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Sandy S. C.; Wong, Raymond C. B.; Sharov, Alexei A.; Nakatake, Yuhki; Yu, Hong; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are prototypical stem cells that remain undifferentiated in culture for long periods, yet maintain the ability to differentiate into essentially all cell types. Previously, we have reported that ES cells oscillate between two distinct states, which can be distinguished by the transient expression of Zscan4 genes originally identified for its specific expression in mouse two-cell stage embryos. Here, we report that the nascent protein synthesis is globally repressed in the Zscan4-positive state of ES cells, which is mediated by the transient expression of newly identified eukaryotic translation initiation factor 1A (Eif1a)-like genes. Eif1a-like genes, clustered on Chromosome 12, show the high sequence similarity to the Eifa1 and consist of 10 genes (Eif1al1–Eif1al10) and 9 pseudogenes (Eif1al-ps1–Eif1al-ps9). The analysis of the expressed sequence tag database showed that Eif1a-like genes are expressed mostly in the two-cell stage mouse embryos. Microarray analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses show that Eif1a-like genes are expressed specifically in the Zscan4-positive state of ES cells. These results indicate a novel mechanism to repress protein synthesis by Eif1a-like genes and a unique mode of protein synthesis regulation in ES cells, which undergo a transient and reversible repression of global protein synthesis in the Zscan4-positive state. PMID:23649898

  18. PICKLE acts throughout the plant to repress expression of embryonic traits and may play a role in Giberellin-Dependent responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henderson, J.; Li, H.C.; Mordhorst, A.P.; Romero-Severson, J.; Cheng, J.C.; Robey, J.; Sung, Z.R.; Vries, de S.C.; Ogas, J.

    2004-01-01

    A seed marks the transition between two developmental states; a plant is an embryo during seed formation, whereas it is a seedling after emergence from the seed. Two factors have been identified in Arabidopsis that play a role in establishment of repression of the embryonic state: PKL (PICKLE), whic

  19. Prioritized Expression of BDH2 under Bulk Translational Repression and Its Contribution to Tolerance to Severe Vanillin Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Ishida, Yoko; Nguyen, Trinh T. M.; Kitajima, Sakihito; Izawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Vanillin is a potent fermentation inhibitor derived from the lignocellulosic biomass in biofuel production, and high concentrations of vanillin result in the pronounced repression of bulk translation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on genes that are efficiently translated even in the presence of high concentrations of vanillin will be useful for improving yeast vanillin tolerance and fermentation efficiency. The BDH1 and BDH2 genes encode putative medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase/reduc...

  20. Soybean miR172c Targets the Repressive AP2 Transcription Factor NNC1 to Activate ENOD40 Expression and Regulate Nodule Initiation[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youning; Wang, Lixiang; Zou, Yanmin; Chen, Liang; Cai, Zhaoming; Zhang, Senlei; Zhao, Fang; Tian, Yinping; Jiang, Qiong; Ferguson, Brett J.; Gresshoff, Peter M.; Li, Xia

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are noncoding RNAs that act as master regulators to modulate various biological processes by posttranscriptionally repressing their target genes. Repression of their target mRNA(s) can modulate signaling cascades and subsequent cellular events. Recently, a role for miR172 in soybean (Glycine max) nodulation has been described; however, the molecular mechanism through which miR172 acts to regulate nodulation has yet to be explored. Here, we demonstrate that soybean miR172c modulates both rhizobium infection and nodule organogenesis. miR172c was induced in soybean roots inoculated with either compatible Bradyrhizobium japonicum or lipooligosaccharide Nod factor and was highly upregulated during nodule development. Reduced activity and overexpression of miR172c caused dramatic changes in nodule initiation and nodule number. We show that soybean miR172c regulates nodule formation by repressing its target gene, Nodule Number Control1, which encodes a protein that directly targets the promoter of the early nodulin gene, ENOD40. Interestingly, transcriptional levels of miR172c were regulated by both Nod Factor Receptor1α/5α-mediated activation and by autoregulation of nodulation-mediated inhibition. Thus, we established a direct link between miR172c and the Nod factor signaling pathway in addition to adding a new layer to the precise nodulation regulation mechanism of soybean. PMID:25549672

  1. Racism and Surplus Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Explores the relationship between Herbert Marcuse's theory of "surplus repression" and Freud's theory of the "unconscious" with respect to latent, hidden, covert, or subliminal aspects of racism in the United States. Argues that unconscious racism, manifested in evasion/avoidance, acting out/projection, and attempted justification, perpetuates…

  2. Mutation in domain II of IAA1 confers diverse auxin-related phenotypes and represses auxin-activated expression of Aux/IAA genes in steroid regulator-inducible system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Hye-Joung; Kim, Jungmook

    2002-12-01

    Most of Aux/IAA genes are rapidly induced by auxin. The Aux/IAA proteins are short-lived nuclear proteins sharing the four conserved domains. Domain II is critical for rapid degradation of Aux/IAA proteins. Among these gene family members, IAA1 is one of the earliest auxin-inducible genes. We used a steroid hormone-inducible system to reveal putative roles and downstream signaling of IAA1 in auxin response. Arabidopsis transgenic plants were generated expressing fusion protein of IAA1 (IAA1-GR) or IAA1 with a mutation in domain II (iaa1-GR) and the glucocorticoid hormone-binding domain (GR). IAA1-GR transgenic plants did not exhibit any discernable phenotypic differences by DEX treatment that allows nuclear translocation of the fusion protein. In contrast, diverse auxin-related physiological processes including gravitropism and phototropism were impaired by DEX treatment in roots, hypocotyls, stems, and leaves in iaa1-GR transgenic plants. Auxin induction of seven Aux/IAA mRNAs including IAA1 itself was repressed by DEX treatment, suggesting that IAA1 functions in the nucleus by mediating auxin response and might act as a negative feedback regulator for the expression of Aux/IAA genes including IAA1 itself. Auxin induction of Aux/IAA genes in the presence of cycloheximide can be repressed by DEX treatment, showing that the repression of transcription of the Aux/IAAs by the iaa1 mutant protein is primary. Wild-type IAA1-GR could not suppress auxin induction of IAA1 and IAA2. These results indicate that inhibition of auxin-activated transcription of Aux/IAA genes by the iaa1 mutant protein might be responsible for alteration of various auxin responses.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-4 Inhibits Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Expression in the Mouse Macrophage Cell Line RAW264.7 through the Repression of Octamer-Dependent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Hiroi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is a signature molecule involved in the classical activation of M1 macrophages and is induced by the Nos2 gene upon stimulation with Th1-cell derived interferon-gamma (IFNγ and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Although the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 is known to inhibit Nos2 gene expression, the molecular mechanism involved in the negative regulation of Nos2 by IL-4 remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of IL-4-mediated Nos2 transcriptional repression in the mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat6 knockdown by siRNA abolished the IL-4-mediated inhibition of Nos2 induced by IFNγ/LPS. Transient transfection of a luciferase reporter gene containing the 5′-flanking region of the Nos2 gene demonstrated that an octamer transcription factor (OCT binding site in the promoter region is required for both positive regulation by IFNγ/LPS and negative regulation by IL-4. Although IL-4 had no inhibitory effect on the DNA-binding activity of constitutively expressed Oct-1, IL-4-induced Nos2-reporter transcriptional repression was partially attenuated by overexpression of the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP. These results suggest that a coactivator/cofactor that functionally interacts with Oct-1 is a molecular target for the IL-4-mediated inhibition of Nos2 and that IL-4-activated Stat6 represses Oct-1-dependent transcription by competing with this coactivator/cofactor.

  4. Financial Liberalization Or Repression?

    OpenAIRE

    Ang, James

    2009-01-01

    While financial liberalization has always been advocated in developing countries, experiences with it do not always produce desirable outcomes. In order to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with financial liberalization and repression, this study highlights that the overall effectiveness of the reform programs depends on the relative strength of each financial sector policy implemented. Using India as a case study, the results indicate that interest rate controls, statutory liquidity...

  5. Helminth Excreted/Secreted Antigens Repress Expression of LPS-Induced Let-7i but Not miR-146a and miR-155 in Human Dendritic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis I. Terrazas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs have emerged as key regulators of immune responses. They influence immune cells' function and probably the outcome of several infections. Currently, it is largely unknown if helminth parasites and their antigens modify host microRNAs expression. The aim of this study was to explore if excreted/secreted antigens of Taenia crassiceps regulate LPS-induced miRNAs expression in human Dendritic Cells. We found that these antigens repressed LPS-let-7i induction but not mir-146a or mir-155 and this correlates with a diminished inflammatory response. This let-7i downregulation in Dendritic Cells constitutes a novel feature of the modulatory activity that helminth-derived antigens exert on their host.

  6. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  7. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization

    OpenAIRE

    Fenghua Bian; Fei Gao; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Jegga, Anil G; Artem Barski; Das, Sanjoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses reveale...

  8. Financial repression and fiscal policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, KL; Lensink, R

    1997-01-01

    This paper develops a simulation model to assess the consequences of government's trying to raise revenues through financial repression in developing countries. The measures of financial repression studied are (1) government borrowing from the banking sector to finance its budget deficit (2) governm

  9. Disulfiram and its novel derivative sensitize prostate cancer cells to the growth regulatory mechanisms of the cell by re-expressing the epigenetically repressed tumor suppressor-estrogen receptor β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Verma, Vikas; Lal, Nand; Yadav, Santosh K; Sarkar, Saumya; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Porwal, Konica; Rawat, Tara; Maikhuri, J P; Rajender, Singh; Sharma, V L; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-11-01

    Estrogen Receptor-β (ER-β), a tumor-suppressor in prostate cancer, is epigenetically repressed by hypermethylation of its promoter. DNA-methyltransferases (DNMTs), which catalyze the transfer of methyl-groups to CpG islands of gene promoters, are overactive in cancers and can be inhibited by DNMT-inhibitors to re-express the tumor suppressors. The FDA-approved nucleoside DNMT-inhibitors like 5-Azacytidine and 5-Aza-deoxycytidine carry notable concerns due to their off-target toxicity, therefore non-nucleoside DNMT inhibitors are desirable for prolonged epigenetic therapy. Disulfiram (DSF), an antabuse drug, inhibits DNMT and prevents proliferation of cells in prostate and other cancers, plausibly through the re-expression of tumor suppressors like ER-β. To increase the DNMT-inhibitory activity of DSF, its chemical scaffold was optimized and compound-339 was discovered as a doubly potent DSF-derivative with similar off-target toxicity. It potently and selectively inhibited cell proliferation of prostate cancer (PC3/DU145) cells in comparison to normal (non-cancer) cells by promoting cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, accompanied with inhibition of total DNMT activity, and re-expression of ER-β (mRNA/protein). Bisulfite-sequencing of ER-β promoter revealed that compound-339 demethylated CpG sites more efficaciously than DSF, restoring near-normal methylation status of ER-β promoter. Compound-339 docked on to the MTase domain of DNMT1 with half the energy of DSF. In xenograft mice-model, the tumor volume regressed by 24% and 50% after treatment with DSF and compound-339, respectively, with increase in ER-β expression. Apparently both compounds inhibit prostate cancer cell proliferation by re-expressing the epigenetically repressed tumor-suppressor ER-β through inhibition of DNMT activity. Compound-339 presents a new lead for further study as an anti-prostate cancer agent. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Analysis of Proteins That Rapidly Change Upon Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Repression Identifies Parkinson Protein 7 (PARK7) as a Novel Protein Aberrantly Expressed in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Song, Ehwang; Dilly, Geoffrey A.; Schoenhard, Grant; Zemelman, Boris V.; Mechref, Yehia; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F.

    2016-01-01

    Many biological processes involve the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Thus, the challenge of deciphering mTORC1-mediated functions during normal and pathological states in the central nervous system is challenging. Because mTORC1 is at the core of translation, we have investigated mTORC1 function in global and regional protein expression. Activation of mTORC1 has been generally regarded to promote translation. Few but recent works have shown that suppression of mTORC1 can also promote local protein synthesis. Moreover, excessive mTORC1 activation during diseased states represses basal and activity-induced protein synthesis. To determine the role of mTORC1 activation in protein expression, we have used an unbiased, large-scale proteomic approach. We provide evidence that a brief repression of mTORC1 activity in vivo by rapamycin has little effect globally, yet leads to a significant remodeling of synaptic proteins, in particular those proteins that reside in the postsynaptic density. We have also found that curtailing the activity of mTORC1 bidirectionally alters the expression of proteins associated with epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder—neurological disorders that exhibit elevated mTORC1 activity. Through a protein–protein interaction network analysis, we have identified common proteins shared among these mTORC1-related diseases. One such protein is Parkinson protein 7, which has been implicated in Parkinson's disease, yet not associated with epilepsy, Alzheimers disease, or autism spectrum disorder. To verify our finding, we provide evidence that the protein expression of Parkinson protein 7, including new protein synthesis, is sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition. Using a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex, a disease that displays both epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder phenotypes and has overactive mTORC1 signaling, we show that Parkinson protein 7 protein is elevated in the dendrites and

  11. Analysis of Proteins That Rapidly Change Upon Mechanistic/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Repression Identifies Parkinson Protein 7 (PARK7) as a Novel Protein Aberrantly Expressed in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niere, Farr; Namjoshi, Sanjeev; Song, Ehwang; Dilly, Geoffrey A; Schoenhard, Grant; Zemelman, Boris V; Mechref, Yehia; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2016-02-01

    Many biological processes involve the mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Thus, the challenge of deciphering mTORC1-mediated functions during normal and pathological states in the central nervous system is challenging. Because mTORC1 is at the core of translation, we have investigated mTORC1 function in global and regional protein expression. Activation of mTORC1 has been generally regarded to promote translation. Few but recent works have shown that suppression of mTORC1 can also promote local protein synthesis. Moreover, excessive mTORC1 activation during diseased states represses basal and activity-induced protein synthesis. To determine the role of mTORC1 activation in protein expression, we have used an unbiased, large-scale proteomic approach. We provide evidence that a brief repression of mTORC1 activity in vivo by rapamycin has little effect globally, yet leads to a significant remodeling of synaptic proteins, in particular those proteins that reside in the postsynaptic density. We have also found that curtailing the activity of mTORC1 bidirectionally alters the expression of proteins associated with epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, and autism spectrum disorder-neurological disorders that exhibit elevated mTORC1 activity. Through a protein-protein interaction network analysis, we have identified common proteins shared among these mTORC1-related diseases. One such protein is Parkinson protein 7, which has been implicated in Parkinson's disease, yet not associated with epilepsy, Alzheimers disease, or autism spectrum disorder. To verify our finding, we provide evidence that the protein expression of Parkinson protein 7, including new protein synthesis, is sensitive to mTORC1 inhibition. Using a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex, a disease that displays both epilepsy and autism spectrum disorder phenotypes and has overactive mTORC1 signaling, we show that Parkinson protein 7 protein is elevated in the dendrites and colocalizes

  12. The Runx1 Transcription Factor Inhibits the Differentiation of Naive CD4+ T Cells into the Th2 Lineage by Repressing GATA3 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Okiru; Hayashi, Keitaro; Natsume, Waka; Watanabe, Toshio; Seki, Youichi; Seki, Noriyasu; Yagi, Ryoji; Sukzuki, Wataru; Tamauchi, Hidekazu; Hozumi, Katsuto; Habu, Sonoko; Kubo, Masato; Satake, Masanobu

    2003-01-01

    Differentiation of naive CD4+ T cells into helper T (Th) cells is controlled by a combination of several transcriptional factors. In this study, we examined the functional role of the Runx1 transcription factor in Th cell differentiation. Naive T cells from transgenic mice expressing a dominant interfering form of Runx1 exhibited enhanced interleukin 4 production and efficient Th2 differentiation. In contrast, transduction of Runx1 into wild-type T cells caused a complete attenuation of Th2 differentiation and was accompanied by the cessation of GATA3 expression. Furthermore, endogenous expression of Runx1 in naive T cells declined after T cell receptor stimulation, at the same time that expression of GATA3 increased. We conclude that Runx1 plays a novel role as a negative regulator of GATA3 expression, thereby inhibiting the Th2 cell differentiation. PMID:12835475

  13. Perspective: repression of competition and the evolution of cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven A

    2003-04-01

    Repression of competition within groups joins kin selection as the second major force in the history of life shaping the evolution of cooperation. When opportunities for competition against neighbors are limited within groups, individuals can increase their own success only by enhancing the efficiency and productivity of their group. Thus, characters that repress competition within groups promote cooperation and enhance group success. Leigh first expressed this idea in the context of fair meiosis, in which each chromosome has an equal chance of transmission via gametes. Randomized success means that each part of the genome can increase its own success only by enhancing the total number of progeny and thus increasing the success of the group. Alexander used this insight about repression of competition in fair meiosis to develop his theories for the evolution of human sociality. Alexander argued that human social structures spread when they repress competition within groups and promote successful group-against-group competition. Buss introduced a new example with his suggestion that metazoan success depended on repression of competition between cellular lineages. Maynard Smith synthesized different lines of thought on repression of competition. In this paper, I develop simple mathematical models to illustrate the main processes by which repression of competition evolves. With the concepts made clear, I then explain the history of the idea. I finish by summarizing many new developments in this subject and the most promising lines for future study.

  14. Urotensin II increases foam cell formation by repressing ABCA1 expression through the ERK/NF-κB pathway in THP-1 macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan [Department of Anesthesiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Wu, Jian-Feng [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Min; Li, Yuan [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Chen, Kong; Zeng, Meng-Ya [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Yao, Feng; Xie, Wei [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Zheng, Xi-Long [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Libin Cardiovascular Institute of Alberta, University of Calgary, Health Sciences Center, 3330 Hospital Dr NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1 (Canada); Zeng, Gao-Feng, E-mail: qichingnudou@tom.com [Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China); Tang, Chao-Ke, E-mail: tangchaoke@qq.com [Institute of Cardiovascular Research, Key Laboratory for Atherosclerology of Hunan Province, University of South China, Hengyang 421001, Hunan (China)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • U II reduces cholesterol efflux in THP-1 macrophages. • U II decreases the expression of ABCA1. • Inhibition of the ERK/NF-κB pathway reduces U II effects on ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux. - Abstract: Objective: Foam cell formation in the arterial wall plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Recent studies showed that Urotensin II (U II) is involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Here we examined the effects of human U II on ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) expression and the underlying mechanism in THP-1 macrophages. Methods and results: Cultured THP-1 macrophages were treated with U II, followed by measuring the intracellular lipid contents, cholesterol efflux and ABCA1 levels. The results showed that U II dramatically decreased ABCA1 levels and impaired cholesterol efflux. However, the effects of U II on ABCA1 protein expression and cellular cholesterol efflux were partially reversed by inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity, suggesting the potential roles of ERK1/2 and NF-κB in ABCA1 expression, respectively. Conclusion: Our current data indicate that U II may have promoting effects on the progression of atherosclerosis, likely through suppressing ABCA1 expression via activation of the ERK/NF-κB pathway and reducing cholesterol efflux to promote macrophage foam cell formation.

  15. OsBBX14 delays heading date by repressing florigen gene expression under long and short-day conditions in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bo; Zhao, Jie; Li, Yaping; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Jinjun; Chen, Fan; Xie, Xianzhi

    2016-06-01

    B-box (BBX) proteins are zinc finger proteins containing B-box domains, which have roles in Arabidopsis growth and development. However, little is known concerning rice BBXs. Herein, we identified a rice BBX protein, Oryza sativa BBX14 (OsBBX14). OsBBX14 is highly expressed in flag leaf blades. OsBBX14 expression shows a diurnal rhythm under photoperiodic conditions and subsequent continuous white light. OsBBX14 is located in the nucleus and has transcriptional activation potential. OsBBX14-overexpression (OsBBX14-OX) lines exhibited delayed heading date under long-day (LD) and short-day (SD) conditions, whereas RNAi lines of OsBBX14 lines had similar heading dates to the WT. The florigen genes, Hd3a and RFT1, were downregulated in the OsBBX14-OX lines under LD and SD conditions. Under LD conditions, Hd1 was expressed higher in the OsBBX14-OX lines than in the wild type (WT), and the rhythmic expression of circadian clock genes, OsLHY and OsPRR1, was changed in OsBBX14-OX lines. Thus, OsBBX14 acts as a floral repressor by promoting Hd1 expression under LD conditions, probably because of crosstalk with the circadian clock. Under SD conditions, Ehd1 expression was reduced in OsBBX14-OX lines, but Hd1 and circadian clock gene expressions were unaffected, indicating that OsBBX14 acts as a repressor of Ehd1. Our findings suggested that OsBBX14 regulates heading date differently under LD and SD conditions.

  16. Epigenetics: methylation-associated repression of heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase gene expression contributes to the invasive phenotype of H-EMC-SS chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Catherine; Ouzzine, Mohamed; Talhaoui, Ibtissam; Sharp, Sheila; Prydz, Kristian; Coughtrie, Michael W H; Fournel-Gigleux, Sylvie

    2010-02-01

    Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), strategically located at the cell-tissue-organ interface, regulate major biological processes, including cell proliferation, migration, and adhesion. These vital functions are compromised in tumors, due, in part, to alterations in heparan sulfate (HS) expression and structure. How these modifications occur is largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether epigenetic abnormalities involving aberrant DNA methylation affect HS biosynthetic enzymes in cancer cells. Analysis of the methylation status of glycosyltransferase and sulfotransferase genes in H-HEMC-SS chondrosarcoma cells showed a typical hypermethylation profile of 3-OST sulfotransferase genes. Exposure of chondrosarcoma cells to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dc), a DNA-methyltransferase inhibitor, up-regulated expression of 3-OST1, 3-OST2, and 3-OST3A mRNAs, indicating that aberrant methylation affects transcription of these genes. Furthermore, HS expression was restored on 5-Aza-dc treatment or reintroduction of 3-OST expression, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and/or analysis of HS chains by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Notably, 5-Aza-dc treatment of HEMC cells or expression of 3-OST3A cDNA reduced their proliferative and invading properties and augmented adhesion of chondrosarcoma cells. These results provide the first evidence for specific epigenetic regulation of 3-OST genes resulting in altered HSPG sulfation and point to a defect of HS-3-O-sulfation as a factor in cancer progression.

  17. NF-kappaB represses E-cadherin expression and enhances epithelial to mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells: potential involvement of ZEB-1 and ZEB-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, H L; Bhat-Nakshatri, P; Clare, S E; Morimiya, A; Badve, S; Nakshatri, H

    2007-02-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) is constitutively active in both cancer cells and stromal cells of breast cancer; however, the precise role of activated NF-kappaB in cancer progression is not known. Using parental MCF10A cells and a variant that expresses the myoepithelial marker p63 stably overexpressing the constitutively active p65 subunit of NF-kappaB (MCF10A/p65), we show that NF-kappaB suppresses the expression of epithelial specific genes E-cadherin and desmoplakin and induces the expression of the mesenchymal specific gene vimentin. P65 also suppressed the expression of p63 and the putative breast epithelial progenitor marker cytokeratin 5/6. MCF10A/p65 cells were phenotypically similar to cells undergoing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). MCF10A/p65 cells failed to form characteristic acini in three-dimensional Matrigel. Analysis of parental and MCF10A/p65 cells for genes previously shown to be involved in EMT revealed elevated expression of ZEB-1 and ZEB-2 in MCF10A/p65 cells compared to parental cells. In transient transfection assays, p65 increased ZEB-1 promoter activity. Furthermore, MCF10A cells overexpressing ZEB-1 showed reduced E-cadherin and p63 expression and displayed an EMT phenotype. The siRNA against ZEB-1 or ZEB-2 reduced the number of viable MCF10A/p65 but not parental cells, suggesting the dependence of MCF10A/p65 cells to ZEB-1 and ZEB-2 for cell cycle progression or survival. MCF10A cells chronically exposed to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), a potent NF-kappaB inducer, also exhibited the EMT-like phenotype and ZEB-1/ZEB-2 induction, both of which were reversed following TNFalpha withdrawal.

  18. Targeted Transcriptional Repression in Bacteria Using CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, John S; Wong, Spencer; Peters, Jason M; Almeida, Ricardo; Qi, Lei S

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) interference (CRISPRi) is a powerful technology for sequence-specifically repressing gene expression in bacterial cells. CRISPRi requires only a single protein and a custom-designed guide RNA for specific gene targeting. In Escherichia coli, CRISPRi repression efficiency is high (~300-fold), and there are no observable off-target effects. The method can be scaled up as a general strategy for the repression of many genes simultaneously using multiple designed guide RNAs. Here we provide a protocol for efficient guide RNA design, cloning, and assay of the CRISPRi system in E. coli. In principle, this protocol can be used to construct CRISPRi systems for gene repression in other species of bacteria.

  19. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...... and Gat1 act positively on gene expression whereas :Da180 and Deh1 act negatively. Expression of nitrogen catabolite pathway genes known to be regulated by these four regulators are glutamine, glutamate, proline, urea, arginine, GABA, and allantoine. In addition, the expression of the genes encoding...... thereby providing a nitrogen source to the cell.In this review, all known promoter sequences related to expression of nitrogen catabolite pathways are discussed as well as other regulatory proteins. Overview of metabolic pathways and promoters are presented....

  20. Noradrenaline represses PPAR (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor) gamma2 gene expression in brown adipocytes: intracellular signalling and effects on PPARgamma2 and PPARgamma1 protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Eva M; Nielsen, Ronni; Petrovic, Natasa

    2004-01-01

    PPAR (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor) gamma is expressed in brown and white adipose tissues and is involved in the control of differentiation and proliferation. Noradrenaline stimulates brown pre-adipocyte proliferation and brown adipocyte differentiation. The aim of the present study...

  1. Expression, purification and characterization of the cancer-germline antigen GAGE12I: a candidate for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten F; Besir, Hüseyin; Larsen, Martin R

    2010-01-01

    for immunotherapy and candidates for cancer vaccines. Recombinant proteins may be superior to peptides as immunogens, since they have the potential to prime both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and are not dependent on patient HLA-type. We have developed a method for production of highly pure recombinant GAGE12I......GAGE cancer-germline antigens are frequently expressed in a broad range of different cancers, while their expression in normal tissues is limited to the germ cells of the immune privileged organs, testis and ovary. GAGE proteins are immunogenic in humans, which make them promising targets...... filtration and formaldehyde cross-linking indicated that GAGE12I forms tetramers. The purified recombinant GAGE12I represents a candidate molecule for vaccination of cancer patients and will form the basis for further structural analysis of GAGE proteins....

  2. Heat Shock Protein 90 Inhibitors Repress Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) Expression and Proliferation of Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Natural Killer Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiquey, Mohammed Nure Alam; Kanazawa, Tetsuhiro; Goshima, Fumi; Kawashima, Daisuke; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsurumi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) LMP1 is a major oncoprotein expressed in latent infection. It functions as a TNFR family member and constitutively activates cellular signals, such as NFκB, MAPK, JAK/STAT and AKT. We here screened small molecule inhibitors and isolated HSP90 inhibitors, Radicicol and 17-AAG, as candidates that suppress LMP1 expression and cell proliferation not only in EBV-positive SNK6 Natural Killer (NK) cell lymphoma cells, but also in B and T cells. Tumor formation in immuno-defficient NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγnull (NOG) mice was also retarded. These results suggest that HSP90 inhibitors can be alternative treatments for patients with EBV-positive malignancies. PMID:23658841

  3. The Systemic Acquired Resistance Regulator OsNPR1 Attenuates Growth by Repressing Auxin Signaling through Promoting IAA-Amido Synthase Expression1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is a long-lasting and broad-spectrum disease resistance to pathogens. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (OsNPR1), a master gene for systemic acquired resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), greatly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae. However, the growth and development of the OsNPR1 overexpression (OsNPR1-OX) plants were restrained, and the mechanism remained elusive. In this study, we dissected the OsNPR1-induced growth inhibition. We found that the OsNPR1-OX lines displayed phenotypes mimicking auxin-defective mutants, with decreases in root system, seed number and weight, internode elongation, and tiller number. Whole-genome expression analysis revealed that genes related to the auxin metabolism and signaling pathway were differentially expressed between the OsNPR1-OX and wild-type plants. Consistently, the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content was decreased and the auxin distribution pattern was altered in OsNPR1-OX plants. Importantly, we found that some GH3 family members, in particular OsGH3.8 coding IAA-amido synthetase, were constitutively up-regulated in OsNPR1-OX plants. Decreased OsGH3.8 expression by RNA interference could partially restore IAA level and largely rescue the restrained growth and development phenotypes but did not affect the disease resistance of OsNPR1-OX plants. Taken together, we revealed that OsNPR1 affects rice growth and development by disrupting the auxin pathway at least partially through indirectly up-regulating OsGH3.8 expression. PMID:27378815

  4. The Systemic Acquired Resistance Regulator OsNPR1 Attenuates Growth by Repressing Auxin Signaling through Promoting IAA-Amido Synthase Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozun; Yang, Dong-Lei; Sun, Li; Li, Qun; Mao, Bizeng; He, Zuhua

    2016-09-01

    Systemic acquired resistance is a long-lasting and broad-spectrum disease resistance to pathogens. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 (OsNPR1), a master gene for systemic acquired resistance in rice (Oryza sativa), greatly enhanced resistance to bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae However, the growth and development of the OsNPR1 overexpression (OsNPR1-OX) plants were restrained, and the mechanism remained elusive. In this study, we dissected the OsNPR1-induced growth inhibition. We found that the OsNPR1-OX lines displayed phenotypes mimicking auxin-defective mutants, with decreases in root system, seed number and weight, internode elongation, and tiller number. Whole-genome expression analysis revealed that genes related to the auxin metabolism and signaling pathway were differentially expressed between the OsNPR1-OX and wild-type plants. Consistently, the indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content was decreased and the auxin distribution pattern was altered in OsNPR1-OX plants. Importantly, we found that some GH3 family members, in particular OsGH3.8 coding IAA-amido synthetase, were constitutively up-regulated in OsNPR1-OX plants. Decreased OsGH3.8 expression by RNA interference could partially restore IAA level and largely rescue the restrained growth and development phenotypes but did not affect the disease resistance of OsNPR1-OX plants. Taken together, we revealed that OsNPR1 affects rice growth and development by disrupting the auxin pathway at least partially through indirectly up-regulating OsGH3.8 expression.

  5. SOX9 accelerates ESC differentiation to three germ layer lineages by repressing SOX2 expression through P21 (WAF1/CIP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H

    2014-11-01

    Upon removal of culture conditions that maintain an undifferentiated state, mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) differentiate into various cell types. Differentiation can be facilitated by forced expression of certain transcription factors (TFs), each of which can generally specify a particular developmental lineage. We previously established 137 mouse ESC lines, each of which carried a doxycycline-controllable TF. Among them, Sox9 has unique capacity: its forced expression accelerates differentiation of mouse ESCs into cells of all three germ layers. With the additional use of specific culture conditions, overexpression of Sox9 facilitated the generation of endothelial cells, hepatocytes and neurons from ESCs. Furthermore, Sox9 action increases formation of p21 (WAF1/CIP1), which then binds to the SRR2 enhancer of pluripotency marker Sox2 and inhibits its expression. Knockdown of p21 abolishes inhibition of Sox2 and Sox9-accelerated differentiation, and reduction of Sox2 2 days after the beginning of ESC differentiation can comparably accelerate mouse ESC formation of cells of three germ layers. These data implicate the involvement of the p21-Sox2 pathway in the mechanism of accelerated ESC differentiation by Sox9 overexpression. The molecular cascade could be among the first steps to program ESC differentiation.

  6. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern as a marker for anabolic potency: desoxymethyltestosterone (madol), norandrostenedione and testosterone repress MHC-IIb expression and stimulate MHC-IId/x expression in orchiectomized rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, S; Velders, M; Schleipen, B; Schänzer, W; Bloch, W; Diel, P

    2011-06-01

    Both 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR) and desoxymethyltestosterone (17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol, DMT or "madol") are 'designer steroids' misused for doping purposes in the bodybuilding scene. We have previously characterized the pharmacological profile of madol and identified potential adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anabolic potency of NOR, madol and the reference substance testosterone propionate (TP). Besides wet weight of the M.levator ani (LA), we examined the effects on muscle fiber type composition and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the M.gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle as additional markers for anabolic potency. A Hershberger assay was performed, where orchiectomized (orchi) male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with NOR, madol, TP or vehicle control (all 1 mg/kg BW/day) for 12 days. Wet weights of the Gas, LA, prostate and seminal vesicle were examined to determine anabolic and androgenic effects. Fiber type composition of the Gas muscle was analyzed using ATPase staining, and MHC protein profiles were determined by silver stain and Western blot analysis. NOR and madol exhibited strong anabolic and weak androgenic potency by stimulating growth of the LA but not the prostate and seminal vesicle. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition characterized by ATPase staining was not significantly altered between the treatment groups, although there was a tendency toward lower levels of type IIB and increased type IIA fibers in all treatment groups relative to orchi. MHC protein expression determined by Western blot and silver stain analysis revealed that MHC IId/x was significantly up-regulated, while MHC IIb was significantly down-regulated in NOR, madol and TP groups relative to orchi. There were no significant differences for MHC IIa and MHC I expression between groups. Results suggest that the observed MHC expression shift could serve as a molecular marker to determine anabolic

  7. Metformin represses self-renewal of the human breast carcinoma stem cells via inhibition of estrogen receptor-mediated OCT4 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Won Jung

    Full Text Available Metformin, a Type II diabetic treatment drug, which inhibits transcription of gluconeogenesis genes, has recently been shown to lower the risk of some diabetes-related tumors, including breast cancer. Recently, "cancer stem cells" have been demonstrated to sustain the growth of tumors and are resistant to therapy. To test the hypothesis that metformin might be reducing the risk to breast cancers, the human breast carcinoma cell line, MCF-7, grown in 3-dimensional mammospheres which represent human breast cancer stem cell population, were treated with various known and suspected breast cancer chemicals with and without non-cytotoxic concentrations of metformin. Using OCT4 expression as a marker for the cancer stem cells, the number and size were measured in these cells. Results demonstrated that TCDD (100 nM and bisphenol A (10 µM increased the number and size of the mammospheres, as did estrogen (10 nM E2. By monitoring a cancer stem cell marker, OCT4, the stimulation by these chemicals was correlated with the increased expression of OCT4. On the other hand, metformin at 1 and 10 mM concentration dramatically reduced the size and number of mammospheres. Results also demonstrated the metformin reduced the expression of OCT4 in E2 & TCDD mammospheres but not in the bisphenol A mammospheres, suggesting different mechanisms of action of the bisphenol A on human breast carcinoma cells. In addition, these results support the use of 3-dimensional human breast cancer stem cells as a means to screen for potential human breast tumor promoters and breast chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  8. microRNA-142 is upregulated by tumor necrosis factor-alpha and triggers apoptosis in human gingival epithelial cells by repressing BACH2 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Song, Zhongchen; Dong, Jiachen; Shu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) has been shown to cause apoptosis of gingival epithelial cells (GECs) in periodontitis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we showed that miR-142 expression was significantly elevated in human GECs after exposure to TNF-α. Such induction was in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Serum miR-142 levels were positively correlated with serum TNF-α levels in patients with chronic periodontitis (r = 0.314, P = 0.0152). Depletion of miR-142 was found to attenuate TNF-α-induced apoptosis, as determined by TUNEL staining and caspase-3 activity assays. In contrast, overexpression of miR-142 significantly reduced viability and induced apoptosis in GECs. Basic leucine zipper transcription factor 2 (BACH2) was identified to be a functional target of miR-142. Overexpression of miR-142 caused a 3-fold reduction of BACH2 protein in primary GECs. Overexpression of BACH2 significantly reversed miR-142- or TNF-α-induced apoptosis of GECs. Similar to the findings with miR-142 mimic, depletion of BACH2 significantly promoted apoptosis in GECs, which was accompanied by decreased expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and increased expression of Bax and Bim. Overall, miR-142 mediates TNF-α-induced apoptosis in gingival epithelial cells by targeting BACH2 and may represent a potential therapeutic target for periodontitis. PMID:28123644

  9. Prevention of GVHD by adoptive T regulatory therapy is associated with active repression of peripheral blood toll-like receptor-5 mRNA expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sawitzki, Birgit; Brunstein, Claudio; Meisel, Christian; Schumann, Julia; Vogt, Katrin; Appelt, Christine; Curtsinger, Julie M.; Verneris, Michael R.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; Wagner, John E.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) occurs in 40-60% of recipients of partially matched umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCB). In a phase I study, adoptive transfer of expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells (nTregs) resulted in a reduced incidence of grade II-IV GVHD. To investigate potential mechanisms responsible for the reduced GVHD risk, we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) mRNA expression of a tolerance gene set previously identified in operational t...

