WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy hie

  1. Preterm Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna G Gopagondanahalli

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a recognizable and defined clinical syndrome in term infants that results from a severe or prolonged hypoxic ischemic episode before or during birth. However, in the preterm infant, defining hypoxic ischemic injury, its clinical course, monitoring and outcomes remains complex. Few studies examine preterm HIE, and these are heterogeneous, with variable inclusion criteria and outcomes reported. We examine the available evidence that implies that the incidence of hypoxic ischemic insult in preterm infants is probably higher than recognized, and follows a more complex clinical course, with higher rates of adverse neurological outcomes, compared to term infants. This review aims to elucidate the causes and consequences of preterm hypoxia ischemia, the subsequent clinical encephalopathy syndrome, diagnostic tools and outcomes. Finally, we suggest a uniform definition for preterm HIE that may help in identifying infants most at risk of adverse outcomes and amenable to neuroprotective therapies.

  2. Can cerebellar and brainstem apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values predict neuromotor outcome in term neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) treated with hypothermia?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gemma Arca-Díaz; Thomas J Re; Marie Drottar; Carmen Rosa Fortuno; Katyucia De Macedo-Rodrigues; Kiho Im; Josep Figueras-Aloy; Patricia Ellen Grant

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose To determine the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in specific infratentorial brain structures during the first week of life and its relation with neuromotor outcome for Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE...

  3. Outcome Factors in Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The predictive value of history, examination, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, EEG and sensory evoked potentials (SEP) in the prognosis of children with acute hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) was evaluated at the University Hospital of Lille, France.

  4. Molecular chaperones and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Hua

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a disease that occurs when the brain is subjected to hypoxia, resulting in neuronal death and neurological deficits, with a poor prognosis. The mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury include excitatory amino acid release, cellular proteolysis, reactive oxygen species generation, nitric oxide synthesis, and inflammation. The molecular and cellular changes in HIE include protein misfolding, aggregation, and destruction of organelles. The apoptotic pathways activated by ischemia and hypoxia include the mitochondrial pathway, the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced pathway. Numerous treatments for hypoxic-ischemic brain injury caused by HIE have been developed over the last half century. Hypothermia, xenon gas treatment, the use of melatonin and erythropoietin, and hypoxic-ischemic preconditioning have proven effective in HIE patients. Molecular chaperones are proteins ubiquitously present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. A large number of molecular chaperones are induced after brain ischemia and hypoxia, among which the heat shock proteins are the most important. Heat shock proteins not only maintain protein homeostasis; they also exert anti-apoptotic effects. Heat shock proteins maintain protein homeostasis by helping to transport proteins to their target destinations, assisting in the proper folding of newly synthesized polypeptides, regulating the degradation of misfolded proteins, inhibiting the aggregation of proteins, and by controlling the refolding of misfolded proteins. In addition, heat shock proteins exert anti-apoptotic effects by interacting with various signaling pathways to block the activation of downstream effectors in numerous apoptotic pathways, including the intrinsic pathway, the endoplasmic reticulum-stress mediated pathway and the extrinsic Fas receptor pathway. Molecular chaperones play a key role in neuroprotection in HIE. In

  5. Incidence of Acute Renal Failure in Birth Asphyxia and its Correlation with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugunakar Reddy B

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Perinatal asphyxia is an essential reason for neonatal mortality and neurological morbidity. The general rate of this condition is assessed to be between 1 to 10 for every 1000 live births and is affected by the birth weight and gestational age of the infant furthermore by the neighbourhood accessibility of therapeutic assets. Methods: The underlying administration of every single such neonate comprised of putting the child under a servocontrolled radiant warmer and nursing them in the thermo-neutral range of temperature. About 41 cases accomplished for early identification of confusions and difficulties and their convenient administration. Following 72 h of birth and before 96 h of birth in the wake of getting educated composed assent from the guardians, under aseptic safety measures 3 ml blood was drawn and was assessed for blood urea (Berthelot strategy, serum creatinine (Jaffe’s test, serum electrolytes (Calorimetric technique and urine yield was observed by applying plastic accumulation pack (minicom and clinical state of the child was checked. Results: A sum of 1285 neonates were conceded in NICU for different issues, among them an aggregate of 90 neonates were conceded for perinatal asphyxia. A sum of 75 cases and 50 controls were chosen. The accompanying tables and figures represent the outcomes in subtle element. The outcomes got were examine blood urea and serum creatinine levels were essentially lifted in cases with renal disappointment, when contrasted with controls (P=0.001. Nevertheless, there was no distinction in electrolyte levels in both the gatherings. Conclusion: The most common perinatal danger component was MSAF (40%. In our study the commonest type of ARF in every one of the three phases of HIE was non-oliguric sort. The frequency of inherent renal disappointment in our study was 9.4%. Checking of blood urea, serum creatinine and urine yield helps in the early finding and administration of renal

  6. Hypothermia therapy for newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Rita C; Procianoy, Renato S

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia reduces cerebral injury and improves the neurological outcome secondary to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. It has been indicated for asphyxiated full-term or near-term newborn infants with clinical signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). A search was performed for articles on therapeutic hypothermia in newborns with perinatal asphyxia in PubMed; the authors chose those considered most significant. There are two therapeutic hypothermia methods: selective head cooling and total body cooling. The target body temperature is 34.5 °C for selective head cooling and 33.5 °C for total body cooling. Temperatures lower than 32 °C are less neuroprotective, and temperatures below 30 °C are very dangerous, with severe complications. Therapeutic hypothermia must start within the first 6h after birth, as studies have shown that this represents the therapeutic window for the hypoxic-ischemic event. Therapy must be maintained for 72 h, with very strict control of the newborn's body temperature. It has been shown that therapeutic hypothermia is effective in reducing neurologic impairment, especially in full-term or near-term newborns with moderate hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Therapeutic hypothermia is a neuroprotective technique indicated for newborn infants with perinatal asphyxia and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chou Chiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1 selection criteria for TH; (2 choices of method and equipment for TH; (3 TH prior to and during transport; (4 methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5 systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6 monitoring and management of seizures; (7 neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8 adjuvant therapy for TH. Key Words: hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, neonate, patient care, perinatal asphyxia, therapeutic hypothermia

  8. Stem Cell Therapy for Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel eGonzales-Portillo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatments for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE have been limited. The aim of this paper is to offer translational research guidance on stem cell therapy for neonatal HIE by examining clinically relevant animal models, practical stem cell sources, safety and efficacy of endpoint assays, as well as a general understanding of modes of action of this cellular therapy. In order to do so, we discuss the clinical manifestations of HIE, highlighting its overlapping pathologies with stroke providing insights on the potential of cell therapy, currently investigated in stroke, for HIE. To this end, we draw guidance from recommendations outlined in Stem cell Therapeutics as an Emerging Paradigm for Stroke or STEPS, which have been recently modified to Baby STEPS to cater for the neonatal symptoms of HIE. These guidelines recognized that neonatal HIE exhibits distinct disease symptoms from adult stroke in need of an innovative translational approach that facilitates the entry of cell therapy in the clinic. Finally, new information about recent clinical trials, and insights into combination therapy are provided with the vision that stem cell therapy may benefit from available treatments, such as hypothermia, already being tested in children diagnosed with HIE.

  9. Biomarkers of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As neonatal intensive care has evolved, the focus has shifted from improving mortality alone to an effort to improve both mortality and morbidity. The most frequent source of neonatal brain injury occurs as a result of hypoxic-ischemic injury. Hypoxic-ischemic injury occurs in about 2 of 1,000 full-term infants and severe injured infants will have lifetime disabilities and neurodevelopmental delays. Most recently, remarkable efforts toward neuroprotection have been started with the advent of therapeutic hypothermia and a key step in the evolution of neonatal neuroprotection is the discovery of biomarkers that enable the clinician-scientist to screen infants for brain injury, monitor progression of disease, identify injured brain regions, and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. Lastly, biomarkers offer great hope identifying when an injury occurred shedding light on the potential pathophysiology and the most effective therapy. In this article, we will review biomarkers of HIE including S100b, neuron specific enolase, umbilical cord IL-6, CK-BB, GFAP, myelin basic protein, UCHL-1, and pNF-H. We hope to contribute to the awareness, validation and clinical use of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  10. Therapeutic Hypothermia for Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ming-Chou; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Chyi-Her

    2017-03-27

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a recommended regimen for newborn infants who are at or near term with evolving moderate-to-severe hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The Task Force of the Taiwan Child Neurology Society and the Taiwan Society of Neonatology held a joint meeting in 2015 to establish recommendations for using TH on newborn patients with HIE. Based on current evidence and experts' experiences, this review article summarizes the key points and recommendations regarding TH for newborns with HIE, including: (1) selection criteria for TH; (2) choices of method and equipment for TH; (3) TH prior to and during transport; (4) methods for temperature maintenance, monitoring, and rewarming; (5) systemic care of patients during TH, including the care of respiratory and cardiovascular systems, management of fluids, electrolytes, and nutrition, as well as sedation and drug metabolism; (6) monitoring and management of seizures; (7) neuroimaging, prognostic factors, and outcomes; and (8) adjuvant therapy for TH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Neurosonographic abnormalities in neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, N K; Gupta, A K; Lamba, I M

    1994-07-01

    Pattern of neurosonographic (NSG) abnormalities in 150 term newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) was studied. Sonographic abnormalities, presumably indicating cerebral edema and or ischemia, were observed in 86% (n = 129) cases. Obliteration of the ventricles occurred as the sole abnormality in 30 (20%) cases. Eighty (53%) patients had diffusely increased echogenicity of the brain parenchyma (DPE) in addition to the compression of the ventricles, sulci and the interhemispheric fissure. Focal parenchymal echodense (FPE) lesions occurred in nine (6%) neonates with HIE. Ten (6.6%) patients, however, had increased periventricular echogenicity (PVE). Two patients, one with focal parenchymal lesions and the other with PVE had obliterated ventricles in addition. Regarding temporal sequence earliest NSG abnormalities were DPE or slit like ventricles that were observed on day-1 itself. Focal or periventricular echogenic lesions, however, made their first appearance on day-3 of life. Twenty one patients had normal scans. Fifty patients with abnormal scans died. None of the infants with normal scans, however, died (p multicystic encephalomalacia (n = 2), porencephalic cyst (n = 1), or persistence of PVE without cystic changes (n = 4). The results of this study highlight the diagnostic efficacy of neurosonography in cases of HIE. We suggest that it should be incorporated in the routine evaluation of patients with hypoxic brain injury.

  12. Focal Brain Injury Associated with a Model of Severe Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M; McPherson, Ronald J; Kapur, Raj P; Juul, Sandra E

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. To better understand the mechanisms contributing to brain injury and improve outcomes in neonates with HIE, better preclinical animal models that mimic the clinical situation following birth asphyxia in term newborns are needed. In an effort to achieve this goal, we modified our nonhuman primate model of HIE induced by in utero umbilical cord occlusion (UCO) to include postnatal hypoxic episodes, in order to simulate apneic events in human neonates with HIE. We describe a cohort of 4 near-term fetal Macaca nemestrina that underwent 18 min of in utero UCO, followed by cesarean section delivery, resuscitation, and subsequent postnatal mechanical ventilation, with exposure to intermittent daily hypoxia (3 min, 8% O2 3-8 times daily for 3 days). After delivery, all animals demonstrated severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7 ± 0.12; mean ± SD) and low APGAR scores (neonates after severe, abrupt hypoxic-ischemic insults. The UCO model permits timely detection of biomarkers associated with specific patterns of neonatal brain injury, and it may ultimately be useful for validating therapeutic strategies to treat neonatal HIE. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Hypoxic-Ischemic Neonatal Encephalopathy: Animal Experiments for Neuroprotective Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sameshima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and ensuing brain damage is still an important problem in modern perinatal medicine. In this paper, we would like to share some of the results of our recent studies on neuroprotective therapies in animal experiments, as well as some literature reviews. From the basic animal studies, we have now obtained some possible candidates for therapeutic measures against hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy. For example, they are hypothermia, rehabilitation, free radical scavenger, neurotrophic factors and growth factors, steroid, calcium channel blocker, vagal stimulation, some anti apoptotic agents, pre- and post conditioning, antioxidants, cell therapy with stem cells, modulators of K(+-ATP channels, and so on. Whether combination of these therapies may be more beneficial than any single therapy needs to be clarified. Hypoxia-ischemia is a complicated condition, in which the cause, severity, and time-course are different in each case. Likewise, each fetus has its own inherent potentials such as adaptation, preconditioning-tolerance, and intolerance. Therefore, further extensive studies are required to establish an individualized strategy for neuroprotection against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult.

  14. Electrocardiographic and enzymatic correlations with outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Jyoti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal asphyxia leading to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is a common problem causing multi organ dysfunction including myocardial involvement which can affect the outcome. Objective To evaluate the myocardial dysfunction in neonates having HIE by electrocardiographic(ECG and cardiac enzymes (CK Total, CK-MB and Troponin I and find out the relationship with HIE and outcome. Design/Methods This was a hospital based prospective study. Sixty term neonates who had suffered perinatal asphyxia and developed HIE were enrolled. Myocardial involvement was assessed by clinical, ECG, and CK Total, CK-MB and Troponin I measurements. Results Of 60 cases, 13(21.7% were in mild, 27(45% in moderate and 20(33.3% belonged to severe,HIE. ECG was abnormal in 46 (76.7%; of these 19 (41.3% had grade I, 13 (28.2% grades II and III each and 1 (2.1% with grade IV changes. Serum levels of CK Total, CK- MB and Troponin I were raised in 54 (90%, 52 (86.6% and 48 (80% neonates, respectively. ECG changes and enzymatic levels showed increasing abnormalities with severity of HIE, and the differences among different grades were significant (p = 0.002, 0.02, Conclusions Abnormal ECG and cardiac enzymes levels are found in HIE and can lead to poor outcome due to myocardial damage Early detection can help in better management and survival of these neonates.

  15. Early EEG Grade and Outcome at 5 Years After Mild Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Deirdre M; O'Connor, Catherine M; Ryan, C Anthony; Korotchikova, Irina; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-10-01

    More than half of all infants with neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are graded as mild and do not meet current criteria for therapeutic hypothermia. These infants are often not enrolled in follow-up, and hence our knowledge of their long-term outcome is sparse. We wished to compare 5-year outcomes in a group of infants with mild, moderate, and severe HIE, graded with both early EEG and clinical assessment, none of whom were treated with therapeutic hypothermia. Term infants with HIE and a healthy comparison group were recruited at birth. Both groups had early continuous EEG recordings. Cognitive and motor outcome was assessed at 5 years. Outcome was available in 53 infants with HIE and 30 infants in the comparison group at 5 years. Infants with mild HIE at birth (n = 22) had significantly lower full-scale IQ, verbal IQ, and performance IQ than comparison infants (n = 30) at 5 years (P = .001, .001, and 0.004, respectively). No difference in cognitive measures was seen between infants with mild and moderate grades HIE. Intact survival at 5 years varied across EEG grade HIE at 6 hours after birth; 75% in mild, 46% in moderate, 43% in major abnormalities, and 0% with inactive EEGs, compared with 97% in the comparison group. Survivors of mild HIE, graded clinically or by early EEG, have higher rates of disability than their peers and have cognitive outcomes similar to that of children with moderate encephalopathy in an uncooled HIE cohort. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  16. The use of fuzzy backpropagation neural networks for the early diagnosis of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liu; Liqing, Huo; Hongru, Lu; Feng, Zhang; Chongxun, Zheng; Pokhrel, Shami; Jie, Zhang

    2011-01-01

    To establish an early diagnostic system for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in newborns based on artificial neural networks and to determine its feasibility. Based on published research as well as preliminary studies in our laboratory, multiple noninvasive indicators with high sensitivity and specificity were selected for the early diagnosis of HIE and employed in the present study, which incorporates fuzzy logic with artificial neural networks. The analysis of the diagnostic results from the fuzzy neural network experiments with 140 cases of HIE showed a correct recognition rate of 100% in all training samples and a correct recognition rate of 95% in all the test samples, indicating a misdiagnosis rate of 5%. A preliminary model using fuzzy backpropagation neural networks based on a composite index of clinical indicators was established and its accuracy for the early diagnosis of HIE was validated. Therefore, this method provides a convenient tool for the early clinical diagnosis of HIE.

  17. The Use of Fuzzy BackPropagation Neural Networks for the Early Diagnosis of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To establish an early diagnostic system for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborns based on artificial neural networks and to determine its feasibility. Methods. Based on published research as well as preliminary studies in our laboratory, multiple noninvasive indicators with high sensitivity and specificity were selected for the early diagnosis of HIE and employed in the present study, which incorporates fuzzy logic with artificial neural networks. Results. The analysis of the diagnostic results from the fuzzy neural network experiments with 140 cases of HIE showed a correct recognition rate of 100% in all training samples and a correct recognition rate of 95% in all the test samples, indicating a misdiagnosis rate of 5%. Conclusion. A preliminary model using fuzzy backpropagation neural networks based on a composite index of clinical indicators was established and its accuracy for the early diagnosis of HIE was validated. Therefore, this method provides a convenient tool for the early clinical diagnosis of HIE.

  18. Erythropoietin and hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Elizabeth E; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Juul, Sandra E; Chang, Taeun; Mayock, Dennis E; Durand, David J; Song, Dongli; Barkovich, Anthony J; Ballard, Roberta A; Wu, Yvonne W

    2014-11-01

    Erythropoietin is neuroprotective in animal models of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. We previously reported a phase I safety and pharmacokinetic study of erythropoietin in neonates. This article presents the neurodevelopmental follow-up of infants who were enrolled in the phase I clinical trial. We enrolled 24 newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in a dose-escalation study. Patients received up to six doses of erythropoietin in addition to hypothermia. All infants underwent neonatal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reviewed by a single neuroradiologist. Moderate-to-severe neurodevelopmental disability was defined as cerebral palsy with Gross Motor Function Classification System levels III-V or cognitive impairment based on Bayley Scales of Infant Development II mental developmental index or Bayley III cognitive composite score. Outcomes were available for 22 of 24 infants, at mean age 22 months (range, 8-34 months). There were no deaths. Eight (36%) had moderate-to-severe brain injury on neonatal MRI. Moderate-to-severe disability occurred in one child (4.5%), in the setting of moderate-to-severe basal ganglia and/or thalamic injury. Seven infants with moderate-to-severe watershed injury exhibited the following outcomes: normal (three), mild language delay (two), mild hemiplegic cerebral palsy (one), and epilepsy (one). All 11 patients with a normal brain MRI had a normal outcome. This study is the first to describe neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants who received high doses of erythropoietin and hypothermia during the neonatal period. The findings suggest that future studies are warranted to assess the efficacy of this new potential neuroprotective therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Arterial spin-labelling perfusion MRI and outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vis, Jill B. de; Hendrikse, Jeroen [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); Petersen, Esben T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, HP E 01.132, P.O. Box 85500, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiotherapy, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vries, Linda S. de; Bel, Frank van; Alderliesten, Thomas; Negro, Simona; Groenendaal, Floris; Benders, Manon J.N.L. [Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital/University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    Hyperperfusion may be related to outcome in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether arterial spin labelling (ASL) perfusion is associated with outcome in neonates with HIE and to compare the predictive value of ASL MRI to known MRI predictive markers. Twenty-eight neonates diagnosed with HIE and assessed with MR imaging (conventional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, MR spectroscopy [MRS], and ASL MRI) were included. Perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami was measured. Outcome at 9 or 18 months of age was scored as either adverse (death or cerebral palsy) or favourable. The median (range) perfusion in the basal ganglia and thalami (BGT) was 63 (28-108) ml/100 g/min in the neonates with adverse outcome and 28 (12-51) ml/100 g/min in the infants with favourable outcome (p < 0.01). The area-under-the-curve was 0.92 for ASL MRI, 0.97 for MRI score, 0.96 for Lac/NAA and 0.92 for ADC in the BGT. The combination of Lac/NAA and ASL MRI results was the best predictor of outcome (r {sup 2} = 0.86, p < 0.001). Higher ASL perfusion values in neonates with HIE are associated with a worse neurodevelopmental outcome. A combination of the MRS and ASL MRI information is the best predictor of outcome. (orig.)

  20. Role of magnetic resonance imaging in biometric evaluation of corpus callosum in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Garhwal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Corpus callosum (CC has an important role in establishing hemispheric lateralization of function. Significance of this structure which is the primary white matter commissure of the brain lies in the fact that damage to the CC during development has been found to be associated with poor neurological outcome and neuropsychological performance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can precisely detect, localize, and evaluate damage to CC in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE patients and assist in reaching to at an accurate anatomical diagnosis, thus heeling in further management of the patient. Objectives: The objective of this study is to analyze the effect of HIE on CC morphometry by assessing various diameters of CC. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four patients with history of hypoxic-ischemic injury referred to the Department of Radiodiagnosis were included in the study. All the patients were made to undergo MRI of the brain using Siemens Symphony Magnetom 1.5 Tesla scanner after taking informed consent for the same. The findings of MRI brain were assessed and analyzed. Data analysis was done using percentages of different diagnosis and outcomes made by MRI brain were computed and compiled. Results: In the present study, male predominance is seen, 77.78% patients were male and 22.22% were female. In the present study, maximum numbers of patients were <1 year of age (37.04%. In the present study, we see that the isthmus was the most commonly affected portion of CC. Children who did not cry at birth, born with low birth weight, low Apgar score were positively correlated with severity of damage to CC. Conclusion: From the present study, it was noted that MRI is very efficient tool in evaluating morphometry of CC in HIE. Its noninvasiveness and no exposure to ionizing radiation is an added advantage. However, experience and understanding of the principles are essential for accurate diagnosis.

  1. Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: epileptic and paretic outcome at one year of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allemand Federico

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The issue concerning neurologic outcome in patients with perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (H.I.E has inspired many studies which tried to identify adequate prognostic factors. Our work aims to find among neonatal parameters: - factors which help to predict the risk to develop both Cerebral Palsy (CP and secondary Epilepsy at one year of age in subjects affected by perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy, - correlations between the neonatal parameters and the variable severity of above mentioned sequelae. Methods We have recruited 32 subjects, whose history and neuroimages suggested a perinatal H.I.E and we have retrospectively analysed clinical-instrumental parameters at birth and at one year of age. Results At one year cut-off, 9 patients developed both secondary epilepsy and CP (28%, whereas the other subjects showed only motor delay (31%, only secondary epilepsy (3% or only CP (38%. Patients with both the severest sequelae were essentially term infants (only 2/9 were pre-term infants, with normal weight (only 3 LBW and 7 of them with early pathologic EEG and neuroimages pointing out cortex injuries (typical of term infants. A statistic analysis showed the following correlations: birth weight and global prognosis (χ2 = 14,03; p = 0,04; neonatal clinical pattern and CP's severity (χ2 = 14,03; p = 0,0009; early EEG and CP's severity (χ2 = 4,32; p = 0,04; epileptic onset age and CP and Epilepsy's severity (F = 16,01; p = 0,005. Birth weight represented a predictive factor of early neurological outcome ( Conclusion From a clinical point of view it is of crucial importance to have some parameters which enable to discriminate patients at risk of more severe sequelae from those at risk of moderate severity outcome.

  2. [Therapeutic effect of early applying hydrotherapy with Chinese drugs on children hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yun-Zhi; Zhai, Hong-Yin; Su, Chun-Ya

    2009-02-01

    To observe the therapeutic effect of hydrotherapy with Chinese drugs (HT-C) in early intervention on children hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). HIE children were assigned to the treatment group and the control group, 50 in each, at random depending on the willingness of patients' parents. Both groups received the conventional functional training, according to the "0 -3-year-old early intervention outline", but for the treatment group, HT-C was applied additionally. Indexes for quality of sleep, gross motor function, severity of spasm and intellectual development were observed and compared before and after treatment to assess the therapeutic effects. Therapeutic effect in the treatment group was better than that in the control group in all the indexes observed, showing statistical significance (all P <0.05). Early intervention of HT-C could improve clinical symptom, promote the functional recovery and intellectual development in children HIE, and also could reduce or prevent the sequelae occurrence of the nervous system in them.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in newborn rats association with increased expression of mTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we observed the therapeutic effects of acupuncture and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms by constructed a hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE animal model. In the electroacupuncture group, mTOR expression increased since 1d, and continued to rise till the 21st day. All of the differences were significantly (p<0.05 vs the model group. Meanwhile, mTOR expression was analyzed by Western blotting. There was statistical significance between the model group and the electroacupuncture group in the four time periods (p<0.05. The results provide evidence that electroacupuncture treatment protected cortical neurons against HIE-induced neuronal damage and degenerative changes in rats, which is in association with activation of mTOR both at the mRNA level and protein level. Therefore, electroacupuncture may become a potential therapeutic strategy for HIE of newborn.

  4. Language in Children with Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez, Chenia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60% of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6 and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  − 0.566; p = 0.028. As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and with consequences of neurologic disorder, evincing the delays in language development. Conclusion This study achieved the goals proposed and highlights the necessity of greater attention by professionals to language skills during the initial period of child development.

  5. Language in children with neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Chenia; Carneiro, Luciana; Vernier, Luíza; Cesa, Carla; Guardiola, Ana; Vidor, Deisi

    2014-07-01

    Introduction Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (NHIE) is a common neurologic injury, and it may compromise the child's language and cognition. Understanding the process of language acquisition becomes possible with concise knowledge about children's global development. Objective The aim of this study was to observe if language acquisition and development are impaired in children with NHIE. Methods Seventy children with NHIE from 1 to 24 months old were analyzed in a Pediatric Neurology Service of Hospital of Porto Alegre, South of Brazil using the Brunet-Lezine Scale. Statistical analysis used SPSS 13.0 software. Results Twenty-four (60%) of the subjects were boys, with mean gestational age of 35.8 weeks (standard deviation of 4.6) and mean Apgar score of 6.0 at 1 minute and 7.1 at 5 minutes. The variables age versus language showed significant inverse correlation (r =  - 0.566; p = 0.028). As the subjects aged, language tasks became more specific and dependent on the subject's direct action, rather than the subjective interpretation of their guardian. This correlation seems to be closely associated with scale configuration and with consequences of neurologic disorder, evincing the delays in language development. Conclusion This study achieved the goals proposed and highlights the necessity of greater attention by professionals to language skills during the initial period of child development.