  10. miR-181b promotes cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis by repressing the expression of adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9) in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan-Li; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Chen, Zheng; Liu, Min; Tang, Hua

    2014-01-03

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In this study, we found that miR-181b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. And we validated a new miR-181b target gene, adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9). miR-181b restricted cAMP production by post-transcriptionally downregulating AC9 expression. Phenotypic experiments indicated that miR-181b and AC9 exerted opposite effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  11. Repression of proinflammatory gene expression by lipid extract of Nostoc commune var sphaeroides Kützing, a blue-green alga, via inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Ki; Rasmussen, Heather E; Ehlers, Sarah J; Blobaum, Kara R; Lu, Fan; Schlegal, Vicki L; Carr, Timothy P; Lee, Ji-Young

    2008-02-01

    We investigated whether lipid extract from a blue-green alga, N commune, modulates proinflammatory gene expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The cells were incubated with N commune lipid extract (0-100 microg/mL) and subsequently activated by LPS (100 ng/mL). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that mRNA abundance of proinflammatory mediators, including TNF-alpha, COX-2, IL-1beta, IL-6, and iNOS, was significantly reduced by N commune lipid extract in a dose-dependent manner. Secretion of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta into cell culture medium was also significantly decreased by N commune lipid extract. Thin-layer chromatography-densitometry analysis showed that N commune lipid extract contained approximately 15% of fatty acids. To determine whether the inhibition of proinflammatory mediator production by N commune lipid extract is primarily conferred by fatty acids in the lipid extract, macrophages were incubated with 100 microg/mL of N commune lipid extract or 15 microg/mL of a fatty acid mixture, which was formulated to reflect the fatty acid composition of N commune lipid extract. The fatty acid mixture significantly reduced RNA abundance of TNF-alpha and COX-2, but to a lesser extent than did the N commune lipid extract, suggesting the presence of additional bioactive compounds with an antiinflammatory property in the lipid extract. As NF-kappaB is a major regulator for the proinflammatory gene expression, we measured its DNA-binding activity. DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB was significantly reduced by N commune lipid extract. In conclusion, our study suggests that N commune lipid extract represses the expression of proinflammatory genes in RAW 264.7 macrophages, at least in part, by inhibiting the activation of NF-kappaB pathway.

  12. The GATA1s isoform is normally down-regulated during terminal haematopoietic differentiation and over-expression leads to failure to repress MYB, CCND2 and SKI during erythroid differentiation of K562 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halsey Christina

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although GATA1 is one of the most extensively studied haematopoietic transcription factors little is currently known about the physiological functions of its naturally occurring isoforms GATA1s and GATA1FL in humans—particularly whether the isoforms have distinct roles in different lineages and whether they have non-redundant roles in haematopoietic differentiation. As well as being of general interest to understanding of haematopoiesis, GATA1 isoform biology is important for children with Down syndrome associated acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia (DS-AMKL where GATA1FL mutations are an essential driver for disease pathogenesis. Methods Human primary cells and cell lines were analyzed using GATA1 isoform specific PCR. K562 cells expressing GATA1s or GATA1FL transgenes were used to model the effects of the two isoforms on in vitro haematopoietic differentiation. Results We found no evidence for lineage specific use of GATA1 isoforms; however GATA1s transcripts, but not GATA1FL transcripts, are down-regulated during in vitro induction of terminal megakaryocytic and erythroid differentiation in the cell line K562. In addition, transgenic K562-GATA1s and K562-GATA1FL cells have distinct gene expression profiles both in steady state and during terminal erythroid differentiation, with GATA1s expression characterised by lack of repression of MYB, CCND2 and SKI. Conclusions These findings support the theory that the GATA1s isoform plays a role in the maintenance of proliferative multipotent megakaryocyte-erythroid precursor cells and must be down-regulated prior to terminal differentiation. In addition our data suggest that SKI may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of children with DS-AMKL.

  13. Proximity of Radiation Desiccation Response Motif to the core promoter is essential for basal repression as well as gamma radiation-induced gyrB gene expression in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaganti, Narasimha; Basu, Bhakti; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2017-03-02

    The radioresistant D. radiodurans regulates its DNA damage regulon (DDR) through interaction between a 17bp palindromic cis-regulatory element called the Radiation Desiccation Response Motif (RDRM), the DdrO repressor and a protease IrrE. The role of RDRM in regulation of DDR was dissected by constructing RDRM sequence-, position- or deletion-variants of Deinococcal gyrB gene (DR0906) promoter and by RDRM insertion in the non-RDRM groESL gene (DR0606) promoter, and monitoring the effect of such modifications on the basal as well as gamma radiation inducible promoter activity by quantifying fluorescence of a GFP reporter. RDRM sequence-variants revealed that the conservation of sequence at the 5th and 13th position and the ends of RDRM is essential for basal repression by interaction with DdrO. RDRM position-variants showed that the sequence acts as a negative regulatory element only when located around transcription start site (TSS) and within the span of RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding region. RDRM deletion-variants indicated that the 5' sequence of RDRM possibly possesses an enhancer-like element responsible for higher expression yields upon repressor clearance post-irradiation. The results suggest that RDRM plays both a negative as well as a positive role of in the regulation of DDR in D. radiodurans.

  14. Polycomb-group protein SlMSI1 represses the expression of fruit-ripening genes to prolong shelf life in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Li-Jie; Fang, Mou-Jing; Dong, Qing-Long; An, Xiu-Hong; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Polycomb-group (PcG) protein MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 (MSI1) protein is an evolutionarily conserved developmental suppressor and plays a crucial role in regulating epigenetic modulations. However, the potential role and function of MSI1 in fleshy fruits remain unknown. In this study, SlMSI1 was cloned and transformed into tomato to explore its function. The quantitative real-time PCR results showed that SlMSI1 was highly expressed in flowers and fruits and that its transcript and protein levels were significantly decreased in fruits after the breaker stage. Additionally, SlMSI1-overexpressing transgenic tomatoes displayed abnormal non-ripening fruit formation, whereas its suppression promoted fruit ripening in transgenic tomatoes. Quantitative real-time PCR assays also showed that RIN and its regulons were decreased in SlMSI1 overexpression transgenic tomato fruits. Furthermore, RNA-seq analysis demonstrated that SlMSI1 inhibits fruit ripening by negatively regulating a large set of fruit-ripening genes in addition to RIN and its regulons. Finally, genetic manipulation of SlMSI1 and RIN successfully prolonged the fruit shelf life by regulating the fruit-ripening genes in tomato. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory function of SlMSI1 in fruit ripening and provide a new regulator that may be useful for genetic engineering and modification of fruit shelf life.

  15. H-NS binding to evpB and evpC and repressing T6SS expression in fish pathogen Edwardsiella piscicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shilei; Xiao, Jingfan; Wang, Qiyao; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2016-09-01

    Edwardsiella piscicida is an important causative agent of hemorrhagic septicemia in fish and infects both cultured and wild fish species. Type VI secretion system (T6SS) was proved to play important roles in pathogenesis of E. piscicida. In this study, it was demonstrated that the expression of T6SS genes evpB and evpC was under control of the global regulator H-NS in E. piscicida and the transcriptional level of evpB and evpC was significantly down-regulated by H-NS. Compared to the wild type, the transcriptional levels of evpB and evpC were up-regulated in hns null mutant, while down-regulated in hns overexpression strain. The results of EMSA and DNase I footprinting revealed that H-NS protein directly bound to upstream region of evpC at multiple sites. A high-affinity motif with a 9-nucleotide sequence 5'-ATATAAAAT-3' was defined for H-NS preferential recognition based on the feature of the binding sites. These results indicated that H-NS acted cooperatively to form extended nucleoprotein filaments on target DNA. Site-directed mutagenesis of H-NS further showed that R86 played an essential role in T6SS gene binding. These findings highlighted the mechanisms underlying the complex regulation network of T6SS by H-NS in E. piscicida.

  16. Human Cortical Neural Stem Cells Expressing Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I: A Novel Cellular Therapy for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Lisa M; Sims, Erika; Lunn, J Simon; Kashlan, Osama N; Chen, Kevin S; Bruno, Elizabeth S; Pacut, Crystal M; Hazel, Tom; Johe, Karl; Sakowski, Stacey A; Feldman, Eva L

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent age-related neurodegenerative disorder and a leading cause of dementia. Current treatment fails to modify underlying disease pathologies and very little progress has been made to develop effective drug treatments. Cellular therapies impact disease by multiple mechanisms, providing increased efficacy compared with traditional single-target approaches. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, we have shown that transplanted spinal neural stem cells (NSCs) integrate into the spinal cord, form synapses with the host, improve inflammation, and reduce disease-associated pathologies. Our current goal is to develop a similar "best in class" cellular therapy for AD. Here, we characterize a novel human cortex-derived NSC line modified to express insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), HK532-IGF-I. Because IGF-I promotes neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in vivo, this enhanced NSC line offers additional environmental enrichment, enhanced neuroprotection, and a multifaceted approach to treating complex AD pathologies. We show that autocrine IGF-I production does not impact the cell secretome or normal cellular functions, including proliferation, migration, or maintenance of progenitor status. However, HK532-IGF-I cells preferentially differentiate into gamma-aminobutyric acid-ergic neurons, a subtype dysregulated in AD; produce increased vascular endothelial growth factor levels; and display an increased neuroprotective capacity in vitro. We also demonstrate that HK532-IGF-I cells survive peri-hippocampal transplantation in a murine AD model and exhibit long-term persistence in targeted brain areas. In conclusion, we believe that harnessing the benefits of cellular and IGF-I therapies together will provide the optimal therapeutic benefit to patients, and our findings support further preclinical development of HK532-IGF-I cells into a disease-modifying intervention for AD. ©AlphaMed Press.

  17. Ribosomal Protein L11 Recruits miR-24/miRISC To Repress c-Myc Expression in Response to Ribosomal Stress ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challagundla, Kishore B.; Sun, Xiao-Xin; Zhang, Xiaoli; DeVine, Tiffany; Zhang, Qinghong; Sears, Rosalie C.; Dai, Mu-Shui

    2011-01-01

    c-Myc promotes cell growth by enhancing ribosomal biogenesis and translation. Deregulated expression of c-Myc and aberrant ribosomal biogenesis and translation contribute to tumorigenesis. Thus, a fine coordination between c-Myc and ribosomal biogenesis is vital for normal cell homeostasis. Here, we show that ribosomal protein L11 regulates c-myc mRNA turnover. L11 binds to c-myc mRNA at its 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR), the core component of microRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) argonaute 2 (Ago2), as well as miR-24, leading to c-myc mRNA reduction. Knockdown of L11 drastically increases the levels and stability of c-myc mRNA. Ablation of Ago2 abrogated the L11-mediated reduction of c-myc mRNA, whereas knockdown of L11 rescued miR-24-mediated c-myc mRNA decay. Interestingly, treatment of cells with the ribosomal stress-inducing agent actinomycin D or 5-fluorouracil significantly decreased the c-myc mRNA levels in an L11- and Ago2-dependent manner. Both treatments enhanced the association of L11 with Ago2, miR-24, and c-myc mRNA. We further show that ribosome-free L11 binds to c-myc mRNA in the cytoplasm and that this binding is enhanced by actinomycin D treatment. Together, our results identify a novel regulatory paradigm wherein L11 plays a critical role in controlling c-myc mRNA turnover via recruiting miRISC in response to ribosomal stress. PMID:21807902

  18. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluc......Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration...... and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...

  19. The unified theory of repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh

    2006-10-01

    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). "Repression" was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud adapted repression to the defensive inhibition of "unbearable" mental contents. Substantial experimental literatures on attentional biases, thought avoidance, interference, and intentional forgetting exist, the oldest prototype being the work of Ebbinghaus, who showed that intentional avoidance of memories results in their progressive forgetting over time. It has now become clear, as clinicians had claimed, that the inaccessible materials are often available and emerge indirectly (e.g., procedurally, implicitly). It is also now established that the Ebbinghaus retention function can be partly reversed, with resulting increases of conscious memory over time (hypermnesia). Freud's clinical experience revealed early on that exclusion from consciousness was effected not just by simple repression (inhibition) but also by a variety of distorting techniques, some deployed to degrade latent contents (denial), all eventually subsumed under the rubric of defense mechanisms ("repression in the widest sense"). Freudian and Bartlettian distortions are essentially the same, even in name, except for motive (cognitive vs. emotional), and experimentally induced false memories and other "memory illusions" are laboratory analogs of self-induced distortions.

  20. Rule of Repression in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    This report on the current condition of the Mapuche Indians of Chile is edited from a document on the "Situation of Human Rights in Chile" and details the repressive and inhumane treatment of the largest indigenous ethnic minority in the country. (Author/RTS)

  1. JARID2 regulates binding of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to target genes in ES cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Cloos, Paul A C; Walfridsson, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have an important role in controlling the expression of genes essential for development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is believed to regulate transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri-methy...

  2. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    OpenAIRE

    E.S.S. de Araújo; Vasques, L.R.; Stabellini,R.; A.C.V. Krepischi; Pereira, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting thatXIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mar...

  3. Harpin-induced expression and transgenic overexpression of the phloem protein gene AtPP2-A1 in Arabidopsis repress phloem feeding of the green peach aphid Myzus persicae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Weiwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of plants with HrpNEa, a protein of harpin group produced by Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria, induces plant resistance to insect herbivores, including the green peach aphid Myzus persicae, a generalist phloem-feeding insect. Under attacks by phloem-feeding insects, plants defend themselves using the phloem-based defense mechanism, which is supposed to involve the phloem protein 2 (PP2, one of the most abundant proteins in the phloem sap. The purpose of this study was to obtain genetic evidence for the function of the Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis PP2-encoding gene AtPP2-A1 in resistance to M. persicae when the plant was treated with HrpNEa and after the plant was transformed with AtPP2-A1. Results The electrical penetration graph technique was used to visualize the phloem-feeding activities of apterous agamic M. persicae females on leaves of Arabidopsis plants treated with HrpNEa and an inactive protein control, respectively. A repression of phloem feeding was induced by HrpNEa in wild-type (WT Arabidopsis but not in atpp2-a1/E/142, the plant mutant that had a defect in the AtPP2-A1 gene, the most HrpNEa-responsive of 30 AtPP2 genes. In WT rather than atpp2-a1/E/142, the deterrent effect of HrpNEa treatment on the phloem-feeding activity accompanied an enhancement of AtPP2-A1 expression. In PP2OETAt (AtPP2-A1-overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants, abundant amounts of the AtPP2-A1 gene transcript were detected in different organs, including leaves, stems, calyces, and petals. All these organs had a deterrent effect on the phloem-feeding activity compared with the same organs of the transgenic control plant. When a large-scale aphid population was monitored for 24 hours, there was a significant decrease in the number of aphids that colonized leaves of HrpNEa-treated WT and PP2OETAt plants, respectively, compared with control plants. Conclusions The repression in phloem-feeding activities of

  4. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems.

  5. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT.

  6. Comment on "Multiple repressive mechanisms in the hippocampus during memory formation".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rebecca S; Mullan, Hillary; Blusztajn, Jan Krzysztof; Lehtinen, Maria K

    2016-07-29

    Cho et al. (Reports, 2 October 2015, p. 82) report that gene repression after contextual fear conditioning regulates hippocampal memory formation. We observe low levels of expression for many of the top candidate genes in the hippocampus and robust expression in the choroid plexus, as well as repression at 4 hours after contextual fear conditioning, suggesting the inclusion of choroid plexus messenger RNAs in Cho et al. hippocampal samples.

  7. Repression of miR-17-5p with elevated expression of E2F-1 and c-MYC in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma and enhancement of cell growth upon reversing this expression pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Tayebi, H.M.; Omar, K.; Hegy, S.; El Maghrabi, M.; El Brolosy, M. [The Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, Cairo (Egypt); Hosny, K.A. [Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Esmat, G. [Department of Endemic Medicine and Hepatology, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt); Abdelaziz, A.I., E-mail: ahmed.abdel-aziz@guc.edu.eg [The Molecular Pathology Research Group, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •The oncogenic miR-17-5p is downregulated in non-metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma patients. •E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts are upregulated in non-metastatic HCC patients. •miR-17-5p forced overexpression inhibited E2F-1 and c-MYC expression in HuH-7 cells. •miR-17-5p mimicking increased HuH-7 cell growth, proliferation, migration and colony formation. •miR-17-5p is responsible for HCC progression among the c-MYC/E2F-1/miR-17-5p triad members. -- Abstract: E2F-1, c-MYC, and miR-17-5p is a triad of two regulatory loops: a negative and a positive loop, where c-MYC induces the expression of E2F-1 that induces the expression of miR-17-5p which in turn reverses the expression of E2F-1 to close the loop. In this study, we investigated this triad for the first time in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), where miR-17-5p showed a significant down-regulation in 23 non-metastatic HCC biopsies compared to 10 healthy tissues; however, E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts were markedly elevated. Forced over-expression of miR-17-5p in HuH-7 cells resulted in enhanced cell proliferation, growth, migration and clonogenicity with concomitant inhibition of E2F-1 and c-MYC transcripts expressions, while antagomirs of miR-17-5p reversed these events. In conclusion, this study revealed a unique pattern of expression for miR-17-5p in non-metastatic HCC patients in contrast to metastatic HCC patients. In addition we show that miR-17-5p is the key player among the triad that tumor growth and spread.

  8. miRNA-dependent translational repression in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila ovary is a tissue rich in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Many of the regulatory factors are proteins identified via genetic screens. The more recent discovery of microRNAs, which in other animals and tissues appear to regulate translation of a large fraction of all mRNAs, raised the possibility that they too might act during oogenesis. However, there has been no direct demonstration of microRNA-dependent translational repression in the ovary. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, quantitative analyses of transcript and protein levels of transgenes with or without synthetic miR-312 binding sites show that the binding sites do confer translational repression. This effect is dependent on the ability of the cells to produce microRNAs. By comparison with microRNA-dependent translational repression in other cell types, the regulated mRNAs and the protein factors that mediate repression were expected to be enriched in sponge bodies, subcellular structures with extensive similarities to the P bodies found in other cells. However, no such enrichment was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the variety of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that operate in the Drosophila ovary, and have implications for the mechanisms of miRNA-dependent translational control used in the ovary.

  9. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter.

  10. A core erythroid transcriptional network is repressed by a master regulator of myelo-lymphoid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wontakal, Sandeep N; Guo, Xingyi; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Bresnick, Emery H; Bergman, Aviv; Snyder, Michael P; Weissman, Sherman M; Zheng, Deyou; Skoultchi, Arthur I

    2012-03-06

    Two mechanisms that play important roles in cell fate decisions are control of a "core transcriptional network" and repression of alternative transcriptional programs by antagonizing transcription factors. Whether these two mechanisms operate together is not known. Here we report that GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 form an erythroid core transcriptional network by co-occupying >300 genes. Importantly, we find that PU.1, a negative regulator of terminal erythroid differentiation, is a highly integrated component of this network. GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 act to promote, whereas PU.1 represses expression of many of the core network genes. PU.1 also represses the genes encoding GATA-1, SCL, Klf1, and important GATA-1 cofactors. Conversely, in addition to repressing PU.1 expression, GATA-1 also binds to and represses >100 PU.1 myelo-lymphoid gene targets in erythroid progenitors. Mathematical modeling further supports that this dual mechanism of repressing both the opposing upstream activator and its downstream targets provides a synergistic, robust mechanism for lineage specification. Taken together, these results amalgamate two key developmental principles, namely, regulation of a core transcriptional network and repression of an alternative transcriptional program, thereby enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms that establish cellular identity.

  11. Snai1 represses Nanog to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Galvagni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained by an external signaling pathways and intrinsic regulatory networks involving ESC-specific transcriptional complexes (mainly formed by OCT3/4, Sox2 and Nanog proteins, the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 and DNA methylation [1–8]. Among these, Nanog represents the more ESC specific factor and its repression correlates with the loss of pluripotency and ESC differentiation [9–11]. During ESC early differentiation, many development-associated genes become upregulated and although, in general, much is known about the pluripotency self-renewal circuitry, the molecular events that lead ESCs to exit from pluripotency and begin differentiation are largely unknown. Snai1 is one the most early induced genes during ESC differentiation in vitro and in vivo [12,13]. Here we show that Snai1 is able to directly repress several stemness-associated genes including Nanog. We use a ESC stable-line expressing a inducible Snai1 protein. We here show microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESC expressing Snail-ER at various time points of induction with 4-OH. Data were deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO datasets under reference GSE57854 and here: http://epigenetics.hugef-research.org/data.php.

  12. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina

    2010-01-01

    to genetic disabilities, including birth defects. The basis by which centromeric meiotic recombination is repressed has been largely unknown. We report here that, in fission yeast, RNAi functions and Clr4-Rik1 (histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferase) are required for repression of centromeric recombination...

  13. Life in the cold: a proteomic study of cold-repressed proteins in the antarctic bacterium pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, Florence; D'Amico, Salvino; Mazzucchelli, Gabriel; Danchin, Antoine; Leprince, Pierre; Feller, Georges

    2011-06-01

    The proteomes expressed at 4°C and 18°C by the psychrophilic Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis were compared using two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis with special reference to proteins repressed by low temperatures. Remarkably, the major cold-repressed proteins, almost undetectable at 4°C, were heat shock proteins involved in folding assistance.

  14. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  15. Interferon-Tau has Antiproliferative effects, Represses the Expression of E6 and E7 Oncogenes, Induces Apoptosis in Cell Lines Transformed with HPV16 and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Quirarte, Herbey Oswaldo; Trejo-Moreno, Cesar; Fierros-Zarate, Geny; Castañeda, Jhoseline Carnalla; Palma-Irizarry, Marie; Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Burguete-Garcia, Ana Isabel; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a promising alternative antiviral and immunotherapeutic agent in a wide variety of diseases including infectious, neurodegenerative, autoimmune and cancer due to its low toxicity in comparison with other type I interferon´s. The objective of our study was established the effect of the bovine IFN-τ on human (SiHa) and murine (BMK-16/myc) cells transformed with HPV 16 and evaluates the antitumor effect in a murine tumor model HPV 16 positive. We determine that bovine IFN-τ has antiproliferative effects, pro-apoptotic activity and induces repression of viral E6 and E7 oncogenes (time- and dose-dependent) on human and murine cells transformed with HPV 16 similar to the effects of IFN-β. However, IFN-τ induces greater antiproliferative effect, apoptosis and repression of both oncogenes in BMK-16/myc cells compared to SiHa cells. The differences were explained by the presence and abundance of the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) in each cell line. On the other hand, we treated groups of tumor-bearing mice (HPV16 positive) with IFN-τ and showed the inhibition tumor growth effect in vivo. Our finding indicates that bovine IFN-τ may be a good candidate for immunotherapy against cervical cancer.

  16. Interferon-Tau has Antiproliferative effects, Represses the Expression of E6 and E7 Oncogenes, Induces Apoptosis in Cell Lines Transformed with HPV16 and Inhibits Tumor Growth In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Quirarte, Herbey Oswaldo; Trejo-Moreno, Cesar; Fierros-Zarate, Geny; Castañeda, Jhoseline Carnalla; Palma-Irizarry, Marie; Hernández-Márquez, Eva; Burguete-Garcia, Ana Isabel; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Madrid-Marina, Vicente; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Interferon tau (IFN-τ) is a promising alternative antiviral and immunotherapeutic agent in a wide variety of diseases including infectious, neurodegenerative, autoimmune and cancer due to its low toxicity in comparison with other type I interferon´s. The objective of our study was established the effect of the bovine IFN-τ on human (SiHa) and murine (BMK-16/myc) cells transformed with HPV 16 and evaluates the antitumor effect in a murine tumor model HPV 16 positive. We determine that bovine IFN-τ has antiproliferative effects, pro-apoptotic activity and induces repression of viral E6 and E7 oncogenes (time- and dose-dependent) on human and murine cells transformed with HPV 16 similar to the effects of IFN-β. However, IFN-τ induces greater antiproliferative effect, apoptosis and repression of both oncogenes in BMK-16/myc cells compared to SiHa cells. The differences were explained by the presence and abundance of the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR) in each cell line. On the other hand, we treated groups of tumor-bearing mice (HPV16 positive) with IFN-τ and showed the inhibition tumor growth effect in vivo. Our finding indicates that bovine IFN-τ may be a good candidate for immunotherapy against cervical cancer. PMID:27994659

  17. Antistress effect of red ginseng in brain cells is mediated by TACE repression via PADI4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, In-Hye; Ha, Jung-Ah; Choi, Kwang-Tae; Pyo, Suhkneung; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Ginseng is known to have antistress effects. Previously, red ginseng (RG) was shown to repress stress-induced peptidyl arginine deiminase type IV (PADI4) via estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in the brain, thus inhibiting brain cell apoptosis. Moreover, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α plays a critical role in immobilization (IMO) stress. However, the signaling pathway of RG-mediated repressesion of inflammation is not completely understood. In this study, we determined how RG modulated gene expression in stressed brain cells. Since secretion of TNF-α is modulated via TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB, we examined the inflammatory pathway in stressed brain cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that TACE was induced by IMO stress, but RG repressed TACE induction. Moreover, PADI4 siRNA repressed TACE expression compared to the mock transfected control suggesting that PADI4 was required for TACE expression. A reporter assay also revealed that H2O2 oxidative stress induced NF-κB in neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cells, however, RG pretreatment repressed NF-κB induction. These findings were supported by significant induction of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species (ROS) by oxidative stress, which could be repressed by RG administration. Taken together, RG appeared to repress stress-induced PADI4 via TACE and NF-κB in brain cells thus preventing production of ROS and subsequently protecting brain cells from apoptosis.

  18. Nitric oxide participates in plant flowering repression by ascorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, Rajendran; Shen, Chin-Hui; Wu, Pei-Yin; Suresh Kumar, Subbiah; Hua, Moda Sang; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-01-01

    In Oncidium, redox homeostasis involved in flowering is mainly due to ascorbic acid (AsA). Here, we discovered that Oncidium floral repression is caused by an increase in AsA-mediated NO levels, which is directed by the enzymatic activities of nitrate reductase (NaR) and nitrite reducatase (NiR). Through Solexa transcriptomic analysis of two libraries, ‘pseudobulb with inflorescent bud’ (PIB) and ‘pseudobulb with axillary bud’ (PAB), we identified differentially expressed genes related to NO metabolism. Subsequently, we showed a significant reduction of NaR enzymatic activities and NO levels during bolting and blooming stage, suggesting that NO controlled the phase transition and flowering process. Applying AsA to Oncidium PLB (protocorm-like bodies) significantly elevated the NO content and enzyme activities. Application of sodium nitroprusside (-NO donor) on Arabidopsis vtc1 mutant caused late flowering and expression level of flowering-associated genes (CO, FT and LFY) were reduced, suggesting NO signaling is vital for flowering repression. Conversely, the flowering time of noa1, an Arabidopsis NO-deficient mutant, was not altered after treatment with L-galacturonate, a precursor of AsA, suggesting AsA is required for NO-biosynthesis involved in the NO-mediated flowering-repression pathway. Altogether, Oncidium bolting is tightly regulated by AsA-mediated NO level and downregulation of transcriptional levels of NO metabolism genes. PMID:27731387

  19. Translational repression by PUF proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chritton, Jacqueline J; Wickens, Marvin

    2010-06-01

    PUF (Pumilio and FBF) proteins provide a paradigm for mRNA regulatory proteins. They interact with specific sequences in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of target mRNAs and cause changes in RNA stability or translational activity. Here we describe an in vitro translation assay that reconstitutes the translational repression activity of canonical PUF proteins. In this system, recombinant PUF proteins were added to yeast cell lysates to repress reporter mRNAs bearing the 3'UTRs of specific target mRNAs. PUF proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans were active in the assay and were specific by multiple criteria. Puf5p, a yeast PUF protein, repressed translation of four target RNAs. Repression mediated by the HO 3'UTR was particularly efficient, due to a specific sequence in that 3'UTR. The sequence lies downstream from the PUF binding site and does not affect PUF protein binding. PUF-mediated repression was sensitive to the distance between the ORF and the regulatory elements in the 3'UTR: excessive distance decreased repression activity. Our data demonstrate that PUF proteins function in vitro across species, that different mRNA targets are regulated differentially, and that specific ancillary sequences distinguish one yeast mRNA target from another. We suggest a model in which PUF proteins can control translation termination or elongation.

  20. Transcriptional Repression of Catalase in Mouse Skin Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A. Kwei

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in our laboratory have shown that the elevation of reactive oxygen species levels and the repression of the antioxidant enzyme, catalase, played a critical role in the in vitro progression of benign papilloma cells to malignant carcinoma cells. Catalase message, protein levels, and activity levels were found to be downregulated in the malignantly progressed cells. The goal of this study is to further characterize the repression of catalase in malignant progression of mouse skin tumors. To validate the in vitro observations, we examined catalase expression in tumor samples generated by the multistep chemical carcinogenesis protocol. Higher levels of catalase mRNA and protein were observed in benign papillomas versus malignant carcinomas. Nuclear run-on analysis showed that catalase repression in the cultured malignant cells was transcription-dependent. Results from luciferase reporter assays indicated that malignant cells have lower catalase promoter activities than benign papilloma cells, in part through the Wilm's tumor suppressor 1 (WT1 binding site within the proximal promoter region. The WTi protein levels were found to be inversely correlated with the observed catalase promoter activities, with higher levels observed in the malignant cells versus the benign cells. These results led us to conclude that WTi is acting as a transcription repressor in catalase gene regulation during tumor progression.

  1. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated with the IEI variables, but there was no evidence of a role of the repressive coping construct. While the total alexithymia score was unrelated to IEI, the TAS-20 subscale of difficulties identifying feelings (DIF) was independently associated with symptoms attributed to IEI. Negative affectivity was a strong independent predictor of the IEI variables and a mediator of the association between DIF and IEI. Conclusion Our results provide no evidence for a role of repressive coping in IEI, and our hypothesis of an association with alexithymia was only partly supported. In contrast, strong associations between IEI and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI. PMID:21432559

  2. A transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression controls macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Anup; Bose, Mainak; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2013-11-01

    In mammalian macrophages, the expression of a number of cytokines is regulated by miRNAs. Upon macrophage activation, proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs are translated, although the expression of miRNAs targeting these mRNAs remains largely unaltered. We show that there is a transient reversal of miRNA-mediated repression during the early phase of the inflammatory response in macrophages, which leads to the protection of cytokine mRNAs from miRNA-mediated repression. This derepression occurs through Ago2 phosphorylation, which results in its impaired binding to miRNAs and to the corresponding target mRNAs. Macrophages expressing a mutant, non-phosphorylatable AGO2--which remains bound to miRNAs during macrophage activation--have a weakened inflammatory response and fail to prevent parasite invasion. These findings highlight the relevance of the transient relief of miRNA repression for macrophage function.

  3. Repression of mesodermal fate by foxa, a key endoderm regulator of the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Paola; Walton, Katherine D; Davidson, Eric H; McClay, David R

    2006-11-01

    The foxa gene is an integral component of the endoderm specification subcircuit of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Its transcripts become confined to veg2, then veg1 endodermal territories, and, following gastrulation, throughout the gut. It is also expressed in the stomodeal ectoderm. gatae and otx genes provide input into the pregastrular regulatory system of foxa, and Foxa represses its own transcription, resulting in an oscillatory temporal expression profile. Here, we report three separate essential functions of the foxa gene: it represses mesodermal fate in the veg2 endomesoderm; it is required in postgastrular development for the expression of gut-specific genes; and it is necessary for stomodaeum formation. If its expression is reduced by a morpholino, more endomesoderm cells become pigment and other mesenchymal cell types, less gut is specified, and the larva has no mouth. Experiments in which blastomere transplantation is combined with foxa MASO treatment demonstrate that, in the normal endoderm, a crucial role of Foxa is to repress gcm expression in response to a Notch signal, and hence to repress mesodermal fate. Chimeric recombination experiments in which veg2, veg1 or ectoderm cells contained foxa MASO show which region of foxa expression controls each of the three functions. These experiments show that the foxa gene is a component of three distinct embryonic gene regulatory networks.

  4. Stability of XIST repression in relation to genomic imprinting following global genome demethylation in a human cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araújo, E.S.S. de [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Vasques, L.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Stabellini, R.; Krepischi, A.C.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Centro Internacional de Pesquisa, A.C. Camargo Cancer Center, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pereira, L.V. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-10-17

    DNA methylation is essential in X chromosome inactivation and genomic imprinting, maintaining repression of XIST in the active X chromosome and monoallelic repression of imprinted genes. Disruption of the DNA methyltransferase genes DNMT1 and DNMT3B in the HCT116 cell line (DKO cells) leads to global DNA hypomethylation and biallelic expression of the imprinted gene IGF2 but does not lead to reactivation of XIST expression, suggesting that XIST repression is due to a more stable epigenetic mark than imprinting. To test this hypothesis, we induced acute hypomethylation in HCT116 cells by 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) treatment (HCT116-5-aza-CdR) and compared that to DKO cells, evaluating DNA methylation by microarray and monitoring the expression of XIST and imprinted genes IGF2, H19, and PEG10. Whereas imprinted genes showed biallelic expression in HCT116-5-aza-CdR and DKO cells, the XIST locus was hypomethylated and weakly expressed only under acute hypomethylation conditions, indicating the importance of XIST repression in the active X to cell survival. Given that DNMT3A is the only active DNMT in DKO cells, it may be responsible for ensuring the repression of XIST in those cells. Taken together, our data suggest that XIST repression is more tightly controlled than genomic imprinting and, at least in part, is due to DNMT3A.

  5. Mitosis-associated repression in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Emilia; Lim, Bomyi; Guessous, Ghita; Falahati, Hanieh; Levine, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Transcriptional repression is a pervasive feature of animal development. Here, we employ live-imaging methods to visualize the Snail repressor, which establishes the boundary between the presumptive mesoderm and neurogenic ectoderm of early Drosophila embryos. Snail target enhancers were attached to an MS2 reporter gene, permitting detection of nascent transcripts in living embryos. The transgenes exhibit initially broad patterns of transcription but are refined by repression in the mesoderm following mitosis. These observations reveal a correlation between mitotic silencing and Snail repression. We propose that mitosis and other inherent discontinuities in transcription boost the activities of sequence-specific repressors, such as Snail. © 2016 Esposito et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  6. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  7. An Introduction to CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    CRISPR interference/activation (CRISPRi/a) technology provides a simple and efficient approach for targeted repression or activation of gene expression in the mammalian genome. It is highly flexible and programmable, using an RNA-guided nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein fused with transcriptional regulators for targeting specific genes to effect their regulation. Multiple studies have shown how this method is an effective way to achieve efficient and specific transcriptional repression or activation of single or multiple genes. Sustained transcriptional modulation can be obtained by stable expression of CRISPR components, which enables directed reprogramming of cell fate. Here, we introduce the basics of CRISPRi/a technology for genome repression or activation.

  8. 从欲望的压抑到欲望的表达——德勒兹后现代唯物主义欲望观的转向%From the Repression of Desire to the Expression of It——Deleuzian Post-Modern Materialistic Turn of the View of Desire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔增宝

    2009-01-01

    Desire is understood as a lack in Western traditional thoughts, and it is a representation of fault and incompleteness. Particularly in psychoanalysis, desire is to a great extent repressed and negated, which demonstrates an idealistic view of desire. The Post-modern philosopher Deleuze criticizes this negative view of desire and brings forward an affirmative view of desire. He does not think desire is a kind of negative force but a kind of positive one with the productive and constructive capacity. In a sense, desire should not be repressed but expressed freely, which is a materialistic view of desire.%欲望在西方传统思想中一直被理解为匮乏或缺失,是一种不完善的表现,尤其在精神分析中,欲望受到强烈的压抑和否定.德勒兹极力批判这种具有唯心主义性质的传统欲望观,提倡一种积极的欲望观.他认为,欲望不是消极的力量,而是一种积极的力量,具有生产性和建设性.在这个意义上,欲望不但不应受到压抑,而且应得到自由和充分的表达.德勒兹的欲望观是一种后现代的唯物主义欲望观.

  9. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Södersten

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb group (PcG proteins bind to and repress genes in embryonic stem cells through lineage commitment to the terminal differentiated state. PcG repressed genes are commonly characterized by the presence of the epigenetic histone mark H3K27me3, catalyzed by the Polycomb repressive complex 2. Here, we present in vivo evidence for a previously unrecognized plasticity of PcG-repressed genes in terminally differentiated brain neurons of parkisonian mice. We show that acute administration of the dopamine precursor, L-DOPA, induces a remarkable increase in H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation. The induction of the H3K27me3S28p histone mark specifically occurs in medium spiny neurons expressing dopamine D1 receptors and is dependent on Msk1 kinase activity and DARPP-32-mediated inhibition of protein phosphatase-1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments showed that increased H3K27me3S28p was accompanied by reduced PcG binding to regulatory regions of genes. An analysis of the genome wide distribution of L-DOPA-induced H3K27me3S28 phosphorylation by ChIP sequencing (ChIP-seq in combination with expression analysis by RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq showed that the induction of H3K27me3S28p correlated with increased expression of a subset of PcG repressed genes. We found that induction of H3K27me3S28p persisted during chronic L-DOPA administration to parkisonian mice and correlated with aberrant gene expression. We propose that dopaminergic transmission can activate PcG repressed genes in the adult brain and thereby contribute to long-term maladaptive responses including the motor complications, or dyskinesia, caused by prolonged administration of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Plant stem cell maintenance involves direct transcriptional repression of differentiation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ram Kishor; Perales, Mariano; Gruel, Jérémy; Ohno, Carolyn; Heisler, Marcus; Girke, Thomas; Jönsson, Henrik; Reddy, G Venugopala

    2013-01-01

    In animal systems, master regulatory transcription factors (TFs) mediate stem cell maintenance through a direct transcriptional repression of differentiation promoting TFs. Whether similar mechanisms operate in plants is not known. In plants, shoot apical meristems serve as reservoirs of stem cells that provide cells for all above ground organs. WUSCHEL, a homeodomain TF produced in cells of the niche, migrates into adjacent cells where it specifies stem cells. Through high-resolution genomic analysis, we show that WUSCHEL represses a large number of genes that are expressed in differentiating cells including a group of differentiation promoting TFs involved in leaf development. We show that WUS directly binds to the regulatory regions of differentiation promoting TFs; KANADI1, KANADI2, ASYMMETRICLEAVES2 and YABBY3 to repress their expression. Predictions from a computational model, supported by live imaging, reveal that WUS-mediated repression prevents premature differentiation of stem cell progenitors, being part of a minimal regulatory network for meristem maintenance. Our work shows that direct transcriptional repression of differentiation promoting TFs is an evolutionarily conserved logic for stem cell regulation.

  11. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  12. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. PMID:27226589

  13. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-07-15

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Repression-Sensitization and Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, William F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined relationship between repression-sensitization (R-S) and visits to prison infirmary for males during a one-year period. Main effect for R-S dimension was significant for total number of visits, number of medically justified visits, and number of medically unjustified visits. Sensitizers had significantly more visits than repressors.…

  15. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  16. Political Repression in U.S. History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors of the essays in this book amass considerable historical evidence illustrating various forms of political repression and its relationship with democracy in the United States, from the late-eighteenth century to the present. They discuss efforts, made mostly but not only by government age

  17. Repression-Sensitization and Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, William F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined relationship between repression-sensitization (R-S) and visits to prison infirmary for males during a one-year period. Main effect for R-S dimension was significant for total number of visits, number of medically justified visits, and number of medically unjustified visits. Sensitizers had significantly more visits than repressors.…

  18. Cancer, acute stress disorder, and repressive coping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Zachariae, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Reaction Questionnaire, and repressive coping was assessed by a combination of scores from the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale, and the Bendig version of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale. Significantly fewer patients classified as "repressors" were diagnosed with ASD compared to patients...

  19. Derangement of a factor upstream of RARalpha triggers the repression of a pleiotropic epigenetic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Corlazzoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin adapts and responds to extrinsic and intrinsic cues. We hypothesize that inheritable aberrant chromatin states in cancer and aging are caused by genetic/environmental factors. In previous studies we demonstrated that either genetic mutations, or loss, of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, can impair the integration of the retinoic acid (RA signal at the chromatin of RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha, and can lead to aberrant repressive chromatin states marked by epigenetic modifications. In this study we tested whether the mere interference with the availability of RA signal at RARalpha, in cells with an otherwise functional RARalpha, can also induce epigenetic repression at RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To hamper the availability of RA at RARalpha in untransformed human mammary epithelial cells, we targeted the cellular RA-binding protein 2 (CRABP2, which transports RA from the cytoplasm onto the nuclear RARs. Stable ectopic expression of a CRABP2 mutant unable to enter the nucleus, as well as stable knock down of endogenous CRABP2, led to the coordinated transcriptional repression of a few RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. The chromatin at these genes acquired an exacerbated repressed state, or state "of no return". This aberrant state is unresponsive to RA, and therefore differs from the physiologically repressed, yet "poised" state, which is responsive to RA. Consistent with development of homozygosis for epigenetically repressed loci, a significant proportion of cells with a defective CRABP2-mediated RA transport developed heritable phenotypes indicative of loss of function. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Derangement/lack of a critical factor necessary for RARalpha function induces epigenetic repression of a RA-regulated gene network downstream of RARalpha, with major pleiotropic biological outcomes.

  20. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middeldorp, Jinte; Kamphuis, Willem; Sluijs, Jacqueline A.; Achoui, Dalila; Leenaars, Cathalijn H. C.; Feenstra, Matthijs G. P.; van Tijn, Paula; Fischer, David F.; Berkers, Celia; Ovaa, Huib; Quinlan, Roy A.; Hol, Elly M.

    2009-01-01

    Increased expression of the astrocytic intermediate filament protein glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is a characteristic of astrogliosis. This process occurs in the brain during aging and neurodegeneration and coincides with impairment of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inhibition of the proteasome impairs protein degradation; therefore, we hypothesized that the increase in GFAP may be the result of impaired proteasomal activity in astrocytes. We investigated the effect of proteasome inhibitors on GFAP expression and other intermediate filament proteins in human astrocytoma cells and in a rat brain model for astrogliosis. Extensive quantitative RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot analysis resulted unexpectedly in a strong decrease of GFAP mRNA to Hol, E. M. Intermediate filament transcription in astrocytes is repressed by proteasome inhibition. PMID:19332645

  1. Repressive BMP2 gene regulatory elements near the BMP2 promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States); Chandler, Ronald L. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Fritz, David T. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States); Mortlock, Douglas P. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Center for Human Genetics Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Rogers, Melissa B., E-mail: rogersmb@umdnj.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Medicine and Dentistry (UMDNJ), New Jersey Medical School (NJMS), Newark, NJ (United States)

    2010-02-05

    The level of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) profoundly influences essential cell behaviors such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration. The spatial and temporal pattern of BMP2 synthesis, particular in diverse embryonic cells, is highly varied and dynamic. We have identified GC-rich sequences within the BMP2 promoter region that strongly repress gene expression. These elements block the activity of a highly conserved, osteoblast enhancer in response to FGF2 treatment. Both positive and negative gene regulatory elements control BMP2 synthesis. Detecting and mapping the repressive motifs is essential because they impede the identification of developmentally regulated enhancers necessary for normal BMP2 patterns and concentration.

  2. Alleviation of glucose repression of maltose metabolism by MIG1 disruption in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Christopher; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    1996-01-01

    The MIG1 gene was disrupted in a haploid laboratory strain (B224) and in an industrial polyploid strain (DGI 342) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The alleviation of glucose repression of the expression of MAL genes and alleviation of glucose control of maltose metabolism were investigated in batch...... cultivations on glucose-maltose mixtures. In the MIG1-disrupted haploid strain, glucose repression was partly alleviated; i.e., maltose metabolism was initiated at higher glucose concentrations than in the corresponding wild-type strain. In contrast, the polyploid Delta mig1 strain exhibited an even more...... of glucose repression of the SUC genes. The disruption of MIG1 was shown to bring about pleiotropic effects, manifested in changes in the pattern of secreted metabolites and in the specific growth rate....

  3. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  4. RNA interference-mediated repression of SmCPS (copalyldiphosphate synthase) expression in hairy roots of Salvia miltiorrhiza causes a decrease of tanshinones and sheds light on the functional role of SmCPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qiqing; Su, Ping; Hu, Yating; He, Yunfei; Gao, Wei; Huang, Luqi

    2014-02-01

    Tanshinones are a group of bioactive abietane-type norditerpenoid quinone compounds in Salvia miltiorrhiza. Copalyldiphosphate synthase of S. miltiorrhiza (SmCPS) is the first key enzyme in tanshinone biosynthesis from the universal diterpene precursor geranylgeranyl diphosphate. Hairy roots of S. miltiorrhiza were transformed with Agrobacterium rhizogenes carrying an RNA interference (RNAi) construct designed to silence SmCPS, and we examined the resulting SmCPS expression and tanshinone accumulation. In SmCPS–RNAi hairy roots, the transcript level of SmCPS was reduced to 26 % while the dihydrotanshinone I and cryptotanshinone levels were decreased by 53 and 38 % compared to those of the vector control hairy roots; tanshinone IIA was not detected. Therefore, the decreased expression of SmCPS caused a decrease in tanshinone levels which verifies that SmCPS is a key enzyme for tanshinone biosynthesis in S. miltiorrhiza.

  5. Male reproductive toxicity of CrVI: In-utero exposure to CrVI at the critical window of testis differentiation represses the expression of Sertoli cell tight junction proteins and hormone receptors in adult F1 progeny rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kathiresh M; Aruldhas, Mariajoseph Michael; Banu, Sheerin L; Sadasivam, Balaji; Vengatesh, Ganapathy; Ganesh, Karthik M; Navaneethabalakrishnan, Shobana; Navin, Ajith Kumar; Michael, Felicia Mary; Venkatachalam, Sankar; Stanley, Jone A; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Banu, Sakhila K; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

    2017-02-10

    The effect of gestational exposure to CrVI (occupational/environmental pollutant and target to Sertoli cells(SC)) was tested in a rat model during the testicular differentiation from the bipotential gonad may interrupt spermatogenesis by disrupting SC tight junctions(TJ) and it's proteins and hormone receptors. Pregnant Wistar rats were exposed to 50/100/200ppm CrVI through drinking water during embryonic days 9-14. On Postnatal day 120, testes were subjected to ion exchange chromatographic analysis and revealed increased level of CrIII in SCs and germ cells, serum and testicular interstitial fluid(TIF). Microscopic analyses showed seminiferous tubules atrophy and disruption of SC TJ, which also recorded decreased testosterone in TIF. mRNA and Protein expression analyses attested decreased level of Fshr, Ar, occludin and claudin-11 in SCs. Immunofluorescent detection revealed weak signal of TJ proteins. Taken together, we concluded that gestational exposure to CrVI interferes with the expression of SC TJ proteins due to attenuated expression of hormone receptors.

  6. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  7. Functional conservation of a glucose-repressible amylase gene promoter from Drosophila virilis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magoulas, C; Loverre-Chyurlia, A; Abukashawa, S; Bally-Cuif, L; Hickey, D A

    1993-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of the alpha-amylase gene is repressed by dietary glucose in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we show that the alpha-amylase gene of a distantly related species, D. virilis, is also subject to glucose repression. Moreover, the cloned amylase gene of D. virilis is shown to be glucose repressible when it is transiently expressed in D. melanogaster larvae. This cross-species, functional conservation is mediated by a 330-bp promoter region of the D. virilis amylase gene. These results indicate that the promoter elements required for glucose repression are conserved between distantly related Drosophila species. A sequence comparison between the amylase genes of D. virilis and D. melanogaster shows that the promoter sequences diverge to a much greater degree than the coding sequences. The amylase promoters of the two species do, however, share small clusters of sequence similarity, suggesting that these conserved cis-acting elements are sufficient to control the glucose-regulated expression of the amylase gene in the genus Drosophila.

  8. The neuronal repellent SLIT2 is a target for repression by EZH2 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Cao, Q; Yu, J; Wu, L; Dallol, A; Li, J; Chen, G; Grasso, C; Cao, X; Lonigro, R J; Varambally, S; Mehra, R; Palanisamy, N; Wu, J Y; Latif, F; Chinnaiyan, A M

    2010-09-30

    The neuronal repellent SLIT2 is repressed in a number of cancer types primarily through promoter hypermethylation. SLIT2, however, has not been studied in prostate cancer. Through genome-wide location analysis we identified SLIT2 as a target of polycomb group (PcG) protein EZH2. The EZH2-containing polycomb repressive complexes bound to the SLIT2 promoter inhibiting its expression. SLIT2 was downregulated in a majority of metastatic prostate tumors, showing a negative correlation with EZH2. This repressed expression could be restored by methylation inhibitors or EZH2-suppressing compounds. In addition, a low level of SLIT2 expression was associated with aggressive prostate, breast and lung cancers. Functional assays showed that SLIT2 inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Thus, this study showed for the first time the epigenetic silencing of SLIT2 in prostate tumors, and supported SLIT2 as a potential biomarker for aggressive solid tumors. Importantly, PcG-mediated repression may serve as a precursor for the silencing of SLIT2 by DNA methylation in cancer.

  9. Transthyretin represses neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells has been reportedly induced by the protein transthyretin (TTR). In human ocular tissue, TTR is generally considered to be secreted mainly by retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPECs); however, whether TTR affects the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains unclear. Methods Natural and simulated DR media were used to culture human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hRECs). Hyperglycemia was simulated by increasing the glucose concentration from 5.5 mM up to 25 mM, while hypoxia was induced with 200 µM CoCl2. To understand the effects of TTR on hRECs, cell proliferation was investigated under natural and DR conditions. Overexpression of TTR, an in vitro wound-healing assay, and a tube formation assay were employed to study the repression of TTR on hRECs. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to study the mRNA levels of DR-related genes, such as Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2. Results The proliferation of hRECs was significantly decreased in the simulated hyperglycemic and hypoxic DR environments. The cells were further repressed by added exogenous or endogenous TTR only under hyperglycemic conditions. The in vitro migration and tube formation processes of the hRECs were inhibited with TTR; furthermore, in the hyperglycemia and hyperglycemia/hypoxia environments, the levels of Tie2 and Angpt1 mRNA were enhanced with exogenous TTR, while those of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and Angpt1 were repressed. Conclusions In hyperglycemia, the proliferation, migration, and neovascularization of hRECs were significantly inhibited by TTR. The key genes for DR neovascularization, including Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2, were regulated by TTR. Under DR conditions, TTR significantly represses neovascularization by inhibiting the proliferation, migration and tube formation of hRECs. PMID:27746673

  10. Expression of a 74-kDa nuclear factor 1 (NF1) protein is induced in mouse mammary gland involution. Involution-enhanced occupation of a twin NF1 binding element in the testosterone-repressed prostate message-2/clusterin promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, E E; Keon, N K; Thornton, F D; Rein, T; Martin, F

    1996-11-22

    Testosterone repressed prostate message-2 (TRPM-2)/clusterin gene expression is rapidly induced in early involution of the mouse mammary gland, after weaning, and in the rat ventral prostate, after castration. A search for involution-enhanced DNaseI footprints in the proximal mouse TRPM-2/clusterin gene promoter led to the identification and characterization (by DNase I footprinting and EMSA) of a twin nuclear factor 1 (NF1) binding element at -356/-309, relative to the proposed transcription start site; nuclear extracts from 2-day involuting mouse mammary gland showed an enhanced footprint over the proximal NF1 element; extracts from involuting prostate showed enhanced occupancy of both NF1 binding elements. Subsequent EMSA and Western analysis led to the detection of a 74-kDa NF1 protein whose expression is triggered in early involution in the mouse mammary gland; such an induced protein is not found in the involuting rat ventral prostate. This protein was not found in lactation where three other NF1 proteins of 114, 68, and 46 kDa were detected. Reiteration of the epithelial cell apoptosis associated with early mammary gland involution, in vitro, in a primary cell culture system, triggered the appearance of the 74-kDa NF1. Overlaying the cells with laminin-rich extracellular matrix suppressed the apoptosis and the expression of the 74-kDa NF1 and, in the presence of lactogenic hormones, initiated milk protein gene expression and the expression of two of the lactation-associated NF1 proteins (68 and 46 kDa). This study, thus, identifies for the first time the occurrence of a switch in expression of different members of the family of NF1 transcription factors as mammary epithelial cells move from the differentiated to the involution/apoptotic state, and it is likely that the involution-specific 74-kDa NF1 accounts for the enhanced NF1 footprint detected on the TRPM-2/clusterin promoter with extracts of mouse mammary gland.

  11. Somatic sex determination in Caenorhabditis elegans is modulated by SUP-26 repression of tra-2 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapes, James; Chen, Jeng-Ting; Yu, Jau-Song; Xue, Ding

    2010-10-19

    Translational repression mediated by RNA-binding proteins or micro RNAs has emerged as a major regulatory mechanism for fine-tuning important biological processes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, translational repression of the key sex-determination gene tra-2 (tra, transformer) is controlled by a 28-nucleotide repeat element, the TRA-2/GLI element (TGE), located in its 3' untranslated region (UTR). Mutations that disrupt TGE or the germline-specific TGE-binding factor GLD-1 increase TRA-2 protein expression and inhibit sperm production in hermaphrodites. Here we report the characterization of the sup-26 gene, which regulates sex determination in the soma and encodes an RNA recognition motif (RRM)-containing protein. We show that SUP-26 regulates the level of the TRA-2 protein through TGE in vivo and binds directly to TGE in vitro through its RRM domain. Interestingly, SUP-26 associates with poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PAB-1) in vivo and may repress tra-2 expression by inhibiting the translation-stimulating activity of PAB-1. Taken together, our results provide further insight into how mRNA-binding factors repress translation and modulate sexual development in different tissues of C. elegans.

  12. Trichostatin A enhances estrogen receptor-alpha repression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells under hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyunggyun; Park, Joonwoo; Shim, Myeongguk; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2016-02-12

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a crucial determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy, which may change during the progression of breast cancer. We previously showed that hypoxia induces ESR1 gene repression and ERα protein degradation via proteasome-mediated pathway in breast cancer cells. HDAC plays important roles in the regulation of histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification. HDAC inhibitors can induce epigenetic changes and have therapeutic potential for targeting various cancers. Trichostatin A exerts potent antitumor activities against breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we show that TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level and downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxic conditions through a proteasome-mediated pathway. TSA-induced estrogen response element-driven reporter activity in the absence of estrogen was synergistically enhanced under hypoxia; however, TSA inhibited cell proliferation under both normoxia and hypoxia. Our data show that the hypoxia-induced repression of ESR1 and degradation of ERα are enhanced by concomitant treatment with TSA. These findings expand our understanding of hormone responsiveness in the tumor microenvironment; however, additional in-depth studies are required to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia. - Highlights: • TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level under hypoxia. • TSA downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxia. • TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia is essential for understanding the behavior and progression of breast cancer.

  13. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR(PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5 CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore,ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated incca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  14. Decitabine represses osteoclastogenesis through inhibition of RANK and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hanfeng; Mi, Baoguo; Li, Yong; Wu, Wei; Tan, Peng; Fang, Zhong; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Li, Feng

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation is essential for maintenance of stable repression of gene transcription during differentiation and tumorigenesis. Demethylating reagents including decitabine could release the repression, leading to perturbed transcription program. Recently others and we showed that, in B cell lymphomas, decitabine repressed B cell specific gene transcription and activated NF-κB signaling, causing decreased expression of translocated oncogenes including MYC and attenuated tumor cell proliferation. During osteoclastogenesis, changes in DNA methylation occurred in numerous genes, implicating important roles for DNA methylation in osteoclastogenesis. In the present study, we found that decitabine inhibited osteoclastogenesis. The inhibitory effect could be at least partially attributed to reduced expression of multiple osteoclast specific genes including RANK by decitabine. Moreover, decitabine inhibited activity of NF-κB, AP-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not PI3K/Akt pathway. In vivo, using ovariectomized mouse as a model, we observed that decitabine reduced the osteoclast activity and bone loss. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that decitabine was an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis by repression of osteoclast specific transcription program including the RANK, NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. DNA methylation might be indispensable for osteoclastogenesis. The use of decitabine could represent a novel strategy in treatment of diseases associated with increased osteoclast activity.

  15. The SUPERMAN protein is an active repressor whose carboxy-terminal repression domain is required for the development of normal flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Ohta, Masaru; Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2002-03-13

    SUPERMAN was identified as a putative regulator of transcription that acts in floral development, but its function remains to be clarified. We demonstrate here that SUPERMAN is an active repressor whose repression domain is located in the carboxy-terminal region. Ectopic expression of SUPERMAN that lacked the repression domain resulted in a phenotype similar to that of superman mutants, demonstrating that the repression activity of SUPERMAN is essential for the development of normal flowers. Constitutive expression of SUPERMAN resulted in a severe dwarfism but did not affect cell size, indicating that SUPERMAN might regulate genes that are involved in cell division.

  16. Serum repressing efflux pump CDR1 in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jen-Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the prevalence of candidemia has increased significantly and drug resistance has also become a pressing problem. Overexpression of CDR1, an efflux pump, has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the drug resistance in Candida albicans. It has been demonstrated that biological fluids such as human serum can have profound effects on antifungal pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to understand the effects of serum in drug susceptibility via monitoring the activity of CDR1 promoter of C. albicans. Results The wild-type C. albicans cells (SC5314 but not the cdr1/cdr1 mutant cells became more susceptible to the antifungal drug when the medium contained serum. To understand the regulation of CDR1 in the presence of serum, we have constructed CDR1 promoter-Renilla luciferase (CDR1p-RLUC reporter to monitor the activity of the CDR1 promoter in C. albicans. As expected, the expression of CDR1p-RLUC was induced by miconazole. Surprisingly, it was repressed by serum. Consistently, the level of CDR1 mRNA was also reduced in the presence of serum but not N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a known inducer for germ tube formation. Conclusion Our finding that the expression of CDR1 is repressed by serum raises the question as to how does CDR1 contribute to the drug resistance in C. albicans causing candidemia. This also suggests that it is important to re-assess the prediction of in vivo therapeutic outcome of candidemia based on the results of standard in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing, conducted in the absence of serum.

  17. MYCN repression of Lifeguard/FAIM2 enhances neuroblastoma aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planells-Ferrer, L; Urresti, J; Soriano, A; Reix, S; Murphy, D M; Ferreres, J C; Borràs, F; Gallego, S; Stallings, R L; Moubarak, R S; Segura, M F; Comella, J X

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common solid tumor in infants and accounts for 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. Several risk factors predict NBL outcome: age at the time of diagnosis, stage, chromosome alterations and MYCN (V-Myc Avian Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Neuroblastoma-Derived Homolog) amplification, which characterizes the subset of the most aggressive NBLs with an overall survival below 30%. MYCN-amplified tumors develop exceptional chemoresistance and metastatic capacity. These properties have been linked to defects in the apoptotic machinery, either by silencing components of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (e.g. caspase-8) or by overexpression of antiapoptotic regulators (e.g. Bcl-2, Mcl-1 or FLIP). Very little is known on the implication of death receptors and their antagonists in NBL. In this work, the expression levels of several death receptor antagonists were analyzed in multiple human NBL data sets. We report that Lifeguard (LFG/FAIM2 (Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 2)/NMP35) is downregulated in the most aggressive and undifferentiated tumors. Intringuingly, although LFG has been initially characterized as an antiapoptotic protein, we have found a new association with NBL differentiation. Moreover, LFG repression resulted in reduced cell adhesion, increased sphere growth and enhanced migration, thus conferring a higher metastatic capacity to NBL cells. Furthermore, LFG expression was found to be directly repressed by MYCN at the transcriptional level. Our data, which support a new functional role for a hitherto undiscovered MYCN target, provide a new link between MYCN overexpression and increased NBL metastatic properties. PMID:25188511

  18. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  19. 茶树生长素抑制蛋白基因CsARP1的克隆与表达分析%CLONING AND EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF AUXIN-REPRESSED PROTEIN GENE CsARP1 IN TEA PLANT(Camellia sinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新超; 马春雷; 杨亚军; 姚明哲; 金基强

    2011-01-01

    A 3′-end gene fragment of auxin-repressed protein gene(ARP) was screened from the tea plant dormant bud suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH) library,its full-length cDNA sequence was cloned through rapid amplification of cDNA ends(RACE),and its relative expression quantity in different stages of dormant buds was analyzed by real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR.The full length of the auxin-repressed protein gene,named CsARP1,was 711bp(GenBank accession No.HQ225758) and contained a 357bp open reading frame(ORF) encoding a 118 amino acid residues,and its 3′ untranslated region was an obvious polyadenylation signal.The deduced protein molecular weight was 12.82kD and its theoretical isoelectric point was 9.57.Sequence alignment of the deduced amino acids of CsARP1revealed a high degree of similarity with other members of plant ARP and had a typical domain characteristic.The results of real-time quantitative PCR showed that the CsARP1gene was expressed at a higher level in dormant buds than in sprouting buds.It suggests that the expression of CsARP1gene is correlated to the bud dormancy transition.%从茶树休眠芽抑制消减杂交文库中分离得到生长素抑制蛋白基因的3'-片段,以休眠芽为材料,利用RACE技术克隆了其cDNA全长,并利用荧光定量PCR研究了该基因在不同休眠阶段芽的相对表达量。结果从茶树休眠芽中获得一个全长为711bp的生长素抑制蛋白基因CsARP1(GenBank登录号为HQ225758)。该基因开放阅读框为357bp,编码118个氨基酸,推测的蛋白质分子量为12.82KD,等电点约为9.57。多序列比对结果显示,该基因编码的氨基酸序列与其他植物的ARP蛋白序列相似性达到70%以上,具有生长素抑制基因家族的保守结构域。荧光定量PCR结果表明,CsARP1基因在休眠阶段表达量较高,而在解除休眠(萌发)后表达量较低,说明CsARP1基因可能与茶树芽休眠有关。

  20. Bending the rules of transcriptional repression: tightly looped DNA directly represses T7 RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionberger, Troy A; Meyhöfer, Edgar

    2010-08-09

    From supercoiled DNA to the tight loops of DNA formed by some gene repressors, DNA in cells is often highly bent. Despite evidence that transcription by RNA polymerase (RNAP) is affected in systems where DNA is deformed significantly, the mechanistic details underlying the relationship between polymerase function and mechanically stressed DNA remain unclear. Seeking to gain additional insight into the regulatory consequences of highly bent DNA, we hypothesize that tightly looping DNA is alone sufficient to repress transcription. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an assay to quantify transcription elongation by bacteriophage T7 RNAP on small, circular DNA templates approximately 100 bp in size. From these highly bent transcription templates, we observe that the elongation velocity and processivity can be repressed by at least two orders of magnitude. Further, we show that minicircle templates sustaining variable levels of twist yield only moderate differences in repression efficiency. We therefore conclude that the bending mechanics within the minicircle templates dominate the observed repression. Our results support a model in which RNAP function is highly dependent on the bending mechanics of DNA and are suggestive of a direct, regulatory role played by the template itself in regulatory systems where DNA is known to be highly bent. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cas9 Nickase-Assisted RNA Repression Enables Stable and Efficient Manipulation of Essential Metabolic Genes in Clostridium cellulolyticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential gene functions remain largely underexplored in bacteria. Clostridium cellulolyticum is a promising candidate for consolidated bioprocessing; however, its genetic manipulation to reduce the formation of less-valuable acetate is technically challenging due to the essentiality of acetate-producing genes. Here we developed a Cas9 nickase-assisted chromosome-based RNA repression to stably manipulate essential genes in C. cellulolyticum. Our plasmid-based expression of antisense RNA (asRNA molecules targeting the phosphotransacetylase (pta gene successfully reduced the enzymatic activity by 35% in cellobiose-grown cells, metabolically decreased the acetate titer by 15 and 52% in wildtype transformants on cellulose and xylan, respectively. To control both acetate and lactate simultaneously, we transformed the repression plasmid into lactate production-deficient mutant and found the plasmid delivery reduced acetate titer by more than 33%, concomitant with negligible lactate formation. The strains with pta gene repression generally diverted more carbon into ethanol. However, further testing on chromosomal integrants that were created by double-crossover recombination exhibited only very weak repression because DNA integration dramatically lessened gene dosage. With the design of a tandem repetitive promoter-driven asRNA module and the use of a new Cas9 nickase genome editing tool, a chromosomal integrant (LM3P was generated in a single step and successfully enhanced RNA repression, with a 27% decrease in acetate titer on cellulose in antibiotic-free medium. These results indicate the effectiveness of tandem promoter-driven RNA repression modules in promoting gene repression in chromosomal integrants. Our combinatorial method using a Cas9 nickase genome editing tool to integrate the gene repression module demonstrates easy-to-use and high-efficiency advantages, paving the way for stably manipulating genes, even essential ones, for functional

  2. Mechanism of catabolite repression of tryptophanase synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H; Chao, D; Yanofsky, C; Saier, M H

    1994-08-01

    Repression of tryptophanase (tryptophan indole-lyase) by glucose and its non-metabolizable analogue methyl alpha-glucoside has been studied employing a series of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli lacking cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and altered for two of the proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), Enzyme I and Enzyme IIAGlc. Basal activity of tryptophanase was depressed mildly by inclusion of glucose in the growth medium, but inducible tryptophanase synthesis was subject to strong glucose repression in the parental strain, which exhibited normal PTS enzyme activities. Methyl alpha-glucoside was without effect in this strain. Loss of Enzyme I decreased sensitivity to repression by glucose but enhanced sensitivity to repression by methyl alpha-glucoside. Loss of Enzyme IIAGlc activity largely abolished repression by methyl alpha-glucoside but had a less severe effect on glucose repression. The repressive effects of both sugars were fully reversed by inclusion of cyclic AMP in the growth medium. Tryptophan uptake under the same conditions was inhibited weakly by glucose and more strongly by methyl alpha-glucoside in the parental strain. Inhibition by both sugars was alleviated by partial loss of Enzyme I. Inhibition by methyl alpha-glucoside appeared to be largely due to energy competition and was not responsible for repression of tryptophanase synthesis. Measurement of net production of cyclic AMP as well as intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP revealed a good correlation with intensity of repression. The results suggest that while basal tryptophanase synthesis is relatively insensitive to catabolite repression, inducible synthesis is subject to strong repression by two distinct mechanisms, one dependent on enzyme IIAGlc of the PTS and the other independent of this protein. Both mechanisms are attributable to depressed rates of cyclic AMP synthesis. No evidence for a cyclic-AMP-independent mechanism of catabolite

  3. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-05-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia into glutamine. Glutamine-limited continuous cultures were used to completely derepress the expression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1. Following an ammonia pulse, the expression of GAP1, PUT4 and GDH1 decreased while the intracellular glutamine concentration remained constant, both in the cytoplasm and in the vacuole. Therefore, it was concluded that ammonia causes gene repression independent of the intracellular glutamine concentration. The expression of GLN1 was not decreased by an ammonia pulse but solely by a glutamine pulse. Analysis of the mRNA levels of ILV5 and HIS4 showed that the response of the two biosynthetic genes, GDH1 and GLN1, to ammonia and glutamine in the wild-type and gln1-37 was not due to changes in general transcription of biosynthetic genes. Ure2p has been shown to be an essential element for nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Deletion of URE2 in the gln1-37 background prevented repression of gene expression by ammonia, showing that the ammonia-induced repression is not caused by a general stress response but represents a specific signal for nitrogen catabolite regulation.

  4. Possible Roles for Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 in Cereal Endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru eTonosaki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2 is an evolutionarily conserved multimeric protein complex in both plants and animals. In contrast to animals, plants have evolved a range of different components of PRC2 and form diverse complexes that act in the control of key regulatory genes at many stages of development during the life cycle. A number of studies, particularly in the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, have highlighted the role of PRC2 and of epigenetic controls via parent-of-origin specific gene expression for endosperm development. However, recent research in cereal plants has revealed that although some components of PRC2 show evolutionary conservation with respect to parent-of-origin specific gene expression patterns, the identity of the imprinted genes encoding PRC2 components is not conserved. This disparity may reflect the facts that cereal plant genomes have undergone different patterns of duplication during evolution compared to Arabidopsis thaliana and that the endosperm development program is not identical in monocots and eudicots. In this context, we focus this review on the expression of imprinted PRC2 genes and their roles in endosperm development in cereals.

  5. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Snail1 is a repressor of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) expression essential for triggering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snail1 represses CDH1 directly binding its promoter and inducing the synthesis of Zeb1 repressor. In this article we show that repression of CDH1...... by Snail1, but not by Zeb1, is dependent on the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). ES cells null for Suz12, one of the components of PRC2, show higher levels of Cdh1 mRNA than control ES cells. In tumour cells, interference of PRC2 activity prevents the ability of Snail1 to down......-regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments...

  6. The tumor suppressor, parafibromin, mediates histone H3 K9 methylation for cyclin D1 repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Parafibromin, a component of the RNA polymerase II-associated PAF1 complex, is a tumor suppressor linked to hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. Parafibromin induces cell cycle arrest by repressing cyclin D1 via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that parafibromin interacts with the histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, and functions as a transcriptional repressor. The central region (128-227 amino acids) of parafibromin is important for both the interaction with SUV39H1 and transcriptional repression. Parafibromin associated with the promoter and coding regions of cyclin D1 and was required for the recruitment of SUV39H1 and the induction of H3 K9 methylation but not H3 K4 methylation. RNA interference analysis showed that SUV39H1 was critical for cyclin D1 repression. These data suggest that parafibromin plays an unexpected role as a repressor in addition to its widely known activity associated with transcriptional activation. Parafibromin as a part of the PAF1 complex might downregulate cyclin D1 expression by integrating repressive H3 K9 methylation during transcription.

  7. MYC Association with Cancer Risk and a New Model of MYC-Mediated Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    MYC is one of the most frequently mutated and overexpressed genes in human cancer but the regulation of MYC expression and the ability of MYC protein to repress cellular genes (including itself) have remained mysterious. Recent genome-wide association studies show that many genetic polymorphisms associated with disease risk map to distal regulatory elements that regulate the MYC promoter through large chromatin loops. Cancer risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contain more potent enhancer activity, promoting higher MYC levels and a greater risk of disease. The MYC promoter is also subject to complex regulatory circuits and limits its own expression by a feedback loop. A model for MYC autoregulation is discussed which involves a signaling pathway between the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) tumor suppressor and repressive histone modifications laid down by the EZH2 methyltransferase. PMID:24985129

  8. SAGA complex components and acetate repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Paraskevi; Lockington, Robin A; Kelly, Joan M

    2012-11-01

    Alongside the well-established carbon catabolite repression by glucose and other sugars, acetate causes repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations in creA, encoding the transcriptional repressor involved in glucose repression, also affect acetate repression, but mutations in creB or creC, encoding components of a deubiquitination system, do not. To understand the effects of acetate, we used a mutational screen that was similar to screens that uncovered mutations in creA, creB, and creC, except that glucose was replaced by acetate to identify mutations that were affected for repression by acetate but not by glucose. We uncovered mutations in acdX, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT8, which in growth tests showed derepression for acetate repression but not for glucose repression. We also made mutations in sptC, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT3, which showed a similar phenotype. We found that acetate repression is complex, and analysis of facA mutations (lacking acetyl CoA synthetase) indicates that acetate metabolism is required for repression of some systems (proline metabolism) but not for others (acetamide metabolism). Although plate tests indicated that acdX- and sptC-null mutations led to derepressed alcohol dehydrogenase activity, reverse-transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed no derepression of alcA or aldA but rather elevated induced levels. Our results indicate that acetate repression is due to repression via CreA together with metabolic changes rather than due to an independent regulatory control mechanism.

  9. CUTTING THE HEAD OF THE ROARING MONSTER": HOMOSEXUALITY AND REPRESSION IN AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Essien, Kwame; Aderinto, Saheed

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how a proposed conference of gays and lesbians in 2006 in Ghana created tensions and repercussions from the social, cultural, religious and political factors, which worked to repress same-sex discourse in the country. The new wave of homophobic expression that ensued is partly a product of the new globalization and also a manifestation of the clash between what is considered "African" and "un-African" social and sexual behavior. This study shows that the government of Ghan...

  10. Active repression by RARγ signaling is required for vertebrate axial elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, Amanda; Nguyen, Tuyen T L; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kitajima, Satoshi; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kanno, Jun; Blumberg, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 (RARγ2) is the major RAR isoform expressed throughout the caudal axial progenitor domain in vertebrates. During a microarray screen to identify RAR targets, we identified a subset of genes that pattern caudal structures or promote axial elongation and are upregulated by increased RAR-mediated repression. Previous studies have suggested that RAR is present in the caudal domain, but is quiescent until its activation in late stage embryos terminates axial elongation. By contrast, we show here that RARγ2 is engaged in all stages of axial elongation, not solely as a terminator of axial growth. In the absence of RA, RARγ2 represses transcriptional activity in vivo and maintains the pool of caudal progenitor cells and presomitic mesoderm. In the presence of RA, RARγ2 serves as an activator, facilitating somite differentiation. Treatment with an RARγ-selective inverse agonist (NRX205099) or overexpression of dominant-negative RARγ increases the expression of posterior Hox genes and that of marker genes for presomitic mesoderm and the chordoneural hinge. Conversely, when RAR-mediated repression is reduced by overexpressing a dominant-negative co-repressor (c-SMRT), a constitutively active RAR (VP16-RARγ2), or by treatment with an RARγ-selective agonist (NRX204647), expression of caudal genes is diminished and extension of the body axis is prematurely terminated. Hence, gene repression mediated by the unliganded RARγ2-co-repressor complex constitutes a novel mechanism to regulate and facilitate the correct expression levels and spatial restriction of key genes that maintain the caudal progenitor pool during axial elongation in Xenopus embryos.

  11. Critical role of TCF-1 in repression of the IL-17 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Ma

    Full Text Available Overwhelming activation of IL-17, a gene involved in inflammation, leads to exaggerated Th17 responses associated with numerous autoimmune conditions, such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. Here we show that TCF-1 is a critical factor to repress IL-17 gene locus by chromatin modifications during T cell development. Deletion of TCF-1 resulted in increased IL-17 gene expression both in thymus and peripheral T cells, which led to enhanced Th17 differentiation. As a result, TCF-1(-/- mice were susceptible to Th17-dependent EAE induction. Rag1(-/- mice reconstituted with TCF-1(-/- T cells were also susceptible to EAE, indicating TCF-1 is intrinsically required to repress IL-17. However, expression of wild-type TCF-1 or dominant negative TCF-1 did not interfere with Th17 differentiation in mature T cells. Furthermore, expression of TCF-1 in TCF-1(-/- T cells could not restore Th17 differentiation to wild-type levels, indicating that TCF-1 cannot affect IL-17 production at the mature T cell stage. This is also supported by the normal up-regulation or activation in mature TCF-1(-/- T cells of factors known to regulate Th17 differentiation, including RORγt and Stat3. We observed hyperacetylation together with trimethylation of Lys-4 at the IL-17 locus in TCF-1(-/- thymocytes, two epigenetic modifications indicating an open active state of the gene. Such epigenetic modifications were preserved even when TCF-1(-/- T cells migrated out of thymus. Therefore, TCF-1 mediates an active process to repress IL-17 gene expression via epigenetic modifications during T cell development. This TCF-1-mediated repression of IL-17 is critical for peripheral T cells to generate balanced immune responses.

  12. Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling represses testicular steroidogenesis through cross-talk with orphan nuclear receptor Nur77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunsook; Song, Chin-Hee; Park, Jae-Il; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) has been reported to inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) mediated-steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells. However, the mechanism by which TGF-β1 controls the steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated the possibility that TGF-β1 represses steroidogenesis through cross-talk with the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77. Nur77, which is induced by LH/cAMP signaling, is one of major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells. TGF-β1 signaling inhibited cAMP-induced testosterone production and the expression of steroidogenic genes such as P450c17, StAR and 3β-HSD in mouse Leydig cells. Further, TGF-β1/ALK5 signaling repressed cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic genes. In addition, TGF-β1/ALK5-activated Smad3 repressed Nur77 transactivation of steroidogenic gene promoters by interfering with Nur77 binding to DNA. In primary Leydig cells isolated from Tgfbr2flox/flox Cyp17iCre mice, TGF-β1-mediated repression of cAMP-induced steroidogenic gene expression was significantly less than that in primary Leydig cells from Tgfbr2flox/flox mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1/ALK5/Smad3 signaling represses the expression of steroidogenic genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation in testicular Leydig cells. These findings may provide a molecular mechanism involved in the TGF-β1-mediated repression of testicular steroidogenesis.