  6. Oxidative Stress in Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in neonates. Because of high concentrations of sensitive immature cells, metal-catalyzed free radicals, non-saturated fatty acids, and low concentrations of antioxidant enzymes, the brain requires high levels of oxygen supply and is, thus, extremely sensitive to hypoxia. Strong evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays an important role in pathogenesis and progression. Following hypoxia and ischemia, reactive oxygen species (ROS production rapidly increases and overwhelms antioxidant defenses. A large excess of ROS will directly modify or degenerate cellular macromolecules, such as membranes, proteins, lipids, and DNA, and lead to a cascading inflammatory response, and protease secretion. These derivatives are involved in a complex interplay of multiple pathways (e.g., inflammation, apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis which finally lead to brain injury. In this review, we highlight the molecular mechanism for oxidative stress in HIE, summarize current research on therapeutic strategies utilized in combating oxidative stress, and try to explore novel potential clinical approaches.

  7. A validated clinical MRI injury scoring system in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Shamik B.; Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Rao, Rakesh; Liao, Steve M.; Mathur, Amit M. [Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Newborn Medicine, Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, St. Louis, MO (United States); Shimony, Joshua S.; McKinstry, Robert C. [Washington University School of Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-10-15

    Deep nuclear gray matter injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is associated with worse neurodevelopmental outcomes. We previously published a qualitative MRI injury scoring system utilizing serial T1-weighted, T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury. To establish the validity of the MRI scoring system with neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months. MRI scans from neonates with moderate to severe HIE treated with therapeutic hypothermia were evaluated. Signal abnormality was scored on T1-weighted, T2-weighted and DWI sequences and assessed using an established system in five regions: (a) subcortical: caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen, thalamus and the posterior limb of the internal capsule; (b) white matter; (c) cortex, (d) cerebellum and (e) brainstem. MRI injury was graded as none, mild, moderate or severe. Inter-rater reliability was tested on a subset of scans by two independent and blinded neuroradiologists. Surviving infants underwent the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (Bayley-III) at 18-24 months. Data were analyzed using univariate and multivariate linear and logistic regression. Fifty-seven eligible neonates underwent at least one MRI scan in the first 2 weeks of life. Mean postnatal age at scan 1 was 4±2 days in 50/57 (88%) neonates and 48/54 (89%) surviving infants underwent scan 2 at 10±2 days. In 54/57 (95%) survivors, higher MRI injury grades were significantly associated with worse outcomes in the cognitive, motor and language domains of the Bayley-III. A qualitative MRI injury scoring system weighted for deep nuclear gray matter injury is a significant predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome at 18-24 months in neonates with HIE. (orig.)

  8. Evolution of the Therapeutic Effects of Induced Local Hypothermia in Neonates with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Basiri

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is one of the most important causes of permanent damage to brain tissue that redound to mortality and/or late sequelae such as cerebral palsy or delayed neural development. 15-20 percent of Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE cases die during neonatal period and 25-30 percent of those who survive suffer from neural development problems such as cerebral palsy and mental retardation. Hypothermia or lowering temperature of brain or total body is a new and promising treatment. The present study was done to assess therapeutic effects of induced local hypothermia in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE among neonates admitted to Fatemieh and Beset hospitals of Hamadan city.Materials & Method: The present study was performed as a randomized clinical trial upon 36 neonates who had inclusion criteria to be imported into the study. In the first 6 hours after birth, the neonates were randomly classified into two 18 person groups. In the control group the neonates were managed with routine treatments consisted of preservative measures and anti-convulsive treatments, if necessary. In the case group the neonates received induced local hypothermia for 6 hours in addition to routine therapeutic managements. The data were analyzed using SPSS Version 13.Results: 72.7% of the neonates of the case and control groups were male. There was no significant difference between the case and control groups in sex, birth weight, gestational age and perinatal obstetric complications. The mean duration of admission was 7.72±4.23 days in the case group and 10.06±5.99 days in the control group with no significant difference between the two groups (P=0.199. The mean time of starting oral feeding was 3.44±3.11 days and 4.53±2.74 days in the control and case groups respectively and this difference was not statistically significant either (P=0.737.The mean time of regaining consciousness was 3.72±3.19 days in the case

  9. [Birth asphyxia and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, incidence and obstetric risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsdottir, Kolbrun; Dagbjartsson, Atli; Thorkelsson, Thordur; Hardardottir, Hildur

    2007-09-01

    Modern medical practice has changed dramatically during the past decades because of improved technology. Still, fetal surveillance during labor is relatively unchanged since 1960 s when fetal heart rate monitoring (FHR) became standard practice. Newborn infants are still suffering from birth asphyxia and in severe cases leading to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) which sometimes results in permanent neurological damage. The incidence of birth asphyxia and HIE in Iceland is unknown and so are the risk factors for severe asphyxia. The objective of this study was to assess the incidence, obstetric risk factors and the sequela of severe asphyxia at Landspitali university hospital (LSH). All term infants born at LSH from 1.1.1997- 31.12.2001 with birth asphyxia, defined as five minute Apgar score %lt;6, were included in the study (n=127). Clinical information were collected retrospectively from maternal records on maternal diseases during pregnancy, cardiotocogram (CTG), type of birth, the presence of meconium and operative delivery rates. Information was also collected regarding birth asphyxia and HIE in the neonatal period. The incidence of birth asphyxia was 9.4/1000 live term births during the study period, with increasing incidence during the three last years. The incidence of HIE was 1.4/ 1,000 live term births. Severe maternal diseases during pregnancy were not a significant risk factor for asphyxia. The amniotic fluid was meconium stained in fifty percent of cases and the umbilical cord was wrapped around the fetal neck in 41% of cases. Abnormal CTG tracing was observed in 66% of cases in the study group and in 79% of the HIE cases. Operative deliveries were significantly more common in the study cohort compared with other deliveries at LSH at the same time: ventouse delivery 22% vs 6.8% (pdiseases does not correlate with increased incidence of asphyxia, presumably due to increased surveillance of these pregnancies and a lower treshold for intervention

  10. The Association between NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms and Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Susceptibility and Symptoms in Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial NOS (NOS3 has a potential role in the prevention of neuronal injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Thus, we aimed to explore the association between NOS3 gene polymorphisms and HIE susceptibility and symptoms in a Chinese Han population. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the NOS3 gene, rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744, were detected in 226 children with HIE and 212 healthy children in a Chinese Han population. Apgar scores and magnetic resonance image scans were used to estimate the symptoms and brain damage. The association analyses were conducted by using SNPStats and SPSS 18.0 software. The genotype and allele distributions of rs1800779 and rs1799983 displayed no significant differences between the patients and the controls, while the rs2070744 allele distribution was significantly different (corrected P=0.009. For clinical characteristics, the rs2070744 genotype distribution was significantly different in patients with different Apgar scores (≤5, TT/TC/CC = 6/7/5; 6~7, TT/TC/CC = 17/0/0; 8~9, TT/TC/CC = 6/2/0; 10, TT/TC/CC = 7/1/0; corrected P=0.006 in the 1001 to 1449 g birth weight subgroup. The haplotype test did not show any associations with the risk and clinical characteristics of HIE. The results suggest that NOS3 gene SNP rs2070744 was significantly associated with HIE susceptibility and symptom expression in Chinese Han population.

  11. Evolving Understanding of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy in the Term Infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Linda S.; Cowan, Frances M.

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to document changes in the evaluation and prognosis of term-born infants with neonatal encephalopathy of hypoxic-ischemic origin, with particular reference to our own experiences and influences, and to summarize the debate on causation and the relative importance of antenatal and

  12. Association of NOS3 gene variants and clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuzmanić Šamija, R. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Primorac, D. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Osijek, Osijek (Croatia); Eberly College of Science, Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States); St. Catherine Speciality Hospital, Zabok (Croatia); Rešić, B. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Pavlov, V. [Department of Neonatology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Čapkun, V. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Punda, H. [School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia); Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine Split, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the association of different clinical contributors of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy with NOS3 gene polymorphisms. A total of 110 children with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and 128 control children were selected for this study. Association of gender, gestational age, birth weight, Apgar score, cranial ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging findings with genotypic data of six haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and the most commonly investigated rs1800779 and rs2070744 polymorphisms was analyzed. The TGT haplotype of rs1800783, rs1800779, and rs2070744 polymorphisms was associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Children with the TGT haplotype were infants below 32 weeks of gestation and they had the most severe brain damage. Increased incidence of the TT genotype of the NOS3 rs1808593 SNP was found in the group of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy patients with medium and severe brain damage. The probability of brain damage was twice as high in children with the TT genotype than in children with the TG genotype of the same polymorphism. Furthermore, the T allele of the same polymorphism was twice as frequent in children with lower Apgar scores. This study strongly suggests associations of NOS3 gene polymorphism with intensity of brain damage and severity of the clinical picture in affected children.

  13. Characterization of neonatal seizures in an animal model of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Dayalan; White, Andrew M.; Raol, Yogendra H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective In this study, we use time-locked video and electroencephalograph (EEG) recordings to characterize acute seizures and EEG abnormalities in an animal model that replicates many salient features of human neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) including the brain injury pattern and long-term neurologic outcome. Methods Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) was induced in 7-day-old rats by ligating the right carotid artery and exposing the pups to hypoxia for 2 hours (Rice-Vannucci method). To identify seizures and abnormal EEG activity, pups were monitored by video-EEG during hypoxia and at various time points after HI. Occurrence of electroclinical seizures, purely electrographic seizures and other abnormal discharges in the EEG were quantified manually. A power spectrum analysis was done to evaluate the effects of HI on EEG spectra in the 1 to 50 Hz frequency band. Results During hypoxia, all pups exhibit short duration, but frequent electroclinical seizures. Almost all pups continue to have seizures in the immediate period following termination of hypoxia. In over half of the HI rats seizures persisted for 24 hours, for some of them, the seizures continued for more than 48 hours. Seizures were not observed in any rats at 72 hours after HI-induction. A significant reduction in background EEG voltage in the cortex ipsilateral to the ligated carotid artery occurred in rats subjected to HI. In addition, purely electrographic seizures, spikes, sharp waves and brief runs of epileptiform discharges (BRED) were also observed in these rats. Significance HI-induction in P7 rats using the Rice-Vannucci method resulted in the development of seizures and EEG abnormalities similar to that seen in human neonates with HIE. Therefore, we conclude that this is a valid model to test the efficacy of novel interventions to treat neonatal seizures. PMID:24836645

  14. Automatic quantification of ischemic injury on diffusion-weighted MRI of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keelin Murphy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A fully automatic method for detection and quantification of ischemic lesions in diffusion-weighted MR images of neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is presented. Ischemic lesions are manually segmented by two independent observers in 1.5 T data from 20 subjects and an automatic algorithm using a random forest classifier is developed and trained on the annotations of observer 1. The algorithm obtains a median sensitivity and specificity of 0.72 and 0.99 respectively. F1-scores are calculated per subject for algorithm performance (median = 0.52 and observer 2 performance (median = 0.56. A paired t-test on the F1-scores shows no statistical difference between the algorithm and observer 2 performances. The method is applied to a larger dataset including 54 additional subjects scanned at both 1.5 T and 3.0 T. The algorithm findings are shown to correspond well with the injury pattern noted by clinicians in both 1.5 T and 3.0 T data and to have a strong relationship with outcome. The results of the automatic method are condensed to a single score for each subject which has significant correlation with an MR score assigned by experienced clinicians (p < 0.0001. This work represents a quantitative method of evaluating diffusion-weighted MR images in neonatal HIE and a first step in the development of an automatic system for more in-depth analysis and prognostication.

  15. Effects of therapeutic hypothermia on the gut microbiota and metabolome of infants suffering hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy at birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C; Murphy, K; Yen, S; Carafa, I; Dempsey, E M; O'Shea, C A; Vercoe, E A; Ross, R P; Stanton, C; Ryan, C A

    2017-12-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in the perinatal period can lead to significant neurological deficits in later life. Total body cooling (TBC) is a neuroprotective strategy used in the treatment of HIE and has been shown to reduce seizures and improve neurodevelopmental outcomes in treated infants. Little is known, however, about the effects of HIE/TBC on the developing gut microbiota composition and subsequent metabolic profile. Ten term infants with HIE who received TBC at 33.5°C for 72h were recruited. A control group consisted of nine healthy full term infants. Faecal samples were collected from both groups at 2 years of age and stored at -20°C. 16S rRNA amplicon Illumina sequencing was carried out to determine gut microbiota composition and 1H NMR analysis was performed to determine the metabolic profile of faecal water. The gut microbiota composition of the HIE/TBC infants were found to have significantly lower proportions of Bacteroides compared to the non-cooled healthy control group. Alpha diversity measures detected significantly lower diversity in microbial richness in the HIE/TBC infant group compared to the control infants (Shannon index, gut microbiota composition and metabolic profile of both groups. Initial principal coordinate analysis and hierarchal clustering of compounds on MetaboAnalyst 3.0 indicated no clear separation in the metabolic profile of these two infant groups. These results suggest that there is no significant impact on the gut microbial development of HIE/TBC infants compared to healthy infants at 2years of life. To our knowledge this is the first study to report the gut microbiota composition and metabolic profile of infants who have experienced HIE/TBC at birth. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Cost-effective therapeutic hypothermia treatment device for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen RH

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available John J Kim,1,2 Nathan Buchbinder,1,† Simon Ammanuel,1,4,5,† Robert Kim,1,† Erika Moore,1 Neil O'Donnell,1 Jennifer K Lee,3 Ewa Kulikowicz,3 Soumyadipta Acharya,1 Robert H Allen,1,9 Ryan W Lee,6,7 Michael V Johnston4–81Department of Biomedical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 2The James Buchanan Brady Urological Institute, Department of Urology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 3Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, 4Kennedy Krieger Institute, 5Hugo W Moser Research Institute, 6Department of Neurology, 7Department of Pediatrics, 8Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 9Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA†These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Despite recent advances in neonatal care and monitoring, asphyxia globally accounts for 23% of the 4 million annual deaths of newborns, and leads to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Occurring in five of 1000 live-born infants globally and even more in developing countries, HIE is a serious problem that causes death in 25%–50% of affected neonates and neurological disability to at least 25% of survivors. In order to prevent the damage caused by HIE, our invention provides an effective whole-body cooling of the neonates by utilizing evaporation and an endothermic reaction. Our device is composed of basic electronics, clay pots, sand, and urea-based instant cold pack powder. A larger clay pot, lined with nearly 5 cm of sand, contains a smaller pot, where the neonate will be placed for therapeutic treatment. When the sand is mixed with instant cold pack urea powder and wetted with water, the device can extract heat from inside to outside and maintain the inner pot at 17°C for more than 24 hours with monitoring by LED lights and thermistors

  17. Can We Predict Functional Outcome in Neonates with Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy by the Combination of Neuroimaging and Electroencephalography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanavati, Tania; Seemaladinne, Nirupama; Regier, Michael; Yossuck, Panitan; Pergami, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Background Neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a major cause of mortality, morbidity, and long-term neurological deficits. Despite the availability of neuroimaging and neurophysiological testing, tools for accurate early diagnosis and prediction of developmental outcome are still lacking. The goal of this study was to determine if combined use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) findings could support outcome prediction. Methods We retrospectively reviewed records of 17 HIE neonates, classified brain MRI and EEG findings based on severity, and assessed clinical outcome up to 48 months. We determined the relation between MRI/EEG findings and clinical outcome. Results We demonstrated a significant relationship between MRI findings and clinical outcome (Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.017). EEG provided no additional information about the outcome beyond that contained in the MRI score. The statistical model for outcome prediction based on random forests suggested that EEG readings at 24 hours and 72 hours could be important variables for outcome prediction, but this needs to be investigated further. Conclusion Caution should be used when discussing prognosis for neonates with mild-to-moderate HIE based on early MR imaging and EEG findings. A robust, quantitative marker of HIE severity that allows for accurate prediction of long-term outcome, particularly for mild-to-moderate cases, is still needed. PMID:25862075

  18. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2012-01-31

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  19. Fetal heart rate patterns in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: relationship with early cerebral activity and neurodevelopmental outcome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murray, Deirdre M

    2009-09-01

    Despite widespread use of fetal heart rate monitoring, the timing of injury in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains unclear. Our aim was to examine fetal heart rate patterns during labor in infants with clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) evidence of HIE and to relate these findings to neurodevelopmental outcome. Timing of onset of pathological cardiotocographs (CTGs) was determined in each case by two blinded reviewers and related to EEG grade at birth and neurological outcome at 24 months. CTGs were available in 35 infants with HIE (17 mild, 12 moderate, 6 severe on EEG). Admission CTGs were normal in 24\\/35 (69%), suspicious in 8\\/35 (23%), and pathological in 3\\/35 (8%). All CTGs developed nonreassuring features prior to delivery. Three patterns of fetal heart rate abnormalities were seen: group 1, abnormal CTGs on admission in 11\\/35 (31%); group 2, normal CTGs on admission with gradual deterioration to pathological in 20\\/35 cases (57%); and group 3, normal CTGs on admission with acute sentinel events in 4\\/35 (11.5%). The median (interquartile range) duration between the development of pathological CTGs and delivery was 145 (81, 221) minutes in group 2 and 22 (12, 28) minutes in group 3. There was no correlation between duration of pathological CTG trace and grade of encephalopathy (R = 0.09, P = 0.63) or neurological outcome (P = 0.75). However, the grade of encephalopathy was significantly worse in group 3 (P = 0.001), with a trend to worse outcomes. The majority of infants with HIE have normal CTG traces on admission but develop pathological CTG patterns within hours of delivery. More severe encephalopathy was associated with normal admission CTG and acute sentinel events shortly before delivery.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Bo; Wang, Yan; Tang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Di; Wang, Sha-Li

    2015-05-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 μM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 μM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  1. Neuroprotective effects of ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cell transplantation on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-bo Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside Rg1 is the major pharmacologically active component of ginseng, and is reported to have various therapeutic actions. To determine whether it induces the differentiation of neural stem cells, and whether neural stem cell transplantation after induction has therapeutic effects on hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, we cultured neural stem cells in 10-80 µM ginsenoside Rg1. Immunohistochemistry revealed that of the concentrations tested, 20 mM ginsenoside Rg1 had the greatest differentiation-inducing effect and was the concentration used for subsequent experiments. Whole-cell patch clamp showed that neural stem cells induced by 20 µM ginsenoside Rg1 were more mature than non-induced cells. We then established neonatal rat models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using the suture method, and ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells were transplanted via intracerebroventricular injection. These tests confirmed that neural stem cells induced by ginsenoside had fewer pathological lesions and had a significantly better behavioral capacity than model rats that received saline. Transplanted neural stem cells expressed neuron-specific enolase, and were mainly distributed in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The present data suggest that ginsenoside Rg1-induced neural stem cells can promote the partial recovery of complicated brain functions in models of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

  2. Blood carbon dioxide levels and adverse outcome in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    We investigated pCO(2) patterns and the relationship between pCO(2) levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Blood gases during the first 72 hours of life were collected from 52 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Moderate hypocapnia (pCO(2) <3.3 kPa), severe hypocapnia (pCO(2) <2.6 kPa), and hypercapnia (pCO(2) >6.6 kPa) were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months. Normocapnia was documented in 416\\/551 (75.5%) of samples and was present during the entire 72 hours in only 6 out of 52 infants. Mean (standard deviation) pCO(2) values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes: 5.43 (2.4) and 5.41 (2.03), respectively. There was no significant association between moderate hypocapnia, severe hypocapnia, or hypercapnia and adverse outcome (odds ratio [OR] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.49 to 6.89; OR = 3.16, CI = 0.14 to 28.45; and OR = 1.07, CI = 0.24 to 5.45, respectively). In conclusion, only one in nine newborns had normocapnia throughout the first 72 hours. Severe hypocapnia was rare and occurred only in ventilated babies. Hypercapnia and hypocapnia in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the first 72 hours of life were not associated with adverse outcome.

  3. Proinflammatory Cytokines, Enolase and S-100 as Early Biochemical Indicators of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Following Perinatal Asphyxia in Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Huerta, Verónica; Flores-Soto, Mario Eduardo; Merin Sigala, Mario Ernesto; Barrera de León, Juan Carlos; Lemus-Varela, María de Lourdes; Torres-Mendoza, Blanca Miriam de Guadalupe; Beas-Zárate, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    Estimation of the neurological prognosis of infants suffering from perinatal asphyxia and signs of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is of great clinical importance; however, it remains difficult to satisfactorily assess these signs with current standard medical practices. Prognoses are typically based on data obtained from clinical examinations and neurological tests, such as electroencephalography (EEG) and neuroimaging, but their sensitivities and specificities are far from optimal, and they do not always reliably predict future neurological sequelae. In an attempt to improve prognostic estimates, neurological research envisaged various biochemical markers detectable in the umbilical cord blood of newborns (NB). Few studies examining these biochemical factors in the whole blood of newborns exist. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the expression and concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and specific CNS enzymes (S-100 and enolase) in infants with perinatal asphyxia. These data were compared between the affected infants and controls and were related to the degree of HIE to determine their utilities as biochemical markers for early diagnosis and prognosis. The levels of the proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Reverse Transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The expression and serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, enolase and S-100 were significantly increased in the children with asphyxia compared with the controls. The role of cytokines after hypoxic-ischemic insult has been determined in studies of transgenic mice that support the use of these molecules as candidate biomarkers. Similarly, S-100 and enolase are considered promising candidates because these markers have been correlated with tissue damage in different experimental models. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. High-Dose Erythropoietin and Hypothermia for Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: A Phase II Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne W; Mathur, Amit M; Chang, Taeun; McKinstry, Robert C; Mulkey, Sarah B; Mayock, Dennis E; Van Meurs, Krisa P; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Gonzalez, Fernando F; Comstock, Bryan A; Juul, Sandra E; Msall, Michael E; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Glass, Hannah C; Massaro, An N; Dong, Lawrence; Tan, Katherine W; Heagerty, Patrick J; Ballard, Roberta A

    2016-06-01

    To determine if multiple doses of erythropoietin (Epo) administered with hypothermia improve neuroradiographic and short-term outcomes of newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In a phase II double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, we randomized newborns to receive Epo (1000 U/kg intravenously; n = 24) or placebo (n = 26) at 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 days of age. All infants had moderate/severe encephalopathy; perinatal depression (10 minute Apgar score in Epo-treated infants (median, 2 vs 11, P = .01). Moderate/severe brain injury (4% vs 44%, P = .002), subcortical (30% vs 68%, P = .02), and cerebellar injury (0% vs 20%, P = .05) were less frequent in the Epo than placebo group. At mean age 12.7 months (SD, 0.9), motor performance in Epo-treated (n = 21) versus placebo-treated (n = 20) infants were as follows: Alberta Infant Motor Scale (53.2 vs 42.8, P = .03); Warner Initial Developmental Evaluation (28.6 vs 23.8, P = .05). High doses of Epo given with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may result in less MRI brain injury and improved 1-year motor function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. CT and MR in non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: radiological findings with pathophysiological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Leonardo Guilhermino; Portela, Luiz Antonio Pezzi [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rovira, Alex [University Hospital Vall d' Hebron, MR Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain); Costa Leite, Claudia da [Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lucato, Leandro Tavares [Hospital Alemao Oswaldo Cruz and Hospital do Coracao, Diagnostic Imaging Division, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Clinics Hospital of the University of Sao Paulo, School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    Non-neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a clinical condition often related to cardiopulmonary arrest that demands critical management and treatment decisions. Management depends mainly on the degree of neurological impairment and prognostic considerations. Computed tomography (CT) is often used to exclude associated or mimicking pathology. If any, only nonspecific signs such as cerebral edema, sulci effacement, and decreased gray matter (GM)/white matter (WM) differentiation are evident. Pseudosubarachnoid hemorrhage, a GM/WM attenuation ratio <1.18, and inverted GM attenuation are associated with a poor prognosis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is more sensitive than CT in assessing brain damage in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Some MR findings have similarities to those seen pathologically, based on spatial distribution and time scale, such as lesions distributed in watershed regions and selective injury to GM structures. In the acute phase, lesions are better depicted using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) because of the presence of cytotoxic edema, which, on T2-weighted images, only become apparent later in the early subacute phase. In the late subacute phase, postanoxic leukoencephalopathy and contrast enhancement could be observed. In the chronic phase, atrophic changes predominate over tissue signal changes. MR can be useful for estimating prognosis when other tests are inconclusive. Some findings, such as the extent of lesions on DWI and presence of a lactate peak and depleted N-acetyl aspartate peak on MR spectroscopy, seem to have prognostic value. (orig.)

  6. Intrapartum electronic fetal heart rate monitoring and the identification of metabolic acidosis and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larma, Joel D; Silva, Anadir M; Holcroft, Cynthia J; Thompson, Richard E; Donohue, Pamela K; Graham, Ernest M

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether electronic fetal monitoring can identify fetuses with metabolic acidosis and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. The cases were 107 nonanomalous chromosomally normal fetuses with an umbilical arterial pH electronic fetal monitoring before delivery was evaluated by 3 obstetricians who were blinded to outcome. Cases had a significant increase in late and prolonged decelerations/hour and late decelerations/contractions. Those fetuses with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy had significant increases in bradycardia, decreased variability, and nonreactivity but no difference in late or variable decelerations/hour. For the identification of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 15.4%, 98.9%, 66.7%, and 89.4%, respectively, for bradycardia; 53.8%, 79.8%, 26.9%, and 92.6%, respectively, for decreased variability; 92.3%, 61.7%, 2.7%, and 82.9%, respectively, for nonreactivity; and 7.7%, 98.9%, 50.0%, and 88.6%, respectively, for all 3 abnormalities combined. Fetal metabolic acidosis and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy are associated with significant increases in electronic fetal monitoring abnormalities, but their predictive ability to identify these conditions is low.