  13. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  14. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) regulates pro-inflammatory transcription in hepatocytes by repressing SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lina; Fan, Zhiwen; Chen, Junliang; Tian, Wenfang; Li, Min; Xu, Huihui; Wu, Xiaoyan; Fang, Mingming; Xia, Jun; Xu, Yong

    2016-07-12

    Excessive nutrition promotes the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by the accumulation of pro-inflammation mediators in the liver. In the present study we investigated the regulation of pro-inflammatory transcription in hepatocytes by protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in this process and the underlying mechanisms. We report that expression of the class III deacetylase SIRT1 was down-regulated in the livers of NASH mice accompanied by a simultaneous increase in the expression and binding activity of PIAS4. Exposure to high glucose stimulated the expression PIAS4 in cultured hepatocytes paralleling SIRT1 repression. Estrogen, a known NASH-protective hormone, ameliorated SIRT1 trans-repression by targeting PIAS4. Over-expression of PIAS4 enhanced, while PIAS4 knockdown alleviated, repression of SIRT1 transcription by high glucose. Lentiviral delivery of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting PIAS4 attenuated hepatic inflammation in NASH mice by restoring SIRT1 expression. Mechanistically, PIAS4 promoted NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory transcription in a SIRT1 dependent manner. In conclusion, our study indicates that PIAS4 mediated SIRT1 repression in response to nutrient surplus contributes to the pathogenesis of NASH. Therefore, targeting PIAS4 might provide novel therapeutic strategies in the intervention of NASH.

  15. Germ cell nuclear factor directly represses the transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqiang He; Naizheng Ding; Jie Kang

    2008-01-01

    Germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF) is a transcription factor that can repress gene transcription and plays an important role during spermatogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a nuclear hormone receptor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily.It can activate the expression of many genes,including those involved in lipid metabolism.In this report,we showed that GCNF specifically interacts with PPARδ promoter.Overexpression of GCNF in African green monkey SV40 transformed kidney fibroblast COS7 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells represses the activity of PPARδ promoter.The mutation of GCNF response element in PPARδ promoter relieves the repression in NIH 3T3 cells and mouse testis.Moreover,we showed that GCNF in nuclear extracts of mouse testis is able to bind to PPARδ promoter directly.We also found that GCNF and PPARδ mRNA were expressed with different patterns in mouse testis by in situ hybridization.These results suggested that GCNF might be a negative regulator of PPARδ gene expression through its direct interaction with PPARδ promoter in mouse testis.

  16. Photoperiodic control of the floral transition through a distinct polycomb repressive complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Gu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Wenya; Schmitz, Robert J; He, Yuehui

    2014-03-31

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes such as PRC1 mediate transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the plant-specific EMBRYONIC FLOWER1 (EMF1), LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1, and a histone H3 lysine-4 demethylase form a distinct PcG complex, termed EMF1c, that plays PRC1-like roles and is crucial for regulation of the florigen gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis. Long-day photoperiods promote FT expression activation in leaf veins specifically at dusk through the photoperiod pathway to induce Arabidopsis flowering. We found that before dusk and at night, a vascular EMF1c directly represses FT expression to prevent photoperiod-independent flowering, whereas at dusk EMF1 binding to FT chromatin is disrupted by the photoperiod pathway, leading to proper FT activation. Furthermore, a MADS-domain transcription factor and potent floral repressor binds EMF1 to repress FT expression. Our study reveals that the vascular EMF1c integrates inputs from several flowering-regulatory pathways to synchronize flowering time to environmental cues.

  17. Carbon catabolite repression in Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsakraklides Vasiliki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The thermophilic anaerobe Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum is capable of directly fermenting xylan and the biomass-derived sugars glucose, cellobiose, xylose, mannose, galactose and arabinose. It has been metabolically engineered and developed as a biocatalyst for the production of ethanol. Results We report the initial characterization of the carbon catabolite repression system in this organism. We find that sugar metabolism in T. saccharolyticum is regulated by histidine-containing protein HPr. We describe a mutation in HPr, His15Asp, that leads to derepression of less-favored carbon source utilization. Conclusion Co-utilization of sugars can be achieved by mutation of HPr in T. saccharolyticum. Further manipulation of CCR in this organism will be instrumental in achieving complete and rapid conversion of all available sugars to ethanol.

  18. Kinetically-defined component actions in gene repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson C Chow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene repression by transcription factors, and glucocorticoid receptors (GR in particular, is a critical, but poorly understood, physiological response. Among the many unresolved questions is the difference between GR regulated induction and repression, and whether transcription cofactor action is the same in both. Because activity classifications based on changes in gene product level are mechanistically uninformative, we present a theory for gene repression in which the mechanisms of factor action are defined kinetically and are consistent for both gene repression and induction. The theory is generally applicable and amenable to predictions if the dose-response curve for gene repression is non-cooperative with a unit Hill coefficient, which is observed for GR-regulated repression of AP1LUC reporter induction by phorbol myristate acetate. The theory predicts the mechanism of GR and cofactors, and where they act with respect to each other, based on how each cofactor alters the plots of various kinetic parameters vs. cofactor. We show that the kinetically-defined mechanism of action of each of four factors (reporter gene, p160 coactivator TIF2, and two pharmaceuticals [NU6027 and phenanthroline] is the same in GR-regulated repression and induction. What differs is the position of GR action. This insight should simplify clinical efforts to differentially modulate factor actions in gene induction vs. gene repression.

  19. Polycomb complexes act redundantly to repress genomic repeats and genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeb, Martin; Pasini, Diego; Novatchkova, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Polycomb complexes establish chromatin modifications for maintaining gene repression and are essential for embryonic development in mice. Here we use pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells to demonstrate an unexpected redundancy between Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and PRC2 during the form...

  20. microRNAs-powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally. miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio- logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression. miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu- lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a new dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  1. ZBTB7A suppresses melanoma metastasis by transcriptionally repressing MCAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue-Song; Genet, Matthew D; Haines, Jenna E; Mehanna, Elie K; Wu, Shaowei; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Chen, Yidong; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali; Chen, Xiang; Fisher, David E; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    The excessive metastatic propensity of melanoma makes it the most deadly form of skin cancer, yet the underlying mechanism of metastasis remains elusive. Here, mining of cancer genome datasets discovered a frequent loss of chromosome 19p13.3 and associated down-regulation of the zinc finger transcription factor ZBTB7A in metastatic melanoma. Functional assessment of ZBTB7A-regulated genes identified MCAM, which encodes an adhesion protein key to melanoma metastasis. Using an integrated approach, it is demonstrated that ZBTB7A directly binds to the promoter and transcriptionally represses the expression of MCAM, establishing ZBTB7A as a bona fide transcriptional repressor of MCAM. Consistently, down-regulation of ZBTB7A results in marked upregulation of MCAM and enhanced melanoma cell invasion and metastasis. An inverse correlation of ZBTB7A and MCAM expression in association with melanoma metastasis is further validated with data from analysis of human melanoma specimens. Implications Together these results uncover a previously unrecognized role of ZBTB7A in negative regulation of melanoma metastasis and have important clinical implications. PMID:25995384

  2. microRNAs- powerful repression comes from small RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Cong; LIU YuFei; HE Lin

    2009-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) encode a novel class of small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression post-trancriptionally, miRNAs comprise one of the major non-coding RNA families, whose diverse bio-logical functions and unusual capacity for gene regulation have attracted enormous interests in the RNA world. Over the past 16 years, genetic, biochemical and computational approaches have greatly shaped the growth of the field, leading to the identification of thousands of miRNA genes in nearly all metazoans. The key molecular machinery for miRNA biogenesis and silencing has been identified, yet the precise biochemical and regulatory mechanisms still remain elusive. However, recent findings have shed new light on how miRNAs are generated and how they function to repress gene expression.miRNAs provide a paradigm for endogenous small RNAs that mediate gene silencing at a genome-wide level. The gene silencing mediated by these small RNAs constitutes a major component of gene regu-lation during various developmental and physiological processes. The accumulating knowledge about their biogenesis and gene silencing mechanism will add a now dimension to our understanding about the complex gene regulatory networks.

  3. Kinetic profiling of the c-Myc transcriptome and bioinformatic analysis of repressed gene promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Chui-Sun; Peterson, Abigail L; Castellani, Gastone

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian c-Myc is a member of a small family of three related proto-oncogenic transcription factors. c-Myc has an unusually broad array of regulatory functions, which include roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, a variety of metabolic functions, cell differentiation, senescence and stem cell maintenance. c-Myc modulates the expression of a very large number of genes, but the magnitude of the majority of the regulatory effects is only two-fold or less. c-Myc can both activate and repress the promoters of its target genes. Identification of genes directly regulated by c-Myc has been an enduring question in the field. We report here microarray expression profiling of a high resolution time course of c-Myc induction, using fibroblast cells in which c-Myc activity can be modulated from null to physiological. The c-Myc transcriptome data set presented is the largest reported to date with 4,186 differentially regulated genes (1,826 upregulated, 2,360 downregulated, 1% FDR). The gene expression patterns fit well with the known biological functions of c-Myc. We describe several novel findings and present tools for further data mining. Although the mechanisms of transcriptional activation by c-Myc are well understood, how c-Myc represses an even greater number of genes remains incompletely described. One mechanism involves the binding of c-Myc to other, positively acting transcription factors and interfering with their activities. We identified rapid-response genes likely to be direct c-Myc targets and analyzed the promoters of the repressed genes to identify transcription factors that could be targets of c-Myc repression. PMID:21623162

  4. Fate of the H-NS-repressed bgl operon in evolution of Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Sabari Sankar

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In the enterobacterial species Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica, expression of horizontally acquired genes with a higher than average AT content is repressed by the nucleoid-associated protein H-NS. A classical example of an H-NS-repressed locus is the bgl (aryl-beta,D-glucoside operon of E. coli. This locus is "cryptic," as no laboratory growth conditions are known to relieve repression of bgl by H-NS in E. coli K12. However, repression can be relieved by spontaneous mutations. Here, we investigated the phylogeny of the bgl operon. Typing of bgl in a representative collection of E. coli demonstrated that it evolved clonally and that it is present in strains of the phylogenetic groups A, B1, and B2, while it is presumably replaced by a cluster of ORFans in the phylogenetic group D. Interestingly, the bgl operon is mutated in 20% of the strains of phylogenetic groups A and B1, suggesting erosion of bgl in these groups. However, bgl is functional in almost all B2 isolates and, in approximately 50% of them, it is weakly expressed at laboratory growth conditions. Homologs of bgl genes exist in Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Erwinia species and also in low GC-content Gram-positive bacteria, while absent in E. albertii and Salmonella sp. This suggests horizontal transfer of bgl genes to an ancestral Enterobacterium. Conservation and weak expression of bgl in isolates of phylogenetic group B2 may indicate a functional role of bgl in extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  5. Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kavita; Liu, Wan-Ju; Thompson, Keyata; Anders, Lars; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Dewi, Ruby; Buckley, Stephanie; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Polster, Brian; Dorsey, Susan G; Sun, Yezhou; Sicinski, Piotr; Girnun, Geoffrey D

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain normal blood glucose during periods of nutrient deprivation. Gluconeogenesis is controlled at multiple levels by a variety of signal transduction and transcriptional pathways. However, dysregulation of these pathways leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. While the effects of various signaling pathways on gluconeogenesis are well established, the downstream signaling events repressing gluconeogenic gene expression are not as well understood. The cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in the liver, despite the liver being a quiescent tissue. The most well-studied function of cyclin D1 is activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), promoting progression of the cell cycle. We show here a novel role for cyclin D1 as a regulator of gluconeogenic and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) gene expression. In mice, fasting decreases liver cyclin D1 expression, while refeeding induces cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of CDK4 enhances the gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas cyclin D1-mediated activation of CDK4 represses the gluconeogenic gene-expression program in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we show that cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis and OxPhos in part via inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α) activity in a CDK4-dependent manner. Indeed, we demonstrate that PGC1α is novel cyclin D1/CDK4 substrate. These studies reveal a novel role for cyclin D1 on metabolism via PGC1α and reveal a potential link between cell-cycle regulation and metabolic control of glucose homeostasis.

  6. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia in

  7. GATA4 mediates gene repression in the mature mouse small intestine through interactions with friend of GATA (FOG) cofactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Beuling (Eva); T. Bosse (Tjalling); D.J. Kerk (Daniel); C.M. Piaseckyj (Christina); Y. Fujiwara (Yuko); S.G. Katz (Samuel); S.H. Orkin (Stuart); R.J. Grand (Richard); S.D. Krasinski (Stephen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractGATA4, a transcription factor expressed in the proximal small intestine but not in the distal ileum, maintains proximal-distal distinctions by multiple processes involving gene repression, gene activation, and cell fate determination. Friend of GATA (FOG) is an evolutionarily conserved f

  8. sRNA Antitoxins: More than One Way to Repress a Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial toxin-antitoxin loci consist of two genes: one encodes a potentially toxic protein, and the second, an antitoxin to repress its function or expression. The antitoxin can either be an RNA or a protein. For type I and type III loci, the antitoxins are RNAs; however, they have very different modes of action. Type I antitoxins repress toxin protein expression through interacting with the toxin mRNA, thereby targeting the mRNA for degradation or preventing its translation or both; type III antitoxins directly bind to the toxin protein, sequestering it. Along with these two very different modes of action for the antitoxin, there are differences in the functions of the toxin proteins and the mobility of these loci between species. Within this review, we discuss the major differences as to how the RNAs repress toxin activity, the potential consequences for utilizing different regulatory strategies, as well as the confirmed and potential biological roles for these loci across bacterial species.

  9. Repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Cheung, Ambrose

    2008-03-01

    The regulatory locus sae is a two-component system in Staphylococcus aureus that regulates many important virulence factors, including alpha-toxin (encoded by hla) at the transcriptional level. The SarA homologs Rot and SarT were previously shown to be repressors of hla in selected S. aureus backgrounds. To delineate the interaction of rot and sae and the contribution of sarT to hla expression, an assortment of rot and sae isogenic single mutants, a rot sae double mutant, and a rot sae sarT markerless triple mutant were constructed from wild-type strain COL. Using Northern blot analysis and transcriptional reporter gene green fluorescent protein, fusion, and phenotypic assays, we found that the repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae. A rot sae sarT triple mutant was not able to rescue the hla defect of the rot sae double mutant. Among the three sae promoters, the distal sae P3 promoter is the strongest in vitro. Interestingly, the sae P3 promoter activities correlate with hla expression in rot, rot sae, and rot sae sarT mutants of COL. Transcriptional study has also shown that rot repressed sae, especially at the sae P3 promoter. Collectively, our data implicated the importance of sae in the rot-mediated repression of hla in S. aureus.

  10. Quorum regulatory small RNAs repress type VI secretion in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2014-06-01

    Type VI secretion is critical for Vibrio cholerae to successfully combat phagocytic eukaryotes and to survive in the presence of competing bacterial species. V. cholerae type VI secretion system genes are encoded in one large and two small clusters. In V. cholerae, type VI secretion is controlled by quorum sensing, the cell-cell communication process that enables bacteria to orchestrate group behaviours. The quorum-sensing response regulator LuxO represses type VI secretion genes at low cell density and the quorum-sensing regulator HapR activates type VI secretion genes at high cell density. We demonstrate that the quorum regulatory small RNAs (Qrr sRNAs) that function between LuxO and HapR in the quorum-sensing cascade are required for these regulatory effects. The Qrr sRNAs control type VI secretion via two mechanisms: they repress expression of the large type VI secretion system cluster through base pairing and they repress HapR, the activator of the two small type VI secretion clusters. This regulatory arrangement ensures that the large cluster encoding many components of the secretory machine is expressed prior to the two small clusters that encode the secreted effectors. Qrr sRNA-dependent regulation of the type VI secretion system is conserved in pandemic and non-pandemic V. cholerae strains.

  11. MYC acts via the PTEN tumor suppressor to elicit autoregulation and genome-wide gene repression by activation of the Ezh2 methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The control of normal cell growth is a balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signals. MYC is a pleiotropic transcription factor that both activates and represses a broad range of target genes and is indispensable for cell growth. While much is known about gene activation by MYC, there is no established mechanism for the majority of MYC repressed genes. We report that MYC transcriptionally activates the PTEN tumor suppressor in normal cells to inactivate the PI3K pathway, thus suppressing AKT activation. Suppression of AKT enhances the activity of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase, a subunit of the epigenetic repressor Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), while simultaneously stabilizing the protein. MYC mediated enhancement in EZH2 protein level and activity results in local and genome-wide elevation in the repressive H3K27me3 histone modification, leading to widespread gene repression including feedback autoregulation of the MYC gene itself. Depletion of either PTEN or EZH2 and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway leads to gene derepression. Importantly, expression of a phospho-defective EZH2 mutant is sufficient to recapitulate nearly half of all MYC-mediated gene repression. We present a novel epigenetic model for MYC-mediated gene repression and propose that PTEN and MYC exist in homeostatic balance to control normal growth which is disrupted in cancer cells. PMID:23135913

  12. MicroRNA-22 promotes cell survival upon UV radiation by repressing PTEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Guangyun [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Jilin Province Key Laboratory of Animal Embryo Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Shi, Yuling [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Wu, Zhao-Hui, E-mail: zwu6@uthsc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States); Center for Adult Cancer Research, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 is induced in cells treated with UV radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATM is required for miR-22 induction in response to UV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-22 targets 3 Prime -UTR of PTEN to repress its expression in UV-treated cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulated miR-22 inhibits apoptosis in cells exposed to UV. -- Abstract: DNA damage response upon UV radiation involves a complex network of cellular events required for maintaining the homeostasis and restoring genomic stability of the cells. As a new class of players involved in DNA damage response, the regulation and function of microRNAs in response to UV remain poorly understood. Here we show that UV radiation induces a significant increase of miR-22 expression, which appears to be dependent on the activation of DNA damage responding kinase ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated). Increased miR-22 expression may result from enhanced miR-22 maturation in cells exposed to UV. We further found that tumor suppressor gene phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) expression was inversely correlated with miR-22 induction and UV-induced PTEN repression was attenuated by overexpression of a miR-22 inhibitor. Moreover, increased miR-22 expression significantly inhibited the activation of caspase signaling cascade, leading to enhanced cell survival upon UV radiation. Collectively, these results indicate that miR-22 is an important player in the cellular stress response upon UV radiation, which may promote cell survival via the repression of PTEN expression.

  13. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andreas; Wende, Sandra; Mörl, Mario; Pan, Tao; Ignatova, Zoya

    2013-08-01

    Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA). An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP):tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  14. Reversible and rapid transfer-RNA deactivation as a mechanism of translational repression in stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Czech

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced changes of gene expression are crucial for survival of eukaryotic cells. Regulation at the level of translation provides the necessary plasticity for immediate changes of cellular activities and protein levels. In this study, we demonstrate that exposure to oxidative stress results in a quick repression of translation by deactivation of the aminoacyl-ends of all transfer-RNA (tRNA. An oxidative-stress activated nuclease, angiogenin, cleaves first within the conserved single-stranded 3'-CCA termini of all tRNAs, thereby blocking their use in translation. This CCA deactivation is reversible and quickly repairable by the CCA-adding enzyme [ATP(CTP:tRNA nucleotidyltransferase]. Through this mechanism the eukaryotic cell dynamically represses and reactivates translation at low metabolic costs.

  15. Gfi1 and gfi1b repress rag transcription in plasmacytoid dendritic cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan T Chow

    Full Text Available Growth factor independence genes (Gfi1 and Gfi1b repress recombination activating genes (Rag transcription in developing B lymphocytes. Because all blood lineages originate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs and different lineage progenitors have been shown to share transcription factor networks prior to cell fate commitment, we hypothesized that GFI family proteins may also play a role in repressing Rag transcription or a global lymphoid transcriptional program in other blood lineages. We tested the level of Rag transcription in various blood cells when Gfi1 and Gfi1b were deleted, and observed an upregulation of Rag expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Using microarray analysis, we observed that Gfi1 and Gfi1b do not regulate a lymphoid or pDC-specific transcriptional program. This study establishes a role for Gfi1 and Gfi1b in Rag regulation in a non-B lineage cell type.

  16. Polycomb repressive complex 2 regulates MiR-200b in retinal endothelial cells: potential relevance in diabetic retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Anthony Ruiz

    Full Text Available Glucose-induced augmented vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF production is a key event in diabetic retinopathy. We have previously demonstrated that downregulation of miR-200b increases VEGF, mediating structural and functional changes in the retina in diabetes. However, mechanisms regulating miR-200b in diabetes are not known. Histone methyltransferase complex, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2, has been shown to repress miRNAs in neoplastic process. We hypothesized that, in diabetes, PRC2 represses miR-200b through its histone H3 lysine-27 trimethylation mark. We show that human retinal microvascular endothelial cells exposed to high levels of glucose regulate miR-200b repression through histone methylation and that inhibition of PRC2 increases miR-200b while reducing VEGF. Furthermore, retinal tissue from animal models of diabetes showed increased expression of major PRC2 components, demonstrating in vivo relevance. This research established a repressive relationship between PRC2 and miR-200b, providing evidence of a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation through histone methylation.

  17. The Transcriptional Repressive Activity of KRAB Zinc Finger Proteins Does Not Correlate with Their Ability to Recruit TRIM28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kristin E.; Shylo, Natalia A.; Alexander, Katherine A.; Churchill, Angela J.; Copperman, Cecilia; García-García, María J.

    2016-01-01

    KRAB domain Zinc finger proteins are one of the most abundant families of transcriptional regulators in higher vertebrates. The prevailing view is that KRAB domain proteins function as potent transcriptional repressors by recruiting TRIM28 and promoting heterochromatin spreading. However, the extent to which all KRAB domain proteins are TRIM28-dependent transcriptional repressors is currently unclear. Our studies on mouse ZFP568 revealed that TRIM28 recruitment by KRAB domain proteins is not sufficient to warrant transcriptional repressive activity. By using luciferase reporter assays and yeast two-hybrid experiments, we tested the ability of ZFP568 and other mouse KRAB domain proteins to repress transcription and bind TRIM28. We found that some mouse KRAB domain proteins are poor transcriptional repressors despite their ability to recruit TRIM28, while others showed strong KRAB-dependent transcriptional repression, but no TRIM28 binding. Together, our results show that the transcriptional repressive activity of KRAB-ZNF proteins does not correlate with their ability to recruit TRIM28, and provide evidence that KRAB domains can regulate transcription in a TRIM28-independent fashion. Our findings challenge the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by KRAB domain proteins to control gene expression and highlight that a high percentage of KRAB domain proteins in the mouse genome differ from the consensus KRAB sequence at amino acid residues that are critical for TRIM28 binding and/or repressive activity. PMID:27658112

  18. Norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in rodent hearts by activating Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fuxia; Xiao, Daliao; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-07-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Recent studies demonstrate that fetal programming of PKCε gene repression results in ischemia-sensitive phenotype in the heart. The present study tests the hypothesis that increased norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart via Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Prolonged norepinephrine treatment increased ROS production in fetal rat hearts and embryonic ventricular myocyte H9c2 cells via a selective increase in Nox1 expression. Norepinephrine-induced ROS resulted in an increase in PKCε promoter methylation at Egr-1 and Sp-1 binding sites, leading to PKCε gene repression. N-acetylcysteine, diphenyleneiodonium, and apocynin blocked norepinephrine-induced ROS production and the promoter methylation, and also restored PKCε mRNA and protein to control levels in vivo in fetal hearts and in vitro in embryonic myocyte cells. Accordingly, norepinephrine-induced ROS production, promoter methylation, and PKCε gene repression were completely abrogated by knockdown of Nox1 in cardiomyocytes. These findings provide evidence of a novel interaction between elevated norepinephrine and epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart mediated by Nox1-dependent oxidative stress and suggest new insights of molecular mechanisms linking the heightened sympathetic activity to aberrant cardioprotection and increased ischemic vulnerability in the heart.

  19. The B-type lamin is required for somatic repression of testis-specific gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelyov, Y. Y.; Lavrov, S. A.; Mikhaylova, L. M.; Nurminsky, I. D.; Kulathinal, R. J.; Egorova, K. S.; Rozovsky, Y. M.; Nurminsky, D. I.

    2009-01-01

    Large clusters of coexpressed tissue-specific genes are abundant on chromosomes of diverse species. The genes coordinately misexpressed in diverse diseases are also found in similar clusters, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate expression of large multigenic regions both in normal development and in its pathological disruptions. Studies on individual loci suggest that silent clusters of coregulated genes are embedded in repressed chromatin domains, often localized to the nuclear periphery. To test this model at the genome-wide scale, we studied transcriptional regulation of large testis-specific gene clusters in somatic tissues of Drosophila. These gene clusters showed a drastic paucity of known expressed transgene insertions, indicating that they indeed are embedded in repressed chromatin. Bioinformatics analysis suggested the major role for the B-type lamin, LamDmo, in repression of large testis-specific gene clusters, showing that in somatic cells as many as three-quarters of these clusters interact with LamDmo. Ablation of LamDmo by using mutants and RNAi led to detachment of testis-specific clusters from nuclear envelope and to their selective transcriptional up-regulation in somatic cells, thus providing the first direct evidence for involvement of the B-type lamin in tissue-specific gene repression. Finally, we found that transcriptional activation of the lamina-bound testis-specific gene cluster in male germ line is coupled with its translocation away from the nuclear envelope. Our studies, which directly link nuclear architecture with coordinated regulation of tissue-specific genes, advance understanding of the mechanisms underlying both normal cell differentiation and developmental disorders caused by lesions in the B-type lamins and interacting proteins. PMID:19218438

  20. Age-associated de-repression of retrotransposons in the Drosophila fat body, its potential cause and consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyang; Zheng, Xiaobin; Xiao, Danqing; Zheng, Yixian

    2016-06-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain transposable elements (TE) that can move into new locations upon activation. Since uncontrolled transposition of TEs, including the retrotransposons and DNA transposons, can lead to DNA breaks and genomic instability, multiple mechanisms, including heterochromatin-mediated repression, have evolved to repress TE activation. Studies in model organisms have shown that TEs become activated upon aging as a result of age-associated deregulation of heterochromatin. Considering that different organisms or cell types may undergo distinct heterochromatin changes upon aging, it is important to identify pathways that lead to TE activation in specific tissues and cell types. Through deep sequencing of isolated RNAs, we report an increased expression of many retrotransposons in the old Drosophila fat body, an organ equivalent to the mammalian liver and adipose tissue. This de-repression correlates with an increased number of DNA damage foci and decreased level of Drosophila lamin-B in the old fat body cells. Depletion of the Drosophila lamin-B in the young or larval fat body results in a reduction of heterochromatin and a corresponding increase in retrotransposon expression and DNA damage. Further manipulations of lamin-B and retrotransposon expression suggest a role of the nuclear lamina in maintaining the genome integrity of the Drosophila fat body by repressing retrotransposons.

  1. Nuclear receptors in inflammation control: repression by GR and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinenov, Yurii; Gupte, Rebecca; Rogatsky, Inez

    2013-11-05

    Inflammation is a protective response of organisms to pathogens, irritation or injury. Primary inflammatory sensors activate an array of signaling pathways that ultimately converge upon a few transcription factors such as AP1, NFκB and STATs that in turn stimulate expression of inflammatory genes to ultimately eradicate infection and repair the damage. A disturbed balance between activation and inhibition of inflammatory pathways can set the stage for chronic inflammation which is increasingly recognized as a key pathogenic component of autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large family of transcription factors many of which are known for their potent anti-inflammatory actions. Activated by small lipophilic ligands, NRs interact with a wide range of transcription factors, cofactors and chromatin-modifying enzymes, assembling numerous cell- and tissue-specific DNA-protein transcriptional regulatory complexes with diverse activities. Here we discuss established and emerging roles and mechanisms by which NRs and, in particular, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) repress genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators.

  2. Multiple repressive mechanisms in the hippocampus during memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun; Yu, Nam-Kyung; Choi, Jun-Hyeok; Sim, Su-Eon; Kang, SukJae Joshua; Kwak, Chuljung; Lee, Seung-Woo; Kim, Ji-il; Choi, Dong Il; Kim, V Narry; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-10-02

    Memory stabilization after learning requires translational and transcriptional regulations in the brain, yet the temporal molecular changes that occur after learning have not been explored at the genomic scale. We used ribosome profiling and RNA sequencing to quantify the translational status and transcript levels in the mouse hippocampus after contextual fear conditioning. We revealed three types of repressive regulations: translational suppression of ribosomal protein-coding genes in the hippocampus, learning-induced early translational repression of specific genes, and late persistent suppression of a subset of genes via inhibition of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1/ERα) signaling. In behavioral analyses, overexpressing Nrsn1, one of the newly identified genes undergoing rapid translational repression, or activating ESR1 in the hippocampus impaired memory formation. Collectively, this study unveils the yet-unappreciated importance of gene repression mechanisms for memory formation. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Organic acid mediated repression of sugar utilization in rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Bhagya; Rajput, Mahendrapal Singh; Jog, Rahul; Joshi, Ekta; Bharwad, Krishna; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2016-11-01

    Rhizobia are a class of symbiotic diazotrophic bacteria which utilize C4 acids in preference to sugars and the sugar utilization is repressed as long as C4 acids are present. This can be manifested as a diauxie when rhizobia are grown in the presence of a sugar and a C4 acid together. Succinate, a C4 acid is known to repress utilization of sugars, sugar alcohols, hydrocarbons, etc by a mechanism termed as Succinate Mediated Catabolite Repression (SMCR). Mechanism of catabolite repression determines the hierarchy of carbon source utilization in bacteria. Though the mechanism of catabolite repression has been well studied in model organisms like E. coli, B. subtilis and Pseudomonas sp., mechanism of SMCR in rhizobia has not been well elucidated. C4 acid uptake is important for effective symbioses while mutation in the sugar transport and utilization genes does not affect symbioses. Deletion of hpr and sma0113 resulted in the partial relief of SMCR of utilization of galactosides like lactose, raffinose and maltose in the presence of succinate. However, no such regulators governing SMCR of glucoside utilization have been identified till date. Though rhizobia can utilize multitude of sugars, high affinity transporters for many sugars are yet to be identified. Identifying high affinity sugar transporters and studying the mechanism of catabolite repression in rhizobia is important to understand the level of regulation of SMCR and the key regulators involved in SMCR.

  4. Generation of a glucose de-repressed mutant of Trichoderma reesei using disparity mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakuma, Hidekazu; Koyama, Yoshiyuki; Miyachi, Ayako; Nasukawa, Masashi; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Yano, Shuntaro; Ogihara, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    We obtained a novel glucose de-repressed mutant of Trichoderma reesei using disparity mutagenesis. A plasmid containing DNA polymerase δ lacking proofreading activity, and AMAI, an autonomously replicating sequence was introduced into T. reesei ATCC66589. The rate of mutation evaluated with 5-fluoroorotic acid resistance was approximately 30-fold higher than that obtained by UV irradiation. The transformants harboring incompetent DNA polymerase δ were then selected on 2-deoxyglucose agar plates with hygromycin B. The pNP-lactoside hydrolyzing activities of mutants were 2 to 5-fold higher than the parent in liquid medium containing glucose. Notably, the amino acid sequence of cre1, a key gene involved in glucose repression, was identical in the mutant and parent strains, and further, the cre1 expression levels was not abolished in the mutant. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the strains of T. reesei generated by disparity mutagenesis are glucose de-repressed variants that contain mutations in yet-unidentified factors other than cre1.

  5. Coordinated regulation of transcriptional repression by the RBP2 H3K4 demethylase and Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Hansen, Klaus H; Christensen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate important cellular processes such as embryogenesis, cell proliferation, and stem cell self-renewal through the transcriptional repression of genes determining cell fate decisions. The Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is highly conserved during evolution......, and its intrinsic histone H3 Lys 27 (K27) trimethylation (me3) activity is essential for PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. Here, we show a functional interplay between the PRC2 complex and the H3K4me3 demethylase Rbp2 (Jarid1a) in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. By genome-wide location analysis we...... found that Rbp2 is associated with a large number of PcG target genes in mouse ES cells. We show that the PRC2 complex recruits Rbp2 to its target genes, and that this interaction is required for PRC2-mediated repressive activity during ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate...

  6. BRCA1 and c-Myc associate to transcriptionally repress psoriasin, a DNA damage-inducible gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard D; Gorski, Julia J; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; James, Colin R; Moore, Stephen; Mulligan, Karl; Emberley, Ethan D; Lioe, Tong F; Morrison, Patrick J; Mullan, Paul B; Reid, George; Johnston, Patrick G; Watson, Peter H; Harkin, D Paul

    2005-11-15

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that some of the diverse functions associated with BRCA1 may relate to its ability to transcriptionally regulate key downstream target genes. Here, we identify S100A7 (psoriasin), S100A8, and S100A9, members of the S100A family of calcium-binding proteins, as novel BRCA1-repressed targets. We show that functional BRCA1 is required for repression of these family members and that a BRCA1 disease-associated mutation abrogates BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin. Furthermore, we show that BRCA1 and c-Myc form a complex on the psoriasin promoter and that BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin is dependent on functional c-Myc. Finally, we show that psoriasin expression is induced by the topoisomerase IIalpha poison, etoposide, in the absence of functional BRCA1 and increased psoriasin expression enhances cellular sensitivity to this chemotherapeutic agent. Therefore, we identified a novel transcriptional mechanism that is likely to contribute to BRCA1-mediated resistance to etoposide.

  7. Direct Repression of Evening Genes by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamioka, Mari; Takao, Saori; Suzuki, Takamasa; Taki, Kyomi; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Nakamichi, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a biological timekeeping system that provides organisms with the ability to adapt to day-night cycles. Timing of the expression of four members of the Arabidopsis thaliana PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) family is crucial for proper clock function, and transcriptional control of PRRs remains incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate that direct regulation of PRR5 by CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) determines the repression state of PRR5 in the morning. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) analyses indicated that CCA1 associates with three separate regions upstream of PRR5. CCA1 and its homolog LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) suppressed PRR5 promoter activity in a transient assay. The regions bound by CCA1 in the PRR5 promoter gave rhythmic patterns with troughs in the morning, when CCA1 and LHY are at high levels. Furthermore, ChIP-seq revealed that CCA1 associates with at least 449 loci with 863 adjacent genes. Importantly, this gene set contains genes that are repressed but upregulated in cca1 lhy double mutants in the morning. This study shows that direct binding by CCA1 in the morning provides strong repression of PRR5, and repression by CCA1 also temporally regulates an evening-expressed gene set that includes PRR5. PMID:26941090

  8. Multi-Faceted Characterization of a Novel LuxR-Repressible Promoter Library for Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Zucca

    Full Text Available The genetic elements regulating the natural quorum sensing (QS networks of several microorganisms are widely used in synthetic biology to control the behaviour of single cells and engineered bacterial populations via ad-hoc constructed synthetic circuits. A number of novel engineering-inspired biological functions have been implemented and model systems have also been constructed to improve the knowledge on natural QS systems. Synthetic QS-based parts, such as promoters, have been reported in literature, to provide biological components with functions that are not present in nature, like modified induction logic or activation/repression by additional molecules. In this work, a library of promoters that can be repressed by the LuxR protein in presence of the QS autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL was reported for Escherichia coli, to expand the toolkit of genetic parts that can be used to engineer novel synthetic QS-based systems. The library was constructed via polymerase chain reaction with highly constrained degenerate oligonucleotides, designed according to the consensus -35 and -10 sequences of a previously reported constitutive promoter library of graded strength, to maximize the probability of obtaining functional clones. All the promoters have a lux box between the -35 and -10 regions, to implement a LuxR-repressible behaviour. Twelve unique library members of graded strength (about 100-fold activity range were selected to form the final library and they were characterized in several genetic contexts, such as in different plasmids, via different reporter genes, in presence of a LuxR expression cassette in different positions and in response to different AHL concentrations. The new obtained regulatory parts and corresponding data can be exploited by synthetic biologists to implement an artificial AHL-dependent repression of transcription in genetic circuits. The target transcriptional activity can be selected among the

  9. Translational repression determines a neuronal potential in Drosophila asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, M; Imai, T; Kurusu, M; Hiromi, Y; Okano, H

    2001-05-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental strategy for generating cellular diversity during animal development. Daughter cells manifest asymmetry in their differential gene expression. Transcriptional regulation of this process has been the focus of many studies, whereas cell-type-specific 'translational' regulation has been considered to have a more minor role. During sensory organ development in Drosophila, Notch signalling directs the asymmetry between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, and a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 (TTK69) acts downstream of Notch as a determinant of non-neuronal identity. Here we show that repression of TTK69 protein expression in the neuronal lineage occurs translationally rather than transcriptionally. This translational repression is achieved by a direct interaction between cis-acting sequences in the 3' untranslated region of ttk69 messenger RNA and its trans-acting repressor, the RNA-binding protein Musashi (MSI). Although msi can act downstream of Notch, Notch signalling does not affect MSI expression. Thus, Notch signalling is likely to regulate MSI activity rather than its expression. Our results define cell-type-specific translational control of ttk69 by MSI as a downstream event of Notch signalling in asymmetric cell division.

  10. Nitric oxide inhibits larval settlement in Amphibalanus amphitrite cyprids by repressing muscle locomotion and molting

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Gen

    2015-08-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a universal signaling molecule and plays a negative role in the metamorphosis of many biphasic organisms. Recently, the NO/NO (cyclic guanosine monophosphate) signaling pathway was reported to repress larval settlement in the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite. To understand the underlying molecular mechanism, we analyzed changes in the proteome of A. amphitrite cyprids in response to different concentrations of the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 62.5, 250 and 1000 μM) using a label-free proteomics method. Compared with the control, the expression of 106 proteins differed in all three treatments. These differentially expressed proteins were assigned to 13 pathways based on KEGG pathway enrichment analysis. SNP treatment stimulated the expression of heat shock proteins and arginine kinase, which are functionally related to NO synthases, increased the expression levels of glutathione transferases for detoxification, and activated the iron-mediated fatty acid degradation pathway and the citrate cycle through ferritin. Moreover, NO repressed the level of myosins and cuticular proteins, which indicated that NO might inhibit larval settlement in A. amphitrite by modulating the process of muscle locomotion and molting.

  11. Epigenetics and depression: return of the repressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Victoria S; Kolshus, Erik; McLoughlin, Declan M

    2014-02-01

    Epigenetics has recently emerged as a potential mechanism by which adverse environmental stimuli can result in persistent changes in gene expression. Epigenetic mechanisms function alongside the DNA sequence to modulate gene expression and ultimately influence protein production. The current review provides an introduction and overview of epigenetics with a particular focus on preclinical and clinical studies relevant to major depressive disorder (MDD). PubMed and Web of Science databases were interrogated from January 1995 up to December 2012 using combinations of search terms, including "epigenetic", "microRNA" and "DNA methylation" cross referenced with "depression", "early life stress" and "antidepressant". There is an association between adverse environmental stimuli, such as early life stress, and epigenetic modification of gene expression. Epigenetic changes have been reported in humans with MDD and may serve as biomarkers to improve diagnosis. Antidepressant treatments appear to reverse or initiate compensatory epigenetic alterations that may be relevant to their mechanism of action. As a narrative review, the current report was interpretive and qualitative in nature. Epigenetic modification of gene expression provides a mechanism for understanding the link between long-term effects of adverse life events and the changes in gene expression that are associated with depression. Although still a developing field, in the future, epigenetic modifications of gene expression may provide novel biomarkers to predict future susceptibility and/or onset of MDD, improve diagnosis, and aid in the development of epigenetics-based therapies for depression. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Repression of androgen receptor transcription through the E2F1/DNMT1 axis.

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    Conrad David Valdez

    Full Text Available Although androgen receptor (AR function has been extensively studied, regulation of the AR gene itself has been much less characterized. In this study, we observed a dramatic reduction in the expression of androgen receptor mRNA and protein in hyperproliferative prostate epithelium of keratin 5 promoter driven E2F1 transgenic mice. To confirm an inhibitory function for E2F1 on AR transcription, we showed that E2F1 inhibited the transcription of endogenous AR mRNA, subsequent AR protein, and AR promoter activity in both human and mouse epithelial cells. E2F1 also inhibited androgen-stimulated activation of two AR target gene promoters. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of E2F-mediated inhibition of AR, we evaluated the effects of two functional E2F1 mutants on AR promoter activity and found that the transactivation domain appears to mediate E2F1 repression of the AR promoter. Because DNMT1 is a functional intermediate of E2F1 we examined DNMT1 function in AR repression. Repression of endogenous AR in normal human prostate epithelial cells was relieved by DNMT1 shRNA knock down. DNMT1 was shown to be physically associated within the AR minimal promoter located 22 bps from the transcription start site; however, methylation remained unchanged at the promoter regardless of DNMT1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that DNMT1 operates either as a functional intermediary or in cooperation with E2F1 inhibiting AR gene expression in a methylation independent manner.

  13. Different levels of catabolite repression optimize growth in stable and variable environments.

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    Aaron M New

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms respond to environmental changes by adapting the expression of key genes. However, such transcriptional reprogramming requires time and energy, and may also leave the organism ill-adapted when the original environment returns. Here, we study the dynamics of transcriptional reprogramming and fitness in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to changing carbon environments. Population and single-cell analyses reveal that some wild yeast strains rapidly and uniformly adapt gene expression and growth to changing carbon sources, whereas other strains respond more slowly, resulting in long periods of slow growth (the so-called "lag phase" and large differences between individual cells within the population. We exploit this natural heterogeneity to evolve a set of mutants that demonstrate how the frequency and duration of changes in carbon source can favor different carbon catabolite repression strategies. At one end of this spectrum are "specialist" strategies that display high rates of growth in stable environments, with more stringent catabolite repression and slower transcriptional reprogramming. The other mutants display less stringent catabolite repression, resulting in leaky expression of genes that are not required for growth in glucose. This "generalist" strategy reduces fitness in glucose, but allows faster transcriptional reprogramming and shorter lag phases when the cells need to shift to alternative carbon sources. Whole-genome sequencing of these mutants reveals that mutations in key regulatory genes such as HXK2 and STD1 adjust the regulation and transcriptional noise of metabolic genes, with some mutations leading to alternative gene regulatory strategies that allow "stochastic sensing" of the environment. Together, our study unmasks how variable and stable environments favor distinct strategies of transcriptional reprogramming and growth.

  14. Repression of telomere-associated genes by microglia activation in neuropsychiatric disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Uhlemann, Ria; Schöner, Johanna; Wegner, Stephanie; Boujon, Valérie; Deigendesch, Nikolas; Endres, Matthias; Gertz, Karen

    2016-11-28

    Microglia senescence may promote neuropsychiatric disease. This prompted us to examine the relationship between microglia activation states and telomere biology. A panel of candidate genes associated with telomere maintenance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and cell-cycle regulation were investigated in M1- and M2-polarized microglia in vitro as well as in MACS-purified CD11b+ microglia/brain macrophages from models of stroke, Alzheimer's disease, and chronic stress. M1 polarization, ischemia, and Alzheimer pathology elicited a strikingly similar transcriptomic profile with, in particular, reduced expression of murine Tert. Our results link classical microglia activation with repression of telomere-associated genes, suggesting a new mechanism underlying microglia dysfunction.

  15. Percept-genetic signs of repression in histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, I A; Saya, A; Pezzarossa, B

    1992-04-01

    Several types of perceptual distortions of two anxiety-arousing visual stimuli are coded as repression in the Defense Mechanism Test, a tachistoscopic, percept-genetic technique. Given the well-established correspondence between hysteria and repression, the study included a clinical validation of these variants of repression against the diagnosis of histrionic personality disorder. 41 subjects with evidence of this disorder on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II were compared with 41 nonhistrionic controls. Significantly more histrionics were coded for the type of repression in which the threatening figure is transformed into a harmless object (code 1:42), while animal- and statue-repressions, when combined (codes 1:1 and 1:2), were significantly more characteristic of the nonhistrionic group. As an unpredicted finding, significantly more histrionic subjects employed defensive strategies, currently coded as reaction formations (code 4:). Histrionic subjects without concomitant compulsive features were coded more frequently for introaggression (code 6:) compared both with nonhistrionic controls and with histrionic-compulsive subjects. The findings are discussed within the context of the available percept-genetic literature. It is suggested that the Defense Mechanism Test may be further employed to objectify and investigate the defense mechanisms of the DSM-III-R disorders.

  16. Ethical issues in the search for repressed memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merskey, H

    1996-01-01

    Currently, concepts of repression and dissociation are in flux. It has been pointed out that there is no scientific evidence for the occurrence of repression and that the whole notion is anecdotal. Dissociation, which is offered as an alternative to repression, cannot logically be held to operate without a motive force, as Freud argued, or a weakness of the organism, as Janet proposed. The concepts have been applied particularly to the idea that early childhood experience could be repressed but recovered many years later. This claim is at variance with established knowledge concerning human memory. Practices of subtle and overt suggestion, employed in recovered-memory treatments, give rise to a false-memory syndrome in which individuals, who have undergone various levels of suggestion, accuse their parents and others of childhood sexual abuse. The common phenomenon of childhood sexual abuse is contaminated by many cases that may be regarded on strong grounds as being false and have been retracted in more than 1,000 instances. Repressed-memory (RM) treatment is also at variance with traditional psychotherapy, which does not encourage confrontation on the basis of uncorroborated information; moreover, many cases of RM therapy seem to result in deterioration. Unlike traditional psychotherapy, some RM practitioners strongly encourage patients to hate individuals in their family circle. The consequences of these developments, the need for informed consent, and the development of legislative initiatives to challenge RM therapy are noted. The impact of these therapies and proposed legislation upon regular psychotherapy and psychiatry is outlined.

  17. YY1 restrained cell senescence through repressing the transcription of p16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuli; Feng, Yunpeng; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yuli; Zhang, Yu; Su, Dongmei; Ren, Guoling; Lu, Jun; Huang, Baiqu

    2008-10-01

    The transcription factor YY1 has been implicated to play a role in cell growth control. In this report, we demonstrate that YY1 was able to suppress NCI-H460 cell senescence through regulating the expression of p16(INK4a), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. We also show that YY1 participated in the repression of p16(INK4a) expression in 293T cells through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone acetylation modification. Specifically, HDAC3 and HDAC4 inhibited the p16(INK4a) promoter activity. The chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays verified that HDAC3 and HDAC4 were recruited to p16(INK4a) promoter by YY1. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed that these three protein factors formed a complex. Furthermore, knockdown of these factors induced cell enlargement and flattened morphology and significantly increased the SA-beta-gal activity, a biochemical marker of cell senescence. Overall, data from this study suggest that YY1, HDAC3 and HDAC4 restrained cell senescence by repressing p16(INK4a) expression through an epigenetic modification of histones.

  18. MTF-1-mediated repression of the zinc transporter Zip10 is alleviated by zinc restriction.

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    Louis A Lichten

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular zinc uptake is a key process in the overall mechanism governing mammalian zinc homeostasis and how zinc participates in cellular functions. We analyzed the zinc transporters of the Zip family in both the brain and liver of zinc-deficient animals and found a large, significant increase in Zip10 expression. Additionally, Zip10 expression decreased in response to zinc repletion. Moreover, isolated mouse hepatocytes, AML12 hepatocytes, and Neuro 2A cells also respond differentially to zinc availability in vitro. Measurement of Zip10 hnRNA and actinomycin D inhibition studies indicate that Zip10 was transcriptionally regulated by zinc deficiency. Through luciferase promoter constructs and ChIP analysis, binding of MTF-1 to a metal response element located 17 bp downstream of the transcription start site was shown to be necessary for zinc-induced repression of Zip10. Furthermore, zinc-activated MTF-1 causes down-regulation of Zip10 transcription by physically blocking Pol II movement through the gene. Lastly, ZIP10 is localized to the plasma membrane of hepatocytes and neuro 2A cells. Collectively, these results reveal a novel repressive role for MTF-1 in the regulation of the Zip10 zinc transporter expression by pausing Pol II transcription. ZIP10 may have roles in control of zinc homeostasis in specific sites particularly those of the brain and liver. Within that context ZIP10 may act as an important survival mechanism during periods of zinc inadequacy.

  19. Sox9 transcriptionally represses Spp1 to prevent matrix mineralization in maturing heart valves and chondrocytes.

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    Jacqueline D Peacock

    Full Text Available Sox9 is an SRY-related transcription factor required for expression of cartilaginous genes in the developing skeletal system and heart valve structures. In contrast to positively regulating cartilaginous matrix, Sox9 also negatively regulates matrix mineralization associated with bone formation. While the transcriptional activation of Sox9 target genes during chondrogenesis has been characterized, the mechanisms by which Sox9 represses osteogenic processes are not so clear. Using ChIP-on-chip and luciferase assays we show that Sox9 binds and represses transactivation of the osteogenic glycoprotein Spp1. In addition, Sox9 knockdown in post natal mouse heart valve explants and rib chondrocyte cultures promotes Spp1 expression and matrix mineralization, while attenuating expression of cartilage genes Type II Collagen and Cartilage Link Protein. Further, we show that Spp1 is required for matrix mineralization induced by Sox9 knockdown. These studies provide insights into the molecular mechanisms by which Sox9 prevents pathologic matrix mineralization in tissues that must remain cartilaginous.

  20. Proto-oncogene PBF/PTTG1IP regulates thyroid cell growth and represses radioiodide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Martin L; Lewy, Greg D; Fong, Jim C W; Sharma, Neil; Seed, Robert I; Smith, Vicki E; Gentilin, Erica; Warfield, Adrian; Eggo, Margaret C; Knauf, Jeffrey A; Leadbeater, Wendy E; Watkinson, John C; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2011-10-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG)-binding factor (PBF or PTTG1IP) is a little characterized proto-oncogene that has been implicated in the etiology of breast and thyroid tumors. In this study, we created a murine transgenic model to target PBF expression to the thyroid gland (PBF-Tg mice) and found that these mice exhibited normal thyroid function, but a striking enlargement of the thyroid gland associated with hyperplastic and macrofollicular lesions. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), a gene essential to the radioiodine ablation of thyroid hyperplasia, neoplasia, and metastasis, was also potently inhibited in PBF-Tg mice. Critically, iodide uptake was repressed in primary thyroid cultures from PBF-Tg mice, which could be rescued by PBF depletion. PBF-Tg thyroids exhibited upregulation of Akt and the TSH receptor (TSHR), each known regulators of thyrocyte proliferation, along with upregulation of the downstream proliferative marker cyclin D1. We extended and confirmed findings from the mouse model by examining PBF expression in human multinodular goiters (MNG), a hyperproliferative thyroid disorder, where PBF and TSHR was strongly upregulated relative to normal thyroid tissue. Furthermore, we showed that depleting PBF in human primary thyrocytes was sufficient to increase radioiodine uptake. Together, our findings indicate that overexpression of PBF causes thyroid cell proliferation, macrofollicular lesions, and hyperplasia, as well as repression of the critical therapeutic route for radioiodide uptake.

  1. Proto-oncogene PBF/PTTG1IP regulates thyroid cell growth and represses radioiodide treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Martin L.; Lewy, Greg D.; Fong, Jim C.W.; Sharma, Neil; Seed, Robert I.; Smith, Vicki E.; Gentilin, Erica; Warfield, Adrian; Eggo, Margaret C.; Knauf, Jeffrey A.; Leadbeater, Wendy E.; Watkinson, John C.; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    PTTG Binding Factor (PBF or PTTG1IP) is a little characterised proto-oncogene that has been implicated in the etiology of breast and thyroid tumors. In this study, we created a murine transgenic model to target PBF expression to the thyroid gland (PBF-Tg mice) and found that these mice exhibited normal thyroid function but a striking enlargement of the thyroid gland associated with hyperplastic and macrofollicular lesions. Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS), a gene essential to the radioiodine ablation of thyroid hyperplasia, neoplasia and metastasis, was also potently inhibited in PBF-Tg mice. Critically, iodide uptake was repressed in primary thyroid cultures from PBF-Tg mice, which could be rescued by PBF depletion. PBF-Tg thyroids exhibited upregulation of Akt and the TSH receptor (TSHR), each known regulators of thyrocyte proliferation, along with upregulation of the downstream proliferative marker cyclin D1. We extended and confirmed findings from the mouse model by examining PBF expression in human multinodular goitres (MNG), a hyperproliferative thyroid disorder, where PBF and TSHR was strongly upregulated relative to normal thyroid tissue. Further, we showed that depleting PBF in human primary thyrocytes was sufficient to increase radioiodine uptake. Together, our findings indicate that overexpression of PBF causes thyroid cell proliferation, macrofollicular lesions and hyperplasia, as well as repression of the critical therapeutic route for radioiodide uptake. PMID:21844185

  2. Repression of Seed Maturation Genes by a Trihelix Transcriptional Repressor in Arabidopsis Seedlings[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming-Jun; Lydiate, Derek J.; Li, Xiang; Lui, Helen; Gjetvaj, Branimir; Hegedus, Dwayne D.; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The seed maturation program is repressed during germination and seedling development so that embryonic genes are not expressed in vegetative organs. Here, we describe a regulator that represses the expression of embryonic seed maturation genes in vegetative tissues. ASIL1 (for Arabidopsis 6b-interacting protein 1-like 1) was isolated by its interaction with the Arabidopsis thaliana 2S3 promoter. ASIL1 possesses domains conserved in the plant-specific trihelix family of DNA binding proteins and belongs to a subfamily of 6b-interacting protein 1-like factors. The seedlings of asil1 mutants exhibited a global shift in gene expression to a profile resembling late embryogenesis. LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and 2 were markedly derepressed during early germination, as was a large subset of seed maturation genes, such as those encoding seed storage proteins and oleosins, in seedlings of asil1 mutants. Consistent with this, asil1 seedlings accumulated 2S albumin and oil with a fatty acid composition similar to that of seed-derived lipid. Moreover, ASIL1 specifically recognized a GT element that overlaps the G-box and is in close proximity to the RY repeats of the 2S promoters. We suggest that ASIL1 targets GT-box–containing embryonic genes by competing with the binding of transcriptional activators to this promoter region. PMID:19155348

  3. DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Chung; Go, Young Sam

    2014-06-06

    The aerial parts of plants are covered with a cuticular wax layer, which is the first barrier between a plant and its environment. Although cuticular wax deposition increases more in the light than in the dark, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cuticular wax biosynthesis. Recently DEWAX (Decrease Wax Biosynthesis) encoding an AP2/ERF transcription factor was found to be preferentially expressed in the epidermis and induced by darkness. Wax analysis of the dewax knockout mutant, wild type, and DEWAX overexpression lines (OX) indicates that DEWAX is a negative regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis. DEWAX represses the expression of wax biosynthetic genes CER1, LACS2, ACLA2, and ECR via direct interaction with their promoters. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is negatively regulated twice a day by the expression of DEWAX; throughout the night and another for stomata closing. Taken together, it is evident that DEWAX-mediated negative regulation of the wax biosynthetic genes plays role in determining the total wax loads produced in Arabidopsis during daily dark and light cycles. In addition, significantly higher levels of DEWAX transcripts in leaves than stems suggest that DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression might be involved in the organ-specific regulation of total wax amounts on plant surfaces.

  4. Development of a mixed feed strategy for a recombinant Pichia pastoris strain producing with a de-repression promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Simona; Horvat, Jernej; Herwig, Christoph; Spadiut, Oliver

    2015-07-10

    Recombinant protein production in the yeast Pichia pastoris is usually based on the alcohol oxidase promoters pAOX1 and pAOX2, which are regulated by methanol and strongly repressed by other C-sources, like glycerol and glucose. However, the use of methanol brings several disadvantages, which is why current trends in bioprocess development with P. pastoris are focussing on minimizing the required amount of methanol or even avoid its employment. In this respect novel promoter systems which do not rely on methanol have been investigated and promoter variants were designed to fine-tune gene expression. Amongst these novel promoter systems, mutated AOX promoters, which are regulated by available carbon source concentration (so-called de-repressed promoters), are currently raising attention. However, the main disadvantage of such a production system is that expression and growth usually cannot happen concomitantly resulting in low space-time-yields. Here we show the development of a mixed-feed strategy for an industrial recombinant P. pastoris de-repression strain aiming at increased productivity and maximum space-time-yield. By doing dynamic experiments we determined a ratio between the specific substrate uptake rates of glycerol and sorbitol allowing a more than 2-fold increased productivity compared to the conventional single substrate de-repression strategy. Based on our results we recommend adjusting q(s glycerol) = 0.04 g g(-1) h(-1) and q(s sorbitol) = 0.055 g g(-1) h(-1) to obtain highest productivity with a P. pastoris de-repression strain. Our methodological approach of designing mixed-feed strategies based on physiological strain characterization using dynamic experiments proved to be beneficial.

  5. Genetic interactions of MAF1 identify a role for Med20 in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Willis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional repression of ribosomal components and tRNAs is coordinately regulated in response to a wide variety of environmental stresses. Part of this response involves the convergence of different nutritional and stress signaling pathways on Maf1, a protein that is essential for repressing transcription by RNA polymerase (pol III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we identify the functions buffering yeast cells that are unable to down-regulate transcription by RNA pol III. MAF1 genetic interactions identified in screens of non-essential gene-deletions and conditionally expressed essential genes reveal a highly interconnected network of 64 genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, RNA pol II transcription, tRNA modification, ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and other processes. A survey of non-essential MAF1 synthetic sick/lethal (SSL genes identified six gene-deletions that are defective in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein (RP genes following rapamycin treatment. This subset of MAF1 SSL genes included MED20 which encodes a head module subunit of the RNA pol II Mediator complex. Genetic interactions between MAF1 and subunits in each structural module of Mediator were investigated to examine the functional relationship between these transcriptional regulators. Gene expression profiling identified a prominent and highly selective role for Med20 in the repression of RP gene transcription under multiple conditions. In addition, attenuated repression of RP genes by rapamycin was observed in a strain deleted for the Mediator tail module subunit Med16. The data suggest that Mediator and Maf1 function in parallel pathways to negatively regulate RP mRNA and tRNA synthesis.

  6. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 10 (COP10 Contributes to Floral Repression under Non-Inductive Short Days in Arabidopsis

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    Min-Young Kang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS genes act in repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness, and recent reports revealed that some of these genes, such as COP1 and DET1, also have important roles in controlling flowering time and circadian rhythm. The COP/DET/FUS protein COP10 interacts with DET1 and DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1 to form a CDD complex and represses photomorphogenesis in darkness. The cop10-4 mutants flower normally in inductive long days (LD but early in non-inductive short days (SD compared with wild type (WT; however, the role of COP10 remains unknown. Here, we investigate the role of COP10 in SD-dependent floral repression. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that in SD, expression of the LD-dependent floral inducers GI, FKF1, and FT significantly increased in cop10-4 mutants, compared with WT. This suggests that COP10 mainly regulates FT expression in a CO-independent manner. We also show that COP10 interacts with GI in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that COP10 could also affect GI function at the posttranslational level. Moreover, FLC expression was repressed drastically in cop10-4 mutants and COP10 interacts with MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 4 (MSI4/FVE (MSI4/FVE, which epigenetically inhibits FLC expression. These data suggest that COP10 contributes to delaying flowering in the photoperiod and autonomous pathways by downregulating FT expression under SD.

  7. Mir-29 repression in bladder outlet obstruction contributes to matrix remodeling and altered stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Mari; Bhattachariya, Anirban; Dahan, Diana; Uvelius, Bengt; Albinsson, Sebastian; Swärd, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has uncovered a role of the microRNA (miRNA) miR-29 in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Partial bladder outlet obstruction is a prevalent condition in older men with prostate enlargement that leads to matrix synthesis in the lower urinary tract and increases bladder stiffness. Here we tested the hypothesis that miR-29 is repressed in the bladder in outlet obstruction and that this has an impact on protein synthesis and matrix remodeling leading to increased bladder stiffness. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3, all of which repress miR-29, were activated in the rat detrusor following partial bladder outlet obstruction but at different times. c-Myc and NF-κB activation occurred early after obstruction, and SMAD3 phosphorylation increased later, with a significant elevation at 6 weeks. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 activation, respectively, correlated with repression of miR-29b and miR-29c at 10 days of obstruction and with repression of miR-29c at 6 weeks. An mRNA microarray analysis showed that the reduction of miR-29 following outlet obstruction was associated with increased levels of miR-29 target mRNAs, including mRNAs for tropoelastin, the matricellular protein Sparc and collagen IV. Outlet obstruction increased protein levels of eight out of eight examined miR-29 targets, including tropoelastin and Sparc. Transfection of human bladder smooth muscle cells with antimiR-29c and miR-29c mimic caused reciprocal changes in target protein levels in vitro. Tamoxifen inducible and smooth muscle-specific deletion of Dicer in mice reduced miR-29 expression and increased tropoelastin and the thickness of the basal lamina surrounding smooth muscle cells in the bladder. It also increased detrusor stiffness independent of outlet obstruction. Taken together, our study supports a model where the combined repressive influences of c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 reduce miR-29 in bladder outlet obstruction, and where the resulting drop in miR-29 contributes to matrix remodeling and

  8. Mir-29 repression in bladder outlet obstruction contributes to matrix remodeling and altered stiffness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Ekman

    Full Text Available Recent work has uncovered a role of the microRNA (miRNA miR-29 in remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Partial bladder outlet obstruction is a prevalent condition in older men with prostate enlargement that leads to matrix synthesis in the lower urinary tract and increases bladder stiffness. Here we tested the hypothesis that miR-29 is repressed in the bladder in outlet obstruction and that this has an impact on protein synthesis and matrix remodeling leading to increased bladder stiffness. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3, all of which repress miR-29, were activated in the rat detrusor following partial bladder outlet obstruction but at different times. c-Myc and NF-κB activation occurred early after obstruction, and SMAD3 phosphorylation increased later, with a significant elevation at 6 weeks. c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 activation, respectively, correlated with repression of miR-29b and miR-29c at 10 days of obstruction and with repression of miR-29c at 6 weeks. An mRNA microarray analysis showed that the reduction of miR-29 following outlet obstruction was associated with increased levels of miR-29 target mRNAs, including mRNAs for tropoelastin, the matricellular protein Sparc and collagen IV. Outlet obstruction increased protein levels of eight out of eight examined miR-29 targets, including tropoelastin and Sparc. Transfection of human bladder smooth muscle cells with antimiR-29c and miR-29c mimic caused reciprocal changes in target protein levels in vitro. Tamoxifen inducible and smooth muscle-specific deletion of Dicer in mice reduced miR-29 expression and increased tropoelastin and the thickness of the basal lamina surrounding smooth muscle cells in the bladder. It also increased detrusor stiffness independent of outlet obstruction. Taken together, our study supports a model where the combined repressive influences of c-Myc, NF-κB and SMAD3 reduce miR-29 in bladder outlet obstruction, and where the resulting drop in miR-29 contributes to

  9. Polycomb repressive complex 1 provides a molecular explanation for repeat copy number dependency in FSHD muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Valentina; Runfola, Valeria; Micheloni, Stefano; Aziz, Arif; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2017-02-15

    Repression of repetitive elements is crucial to preserve genome integrity and has been traditionally ascribed to constitutive heterochromatin pathways. FacioScapuloHumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD), one of the most common myopathies, is characterized by a complex interplay of genetic and epigenetic events. The main FSHD form is linked to a reduced copy number of the D4Z4 macrosatellite repeat on 4q35, causing loss of silencing and aberrant expression of the D4Z4-embedded DUX4 gene leading to disease. By an unknown mechanism, D4Z4 copy-number correlates with FSHD phenotype. Here we show that the DUX4 proximal promoter (DUX4p) is sufficient to nucleate the enrichment of both constitutive and facultative heterochromatin components and to mediate a copy-number dependent gene silencing. We found that both the CpG/GC dense DNA content and the repetitive nature of DUX4p arrays are important for their repressive ability. We showed that DUX4p mediates a copy number-dependent Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) recruitment, which is responsible for the copy-number dependent gene repression. Overall, we directly link genetic and epigenetic defects in FSHD by proposing a novel molecular explanation for the copy number-dependency in FSHD pathogenesis, and offer insight into the molecular functions of repeats in chromatin regulation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. PPARα Promotes Cancer Cell Glut1 Transcription Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Mengli; Jin, Jianhua; Liu, Qian; Xu, QingGang; Shi, Juanjuan; Hou, Yongzhong

    2017-06-01

    Abundant nutrient availability including glucose and amino acids plays an important role in maintaining cancer cell energetic and biosynthetic pathways. As a nuclear receptor, peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) regulates inflammation and cancer progression, however, it is still unclear the interaction of PPARα with the cancer cell glucose metabolism. Here we found that PPARα reduced Glut1 (Glucose transporter 1) protein and gene levels in HCT-116, SW480, HeLa, and MCF-7 cancer cell lines. In contrast, silenced PPARα reversed this event. Further analysis shows that PPARα directly targeted the consensus PPRE motif of Glut1 promoter region resulting in Glut1 transcription repression. PPARα-mediated Glut1 transcription repression led to decreased influx of glucose in cancer cells. These findings revealed a novel mechanism of PPARα-mediated cancer cell Glut1 transcription repression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1556-1562, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Suppression and repression: A theoretical discussion illustrated by a movie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia de Souza Campos Paiva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The first translations of Freud's work into Portuguese have presented problems because they were not translated from the German language. More than a hundred years after the beginning of Psychoanalysis, there are still many discussions on Freud's metapsychology and a considerable difficulty in obtaining a consensus on the translation of some concepts. This paper refers back to Freud's concepts of primal repression, repression and suppression. In order to discuss such concepts, we have made use of a film, co-produced by Germans and Argentineans, which is named "The Song in me" (Das Lied in mir, released to the public in 2011 and directed by Florian Micoud Cossen. Through this motion picture, the following of Freud's concepts are analyzed, and the differentiation between them is discussed: suppression and repression, as well as the importance of their precise translation.

  12. Dominant Repression by Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB44 Causes Oxidative Damage and Hypersensitivity to Abiotic Stress

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    Helene Persak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In any living species, stress adaptation is closely linked with major changes of the gene expression profile. As a substrate protein of the rapidly stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3, Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 likely acts at the front line of stress-induced re-programming. We recently characterized MYB44 as phosphorylation-dependent positive regulator of salt stress signaling. Molecular events downstream of MYB44 are largely unknown. Although MYB44 binds to the MBSII element in vitro, it has no discernible effect on MBSII-driven reporter gene expression in plant co-transfection assays. This may suggest limited abundance of a synergistic co-regulator. MYB44 carries a putative transcriptional repression (Ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression, EAR motif. We employed a dominant repressor strategy to gain insights into MYB44-conferred stress resistance. Overexpression of a MYB44-REP fusion markedly compromised salt and drought stress tolerance—the opposite was seen in MYB44 overexpression lines. MYB44-mediated resistance likely results from induction of tolerance-enhancing, rather than from repression of tolerance-diminishing factors. Salt stress-induced accumulation of destructive reactive oxygen species is efficiently prevented in transgenic MYB44, but accelerated in MYB44-REP lines. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of MYB44-REP caused tissue collapse in Nicotiana. A mechanistic model of MAPK-MYB-mediated enhancement in the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance is proposed. Genetic engineering of MYB44 variants with higher trans-activating capacity may be a means to further raise stress resistance in crops.

  13. Political Repressions in USSR (Against Speculations, Perversion and Mystifications)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In the article the great numbers of political repressions, which were exaggerated by authors: R.A. Medvedev, A.I. Solzhenitsyn, O.G. Shatunovskoy, A.V. Antonov-Ovseenko in 80-90s are criticized. The author characterizes figures given in tens and even in hundreds of millions of victims as a statistical charlatanism.After checking up the KGB archives, and documents of division responsible for NKVD-MVD special settlements, the author spills the light on real numbers of political repressions in U...

  14. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of the polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive......The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  15. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    . In this report, we review the recent literature to deduce mechanisms underlying Polycomb and H3K9 methylation mediated repression, and describe the functional interplay with activating H3K4 methylation. We summarize recent data that indicate a close relationship between GC density of promoter sequences......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional outcomes from stable repression to highly...... dynamic regulated genes, strongly suggesting that the interplay of different epigenetic pathways is essential in defining specific types of heritable chromatin and associated transcriptional states....

  16. Nitrogen catabolite repression of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, P C; Meyer, G M; Roon, R J

    1980-01-01

    The biosynthesis of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is subject to strong catabolite repression by a variety of nitrogen compounds. In the present study, asparaginase II synthesis was examined in a wild-type yeast strain and in strains carrying gdhA, gdhCR, or gdhCS mutations. The following effects were observed: (i) In the wild-type strain, the biosynthesis of asparaginase II was strongly repressed when either 10 mM ammonium sulfate or various amino acids (10 mM) served as the sou...

  17. Extremadura: Behind the material traces of Franco’s repression

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Encinar, Laura; Chaves Palacios, Julián

    2014-01-01

    After the failed coup d’état of July 17th, 1936 and after the start of the Spanish Civil War that followed it, rebels carried out a repressive strategy based on the execution of thousands of people as a key tool of social control. The socialization of fear and terror through humiliation, killing and disappearance would become the main strategy employed throughout the war and the post-war period. In this context, perpetrators would exercise repressive practices on victims and their bodies. As ...

  18. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali

    2012-01-01

    . Psd-95 was transcribed early in mouse embryonic brain, but most of its product transcripts were degraded. The polypyrimidine tract binding proteins PTBP1 and PTBP2 repressed Psd-95 (also known as Dlg4) exon 18 splicing, leading to premature translation termination and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay......, expression of PSD-95 during early neural development is controlled at the RNA level by two PTB proteins whose sequential downregulation is necessary for synapse maturation....

  19. The Flagellar Regulator fliT Represses Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 through flhDC and fliZ

    OpenAIRE

    Chien-Che Hung; Leanne Haines; Craig Altier

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1), comprising a type III section system that translocates effector proteins into host cells, is essential for the enteric pathogen Salmonella to penetrate the intestinal epithelium and subsequently to cause disease. Using random transposon mutagenesis, we found that a Tn10 disruption in the flagellar fliDST operon induced SPI1 expression when the strain was grown under conditions designed to repress SPI1, by mimicking the environment of the large intesti...

  20. Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang-Xia Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The miR-15/107 family comprises a group of 10 paralogous microRNAs (miRNAs, sharing a 5′ AGCAGC sequence. These miRNAs have overlapping targets. In order to characterize the expression of miR-15/107 family miRNAs, we employed customized TaqMan Low-Density micro-fluid PCR-array to investigate the expression of miR-15/107 family members, and other selected miRNAs, in 11 human tissues obtained at autopsy including the cerebral cortex, frontal cortex, primary visual cortex, thalamus, heart, lung, liver, kidney, spleen, stomach and skeletal muscle. miR-103, miR-195 and miR-497 were expressed at similar levels across various tissues, whereas miR-107 is enriched in brain samples. We also examined the expression patterns of evolutionarily conserved miR-15/107 miRNAs in three distinct primary rat brain cell preparations (enriched for cortical neurons, astrocytes and microglia, respectively. In primary cultures of rat brain cells, several members of the miR-15/107 family are enriched in neurons compared to other cell types in the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to mature miRNAs, we also examined the expression of precursors (pri-miRNAs. Our data suggested a generally poor correlation between the expression of mature miRNAs and their precursors. In summary, we provide a detailed study of the tissue and cell type-specific expression profile of this highly expressed and phylogenetically conserved family of miRNA genes.

  1. ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacher Markus D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that RAS-MEK (Cancer Res. 2003 May 1;63(9:2088-95 and TGF-β (Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3:1648-57 signaling negatively regulate coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR cell-surface expression and adenovirus uptake. In the case of TGF-β, down-regulation of CAR occurred in context of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process associated with transcriptional repression of E-cadherin by, for instance, the E2 box-binding factors Snail, Slug, SIP1 or ZEB1. While EMT is crucial in embryonic development, it has been proposed to contribute to the formation of invasive and metastatic carcinomas by reducing cell-cell contacts and increasing cell migration. Results Here, we show that ZEB1 represses CAR expression in both PANC-1 (pancreatic and MDA-MB-231 (breast human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ZEB1 physically associates with at least one of two closely spaced and conserved E2 boxes within the minimal CAR promoter here defined as genomic region -291 to -1 relative to the translational start ATG. In agreement with ZEB1's established role as a negative regulator of the epithelial phenotype, silencing its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells induced a partial Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET characterized by increased levels of E-cadherin and CAR, and decreased expression of fibronectin. Conversely, knockdown of ZEB1 in PANC-1 cells antagonized both the TGF-β-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and CAR and the reduction of adenovirus uptake. Interestingly, even though ZEB1 clearly contributes to the TGF-β-induced mesenchymal phenotype of PANC-1 cells, TGF-β did not seem to affect ZEB1's protein levels or subcellular localization. These findings suggest that TGF-β may inhibit CAR expression by regulating factor(s that cooperate with ZEB1 to repress the CAR promoter, rather than by regulating ZEB1 expression levels. In addition to the negative E2 box-mediated regulation the minimal

  2. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Elvenes

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-10-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3' UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Foxk proteins repress the initiation of starvation-induced atrophy and autophagy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Christopher John; Ayer, Donald E; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is the primary catabolic process triggered in response to starvation. Although autophagic regulation within the cytosolic compartment is well established, it is becoming clear that nuclear events also regulate the induction or repression of autophagy. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which sequence-specific transcription factors modulate expression of genes required for autophagy is lacking. Here, we identify Foxk proteins (Foxk1 and Foxk2) as transcriptional repressors of autophagy in muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interestingly, Foxk1/2 serve to counter-balance another forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, which induces an overlapping set of autophagic and atrophic targets in muscle. Foxk1/2 specifically recruits Sin3A-HDAC complexes to restrict acetylation of histone H4 and expression of critical autophagy genes. Remarkably, mTOR promotes the transcriptional activity of Foxk1 by facilitating nuclear entry to specifically limit basal levels of autophagy in nutrient-rich conditions. Our study highlights an ancient, conserved mechanism whereby nutritional status is interpreted by mTOR to restrict autophagy by repressing essential autophagy genes through Foxk-Sin3-mediated transcriptional control.