  7. Preventing Pressure Injuries in Neonates Undergoing Therapeutic Hypothermia for Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: An Interprofessional Quality Improvement Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luton, Alexandra; Hernandez, Jae; Patterson, Clive Robert; Nielsen-Farrell, Jill; Thompson, Anita; Kaiser, Jeffrey R

    2017-08-01

    Hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPIs) can be caused by multiple factors including pressure, shear, friction, moisture/incontinence, device-related pressure, immobility, inactivity, and nutritional deficits. Along with immobility, medical device-related (MDR) HAPIs are a primary cause of pressure injury in neonates, as the clinical practice setting has become increasingly technologically advanced. It is estimated that up to 50% of HAPIs are MDR in pediatric patients. Neonates are at particular risk for HAPI because of their specific anatomical, physiological, and developmental vulnerabilities. A specific example of confluent factors that may increase risk for HAPI is the application of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) and continuous electroencephalography monitoring for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). An interprofessional team collaborated to expand upon existing evidence-based standards of care to address the needs of this specific population within the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Interventions centered on revision of current protocols, with efforts to optimize product selection, hardwire assessment practices, and refine documentation of patient care and outcomes. The team primarily utilized plan-do-study-act (PDSA) cycles to test and refine specific methods and strategies to reduce HAPIs. Tested solutions were adopted, adapted, or abandoned. A sustained zero HAPI rate in the HIE population resulted. The team continues to collect, report, and utilize near-miss data to continue to refine the process as new risks are identified. Recognizing the unique skin protection needs of special populations within the NICU, such as those undergoing TH, is crucial. When evidence-based standards of care fail to adequately meet such needs, a collaborative approach to identifying, testing, and implementing population-specific solutions is essential. A paucity of literature regarding the unique skin protection needs for babies undergoing TH exists

  8. Protective Effects of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine in Human Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells and Restoration of Motor Function in Neonatal Rats with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsun Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Since oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs are the target cells of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, the present study was aimed at investigating the protective effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, a well-known antioxidant and precursor of glutathione, in OPCs as well as in neonatal rats. Methods. In in vitro study, protective effects of NAC on KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 OPCs were investigated via MTT assay and apoptotic signal analysis. In in vivo study, NAC was administered to rats with HIE induced by hypoxia-ischemia surgery at postnatal day 7, and their motor functions and white matter demyelination were analyzed. Results. NAC decreased KCN cytotoxicity in F3.Olig2 cells and especially suppressed apoptosis by regulating Bcl2 and p-ERK. Administration of NAC recovered motor functions such as the using ratio of forelimb contralateral to the injured brain, locomotor activity, and rotarod performance of neonatal HIE animals. It was also confirmed that NAC attenuated demyelination in the corpus callosum, a white matter region vulnerable to HIE. Conclusion. The results indicate that NAC exerts neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo by preserving OPCs, via regulation of antiapoptotic signaling, and that F3.Olig2 human OPCs could be a good tool for screening of candidates for demyelinating diseases.

  9. Goreisan Inhibits Upregulation of Aquaporin 4 and Formation of Cerebral Edema in the Rat Model of Juvenile Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Yano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary cerebral edema regulation is of prognostic significance in hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE, and aquaporin 4 (AQP4 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cerebral edema. The traditional Japanese herbal medicine Goreisan relieves brain edema in adults; however, its effect and pharmacological mechanism in children are unknown. We investigated the effects of Goreisan on HIE-associated brain edema and AQP4 expression in a juvenile rat model, established by combined occlusion of middle cerebral and common carotid arteries. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the lesion areas were significantly smaller in the Goreisan- (2 g/kg treated group than in the nontreated (saline group at 24 and 48 h postoperatively. AQP4 mRNA levels in the lesion and nonlesion sides were significantly suppressed in the Goreisan group compared with the nontreated group 36 h postoperatively. Western blotting revealed that levels of AQP4 protein were significantly decreased in the Goreisan group compared with the nontreated group in the lesion side 72 h postoperatively, but not at 12 or 36 h. After 14 days, the Goreisan group had a significantly better survival rate. These findings suggest that Goreisan suppresses brain edema in HIE and improves survival in juvenile rats, possibly via regulation of AQP4 expression and function.

  10. Therapeutic hypothermia for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy - where to from here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne O. Davidson

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia before or around the time of birth occurs in approximately 2/1000 live births and is associated with a high risk of death or lifelong disability. Therapeutic hypothermia is now well established as standard treatment for infants with moderate to severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy but is only partially effective. There is compelling preclinical and clinical evidence that hypothermia is most protective when it is started as early as possible after hypoxia-ischemia. Further improvements in outcome from therapeutic hypothermia are very likely to arise from strategies to reduce the delay before starting treatment of affected infants. In this review we examine evidence that current protocols are reasonably close to the optimal depth and duration of cooling, but that the optimal rate of rewarming after hypothermia is unclear. The potential for combination treatments to augment hypothermic neuroprotection has considerable promise, particularly with endogenous targets such as melatonin and erythropoietin and noble gases such as xenon. We dissect the critical importance of preclinical studies using realistic delays in treatment and clinically relevant cooling protocols when examining combination treatment, and that for many strategies overlapping mechanisms of action can substantially attenuate any effects.

  11. Comparison of early and late MRI in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy using three assessment methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charon, Valerie; Proisy, Maia; Bruneau, Bertrand; Treguier, Catherine; Rozel, Celine [University Hospital, Department of Imaging, Hopital Sud, Rennes, Cedex 2 (France); Ferre, Jean-Christophe [University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Hopital Pontchaillou, Rennes (France); Beuchee, Alain [University Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Hopital Sud, Rennes (France); Chauvel, Jennifer [Saint Brieuc Hospital, Department of Neonatology, Saint-Brieuc (France)

    2015-12-15

    There is no consensus on the optimum timing of MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated with hypothermia. Reliable early imaging assessment might help managing treatment. To assess non-random differences between early and late MRI that might influence intensive-care decisions. This single-center retrospective study included all asphyxiated term neonates eligible for hypothermia treatment November 2009-July 2012. MRI scans were systematically performed at day 4 (early MRI) and day 11 of life as part of routine protocol. Two experienced pediatric radiologists reviewed both scans according to three assessment methods: a pattern classification, a scoring system and a simplified classification. Agreement between early and late imaging findings was assessed using Cohen's kappa coefficients. Thirty-three neonates were included. Interobserver agreement was excellent. Early MRI detected all severe injuries. Agreement between early and late MRI was excellent for the simplified classification (κ = 0.82), good for the pattern classification (κ = 0.64), and good to excellent for 3 scores out of 4 in the scoring system (κ = 0.70-0.89). Early MRI may provide valuable information about brain injury to help parents and neonatologists in intensive-care decisions at the end of hypothermia treatment. (orig.)

  12. Amplitude Integrated Electroencephalogram as a Prognostic Tool in Neonates with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Del Río

    Full Text Available Perinatal management and prognostic value of clinical evaluation and diagnostic tools have changed with the generalization of therapeutic hypothermia (TH in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE.to ascertain the prognostic value of amplitude integrated electroencephalogram (aEEG in neonates with HIE considering hours of life and treatment with TH.A systematic review was performed. Inclusion criteria were studies including data of neonates with HIE, treated or not with TH, monitored with aEEG and with neurodevelopmental follow-up of at least 12 months. The period of bibliographic search was until February 2016. No language restrictions were initially applied. Consulted databases were MEDLINE, Scopus, CINHAL and the Spanish language databases GuiaSalud and Bravo. Article selection was performed by two independent reviewers. Quality for each individual paper selected was evaluated using QUADAS-2. Review Manager (RevMan version 5.3 software was used. Forest plots were constructed to graphically show sensitivity and specificity for all included studies, separating patients treated or not with hypothermia. Summary statistics were estimated using bivariate models and random effects approaches with the R package MADA from summary ROC curves. Meta-regression was used to estimate heterogeneity and trends.from the 403 articles initially identified, 17 were finally included and critically reviewed. In infants not treated with hypothermia the maximum reliability of an abnormal aEEG background to predict death or moderate/severe disability was at 36 hours of life, when a positive post-test probability of 97.90% was achieved (95%CI 88.40 to 99.40%. Positive likelihood ratio (+LR at these hours of life was 26.60 (95%CI 4.40 to 94.90 and negative likelihood ratio (-LR was 0.23 (95%CI 0.10 to 0.44. A high predictive value was already present at 6 hours of life in this group of patients, with a positive post-test probability of 88.20% (95%CI 79.80 to

  13. Transfontanellar Duplex Brain Ultrasonography Resistive Indices as a Prognostic Tool in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Before and After Treatment with Therapeutic Hypothermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerner, Gwendolyn J; Burton, V Joanna; Poretti, Andrea; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Cristofalo, Elizabeth; Tekes, Aylin; Seyfert, Donna; Parkinson, Charlamaine; Leppert, Mary; Allen, Marilee; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Northington, Frances J; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prior to therapeutic hypothermia (i.e., cooling), transfontanellar duplex brain sonography resistive indices (RI) were studied as bedside non-invasive measures of cerebral hemodynamics in neonates who suffered from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We compared pre- and post-cooling RI values and examined the relationships between RI values and specific long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. STUDY DESIGN Transfontanellar duplex brain sonography, including RI, were obtained for 28 neonates prior to brain cooling and for 20 neonates following brain cooling. All RI values were sampled in the anterior cerebral artery at the beginning of each ultrasound study. Neurodevelopmental assessment was conducted between ages 20-32 months with the Mullen Scale of Early Learning. The relationships between pre- and post-cooling RI and cognitive and motor outcomes were studied. RESULT Neonates with RI values 0.60. Lower RI values were associated with specific neurodevelopmental deficits in motor skill attainment. CONCLUSION Pre- and post-cooling transfontanellar duplex brain sonography RI values may be a useful prognostic tool, in conjunction with other clinical information, for neonates diagnosed with HIE. The results of this study suggest that further study of the prognostic value of RI values for short- and long-term outcomes is warranted. PMID:26609871

  14. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside may improve neurological outcomes in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sheng

    Full Text Available Ganglioside has a neuroprotective role in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. This study aimed to evaluate the neurological outcomes of monosialoganglioside as adjuvant treatment for neonatal HIE by conducting a meta-analysis.A comprehensive literature search was made in the Pubmed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Wanfang, CNKI, VIP databases through October 2016. Randomized controlled trials comparing monosialoganglioside with the usual treatment for newborns having HIE deemed eligible. Weighted mean difference (WMD and risk ratio (RR with 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated for continuous and dichotomous data, respectively.Ten trials consisting of 787 neonates were included. Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside significantly reduced major neurodevelopmental disabilities (RR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, cerebral palsy (RR = 0.32; 95% CI = 0.12-0.87, mental retardation (RR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.11-0.88 as well as improved the mental (WMD = 14.95; 95% CI = 7.44-22.46 and psychomotive (WMD = 13.40; 95% CI = 6.69-20.11 development index during the follow-up. Also, monosialoganglioside significantly improved Neonatal Behavioral Neurological Assessment scores (WMD = 2.91; 95% CI = 2.05-3.78 compared with the usual treatment. However, adverse effects associated with monosialoganglioside were poorly reported in the included trials.Adjuvant treatment with monosialoganglioside had beneficial effects in improving neurological outcomes in neonatal HIE. However, these findings should be interpreted with caution because of methodological flaws in the included trials. Furthermore, safety of monosialoganglioside use should also be further evaluated.

  15. Systemic hypothermia after neonatal encephalopathy: outcomes of neo.nEURO.network RCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simbruner, Georg; Mittal, Rashmi A; Rohlmann, Friederike

    2010-01-01

    Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods.......Mild hypothermia after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) reduces neurologic sequelae without significant adverse effects, but studies are needed to determine the most-efficacious methods....

  16. Clinical hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy score of the Iberoamerican Society of Neonatology (Siben: A new proposal for diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Rodriguez Perez

    Full Text Available Summary Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy is a major complication of perinatal asphyxia, with high morbidity, mortality and neurologic sequelae as cerebral palsy, mostly in poor or developing countries. The difficulty in the diagnosis and management of newborns in these countries is astonishing, thus resulting in unreliable data on this pathology and bad outcomes regarding mortality and incidence of neurologic sequelae. The objective of this article is to present a new clinical diagnostic score to be started in the delivery room and to guide the therapeutic approach, in order to improve these results.

  17. Prognostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging summation scores or apparent diffusion coefficient maps in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalleri, Francesca; Lugli, Licia; Pugliese, Marisa; D'Amico, Roberto; Todeschini, Alessandra; Della Casa, Elisa; Gallo, Claudio; Frassoldati, Rossella; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic assessment of newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) comprises, among other tools, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To compare the ability of DWI and ADC maps in newborns with HIE to predict the neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Thirty-four term newborns with HIE admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Modena University Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were consecutively enrolled in the study. All newborns received EEG, conventional MRI and DWI within the first week of life. DWI was analyzed by means of summation (S) score and regional ADC measurements. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with a standard 1-4 scale and the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales - Revised (GMDS-R). When the outcome was evaluated with a standard 1-4 scale, the DWI S scores showed very high area under the curve (AUC) (0.89) whereas regional ADC measurements in specific subregions had relatively modest predictive value. The lentiform nucleus was the region with the highest AUC (0.78). When GMDS-R were considered, DWI S scores were good to excellent predictors for some GMDS-R subscales. The predictive value of ADC measurements was both region- and subscale-specific. In particular, ADC measurements in some regions (basal ganglia, white matter or rolandic cortex) were excellent predictors for specific GMDS-R with AUCs up to 0.93. DWI S scores showed the highest prognostic value for the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Regional ADC measurements in specific subregions proved to be highly prognostic for specific neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  18. Prognostic value of brain proton MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy treated by brain cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancora, G. [Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Department of Mother and Infant Infermi Hospital of Rimini, Rimini (Italy); Testa, C.; Tonon, C.; Manners, D.N.; Gramegna, L.L.; Lodi, R. [Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences University of Bologna, MR Functional Unit, Bologna (Italy); Grandi, S.; Sbravati, F.; Savini, S.; Corvaglia, L.T.; Faldella, G. [University of Bologna, Neonatology Unit, Department of Woman, Child and Adolescent Health, Bologna (Italy); Tani, G. [University of Bologna, Radiology Unit, Department of Woman, Child and Adolescent Health, Bologna (Italy); Malucelli, E. [University of Bologna, Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnologies, Bologna (Italy)

    2013-08-15

    MRI, proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) have been shown to be of great prognostic value in term newborns with moderate-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Currently, no data are available on {sup 1}H-MRS and DTI performed in the subacute phase after hypothermic treatment. The aim of the present study was to assess their prognostic value in newborns affected by moderate-severe HIE and treated with selective brain cooling (BC). Twenty infants treated with BC underwent conventional MRI and {sup 1}H-MRS at a mean (SD) age of 8.3 (2.8) days; 15 also underwent DTI. Peak area ratios of metabolites and DTI variables, namely mean diffusivity (MD), axial and radial diffusivity, and fractional anisotropy (FA), were calculated. Clinical outcome was monitored until 2 years of age. Adverse outcome was observed in 6/20 newborns. Both {sup 1}H-MRS and DTI variables showed higher prognostic accuracy than conventional MRI. N-acetylaspartate/creatine at a basal ganglia localisation showed 100 % PPV and 93 % NPV for outcome. MD showed significantly decreased values in many regions of white and gray matter, axial diffusivity showed the best predictive value (PPV and NPV) in the genu of corpus callosum (100 and 91 %, respectively), and radial diffusivity was significantly decreased in fronto white matter (FWM) and fronto parietal (FP) WM. The decrement of FA showed the best AUC (0.94) in the FPWM. Selective BC in HIE neonates does not affect the early and accurate prognostic value of {sup 1}H-MRS and DTI, which outperform conventional MRI. (orig.)

  19. Prognostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging summation scores or apparent diffusion coefficient maps in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalleri, Francesca; Todeschini, Alessandra [Azienda Unita Sanitaria Locale di Modena, Neuroradiology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino Estense di Modena, Modena (Italy); Lugli, Licia; Pugliese, Marisa; Della Casa, Elisa; Gallo, Claudio; Frassoldati, Rossella; Ferrari, Fabrizio [Modena University Hospital, Institute of Pediatrics and Neonatal Medicine and NICU, Modena (Italy); D' Amico, Roberto [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Clinical and Diagnostic Medicine and Public Health, Modena (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    The diagnostic and prognostic assessment of newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) comprises, among other tools, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To compare the ability of DWI and ADC maps in newborns with HIE to predict the neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Thirty-four term newborns with HIE admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Modena University Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were consecutively enrolled in the study. All newborns received EEG, conventional MRI and DWI within the first week of life. DWI was analyzed by means of summation (S) score and regional ADC measurements. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with a standard 1-4 scale and the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales - Revised (GMDS-R). When the outcome was evaluated with a standard 1-4 scale, the DWI S scores showed very high area under the curve (AUC) (0.89) whereas regional ADC measurements in specific subregions had relatively modest predictive value. The lentiform nucleus was the region with the highest AUC (0.78). When GMDS-R were considered, DWI S scores were good to excellent predictors for some GMDS-R subscales. The predictive value of ADC measurements was both region- and subscale-specific. In particular, ADC measurements in some regions (basal ganglia, white matter or rolandic cortex) were excellent predictors for specific GMDS-R with AUCs up to 0.93. DWI S scores showed the highest prognostic value for the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Regional ADC measurements in specific subregions proved to be highly prognostic for specific neurodevelopmental outcomes. (orig.)

  20. Correlation between grades of intraventricular hemorrhage and severity of hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in perinatal asphyxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, R H; Islam, M S; Haque, S A; Hossain, M A; Islam, M N; Khaleque, M A; Chowdhury, B; Chowdhury, M A

    2014-01-01

    This study was done to find out the correlation between various grades of Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH) and stages of HIE in perinatal asphyxia and to determine the short-term outcome of the affected baby. This observational study was conducted in Neonatal ward of Dhaka Shishu Hospital (DHS) and Dhaka Medical College Hospital for period of 37 months from January 2004 to January 2007. Total 189 perinatally asphyxiated babies were enrolled for HIE staging and cranial Ultrasonogram (USG) to find out grades of IVH. Finally 178 newborns were fulfilling all the necessary criteria for statistical analysis of the collected data on prescribed questionnaire. Among 178 perinatally asphyxiated newborns HIE stages - I, II, III were 50(28%), 10(56%) and 28(16%) respectively. Out of this 178 neonates total 50(28%) developed various grades IVH. Grades of IVH, I, II, III, IV were 15(30%), 18(36%), 10(20%) and 7(14%) respectively. There was significant correlation between the severity of HIE staging and grades of IVH. Short term outcome was poor in HIE-III, IVH grade III and IV. There is a direct relationship between different grades of IVH and stages of HIE. That is more the severe stages of HIE there is more chances to develop severe grades of IVH, Immediate morbidity and mortality is dependent on the grades of IVH and severity of stages of HIE.

  1. Encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica em recém-nascidos a termo: aspectos da fase aguda e evolução Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: acute period and outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina A. R. Funayama

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Noventa e quatro recém-nascidos com encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica (EHI, atendidos no Hospital das Clínicas de Ribeirão Preto desde 1982, foram avaliados evolutivamente na fase aguda e por período médio de 47 meses. De 43 casos com EHI 1,40 se recuperaram em 96 horas e 3 faleceram. Dos 40 com EHI II, 37,5% se recuperaram até o sétimo dia e demais permaneceram com alterações. Os 11 casos com grau III faleceram até o segundo mês de vida. As crianças com EHI grau I não apresentaram seqüelas motoras. Do grupo com EHI grau II 34,5% apresentaram paralisia cerebral e 17,7% atraso neuromotor. 80% dos casos com sequela apresentaram exame neurológico anormal além do sétimo dia, na fase aguda da EHI. Epilepsia ocorreu em 17,5% dos casos com EHI grau II e somente no grupo com seqüelas motoras. Teste de QI não evidenciou diferença significativa entre os grupos com grau I, II sem seqüelas motoras e o grupo controle. Com esses dados os autores reafirmaram a importância prognostica da evolução da EHI na fase aguda.Ninety four neonates with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy HIE attended at the University of Ribeirão Preto since 1982 were studied in terms of the neurological alterations during the acute phase and outcome over a mean period of 47 months. From 43 newborns with HIE I, 40 recovered within 96 hours and 3 died. Among 40 infants with HIE II, 37.5% recovered within the first week, and the others continued abnormal beyond the 7th day. All 11 infants with HIE III died before the second month of life. The HIE I group had no motor sequelae. Among the HIE II group, 34.5% showed cerebral palsy and 17.7% neuromotor retardation. 80.0% of those with sequelae persisted abnormal beyond 7th day of life, during the acute phase of the HIE. Epilepsy occurred in 17.5% of cases with HIE grade II, only among those with neuromotor sequelae. The 1Q test did not show statistically significant difference between the HIE I, II without motor sequelae

  2. Efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport of asphyxiated newborns according to the severity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Nuria; Alsina, Miguel; Alarcon, Ana; Arca-Díaz, Gemma; Agut, Thais; García-Alix, Alfredo

    2017-08-18

    To determine if the efficacy of passive hypothermia and adverse events during transport are related to the severity of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. This was a retrospective study of 67 infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, born between April 2009 and December 2013, who were transferred for therapeutic hypothermia and cooled during transport. Fifty-six newborns (84%) were transferred without external sources of heat and 11 (16%) needed an external heat source. The mean temperature at departure was 34.4±1.4°C and mean transfer time was 3.3±2.0h. Mean age at arrival was 5.6±2.5h. Temperature at arrival was between 33 and 35°C in 41 (61%) infants, between 35°C and 36.5°C in 15 (22%) and transport is greater in newborns with severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and those with more severe acidosis at birth. The most common adverse events during transport are related to physiological deterioration and bleeding from the endotracheal tube. This observation provides useful information to identify those asphyxiated infants who require closer clinical surveillance during transport. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Difficulty in Distinguishing Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome, Hypoxic-Ischemic Insult, and Acute Toxic Leukoencephalopathy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckman, Judith; Zahavi, Alon; Efrati, Shai; Gilad, Gil; Snir, Moshe; Michowiz, Shalom; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to describe our experience of unique pediatric neurological cases and associated difficulty in differentiating posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) from hypoxic-ischemic insult (HII), and acute toxic leukoencephalopathy (ATL). The study included three children with a clinical picture suggestive of PRES, HII, and ATL of different etiologies who were diagnosed and treated at a tertiary pediatric medical center in 2011 to 2014. All patients presented with blindness following seizures with asphyxia/aspiration in a syndromatic child, too-rapid lipid infusion in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and repeated vomiting in a child with cerebral palsy, hydrocephalus, and malfunction of ventriculoperitoneal shunt. All patients had cortical blindness and high-signal foci in the cortical and subcortical regions on magnetic resonance imaging. All children improved. Familiarity with the clinical and radiological characteristics of neurological conditions leading to reversible cortical blindness is essential for diagnosis and management. Distinguishing PRES from HII and ATL can be challenging. Our cases most likely combined these etiologies, with the first patient diagnosed with PRES with HII, the second with PRES with ATL, and the third with focal HII. Given the diversity of the findings and the unclear prognostic significance, studies of the pathophysiology of PRES are warranted. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Proinflammatory Cytokines, Enolase and S-100 as Early Biochemical Indicators of Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Following Perinatal Asphyxia in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Chaparro-Huerta

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: The role of cytokines after hypoxic-ischemic insult has been determined in studies of transgenic mice that support the use of these molecules as candidate biomarkers. Similarly, S-100 and enolase are considered promising candidates because these markers have been correlated with tissue damage in different experimental models.

  5. Ceftriaxone attenuates hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in neonatal rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Yen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Perinatal brain injury is the leading cause of subsequent neurological disability in both term and preterm baby. Glutamate excitotoxicity is one of the major factors involved in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Glutamate transporter GLT1, expressed mainly in mature astrocytes, is the major glutamate transporter in the brain. HIE induced excessive glutamate release which is not reuptaked by immature astrocytes may induce neuronal damage. Compounds, such as ceftriaxone, that enhance the expression of GLT1 may exert neuroprotective effect in HIE. Methods We used a neonatal rat model of HIE by unilateral ligation of carotid artery and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen for 2 hrs on postnatal day 7 (P7 rats. Neonatal rats were administered three dosages of an antibiotic, ceftriaxone, 48 hrs prior to experimental HIE. Neurobehavioral tests of treated rats were assessed. Brain sections from P14 rats were examined with Nissl and immunohistochemical stain, and TUNEL assay. GLT1 protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results Pre-treatment with 200 mg/kg ceftriaxone significantly reduced the brain injury scores and apoptotic cells in the hippocampus, restored myelination in the external capsule of P14 rats, and improved the hypoxia-ischemia induced learning and memory deficit of P23-24 rats. GLT1 expression was observed in the cortical neurons of ceftriaxone treated rats. Conclusion These results suggest that pre-treatment of infants at risk for HIE with ceftriaxone may reduce subsequent brain injury.