  5. PRDM16 represses the type I interferon response in adipocytes to promote mitochondrial and thermogenic programing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissig, Megan; Ishibashi, Jeff; Harms, Matthew J; Lim, Hee-Woong; Stine, Rachel R; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Seale, Patrick

    2017-06-01

    Brown adipose has the potential to counteract obesity, and thus, identifying signaling pathways that regulate the activity of this tissue is of great clinical interest. PRDM16 is a transcription factor that activates brown fat-specific genes while repressing white fat and muscle-specific genes in adipocytes. Whether PRDM16 also controls other gene programs to regulate adipocyte function was unclear. Here, we identify a novel role for PRDM16 in suppressing type I interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs), including Stat1, in adipocytes in vitro and in vivo Ectopic activation of type I IFN signaling in brown adipocytes induces mitochondrial dysfunction and reduces uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression. Prdm16-deficient adipose displays an exaggerated response to type I IFN, including higher STAT1 levels and reduced mitochondrial gene expression. Mechanistically, PRDM16 represses ISGs through binding to promoter regions of these genes and blocking the activating function of IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF1). Together, these data indicate that PRDM16 diminishes responsiveness to type I IFN in adipose cells to promote thermogenic and mitochondrial function. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Manipulating the sensitivity of signal-induced repression: quantification and consequences of altered brinker gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Gafner

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the analysis of gene regulatory regions suffered from the caveat that it was restricted to artificial contexts (e.g. reporter constructs of limited size. With the advent of the BAC recombineering technique, genomic constructs can now be generated to test regulatory elements in their endogenous environment. The expression of the transcriptional repressor brinker (brk is negatively regulated by Dpp signaling. Repression is mediated by small sequence motifs, the silencer elements (SEs, that are present in multiple copies in the regulatory region of brk. In this work, we manipulated the SEs in the brk locus. We precisely quantified the effects of the individual SEs on the Brk gradient in the wing disc by employing a 1D data extraction method, followed by the quantification of the data with reference to an internal control. We found that mutating the SEs results in an expansion of the brk expression domain. However, even after mutating all predicted SEs, repression could still be observed in regions of maximal Dpp levels. Thus, our data point to the presence of additional, low affinity binding sites in the brk locus.

  7. Gene induction and repression during terminal erythropoiesis are mediated by distinct epigenetic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Piu; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Cheng, Albert W; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Richard A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-10-20

    It is unclear how epigenetic changes regulate the induction of erythroid-specific genes during terminal erythropoiesis. Here we use global mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq) and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CHIP-seq) to investigate the changes that occur in mRNA levels, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy, and multiple posttranslational histone modifications when erythroid progenitors differentiate into late erythroblasts. Among genes induced during this developmental transition, there was an increase in the occupancy of Pol II, the activation marks H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9Ac, and H4K16Ac, and the elongation methylation mark H3K79me2. In contrast, genes that were repressed during differentiation showed relative decreases in H3K79me2 levels yet had levels of Pol II binding and active histone marks similar to those in erythroid progenitors. We also found that relative changes in histone modification levels, in particular, H3K79me2 and H4K16ac, were most predictive of gene expression patterns. Our results suggest that in terminal erythropoiesis both promoter and elongation-associated marks contribute to the induction of erythroid genes, whereas gene repression is marked by changes in histone modifications mediating Pol II elongation. Our data map the epigenetic landscape of terminal erythropoiesis and suggest that control of transcription elongation regulates gene expression during terminal erythroid differentiation.

  8. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H.; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J.R.; Cook, Stuart A.; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3′ and 5′ splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:24960161

  9. A cell-autonomous molecular cascade initiated by AMP-activated protein kinase represses steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Houssein S; Bergeron, Francis; Tremblay, Jacques J

    2014-12-01

    Steroid hormones regulate essential physiological processes, and inadequate levels are associated with various pathological conditions. In testosterone-producing Leydig cells, steroidogenesis is strongly stimulated by luteinizing hormone (LH) via its receptor leading to increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) production and expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (STAR) protein, which is essential for the initiation of steroidogenesis. Steroidogenesis then passively decreases with the degradation of cAMP into AMP by phosphodiesterases. In this study, we show that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated following cAMP-to-AMP breakdown in MA-10 and MLTC-1 Leydig cells. Activated AMPK then actively inhibits cAMP-induced steroidogenesis by repressing the expression of key regulators of steroidogenesis, including Star and Nr4a1. Similar results were obtained in Y-1 adrenal cells and in the constitutively steroidogenic R2C cells. We have also determined that maximum AMPK activation following stimulation of steroidogenesis in MA-10 Leydig cells occurs when steroid hormone production has reached a plateau. Our data identify AMPK as a molecular rheostat that actively represses steroid hormone biosynthesis to preserve cellular energy homeostasis and prevent excess steroid production.

  10. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  11. Facile promoter deletion in Escherichia coli in response to leaky expression of very robust and benign proteins from common expression vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawe Martin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overexpression of proteins in Escherichia coli is considered routine today, at least when the protein is soluble and not otherwise toxic for the host. We report here that the massive overproduction of even such "benign" proteins can cause surprisingly efficient promoter deletions in the expression plasmid, leading to the growth of only non-producers, when expression is not well repressed in the newly transformed bacterial cell. Because deletion is so facile, it might impact on high-throughput protein production, e.g. for structural genomics, where not every expression parameter will be monitored. Results We studied the high-level expression of several robust non-toxic proteins using a T5 promoter under lac operator control. Full induction leads to no significant growth retardation. We compared expression from almost identical plasmids with or without the lacI gene together in strains expressing different levels of LacI. Any combination without net overexpression of LacI led to an efficient promoter deletion in the plasmid, although the number of growing colonies and even the plasmid size – all antibiotic-resistant non-producers – was almost normal, and thus the problem not immediately recognizable. However, by assuring sufficient repression during the initial establishment phase of the plasmid, deletion was completely prevented. Conclusion The deletions in the insufficiently repressed system are caused entirely by the burden of high-level translation. Since the E. coli Dps protein, known to protect DNA against stress in the stationary phase, is accumulated in the deletion mutants, the mutation may have taken place during a transient stationary phase. The cause of the deletion is thus distinct from the well known interference of high-level transcription with plasmid replication. The deletion can be entirely prevented by overexpressing LacI, a useful precaution even without any signs of stress caused by the protein.

  12. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Flora Aparecida [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Cvoro, Aleksandra [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Amato, Angelica A. [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan [Laboratório de Planejamento e Síntese de Fármacos – LPSF, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Webb, Paul, E-mail: pwebb@HoustonMethodist.org [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  13. Financial repression, money growth, and seignorage: The Polish experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarle, B. van; Budina, N.

    1997-01-01

    Financial Repression, Money Growth and Seignorage: The Polish Experience. — A small analytical framework is developed to analyze the relation between reserve requirements, base money growth and seignorage revenues. From the analysis, the authors can derive of steady-state seignorage revenues as a

  14. Financial repression, money growth, and seignorage: The Polish experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarle, B. van; Budina, N.

    1997-01-01

    Financial Repression, Money Growth and Seignorage: The Polish Experience. — A small analytical framework is developed to analyze the relation between reserve requirements, base money growth and seignorage revenues. From the analysis, the authors can derive of steady-state seignorage revenues as a fu

  15. Financial repression, money growth, and seignorage: The Polish experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarle, B. van; Budina, N.

    1997-01-01

    Financial Repression, Money Growth and Seignorage: The Polish Experience. — A small analytical framework is developed to analyze the relation between reserve requirements, base money growth and seignorage revenues. From the analysis, the authors can derive of steady-state seignorage revenues as a fu

  16. Intellectual Performance as a Function of Repression and Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander-Golden, Paula; And Others

    Performance on complex (Space Relations and Verbal Reasoning) and simple (Digit Symbol) tests was investigated as a function of Byrne's Repression-Sensitization (RS) dimension, phase of menstrual cycle and premenstrual-menstrual (PM) symptomatology in a group of females not taking oral contraceptives. Two control groups, consisting of males and…

  17. Onset of carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipphi, M.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Ruijter, G.J.G.; Visser, J.; Arst Jr., H.N.; Felenbok, B.

    2003-01-01

    The role of hexose phosphorylating enzymes in the signaling of carbon catabolite repression was investigated in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. A D-fructose non-utilizing, hexokinase-deficient (hxkA1, formerly designated frA1) strain was utilized to obtain new mutants lacking either glu

  18. The glycosyltransferase LARGE2 is repressed by Snail and ZEB1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qin; Miller, Michael R; Schappet, James; Henry, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in both expression of the dystroglycan core protein and functional glycosylation of the α-dystroglycan (αDG) subunit have been reported in a number of cancers and may contribute to disease progression. In the case of prostate cancer, one mechanism that contributes to αDG hypoglycosylation is transcriptional down-regulation of LARGE2 (GYLTY1B), a glycosyltransferase that produces the functional (laminin-binding) glycan on αDG, but the mechanism(s) underlying reduction of LARGE2 mRNA remain unclear. Here, we show that αDG hypoglycosylation is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like status. We examined immunoreactivity for both functionally-glycosylated αDG and E-cadherin by flow cytometry and the relative expression of ZEB1 mRNA and the αDG glycosyltransferase LARGE2 mRNA in prostate and other cancer cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. To study the role of ZEB1 and other transcription factors in the regulation of LARGE2, we employed overexpression and knockdown approaches. Snail- or ZEB1-driven EMT caused αDG hypoglycosylation by repressing expression of the LARGE2 mRNA, with both ZEB1-dependent and -independent mechanisms contributing to Snail-mediated LARGE2 repression. To examine the direct regulation of LARGE2 by Snail and ZEB1 we employed luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Snail and ZEB1 were found to bind directly to the LARGE2 promoter, specifically to E/Z-box clusters. Furthermore, analysis of gene expression profiles of clinical samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas reveals negative correlation of LARGE2 and ZEB1 expression in various cancers. Collectively, our results suggest that LARGE2 is negatively regulated by Snail and/or ZEB1, revealing a mechanistic basis for αDG hypoglycosylation during prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

  19. CTCF and CohesinSA-1 Mark Active Promoters and Boundaries of Repressive Chromatin Domains in Primary Human Erythroid Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A Steiner

    Full Text Available CTCF and cohesinSA-1 are regulatory proteins involved in a number of critical cellular processes including transcription, maintenance of chromatin domain architecture, and insulator function. To assess changes in the CTCF and cohesinSA-1 interactomes during erythropoiesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing and mRNA transcriptome analyses via RNA-seq were performed in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC and primary human erythroid cells from single donors.Sites of CTCF and cohesinSA-1 co-occupancy were enriched in gene promoters in HSPC and erythroid cells compared to single CTCF or cohesin sites. Cell type-specific CTCF sites in erythroid cells were linked to highly expressed genes, with the opposite pattern observed in HSPCs. Chromatin domains were identified by ChIP-seq with antibodies against trimethylated lysine 27 histone H3, a modification associated with repressive chromatin. Repressive chromatin domains increased in both number and size during hematopoiesis, with many more repressive domains in erythroid cells than HSPCs. CTCF and cohesinSA-1 marked the boundaries of these repressive chromatin domains in a cell-type specific manner.These genome wide data, changes in sites of protein occupancy, chromatin architecture, and related gene expression, support the hypothesis that CTCF and cohesinSA-1 have multiple roles in the regulation of gene expression during erythropoiesis including transcriptional regulation at gene promoters and maintenance of chromatin architecture. These data from primary human erythroid cells provide a resource for studies of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis.

  20. Repression of cancer cell senescence by PKCι.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, J A; Restall, I J; Daneshmand, M; Mersereau, J A; Simard, M A; Parolin, D A E; Lavictoire, S J; Amin, M S; Islam, S; Lorimer, I A J

    2012-08-02

    Senescence is an irreversible growth arrest phenotype adopted by cells that has a key role in protecting organisms from cancer. There is now considerable interest in therapeutic strategies that reactivate this process to control the growth of cancer cells. Protein kinase-Cι (PKCι) is a member of the atypical PKC family and an important downstream mediator in the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI-3-kinase) pathway. PKCι expression was found to be upregulated in a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. Activation of the PI-3-kinase pathway by introduction of mutant, oncogenic PIK3CA into breast mammary epithelial cells increased both the expression and activation of PKCι. In breast cancer cells lines overexpressing PKCι, depletion of PKCι increased the number of senescent cells, as assessed by senescence-associated β-galactosidase, morphology and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. This phenomenon was not restricted to breast cancer cells, as it was also seen in glioblastoma cells in which PKCι is activated by loss of PTEN. Senescence occurred in the absence of a detectable DNA-damage response, was dependent on p21 and was enhanced by the aurora kinase inhibitor VX-680, suggesting that senescence is triggered by defects in mitosis. Depletion of PKCι had no effect on senescence in normal mammary epithelial cell lines. We conclude that PKCι is overexpressed in a subset of cancers where it functions to suppress premature senescence. This function appears to be restricted to cancer cells and inhibition of PKCι may therefore be an effective way to selectively activate premature senescence in cancer cells.

  1. The X protein of hepatitis B virus activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing melanoma inhibitory activity 2 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yilin; Yang, Yang; Cai, Yanyan; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yingle; Zhu, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, and Chinese-French Liver Disease Research Institute at Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, Jianguo, E-mail: jwu@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, and Chinese-French Liver Disease Research Institute at Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated that HBV represses MIA2 gene expression both invitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The X protein of HBV plays a major role in such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activates cell growth and proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates cell proliferation, over-expression of MIA2 impaired such regulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBx activates hepatoma cell proliferation through repressing MIA2 expression. -- Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths globally. Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection accounts for over 75% of all HCC cases; however, the molecular pathogenesis of HCC is not well understood. In this study, we found that the expression of the newly identified gene melanoma inhibitory activity 2 (MIA2) was reduced by HBV infection invitro and invivo, and that HBV X protein (HBx) plays a major role in this regulation. Recent studies have revealed that MIA2 is a potential tumor suppressor, and that, in most HCCs, MIA2 expression is down-regulated or lost. We found that the knock-down of MIA2 in HepG2 cells activated cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that MIA2 inhibits HCC cell growth and proliferation. In addition, the over-expression of HBx alone induced cell proliferation, whereas MIA2 over-expression impaired the HBx-mediated induction of proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that HBx activates hepatoma cell growth and proliferation through repression of the potential tumor suppressor MIA2.

  2. Cyclic di-GMP regulation of the bvg-repressed genes and the orphan response regulator RisA in Bordetella pertussis

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    Expression of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors is activated by the BvgAS two-component system. Under modulating growth conditions BvgAS indirectly represses another set of genes through the action of BvgR, a bvg-activated protein. BvgR blocks activation of the response regulator RisA which is ...

  3. Role of ND10 nuclear bodies in the chromatin repression of HSV-1.

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    Gu, Haidong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a neurotropic virus that establishes lifelong latent infection in human ganglion sensory neurons. This unique life cycle necessitates an intimate relation between the host defenses and virus counteractions over the long course of infection. Two important aspects of host anti-viral defense, nuclear substructure restriction and epigenetic chromatin regulation, have been intensively studied in the recent years. Upon viral DNA entering the nucleus, components of discrete nuclear bodies termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), converge at viral DNA and place restrictions on viral gene expression. Meanwhile the infected cell mobilizes its histones and histone-associated repressors to force the viral DNA into nucleosome-like structures and also represses viral transcription. Both anti-viral strategies are negated by various HSV countermeasures. One HSV gene transactivator, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a key player in antagonizing both the ND10 restriction and chromatin repression. On one hand, ICP0 uses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity to target major ND10 components for proteasome-dependent degradation and thereafter disrupts the ND10 nuclear bodies. On the other hand, ICP0 participates in de-repressing the HSV chromatin by changing histone composition or modification and therefore activates viral transcription. Involvement of a single viral protein in two seemingly different pathways suggests that there is coordination in host anti-viral defense mechanisms and also cooperation in viral counteraction strategies. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin regulation and ND10 dynamics in both lytic and latent HSV infection. We focus on the new observations showing that ND10 nuclear bodies play a critical role in cellular chromatin regulation. We intend to find the connections between the two major anti-viral defense pathways, chromatin remodeling and ND10 structure, in order to achieve a better

  4. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with SERTA domain proteins and repress their transactivating functions.

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    Kusano, Shuichi; Shiimura, Yuki; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2011-09-01

    The I-mfa domain proteins I-mfa and HIC are considered to be candidate tumor suppressor genes and have been shown to be involved in transcriptional regulation. We show here that I-mfa and HIC specifically interact with SEI-1 through their C-terminal I-mfa domains in vivo. This interaction affects the intracellular localization of I-mfa and requires the region of SEI-1 between 30 and 90 amino acids, which includes its SERTA domain, and results in repression of its intrinsic transcriptional activity. I-mfa also decreases the levels of the SEI-1·DP-1 complex and endogenous Fbxw7 mRNA, the expression of which is coregulated by E2F·DP-1 and SEI-1 in an interaction-dependent manner in vitro. In addition, I-mfa also specifically interacts with other SERTA domain-containing proteins, including SEI-2, SEI-3, SERTAD3 and SERTAD4, through its I-mfa domain in vivo. This interaction also affects the intracellular localization of I-mfa and represses the intrinsic transcriptional activities of SEI-2 and SERTAD3, which are also involved in the E2F-dependent transcription. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with SERTA domain proteins and negatively regulate their transcriptional activity. Because SEI-1, SEI-2 and SERTAD3, whose intrinsic transcriptional activities are repressed by I-mfa, are suggested to be oncogenes, I-mfa domain proteins may be involved in their oncogenic functions by negatively regulating their transcriptional activities.

  5. Influence of repressive coping style on cortical activation during encoding of angry faces.

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    Astrid Veronika Rauch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coping plays an important role for emotion regulation in threatening situations. The model of coping modes designates repression and sensitization as two independent coping styles. Repression consists of strategies that shield the individual from arousal. Sensitization indicates increased analysis of the environment in order to reduce uncertainty. According to the discontinuity hypothesis, repressors are sensitive to threat in the early stages of information processing. While repressors do not exhibit memory disturbances early on, they manifest weak memory for these stimuli later. This study investigates the discontinuity hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. METHODS: Healthy volunteers (20 repressors and 20 sensitizers were selected from a sample of 150 students on the basis of the Mainz Coping Inventory. During the fMRI experiment, subjects evaluated and memorized emotional and neutral faces. Subjects performed two sessions of face recognition: immediately after the fMRI session and three days later. RESULTS: Repressors exhibited greater activation of frontal, parietal and temporal areas during encoding of angry faces compared to sensitizers. There were no differences in recognition of facial emotions between groups neither immediately after exposure nor after three days. CONCLUSIONS: The fMRI findings suggest that repressors manifest an enhanced neural processing of directly threatening facial expression which confirms the assumption of hyper-responsivity to threatening information in repression in an early processing stage. A discrepancy was observed between high neural activation in encoding-relevant brain areas in response to angry faces in repressors and no advantage in subsequent memory for these faces compared to sensitizers.

  6. Endocytosis of a maltose permease is induced when amylolytic enzyme production is repressed in Aspergillus oryzae.

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    Hiramoto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Mizuki; Ichikawa, Takanori; Matsuura, Yuka; Hasegawa-Shiro, Sachiko; Shintani, Takahiro; Gomi, Katsuya

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae, amylolytic enzyme production is induced by the presence of maltose. Previously, we identified a putative maltose permease (MalP) gene in the maltose-utilizing cluster of A. oryzae. malP disruption causes a significant decrease in α-amylase activity and maltose consumption, indicating that MalP is a maltose transporter required for amylolytic enzyme production in A. oryzae. Although the expression of amylase genes and malP is repressed by the presence of glucose, the effect of glucose on the abundance of functional MalP is unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of glucose and other carbon sources on the subcellular localization of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged MalP. After glucose addition, GFP-MalP at the plasma membrane was internalized and delivered to the vacuole. This glucose-induced internalization of GFP-MalP was inhibited by treatment with latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Furthermore, GFP-MalP internalization was inhibited by repressing the HECT ubiquitin ligase HulA (ortholog of yeast Rsp5). These results suggest that MalP is transported to the vacuole by endocytosis in the presence of glucose. Besides glucose, mannose and 2-deoxyglucose also induced the endocytosis of GFP-MalP and amylolytic enzyme production was inhibited by the addition of these sugars. However, neither the subcellular localization of GFP-MalP nor amylolytic enzyme production was influenced by the addition of xylose or 3-O-methylglucose. These results imply that MalP endocytosis is induced when amylolytic enzyme production is repressed.

  7. Iron repressible outer membrane proteins of Moraxella bovis and demonstration of siderophore-like activity.

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    Fenwick, B; Rider, M; Liang, J; Brightman, A

    1996-02-01

    Moraxella bovis (strain Epp 63), grown in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with desferrioxamine mesylate (0.05 mg/ml) resulted in cell free culture supernatants with an increased chromeazurol-S response indicating the presence of high affinity iron binding ligand(s). Supernatants of cultures where growth occurred in tryptic soy broth, RPMI 1640, or RPMI 1640-desferrioxamine supplemented with ferrous sulfate (10 micrograms/ml) were negative on the chromeazurol-S test. Growth of M. bovis in RPMI 1640 or RPMI 1640-desferrioxamine medium induced the expression of previously unrecognized outer membrane proteins whose expression was repressed when the medium was supplemented with iron and which were not produced when growth occurred in tryptic soy broth.

  8. Unified translation repression mechanism for microRNAs and upstream AUGs

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    Ajay Subramanian S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs that modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by binding complementary sites in the 3'-UTR. In a recent genome-wide study reporting a new miRNA target class (miBridge, we identified and validated interactions between 5'-UTRs and miRNAs. Separately, upstream AUGs (uAUGs in 5'-UTRs are known to regulate genes translationally without affecting mRNA levels, one of the mechanisms for miRNA-mediated repression. Results Using sequence data from whole-genome cDNA alignments we identified 1418 uAUG sequences on the 5'-UTR that specifically interact with 3'-ends of conserved miRNAs. We computationally identified miRNAs that can target six genes through their uAUGs that were previously reported to suppress translation. We extended this meta-analysis by confirming expression of these miRNAs in cell-lines used in the uAUG studies. Similarly, seven members of the KLF family of genes containing uAUGs were computationally identified as interacting with several miRNAs. Using KLF9 as an example (whose protein expression is limited to brain tissue despite the mRNA being expressed ubiquitously, we show computationally that miRNAs expressed only in HeLa cells and not in neuroblastoma (N2A cells can bind the uAUGs responsible for translation inhibition. Our computed results demonstrate that tissue- or cell-line specific repression of protein translation by uAUGs can be explained by the presence or absence of miRNAs that target these uAUG sequences. We propose that these uAUGs represent a subset of miRNA interaction sites on 5'-UTRs in miBridge, whereby a miRNA binding a uAUG hinders the progression of ribosome scanning the mRNA before it reaches the open reading frame (ORF. Conclusions While both miRNAs and uAUGs are separately known to down-regulate protein expression, we show that they may be functionally related by identifying potential interactions through a sequence

  9. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jiangsu Provincial Hospital of Chinese Traditional Medicine (China); Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yuhao [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Fang, Mingming [Jiangsu Jiankang Vocational Institute (China); Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxienjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwangnjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Xu, Yong [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IFN-{gamma} represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-{gamma} in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  10. pipetas usadas para I. A.

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    J. Castañeda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available La vagina y cerviz de las cerdas son estimuladas físicamente durante la inseminación. Este contacto puede afectar características reproductivas tales como el transporte espermático y el proceso de ovulación. En el presente trabajo se evaluaron desde el punto de vista económico y reproductivo, tres tipos de pipetas utilizadas para I. A. de cerdas de diferente material y forma. Se utilizaron 120 animales multíparos asignados de acuerdo a su orden de entrada al celo, en forma sucesiva a uno de tres grupos experimentales: 1 I. A. mediante pipeta reusable de hule tipo Melrose ( Medata, 2 I. A. con pipeta desechable de punta plástica en espiral y 3 I. A. con pipeta desechable con punta de poliestireno redonda (Medi chimica. No se encontró diferencia (P>0.05 entre los porcentajes de gestación, parición y promedio de lechones nacidos vivos por parto, en el tiempo de aplicación del semen, ni en el volumen del mismo, arrojado por las cerdas en los 10 min. posteriores a la I. A. Los valores promedio fueron de: 91.7%, 86.7%, 10.4 ± 2.8, 7.8 ± 2.6 min. y 10.4 ± 11.3 ml, respectivamente. El análisis de regresión, no mostró significancia en cuanto a paridad en ninguna de las variables estudiadas (P>0.05. Se concluye que las pipetas evaluadas no difieren en su efecto sobre el desarrollo reproductivo de la piara. Sin embargo, la pipeta reusable tipo Melrose ofrece ventaja económica bajo las condiciones del presente estudio

  11. Methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of microRNAs during cervical carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Saskia M.; Verlaat, Wina; Jaspers, Annelieke; Makazaji, Nour A.; Agami, Reuven; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is common and biologically relevant in cervical carcinogenesis and appears only partly related to chromosomal changes. We recently identified 32 miRNAs showing decreased expression in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and carcinomas not associated with a chromosomal loss, 6 of which were located within a CpG island. This study aimed to investigate to what extent these miRNAs are subject to DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional repression in cervical carcinogenesis.   Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) analysis on a cell line panel representing different stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) induced transformation revealed an increase in methylation of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 with progression to malignancy, whereas expression of these miRNAs was restored upon treatment with a demethylating agent. All three miRNAs showed significantly increased levels of methylation in cervical carcinomas, whereas methylation levels of hsa-miR-203 and -375 were also significantly increased in high-grade CIN. A pilot analysis showed that increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was also detectable in HPV-positive cervical scrapes of women with high-grade CIN compared with controls. Similar to recent findings on hsa-miR-375, ectopic expression of hsa-miR-203 in cervical cancer cells decreased both the proliferation rate and anchorage independent growth. We found evidence for methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 in cervical cancer. Methylation of the latter two was already apparent in precancerous lesions and represent functionally relevant events in HPV-mediated transformation. Increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was detectable in scrapes of women with high-grade CIN, indicating that methylated miRNAs may provide putative markers to assess the presence of (pre)cancerous lesions. PMID:23324622

  12. DDX3 Represses Stemness by Epigenetically Modulating Tumor-suppressive miRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Kang; Mai, Ru-Tsun; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chou, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yi-An; Chang, Yao-Wen; You, Li-Ru; Chen, Chun-Ming; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    2016-06-27

    Studies indicate that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, the functional role of DDX3 in regulation of hepatic CSCs was investigated. Our results demonstrated that reduced DDX3 expression was not only inversely associated with tumor grade, but also predicted poor prognosis of HCC patients. Knockdown of DDX3 in HCC cell line HepG2 induced stemness gene signature followed by occurrence of self-renewal, chemoreisistance, EMT, migration as well as CSC expansion, and most importantly, DDX3 knockdown promotes tumorigenesis. Moreover, we found positive correlations between DDX3 level and expressions of tumor-suppressive miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-122 and miR-145, but not miR-10b and miR-519a, implying their involvement in DDX3 knockdown-induced CSC phenotypes. In addition, DDX3 reduction promoted up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), while neither DNMT3B nor DNMT1 expression was affected. Enriched DNMT3A binding along with hypermethylation on promoters of these tumor-suppressive miRNAs reflected their transcriptional repressions in DDX3-knockdown cells. Furthermore, individual restoration of these tumor-suppressive miRNAs represses DDX3 knockdown-induced CSC phenotypes. In conclusion, our study suggested that DDX3 prevents generation of CSCs through epigenetically regulating a subset of tumor-suppressive miRNAs expressions, which strengthens tumor suppressor role of DDX3 in HCC.

  13. Single-cell analysis of Daxx and ATRX-dependent transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhart, Alyshia; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Yang, Tian; Negorev, Dmitri G; Janicki, Susan M

    2012-11-15

    Histone H3.3 is a constitutively expressed H3 variant implicated in the epigenetic inheritance of chromatin structures. Recently, the PML-nuclear body (PML-NB)/Nuclear Domain 10 (ND10) proteins, Daxx and ATRX, were found to regulate replication-independent histone H3.3 chromatin assembly at telomeres and pericentric heterochromatin. As it is not completely understood how PML-NBs/ND10s regulate transcription and resistance to viral infection, we have used a CMV-promoter-regulated inducible transgene array, at which Daxx and ATRX are enriched, to delineate the mechanisms through which they regulate transcription. When integrated into HeLa cells, which express both Daxx and ATRX, the array is refractory to activation. However, transcription can be induced when ICP0, the HSV-1 E3 ubiquitin ligase required to reverse latency, is expressed. As ATRX and Daxx are depleted from the activated array in ICP0-expressing HeLa cells, this suggests that they are required to maintain a repressed chromatin environment. As histone H3.3 is strongly recruited to the ICP0-activated array but does not co-localize with the DNA, this also suggests that chromatin assembly is blocked during activation. The conclusion that the Daxx and ATRX pathway is required for transcriptional repression and chromatin assembly at this site is further supported by the finding that an array integrated into the ATRX-negative U2OS cell line can be robustly activated and that histone H3.3 is similarly recruited and unincorporated into the chromatin. Therefore, this study has important implications for understanding gene silencing, viral latency and PML-NB/ND10 function.

  14. Repression of sulfate assimilation is an adaptive response of yeast to the oxidative stress of zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Yi; Roje, Sanja; Sandoval, Francisco J; Bird, Amanda J; Winge, Dennis R; Eide, David J

    2009-10-02

    The Zap1 transcription factor is a central player in the response of yeast to changes in zinc status. Previous studies identified over 80 genes activated by Zap1 in zinc-limited cells. In this report, we identified 36 genes repressed in a zinc- and Zap1-responsive manner. As a result, we have identified a new mechanism of Zap1-mediated gene repression whereby transcription of the MET3, MET14, and MET16 genes is repressed in zinc-limited cells. These genes encode the first three enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. We found that MET30, encoding a component of the SCF(Met30) ubiquitin ligase, is a direct Zap1 target gene. MET30 expression is increased in zinc-limited cells, and this leads to degradation of Met4, a transcription factor responsible for MET3, MET14, and MET16 expression. Thus, Zap1 is responsible for a decrease in sulfate assimilation in zinc-limited cells. We further show that cells that are unable to down-regulate sulfate assimilation under zinc deficiency experience increased oxidative stress. This increased oxidative stress is associated with an increase in the NADP(+)/NADPH ratio and may result from a decrease in NADPH-dependent antioxidant activities. These studies have led to new insights into how cells adapt to nutrient-limiting growth conditions.

  15. SUV39H1 mediated SIRT1 trans-repression contributes to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhang, Xinjian; Weng, Xinyu; Liang, Peng; Dai, Xin; Zeng, Sheng; Xu, Huihui; Huan, Hailin; Fang, Mingming; Li, Yuehua; Xu, Dachun; Xu, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Ischemic reperfusion (I/R) contributes to deleterious cardiac remodeling and heart failure. The deacetylase SIRT1 has been shown to protect the heart from I/R injury. We examined the mechanism whereby I/R injury represses SIRT1 transcription in the myocardium. There was accumulation of trimethylated histone H3K9 on the proximal SIRT1 promoter in the myocardium in mice following I/R injury and in cultured cardiomyocytes exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R). In accordance, the H3K9 trimethyltransferase SUV39H1 bound to the SIRT1 promoter and repressed SIRT1 transcription. SUV39H1 expression was up-regulated in the myocardium in mice following I/R insults and in H/R-treated cardiomyocytes paralleling SIRT1 down-regulation. Silencing SUV39H1 expression or suppression of SUV39H1 activity erased H3K9Me3 from the SIRT1 promoter and normalized SIRT1 levels in cardiomyocytes. Meanwhile, SUV39H1 deficiency or inhibition attenuated I/R-induced infarction and improved heart function in mice likely through influencing ROS levels in a SIRT1-dependent manner. Therefore, our data uncover a novel mechanism for SIRT1 trans-repression during cardiac I/R injury and present SUV39H1 as a druggable target for the development of therapeutic strategies against ischemic heart disease.

  16. Metformin inhibits castration-induced EMT in prostate cancer by repressing COX2/PGE2/STAT3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dali; Liu, Qiuli; Liu, Gaolei; Xu, Jing; Lan, Weihua; Jiang, Yao; Xiao, Hualiang; Zhang, Dianzheng; Jiang, Jun

    2017-03-28

    Castration is the standard therapeutic treatment for advanced prostate cancer but with limited benefit due to the profound relapse and metastasis. Activation of inflammatory signaling pathway and initiation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are closely related to drug resistance, tumor relapseas well as metastasis. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin is capable of inhibiting prostate cancer cell migration and invasion by repressing EMT evidenced by downregulating the mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Twist and upregulating the epithelium E-cadherin. These effects have also been observed in our animal model as well as prostate cancer patients. In addition, we showed the effects of metformin on the expression of genes involved in EMT through repressing the levels of COX2, PGE2 and phosphorylated STAT3. Furthermore, inactivating COX2 abolishes metformin's regulatory effects and exogenously administered PGE2 is capable of enhancing STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of EMT biomarker. We propose that metformin represses prostate cancer EMT and metastasis through targeting the COX2/PGE2/STAT3 axis. These findings suggest that metformin by itself or in combination with other anticancer drugs could be used as an anti-metastasis therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. cis-Encoded Small RNAs, a Conserved Mechanism for Repression of Polysaccharide Utilization in Bacteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanlu; Förstner, Konrad U; Vogel, Jörg; Smith, C Jeffrey

    2016-09-15

    Bacteroides is a major component of the human gut microbiota which has a broad impact on the development and physiology of its host and a potential role in a wide range of disease syndromes. The predominance of this genus is due in large part to expansion of paralogous gene clusters, termed polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs), dedicated to the uptake and catabolism of host-derived and dietary polysaccharides. The nutritive value and availability of polysaccharides in the gut vary greatly; thus, their utilization is hierarchical and strictly controlled. A typical PUL includes regulatory genes that induce PUL expression in response to the presence of specific glycan substrates. However, the existence of additional regulatory mechanisms has been predicted to explain phenomena such as hierarchical control and catabolite repression. In this report, a previously unknown layer of regulatory control was discovered in Bacteroides fragilis Exploratory transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis revealed the presence of cis-encoded antisense small RNAs (sRNAs) associated with 15 (30%) of the B. fragilis PULs. A model system using the Don (degradation of N-glycans) PUL showed that the donS sRNA negatively regulated Don expression at the transcriptional level, resulting in a decrease in N-glycan utilization. Additional studies performed with other Bacteroides species indicated that this regulatory mechanism is highly conserved and, interestingly, that the regulated PULs appear to be closely linked to the utilization of host-derived glycans rather than dietary plant polysaccharides. The findings described here demonstrate a global control mechanism underlying known PUL regulatory circuits and provide insight into regulation of Bacteroides physiology. The human gut is colonized by a dense microbiota which is essential to the health and normal development of the host. A key to gut homeostasis is the preservation of a stable, diverse microbiota. Bacteroides is a dominant genus

  18. Repression of both isoforms of disproportionating enzyme leads to higher malto-oligosaccharide content and reduced growth in potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Henrik Lütken; Lloyd, James Richard; Glaring, Mikkel A.;

    2010-01-01

    Two glucanotransferases, disproportionating enzyme 1 (StDPE1) and disproportionating enzyme 2 (StDPE2), were repressed using RNA interference technology in potato, leading to plants repressed in either isoform individually, or both simultaneously. This is the first detailed report of their combin......-oligosaccharides, starch content and photosynthetic activity and thereby plant growth possibly by a negative feedback mechanism....... that this was most likely due to a decrease in carbon assimilation. The subcellular localisation of StDPE2 was re-addressed in parallel with DPE2 from Arabidopsis thaliana by transient expression of yellow fluorescent protein fusions in tobacco. No translocation to the chloroplasts was observed for any of the fusion...

  19. PROBLEM OF CRIMINAL REPRESSION, APPLIED OUTSIDE OF CRIMINAL LIABILITY

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    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.2A new institute of repressive measures applied outside the criminal liability in criminal law (including as a condition for exemption from criminal liability is forming now in Russian legislation. The author concludes that the provisions of the criminal law on monetary compensation and a court fine should be deleted because of the following reasons. 1 By their nature, and monetary compensation and a court fine, not being a formal punishment (and, therefore, a form of realization of criminal responsibility is a monetary penalty, i.e., penalty-punishment. Moreover, the rules of court fine destination identical rules of criminal sentencing. 2 Quantitatively court fine may exceed the minimum limits of criminal punish-ment in the form of fines. The dimensions of monetary compensation in the order of hours. Pt. 2, Art. 76.1 of the Criminal Code and at all close to the maximum values of fine-punishment. 3 Exemption from criminal liability requires states to refrain from prosecuting the person alleged to have committed a crime, which means that the nonuse of criminal repression. Regulatory standards analyzed, on the other hand, require mandatory use of repression, ie, virtually no exemption from criminal liability does not occur at all. 4 The use of a quasi-penalty in the form of monetary compensation and court fines are not an exemption from criminal responsibility, but on the contrary, the use of criminal repression (of responsibility, and in a simplified manner. 5 Contrary to the requirements of the Constitution and the Criminal Code of criminal repression is applied to persons whose guilt has not been established in the commission of a crime. Thus, in criminal law introduced a presumption of guilt. 6 Customization repression (in fact – of criminal responsibility in the application of the judicial penalty is substantially limited, and the application of monetary compensation is excluded at all, contrary to the requirement that the rough

  20. Transcriptional repression and DNA hypermethylation of a small set of ES cell marker genes in male germline stem cells

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    Kanatsu-Shinohara Mito

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously identified a set of genes called ECATs (ES cell-associated transcripts that are expressed at high levels in mouse ES cells. Here, we examine the expression and DNA methylation of ECATs in somatic cells and germ cells. Results In all ECATs examined, the promoter region had low methylation levels in ES cells, but higher levels in somatic cells. In contrast, in spite of their lack of pluripotency, male germline stem (GS cells expressed most ECATs and exhibited hypomethylation of ECAT promoter regions. We observed a similar hypomethylation of ECAT loci in adult testis and isolated sperm. Some ECATs were even less methylated in male germ cells than in ES cells. However, a few ECATs were not expressed in GS cells, and most of them targets of Oct3/4 and Sox2. The Octamer/Sox regulatory elements were hypermethylated in these genes. In addition, we found that GS cells express little Sox2 protein and low Oct3/4 protein despite abundant expression of their transcripts. Conclusion Our results suggest that DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional repression of a small set of ECATs, together with post-transcriptional repression of Oct3/4 and Sox2, contribute to the loss of pluripotency in male germ cells.

  1. Characterization of an Nmr homolog that modulates GATA factor-mediated nitrogen metabolite repression in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Russel Lee

    Full Text Available Nitrogen source utilization plays a critical role in fungal development, secondary metabolite production and pathogenesis. In both the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, GATA transcription factors globally activate the expression of catabolic enzyme-encoding genes required to degrade complex nitrogenous compounds. However, in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources such as ammonium, GATA factor activity is inhibited in some species through interaction with co-repressor Nmr proteins. This regulatory phenomenon, nitrogen metabolite repression, enables preferential utilization of readily assimilated nitrogen sources. In the basidiomycete pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the GATA factor Gat1/Are1 has been co-opted into regulating multiple key virulence traits in addition to nitrogen catabolism. Here, we further characterize Gat1/Are1 function and investigate the regulatory role of the predicted Nmr homolog Tar1. While GAT1/ARE1 expression is induced during nitrogen limitation, TAR1 transcription is unaffected by nitrogen availability. Deletion of TAR1 leads to inappropriate derepression of non-preferred nitrogen catabolic pathways in the simultaneous presence of favoured sources. In addition to exhibiting its evolutionary conserved role of inhibiting GATA factor activity under repressing conditions, Tar1 also positively regulates GAT1/ARE1 transcription under non-repressing conditions. The molecular mechanism by which Tar1 modulates nitrogen metabolite repression, however, remains open to speculation. Interaction between Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 was undetectable in a yeast two-hybrid assay, consistent with Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 each lacking the conserved C-terminus regions present in ascomycete Nmr proteins and GATA factors that are known to interact with each other. Importantly, both Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 are suppressors of C. neoformans virulence, reiterating and highlighting the paradigm of nitrogen regulation of pathogenesis.

  2. Amino acid 1-209 is essential for PDX-1-mediated repression of human CMV IE promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing CHEN; Lei CHEN; Ge LI; Lu CHENG; Yin HUANG; Jia-xin ZHANG; Wei-wei FAN; Da-ru LU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the different roles of pancreatic duodenal homeobox factors-1 (PDX-1) domains in PDX-1 mediated repression of human cytomegalovirus immediately early (CMV IE) promoter. Methods: A series of truncated PDX-1 mutants were constructed. The binding of PDX-1 and CMV IE promoter was identified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The dual-reporter assay was applied to examine the repression activities of PDX-1 mutants on CMV IE promoter. In addition, RNAi technology was used to specifically knock down the endogenous PDX-1 expression. Results: The reporter assay indicated that compared to the mock controls (pEGFP-N2), overexpression of PDX-1 resulted in a 41% decrease of CMV IE promoter activity in the 293 cells (P<0.05) and 43% decrease in HeLa cells (P<0.05), and the repression levels of various truncated mutants played on CMV IE promoter were different. Specific knock down of the endogenous PDX-1 expression significantly restored the activity of CMV IE promoter. EMS A demonstrated that domain 3 is necessary for nuclear localization and DNA binding activity of PDX-1. However, binding of PDX-1 alone to CMV IE promoter was not sufficient to inhibit its transcriptional activity, and other domains of PDX-1 presented were also required. Conclusion: Our data suggested that the DNA binding activity of PDX-1 domain 3 and the cooperative binding of PDX-1 domain 1/2 with other proteins were required for PDX-1 mediated repression of CMV IE promoter.

  3. Disruption of DNA methylation-dependent long gene repression in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Harrison W.; Kinde, Benyam Z.; Stroud, Hume; Gilbert, Caitlin S.; Harmin, David A.; Kastan, Nathaniel R.; Hemberg, Martin; Ebert, Daniel H.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the MECP2 gene leads to Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurological disorder with features of autism1. MECP2 encodes a methyl-DNA-binding protein2 that has been proposed to function as a transcriptional repressor, but despite numerous studies examining neuronal gene expression in Mecp2 mutants, no clear model has emerged for how MeCP2 regulates transcription3–9. Here we identify a genome-wide length-dependent increase in gene expression in MeCP2 mutant mouse models and human RTT brains. We present evidence that MeCP2 represses gene expression by binding to methylated CA sites within long genes, and that in neurons lacking MeCP2, decreasing the expression of long genes attenuates RTT-associated cellular deficits. In addition, we find that long genes as a population are enriched for neuronal functions and selectively expressed in the brain. These findings suggest that mutations in MeCP2 may cause neurological dysfunction by specifically disrupting long gene expression in the brain. PMID:25762136

  4. Repression of class I transcription by cadmium is mediated by the protein phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Le Roux, Gwenaëlle; Ducrot, Cécile; Chédin, Stéphane; Labarre, Jean; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Toxic metals are part of our environment, and undue exposure to them leads to a variety of pathologies. In response, most organisms adapt their metabolism and have evolved systems to limit this toxicity and to acquire tolerance. Ribosome biosynthesis being central for protein synthesis, we analyzed in yeast the effects of a moderate concentration of cadmium (Cd2+) on Pol I transcription that represents >60% of the transcriptional activity of the cells. We show that Cd2+ rapidly and drastically shuts down the expression of the 35S rRNA. Repression does not result from a poisoning of any of the components of the class I transcriptional machinery by Cd2+, but rather involves a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent cellular signaling pathway that targets the formation/dissociation of the Pol I–Rrn3 complex. We also show that Pol I transcription is repressed by other toxic metals, such as Ag+ and Hg2+, which likewise perturb the Pol I–Rrn3 complex, but through PP2A-independent mechanisms. Taken together, our results point to a central role for the Pol I–Rrn3 complex as molecular switch for regulating Pol I transcription in response to toxic metals. PMID:23640330

  5. Greves, sindicatos e repressão policial no Rio de Janeiro (1954-1964

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    Marcelo Badaró Mattos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta parte dos resultados de uma pesquisa sobre as greves e a repressão aos sindicatos no Rio de Janeiro entre 1954 e 1964. Seu objetivo central é rediscutir a relação entre Estado, empresários e trabalhadores organizados no período em questão a partir da dimensão de conflito explicitada nos momentos de greve. Pretendeu-se também apresentar dados mais completos que os anteriormente disponíveis sobre o total e as características das greves, bem como explorar o potencial da documentação policial, aberta à consulta nos últimos anos.This article presents some conclusions on strikes and police repression to trade unions in Rio de Janeiro. The central question is the relation between State, capitalists and organized workers in that moment, with special attention to the conflict dimension expressed by strikes. The article tries to show more complete data about strike numbers and characteristics, as well as to explore the recently opened police documents.

  6. EBV reactivation as a target of luteolin to repress NPC tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chung-Chun; Fang, Chih-Yeu; Hsu, Hui-Yu; Chuang, Hsin-Ying; Cheng, Yu-Jhen; Chen, Yen-Ju; Chou, Sheng-Ping; Huang, Sheng-Yen; Lin, Su-Fang; Chang, Yao; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2016-04-05

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignancy derived from the epithelial cells of the nasopharynx. Although a combination of radiotherapy with chemotherapy is effective for therapy, relapse and metastasis after remission remain major causes of mortality. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is believed to be one of causes of NPC development. We demonstrated previously that EBV reactivation is important for the carcinogenesis of NPC. We sought, therefore, to determine whether EBV reactivation can be a target for retardation of relapse of NPC. After screening, we found luteolin is able to inhibit EBV reactivation. It inhibited EBV lytic protein expression and repressed the promoter activities of two major immediate-early genes, Zta and Rta. Furthermore, luteolin was shown to reduce genomic instability induced by recurrent EBV reactivation in NPC cells. EBV reactivation-induced NPC cell proliferation and migration, as well as matrigel invasiveness, were also repressed by luteolin treatment. Tumorigenicity in mice, induced by EBV reactivation, was decreased profoundly following luteolin administration. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of EBV reactivation is a novel approach to prevent the relapse of NPC.

  7. p53 represses human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication via the viral E2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Iain M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV DNA replication can be inhibited by the cellular tumour suppressor protein p53. However, the mechanism through which p53 inhibits viral replication and the role that this might play in the HPV life cycle are not known. The papillomavirus E2 protein is required for efficient HPV DNA replication and also regulates viral gene expression. E2 represses transcription of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes and can thereby modulate indirectly host cell proliferation and survival. In addition, the E2 protein from HPV 16 has been shown to bind p53 and to be capable of inducing apoptosis independently of E6 and E7. Results Here we use a panel of E2 mutants to confirm that mutations which block the induction of apoptosis via this E6/E7-independent pathway, have little or no effect on the induction of apoptosis by the E6/E7-dependent pathway. Although these mutations in E2 do not affect the ability of the protein to mediate HPV DNA replication, they do abrogate the repressive effects of p53 on the transcriptional activity of E2 and prevent the inhibition of E2-dependent HPV DNA replication by p53. Conclusion These data suggest that p53 down-regulates HPV 16 DNA replication via the E2 protein.

  8. MOF-associated complexes ensure stem cell identity and Xist repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmicki, Tomasz; Dündar, Friederike; Ramírez, Fidel; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Wright, Patrick Rudolf; Videm, Pavankumar; Backofen, Rolf; Heard, Edith; Manke, Thomas; Akhtar, Asifa

    2014-01-01

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) play distinct roles in many cellular processes and are frequently misregulated in cancers. Here, we study the regulatory potential of MYST1-(MOF)-containing MSL and NSL complexes in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and neuronal progenitors. We find that both complexes influence transcription by targeting promoters and TSS-distal enhancers. In contrast to flies, the MSL complex is not exclusively enriched on the X chromosome, yet it is crucial for mammalian X chromosome regulation as it specifically regulates Tsix, the major repressor of Xist lncRNA. MSL depletion leads to decreased Tsix expression, reduced REX1 recruitment, and consequently, enhanced accumulation of Xist and variable numbers of inactivated X chromosomes during early differentiation. The NSL complex provides additional, Tsix-independent repression of Xist by maintaining pluripotency. MSL and NSL complexes therefore act synergistically by using distinct pathways to ensure a fail-safe mechanism for the repression of X inactivation in ESCs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02024.001 PMID:24842875

  9. The mechanism underlying Ler-mediated alleviation of gene repression by H-NS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Minsang

    2017-01-29

    Secretion of effector proteins in Enteropathogeneic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is mediated by a specialized type III secretion system, components of which are encoded in the LEE operons 1 to 5. H-NS, a global repressor in E. coli, silences the expression of LEE operons. Ler, a master regulator in LEE operons, shares 24% amnio acid identity and 44% amino acid similarity to H-NS. Interestingly, rather than a gene silencer, its main role has been characterized as an antagonizing protein that relieves H-NS-mediated transcriptional silencing. In the previous study we reported molecular mechanism for the repression of LEE5 promoter in EPEC and EHEC by H-NS as a protein interaction between upstream DNA-bound H-NS and the αCTD of promoter-bound RNA polymerase. The mechanism underlying Ler-mediated alleviation of the genes repression by H-NS is largely unknown. We examined regulatory effect of these proteins on LEE5p activity using various in vitro tools. Our results revealed that binding affinity of Ler to the LEE5p DNA is about 40 folds greater than that of H-NS as determined by surface plasmon resonance. We verified that Ler binding removed H-NS bound to the same stretch of DNA on LEE5 promoter resulting in a derepression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Citrullination of histone H3 interferes with HP1-mediated transcriptional repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease associated with abnormal expression of a subset of cytokines, resulting in inappropriate T-lymphocyte activation and uncontrolled immune response. A key issue in the field is the need to understand why these cytokines are transcriptionally activated in the patients. Here, we have examined several transcription units subject to pathological reactivation in MS, including the TNFα and IL8 cytokine genes and also several Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs. We find that both the immune genes and the HERVs require the heterochromatin protein HP1α for their transcriptional repression. We further show that the Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4 (PADI4, an enzyme with a suspected role in MS, weakens the binding of HP1α to tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 by citrullinating histone H3 arginine 8. The resulting de-repression of both cytokines and HERVs can be reversed with the PADI-inhibitor Cl-amidine. Finally, we show that in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from MS patients, the promoters of TNFα, and several HERVs share a deficit in HP1α recruitment and an augmented accumulation of histone H3 with a double citrulline 8 tri-methyl lysine 9 modifications. Thus, our study provides compelling evidence that HP1α and PADI4 are regulators of both immune genes and HERVs, and that multiple events of transcriptional reactivation in MS patients can be explained by the deficiency of a single mechanism of gene silencing.

  11. Pectin lyase overproduction by Penicillium griseoroseum mutants resistant to catabolite repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Juliana Oliveira; Pereira, Jorge Fernando; Araújo, Elza Fernandes de; Queiroz, Marisa Vieira de

    2017-02-09

    Expression of pectinolytic genes is regulated by catabolic repression limiting the production of pectin lyase (PL) if the natural inducer, pectin, is missing from the growth medium. Here, we report the isolation of Penicillium griseoroseum mutants resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose (DG) that show resistance to catabolite repression and overproduce PL. Three spontaneous and nine UV-induced mutants were obtained. Some mutants produced sectors (segments morphologically different) that were also studied. The mutants were analyzed for pectinases production on pectinase-agar plates and five mutants and two sectors showing larger clearing zones than the wild type were selected for quantitative assay. Although PL production higher than the wild type has been found, phenotype instability was observed for most of the mutants and, after transfers to nonselective medium, the DG resistance was no longer present. Only mutants M03 and M04 were stable maintaining the DG-resistance phenotype. When growing for 120h in liquid medium containing glucose with or without pectin, both mutants showed higher PL production. In the presence of glucose as sole carbon source, the mutant M03 produced 7.8-fold more PL than the wild type. Due its phenotypic stability and PL overproduction, the mutant M03 presents potential for industrial applications.

  12. miR-29 Represses the Activities of DNA Methyltransferases and DNA Demethylases

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    Izuho Hatada

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the microRNA-29 (miR-29 family directly target the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. Disturbances in the expression levels of miR-29 have been linked to tumorigenesis and tumor aggressiveness. Members of the miR-29 family are currently thought to repress DNA methylation and suppress tumorigenesis by protecting against de novo methylation. Here, we report that members of the miR-29 family repress the activities of DNA methyltransferases and DNA demethylases, which have opposing roles in control of DNA methylation status. Members of the miR-29 family directly inhibited DNA methyltransferases and two major factors involved in DNA demethylation, namely tet methylcytosine dioxygenase 1 (TET1 and thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG. Overexpression of miR-29 upregulated the global DNA methylation level in some cancer cells and downregulated DNA methylation in other cancer cells, suggesting that miR-29 suppresses tumorigenesis by protecting against changes in the existing DNA methylation status rather than by preventing de novo methylation of DNA.

  13. Puf mediates translation repression of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Miao

    Full Text Available Translational control of gene expression plays an essential role in development. In malaria parasites, translational regulation is critical during the development of specialized transition stages between the vertebrate host and mosquito vector. Here we show that a Pumilio/FBF (Puf family RNA-binding protein, PfPuf2, is required for the translation repression of a number of transcripts in gametocytes including two genes encoding the transmission-blocking vaccine candidates Pfs25 and Pfs28. Whereas studies to date support a paradigm of Puf-mediated translation regulation through 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of target mRNAs, this study, for the first time, identifies a functional Puf-binding element (PBE in the 5'UTR of pfs25. We provide both in vitro and in vivo evidence to demonstrate that PfPuf2 binds to the PBEs in pfs25 and pfs28 to mediate translation repression. This finding provides a renewed view of Pufs as versatile translation regulators and sheds light on their functions in the development of lower branches of eukaryotes.

  14. Political Repressions in USSR (Against Speculations, Perversion and Mystifications

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    Viktor N. Zemskov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the great numbers of political repressions, which were exaggerated by authors: R.A. Medvedev, A.I. Solzhenitsyn, O.G. Shatunovskoy, A.V. Antonov-Ovseenko in 80-90s are criticized. The author characterizes figures given in tens and even in hundreds of millions of victims as a statistical charlatanism.After checking up the KGB archives, and documents of division responsible for NKVD-MVD special settlements, the author spills the light on real numbers of political repressions in USSR. In his view, the total number of political victims does not exceed 2, 6 million people. This number implies over 800 thousand of death sentenced for political reasons, around 600 thousand political prisoners who died in labor camps, and about 1, 2 million people died in exile (including ‘Kulak Exile’ and during transportation (deported ethnic groups and others.

  15. An Updated GA Signaling 'Relief of Repression' Regulatory Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Hua Gao; Sen-Lin Xiao; Qin-Fang Yao; Yu-Juan Wang; Xiang-Dong Fu

    2011-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA)regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. The DELLA proteins act to restrain plant growth, and GA relieves this repression by promoting their degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway.The elucidation of the crystalline structure of the GA soluble receptor GID1 protein represents an important breakthrough for understanding the way in which GA is perceived and how it induces the destabilization of the DELLA proteins. Recent advances have revealed that the DELLA proteins are involved in protein-protein interactions within various environmental and hormone signaling pathways. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the 'relief of repression" model that aims to explain the role of GA and the function of the DELLA proteins, incorporating the many aspects of cross-talk shown to exist in the control of plant development and the response to stress.

  16. Recruitment of HDAC4 by transcription factor YY1 represses HOXB13 to affect cell growth in AR-negative prostate cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guoling; Zhang, Guocui; Dong, Zhixiong

    2008-01-01

    HOXB13 is a homeodomain protein implicated to play a role in growth arrest in AR (androgen receptor)-negative prostate cancer cells. Expression of HOXB13 is restricted to the AR-expressing prostate cells. In this report, we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor NaB (sodium butyrate) was able to ind...... to induce cell growth arrest and to increase HOXB13 expression in AR-negative prostate cancer cells. We also show that both HDAC4 and YY1 participated in the repression of HOXB13 expression through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone acetylation modification. Specifically, co...... essential for the recruitments of YY1 and HDAC4. Data presented in this report suggest that YY1 and HDAC4 affected cell growth by repressing transcriptional regulation of HOXB13 through an epigenetic modification of histones....

  17. Repression and reactivation of lithium efflux from erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodnick, P J; Meltzer, H L; Dunner, D L; Fieve, R R

    1979-10-01

    Efflux of lithium from human erythrocytes was studied in patients before, during, and after discontinuation of administration of lithium carbonate. Onset of lithium-induced repression of efflux took approximately 10 days and was significantly shorter in patients who had had lithium therapy previously. Reactivation took a longer period of time--approximately 2 week--and was found to be related to duration of lithium therapy. Theoretical pathways of lithium flow through membranes are discussed.

  18. Churchill regulates cell movement and mesoderm specification by repressing Nodal signaling

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    Mentzer Laura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell movements are essential to the determination of cell fates during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Churchill (ChCh has been proposed to regulate cell fate by regulating cell movements during gastrulation in the chick. However, the mechanism of action of ChCh is not understood. Results We demonstrate that ChCh acts to repress the response to Nodal-related signals in zebrafish. When ChCh function is abrogated the expression of mesodermal markers is enhanced while ectodermal markers are expressed at decreased levels. In cell transplant assays, we observed that ChCh-deficient cells are more motile than wild-type cells. When placed in wild-type hosts, ChCh-deficient cells often leave the epiblast, migrate to the germ ring and are later found in mesodermal structures. We demonstrate that both movement of ChCh-compromised cells to the germ ring and acquisition of mesodermal character depend on the ability of the donor cells to respond to Nodal signals. Blocking Nodal signaling in the donor cells at the levels of Oep, Alk receptors or Fast1 inhibited migration to the germ ring and mesodermal fate change in the donor cells. We also detect additional unusual movements of transplanted ChCh-deficient cells which suggests that movement and acquisition of mesodermal character can be uncoupled. Finally, we demonstrate that ChCh is required to limit the transcriptional response to Nodal. Conclusion These data establish a broad role for ChCh in regulating both cell movement and Nodal signaling during early zebrafish development. We show that chch is required to limit mesodermal gene expression, inhibit Nodal-dependant movement of presumptive ectodermal cells and repress the transcriptional response to Nodal signaling. These findings reveal a dynamic role for chch in regulating cell movement and fate during early development.

  19. Glutamine: a major player in nitrogen catabolite repression in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajueiro, Danielli Batista Bezerra; Parente, Denise Castro; Leite, Fernanda Cristina Bezerra; de Morais Junior, Marcos Antonio; de Barros Pita, Will

    2017-06-19

    In the present work we studied the expression of genes from nitrogen central metabolism in the yeast Dekkera bruxellensis and under regulation by the Nitrogen Catabolite Repression mechanism (NCR). These analyses could shed some light on the biological mechanisms involved in the adaptation and survival of this yeast in the sugarcane fermentation process for ethanol production. Nitrogen sources (N-sources) in the form of ammonium, nitrate, glutamate or glutamine were investigated with or without the addition of methionine sulfoximine, which inhibits the activity of the enzyme glutamine synthetase and releases cells from NCR. The results showed that glutamine might act as an intracellular sensor for nitrogen availability in D. bruxellensis, by activating NCR. Gene expression analyses indicated the existence of two different GATA-dependent NCR pathways, identified as glutamine-dependent and glutamine-independent mechanisms. Moreover, nitrate is sensed as a non-preferential N-source and releases NCR to its higher level. After grouping genes according to their regulation pattern, we showed that genes for ammonium assimilation represent a regulon with almost constitutive expression, while permease encoding genes are mostly affected by the nitrogen sensor mechanism. On the other hand, nitrate assimilation genes constitute a regulon that is primarily subjected to induction by nitrate and, to a lesser extent, to a repressive mechanism by preferential N-sources. This observation explains our previous reports showing that nitrate is co-consumed with ammonium, a trait that enables D. bruxellensis cells to scavenge limiting N-sources in the industrial substrate and, therefore, to compete with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in this environment.

  20. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  1. Trans-inactivation: Repression in a wrong place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatskikh, Aleksei S; Abramov, Yuriy A; Lavrov, Sergey A

    2016-08-19

    Trans-inactivation is the repression of genes on a normal chromosome under the influence of a rearranged homologous chromosome demonstrating the position effect variegation (PEV). This phenomenon was studied in detail on the example of brown(Dominant) allele causing the repression of wild-type brown gene on the opposite chromosome. We have investigated another trans-inactivation-inducing chromosome rearrangement, In(2)A4 inversion. In both cases, brown(Dominant) and In(2)A4, the repression seems to be the result of dragging of the euchromatic region of the normal chromosome into the heterochromatic environment. It was found that cis-inactivation (classical PEV) and trans-inactivation show different patterns of distribution along the chromosome and respond differently to PEV modifying genes. It appears that the causative mechanism of trans-inactivation is de novo heterochromatin assembly on euchromatic sequences dragged into the heterochromatic nuclear compartment. Trans-inactivation turns out to be the result of a combination of heterochromatin-induced position effect and the somatic interphase chromosome pairing that is widespread in Diptera.

  2. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  3. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  4. EZH2-mediated Puma gene repression regulates non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation and cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haidan; Li, Wei; Yu, Xinfang; Gao, Feng; Duan, Zhi; Ma, Xiaolong; Tan, Shiming; Yuan, Yunchang; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Xinmin; Yang, Yifeng

    2016-08-30

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic effectors that maintain the silenced state of genes. EZH2 is the catalytic core and one of the most important components of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and primary lung tumors, we found that PRC2 components, including EZH2, are overexpressed. High levels of EZH2 protein were associated with worse overall survival rate in NSCLC patients. RNA interference mediated attenuation of EZH2 expression blunted the malignant phenotype in this setting, exerting inhibitory effects on cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, and tumor development in a xenograft mouse model. Unexpectedly, we discovered that, in the suppression of EZH2, p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression was concomitantly induced. This is achieved through EZH2 directly binds to the Puma promoter thus epigenetic repression of PUMA expression. Furthermore, cisplatin-induced apoptosis of EZH2-knocking down NSCLC cells was elevated as a consequence of increased PUMA expression. Our work reveals a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism controlling PUMA expression and suggests that EZH2 offers a candidate molecular target for NSCLC therapy and EZH2-regulated PUMA induction would synergistically increase the sensitivity to platinum agents in non-small cell lung cancers.

  5. ICP0 antagonizes Stat 1-dependent repression of herpes simplex virus: implications for the regulation of viral latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balliet John W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is encoded within the HSV-1 latency-associated locus. When ICP0 is not synthesized, the HSV-1 genome is acutely susceptible to cellular repression. Reciprocally, when ICP0 is synthesized, viral replication is efficiently initiated from virions or latent HSV-1 genomes. The current study was initiated to determine if ICP0's putative role as a viral interferon (IFN antagonist may be relevant to the process by which ICP0 influences the balance between productive replication versus cellular repression of HSV-1. Results Wild-type (ICP0+ strains of HSV-1 produced lethal infections in scid or rag2-/- mice. The replication of ICP0- null viruses was rapidly repressed by the innate host response of scid or rag2-/- mice, and the infected animals remained healthy for months. In contrast, rag2-/- mice that lacked the IFN-α/β receptor (rag2-/- ifnar-/- or Stat 1 (rag2-/- stat1-/- failed to repress ICP0- viral replication, resulting in uncontrolled viral spread and death. Thus, the replication of ICP0- viruses is potently repressed in vivo by an innate immune response that is dependent on the IFN-α/β receptor and the downstream transcription factor, Stat 1. Conclusion ICP0's function as a viral IFN antagonist is necessary in vivo to prevent an innate, Stat 1-dependent host response from rapidly repressing productive HSV-1 replication. This antagonistic relationship between ICP0 and the host IFN response may be relevant in regulating whether the HSV-1 genome is expressed, or silenced, in virus-infected cells in vivo. These results may also be clinically relevant. IFN-sensitive ICP0- viruses are avirulent, establish long-term latent infections, and induce an adaptive immune response that is highly protective against lethal challenge with HSV-1. Therefore, ICP0- viruses appear to possess the desired safety and efficacy profile of a live vaccine against

  6. Tbx2 regulates anterior neural specification by repressing FGF signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Park, Dong-Seok; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2017-01-15

    During early embryogenesis, FGF signals regulate the antero-posterior (AP) patterning of the neural plate by promoting posterior cell fates. In particular, BMP signal-mediated attenuation of FGF pathway plays a critical role in the determination of the anterior neural region. Here we show that Tbx2, a T-box transcriptional repressor regulates anterior neural specification by suppressing FGF8 signaling pathway in Xenopus embryo. Tbx2 is expressed in the anterior edge of the neural plate in early neurulae. Overexpression and knockdown of Tbx2 induce expansion and reduction in the expression of anterior neural markers, respectively. It also suppresses FGF8-induced ERK phosphorylation and neural caudalization. Tbx2, which is a target gene of BMP signal, down-regulates FGF8 signaling by inhibiting the expression of Flrt3, a positive regulator of this pathway. We found that Tbx2 binds directly to the T-box element located in the promoter region of Flrt3 gene, thereby interfering with the activity of the promoter. Consistently, Tbx2 augmentation of anterior neural formation is inhibited by co-expression of Flrt3. Furthermore, disruption of the anterior-most structures such as eyes in Tbx2-depleted embryos can be rescued by inhibition of Flrt3 function or FGF signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that Tbx2 mediates BMP signal to down-regulate FGF signaling pathway by repressing Flrt3 expression for anterior tissue formation.

  7. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  8. Role of the BAHD1 Chromatin-Repressive Complex in Placental Development and Regulation of Steroid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakisic, Goran; Wendling, Olivia; Libertini, Emanuele; Radford, Elizabeth J.; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Champy, Marie-France; Wattenhofer-Donzé, Marie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Feunteun, Jean; Sorg, Tania; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    BAHD1 is a vertebrate protein that promotes heterochromatin formation and gene repression in association with several epigenetic regulators. However, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the Bahd1 gene results in hypocholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and decreased body fat in mice. It also causes placental growth restriction with a drop of trophoblast glycogen cells, a reduction of fetal weight and a high neonatal mortality rate. By intersecting transcriptome data from murine Bahd1 knockout (KO) placentas at stages E16.5 and E18.5 of gestation, Bahd1-KO embryonic fibroblasts, and human cells stably expressing BAHD1, we also show that changes in BAHD1 levels alter expression of steroid/lipid metabolism genes. Biochemical analysis of the BAHD1-associated multiprotein complex identifies MIER proteins as novel partners of BAHD1 and suggests that BAHD1-MIER interaction forms a hub for histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, chromatin readers and transcription factors. We further show that overexpression of BAHD1 leads to an increase of MIER1 enrichment on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). In addition, BAHD1 and MIER1/3 repress expression of the steroid hormone receptor genes ESR1 and PGR, both playing important roles in placental development and energy metabolism. Moreover, modulation of BAHD1 expression in HEK293 cells triggers epigenetic changes at the ESR1 locus. Together, these results identify BAHD1 as a core component of a chromatin-repressive complex regulating placental morphogenesis and body fat storage and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to several human diseases. PMID:26938916

  9. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  10. A systems biology approach to study glucose repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Steen Lund; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Bro, Christoffer

    2007-01-01

    in repression of a wide range of genes involved to utilization of alternative carbon sources. In this work, we applied a systems biology approach to study the interaction between these two pathways. Through genome-wide transcription analysis of strains with disruption of HXK2, GRR1, MIG1, the combination of MIG......1 and MIG2, and the parentel strain, we identified 393 genes to have significantly changed expression levels. To identify co-regulation patterns in the different strains we applied principal component analysis. Disruption of either GRR1 or HXK2 were both found to have profound effects...... reporter metabolites, and found that there is a high degree of consistency between the identified reporter metabolites and the physiological effects observed in the different mutants . Our systems biology approach points to close interaction between the two pathways, and our metabolism driven analysis...

  11. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D

    2016-06-15

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors.

  12. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Chunmei; Cheng, Jingfei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  13. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF, a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1. In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN. This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs, including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  14. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  15. The Polycomb group protein MEDEA and the DNA methyltransferase MET1 interact to repress autonomous endosperm development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Anja; Wöhrmann, Heike J P; Raissig, Michael T; Arand, Julia; Gheyselinck, Jacqueline; Gagliardini, Valeria; Heichinger, Christian; Walter, Joern; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2013-03-01

    In flowering plants, double fertilization of the female gametes, the egg and the central cell, initiates seed development to give rise to a diploid embryo and the triploid endosperm. In the absence of fertilization, the FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT SEED Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (FIS-PRC2) represses this developmental process by histone methylation of certain target genes. The FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT SEED (FIS) class genes MEDEA (MEA) and FERTILIZATION-INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE) encode two of the core components of this complex. In addition, DNA methylation establishes and maintains the repression of gene activity, for instance via DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (MET1), which maintains methylation of symmetric CpG residues. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis MET1 interacts with MEA in vitro and in a yeast two-hybrid assay, similar to the previously identified interaction of the mammalian homologues DNMT1 and EZH2. MET1 and MEA share overlapping expression patterns in reproductive tissues before and after fertilization, a prerequisite for an interaction in vivo. Importantly, a much higher percentage of central cells initiate endosperm development in the absence of fertilization in mea-1/MEA; met1-3/MET1 as compared to mea-1/MEA mutant plants. In addition, DNA methylation at the PHERES1 and MEA loci, imprinted target genes of the FIS-PRC2, was affected in the mea-1 mutant compared with wild-type embryos. In conclusion, our data suggest a mechanistic link between two major epigenetic pathways involved in histone and DNA methylation in plants by physical interaction of MET1 with the FIS-PRC2 core component MEA. This concerted action is relevant for the repression of seed development in the absence of fertilization. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Lysogeny with Shiga toxin 2-encoding bacteriophages represses type III secretion in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefang; McAteer, Sean P; Tree, Jai J; Shaw, Darren J; Wolfson, Eliza B K; Beatson, Scott A; Roe, Andrew J; Allison, Lesley J; Chase-Topping, Margo E; Mahajan, Arvind; Tozzoli, Rosangela; Woolhouse, Mark E J; Morabito, Stefano; Gally, David L

    2012-01-01

    Lytic or lysogenic infections by bacteriophages drive the evolution of enteric bacteria. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) have recently emerged as a significant zoonotic infection of humans with the main serotypes carried by ruminants. Typical EHEC strains are defined by the expression of a type III secretion (T3S) system, the production of Shiga toxins (Stx) and association with specific clinical symptoms. The genes for Stx are present on lambdoid bacteriophages integrated into the E. coli genome. Phage type (PT) 21/28 is the most prevalent strain type linked with human EHEC infections in the United Kingdom and is more likely to be associated with cattle shedding high levels of the organism than PT32 strains. In this study we have demonstrated that the majority (90%) of PT 21/28 strains contain both Stx2 and Stx2c phages, irrespective of source. This is in contrast to PT 32 strains for which only a minority of strains contain both Stx2 and 2c phages (28%). PT21/28 strains had a lower median level of T3S compared to PT32 strains and so the relationship between Stx phage lysogeny and T3S was investigated. Deletion of Stx2 phages from EHEC strains increased the level of T3S whereas lysogeny decreased T3S. This regulation was confirmed in an E. coli K12 background transduced with a marked Stx2 phage followed by measurement of a T3S reporter controlled by induced levels of the LEE-encoded regulator (Ler). The presence of an integrated Stx2 phage was shown to repress Ler induction of LEE1 and this regulation involved the CII phage regulator. This repression could be relieved by ectopic expression of a cognate CI regulator. A model is proposed in which Stx2-encoding bacteriophages regulate T3S to co-ordinate epithelial cell colonisation that is promoted by Stx and secreted effector proteins.

  17. Lysogeny with Shiga toxin 2-encoding bacteriophages represses type III secretion in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefang Xu

    Full Text Available Lytic or lysogenic infections by bacteriophages drive the evolution of enteric bacteria. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC have recently emerged as a significant zoonotic infection of humans with the main serotypes carried by ruminants. Typical EHEC strains are defined by the expression of a type III secretion (T3S system, the production of Shiga toxins (Stx and association with specific clinical symptoms. The genes for Stx are present on lambdoid bacteriophages integrated into the E. coli genome. Phage type (PT 21/28 is the most prevalent strain type linked with human EHEC infections in the United Kingdom and is more likely to be associated with cattle shedding high levels of the organism than PT32 strains. In this study we have demonstrated that the majority (90% of PT 21/28 strains contain both Stx2 and Stx2c phages, irrespective of source. This is in contrast to PT 32 strains for which only a minority of strains contain both Stx2 and 2c phages (28%. PT21/28 strains had a lower median level of T3S compared to PT32 strains and so the relationship between Stx phage lysogeny and T3S was investigated. Deletion of Stx2 phages from EHEC strains increased the level of T3S whereas lysogeny decreased T3S. This regulation was confirmed in an E. coli K12 background transduced with a marked Stx2 phage followed by measurement of a T3S reporter controlled by induced levels of the LEE-encoded regulator (Ler. The presence of an integrated Stx2 phage was shown to repress Ler induction of LEE1 and this regulation involved the CII phage regulator. This repression could be relieved by ectopic expression of a cognate CI regulator. A model is proposed in which Stx2-encoding bacteriophages regulate T3S to co-ordinate epithelial cell colonisation that is promoted by Stx and secreted effector proteins.

  18. Position-dependent repression and promotion of DQB1 intron 3 splicing by GGGG motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Královicová, Jana; Vorechovsky, Igor

    2006-02-15

    Alternative splicing of HLA-DQB1 exon 4 is allele-dependent and results in variable expression of soluble DQbeta. We have recently shown that differential inclusion of this exon in mature transcripts is largely due to intron 3 variants in the branch point sequence (BPS) and polypyrimidine tract. To identify additional regulatory cis-elements that contribute to haplotype-specific splicing of DQB1, we systematically examined the effect of guanosine (G) repeats on intron 3 removal. We found that the GGG or GGGG repeats generally improved splicing of DQB1 intron 3, except for those that were adjacent to the 5' splice site where they had the opposite effect. The most prominent splicing enhancement was conferred by GGGG motifs arranged in tandem upstream of the BPS. Replacement of a G-rich segment just 5' of the BPS with a series of random sequences markedly repressed splicing, whereas substitutions of a segment further upstream that lacked the G-rich elements and had the same size did not result in comparable splicing inhibition. Systematic mutagenesis of both suprabranch guanosine quadruplets (G(4)) revealed a key role of central G residues in splicing enhancement, whereas cytosines in these positions had the most prominent repressive effects. Together, these results show a significant role of tandem G(4)NG(4) structures in splicing of both complete and truncated DQB1 intron 3, support position dependency of G repeats in splicing promotion and inhibition, and identify positively and negatively acting sequences that contribute to the haplotype-specific DQB1 expression.

  19. MicroRNA-125b promotes neuronal differentiation in human cells by repressing multiple targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Minh T N; Xie, Huangming; Zhou, Beiyan; Chia, Poh Hui; Rizk, Pamela; Um, Moonkyoung; Udolph, Gerald; Yang, Henry; Lim, Bing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2009-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Research on miRNAs has highlighted their importance in neural development, but the specific functions of neurally enriched miRNAs remain poorly understood. We report here the expression profile of miRNAs during neuronal differentiation in the human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Six miRNAs were significantly upregulated during differentiation induced by all-trans-retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. We demonstrated that the ectopic expression of either miR-124a or miR-125b increases the percentage of differentiated SH-SY5Y cells with neurite outgrowth. Subsequently, we focused our functional analysis on miR-125b and demonstrated the important role of this miRNA in both the spontaneous and induced differentiations of SH-SH5Y cells. miR-125b is also upregulated during the differentiation of human neural progenitor ReNcell VM cells, and miR-125b ectopic expression significantly promotes the neurite outgrowth of these cells. To identify the targets of miR-125b regulation, we profiled the global changes in gene expression following miR-125b ectopic expression in SH-SY5Y cells. miR-125b represses 164 genes that contain the seed match sequence of the miRNA and/or that are predicted to be direct targets of miR-125b by conventional methods. Pathway analysis suggests that a subset of miR-125b-repressed targets antagonizes neuronal genes in several neurogenic pathways, thereby mediating the positive effect of miR-125b on neuronal differentiation. We have further validated the binding of miR-125b to the miRNA response elements of 10 selected mRNA targets. Together, we report here for the first time the important role of miR-125b in human neuronal differentiation.