  6. Implementation of a Neurocritical Care Program: Improved Seizure Detection and Decreased Antiseizure Medication at Discharge in Neonates With Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Rani Ameena; Espinoza, Liza; Vayalthrikkovil, Sakeer; Buchhalter, Jeffrey; Irvine, Leigh; Bello-Espinosa, Luis; Mohammad, Khorshid

    2016-11-01

    We report the impact of implementing continuous video electroencephalography monitoring for neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy via a protocol in the context of neonatal neuro-critical care program. Neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy were studied retrospectively two years before and after implementing continuous video electroencephalography for 72 hours as a care protocol. Before continuous video electroencephalography, a 60-minute routine electroencephalography was performed at the discretion of the provider. electrographic seizure detection; secondary outcome: use of maintenance antiseizure medications, discharge antiseizure medications, and cumulative burden for each antiseizure medication defined as total mg/kg during hospital stay. A total of 157 patients with a median gestation of 40 weeks were analyzed; 103 (66%) underwent therapeutic hypothermia. Baseline and clinical characteristics including disease severity and cooling were similar. Before continuous video-electroencephalography (n = 86), 44 (51.2%) had clinical seizures, of those 35 had available routine electroencephalography; 12 of 35 (34%) had electrographic seizures. None of the infants without clinical seizures showed electrographic seizures. After continuous video-electroencephalography (n = 71), 34 (47.9%) had clinical seizures, of those 18 (53%) had electrographic seizures; five of 37 (14%) of infants with no clinical seizures had electrographic seizures. The introduction of continuous video-electroencephalography significantly increased electrographic seizure detection (P = 0.016). Although there was no significant difference in the initiation and maintenance use of antiseizure medications after continuous video-electroencephalography, fewer infants were discharged on any antiseizure medication (P = 0.008). Also, the mean phenobarbital burden reduced (P = 0.04), without increase in other antiseizure medications use or burden. Use of continuous video

  7. Neuroprotective body hypothermia among newborns with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy: three-year experience in a tertiary university hospital. A retrospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Magalhães

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE:Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Studies have shown that therapeutic hypothermia decreases neurological sequelae and death. Our aim was therefore to report on a three-year experience of therapeutic hypothermia among asphyxiated newborns.DESIGN AND SETTING:Retrospective study, conducted in a university hospital.METHODS:Thirty-five patients with perinatal asphyxia undergoing body cooling between May 2009 and November 2012 were evaluated.RESULTS:Thirty-nine infants fulfilled the hypothermia protocol criteria. Four newborns were removed from study due to refractory septic shock, non-maintenance of temperature and severe coagulopathy. The median Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes were 2 and 5. The main complication was infection, diagnosed in seven mothers (20% and 14 newborns (40%. Convulsions occurred in 15 infants (43%. Thirty-one patients (88.6% required mechanical ventilation and 14 of them (45% were extubated within 24 hours. The duration of mechanical ventilation among the others was 7.7 days. The cooling protocol was started 1.8 hours after birth. All patients showed elevated levels of creatine phosphokinase, creatine phosphokinase- MB and lactate dehydrogenase. There was no severe arrhythmia; one newborn (2.9% presented controlled coagulopathy. Four patients (11.4% presented controlled hypotension. Twenty-nine patients (82.9% underwent cerebral ultrasonography and 10 of them (34.5% presented white matter hyper-echogenicity. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on 33 infants (94.3% and 11 of them (33.3% presented hypoxic-ischemic changes. The hospital stay was 23 days. All newborns were discharged. Two patients (5.8% needed gastrostomy.CONCLUSION:Hypothermia as therapy for asphyxiated newborns was shown to be safe.

  8. Neuroprotección en la encefalopatia hipóxico isquémica perinatal: Tratamientos con eficacia clínica demostrada y perspectivas futuras Neuroprotection in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy: Effective treatment and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Legido

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es revisar el resultado de estudios clínicos recientes que han demostrado el efecto neuroprotector de algunas terapias en la encefalopatía hipóxico-isquémica (EHI perinatal y presentar las perspectivas futuras de otras investigaciones clínicas y experimentales. Terapias con eficacia clínica demostrada. Alopurinol: Bloquea la producción de radicales libres tras hipoxia-isquemia. En un estudio reciente, los niños con corazón izquierdo hipoplásico tratados con alopurinol, pero no aquéllos con otras cardiopatías, tuvieron un número significativamente menor de complicaciones que los controles, incluyendo muerte, convulsiones, coma o problemas cardíacos. Opiáceos: En otro estudio reciente, un grupo de recién nacidos con EHI tratados con morfina o fentanil tuvieron un grado menor de lesión cerebral en la RMN y un mejor pronóstico neurológico. Hipotermia: Tanto la hipotermia localizada (cerebral como la sistémica (todo el cuerpo tienen un efecto neuroprotector en recién nacidos seleccionados tras sufrir EHI. Perspectivas Futuras. Fármacos antiepilépticos. Estos tienen mecanismos de acción múltiple que pueden bloquear la cascada bioquímica de lesión neuronal en EHI. Otras modalidades terapéuticas. Entre ellas hay que destacar el estudio de la terapia neuroprotectora combinada, los factores de crecimiento, la terapia genética, el transplante de células madre y la vacunación neuroprotectora. En conclusión, un mejor conocimiento de los mecanismos moleculares de la patogenia de la EHI y mejores estudios clínicos con terapias neuroprotectoras abrirá nuevas posibilidades terapéuticas aplicables en la práctica clínica. Todo ello mejorará sin lugar a duda el pronóstico de los recién nacidos con EHI.The aim of this paper is to review the results of recent clinical studies of some therapies that have demonstrated a neuroprotective effect in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE and to

  9. Placental pathology in full-term infants with hypoxic-ischemic neonatal encephalopathy and association with magnetic resonance imaging pattern of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harteman, Johanna C; Nikkels, Peter G J; Benders, Manon J N L; Kwee, Anneke; Groenendaal, Floris; de Vries, Linda S

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the relationship between placental pathology and pattern of brain injury in full-term infants with neonatal encephalopathy after a presumed hypoxic-ischemic insult. The study group comprised full-term infants with neonatal encephalopathy subsequent to presumed hypoxia-ischemia with available placenta for analysis who underwent cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within the first 15 days after birth. Macroscopic and microscopic characteristics of the placenta were assessed. The infants were classified according to the predominant pattern of brain injury detected on MRI: no injury, predominant white matter/watershed injury, predominant basal ganglia and thalami (BGT) injury, or white matter/watershed injury with BGT involvement. Maternal and perinatal clinical factors were recorded. Placental tissue was available for analysis in 95 of 171 infants evaluated (56%). Among these 95 infants, 34 had no cerebral abnormalities on MRI, 27 had white matter/watershed injury, 18 had BGT injury, and 16 had white matter/watershed injury with BGT involvement. Chorioamnionitis was a common placental finding in both the infants without injury (59%) and those with white matter/BGT injury (56%). On multinomial logistic regression analysis, white matter/watershed injury with and without BGT involvement was associated with decreased placental maturation. Hypoglycemia was associated with an increased risk of the white matter/BGT injury pattern (OR,5.4; 95% CI, 1.4-21.4). The BGT injury pattern was associated with chronic villitis (OR, 12.7; 95% CI, 2.4-68.7). A placental weight brain injury, especially for the BGT pattern (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.01-0.7). Placental weight <10th percentile was mainly associated with normal cerebral MRI findings. Decreased placental maturation and hypoglycemia <2.0 mmol/L were associated with increased risk of white matter/watershed injury with or without BGT involvement. Chronic villitis was associated with BGT injury irrespective of white

  10. [Multicenter program for the integrated care of newborns with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult (ARAHIP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnáez, J; Vega, C; García-Alix, A; Gutiérrez, E P; Caserío, S; Jiménez, M P; Castañón, L; Esteban, I; Hortelano, M; Hernández, N; Serrano, M; Prada, T; Diego, P; Barbadillo, F

    2015-03-01

    Newborns with perinatal indicators of a potential hypoxic-ischemic event require an integrated care in order to control the aggravating factors of brain damage, and the early identification of candidates for hypothermia treatment. The application of a prospective, populational program that organizes and systematizes medical care during the first 6 hours of life to all newborns over 35 weeks gestational age born with indicators of a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult. The program includes 12 hospitals (91,217 m(2)); two level i centers, five level ii centers, and five level iii hospitals. The program establishes four protocols: a) detection of the newborn with a potential hypoxic-ischemic insult, b) surveillance of the neurological repercussions and other organ involvement, c) control and treatment of complications, d) procedures and monitoring during transport. From June 2011 to June 2013, 213 of 32325 newborns above 35 weeks gestational age met the criteria of a potential hypoxic-ischemic insult (7.4/1000), with 92% of them being cared for following the program specifications. Moderate-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy was diagnosed in 33 cases (1/1,000), and 31 out of the 33 received treatment with hypothermia (94%). The program for the Integrated Care of Newborns with Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Insult has led to providing a comprehensive care to the newborns with a suspected perinatal hypoxic-ischemic insult. Aggravators of brain damage have been controlled, and cases of moderate-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy have been detected, allowing the start of hypothermia treatment within the first six hours of life. Populational programs are fundamental to reducing the mortality and morbidity of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Lack of evidence for a causal relationship between hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and subdural hemorrhage in fetal life, infancy, and early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byard, Roger W; Blumbergs, Peter; Rutty, Guy

    2013-01-01

    to cause injury in certain cases of inflicted head injury in infancy, clarification is required. A retrospective study of 82 fetuses, infants, and toddlers with proven HIE and no trauma was undertaken from forensic institutes in Australia, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, and the United States...

  12. Prospective observations of 100 high-risk neonates by high-field (1.5 Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the central nervous system. II. Lesions associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, S E; Adcock, E W; McArdle, C B

    1991-04-01

    One hundred neonates determined prospectively to be at risk for neurologic handicap underwent magnetic resonance imaging with a high-field (1.5 T) imager. Thirty-three demonstrated a total of 37 lesions consistent with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, including periventricular leukomalacia (n = 12), basal ganglia hemorrhage (n = 5), multicystic encephalomalacia (n = 5), and focal parenchymal hemorrhage (n = 15). Diagnoses by ultrasonography and computed tomography were compared with those by magnetic resonance imaging in 29 and 17 infants, respectively. Ultrasonography agreed more frequently with magnetic resonance imaging than did computed tomography. Ultrasonography detected 79% of lesions demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging whereas computed tomography detected only 41%. Periventricular leukomalacia was seen most often in preterm infants, basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia primarily occurred in term infants, and focal parenchymal hemorrhage occurred at all gestational ages. Basal ganglia hemorrhage and multicystic encephalomalacia were strongly associated with histories of perinatal asphyxia, seizures, and early abnormal neurological status. All infants with basal ganglia hemorrhage (5/5) and multicystic encephalomalacia (5/5) and the majority with periventricular leukomalacia (9/12) and focal parenchymal hemorrhages (9/15) had developmental abnormalities at discharge.

  13. The value of brainstem evoked potential in clinical decision of a patient with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy O valor do potencial evocado auditivo em decisão clínica em paciente com síndrome hipóxico-isquêmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lecticia R. Pinto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Establishing a prognosis for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy during the neonatal period is extremely difficult, as the neuroplasticity of the developing brain makes it almost impossible to measure the affected area. This case report describes a newborn with severe perinatal asphyxia and neonatal neurological syndrome including absent suck reflex. Normal brainstem auditory evoked potential led the diagnosis towards a transitory dysfunction of deglutition, and the subject received daily stimulation in the hospital environment. Suck developed satisfactorily by day of life 30 and the patient was released without having to be tube fed. Neurophysiologic tests can be of value in the clinical decisions and analysis of functional prognosis of patients with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.Estabelecer o prognóstico da encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica durante o período neonatal é extremamente difícil, devido à neuroplasticidade do cérebro em desenvolvimento que impede a medida exata das áreas afetadas. Este relato descreve um recém-nascido a termo com grave asfixia perinatal e síndrome neurológica pós-natal, incluindo ausência do reflexo de sucção. O potencial evocado auditivo do tronco cerebral foi normal, sugerindo o diagnóstico de disfunção transitória da deglutição. Após estimulação diária no hospital a sucção foi obtida satisfatoriamente, e o paciente recebeu alta sem necessidade de alimentação enteral. Os testes neurofisiológicos podem ser de grande valor em decisões clínicas e análise funcional prognóstica de pacientes com encefalopatia hipóxico-isquêmica.

  14. Neuroprotection with hypothermia and allopurinol in an animal model of hypoxic-ischemic injury: Is it a gender question?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Rodríguez-Fanjul

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is one of the most important causes of neonatal brain injury. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH is the standard treatment for term newborns after perinatal hypoxic ischemic injury (HI. Despite this, TH does not provide complete neuroprotection. Allopurinol seems to be a good neuroprotector in several animal studies, but it has never been tested in combination with hypothermia. Clinical findings show that male infants with (HI fare more poorly than matched females in cognitive outcomes. However, there are few studies about neuroprotection taking gender into account in the results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential additive neuroprotective effect of allopurinol when administrated in association with TH in a rodent model of moderate HI. Gender differences in neuroprotection were also evaluated.P10 male and female rat pups were subjected to HI (Vannucci model and randomized into five groups: sham intervention (Control, no treatment (HI, hypothermia (HIH, allopurinol (HIA, and dual therapy (hypothermia and allopurinol (HIHA. To evaluate a treatment's neuroprotective efficiency, 24 hours after the HI event caspase3 activation was measured. Damaged area and hippocampal volume were also measured 72 hours after the HI event. Negative geotaxis test was performed to evaluate early neurobehavioral reflexes. Learning and spatial memory were assessed via Morris Water Maze (MWM test at 25 days of life.Damaged area and hippocampal volume were different among treatment groups (p = 0.001. The largest tissue lesion was observed in the HI group, followed by HIA. There were no differences between control, HIH, and HIHA. When learning process was analyzed, no differences were found. Females from the HIA group had similar results to the HIH and HIHA groups. Cleaved caspase 3 expression was increased in both HI and HIA. Despite this, in females cleaved caspase-3 was only differently increased in the HI group. All

  15. Identifying stereotypic evolving micro-scale seizures (SEMS) in the hypoxic-ischemic EEG of the pre-term fetal sheep with a wavelet type-II fuzzy classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamid; Bennet, Laura; Gunn, Alistair J; Unsworth, Charles P

    2016-08-01

    Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) around the time of birth due to lack of oxygen can lead to debilitating neurological conditions such as epilepsy and cerebral palsy. Experimental data have shown that brain injury evolves over time, but during the first 6-8 hours after HIE the brain has recovered oxidative metabolism in a latent phase, and brain injury is reversible. Treatments such as therapeutic cerebral hypothermia (brain cooling) are effective when started during the latent phase, and continued for several days. Effectiveness of hypothermia is lost if started after the latent phase. Post occlusion monitoring of particular micro-scale transients in the hypoxic-ischemic (HI) Electroencephalogram (EEG), from an asphyxiated fetal sheep model in utero, could provide precursory evidence to identify potential biomarkers of injury when brain damage is still treatable. In our studies, we have reported how it is possible to automatically detect HI EEG transients in the form of spikes and sharp waves during the latent phase of the HI EEG of the preterm fetal sheep. This paper describes how to identify stereotypic evolving micro-scale seizures (SEMS) which have a relatively abrupt onset and termination in a frequency range of 1.8-3Hz (Delta waves) superimposed on a suppressed EEG amplitude background post occlusion. This research demonstrates how a Wavelet Type-II Fuzzy Logic System (WT-Type-II-FLS) can be used to automatically identify subtle abnormal SEMS that occur during the latent phase with a preliminary average validation overall performance of 78.71%±6.63 over the 390 minutes of the latent phase, post insult, using in utero pre-term hypoxic fetal sheep models.

  16. Fetal stress and programming of hypoxic/ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain: mechanisms and possible interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-08-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxic-ischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other brain disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. MicroRNA-210 Suppresses Junction Proteins and Disrupts Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity in Neonatal Rat Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyi; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Li, Yong; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Lubo

    2017-06-24

    Cerebral edema, primarily caused by disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), is one of the serious complications associated with brain injury in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Our recent study demonstrated that the hypoxic-ischemic (HI) treatment significantly increased microRNA-210 (miR-210) in the neonatal rat brain and inhibition of miR-210 provided neuroprotection in neonatal HI brain injury. The present study aims to determine the role of miR-210 in the regulation of BBB integrity in the developing brain. miR-210 mimic was administered via intracerebroventricular injection (i.c.v.) into the brain of rat pups. Forty-eight hours after the injection, a modified Rice-Vannucci model was conducted to produce HI brain injury. Post-assays included cerebral edema analysis, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining for serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) leakage. The results showed that miR-210 mimic exacerbated cerebral edema and IgG leakage into the brain parenchyma. In contrast, inhibition of miR-210 with its complementary locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides (miR-210-LNA) significantly reduced cerebral edema and IgG leakage. These findings suggest that miR-210 negatively regulates BBB integrity i n the neonatal brain. Mechanistically, the seed sequences of miR-210 were identified complementary to the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of the mRNA transcripts of tight junction protein occludin and adherens junction protein β-catenin, indicating downstream targets of miR-210. This was further validated by in vivo data showing that miR-210 mimic significantly reduced the expression of these junction proteins in rat pup brains. Of importance, miR-210-LNA preserved the expression of junction proteins occludin and β-catenin from neonatal HI insult. Altogether, the present study reveals a novel mechanism of miR-210 in impairing BBB integrity that contributes to cerebral edema formation after neonatal HI insult, and provides new insights in miR-210-LNA

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbao Luo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1. Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma.

  19. Fetal Stress and Programming of Hypoxic/Ischemic-Sensitive Phenotype in the Neonatal Brain: Mechanisms and Possible Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Gonzalez, Pablo; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence of epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies has clearly shown a close link between adverse in utero environment and the increased risk of neurological, psychological and psychiatric disorders in later life. Fetal stresses, such as hypoxia, malnutrition, and fetal exposure to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine and glucocorticoids may directly or indirectly act at cellular and molecular levels to alter the brain development and result in programming of heightened brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and the development of neurological diseases in the postnatal life. The underlying mechanisms are not well understood. However, glucocorticoids may play a crucial role in epigenetic programming of neurological disorders of fetal origins. This review summarizes the recent studies about the effects of fetal stress on the abnormal brain development, focusing on the cellular, molecular and epigenetic mechanisms and highlighting the central effects of glucocorticoids on programming of hypoxicischemic-sensitive phenotype in the neonatal brain, which may enhance the understanding of brain pathophysiology resulting from fetal stress and help explore potential targets of timely diagnosis, prevention and intervention in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and other for brain disorders. PMID:22627492

  20. Brain calcification in hypoxic-ischemic lesions: an autopsy review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, M Q; Chincanchan, C A; Armstrong, D L

    1990-01-01

    Calcification of ischemic lesions in a child's brain is well recognized by pathologists; however, clinicians and radiologists usually associate cerebral calcification with infections, particularly the TORCH organisms. We illustrate this phenomenon in a 5-month-old infant with extensive, calcified, multicystic encephalomalacia without evidence of a cerebral infection. In order to ascertain the incidence of cerebral calcification in pure hypoxic-ischemic lesions, we retrospectively analyzed 486 consecutive autopsies. Ninety-nine patients had histologic evidence of cerebral hypoxic-ischemic lesions and hypoxia or ischemia. Thirty-nine of these patients displayed microscopic calcification; 23 patients had slight, 12 had minor, and 4 had prominent calcifications. Prominent calcification lesions were large enough to be detected by routine radiologic methods. Correlations between degree of calcification and the underlying disease process and between the gestational age and the length of survival were not statistically significant. This study illustrates the very frequent occurrence of brain calcification in ischemic brain lesions in children. It is necessary to include this diagnosis in the differential diagnosis of cerebral calcification.

  1. Neuroprotective Therapies after Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Hilario

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injury is one of the main causes of disabilities in term-born infants. It is the result of a deprivation of oxygen and glucose in the neural tissue. As one of the most important causes of brain damage in the newborn period, the neonatal HI event is a devastating condition that can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. The pattern of this injury occurs in two phases, the first one is a primary energy failure related to the HI event and the second phase is an energy failure that takes place some hours later. Injuries that occur in response to these events are often manifested as severe cognitive and motor disturbances over time. Due to difficulties regarding the early diagnosis and treatment of HI injury, there is an increasing need to find effective therapies as new opportunities for the reduction of brain damage and its long term effects. Some of these therapies are focused on prevention of the production of reactive oxygen species, anti-inflammatory effects, anti-apoptotic interventions and in a later stage, the stimulation of neurotrophic properties in the neonatal brain which could be targeted to promote neuronal and oligodendrocyte regeneration.

  2. Inhibition of miRNA-210 reverses nicotine-induced brain hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ke, Jun; Li, Yong; Ma, Qinyi; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lubo; Xiao, DaLiao

    2017-01-01

    Maternal tobacco use in pregnancy increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and neurobehavioral deficits in postnatal life. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine exposure exacerbated brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal rats through up-regulation of miR-210 expression in the developing brain. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. Experiments of HI brain injury were performed in 10-day-old pups. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly decreased neonatal body and brain weights, but increased the brain to body weight ratio. Perinatal nicotine exposure caused a significant increase in HI brain infarct size in the neonates. In addition, nicotine enhanced miR-210 expression and significantly attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase isoform B (TrkB) protein abundance in the brain. Of importance, intracerebroventricular administration of a miR-210 inhibitor (miR-210-LNA) significantly decreased HI-induced brain infarct size and reversed the nicotine-increased vulnerability to brain HI injury in the neonate. Furthermore, miR-210-LNA treatment also reversed nicotine-mediated down-regulation of BDNF and TrkB protein expression in the neonatal brains. These findings provide novel evidence that the increased miR-210 plays a causal role in perinatal nicotine-induced developmental programming of ischemic sensitive phenotype in the brain. It represents a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of brain hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in the neonate-induced by fetal stress.

  3. Role of Mitochondria in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yujiao; Tucker, Donovan; Dong, Yan; Zhao, Ningjun; Zhuo, Xiaoying; Zhang, Quanguang

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) causes severe brain injury in neonates. It's one of the leading causes to neonatal death and pediatric disability, resulting in devastating consequences, emotionally and economically, to their families. A series of events happens in this process, e.g. excitatory transmitter release, extracelluar Ca(2+) influxing, mitochondrial dysfunction, energy failure, and neuron death. There are two forms of neuron death after HI insult: necrosis and apoptosis, apoptosis being the more prevalent form. Mitochondria handle a series of oxidative reactions, and yield energy for various cellular activities including the maintainance of membrane potential and preservation of intracellular ionic homeostasis. Therefore mitochondria play a critical role in neonatal neurodegeneration following HI, and mitochondrial dysfunction is the key point in neurodegenerative evolution. Because of this, exploring effective mitochondria-based clinical strategies is crucial. Today the only efficacious clinic treatment is hypothermia. However, due to its complex management, clinical complication and autoimmune decrease, its clinical application is limited. So far, many mitochondria-based strategies have been reported neuroprotective in animal models, which offers promise on neonatal therapy. However, since their clinical effectiveness are still unclear, plenty of studies need to be continued in the future. According to recent reports, two novel strategies have been proposed: methylene blue (MB) and melatonin. Although they are still in primary stage, the underlying mechanisms indicate promising clinical applications. Every neurological therapeutic strategy has its intrinsic deficit and limited efficacy, therefore in the long run, the perfect clinical therapy for hypoxic-ischemic neonatal brain injury will be based on the combination of multiple strategies.

  4. Erythropoietin for neuroprotection in neonatal encephalopathy: safety and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne W; Bauer, Larry A; Ballard, Roberta A; Ferriero, Donna M; Glidden, David V; Mayock, Dennis E; Chang, Taeun; Durand, David J; Song, Dongli; Bonifacio, Sonia L; Gonzalez, Fernando F; Glass, Hannah C; Juul, Sandra E

    2012-10-01

    To determine the safety and pharmacokinetics of erythropoietin (Epo) given in conjunction with hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). We hypothesized that high dose Epo would produce plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animal studies (ie, maximum concentration = 6000-10000 U/L; area under the curve = 117000-140000 U*h/L). In this multicenter, open-label, dose-escalation, phase I study, we enrolled 24 newborns undergoing hypothermia for HIE. All patients had decreased consciousness and acidosis (pH score ≤ 5, or ongoing resuscitation at 10 minutes. Patients received 1 of 4 Epo doses intravenously: 250 (N = 3), 500 (N = 6), 1000 (N = 7), or 2500 U/kg per dose (N = 8). We gave up to 6 doses every 48 hours starting at <24 hours of age and performed pharmacokinetic and safety analyses. Patients received mean 4.8 ± 1.2 Epo doses. Although Epo followed nonlinear pharmacokinetics, excessive accumulation did not occur during multiple dosing. At 500, 1000, and 2500 U/kg Epo, half-life was 7.2, 15.0, and 18.7 hours; maximum concentration was 7046, 13780, and 33316 U/L, and total Epo exposure (area under the curve) was 50306, 131054, and 328002 U*h/L, respectively. Drug clearance at a given dose was slower than reported in uncooled preterm infants. No deaths or serious adverse effects were seen. Epo 1000 U/kg per dose intravenously given in conjunction with hypothermia is well tolerated and produces plasma concentrations that are neuroprotective in animals. A large efficacy trial is needed to determine whether Epo add-on therapy further improves outcome in infants undergoing hypothermia for HIE.

  5. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    OpenAIRE

    E. V. Shimchenko; E. I. Kleshchenko; K. F. Goloseyev

    2014-01-01

    The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI) for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI) for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard mo...

  6. Early cerebral hemodynamic, metabolic and histological changes in hypoxic-ischemic fetal lambs during postnatal life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eRey-Santano

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The hemodynamic, metabolic and biochemical changes produce during transition from fetal to neonatal life could be aggravated if asphyctic event occur during fetal life. The aim of the study was to examine the regional cerebral blood flow (RCBF, histological changes, and cerebral brain metabolism in preterm lambs, and to analyze the role of oxidative stress for the first hours of postnatal life following severe fetal asphyxia. 18 chronically instrumented fetal lambs were assigned to: hypoxic-ischemic group, following fetal asphyxia animals were delivered and maintained on intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation for 3 hours, and non-injured animals that were managed similarly to the previous group and used as control group. During hypoxic-ischemic insult, injured group developed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia, latacidaemia and tachycardia in comparison to control group, without hypotension. Intermittent-positive-pressure-ventilation transiently improved gas exchange and cardiovascular parameters. After HI injury and during ventilation-support, the increased RCBF in inner zones was maintained for hypoxic-ischemic group, but cortical flow did not exhibit differences compared to the control group. Also, the increase of TUNEL positive cells (apoptosis and antioxidant enzymes, and decrease of ATP reserves was significantly higher in the brain regions where the RCBF were not increased.In conclusion, early metabolic, histological and hemodynamic changes involved in brain damage have been intensively investigated and reported in premature asphyctic lambs for the first 3 hours of postnatal life. Those changes have been described in human neonates, so our model could be useful to test the security and the effectiveness of different neuroprotective or ventilatory strategies when are applied in the first hours after fetal hypoxic-ischemic injury.

  7. Can induced hypothermia be assured during brain MRI in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintermark, Pia [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Montreal Children' s Hospital, Division of Newborn Medicine, Montreal, QC (Canada); Labrecque, Michelle; Hansen, Anne [Children' s Hospital Boston, Division of Newborn Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Warfield, Simon K.; DeHart, Stephanie [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Until now, brain MRIs in asphyxiated neonates who are receiving therapeutic hypothermia have been performed after treatment is complete. However, there is increasing interest in utilizing early brain MRI while hypothermia is still being provided to rapidly understand the degree of brain injury and possibly refine neuroprotective strategies. This study was designed to assess whether therapeutic hypothermia can be maintained while performing a brain MRI. Twenty MRI scans were obtained in 12 asphyxiated neonates while they were treated with hypothermia. The median difference between esophageal temperature on NICU departure and return was 0.1 C (range: -0.8 to 0.8 C). We found that therapeutic hypothermia can be safely and reproducibly maintained during a brain MRI. Hypothermia treatment should not prevent obtaining an early brain MRI if clinically indicated. (orig.)

  8. NOC/oFQ and NMDA contribute to piglet hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, William M

    2002-05-01

    Previous studies have observed that hypotensive pial artery dilation was blunted after hypoxia-ischemia. In unrelated studies, the opioid nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOC/oFQ) was observed to contribute to hypoxic ischemic impairment of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced pial dilation. This study determined the contribution of NOC/oFQ and NMDA to hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment in newborn pigs equipped with a closed cranial window. Global cerebral ischemia was produced via elevated intracranial pressure. Hypoxia decreased PO(2) to 33 +/- 3 mm Hg. Topical NOC/oFQ (10(-10) M), the cerebrospinal fluid concentration after hypoxia-ischemia, had no effect on pial artery diameter by itself but attenuated hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure decrease of 44 +/- 2%) -induced pial artery dilation (35 +/- 2% versus 22 +/- 3%). Hypotensive pial artery dilation was blunted by hypoxia-ischemia, but such dilation was partially protected by pretreatment with the putative NOC/oFQ receptor antagonist, [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2) (10(-6) M; 29 +/- 2%, sham control; 7 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia; and 13 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia and [F/G] NOC/oFQ (1-13) NH(2)). Coadministration of the NMDA antagonist MK801 (10(-5) M) with NOC/oFQ(10(-10) M) partially prevented hypotensive pial dilation impairment. Similarly, pretreatment with MK801 partially protected hypoxic ischemia impairment of hypotensive pial dilation (35 +/- 2%, sham control; 7 +/- 1%, hypoxia-ischemia; 22 +/- 2%, hypoxia-ischemia + MK801). These data show that NOC/oFQ and NMDA contribute to hypoxic ischemic hypotensive cerebrovasodilation impairment. These data suggest that NOC/oFQ modulation of NMDA vascular activity also contributes to such hypotensive impairment.

  9. Effects of caffeine on neuronal apoptosis in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicdag, Hasan; Daglioglu, Yusuf Kenan; Erdogan, Seyda; Zorludemir, Suzan

    2014-09-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in rat pups leads to strong activation of apoptosis, and apoptosis contributes significantly to cerebral damage in the perinatal period. Caffeine displays a broad array of actions on the brain. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on neuronal apoptosis in a hypoxic-ischemic neonatal model. Twenty-four seven-day-old Wistar rat pups were subjected to right common carotid artery ligation and hypoxia for 2 h. Sham group (n = 8) had a median neck incision, but the rats were not subjected to ligation or hypoxia. The pups were treated with 20 mg/kg/day caffeine citrate (n = 8) or saline (n = 8) immediately before HI and at 0, 24, 48 and 72 h post-hypoxia. Neuronal apoptosis was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) and caspase-3 in the hippocampus and parietal cortex of both hemispheres. The numbers of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus and parietal cortex were significantly higher in the saline group than they were in the sham group (p cells in the hippocampus (p caffeine-treated group than they were in the sham group, but the number of apoptotic cells decreased significantly in the caffeine-treated group compared with the saline group in the hippocampus (p caffeine administration in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury reduces neuronal apoptosis in the developing brain. We suggest that caffeine may be effective in reducing brain injury.

  10. Role of Antioxidants in Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury: New Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Olatz; Álvarez, Antonia; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Urtasun, Andoni; Hilario, Enrique

    2017-01-28

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage is an alarming health and economic problem in spite of the advances in neonatal care. It can cause mortality or detrimental neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy, motor impairment and cognitive deficits in neonates. When hypoxia-ischemia occurs, a multi-faceted cascade of events starts out, which can eventually cause cell death. Lower levels of oxygen due to reduced blood supply increase the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to oxidative stress, a higher concentration of free cytosolic calcium and impaired mitochondrial function, triggering the activation of apoptotic pathways, DNA fragmentation and cell death. The high incidence of this type of lesion in newborns can be partly attributed to the fact that the developing brain is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Since antioxidants can safely interact with free radicals and terminate that chain reaction before vital molecules are damaged, exogenous antioxidant therapy may have the potential to diminish cellular damage caused by hypoxia-ischemia. In this review, we focus on the neuroprotective effects of antioxidant treatments against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, in the light of the most recent advances.

  11. Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells prevents long-lasting learning impairment following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain insult in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuragi, Shinji; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Date, Isao; Shingo, Tetsuro; Yasuhara, Takao; Mishima, Kenichi; Aoo, Naoya; Harada, Kazuhiko; Egashira, Nobuaki; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu

    2005-04-01

    Implantation of encapsulated glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-secreting cells into brain parenchyma reduces histological brain damage following hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. We examined the effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factors on long-term learning and memory impairment and morphological changes up to 18 weeks after hypoxic-ischemic stress in neonatal rats. Baby hamster kidney cells were transfected with expression vector either including (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 10) or not including (control-hypoxic-ischemic group; n = 8) human glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor cDNA, encapsulated in semipermeable hollow fibers, and implanted into the left brain parenchyma of 7-day-old Wistar rats. Two days after implantation the rats received hypoxic-ischemic stress, and their behavior was then examined in several learning tasks: the 8-arm radial maze, choice reaction time, and water maze tasks, which examine short-term working memory, attention process, and long-term reference memory, respectively. The rats were killed 18 weeks after the hypoxic-ischemic insult for evaluation of brain damage. Two additional control groups were used: the control group (n = 15), which underwent no treatment, and the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor group (n = 6), which underwent implantation of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor capsule but did not undergo hypoxic-ischemic stress. The decrease in the size of the cerebral hemisphere was significantly less in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, compared with the control-hypoxic-ischemic group, and improved performance was observed in all three tasks for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group: for the control-hypoxic-ischemic group versus the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-hypoxic-ischemic group, respectively, in the 8-arm radial maze test, average

  12. NEUROGENETIC ASPECTS OF PERINATAL HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC AFFECTIONS OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George A. Karkashadze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenetics is a thriving young science greatly contributing to the generally accepted concept of the brain development in health and disease. Thereby; scientists are not only able to highlight new key points in traditional ideas about the origin of diseases; but also to completely rethink their view on the problem of pathology development. In particular; new data on neurogenetics of perinatal affections of the central nervous system (CNS has appeared. Genetic factors in varying degrees affect perinatal hypoxic-ischemic CNS affections. Prematurity determination stays the most studied among them. Nevertheless; there is increasing evidence of significant epigenetic regulations of neuro-expression caused by hypoxia; malnutrition of a pregnant woman; stress; smoking; alcohol; drugs that either directly pathologically affect the developing brain; or form a brain phenotype sensitive to a perinatal CNS affection. New data obliges to change the approaches to prevention of perinatal CNS affections.

  13. Time jitter of somatosensory evoked potentials in recovery from hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Hu, Yong; Valentin, Nicolas; Geocadin, Romergryko G; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2011-10-15

    Impaired neural conductivity shown by delayed latency and reduced amplitude of characteristic peaks in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs), has been used to monitor hypoxic-ischemic brain injury after cardiac arrest (CA). However, rather than characteristic peak deferral and suppression, the time jitter of the peak in SSEP related with time-variant neurological abnormalities is diminished by the commonly used ensemble average method. This paper utilizes the second order blind identification (SOBI) technique to extract characteristic peak information from one trial of SSEPs. Sixteen male Wistar rats were subjected to 7 or 9 min of asphyxial CA (n=8 per group). The SSEPs from median nerve stimulation were recorded for 4h after CA and then for 15 min periods at 24, 48 and 72 h. Neurological outcomes were evaluated by neurologic deficit score (NDS) at 72 h post-CA. The SSEP signal was analyzed offline with SOBI processing in Matlab. The N10 feature of SSEP was compared between good (NDS≥50) and bad (NDS<50) outcomes. After processed by SOBI, the N10 detection rate was significantly increased (p<0.001) from 90 min post-CA. Statistical difference of the latency variance of the N10 between good and bad outcome groups existed at 24, 48 and 72 h post-CA (p≤0.001). Our study is the first application using SOBI detecting variance in neural signals like SSEP. N10 latency variance, related with neurophysiological dysfunction, increased after hypoxic-ischemic injury. The SOBI technique is an efficient method in the identification of peak detection and offers a favorable alternative to reveal the neural transmission variation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs, radiation, paints, industrial chemicals, and certain metals), chronic progressive trauma, poor nutrition, or lack of oxygen or blood flow to the brain. The hallmark of encephalopathy is an altered mental state. Depending on the ...

  15. USE OF DIFFUSION-WEIGHTED MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR REVEALING HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC BRAIN LESIONS IN NEONATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Shimchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents advantages of use of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW MRI for revealing hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions in neonates. The trial included 97 neonates with perinatal brain lesion who had been undergoing treatment at a resuscitation department or neonatal pathology department in the first month of life. The article shows high information value of diffusion-weighted images (DWI for diagnostics of hypoxic-ischemic lesions in comparison with regular standard modes. In the event of no structural brain lesions of neonates, pronounced increase in signal characteristics revealed by DWI indicated considerable pathophysiological alterations. Subsequently, children developed structural alterations in the form of cystic encephalomalacia with expansion of cerebrospinal fluid spaces manifested with pronounced neurological deficit. DW MRI has been offered as a method of prognosticating further neurological development of children on early stages. 

  16. Neuroprotection of lamotrigine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats: Relations to administration time and doses

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Yong-Hong; Guo, Wen-Chao; Sun, Wei-Wen; Su, Tao; Lin, Han; Chen, Sheng-Qiang; Deng, Wen-Yi; Zhou, Wei; Liao, Wei-Ping

    2008-01-01

    Lamotrigine (LTG), an antiepileptic drug, has been shown to be able to improve cerebral ischemic damage by limiting the presynaptic release of glutamate. The present study investigated further the neuroprotective effect of LTG on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) in neonatal rats and its relations to administration time and doses. The HIBD model was produced in 7-days old SD rats by left common carotid artery ligation followed by 2 h hypoxic exposure (8% oxygen). LTG was administered intra...

  17. Neuroprotective Effects of Cannabidiol in Hypoxic Ischemic Insult. The Therapeutic Window in Newborn Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Nagat; Ceprian, Maria; Jimenez, Laura; Pazos, M Ruth; Martínez-Orgado, Jose

    2017-01-01

    A relevant therapeutic time window (TTW) is an important criterion for considering the clinical relevance of a substance preventing newborn hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. To test the TTW of the neuroprotective effects of cannabidol (CBD), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid in a model of newborn HI brain damage. 9-10 day-old C57BL6 mice underwent a HI insult (10% oxygen for 90 min after left carotid artery electrocoagulation). Then, CBD 1 mg/kg or vehicle were administered s.c. 15 min, or 1, 3, 6, 12, 18 or 24 h after the end of the HI insult. Seven days later brain damage was assessed using T2W Magnetic Resonance Imaging scan (ipsilateral hemisphere volume loss, IVHL) and histological studies: Nissl staining (neuropathological score), TUNEL staining (apoptotic damage) and immunohistochemistry with glial fibrillary acidic protein (astrocyte viability) or ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule (microglial activation). CBD administered up to 18 h after HI reduced IHVL and neuropathological score by 60%, TUNEL+ count by 90% and astrocyte damage by 50%. In addition, CBD blunted the HI-induced increase in microglial population. When CBD administration was delayed 24 h, however, the neuroprotective effect was lost in terms of IHVL, apoptosis or astrogliosis reduction. CBD shows a TTW of 18 h when administered to HI newborn mice, which represents a broader TTW than reported for other neuroprotective treatments including hypothermia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Maternal high-fat diet influences outcomes after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barks, John D; Liu, Yiqing; Shangguan, Yu; Djuric, Zora; Ren, Jianwei; Silverstein, Faye S

    2017-01-01

    The typical US diet has >30% calories from fat; yet, typical laboratory diets contain 17% calories from fat. This disparity could confound the clinical relevance of findings in cerebral ischemia models. We compared outcomes after neonatal brain injury in offspring of rat dams fed standard low-fat chow (17% fat calories) or a higher fat diet (34% fat calories) from day 7 of pregnancy. On postnatal day 7, hypoxic-ischemic injury was induced by right carotid ligation, followed by 60, 75 or 90 min 8% oxygen exposure. Sensorimotor function, brain damage, and serum and brain fatty acid content were compared 1 to 4 weeks later. All lesioned animals developed left forepaw placing deficits; scores were worse in the high-fat groups (p diet groups. Serum and brain docosahexaenoic acid fatty acid fractions were lower in high-fat progeny (p diet disrupted docosahexaenoic acid-dependent recovery mechanisms. These findings have significant implications both for refinement of neonatal brain injury models and for understanding the impact of maternal diet on neonatal neuroplasticity. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Neurogenin-2-transduced human neural progenitor cells attenuate neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il-Shin; Koo, Kyo Yeon; Jung, Kwangsoo; Kim, Miri; Kim, Il-Sun; Hwang, Kyujin; Yun, Seokhwan; Lee, Haejin; Shin, Jeong Eun; Park, Kook In

    2017-05-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury leads to high mortality and neurodevelopmental disabilities. Multipotent neural progenitor cells (NPCs) with self-renewing capacity have the potential to reduce neuronal loss and improve the compromised environment in the HI brain injury. However, the therapeutic efficacy of neuronal-committed progenitor cells and the underlying mechanisms of recovery are not yet fully understood. Therefore, this study investigated the regenerative ability and action mechanisms of neuronally committed human NPCs (hNPCs) transduced with neurogenin-2 (NEUROG2) in neonatal HI brain injury. NEUROG2- or green fluorescent protein (GFP)-encoding adenoviral vector-transduced hNPCs (NEUROG2- or GFP-NPCs) were transplanted into neonatal mouse brains with HI injury. Grafted NEUROG2-NPCs showed robust dispersion and engraftment, prolonged survival, and neuronal differentiation in HI brain injury. NEUROG2-NPCs significantly improved neurological behaviors, decreased cellular apoptosis, and increased the neurite outgrowth and axonal sprouting in HI brain injury. In contrast, GFP-NPC grafts moderately enhanced axonal extension with limited behavioral recovery. Notably, NEUROG2-NPCs showed increased secretion of multiple factors, such as nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3 (NTF3), fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and thrombospondins 1 and 2 (THBS 1/2), which promoted SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell survival and neurite outgrowth. Thus, we postulate that NEUROG2-expressing human NPCs facilitate functional recovery after neonatal HI brain injury via their ability to secrete multiple factors that enhance neuronal survival and neuroplasticity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of microRNA expression detected by microarray of the cerebral cortex after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hong; Yang, Lijun

    2013-11-01

    Small and noncoding microRNAs (miRNAs) are known as key regulators of biological processes such as cell differentiation and tumor generation. They are also the important mediators of posttranscriptional gene silencing in both pathogenic and pathologic aspects of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. miRNA microarray has been considered to be a high-throughput and precise analysis tool for detecting miRNA expression profiling, and it does greatly facilitate the research of the biological function of miRNAs. To investigate the changes of miRNA expression in cortex of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI) and the possible roles of miRNA in the pathogenesis of HIBI, we constructed the model of rat with HIBI and the cortex tissues were obtained 14 days after the HIBI operation. The large-scale miRNA microarrays and bioinformatics analysis were used to determine the differentially expressed miRNAs of HIBI rats compared with controls. Expression of 3 miRNAs (mir-429, mir-200b, and mir-182) was determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of miRNA expression profiles indicated that 5 miRNAs were up-regulated more than twice and 29 miRNAs were down-regulated more than twice compared with the normal control group. The results of the 3 miRNAs detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction were consistent with those detected by miRNA microarray. Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury rats have significant changes in miRNA expression, which demonstrated that miRNAs may play important roles in the pathogenesis of HIBI.

  1. Using type-2 fuzzy logic systems for spike detection in the hypoxic ischemic EEG of the preterm fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamid; Unsworth, Charles P; McKenzie, Anita C; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia is a major cause of brain injury in preterm babies. Thus, neuro-protective treatments play a pivotal role during the first 6-8 hours post hypoxic-ischemic insult. However, at present it is not possible to determine which infants are suffering from hypoxic ischemia. Recent investigations suggest that there are high frequency micro-scale transients exist in the first 6-8 hours of a hypoxic ischemic EEG which could be utilized as the useful benchmarks for the prediction of hypoxia. Type-2 Fuzzy Logic Systems (Type-2 FLS) have the capability to handle inherent uncertainties in nonlinear signals. This paper describes the application of a Type-2 FLS to detect spikes in the preterm fetal sheep electroencephalogram (EEG) after asphyxia in utero. The Type-2 FLS differentiates each detected event in terms of its spikiness and specifies the potential events based on their degree of similarity to an EEG expert definition of a standard spike. An adaptive thresholding method has been employed in order to increase the spike detection ability of the purposed system. The sensitivity and selectivity verify enhanced performance of the Type-2 FLS for spike detection in fetal sheep EEG signals with a 98.1% and 93.7% respectively which are significantly improved in comparison to our previous methods.

  2. Does Whole-Body Hypothermia in Neonates with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy Affect Surfactant Disaturated-Phosphatidylcholine Kinetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nespeca, Matteo; Giorgetti, Chiara; Nobile, Stefano; Ferrini, Ilaria; Simonato, Manuela; Verlato, Giovanna; Cogo, Paola; Carnielli, Virgilio Paolo

    2016-01-01

    It is unknown whether Whole-Body Hypothermia (WBH) affects pulmonary function. In vitro studies, at relatively low temperatures, suggest that hypothermia may induce significant changes to the surfactant composition. The effect of WBH on surfactant kinetics in newborn infants is unknown. We studied in vivo kinetics of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) in asphyxiated newborns during WBH and in normothermic controls (NTC) with no or mild asphyxia. Both groups presented no clinically apparent lung disease. Twenty-seven term or near term newborns requiring mechanical ventilation were studied (GA 38.6±2.2 wks). Fifteen during WBH and twelve NTC. All infants received an intra-tracheal dose of 13C labelled DSPC and tracheal aspirate were performed. DSPC amount, DSPC half-life (HL) and pool size (PS) were calculated. DSPC amount in tracheal aspirates was 0.42 [0.22-0.54] and 0.36 [0.10-0.58] mg/ml in WBH and NTC respectively (p = 0.578). DSPC HL was 24.9 [15.7-52.5] and 25.3 [15.8-59.3] h (p = 0.733) and DSPC PS was 53.2 [29.4-91.6] and 40.2 [29.8-64.6] mg/kg (p = 0.598) in WBH and NTC respectively. WBH does not alter DSPC HL and PS in newborn infants with no clinical apparent lung disease.

  3. Measurement of Lactate Content and Amide Proton Transfer Values in the Basal Ganglia of a Neonatal Piglet Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury Model Using MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Wang, X-M

    2017-04-01

    As amide proton transfer imaging is sensitive to protein content and intracellular pH, it has been widely used in the nervous system, including brain tumors and stroke. This work aimed to measure the lactate content and amide proton transfer values in the basal ganglia of a neonatal piglet hypoxic-ischemic brain injury model by using MR spectroscopy and amide proton transfer imaging. From 58 healthy neonatal piglets (3-5 days after birth; weight, 1-1.5 kg) selected initially, 9 piglets remained in the control group and 43 piglets, in the hypoxic-ischemic brain injury group. Single-section amide proton transfer imaging was performed at the coronal level of the basal ganglia. Amide proton transfer values of the bilateral basal ganglia were measured in all piglets. The ROI of MR spectroscopy imaging was the right basal ganglia, and the postprocessing was completed with LCModel software. After hypoxic-ischemic insult, the amide proton transfer values immediately decreased, and at 0-2 hours, they remained at their lowest level. Thereafter, they gradually increased and finally exceeded those of the control group at 48-72 hours. After hypoxic-ischemic insult, the lactate content increased immediately, was maximal at 2-6 hours, and then gradually decreased to the level of the control group. The amide proton transfer values were negatively correlated with lactate content (r = -0.79, P < .05). This observation suggests that after hypoxic-ischemic insult, the recovery of pH was faster than that of lactate homeostasis. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Cortical hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in shaken-baby (shaken impact) syndrome: value of diffusion-weighted MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parizel, Paul M.; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Goethem, Johan W. van [Department of Radiology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Ceulemans, Berten; Laridon, Annick [Department of Pediatric Neurology, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium); Jorens, Philippe G. [Department of Pediatric Intensive Care Medicine, University of Antwerp, Wilrijkstraat 10, 2650, Edegem (Belgium)

    2003-12-01

    Shaken-baby syndrome (SBS) is a type of child abuse caused by violent shaking of an infant, with or without impact, and characterized by subdural hematomas, retinal hemorrhages, and occult bone fractures. Parenchymal brain lesions in SBS may be missed or underestimated on CT scans, but can be detected at an earlier stage with diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) as areas of restricted diffusion. We demonstrate the value of DW-MRI in a 2-month-old baby boy with suspected SBS. The pattern of diffusion abnormalities indicates that the neuropathology of parenchymal lesions in SBS is due to hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries, and not to diffuse axonal injury. (orig.)

  5. Fetal encephalopathy after maternal anaphylaxis. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, R; Zuppa, A A; Maragliano, G; Gallini, F; Tortorolo, G

    1997-01-01

    Fetal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy can be diagnosed at birth by means of cerebral ultrasound scanning. The morphological appearance of the lesions depends on the time elapsed between the insult and examination of the brain. We report a case of a neonate affected by multicystic encephalomalacia and corpus callosum atrophy attributable to an episode of maternal anaphylactic shock which occurred at 27 weeks of gestation following intravenous iron injection. The diagnosis was made by means of a cerebral ultrasound scan performed at birth and confirmed by magnetic resonance. This case demonstrates that maternal severe acute hypotension during pregnancy can cause fetal cerebral damage similar to the hypoxicischemic injuries occurring in the perinatal period.

  6. Behavioral and neuroanatomical outcomes in a rat model of preterm hypoxic-ischemic brain Injury: Effects of caffeine and hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Molly; Rosenkrantz, Ted; Fitch, R Holly

    2018-02-21

    The current study investigated behavioral and post mortem neuroanatomical outcomes in Wistar rats with a neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury induced on postnatal day 6 (P6; Rice-Vannucci HI method; Rice et al., 1981). This preparation models brain injury seen in premature infants (gestational age (GA) 32-35 weeks) based on shared neurodevelopmental markers at time of insult, coupled with similar neuropathologic sequelae (Rice et al., 1981; Workman et al., 2013). Clinically, HI insult during this window is associated with poor outcomes that include attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), motor coordination deficits, spatial memory deficits, and language/learning disabilities. To assess therapies that might offer translational potential for improved outcomes, we used a P6 HI rat model to measure the behavioral and neuroanatomical effects of two prospective preterm neuroprotective treatments - hypothermia and caffeine. Hypothermia (aka "cooling") is an approved and moderately efficacious intervention therapy for fullterm infants with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury, but is not currently approved for preterm use. Caffeine is a respiratory stimulant used during removal of infants from ventilation but has shown surprising long-term benefits, leading to consideration as a therapy for HI of prematurity. Current findings support caffeine as a preterm neuroprotectant; treatment significantly improved some behavioral outcomes in a P6 HI rat model and partially rescued neuropathology. Hypothermia treatment (involving core temperature reduction by 4 °C over 5 hours), conversely, was found to be largely ineffective and even deleterious for some measures in both HI and sham rats. These results have important implications for therapeutic intervention in at-risk preterm populations, and promote caution in the application of hypothermia protocols to at-risk premature infants without further research. Copyright © 2018 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  7. Neuroprotection of lamotrigine on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats: Relations to administration time and doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hong Yi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Hong Yi1, Wen-Chao Guo1, Wei-Wen Sun1, Tao Su1, Han Lin1, Sheng-Qiang Chen1, Wen-Yi Deng1, Wei Zhou2, Wei-Ping Liao11Department of Neurology, Institute of Neurosciences and the Second Affiliated Hospital, 2Department of Neonatology, Affiliated Guangzhou Children’s Hospital, Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, P.R. ChinaAbstract: Lamotrigine (LTG, an antiepileptic drug, has been shown to be able to improve cerebral ischemic damage by limiting the presynaptic release of glutamate. The present study investigated further the neuroprotective effect of LTG on hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD in neonatal rats and its relations to administration time and doses. The HIBD model was produced in 7-days old SD rats by left common carotid artery ligation followed by 2 h hypoxic exposure (8% oxygen. LTG was administered intraperitoneally with the doses of 5, 10, 20, and 40 mg/kg 3 h after operation and the dose of 20 mg/kg 1 h before and 3 h, 6 h after operation. Blood and brain were sampled 24 h after operation. Nissl staining, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase biotin-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE immunohistochemical staining were used for morphological studies. Water content in left cortex and NSE concentration in serum were determined. LTG significantly reduced water content in the cerebral cortex, as well as the number of TUNEL staining neurons in the dentate gyrus and cortex in hypoxic-ischemia (HI model. Furthermore, LTG significantly decreased the NSE level in serum and increased the number of NSE staining neurons in the cortex. These effects, except that on water content, were dose-dependent and were more remarkable in the pre-treated group than in the post-treated groups. These results demonstrate that LTG may have a neuroprotective effect on acute HIBD in neonates. The effect is more prominent when administrated with higher doses and before HI.Keywords: hypoxic-ischemic brain

  8. SOME IMMUNOLOGICAL INDICATORS IN INFANTS WITH PSYCHOMOTOR DEVELOPMENT RETARDATION IN CONSEQUENCE OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM HYPOXIC-ISCHEMIC PERINATAL DAMAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.M. Karimova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that there are the researches testifying to activation of congenital (nonspecific and got (adaptive, specific immunity in Central Nervous System Perinatal Damages, interrelations between blood sera immunological indicators and clinical lines of Central Nervous System Perinatal Damages are studied now insufficiently. In our work the analysis of interrelations between a number of immunological indicators (the activity of leucocyte elastase (LE and 1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI, the rates of autoantibodies (aAB to nerve tissue proteins and psychomotor development of children with consequences of Central Nervous System hypoxic-ischemic Perinatal Damages has been carried out. It is revealed that in this pathology activation of the congenital and got immunity takes place; the congenital immunity activation degree (on LE activity back correlates with severity of psychomotor development disorders, activity α1-PI directly correlates with a psychomotor development point of children, i.e. its lowered activity is the adverse diagnostic factor; joining of autoimmune reactions (increased rates of aAB to nerve tissue proteins characterizes the heaviest variants of psychomotor development retardations. It is shown also that pre-term infants have lower point of psychomotor development, and also more patients of this group have low α1-PI activity and the raised levels of aAB in comparison to full-term infants.Key words: children, perinatal damages of central nervous system, psychomotor development, congenital immunity, leucocyte elastase, α1-proteinase inhibitor, autoimmune reactions.