  20. MicroRNA-31 functions as an oncogenic microRNA in mouse and human lung cancer cells by repressing specific tumor suppressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Ouyang, Haoxu;

    2010-01-01

    confirmed them as direct targets in human and mouse lung cancer cell lines. These targets included the tumor-suppressive genes large tumor suppressor 2 (LATS2) and PP2A regulatory subunit B alpha isoform (PPP2R2A), and expression of each was augmented by miR-31 knockdown. Their engineered repression...... normal and malignant human lung tissues. Together, these findings revealed that miR-31 acts as an oncogenic miRNA (oncomir) in lung cancer by targeting specific tumor suppressors for repression.......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression. It has been suggested that obtaining miRNA expression profiles can improve classification, diagnostic, and prognostic information in oncology. Here, we sought to comprehensively identify the miRNAs that are overexpressed in lung cancer by conducting mi...

  1. Cell-Autonomous Repression of Shh by Transcription Factor Pax6 Regulates Diencephalic Patterning by Controlling the Central Diencephalic Organizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martín Caballero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During development, region-specific patterns of regulatory gene expression are controlled by signaling centers that release morphogens providing positional information to surrounding cells. Regulation of signaling centers themselves is therefore critical. The size and the influence of a Shh-producing forebrain organizer, the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI, are limited by Pax6. By studying mouse chimeras, we find that Pax6 acts cell autonomously to block Shh expression in cells around the ZLI. Immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays indicate that Pax6 can bind the Shh promoter and repress its function. An analysis of chimeras suggests that many of the regional gene expression pattern defects that occur in Pax6−/− diencephalic cells result from a non-cell-autonomous position-dependent defect of local intercellular signaling. Blocking Shh signaling in Pax6−/− mutants reverses major diencephalic patterning defects. We conclude that Pax6’s cell-autonomous repression of Shh expression around the ZLI is critical for many aspects of normal diencephalic patterning.

  2. Cell-autonomous repression of Shh by transcription factor Pax6 regulates diencephalic patterning by controlling the central diencephalic organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Isabel Martín; Manuel, Martine N; Molinek, Michael; Quintana-Urzainqui, Idoia; Mi, Da; Shimogori, Tomomi; Price, David J

    2014-09-11

    During development, region-specific patterns of regulatory gene expression are controlled by signaling centers that release morphogens providing positional information to surrounding cells. Regulation of signaling centers themselves is therefore critical. The size and the influence of a Shh-producing forebrain organizer, the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), are limited by Pax6. By studying mouse chimeras, we find that Pax6 acts cell autonomously to block Shh expression in cells around the ZLI. Immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays indicate that Pax6 can bind the Shh promoter and repress its function. An analysis of chimeras suggests that many of the regional gene expression pattern defects that occur in Pax6(-/-) diencephalic cells result from a non-cell-autonomous position-dependent defect of local intercellular signaling. Blocking Shh signaling in Pax6(-/-) mutants reverses major diencephalic patterning defects. We conclude that Pax6's cell-autonomous repression of Shh expression around the ZLI is critical for many aspects of normal diencephalic patterning.

  3. Ectomycorrhiza-mediated repression of the high-affinity ammonium importer gene AmAMT2 in Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Anita; Weiss, Michael; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-02-01

    A main function of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between certain soil fungi and fine roots of woody plants, is the exchange of plant-derived carbohydrates for fungus-derived nutrients. As it is required in large amounts, nitrogen is of special interest. A gene (AmAMT2) coding for a putative fungal ammonium importer was identified in an EST project of functional Amanita muscaria/poplar ectomycorrhizas. Heterologous expression of the entire AmAMT2 coding region in yeast revealed the corresponding protein to be a high-affinity ammonium importer. In axenically grown Amanita hyphae AmAMT2 expression was strongly repressed by nitrogen, independent of whether the offered nitrogen source was transported by AmAMT2 or not. In functional ectomycorrhizas the AmAMT2 transcript level was further decreased in both hyphal networks (sheath and Hartig net), while extraradical hyphae revealed strong gene expression. Together our data suggest that (1) AmAMT2 expression is regulated by the endogenous nitrogen content of hyphae and (2) fungal hyphae in ectomycorrhizas are well supported with nitrogen even when the extraradical mycelium is nitrogen limited. As a consequence of AmAMT2 repression in mycorrhizas, ammonium can be suggested as a potential nitrogen source delivered by fungal hyphae in symbiosis.

  4. Differential Sensitivity of Target Genes to Translational Repression by miR-17~92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyun Yong; Oda, Hiroyo; Chen, Pengda; Kang, Seung Goo; Valentine, Elizabeth; Liao, Lujian; Zhang, Yaoyang; Gonzalez-Martin, Alicia; Shepherd, Jovan; Head, Steven R.; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Fu, Guo; Liu, Wen-Hsien; Han, Jiahuai

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are thought to exert their functions by modulating the expression of hundreds of target genes and each to a small degree, but it remains unclear how small changes in hundreds of target genes are translated into the specific function of a miRNA. Here, we conducted an integrated analysis of transcriptome and translatome of primary B cells from mutant mice expressing miR-17~92 at three different levels to address this issue. We found that target genes exhibit differential sensitivity to miRNA suppression and that only a small fraction of target genes are actually suppressed by a given concentration of miRNA under physiological conditions. Transgenic expression and deletion of the same miRNA gene regulate largely distinct sets of target genes. miR-17~92 controls target gene expression mainly through translational repression and 5’UTR plays an important role in regulating target gene sensitivity to miRNA suppression. These findings provide molecular insights into a model in which miRNAs exert their specific functions through a small number of key target genes. PMID:28241004

  5. miR-186 inhibits cell proliferation in multiple myeloma by repressing Jagged1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zengyan [Department of Hematology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107 Wenhuaxi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China); Department of Hematology, Hospital Affiliated to Binzhou Medical University, 661 Second Huanghe Street, Binzhou 256603 (China); Zhang, Guoqiang [Department of Thyroid and Breast Surgery, Hospital Affiliated to Binzhou Medical University, 661 Second Huanghe Street, Binzhou 256603 (China); Yu, Wenzheng; Gao, Na [Department of Hematology, Hospital Affiliated to Binzhou Medical University, 661 Second Huanghe Street, Binzhou 256603 (China); Peng, Jun, E-mail: junpeng885@sina.com [Department of Hematology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107 Wenhuaxi Road, Jinan, Shandong 250012 (China)

    2016-01-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding ribonucleic acids that regulate gene expression by targeting mRNAs for translational repression and degradation. Accumulating experimental evidence supports a causal role of miRNAs in hematology tumorigenesis. However, the specific functions of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma (MM) remain to be established. In this study, we demonstrated that miR-186 is commonly downregulated in MM cell lines and patient MM cells. Ectopic expression of miR-186 significantly inhibited cell growth, both in vitro and in vivo, and induced cell cycle G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} arrest. Furthermore, miR-186 induced downregulation of Jagged1 protein expression by directly targeting its 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR). Conversely, overexpression of Jagged1 rescued cells from miR-186-induced growth inhibition. Our collective results clearly indicate that miR-186 functions as a tumor suppressor in MM, supporting its potential as a therapeutic target for the disease. - Highlights: • miR-186 expression is decreased in MM. • miR-186 inhibits MM cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Jagged1 is regulated by miR-186. • Overexpression of Jagged1 reverses the effects of miR-186.

  6. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  7. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the ′denial of death′ while ′embracing one′s symbolic immortality′ would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its way into all of life, ′death′ would soon become a terminology in medicine too and assert its position, by giving a push to those directly dealing with the dying to shy away from its emotional and spiritual affliction. The need to put off death and prolong one′s life would become ever more urgent. Research using psychedelics on the terminally ill which had begun in the 1950s and 1960s would coerce into another realm and alter the face of medicine; but the aggression with which it forced itself in the 1960s would soon be politically maimed, and what remained would be sporadic outpours that trickled its way from European labs and underground boot camps. Now, with the curtain rising, the question has etched itself again, about the use of psychedelic drugs in medicine, particularly psychedelic psychotherapy with the terminally ill. This study is an attempt to philosophically explore death anxiety from its existential context and how something that is innate in our condition cannot be therapeutically cured. Psychedelic use was immutably linked with ancient cultures and only recently has it seen its scientific revival, from which a scientific culture grew around psychedelic therapy. How much of what was threaded in the ritual and spiritual mores can be extricated and be interpreted in our own mechanized language of medicine is the question that nudges many.

  8. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Varsha

    2012-01-01

    Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the 'denial of death' while 'embracing one's symbolic immortality' would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its way into all of life, 'death' would soon become a terminology in medicine too and assert its position, by giving a push to those directly dealing with the dying to shy away from its emotional and spiritual affliction. The need to put off death and prolong one's life would become ever more urgent. Research using psychedelics on the terminally ill which had begun in the 1950s and 1960s would coerce into another realm and alter the face of medicine; but the aggression with which it forced itself in the 1960s would soon be politically maimed, and what remained would be sporadic outpours that trickled its way from European labs and underground boot camps. Now, with the curtain rising, the question has etched itself again, about the use of psychedelic drugs in medicine, particularly psychedelic psychotherapy with the terminally ill. This study is an attempt to philosophically explore death anxiety from its existential context and how something that is innate in our condition cannot be therapeutically cured. Psychedelic use was immutably linked with ancient cultures and only recently has it seen its scientific revival, from which a scientific culture grew around psychedelic therapy. How much of what was threaded in the ritual and spiritual mores can be extricated and be interpreted in our own mechanized language of medicine is the question that nudges many.

  9. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  10. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice

    2010-01-01

    participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS......) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated...

  11. Repression of BIM mediates survival signaling by MYC and AKT in high-risk T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, C; Roderick, J E; LaBelle, J L; Bird, G; Mathieu, R; Bodaar, K; Colon, D; Pyati, U; Stevenson, K E; Qi, J; Harris, M; Silverman, L B; Sallan, S E; Bradner, J E; Neuberg, D S; Look, A T; Walensky, L D; Kelliher, M A; Gutierrez, A

    2014-09-01

    Treatment resistance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is associated with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) deletions and resultant phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway activation, as well as MYC overexpression, and these pathways repress mitochondrial apoptosis in established T-lymphoblasts through poorly defined mechanisms. Normal T-cell progenitors are hypersensitive to mitochondrial apoptosis, a phenotype that is dependent on the expression of proapoptotic BIM. In a conditional zebrafish model, MYC downregulation induced BIM expression in T-lymphoblasts, an effect that was blunted by expression of constitutively active AKT. In human T-ALL cell lines and treatment-resistant patient samples, treatment with MYC or PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors each induced BIM upregulation and apoptosis, indicating that BIM is repressed downstream of MYC and PI3K-AKT in high-risk T-ALL. Restoring BIM function in human T-ALL cells using a stapled peptide mimetic of the BIM BH3 domain had therapeutic activity, indicating that BIM repression is required for T-ALL viability. In the zebrafish model, where MYC downregulation induces T-ALL regression via mitochondrial apoptosis, T-ALL persisted despite MYC downregulation in 10% of bim wild-type zebrafish, 18% of bim heterozygotes and in 33% of bim homozygous mutants (P=0.017). We conclude that downregulation of BIM represents a key survival signal downstream of oncogenic MYC and PI3K-AKT signaling in treatment-resistant T-ALL.

  12. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process.

  13. Tcf3 represses Wnt-β-catenin signaling and maintains neural stem cell population during neocortical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kuwahara

    Full Text Available During mouse neocortical development, the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in various phenomena including neuronal differentiation and proliferation of neural precursor cells (NPCs. Production of the appropriate number of neurons without depletion of the NPC population requires precise regulation of the balance between differentiation and maintenance of NPCs. However, the mechanism that suppresses Wnt signaling to prevent premature neuronal differentiation of NPCs is poorly understood. We now show that the HMG box transcription factor Tcf3 (also known as Tcf7l1 contributes to this mechanism. Tcf3 is highly expressed in undifferentiated NPCs in the mouse neocortex, and its expression is reduced in intermediate neuronal progenitors (INPs committed to the neuronal fate. We found Tcf3 to be a repressor of Wnt signaling in neocortical NPCs in a reporter gene assay. Tcf3 bound to the promoter of the proneural bHLH gene Neurogenin1 (Neurog1 and repressed its expression. Consistent with this, Tcf3 repressed neuronal differentiation and increased the self-renewal activity of NPCs. We also found that Wnt signal stimulation reduces the level of Tcf3, and increases those of Tcf1 (also known as Tcf7 and Lef1, positive mediators of Wnt signaling, in NPCs. Together, these results suggest that Tcf3 antagonizes Wnt signaling in NPCs, thereby maintaining their undifferentiated state in the neocortex and that Wnt signaling promotes the transition from Tcf3-mediated repression to Tcf1/Lef1-mediated enhancement of Wnt signaling, constituting a positive feedback loop that facilitates neuronal differentiation.

  14. HCV core protein represses the apoptosis and improves the autophagy of human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Qu, Aihua; Han, Xiaochun; Wang, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the influence on human hepatocytes apoptosis and autophagy by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Methods: QSG-7701, a human-derived non-neoplastic liver cell line, was transfected with PIRES-core vector that was a eukaryotic vector to express HCV core protein. Fluorescence microscope was used to observe the changes of nuclei in apoptosis cells by Annex in V-FITC/PI double staining. Flow cytometry was applied to detect the rate of cell apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of HCV core protein, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), autophagic biomarker microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and Beclin-1. Results: The apoptosis rate was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in QSG7701/core group (transfected with PIRES-core vector, (1.34±0.07)%) than in QSG7701 group (no transfection, (2.35±0.11)%) and in QSG7701 QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group (transfected with pcDNA3.1 vector, (2.58±0.1)%). NF-κB expression was up-expressed in QSG7701/core group than in QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). LC3-II expression and Beclin-1 expression was significant higher in QSG7701/core group than in the QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: HCV core protein can repress the apoptosis and improve the autophagy of QSG7701 through up-regulating NF-κB and Beclin-1 expression. PMID:26629077

  15. How social media matter: Repression and the diffusion of the Occupy Wall Street movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Chan S; Vasi, Ion Bogdan; Chang, Paul Y

    2017-07-01

    This study explores the role played by social media in reshaping the repression-mobilization relationship. Drawing on the case of the Occupy Wall Street movement, we examine the impact of Facebook and Twitter on the spatial diffusion of protests during a period of heightened state repression. Results from event history analyses suggest that the effects of repression on protest diffusion are contingent on the presence of social media accounts supporting the movement. We find that state repression at earlier protest sites encouraged activists to create Facebook and Twitter accounts in their own cities, which then served as important vehicles for the initiation of new Occupy protests. Moreover, results suggest that repression incidents can directly facilitate future protests in cities that already have Occupy Facebook accounts. This study highlights the potential of social media to both mediate and moderate the influence of repression on the diffusion of contemporary movements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Repressive Epigenetic Changes at the mGlu2 Promoter in Frontal Cortex of 5-HT2A Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kurita, Mitsumasa; Moreno, José L.; Holloway, Terrell; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Mocci, Giuseppe; García-Bea, Aintzane; Hanks, James B.; Neve, Rachael; Nestler, Eric J.; Russo, Scott J.; González-Maeso, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2A and metabotropic glutamate 2 (mGlu2) are G protein–coupled receptors suspected in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, and suicide. Previous findings demonstrate that mGlu2 mRNA expression is down-regulated in brain cortical regions of 5-HT2A knockout (KO) mice. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this alteration remains unknown. We show here repressive epigenetic changes at the promoter region of the mGlu2 gene in fron...

  17. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses...

  18. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Södersten, Erik; Feyder, Michael; Lerdrup, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins bind to and repress genes in embryonic stem cells through lineage commitment to the terminal differentiated state. PcG repressed genes are commonly characterized by the presence of the epigenetic histone mark H3K27me3, catalyzed by the Polycomb repressive complex 2. ...... and thereby contribute to long-term maladaptive responses including the motor complications, or dyskinesia, caused by prolonged administration of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease....

  19. SCARECROW-LIKE15 interacts with HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 and is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming-Jun; Li, Xiang; Huang, Jun; Gropp, Gordon M.; Gjetvaj, Branimir; Lindsay, Donna L.; Wei, Shu; Coutu, Cathy; Chen, Zhixiang; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Hannoufa, Abdelali; Lydiate, Derek J.; Gruber, Margaret Y.; Chen, Z. Jeffrey; Hegedus, Dwayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is critical for controlling embryonic properties during the embryo-to-seedling phase transition. Here we report that a HISTONE DEACETYLASE19 (HDA19)-associated regulator, SCARECROW-LIKE15 (SCL15), is essential for repressing the seed maturation programme in vegetative tissues. SCL15 is expressed in and GFP-tagged SCL15 predominantly localizes to, the vascular bundles particularly in the phloem companion cells and neighbouring specialized cells. Mutation of SCL15 leads to a global shift in gene expression in seedlings to a profile resembling late embryogenesis in seeds. In scl15 seedlings, many genes involved in seed maturation are markedly derepressed with concomitant accumulation of seed 12S globulin; this is correlated with elevated levels of histone acetylation at a subset of seed-specific loci. SCL15 physically interacts with HDA19 and direct targets of HDA19–SCL15 association are identified. These studies reveal that SCL15 acts as an HDA19-associated regulator to repress embryonic traits in seedlings. PMID:26129778

  20. KSHV MicroRNAs Repress Tropomyosin 1 and Increase Anchorage-Independent Growth and Endothelial Tube Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Kieffer-Kwon

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is characterized by highly vascularized spindle-cell tumors induced after infection of endothelial cells by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. In KS tumors, KSHV expresses only a few latent proteins together with 12 pre-microRNAs. Previous microarray and proteomic studies predicted that multiple splice variants of the tumor suppressor protein tropomyosin 1 (TPM1 were targets of KSHV microRNAs. Here we show that at least two microRNAs of KSHV, miR-K2 and miR-K5, repress protein levels of specific isoforms of TPM1. We identified a functional miR-K5 binding site in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of one TPM1 isoform. Furthermore, the inhibition or loss of miR-K2 or miR-K5 restores expression of TPM1 in KSHV-infected cells. TPM1 protein levels were also repressed in KSHV-infected clinical samples compared to uninfected samples. Functionally, miR-K2 increases viability of unanchored human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC by inhibiting anoikis (apoptosis after cell detachment, enhances tube formation of HUVECs, and enhances VEGFA expression. Taken together, KSHV miR-K2 and miR-K5 may facilitate KSHV pathogenesis.

  1. Retinoid X receptor alpha represses GATA-4-mediated transcription via a retinoid-dependent interaction with the cardiac-enriched repressor FOG-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clabby, Martha L; Robison, Trevor A; Quigley, Heather F; Wilson, David B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2003-02-21

    Dietary vitamin A and its derivatives, retinoids, regulate cardiac growth and development. To delineate mechanisms involved in retinoid-mediated control of cardiac gene expression, the regulatory effects of the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) on atrial naturietic factor (ANF) gene transcription was investigated. The transcriptional activity of an ANF promoter-reporter in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes was repressed by RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA and by the constitutively active mutant RXR alpha F318A indicating that liganded RXR confers the regulatory effect. The RXR alpha-mediated repression mapped to the proximal 147 bp of the rat ANF promoter, a region lacking a consensus retinoid response element but containing several known cardiogenic cis elements including a well characterized GATA response element. Glutathione S-transferase "pull-down" assays revealed that RXR alpha interacts directly with GATA-4, in a ligand-independent manner, via the DNA binding domain of RXR alpha and the second zinc finger of GATA-4. Liganded RXR alpha repressed the activity of a heterologous promoter-reporter construct containing GATA-response element recognition sites in cardiac myocytes but not in several other cell types, suggesting that additional cardiac-enriched factors participate in the repression complex. Co-transfection of liganded RXR alpha and the known cardiac-enriched GATA-4 repressor, FOG-2, resulted in additive repression of GATA-4 activity in ventricular myocytes. In addition, RXR alpha was found to bind FOG-2, in a 9-cis-RA-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which retinoids regulate cardiogenic gene expression through direct interaction with GATA-4 and its co-repressor, FOG-2.

  2. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-08-21

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Evidence that regulatory protein MarA of Escherichia coli represses rob by steric hindrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-08-01

    The MarA protein of Escherichia coli can both activate and repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the position and orientation of its degenerate 20-bp binding site ("marbox") at the promoter. For all three known repressed genes, the marbox overlaps the promoter. It has been reported that MarA represses the rob promoter via an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-DNA-MarA ternary complex. Under similar conditions, we found a ternary complex for the repressed purA promoter also. These findings, together with the backwards orientation of repressed marboxes, suggested a unique interaction of MarA with RNAP in repression. However, no repression-specific residues of MarA could be found among 38 single-alanine replacement mutations previously shown to retain activation function or among mutants from random mutagenesis. Mutations Thr12Ala, Arg36Ala, Thr95Ile, and Pro106Ala were more damaging for activation than for repression, some up to 10-fold, so these residues may play a specific role in activation. We found that nonspecific binding of RNAP to promoterless regions of DNA was presumably responsible for the ternary complexes seen previously. When RNAP binding was promoter specific, MarA reduced RNAP access to the rob promoter; there was little or no ternary complex. These findings strongly implicate steric hindrance as the mechanism of repression of rob by MarA.

  4. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  5. Ezh2 represses the basal cell lineage during lung endoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitow, Melinda E; Li, Shanru; Morley, Michael P; Rathi, Komal; Lu, Min Min; Kadzik, Rachel S; Stewart, Kathleen M; Morrisey, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    The development of the lung epithelium is regulated in a stepwise fashion to generate numerous differentiated and stem cell lineages in the adult lung. How these different lineages are generated in a spatially and temporally restricted fashion remains poorly understood, although epigenetic regulation probably plays an important role. We show that the Polycomb repressive complex 2 component Ezh2 is highly expressed in early lung development but is gradually downregulated by late gestation. Deletion of Ezh2 in early lung endoderm progenitors leads to the ectopic and premature appearance of Trp63+ basal cells that extend the entire length of the airway. Loss of Ezh2 also leads to reduced secretory cell differentiation. In their place, morphologically similar cells develop that express a subset of basal cell genes, including keratin 5, but no longer express high levels of either Trp63 or of standard secretory cell markers. This suggests that Ezh2 regulates the phenotypic switch between basal cells and secretory cells. Together, these findings show that Ezh2 restricts the basal cell lineage during normal lung endoderm development to allow the proper patterning of epithelial lineages during lung formation.

  6. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Darrion L. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  7. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter Mcu controls excitotoxicity and is transcriptionally repressed by neuroprotective nuclear calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Tan, Yan-Wei; Hagenston, Anna M; Martel, Marc-Andre; Kneisel, Niclas; Skehel, Paul A; Wyllie, David J A; Bading, Hilmar; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter gene (Mcu/Ccdc109a) has enabled us to address its role, and that of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, in neuronal excitotoxicity. Here we show that exogenously expressed Mcu is mitochondrially localized and increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels following NMDA receptor activation, leading to increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization and excitotoxic cell death. Knockdown of endogenous Mcu expression reduces NMDA-induced increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), resulting in lower levels of mitochondrial depolarization and resistance to excitotoxicity. Mcu is subject to dynamic regulation as part of an activity-dependent adaptive mechanism that limits mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload when cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels are high. Specifically, synaptic activity transcriptionally represses Mcu, via a mechanism involving the nuclear Ca(2+) and CaM kinase-mediated induction of Npas4, resulting in the inhibition of NMDA receptor-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and preventing excitotoxic death. This establishes Mcu and the pathways regulating its expression as important determinants of excitotoxicity, which may represent therapeutic targets for excitotoxic disorders.

  8. STAT4-mediated transcriptional repression of the IL5 gene in human memory Th2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-van Horn, Sarah R; Estrada, Leonardo D; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Farrar, J David

    2016-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) plays a critical role in suppressing viral replication by driving the transcription of hundreds of interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs). While many ISGs are transcriptionally activated by the ISGF3 complex, the significance of other signaling intermediates in IFN-α/β-mediated gene regulation remains elusive, particularly in rare cases of gene silencing. In human Th2 cells, IFN-α/β signaling suppressed IL5 and IL13 mRNA expression during recall responses to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This suppression occurred through a rapid reduction in the rate of nascent transcription, independent of de novo expression of ISGs. Further, IFN-α/β-mediated STAT4 activation was required for repressing the human IL5 gene, and disrupting STAT4 dimerization reversed this effect. This is the first demonstration of STAT4 acting as a transcriptional repressor in response to IFN-α/β signaling and highlights the unique activity of this cytokine to acutely block the expression of an inflammatory cytokine in human T cells.

  9. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel. La; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counteracted by PADI4, which augments the active H3K4me3 mark and thus increases IL6ST expression. In contrast, at the CTCF promoter PADI4 acts as a repressor. We propose that the influence of PADI4 on IL6ST transcription plays a role in the control of IL6ST expression during lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. These results open the possibility to pharmacologically influence Tal1 in leukaemia.

  10. Histone H4 lysine 20 acetylation is associated with gene repression in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaimori, Jun-Ya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Harada, Akihito; Fukuda, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Satoko; Ichimaru, Naotsugu; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Matsuda, Ryo; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Nozaki, Naohito; Takahara, Shiro; Takao, Toshifumi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kimura, Hiroshi; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally associated with gene activation and chromatin decondensation. Recent mass spectrometry analysis has revealed that histone H4 lysine 20, a major methylation site, can also be acetylated. To understand the function of H4 lysine 20 acetylation (H4K20ac), we have developed a specific monoclonal antibody and performed ChIP-seq analysis using HeLa-S3 cells. H4K20ac was enriched around the transcription start sites (TSSs) of minimally expressed genes and in the gene body of expressed genes, in contrast to most histone acetylation being enriched around the TSSs of expressed genes. The distribution of H4K20ac showed little correlation with known histone modifications, including histone H3 methylations. A motif search in H4K20ac-enriched sequences, together with transcription factor binding profiles based on ENCODE ChIP-seq data, revealed that most transcription activators are excluded from H4K20ac-enriched genes and a transcription repressor NRSF/REST co-localized with H4K20ac. These results suggest that H4K20ac is a unique acetylation mark associated with gene repression. PMID:27064113

  11. Ribbon regulates morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland through transcriptional activation and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Lee, Joslynn S; Wells, Michael B; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Slattery, Matthew; Andrew, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors affect spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression often regulating multiple aspects of tissue morphogenesis, including cell-type specification, cell proliferation, cell death, cell polarity, cell shape, cell arrangement and cell migration. In this work, we describe a distinct role for Ribbon (Rib) in controlling cell shape/volume increases during elongation of the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). Notably, the morphogenetic changes in rib mutants occurred without effects on general SG cell attributes such as specification, proliferation and apoptosis. Moreover, the changes in cell shape/volume in rib mutants occurred without compromising epithelial-specific morphological attributes such as apicobasal polarity and junctional integrity. To identify the genes regulated by Rib, we performed ChIP-seq analysis in embryos driving expression of GFP-tagged Rib specifically in the SGs. To learn if the Rib binding sites identified in the ChIP-seq analysis were linked to changes in gene expression, we performed microarray analysis comparing RNA samples from age-matched wild-type and rib null embryos. From the superposed ChIP-seq and microarray gene expression data, we identified 60 genomic sites bound by Rib likely to regulate SG-specific gene expression. We confirmed several of the identified Rib targets by qRT-pCR and/or in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that Rib regulates cell growth and tissue shape in the Drosophila salivary gland via a diverse array of targets through both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, our results suggest that autoregulation of rib expression may be a key component of the SG morphogenetic gene network.

  12. Stochastic de-repression of Rhodopsins in single photoreceptors of the fly retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranidhi Sood

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptors of the Drosophila compound eye are a classical model for studying cell fate specification. Photoreceptors (PRs are organized in bundles of eight cells with two major types - inner PRs involved in color vision and outer PRs involved in motion detection. In wild type flies, most PRs express a single type of Rhodopsin (Rh: inner PRs express either Rh3, Rh4, Rh5 or Rh6 and outer PRs express Rh1. In outer PRs, the K(50 homeodomain protein Dve is a key repressor that acts to ensure exclusive Rh expression. Loss of Dve results in de-repression of Rhodopsins in outer PRs, and leads to a wide distribution of expression levels. To quantify these effects, we introduce an automated image analysis method to measure Rhodopsin levels at the single cell level in 3D confocal stacks. Our sensitive methodology reveals cell-specific differences in Rhodopsin distributions among the outer PRs, observed over a developmental time course. We show that Rhodopsin distributions are consistent with a two-state model of gene expression, in which cells can be in either high or basal states of Rhodopsin production. Our model identifies a significant role of post-transcriptional regulation in establishing the two distinct states. The timescale for interconversion between basal and high states is shown to be on the order of days. Our results indicate that even in the absence of Dve, the Rhodopsin regulatory network can maintain highly stable states. We propose that the role of Dve in outer PRs is to buffer against rare fluctuations in this network.

  13. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  14. PRC2 represses transcribed genes on the imprinted inactive X chromosome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclary, Emily; Hinten, Michael; Harris, Clair; Sethuraman, Shriya; Gayen, Srimonta; Kalantry, Sundeep

    2017-05-03

    Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes histone H3K27me3, which marks many transcriptionally silent genes throughout the mammalian genome. Although H3K27me3 is associated with silenced gene expression broadly, it remains unclear why some but not other PRC2 target genes require PRC2 and H3K27me3 for silencing. Here we define the transcriptional and chromatin features that predict which PRC2 target genes require PRC2/H3K27me3 for silencing by interrogating imprinted mouse X-chromosome inactivation. H3K27me3 is enriched at promoters of silenced genes across the inactive X chromosome. To abrogate PRC2 function, we delete the core PRC2 protein EED in F1 hybrid trophoblast stem cells (TSCs), which undergo imprinted inactivation of the paternally inherited X chromosome. Eed (-/-) TSCs lack H3K27me3 and Xist lncRNA enrichment on the inactive X chromosome. Despite the absence of H3K27me3 and Xist RNA, only a subset of the inactivated X-linked genes is derepressed in Eed (-/-) TSCs. Unexpectedly, in wild-type (WT) TSCs these genes are transcribed and are enriched for active chromatin hallmarks on the inactive-X, including RNA PolII, H3K27ac, and H3K36me3, but not the bivalent mark H3K4me2. By contrast, PRC2 targets that remain repressed in Eed (-/-) TSCs are depleted for active chromatin characteristics in WT TSCs. A comparative analysis of transcriptional and chromatin features of inactive X-linked genes in WT and Eed (-/-) TSCs suggests that PRC2 acts as a brake to prevent induction of transcribed genes on the inactive X chromosome, a mode of PRC2 function that may apply broadly.

  15. Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Cortney R.; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K.; Lehman, Mckenzie K.; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Steinke, Laurey; Sadykov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus must rapidly adapt to a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources during invasion of a host. Within a staphylococcal abscess, preferred carbon sources such as glucose are limiting, suggesting that S. aureus survives through the catabolism of secondary carbon sources. S. aureus encodes pathways to catabolize multiple amino acids, including those that generate pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate, and oxaloacetate. To assess amino acid catabolism, S. aureus JE2 and mutants were grown in complete defined medium containing 18 amino acids but lacking glucose (CDM). A mutation in the gudB gene, coding for glutamate dehydrogenase, which generates 2-oxoglutarate from glutamate, significantly reduced growth in CDM, suggesting that glutamate and those amino acids generating glutamate, particularly proline, serve as the major carbon source in this medium. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed this supposition. Furthermore, a mutation in the ackA gene, coding for acetate kinase, also abrogated growth of JE2 in CDM, suggesting that ATP production from pyruvate-producing amino acids is also critical for growth. In addition, although a functional respiratory chain was absolutely required for growth, the oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP concentration were significantly lower during growth in CDM than during growth in glucose-containing media. Finally, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that expression levels of genes coding for the enzymes that synthesize glutamate from proline, arginine, and histidine are repressed by CcpA and carbon catabolite repression. These data show that pathways important for glutamate catabolism or ATP generation via Pta/AckA are important for growth in niches where glucose is not abundant, such as abscesses within skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:28196956

  16. Specific binding sites in the alcR and alcA promoters of the ethanol regulon for the CREA repressor mediating carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmburg, P; Mathieu, M; Dowzer, C; Kelly, J; Felenbok, B

    1993-03-01

    The CREA repressor responsible for carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans represses the transcription of the ethanol regulon. The N-terminal part of the CREA protein encompassing the two zinc fingers (C2H2 class family) and an alanine-rich region was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. Our results show that CREA is a DNA-binding protein able to bind to the promoters of both the specific trans-acting gene, alcR, and of the structural gene, alcA, encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase I. DNase I protection footprinting experiments revealed several specific binding sites in the alcR and in the alcA promoters having the consensus sequence 5'-G/CPyGGGG-3'. The disruption of one of these CREA-binding sites in the alcR promoter overlapping the induction target for the trans-activator ALCR results in a partially derepressed alc phenotype and derepressed alcR transcription, showing that this binding site is functional in vivo. Our data suggest that CREA represses the ethanol regulon by a double lock mechanism repressing both the trans-acting gene, alcR, and the structural gene, alcA.

  17. Strict and direct transcriptional repression of the pobA gene by benzoate avoids 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation in the pollutant degrader bacterium Cupriavidus necator JMP134.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, Raúl A; Pérez-Pantoja, Danilo; González, Bernardo

    2011-06-01

    As other environmental bacteria, Cupriavidus necator JMP134 uses benzoate as preferred substrate in mixtures with 4-hydroxybenzoate, strongly inhibiting its degradation. The mechanism underlying this hierarchical use was studied. A C. necator benA mutant, defective in the first step of benzoate degradation, is unable to metabolize 4-hydroxybenzoate when benzoate is also included in the medium, indicating that this substrate and not one of its catabolic intermediates is directly triggering repression. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoate 3-hydroxylase-encoding pobA transcripts are nearly absent in presence of benzoate and a fusion of pobA promoter to lacZ reporter confirmed that benzoate drastically decreases the transcription of this gene. Expression of pobA driven by a heterologous promoter in C. necator benA mutant, allows growth on 4-hydroxybenzoate in presence of benzoate, overcoming its repressive effect. In contrast with other bacteria, regulators of benzoate catabolism do not participate in repression of 4-hydroxybenzoate degradation. Moreover, the effect of benzoate on pobA promoter can be observed in heterologous strains with the sole presence of PobR, the transcriptional activator of pobA gene, indicating that PobR is enough to fully reproduce the phenomenon. This novel mechanism for benzoate repression is probably mediated by direct action of benzoate over PobR. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Overexpression of a Gene Encoding a Catabolite Repression Element in Alternaria citri Causes Severe Symptoms of Black Rot in Citrus Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, H; Ohtani, K; Yamamoto, H; Akimitsu, K

    2007-05-01

    ABSTRACT A gene (AcCreA) encoding a catabolite repression element (CreA) with (two zinc fingers of the Cys(2)His(2) type was isolated from the postharvest fungal pathogen Alternaria citri. The AcCreA overexpression mutant AcOEC2 of A. citri showed normal growth on pectin medium and on segments of peel or the juice sac area from citrus fruit. Production of endopolygalacturonase, an essential virulence factor of this pathogen, was similar in AcOEC2 and the wild type in pectin-containing media. However, addition of glucose to the medium showed that carbon catabolite repression of endopolygalacturonase gene (Acpg1) expression, as well as endopolygalacturonase production, was lost in AcOEC2. The wild-type strain of A. citri causes rot mainly in the central axis of citrus fruit without development of rotting in the juice sac area; however, AcOEC2 caused severe black rot symptoms in both the central axis and juice sac areas. These results indicate that AcCreA-mediated catabolite repression controls the virulence or infection of this pathogen, and that the wild-type A. citri does not cause symptoms in the juice sac area due to carbon catabolite repression by sugars in the juice of the juice sac area.

  19. Inositol and Phosphatidylinositol Mediated Glucose Derepression, Gene Expression and Invertase Secretion in Yeasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Ming CHI; Jun-Feng LI; Xiang-Hong WANG; Shu-Min YAO

    2004-01-01

    Glucose repression occurs in many yeast species and some filamentous fungi, and it represses the expression and secretion of many intracellular and extracellular proteins. In recent years, it has been found that many biochemical reactions in yeast cells are mediated by phosphatidylinositol (PI)-type signaling pathway. However, little is known about the relationships between PI-type signaling and glucose repression,gene expression and invertase secretion in yeasts. Many evidences in our previous studies showed that glucose repression, invertase secretion, gene expression and cell growth were mediated by inositol and PI in Saccharomyces and Schizosaccharomyces. The elucidation of the new regulatory mechanisms of protein secretion, gene expression and glucose repression would be an entirely new aspect of inositol and PI-type signaling regulation in yeasts.

  20. Corticosteroid-Induced MKP-1 Represses Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Secretion by Enhancing Activity of Tristetraprolin (TTP) in ASM Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhala, Pavan; Bunge, Kristin; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2016-10-01

    Exaggerated cytokine secretion drives pathogenesis of a number of chronic inflammat