  9. [Effect of acupuncture intervention on 14-3-3 expression in cerebral cortex of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-er; Yuan, Qing; Tang, Chun-zhi; Chen, Fei; Zhao, Rong; Liu, Long-lin; Yu, Yu-tian; Cao, Yong; Wu, Jia-li; Sun, Shuo

    2014-12-01

    To observe the effect of acupuncture therapy on 14-3-3, Bcl-2 and Bax expression levels in the cerebral cortex in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage(HIBD). Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rat dams were delivered either vaginally (normal group), or by C-section (sham-operation group) or by C-section with 5 min of global anoxia (anoxia group), with 8 rats in each group. The rat pups of the anoxia group were randomly divided into model group and acupuncture group (n =8). Acupuncture stimulation of "Naosanzhen" "Niesanzhen" and "Zhisanzhen" acupoints was given begin- ning from the 14th day after birth, once daily for 7 consecutive days. All rat pups were killed by decapitation on day 21 after birth, and then 14-3-3, Bcl-2 and Bax immunoactivity (expression) in the cerebral cortex were detected by immunohistochemistry. In comparison with the normal group, the expression level of cerebral cortical 14-3-3 was significantly decreased, and that of Bax remarkably increased in the model group (Poperation group (P0. 05). Acupuncture intervention can increase the expression of 14-3-3 and Bcl-2 in the cerebral cortex in HIBD rats.

  10. [Follow-up of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Biarge, M; Blanco, D; García-Alix, A; Salas, S

    2014-07-01

    Hypothermia treatment for newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy reduces the number of neonates who die or have permanent neurological deficits. Although this therapy is now standard of care, neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy still has a significant impact on the child's neurodevelopment and quality of life. Infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy should be enrolled in multidisciplinary follow-up programs in order to detect impairments, to initiate early intervention, and to provide counselling and support for families. This article describes the main neurodevelopmental outcomes after term neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. We offer recommendations for follow-up based on the infant's clinical condition and other prognostic indicators, mainly neonatal neuroimaging. Other aspects, such as palliative care and medico-legal issues, are also briefly discussed. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. NOC/oFQ PKC-dependent superoxide generation contributes to hypoxic-ischemic impairment of NMDA cerebrovasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, W M

    2000-12-01

    This study determined whether nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOC/oFQ) generates superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) in a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent manner and whether such production contributes to hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) impairment of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced pial artery dilation in newborn pigs equipped with closed cranial windows. Superoxide dismutase (SOD)-inhibitable nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction was an index of O(2)(-) generation. Under non-H-I conditions, topical NOC/oFQ (10(-10) M, concentration present in cerebrospinal fluid after I or H-I) increased SOD-inhibitable NBT reduction from 1 +/- 1 to 20 +/- 3 pmol/mm(2). PKC inhibitors staurosporine and chelerythrine (10(-7) M) blunted NBT reduction (1 +/- 1 to 7 +/- 2 pmol/mm(2) for chelerythrine), whereas the NOC/oFQ receptor antagonist [F/G]NOC/oFQ (1-13)-NH(2) (10(-6) M) blocked NBT reduction. [F/G]NOC/oFQ(1-13)-NH(2) and staurosporine also blunted the NBT reduction observed after I or H-I. NMDA (10(-8), 10(-6) M)-induced pial artery dilation was reversed to vasoconstriction after H-I. The NOC/oFQ antagonist staurosporine and free radical scavengers partially prevented this impaired dilation (sham: 9 +/- 1 and 16 +/- 1; H-I: -5 and -10 +/- 1; H-I staurosporine pretreated: 3 +/- 1 and 6 +/- 1%). These data show that NOC/oFQ increased O(2)(-) production in a PKC-dependent manner and contributed to this production after insult and that NOC/oFQ contributed to impaired NMDA-induced pial artery dilation after H-I, suggesting, therefore, that PKC-dependent O(2)(-) generation by NOC/oFQ links NOC/oFQ release to impaired NMDA dilation after H-I.

  12. Superiority of high frequency hypoxic ischemic EEG signals of fetal sheep for sharp wave detection using Wavelet-Type 2 Fuzzy classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Hamid; Unsworth, Charles P; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is approximately a 6-8 hour window that exists from when a hypoxic-ischemic insult occurs, in utero, before significant irreversible brain injury occurs in new born infants. The focus of our work is to determine through the electroencephalogram (EEG) if such a hypoxic-ischemic insult has occurred such that neuro-protective treatment can be sought within this period. At present, there are no defined biomarkers in the EEG that are currently being used to help classify if a hypoxic ischemia insult has occurred. However, micro-scale transients in the form of spikes, sharps and slow waves exists that could provide precursory information whether a hypoxic-ischemic insult has occurred or not. In our previous studies we have successfully automatically identified spikes with high sensitivity and selectivity in the conventional 64Hz sampled EEG. This paper details the significant advantage that can be obtained in using high frequency 1024Hz sampled EEG for sharp wave detection over the typically employed 64Hz sampled EEG. This advantage is amplified when a combination of wavelet Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System (WT-Type-2-FLS) classifiers are used to identify the sharp wave transients. By applying WT-Type-2-FLS to the 1024Hz EEG record and to the same down-sampled 64Hz EEG record we demonstrate, how the sharp wave transients detection increases significantly for high resolution 1024Hz EEG over 64Hz EEG. The WT-Type-2-FLS algorithm performance was assessed over 3 standardised time periods within the first 8 hours, post occlusion of a fetal sheep, in utero. 1024Hz EEG results demonstrate the algorithm detected sharps with overall performance rates of 85%, 92%, and 87% in the Early/Mid and Late-latent phases of injury, respectively as compared to 25%, 55% and 31% in the 64Hz EEG. These results demonstrate the power of Wavelet Type-2 Fuzzy Logic System at detecting sharp waves in 1024Hz EEG and suggest that there should be a movement toward recording high frequency EEG for

  13. Induction of striatal neurogenesis enhances functional recovery in an adult animal model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S H; Yu, J H; Park, E S; Lee, J E; Kim, H O; Park, K I; Kim, G W; Park, C I; Cho, S-R

    2010-08-11

    While intraventricular administration of epidermal growth factor (EGF) expands the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ), overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is particularly effective in enhancing striatal neurogenesis. We assessed the induction of striatal neurogenesis and consequent functional recovery after chronic infusion of BDNF and EGF in an adult animal model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. Permanent brain damage was induced in CD-1 (ICR) mice (P7) by applying the ligation of unilateral carotid artery and hypoxic condition. At 6 weeks of age, the mice were randomly assigned to groups receiving a continuous 2-week infusion of one of the following treatments into the ventricle: BDNF, EGF, BDNF/EGF, or phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Two weeks after treatment, immunohistochemical analysis revealed an increase in the number of BrdU(+) cells in the SVZ and striata of BDNF/EGF-treated mice. The number of new neurons co-stained with BrdU and betaIII-tubulin was also significantly increased in the neostriata of BDNF/EGF-treated mice, compared with PBS group. In addition, the newly generated cells were expressed as migrating neuroblasts labeled with PSA-NCAM or doublecortin in the SVZ and the ventricular side of neostriata. The new striatal neurons were also differentiated as mature neurons co-labeled with BrdU(+)/NeuN(+). When evaluated post-surgical 8 weeks, BDNF/EGF-treated mice exhibited significantly longer rotarod latencies at constant speed (48 rpm) and under accelerating condition (4-80 rpm), relative to PBS and untreated controls. In the forelimb-use asymmetry test, BDNF/EGF-treated mice showed significant improvement in the use of the contralateral forelimb. In contrast, this BDNF/EGF-associated functional recovery was abolished in mice receiving a co-infusion of 2% cytosine-b-d-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C), a mitotic inhibitor. Induction of striatal neurogenesis by the

  14. N-3 Fatty Acid Rich Triglyceride Emulsions Are Neuroprotective after Cerebral Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury in Neonatal Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Susan J.; Mastropietro, Christopher; Bazan, Nicolas G.; Ten, Vadim S.; Deckelbaum, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    We questioned if acute administration of n-3 fatty acids (FA) carried in n-3 rich triglyceride (TG) emulsions provides neuroprotection in neonatal mice subjected to hypoxic-ischemic (H/I) brain injury. We examined specificity of FA, optimal doses, and therapeutic windows for neuroprotection after H/I. H/I insult was induced in C57BL/6J 10-day-old mice by right carotid artery ligation followed by exposure to 8% O2 for 15 minutes at 37°C. Intraperitoneal injection with n-3-rich TG emulsions, n-6 rich TG emulsions or saline for control was administered at different time points before and/or after H/I. In separate experiments, dose responses were determined with TG containing only docosahexaenoic acid (Tri-DHA) or eicosapentaenoic acid (Tri-EPA) with a range of 0.1–0.375 g n-3 TG/kg, administered immediately after H/I insult. Infarct volume and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were measured. Treatment with n-3 TG emulsions both before- and after- H/I significantly reduced total infarct volume by a mean of 43% when administered 90 min prior to H/I and by 47% when administered immediately after H/I. In post-H/I experiments Tri-DHA, but not Tri-EPA exhibited neuroprotective effects with both low and high doses (p<0.05). Moreover, delayed post-H/I treatment with Tri-DHA significantly decreased total infarct volume by a mean of 51% when administered at 0 hr, by 46% at 1 hr, and by 51% at 2 hr after H/I insult. No protective effect occurred with Tri-DHA injection at 4 hr after H/I. There were no n-3 TG related differences in CBF. A significant reduction in brain tissue death was maintained after Tri-DHA injection at 8 wk after the initial brain injury. Thus, n-3 TG, specifically containing DHA, is protective against H/I induced brain infarction when administered up to 2 hr after H/I injury. Acute administration of TG-rich DHA may prove effective for treatment of stroke in humans. PMID:23437099

  15. Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy with features on diffusion-weighted images: Report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ja Young; Yu, In Kyu [Dept. of Radiology, Eulji University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a rare toxic encephalopathy caused by accumulated plasma ammonia. A few literatures are reported about MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. It is different from the well-known chronic hepatic encephalopathy. The clinical symptom and MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy can be reversible with proper treatment. Acute hepatic encephalopathy involves the cingulate cortex, diffuse cerebral cortices, insula, bilateral thalami on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), and fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery. Acute hepatic encephalopathy might mimic hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy because of their similar predominant involving sites. We experienced 2 cases of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy consecutively. They showed restricted diffusion at the cingulate cortex, cerebral cortices, insula, and bilateral dorsomedial thalami on DWI. One patient underwent acute fulminant hepatitis A, the other patient with underlying chronic liver disease had acute liver failure due to hepatotoxicity of tuberculosis medication. In this report, we presented the characteristic features of DWI in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy. In addition, we reviewed articles on MRI findings of acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy.

  16. Ischemic injury suppresses hypoxia-induced electrographic seizures and the background EEG in a rat model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayachkivsky, A; Lehmkuhle, M J; Ekstrand, J J; Dudek, F E

    2015-11-01

    The relationship among neonatal seizures, abnormalities of the electroencephalogram (EEG), brain injury, and long-term neurological outcome (e.g., epilepsy) remains controversial. The effects of hypoxia alone (Ha) and hypoxia-ischemia (HI) were studied in neonatal rats at postnatal day 7; both models generate EEG seizures during the 2-h hypoxia treatment, but only HI causes an infarct with severe neuronal degeneration. Single-channel, differential recordings of acute EEG seizures and background suppression were recorded with a novel miniature telemetry device during the hypoxia treatment and analyzed quantitatively. The waveforms of electrographic seizures (and their behavioral correlates) appeared virtually identical in both models and were identified as discrete events with high power in the traditional delta (0.1-4 Hz) and/or alpha (8-12 Hz) bands. Although the EEG patterns during seizures were similar in Ha- and HI-treated animals at the beginning of the hypoxic insult, Ha caused a more severe electrographic seizure profile than HI near the end. Analyses of power spectral density and seizure frequency profiles indicated that the electrographic seizures progressively increased during the 2-h Ha treatment, while HI led to a progressive decrease in the seizures with significant suppression of the EEG background. These data show that 1) the hypoxia component of these two models drives the seizures; 2) the seizures during Ha are substantially more robust than those during HI, possibly because ongoing neuronal damage blunts the electrographic activity; and 3) a progressive decrease in background EEG, rather than the presence of electrographic seizures, indicates neuronal degeneration during perinatal HI. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. BLOOD BIOMARKERS FOR EVALUATION OF PERINATAL ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Marshall Graham

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in identification of brain injury after trauma shows many possible blood biomarkers that may help identify the fetus and neonate with encephalopathy. Traumatic brain injury shares many common features with perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Trauma has a hypoxic component, and one of the 1st physiologic consequences of moderate-severe traumatic brain injury is apnea. Trauma and hypoxia-ischemia initiate an excitotoxic cascade and free radical injury followed by the inflammatory cascade, producing injury in neurons, glial cells and white matter. Increased excitatory amino acids, lipid peroxidation products and alteration in microRNAs and inflammatory markers are common to both traumatic brain injury and perinatal encephalopathy. The blood-brain barrier is disrupted in both leading to egress of substances normally only found in the central nervous system. Brain exosomes may represent ideal biomarker containers, as RNA and protein transported within the vesicles are protected from enzymatic degradation. Evaluation of fetal or neonatal brain derived exosomes that cross the blood-brain barrier and circulate peripherally has been referred to as the liquid brain biopsy. A multiplex of serum biomarkers could improve upon the current imprecise methods of identifying fetal and neonatal brain injury such as fetal heart rate abnormalities, meconium, cord gases at delivery, and Apgar scores. Quantitative biomarker measurements of perinatal brain injury and recovery could lead to operative delivery only in the presence of significant fetal risk, triage to appropriate therapy after birth and measure the effectiveness of treatment.

  18. [Effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on learning and memory functional recovery in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Xuan; Dai, Ying; Shu, Chang; Qu, Ping; Liu, You-xue; Yang, Li; Li, Ting-yu

    2008-09-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) causes acute death and chronic nervous system sequelae in newborn infants and children. Whereas there have been no specific treatment towards it up to now. Studies have shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the therapeutic potential in many nervous system diseases and the authors previously found that retinoid acid (RA), which plays an important role in brain development, could enhance the neural differentiation of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in vitro. This study aimed to examine effects of rMSCs and RA-preinduced rMSC on learning and memory functional recovery after HIBD in neonatal rats in order to explore a new treatment strategy for clinical application, and explore the mechanism of action of rMSCs. Rat MSCs were isolated and purified from the whole bone marrow of juvenile Wistar rats by removing the non-adherent cells in primary and passage cultures. Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage rat models were built according to the methods described by Rice: the right carotid artery of 7-day-postnatal Wistar rats was ligated under anesthesia, and then the rats were exposed to 8% - 9% O2 in a container. At 5 days after hypoxia-ischemia, the HIBD neonatal rats were randomly divided into 3 groups and respectively transplanted with saline, BrdU marked rMSCs (1 - 2 x 10(5)) or RA-preinduced rMSCs (1 - 2 x 10(5)) into their lateral cerebral ventricle. Immunohistochemistry for nestin, neuron-specific enolase (NSE), neurofilament protein-heavy chain (NF-H) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to identify cells derived from rMSCs at 14 days and 42 days after transplantation. Shuttle box test was performed to evaluate the condition of learning and memory functional recovery when animals were 7 weeks old. Neurotrophin and receptors cDNA microarray were also employed at 14 days after transplantation to investigate the underlying action mechanisms of rMSCs treatment. Real-time PCR was used to confirm some of

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and prognostication in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury: a vignette-based study of Canadian specialty physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Emily; Rasmussen, Lisa Anne; Mazer, Barbara; Shevell, Michael; Miller, Steven P; Synnes, Anne; Yager, Jerome Y; Majnemer, Annette; Muhajarine, Nazeem; Chouinard, Isabelle; Racine, Eric

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could improve prognostication in neonatal brain injury; however, factors beyond technical or scientific refinement may impact its use and interpretation. We surveyed Canadian neonatologists and pediatric neurologists using general and vignette-based questions about the use of MRI for prognostication in neonates with hypoxic-ischemic injury. There was inter- and intra-vignette variability in prognosis and in ratings about the usefulness of MRI. Severity of predicted outcome correlated with certainty about the outcome. A majority of physicians endorsed using MRI results in discussing prognosis with families, and most suggested that MRI results contribute to end-of-life decisions. Participating neonatologists, when compared to participating pediatric neurologists, had significantly less confidence in the interpretation of MRI by colleagues in neurology and radiology. Further investigation is needed to understand the complexity of MRI and of its application. Potential gaps relative to our understanding of the ethical importance of these findings should be addressed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Shear Stress Induces Differentiation of Endothelial Lineage Cells to Protect Neonatal Brain from Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury through NRP1 and VEGFR2 Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Wei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI brain injuries disrupt the integrity of neurovascular structure and lead to lifelong neurological deficit. The devastating damage can be ameliorated by preserving the endothelial network, but the source for therapeutic cells is limited. We aim to evaluate the beneficial effect of mechanical shear stress in the differentiation of endothelial lineage cells (ELCs from adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs and the possible intracellular signals to protect HI injury using cell-based therapy in the neonatal rats. The ASCs expressed early endothelial markers after biochemical stimulation of endothelial growth medium. The ELCs with full endothelial characteristics were accomplished after a subsequential shear stress application for 24 hours. When comparing the therapeutic potential of ASCs and ELCs, the ELCs treatment significantly reduced the infarction area and preserved neurovascular architecture in HI injured brain. The transplanted ELCs can migrate and engraft into the brain tissue, especially in vessels, where they promoted the angiogenesis. The activation of Akt by neuropilin 1 (NRP1 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 was important for ELC migration and following in vivo therapeutic outcomes. Therefore, the current study demonstrated importance of mechanical factor in stem cell differentiation and showed promising protection of brain from HI injury using ELCs treatment.

  1. Dexamethasone Protects Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury via L-PGDS-Dependent PGD2-DP1-pERK Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Pablo J.; Li, Yong; Martinez, Fabian; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Glucocorticoids pretreatment confers protection against neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. However, the molecular mechanism remains poorly elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that glucocorticoids protect against HI brain injury in neonatal rat by stimulation of lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS)-induced prostaglandin D2 (PGD2)-DP1-pERK mediated signaling pathway. Methods Dexamethasone and inhibitors were administered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) injections into 10-day-old rat brains. Levels of L-PGD2, D prostanoid (DP1) receptor, pERK1/2 and PGD2 were determined by Western immunoblotting and ELISA, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated 48 hours after conduction of HI in 10-day-old rat pups. Results Dexamethasone pretreatment significantly upregulated L-PGDS expression and the biosynthesis of PGD2. Dexamethasone also selectively increased isoform pERK-44 level in the neonatal rat brains. Inhibitors of L-PGDS (SeCl4), DP1 (MK-0524) and MAPK (PD98059) abrogated dexamethasone-induced increases in pERK-44 level, respectively. Of importance, these inhibitors also blocked dexamethasone-mediated neuroprotective effects against HI brain injury in neonatal rat brains. Conclusion Interaction of glucocorticoids-GR signaling and L-PGDS-PGD2-DP1-pERK mediated pathway underlies the neuroprotective effects of dexamethasone pretreatment in neonatal HI brain injury. PMID:25474649

  2. Peptidylarginine deiminases: novel drug targets for prevention of neuronal damage following hypoxic ischemic insult (HI) in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Sigrun; Rocha-Ferreira, Eridan; Thei, Laura; Mawjee, Priyanka; Bennett, Kate; Thompson, Paul R; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Nicholas, Anthony P; Peebles, Donald; Hristova, Mariya; Raivich, Gennadij

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal hypoxic ischaemic (HI) injury frequently causes neural impairment in surviving infants. Our knowledge of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still limited. Protein deimination is a post-translational modification caused by Ca(+2) -regulated peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs), a group of five isozymes that display tissue-specific expression and different preference for target proteins. Protein deimination results in altered protein conformation and function of target proteins, and is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, gene regulation and autoimmunity. In this study, we used the neonatal HI and HI/infection [lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation] murine models to investigate changes in protein deimination. Brains showed increases in deiminated proteins, cell death, activated microglia and neuronal loss in affected brain areas at 48 h after hypoxic ischaemic insult. Upon treatment with the pan-PAD inhibitor Cl-amidine, a significant reduction was seen in microglial activation, cell death and infarct size compared with control saline or LPS-treated animals. Deimination of histone 3, a target protein of the PAD4 isozyme, was increased in hippocampus and cortex specifically upon LPS stimulation and markedly reduced following Cl-amidine treatment. Here, we demonstrate a novel role for PAD enzymes in neural impairment in neonatal HI Encephalopathy, highlighting their role as promising new candidates for drug-directed intervention in neurotrauma. Hypoxic Ischaemic Insult (HI) results in activation of peptidylarginine deiminases (PADs) because of calcium dysregulation. Target proteins undergo irreversible changes of protein bound arginine to citrulline, resulting in protein misfolding. Infection in synergy with HI causes up-regulation of TNFα, nuclear translocation of PAD4 and change in gene regulation as a result of histone deimination. Pharmacological PAD inhibition significantly reduced HI brain damage. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry

  3. Melatonin influences NO/NOS pathway and reduces oxidative and nitrosative stress in a model of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Santos; Hernández, Raquel; Franchelli, Gustavo; Ramos-Álvarez, Manuel Miguel; Peinado, María Ángeles

    2017-01-30

    In this work, using a rat model combining ischemia and hypobaric hypoxia (IH), we evaluate the relationships between the antioxidant melatonin and the cerebral nitric oxide/nitric oxide synthase (NO/NOS) system seeking to ascertain whether melatonin exerts its antioxidant protective action by balancing this key pathway, which is highly involved in the cerebral oxidative and nitrosative damage underlying these pathologies. The application of the IH model increases the expression of the three nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, as well as nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels and nitrotyrosine (n-Tyr) impacts on the cerebral cortex. However, melatonin administration before IH makes nNOS expression response earlier and stronger, but diminishes iNOS and n-Tyr expression, while both eNOS and NOx remain unchanged. These results were corroborated by nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) staining, as indicative of in situ NOS activity. In addition, the rats previously treated with melatonin exhibited a reduction in the oxidative impact evaluated by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Finally, IH also intensified glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, reduced hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α), but did not change nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB); meanwhile, melatonin did not significantly affect any of these patterns after the application of the IH model. The antioxidant melatonin acts on the NO/NOS system after IH injury balancing the release of NO, reducing peroxynitrite formation and protecting from nitrosative/oxidative damage. In addition, this paper raises questions concerning the classical role of some controversial molecules such as NO, which are of great consequence in the final fate of hypoxic neurons. We conclude that melatonin protects the brain from hypoxic/ischemic-derived damage in the first steps of the ischemic cascade, influencing the NO/NOS pathway and reducing oxidative and nitrosative stress. Copyright

  4. Early metabolite changes after melatonin treatment in neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury studied by in-vivo1H MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Hester Rijkje; Nyman, Axel K G; Morken, Tora Sund; Vettukattil, Riyas; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Widerøe, Marius

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is a promising neuroprotective agent after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury. We used in-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate effects of melatonin treatment on brain metabolism after HI. Postnatal day 7 Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral HI brain injury were treated with either melatonin 10 mg/kg dissolved in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) with 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) or vehicle (5% DMSO and/or PBS) directly and at 6 hours after HI. 1H MR spectra from the thalamus in the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere were acquired 1 day after HI. Our results showed that injured animals had a distinct metabolic profile in the ipsilateral thalamus compared to sham with low concentrations of total creatine, choline, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), and high concentrations of lipids. A majority of the melatonin-treated animals had a metabolic profile characterized by higher total creatine, choline, NAA and lower lipid levels than other HI animals. When comparing absolute concentrations, melatonin treatment resulted in higher glutamine levels and lower lipid concentrations compared to DMSO treatment as well as higher macromolecule levels compared to PBS treatment day 1 after HI. DMSO treated animals had lower concentrations of glucose, creatine, phosphocholine and macromolecules compared to sham animals. In conclusion, the neuroprotective effects of melatonin were reflected in a more favorable metabolic profile including reduced lipid levels that likely represents reduced cell injury. Neuroprotective effects may also be related to the influence of melatonin on glutamate/glutamine metabolism. The modulatory effects of the solvent DMSO on cerebral energy metabolism might have masked additional beneficial effects of melatonin.

  5. [Expression profiles of miRNA-182 and Clock mRNA in the pineal gland of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xing; Ding, Xin; Xu, Li-Xiao; Liu, Ming-Hua; Feng, Xing

    2016-03-01

    To study the changes of miRNA expression in the pineal gland of neonatal rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) and the possible roles of miRNA in the pathogenesis of circadian rhythm disturbance after HIBD. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: HIBD and sham-operated. HIBD was induced according to the Rice-Vannucci method. The pineal glands were obtained 24 hours after the HIBD event. The expression profiles of miRNAs were determined using GeneChip technigue and quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Then the miRNA which was highly expressed was selected. The expression levels of the chosen miRNA were detected in different tissues (lungs, intestines, stomach, kidneys, cerebral cortex, pineal gland). RT-PCR analysis was performed to measure the expression profiles of the chosen miRNA and the targeted gene Clock mRNA in the pineal gland at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours after HIBD. miRNA-182 that met the criteria was selected by GeneChip and RT-PCR. miRNA-182 was highly expressed in the pineal gland. Compared with the sham-operated group, the expression of miRNA-182 was significantly up-regulated in the pineal gland at 24 and 48 hours after HIBD (P<0.05). Compared with the sham-operated group, Clock mRNA expression in the HIBD group increased at 0 hour after HIBD, decreased at 48 hours after HIBD and increased at 72 hours after HIBD (P<0.05). miRNA-182 may be involved in the pathogenesis of circadian rhythm disturbance after HIBD.

  6. The neuroblast and angioblast chemotaxic factor SDF-1 (CXCL12 expression is briefly up regulated by reactive astrocytes in brain following neonatal hypoxic-ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Aisha L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1 or CXCL12 is chemotaxic for CXCR4 expressing bone marrow-derived cells. It functions in brain embryonic development and in response to ischemic injury in helping guide neuroblast migration and vasculogenesis. In experimental adult stroke models SDF-1 is expressed perivascularly in the injured region up to 30 days after the injury, suggesting it could be a therapeutic target for tissue repair strategies. We hypothesized that SDF-1 would be expressed in similar temporal and spatial patterns following hypoxic-ischemic (HI injury in neonatal brain. Results Twenty-five 7-day-old C57BL/J mice underwent HI injury. SDF-1 expression was up regulated up to 7 days after the injury but not at the later time points. The chief sites of SDF-1 up regulation were astrocytes, their foot processes along blood vessels and endothelial cells. Conclusion The localization of SDF-1 along blood vessels in the HI injury zone suggests that these perivascular areas are where chemotaxic signaling for cellular recruitment originates and that reactive astrocytes are major mediators of this process. The associated endothelium is likely to be the site for vascular attachment and diapedesis of CXCR4 receptor expressing cells to enter the injured tissue. Here we show that, relative to adults, neonates have a significantly smaller window of opportunity for SDF-1 based vascular chemotaxic recruitment of bone marrow-derived cells. Therefore, without modification, following neonatal HI injury there is only a narrow period of time for endogenous SDF-1 mediated chemotaxis and recruitment of reparative cells, including exogenously administered stem/progenitor cells.

  7. HIE Isolde – General Presentation of MATHILDE

    CERN Document Server

    Kautzmann, Guillaume; Klumb, Francis; Kadi, Yacine; Bensinger, Jim; Hashemi, Kevan; Sulc, Miroslav

    2014-01-01

    In the frame of the HIE-ISOLDE project a superconducting Linac will upgrade the energy and intensity of the REX ISOLDE facility at CERN. It will be made of 2 low β and 4 high β cryomodules. Each high β cryomodule houses five superconducting RF cavities and one superconducting solenoid (respectively 6 and 2 for the low β). Beam physics simulations show that the optimum linac working conditions are obtained with components aligned and monitored on the Nominal Beam Line within 0.3 mm for the cavities and 0.15 mm for the solenoids at one sigma level. The Monitoring and Alignment Tracking for HIE-ISOLDE (MATHILDE) system is based on opto electronic sensors, optical and mechanical elements partly exposed to high vacuum and cryogenic temperatures. This paper summarizes the MATHILDE studies and focuses on the viewport crossing, the MATHIS software, the newly designed HBCAM cameras and the retro-reflective targets based on high index glass properties.

  8. HIE-ISOLDE Phase I celebration

    CERN Multimedia

    Ordan, Julien

    2016-01-01

    HIE-Isolde celebration hosted by Belgian State Secretary E. Sleurs for Combating Poverty, for Equal Opportunities, for Disabled People and for Science Policy, in charge of Larger Towns, attached to the Minister of Finance, Ms Elke Sleurs State Secretary for Combating Poverty, for Equal Opportunities, for Disabled People and for Science Policy, in charge of Larger Towns, attached to the Minister of Finance Kingdom of Belgium

  9. New researchers join HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE team is expecting a few new faces around the lab, as the new EU-funded project CATHI (Cryogenics, Accelerators and Targets for HIE-ISOLDE) gets into full swing as part of the Seventh Framework Programme. The project will recruit researchers from around the world to be trained at CERN and will hold its kick-off meeting here on 23 May.   CATHI is a 4-year Marie Curie-funded Initial Training Network aimed at preparing researchers in the application of advanced accelerator technology. The €4.97 million initiative provides support for 20 researchers: 16 Early Stage Researchers and 4 Experienced Researchers (positions are similar to CERN’s junior and senior fellowships). The main objective of the CATHI project is to give researchers the highest level of specialist training. Researchers will develop expert, technical R&D skills by working on HIE-ISOLDE, the ongoing upgrade of the ISOLDE facility, one of Europe’s leading radioactive ion beam facilities. In...

  10. [Magnesium sulphate in the treatment of ischemic-hypoxic neonatal encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornacka, M K

    2001-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) remains one of the most important neurological complications in full and near full term newborns. During HIE glutamate and other excitatory neurotransmitters are released and progressive energy failure in brain is observed. Toxicity of glutamate plays the main role in brain injury. Glutamate activates the specific receptors that, in turn, mediate an overwhelming influx of calcium into the postsynaptic neuron. The pathological changes are located particularly in hippocampus. Magnesium sulfate has been used safely for years to treat preclampsia. The animal experimental evidence support a neuroprotective role for magnesium in HIE.

  11. The mechanisms and treatment of asphyxial encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido eWassink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute post-asphyxial encephalopathy occurring around the time of birth remains a major cause of death and disability. The recent seminal insight that allows active neuroprotective treatment is that even after profound asphyxia (the primary phase, many brain cells show initial recovery from the insult during a short latent phase, typically lasting approximately 6 h, only to die hours to days later after a secondary deterioration characterized by seizures, cytotoxic edema, and progressive failure of cerebral oxidative metabolism. Although many of these secondary processes are potentially injurious, they appear to be primarily epiphenomena of the ‘execution’ phase of cell death. Animal and human studies designed around this conceptual framework have shown that moderate cerebral hypothermia initiated as early as possible but before the onset of secondary deterioration, and continued for a sufficient duration to allow the secondary deterioration to resolve, has been associated with potent, long-lasting neuroprotection. Recent clinical trials show that while therapeutic hypothermia significantly reduces morbidity and mortality, many babies still die or survive with disabilities. The challenge for the future is to find ways of improving the effectiveness of treatment. In this review, we will dissect the known mechanisms of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in relation to the known effects of hypothermic neuroprotection.

  12. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? ... portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that causes temporary worsening of brain function in people with ...

  13. Breaking the ground for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Have you noticed that Building 135 has disappeared from the Meyrin site? The old hangar used by the transport service – now located on the Prévessin site – has been removed to make room for the civil engineering work for the High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) installations. The work began at the end of August and it will not be long before new buildings start to appear in the ISOLDE premises.   Beamlines in the ISOLDE Hall. HIE-ISOLDE is a major upgrade, which will make the 44-year-old ISOLDE an internationally unique facility capable of accelerating heavy radioactive elements like no other. This important feature will allow the large ISOLDE scientific community to set up new experiments and explore the nuclear structure over the entire nuclear chart. A new superconducting linear accelerator, new beam lines and improved targets will replace the current installations. The cost of the upgrade is estimated at around 36 million Swiss francs. It will be ...

  14. Hashimoto's Encephalopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schiess, Nicoline; Pardo, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a controversial neurological disorder that comprises a heterogenous group of neurological symptoms that manifest in patients with high titers of antithyroid antibodies...

  15. Notes on the HIE-ISOLDE HEBT

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA

    2011-01-01

    The HEBT will need to transfer the beam from the HIE-ISOLDE linac to up to four experimental stations over a wide range of energies from 0.45 MeV/u to 10 MeV/u, which equates to a maximum beam rigidity of 2 Tm for A/q = 4.5. As the linac will be installed in stages, so too will the HEBT, with the first two experimental stations being installed before a larger U-bend that will take the beam to a third experimental station and a spectrometer. The beam parameters at output fromthe linac are presented along with a preliminary scheme for the HEBT, which is consistent with the experiments’ footprints. The first beam optics calculations were carried out using TRACE3D. Supporting documentation can be found on the CERN DFS at \\\\cern.ch\\dfs\\Users\\m\\mfraser\\Public\\HEBT.

  16. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan

    OpenAIRE

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E. M.; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children’s Specialized Hospit...

  17. Passive hypothermia (≥35 - <36°C) during transport of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellam, Aurélie; Lode, Noëlla; Ayachi, Azzedine; Jourdain, Gilles; Dauger, Stéphane; Jones, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Hypothermia initiated in the first six hours of life in term infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy reduces the risk of death and severe neurological sequelae. Our study's principal objective was to evaluate transport predictors potentially influencing arrival in NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) at a temperature ≥35-study was conducted during 18 months by the three Neonatal Transport Teams and 13 NICUs. Newborns were selected for inclusion according to biological and clinical criteria before transport using passive hypothermia using a target temperature of ≥35-35-35.4°C (34.3-36.5). The median age of all infants on arrival in NICU was 3h03min [2h25min-3h56min]. Three infants arrived in NICU with a temperature of 35-35.5°C may reduce the proportion of infants with high/normothermic temperatures.

  18. The HIE-ISOLDE Vacuum System

    CERN Document Server

    Vandoni, G; Radwan, K; Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy Isolde (HIE-Isolde) project aims at increasing the energy and intensity of the radioactive ion beams (RIB) delivered by the present Rex-Isolde facility. Energy up to 10MeV/amu will be reached by a new post-accelerating, superconducting (SC) linac. Beam will be delivered via a HEBT to three experimental stations for nuclear physics. To keep the SC linac compact and avoid cold-warm transitions, the cryomodules feature a common beam and insulation vacuum. Radioactive ion beams require a hermetically sealed vacuum, with transfer of the effluents to the nuclear ventilation chimney. Hermetically sealed, dry, gas transfer vacuum pumps are preferred to gas binding pumps, for an optimized management of radioactive contamination risk during maintenance and intervention. The vacuum system of the SC-linac is isolated by two fast valves, triggered by fast reacting cold cathode gauges installed on the warm linac, the HEBT and the experimental stations. Rough pumping is distributed, while the H...

  19. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE ... liver disease. When your liver is damaged it can no longer remove toxic substances from your blood. ...

  20. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2018 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  1. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering ...

  2. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your doctor right away if you think you may have it. ... American Liver Foundation © 2017 American Liver Foundation. All rights reserved. Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and ...

  3. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be aware you have it. The stages ... your doctor right away if you think you may have it. Prompt identification and treatment of HE ...

  4. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical Appointment Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment ... treatment. Being a fully-informed participant in your medical care is an important factor in staying as ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to Give Contact Us Privacy ...

  6. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Treatment Options Treatment Basics Treatment Medications Importance of Adhering to Your Treatment Plan Long-Term ... disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic ...

  7. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reading Webinars Caregivers The Role of a Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver ... and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy so you can tell your ...

  8. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are the Symptoms of HE? What Are the Stages of Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause ... may not be aware you have it. The stages of HE span from mild to severe and ...

  9. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cirrhosis of the Liver & Symptoms Why it’s Important to Treat HE Symptoms of Liver Failure Glossary of ... Hepatic Encephalopathy? What Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to ...

  10. Human Umbilical Cord-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Improve Learning and Memory Function in Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain-Damaged Rats via an IL-8-Mediated Secretion Mechanism Rather than Differentiation Pattern Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Zhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: MSCs are a promising therapeutic resource. Paracrine effects and the induction of differentiation patterns are thought to represent the two primary mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC transplantation in vivo. However, it is unclear which mechanism is involved in the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord-derived MSC (hUC-MSC transplantation. Methods and Results: Based on flow cytometry analysis, hUC-MSCs exhibited the morphological characteristics and surface markers of MSCs. Following directed neural induction, these cells displayed a neuron-like morphology and expressed high levels of neural markers. All types of hUC-MSCs, including differentiated and redifferentiated cells, promoted learning and memory function recovery in hypoxic-ischemic brain damaged (HIBD rats. The hUC-MSCs secreted IL-8, which enhanced angiogenesis in the hippocampus via the JNK pathway. However, the differentiated and redifferentiated cells did not exert significantly greater therapeutic effects than the undifferentiated hUC-MSCs. Conclusion: hUC-MSCs display the biological properties and neural differentiation potential of MSCs and provide therapeutic advantages by secreting IL-8, which participates in angiogenesis in the rat HIBD model. These data suggest that hUC-MSC transplantation improves the recovery of neuronal function via an IL-8-mediated secretion mechanism, whereas differentiation pattern induction was limited.

  11. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Jose Alvarez

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets.Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6 and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10. ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline, after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury.Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant.The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  12. Effect of neonatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway by recording auditory brainstem responses in newborn piglets: a new experimentation model to study the perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage on the auditory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Francisco Jose; Revuelta, Miren; Santaolalla, Francisco; Alvarez, Antonia; Lafuente, Hector; Arteaga, Olatz; Alonso-Alconada, Daniel; Sanchez-del-Rey, Ana; Hilario, Enrique; Martinez-Ibargüen, Agustin

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a major perinatal problem that results in severe damage to the brain impairing the normal development of the auditory system. The purpose of the present study is to study the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the auditory pathway by recording auditory brain responses in a novel animal experimentation model in newborn piglets. Hypoxia-ischemia was induced to 1.3 day-old piglets by clamping 30 minutes both carotid arteries by vascular occluders and lowering the fraction of inspired oxygen. We compared the Auditory Brain Responses (ABRs) of newborn piglets exposed to acute hypoxia/ischemia (n = 6) and a control group with no such exposure (n = 10). ABRs were recorded for both ears before the start of the experiment (baseline), after 30 minutes of HI injury, and every 30 minutes during 6 h after the HI injury. Auditory brain responses were altered during the hypoxic-ischemic insult but recovered 30-60 minutes later. Hypoxia/ischemia seemed to induce auditory functional damage by increasing I-V latencies and decreasing wave I, III and V amplitudes, although differences were not significant. The described experimental model of hypoxia-ischemia in newborn piglets may be useful for studying the effect of perinatal asphyxia on the impairment of the auditory pathway.

  13. Beam dynamics studies of the HIE-LINAC at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, MA

    2008-01-01

    We present a beam dynamics study of the superconducting (SC) HIE-LINAC proposed to replace the existing normal conducting REX-ISOLDE accelerating infrastructure at CERN. The Linear Accelerator Numerical Analysis (LANA) code was used to run first-order simulations of the HIE-LINAC in order to study the beam quality during acceleration. A resonance in the transverse emittance growth at ejection from the HIE-LINAC was discovered and understood as a parametric coupling between the longitudinal and transverse dynamics. The dangerous effect of this resonance can be avoided for all mass-to-charge states in the range 2.5 ≤ A/q ≤ 4.5, if the linac is operated with a transverse phase advance higher than 70 degrees. The transverse emittance growth is minimised along the HIE-LINAC if operated above a transverse phase advance of 90 degrees per focusing period. Without a dedicated matching region between the two sections of the HIE-LINAC a solution for matching the beam was found by using the solenoids in the low-energ...

  14. HIE-ISOLDE: NUCLEAR PHYSICS NOW AT HIGHER ENERGIES

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    From biomedical applications to nuclear astrophysics, physicists at CERN’s nuclear physics facility, ISOLDE, are probing the structure of matter. To stay at the cutting edge of technology and science, further development was needed. Now, 8 years since the start of the HIE-ISOLDE project, a new accelerator is in place taking nuclear physics at CERN to higher energies. With physicists setting their sights on even higher energies of 10 MeV in the future, with four times the intensity, they will continue to commission more HIE-ISOLDE accelerating cavities and beamlines in the years to come.

  15. HIE-ISOLDE, the project and the physics opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M.J.G. [ISOLDE, EP Department, CERN, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Riisager, K. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2016-11-15

    The ISOLDE facility at CERN offers the largest selection of ISOL beams today. The overall aim of the HIE-ISOLDE project is to enlarge the physics domains achievable with these beams, in particular by raising the maximum energy of post-accelerated beams to more than 10 MeV/u. An outline of the history of the project is followed by a succinct description of the superconducting linac chosen for acceleration and an overview of the parts of the project aiming to the improvement of the beam quality and intensity. Concrete examples are given of experiments that will be performed at HIE-ISOLDE. (orig.)

  16. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... toxic substances from your blood. These toxins build up and can travel through your body until they reach your brain, causing mental and physical symptoms of HE. Hepatic Encephalopathy often starts slowly, and at first you may not be ...

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Triggers or Can Cause HE to Get Worse? How is HE Diagnosed? Prior to Treatment Who treats HE? Preparing for your Medical ... mild to severe and symptoms vary depending on how bad your liver disease is. It’s important for you and your family to become familiar with the signs of Hepatic Encephalopathy ...

  18. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Caregiver Signs and Symptoms to look for Caregiver Support Caregiver Stories Home › What is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Why Your Liver is ... questions about HE, one step at a time. Home About Us Ways to ... Funding for the HE123 - Diagnosis, Treatment and Support program is provided by Salix Pharmaceuticals

  19. Statistical Analysis of Hie (Cold Sensation and Hiesho (Cold Disorder in Kampo Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuhiro Yoshino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A cold sensation (hie is common in Japanese women and is an important treatment target in Kampo medicine. Physicians diagnose patients as having hiesho (cold disorder when hie disturbs their daily activity. However, differences between hie and hiesho in men and women are not well described. Hie can be of three types depending on body part where patients feel hie. We aimed to clarify the characteristics of patients with hie and hiesho by analyzing data from new patients seen at the Kampo Clinic at Keio University Hospital between 2008 and 2013. We collected information about patients’ subjective symptoms and their severity using visual analogue scales. Of 4,016 new patients, 2,344 complained about hie and 524 of those were diagnosed with hiesho. Hie was most common in legs/feet and combined with hands or lower back, rather than the whole body. Almost 30% of patients with hie felt upper body heat symptoms like hot flushes. Cold sensation was stronger in hiesho than non-hiesho patients. Patients with hie had more complaints. Men with hiesho had the same distribution of hie and had symptoms similar to women. The results of our study may increase awareness of hiesho and help doctors treat hie and other symptoms.

  20. Storage ring at HIE-ISOLDE Technical design report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grieser, M.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Raabe, R.; Blaum, K.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Butler, P. A.; Wenander, F.; Woods, P. J.; Aliotta, M.; Andreyev, A.; Artemyev, A.; Atanasov, D.; Aumann, T.; Balabanski, D.; Barzakh, A.; Batist, L.; Bernardes, A. -P.; Bernhardt, D.; Billowes, J.; Bishop, S.; Borge, M.; Borzov, I.; Boston, A. J.; Brandau, C.; Catford, W.; Catherall, R.; Cederkall, J.; Cullen, D.; Davinson, T.; Dillmann, I.; Dimopoulou, C.; Dracoulis, G.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Egelhof, P.; Estrade, A.; Fischer, D.; Flanagan, K.; Fraile, L.; Fraser, M. A.; Freeman, S. J.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Greenlees, P.; Grisenti, R. E.; Habs, D.; von Hahn, R.; Hagmann, S.; Hausmann, M.; He, J. J.; Heil, M.; Huyse, M.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; Jonson, B.; Joss, D. T.; Kadi, Y.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kay, B. P.; Kiselev, O.; Kluge, H. -J.; Kowalska, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kreim, S.; Kroell, T.; Kurcewicz, J.; Labiche, M.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lestinsky, M.; Lotay, G.; Ma, X. W.; Marta, M.; Meng, J.; Muecher, D.; Mukha, I.; Mueller, A.; Murphy, A. St J.; Neyens, G.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Noertershaeuser, W.; Page, R. D.; Pasini, M.; Petridis, N.; Pietralla, N.; Pfuetzner, M.; Podolyak, Z.; Regan, P.; Reed, M. W.; Reifarth, R.; Reiter, P.; Repnow, R.; Riisager, K.; Rubio, B.; Sanjari, M. S.; Savin, D. W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schippers, S.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Shubina, D.; Siesling, E.; Simon, H.; Simpson, J.; Smith, J.; Sonnabend, K.; Steck, M.; Stora, T.; Stoehlker, T.; Sun, B.; Surzhykov, A.; Suzaki, F.; Tarasov, O.; Trotsenko, S.; Tu, X. L.; Van Duppen, P.; Volpe, C.; Voulot, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wildner, E.; Winckler, N.; Winters, D. F. A.; Wolf, A.; Xu, H. S.; Yakushev, A.; Yamaguchi, T.; Yuan, Y. J.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zuber, K.; Bosch, F.M.

    We propose to install a storage ring at an ISOL-type radioactive beam facility for the first time. Specifically, we intend to setup the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored secondary beams

  1. The Akt/mTOR/p70S6K Pathway Is Involved in the Neuroprotective Effect of Erythropoietin on Hypoxic/Ischemic Brain Injury in a Neonatal Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ju; Koh, Seong-Ho; Song, Ki-Min; Seol, In Joon; Park, Hyun-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathway is a master regulator of cell growth and proliferation in the nervous system. However, the effects of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment on the mTOR signaling pathway have not been elucidated in neonates with hypoxic/ischemic (H/I) brain injury. We investigated the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of EPO by analyzing the mTOR signaling pathway after H/I injury in a neonatal rat model. Seven-day-old rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation and hypoxic exposure (8%) for 90 min (H/I). EPO at a dose of either 3,000 U/kg or a vehicle (V) was administered by intraperitoneal injection 0, 24 and 48 h after H/I. At 72 h after H/I (postnatal day 10), 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, myelin basic protein (MBP) immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis of the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway were performed. Neuromotor behavioral tests included Rotarod challenge and cylinder rearing test 1 performed 3 and 6 weeks after H/I. EPO treatment resulted in significant offsetting of MBP depletion ipsilateral (p = 0.001) and contralateral (p = 0.003) to ligation. Western blot analysis showed that the relative immunoreactivity of phosphorylated (p)-Akt, p-mTOR and p-p70S6K ipsilateral to ligation was significantly decreased in the H/I+V group compared with the sham-operated groups. However, EPO treatment significantly upregulated Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signals ipsilateral to ligation compared to the H/I+V group. The behavior tests showed that EPO attenuates long-term impairment in Rotarod challenge and cylinder test performance from 3-6 weeks. This study demonstrates an underlying mechanism of the mTOR signaling pathway after EPO treatment, which is a potential target for treating H/I-induced brain injury. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Hashimoto's encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montagna, Giacomo; Imperiali, Mauro; Agazzi, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    diseases and the most common feature is the presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb). Patients are usually euthyroid or mildly hypothyroid at presentation. All age groups can be affected. The pathophysiology is still unclear, especially the link between elevated serum TPOAb...... and the encephalopathy. Most reported cases occurred in women and girls. Unspecific symptoms, non-pathognomonic laboratory neurophysiology and neuroimaging features make its diagnosis a real challenge for clinicians.The case of a 16 year old boy, with a clinical picture of HE associated with hypothyroidism...

  3. Minimizing Energy Spread In The REX/HIE-ISOLDE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Yucemoz, Mert

    2017-01-01

    This report tries to minimize the energy spread of the beam at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE Linac using the last RF cavity as a buncher. Beams with very low energy spread are often required by the users of the facility In addition, one of the main reason to have minimum energy spread in longitudinal phase space is that higher beam energy spread translates in to a position spread after interacting with target. This causes an overlap in the position of different particles that makes it difficult to distinguish them. Hence, in order to find the operation settings for minimum energy spread at the end of the REX-HIE-ISOLDE linac and to inspect the ongoing physics, several functions on Matlab were created that runs beam dynamics program called “TRACKV39” that provides some graphs and values as a result for analysis.

  4. Magnetic field mapping for HIE-ISOLDE cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this report the importance of a magnetic field mapping (B-mapping) around the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting cavities is described. In fact the cavities are not always above the HIE-ISOLDE specification, so it is important to understand the reason of their bad performances and improve them. For doing the B-mapping, the supports for three fluxgate sensors are designed and manufactured. The material of the supports is PEEK: a proper thermoplastic for the extreme operation conditions of the cavities. According to simulation of behavior of external magnetic field, an initial configuration of the sensors is proposed for the first measurements, in order to get the extent of Meissner effect around the superconducting cavities.

  5. HIE-ISOLDE CRYO-MODULE Assembly - Superconducting Solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Leclercq, Yann

    2016-01-01

    Assembly of the cryo-module components in SM18 cleanroom. The superconducting solenoid (housed inside its helium vessel) is cleaned, prepared then installed on the supporting frame of the cryo-module and connected to the helium tank, prior to the assembly of the RF cavities on the structure. The completed first 2 cryo-modules installed inside the HIE-ISOLDE-LINAC ready for beam operation is also shown.

  6. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy: early and late magnetic resonance imaging findings in relation to outcome.

    OpenAIRE

    Rutherford, M; Pennock , J.; Schwieso, J; Cowan, F; Dubowitz, L.

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) were studied using serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) up to the age of 2 years. The infants had regular neurological and developmental assessments. An nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) score was devised to quantify the early and late MRI findings and a neurological optimality score was used to quantify abnormal neurological signs at the time of the final examination. The follow up MRI score was compared with the neonatal MRI scor...

  7. Optimizing financial effects of HIE: a multi-party linear programming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Srikrishna; Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Wright, Stephen J; Robinson, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    To describe an analytical framework for quantifying the societal savings and financial consequences of a health information exchange (HIE), and to demonstrate its use in designing pricing policies for sustainable HIEs. We developed a linear programming model to (1) quantify the financial worth of HIE information to each of its participating institutions and (2) evaluate three HIE pricing policies: fixed-rate annual, charge per visit, and charge per look-up. We considered three desired outcomes of HIE-related emergency care (modeled as parameters): preventing unrequired hospitalizations, reducing duplicate tests, and avoiding emergency department (ED) visits. We applied this framework to 4639 ED encounters over a 12-month period in three large EDs in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, using Medicare/Medicaid claims data, public reports of hospital admissions, published payer mix data, and use data from a not-for-profit regional HIE. For this HIE, data accesses produced net financial gains for all providers and payers. Gains, due to HIE, were more significant for providers with more health maintenance organizations patients. Reducing unrequired hospitalizations and avoiding repeat ED visits were responsible for more than 70% of the savings. The results showed that fixed annual subscriptions can sustain this HIE, while ensuring financial gains to all participants. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the results were robust to uncertainties in modeling parameters. Our specific HIE pricing recommendations depend on the unique characteristics of this study population. However, our main contribution is the modeling approach, which is broadly applicable to other populations.

  8. Wernicke Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Patricia F

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the complaints and associated symptoms/consequences of lacking essential nutrients and vitamins in our central and peripheral nervous systems. This has become important as there has been a rise in malnutrition following the increasing incidence of bariatric surgery for obesity. A case report example involving review of the clinical presentation and treatment. A 30-year-old Caucasian woman who had gastric sleeve surgery did not take the recommended capsules as they were too large to swallow. She noted diplopia and oscillopsia 2 months later, which led her to have full orthoptic and neuro-ophthalmic evaluations. After being treated with chewable vitamins with thiamine, she noted a tremendous improvement in her symptoms. Wernicke encephalopathy is a disease that was seen more in the 1940s and 1950s, following war times and mostly in underdeveloped countries. However, with the increasing utilization of bariatric surgery for obesity, neurological offices are seeing more patients with neurological impairments. We recommend inquiring about any obesity surgery in one's history and including Wernicke encephalopathy in possible differential diagnoses in those patients who have a recent onset of strabismus or nystagmus, altered mental status, and/or gait ataxia. © 2015 Board of regents of the University of Wisconsin System, American Orthoptic Journal, Volume 65, 2015, ISSN 0065-955X, E-ISSN 1553-4448.

  9. Transport of cryo module 2 for HIE ISOLDE, Part 1

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Transport of the second Cryo Module for the HIE ISOLDE superconducting LINAC by truck at 0.5km/h. The cryo module contains 5 superconductive RF resonance cavities and one superconducting solenoid. These elements are suspended from the top plate of the vessel and transportation and handling must be done with great care. The CM comes from SM18 where it was assembled in a dedicated cleanroom and is transported to the ISOLDE hall, building 170. This footage has been taken from when it arrives by truck at the CERN Meyrin site till the arrival in the ISOLDE experimental hall.

  10. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  11. XDS-I Gateway Development for HIE Connectivity with Legacy PACS at Gil Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simalango, Mikael Fernandus; Kim, Youngchul; Seo, Young Tae; Choi, Young Hwan; Cho, Yong Kyun

    2013-12-01

    The ability to support healthcare document sharing is imperative in a health information exchange (HIE). Sharing imaging documents or images, however, can be challenging, especially when they are stored in a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) archive that does not support document sharing via standard HIE protocols. This research proposes a standard-compliant imaging gateway that enables connectivity between a legacy PACS and the entire HIE. Investigation of the PACS solutions used at Gil Hospital was conducted. An imaging gateway application was then developed using a Java technology stack. Imaging document sharing capability enabled by the gateway was tested by integrating it into Gil Hospital's order communication system and its HIE infrastructure. The gateway can acquire radiology images from a PACS storage system, provide and register the images to Gil Hospital's HIE for document sharing purposes, and make the images retrievable by a cross-enterprise document sharing document viewer. Development of an imaging gateway that mediates communication between a PACS and an HIE can be considered a viable option when the PACS does not support the standard protocol for cross-enterprise document sharing for imaging. Furthermore, the availability of common HIE standards expedites the development and integration of the imaging gateway with an HIE.

  12. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  13. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  14. Optimizing financial effects of HIE: a multi-party linear programming approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Wright, Stephen J; Robinson, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Objective To describe an analytical framework for quantifying the societal savings and financial consequences of a health information exchange (HIE), and to demonstrate its use in designing pricing policies for sustainable HIEs. Materials and methods We developed a linear programming model to (1) quantify the financial worth of HIE information to each of its participating institutions and (2) evaluate three HIE pricing policies: fixed-rate annual, charge per visit, and charge per look-up. We considered three desired outcomes of HIE-related emergency care (modeled as parameters): preventing unrequired hospitalizations, reducing duplicate tests, and avoiding emergency department (ED) visits. We applied this framework to 4639 ED encounters over a 12-month period in three large EDs in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, using Medicare/Medicaid claims data, public reports of hospital admissions, published payer mix data, and use data from a not-for-profit regional HIE. Results For this HIE, data accesses produced net financial gains for all providers and payers. Gains, due to HIE, were more significant for providers with more health maintenance organizations patients. Reducing unrequired hospitalizations and avoiding repeat ED visits were responsible for more than 70% of the savings. The results showed that fixed annual subscriptions can sustain this HIE, while ensuring financial gains to all participants. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the results were robust to uncertainties in modeling parameters. Discussion Our specific HIE pricing recommendations depend on the unique characteristics of this study population. However, our main contribution is the modeling approach, which is broadly applicable to other populations. PMID:22733978

  15. Predicting outcome in term neonates with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy using simplified MR criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jyoti, Rajeev; O' Neil, Ross [Canberra Hospital, Medical Imaging, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2006-01-01

    MRI is an established investigation in the evaluation of neonates with suspected hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE). However, its role as a predictor of neurodevelopmental outcome remains complex. To establish reproducible simplified MR criteria and evaluate their role in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome in term neonates with HIE. Term neonates with suspected HIE had MRI at 7-10 days of age. MR scans were interpreted according to new simplified criteria by two radiologists blinded to the clinical course and outcome. The new simplified criteria allocated grade 1 to cases with no central and less than 10% peripheral change, grade 2 to those with less than 30% central and/or 10-30% peripheral area change, and grade 3 to those with more than 30% central or peripheral change. MRI changes were compared with clinical neurodevelopmental outcome evaluated prospectively at 1 year of age. Neurodevelopmental outcome was based upon the DQ score (revised Griffith's) and cerebral palsy on neurological assessment. Of 20 subjects, all those showing severe (grade 3) MR changes (35%) died or had poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Subjects with a normal MR scan or with scans showing only mild (grade 1) MR changes (55%) had normal outcomes. One subject showing moderate (grade 2) changes on MRI had a moderate outcome (5%), while another had an atypical pattern of MR changes with a normal outcome (5%). Assessment of full-term neonates with suspected HIE using the simplified MR criteria is highly predictive of neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  16. Failure of the Nemo trial: bumetanide is a promising agent to treat many brain disorders but not newborn seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehezkel eBen-Ari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic bumetanide failed to treat acute seizures due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborn babies and was associated with hearing loss (NEMO trial; 1. On the other hand, clinical and experimental observations suggest that the diuretic might provide novel therapy for many brain disorders including autistic spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, Rett syndrome and Parkinson disease. Here, we discuss the differences between the pathophysiology of severe recurrent seizures in the neonates and neurological and psychiatric disorders stressing the uniqueness of severe seizures in newborn in comparison to other disorders.

  17. Leak Propagation Dynamics for the HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Ady, M; Kersevan, R; Vandoni, G; Ziemianski, D

    2014-01-01

    In order to cope with space limitations of existing infrastructure, the cryomodules of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac feature a common insulation and beam vacuum, imposing the severe cleanliness standard of RF cavities to the whole cryostat. Protection of the linac vacuum against air-inrush from the three experimental stations through the HEBT (High Energy Beam Transport) lines relies on fast valves, triggered by fast cold cathode gauges. To evaluate the leak propagation velocity as a function of leak size and geometry of the lines, a computational and experimental investigation is being carried out at CERN. A 28 m long tube is equipped with cold-cathode gauges. A leak is opened by the effect of a cutting pendulum, equipped with an accelerometer for data acquisition triggering, on a thin aluminium window. The air inrush dynamics is simulated by Finite Elements fluid dynamics in the viscous regime.

  18. TSR: A Storage Ring for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, P A; Blaum, K; Grieser, M; Davinson, T; Woods, P J; Flanagan, K; Freeman, S J; Lazarus, I H; Litvinov, Yu A; Raabe, R; Siesling, E; Wenander, F

    2016-01-01

    It is planned to install the heavy-ion, low-energy ring TSR, currently at the Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, at the HIE-ISOLDE facility in CERN, Geneva. Such a facility will provide a capability for experiments with stored, cooled secondary beams that is rich and varied, spanning from studies of nuclear ground-state properties and reaction studies of astrophysical relevance, to investigations with highly-charged ions and pure isomeric beams. In addition to experiments performed using beams recirculating within the ring, the cooled beams can be extracted and exploited by external spectrometers for high-precision measurements. The capabilities of the ring facility as well as some physics cases will be presented, together with a brief report on the status of the project.

  19. Évaluation du pronostic des nouveau-nés traités par hypothermie thérapeutique

    OpenAIRE

    BEGOU, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    The consecutive hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy causes asphyxia perinatal and present devastating consequences of neo natal death or Cerebral Palsy. Before 2000 the common treatment of new born with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy was poor and was essentially based upon homeostasy maintaining body liquid, electrolytic, respiratory functions and treating convulsion. Today hypothermia therapy is the only neuro protecting treatment efficient to treat hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It is now a ...

  20. HIE-ISOLDE HEBT beam optics studies with MADX

    CERN Document Server

    Parfenova, A; Fraser, M A; Goddard, B; Martino, M; Voulot, D; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2014-01-01

    Beam design and beam optics studies for the HIE-ISOLDE transfer lines [1, 2] have been carried out in MADX [3], and benchmarked against TRACE 3-D results [4, 5, 6]. Magnet field errors and alignment imperfections leading to deviations from design parameters have been treated explicitly, and the sensitivity of the machine lattice to different individual error sources was studied. Errors of different types have been considered and their effects on the machine have been corrected [7]. As a result, the tolerances for the various error contributions have been specified for the different equipment systems. The design choices for the expected magnet field and power supply quality, alignment tolerances, instrument resolution and physical apertures were validated. The baseline layout contains three identical branch lines as presented in Fig. 1. The detailed beam optics study with MADX was carried out for the beam line XT01. The large energy range from 0.3 to 10 MeV/u requested for the experiments sets a number of chal...

  1. An overview of the HIE-ISOLDE Design Study

    CERN Document Server

    Catherall, R; Polato, A; Stora, T; Huyse, M; Fowler, T; Venturi, V; Augustin, M; Montano, J; Van Duppen, P; Babcock, C; Kadi, Y; Vandoni, G; Bernardes, A P; Giles, T; Cimmino, S; Wenander, F J C; Marcone, A Perillo; Hermann, M; Marzari, S; Shornikov, A; Barlow, R

    2013-01-01

    The On-Line Isotope Mass Separator ISOLDE 111 is a facility dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams (RIB) for a great number of different experiments. Over 1000 radioactive nuclides from 70 elements can be produced in thick high-temperature targets via spallation, fission or fragmentation reactions with the PS-Booster pulsed proton-beam. With the arrival of CERN's new linear accelerator Linac 4 {[}2,3], ISOLDE will have the possibility to exploit a factor of 3 increase in proton-beam intensity and a possible proton-beam energy increase from 1.4 GeV to 2 GeV {[}4]. After 20 years of successful ISOLDE operation at the PS-Booster, a major upgrade of the facility, the HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE) project was launched in 2010. It is divided into three parts; a staged upgrade of the REX post-accelerator to increase the beam energy from 3.3 MeV/u to 10 MeV/u using a super-conducting Linac, an evaluation of the critical issues associated with an increase in proton-beam...

  2. [Rota virus encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Yasuyo; Kawashima, Hisashi; Suzuki, Shunsuke

    2011-03-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children, but the pathogenesis and immunity of this disease are not completely understood. Less well recognized is the association of rotavirus-induced central nervous system (CNS) involvement, which has been associated with seizure, encephalopathy and death etc. The term 'rotavirus encephalopathy' has been used for cases of rotavirus gastroenteritis with CNS involvement as evidenced by clinical features of encephalopathy with or without CSF pleocytosis. Here, we review the recent advances regarding its causative agent, prognosis, pathogenesis, and treatment.

  3. Neurotrophin-induced migration and neuronal differentiation of multipotent astrocytic stem cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Douglas-Escobar

    Full Text Available Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE affects 2-3 per 1000 full-term neonates. Up to 75% of newborns with severe HIE die or have severe neurological handicaps. Stem cell therapy offers the potential to replace HIE-damaged cells and enhances the autoregeneration process. Our laboratory implanted Multipotent Astrocytic Stem Cells (MASCs into a neonatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia (HI and demonstrated that MASCs move to areas of injury in the cortex and hippocampus. However, only a small proportion of the implanted MASCs differentiated into neurons. MASCs injected into control pups did not move into the cortex or differentiate into neurons. We do not know the mechanism by which the MASCs moved from the site of injection to the injured cortex. We found neurotrophins present after the hypoxic-ischemic milieu and hypothesized that neurotrophins could enhance the migration and differentiation of MASCs. Using a Boyden chamber device, we demonstrated that neurotrophins potentiate the in vitro migration of stem cells. NGF, GDNF, BDNF and NT-3 increased stem cell migration when compared to a chemokinesis control. Also, MASCs had increased differentiation toward neuronal phenotypes when these neurotrophins were added to MASC culture tissue. Due to this finding, we believed neurotrophins could guide migration and differentiation of stem cell transplants after brain injury.

  4. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... com/home. Accessed Jan. 29, 2016. Concussion: Mayo's multidisciplinary approach. Mayo Clinic Neuroscience Update. 2013;10:2. ... al. Clinical appraisal of chronic traumatic encephalopathy: Current perspectives and future directions. Current Opinion in Neurology. 2011; ...

  5. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. METHODS: Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. RESULTS: Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  6. Early blood glucose profile and neurodevelopmental outcome at two years in neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nadeem, Montasser

    2011-02-04

    Abstract Background To examine the blood glucose profile and the relationship between blood glucose levels and neurodevelopmental outcome in term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Methods Blood glucose values within 72 hours of birth were collected from 52 term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. Hypoglycaemia [< 46.8 mg\\/dL (2.6 mmol\\/L)] and hyperglycaemia [> 150 mg\\/dL (8.3 mmol\\/L)] were correlated to neurodevelopmental outcome at 24 months of age. Results Four fifths of the 468 blood samples were in the normoglycaemic range (392\\/468:83.8%). Of the remaining 76 samples, 51.3% were in the hypoglycaemic range and (48.7%) were hyperglycaemic. A quarter of the hypoglycaemic samples (28.2%:11\\/39) and a third of the hyperglycaemic samples (32.4%:12\\/37) were recorded within the first 30 minutes of life. Mean (SD) blood glucose values did not differ between infants with normal and abnormal outcomes [4.89(2.28) mmol\\/L and 5.02(2.35) mmol\\/L, p value = 0.15] respectively. In term infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy, early hypoglycaemia (between 0-6 hours of life) was associated with adverse outcome at 24 months of age [OR = 5.8, CI = 1.04-32)]. On multivariate analysis to adjust for grade of HIE this association was not statistically significant. Late hypoglycaemia (6-72 hours of life) was not associated with abnormal outcome [OR = 0.22, CI (0.04-1.14)]. The occurrence of hyperglycaemia was not associated with adverse outcome. Conclusion During the first 72 hours of life, blood glucose profile in infants with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy varies widely despite a management protocol. Early hypoglycaemia (0-6 hours of life) was associated with severe HIE, and thereby; adverse outcome.

  7. Current pathogenetic aspects of hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Cichoż-Lach, Halina; Michalak, Agata

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a medical phenomenon that is described as a neuropsychiatric manifestation of chronic or acute liver disease that is characterized by psychomotor, intellectual and cognitive abnormalities with emotional/affective and behavioral disturbances. This article focuses on the underlying mechanisms of the condition and the differences between hepatic encephalopathy and noncirrhotic hyperammonemic encephalopathy. Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious condition that can cause ne...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: ethylmalonic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have been identified worldwide, mostly in Mediterranean and Arab populations. Although ethylmalonic encephalopathy appears to be very ... sulfide (H(2)S) metabolism in ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2013 Jan 1;5(1): ...

  9. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    OpenAIRE

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy.

  10. Acute polyhydramnios after maternal status epilepticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Ryosuke; Aoki, Shigeru; Kasai, Michi; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Maternal status epilepticus can cause fetal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy that in turn results in acute polyhydramnios caused by fetal dysphagia; thus, acute polyhydramnios is a symptom that should lead to a suspicion of fetal dysphagia caused by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:26331018

  11. Isotretinoin-induced encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian; Williams, Matthew; Gibb, William

    2010-11-01

    A 16-year-old male started on isotretinoin 80 mg daily for acne developed persistent headache 3 weeks later, with myoclonus and confusion 10 weeks later. During initial hospital assessment his Glasgow Coma Scale score fell acutely to 8 and he required ventilation. Brain imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis were normal and an electroencephalogram (EEG) showed features of encephalopathy. No cause was found. He was extubated after 24 hours and made a full recovery. This is the first report of a generalized encephalopathy thought likely to be due to isotretinoin.

  12. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schuetz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed for a comprehensive delineation of genetic, functional and phenotypic aspects of GRIN2B encephalopathy and explored potential prospects of personalised medicine. METHODS: Data of 48 individuals with de novo GRIN2B variants were collected from several diagnostic and research c...

  13. Management of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wright

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE, the neuropsychiatric presentation of liver disease, is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Reduction of plasma ammonia remains the central therapeutic strategy, but there is a need for newer novel therapies. We discuss current evidence supporting the use of interventions for both the general management of chronic HE and that necessary for more acute and advanced disease.

  14. Improving Clinical Data Integrity by using Data Adjudication Techniques for Data Received through a Health Information Exchange (HIE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranade-Kharkar, Pallavi; Pollock, Susan E; Mann, Darren K; Thornton, Sidney N

    2014-01-01

    Growing participation in Healthcare Information Exchange (HIE) has created opportunities for the seamless integration of external data into an organization's own EHR and clinical workflows. The process of integrating external data has the potential to detect data integrity issues. Lack of critiquing external data before its incorporation can lead to data unfit for use in the clinical setting. HIE data adjudication, by detecting inconsistencies, physiological and temporal incompatibilities, data completeness and timeliness issues in HIE data, facilitates corrective actions and improves clinical data integrity.

  15. Passive hypothermia (≥35 - <36°C during transport of newborns with hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Sellam

    Full Text Available Hypothermia initiated in the first six hours of life in term infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy reduces the risk of death and severe neurological sequelae. Our study's principal objective was to evaluate transport predictors potentially influencing arrival in NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at a temperature ≥35-<36°C.A multi-centric, prospective cohort study was conducted during 18 months by the three Neonatal Transport Teams and 13 NICUs. Newborns were selected for inclusion according to biological and clinical criteria before transport using passive hypothermia using a target temperature of ≥35-<36°C. Data on 120 of 126 inclusions were available for analysis. Thirty-three percent of the children arrived in NICU with the target temperature of ≥35-<36°C. The mean temperature for the whole group of infants on arrival in NICU was 35.4°C (34.3-36.5. The median age of all infants on arrival in NICU was 3h03min [2h25min-3h56min]. Three infants arrived in NICU with a temperature of <33°C and eleven with a temperature ≥37°C. Adrenaline during resuscitation was associated with a lower mean temperature on arrival in NICU.Our strategy using ≥35-<36°C passive hypothermia combined with short transport times had little effect on temperature after the arrival of Neonatal Transport Team although did reduce numbers of infants arriving in NICU in deep hypothermia. For those infants where hypothermia was discontinued in NICU our strategy facilitated re-warming. Re-adjustment to a lower target temperature to ≥34.5-<35.5°C may reduce the proportion of infants with high/normothermic temperatures.

  16. Lead encephalopathy in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janapareddy Vijaya Bhaskara Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries. We report the varied clinical presentation, diagnostic and management issues in two adult patients with lead encephalopathy. Both patients worked in a battery manufacturing unit. Both patients presented with seizures and one patient also complained of abdominal colic and vomiting. Both were anemic and a lead line was present. Blood lead level in both the patients was greater than 25 µg/dl. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain revealed bilateral symmetric involvement of the thalamus, lentiform nucleus in both patients and also the external capsules, sub-cortical white matter in one patient. All these changes, seen as hyperintensities in T2-weighted images suggested demyelination. They were advised avoidance of further exposure to lead and were treated with anti-epileptics; one patient also received D-penicillamine. They improved well on follow-up. Lead encephalopathy is an uncommon but important manifestation of lead toxicity in adults.

  17. GRIN2B encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Platzer, Konrad; Yuan, Hongjie; Schütz, Hannah

    2017-01-01

    presented with neurodevelopmental disorders and a spectrum of hypotonia, movement disorder, cortical visual impairment, cerebral volume loss and epilepsy. Six patients presented with a consistent malformation of cortical development (MCD) intermediate between tubulinopathies and polymicrogyria. Missense...... treatment response in the respective patients still remains to be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to previously known features of intellectual disability, epilepsy and autism, we found evidence that GRIN2B encephalopathy is also frequently associated with movement disorder, cortical visual impairment...

  18. Upgrade of the radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher for the HIE-ISOLDE project

    CERN Document Server

    Babcock, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The upgrade to the ISOLDE facility, HIE-ISOLDE, will include an upgrade to the RFQCB (radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher), the focus of which will be fixing the problems of alignment with the current machine, improving the integrity of the vacuum system, stabilizing the internal gas pressure, and the changes associated with a new position. The beam passage inside the RFQCB has been simulated with an independent code to highlight the importance of the internal gas pressure, to motivate design changes in the new RFQCB and to explain ways to improve the performance of the current machine. The suspected misalignment of ISCOOL has been quantified, and, using a simulation of ions passing through the external injection electrodes, the effect of the misalignment on machine acceptance has been detailed. Plans for the future RFQCB test stand and HIE-ISOLDE installation have been outlined. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hashimoto encephalopathy: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, J Y; Xu, B; Lopes, J; Blamoun, J; Li, L

    2017-03-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) presents as an encephalopathy without central nervous system infection or tumor. HE is associated with autoimmune thyroiditis and is thus considered to be an autoimmune disorder. The prevalence of HE is low, but death and status epilepticus have been reported. HE manifests with a wide range of symptoms that include behavioral changes and confusion. Elevated thyroid antibodies are present in the majority of cases and are required for the diagnosis of HE. Normal brain MRI findings are found in the majority of patients diagnosed with HE. The most consistent CSF abnormality noted in HE patients is the presence of elevated protein. Most HE patients respond well to steroid therapy. Clinical improvements are also observed with IV immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. In conclusion, it is now generally accepted that the diagnosis of HE must include encephalopathy characterized by cognitive impairment associated with psychiatric features, such as hallucinations, delusions, and paranoia. Autoimmune encephalitis and prion disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis due to the similarity of the clinical features of these conditions to those of HE. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Radiation protection, radiation safety and radiation shielding assessment of HIE-ISOLDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanets, Y; Bernardes, A P; Dorsival, A; Gonçalves, I F; Kadi, Y; di Maria, S; Vaz, P; Vlachoudis, V; Vollaire, J

    2013-07-01

    The high intensity and energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is an upgrade to the existing ISOLDE facility at CERN. The foreseen increase in the nominal intensity and the energy of the primary proton beam of the existing ISOLDE facility aims at increasing the intensity of the produced radioactive ion beams (RIBs). The currently existing ISOLDE facility uses the proton beam from the proton-synchrotron booster with an energy of 1.4 GeV and an intensity up to 2 μA. After upgrade (final stage), the HIE-ISOLDE facility is supposed to run at an energy up to 2 GeV and an intensity up to 4 μA. The foreseen upgrade imposes constrains, from the radiation protection and the radiation safety point of view, to the existing experimental and supply areas. Taking into account the upgraded energy and intensity of the primary proton beam, a new assessment of the radiation protection and radiation safety of the HIE-ISOLDE facility is necessary. Special attention must be devoted to the shielding assessment of the beam dumps and of the experimental areas. In this work the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo particle transport simulation program FLUKA was used to perform the computation of the ambient dose equivalent rate distribution and of the particle fluxes in the projected HIE-ISOLDE facility (taking into account the upgrade nominal primary proton beam energy and intensity) and the shielding assessment of the facility, with the aim of identifying in the existing facility (ISOLDE) the critical areas and locations where new or reinforced shielding may be necessary. The consequences of the upgraded proton beam parameters on the operational radiation protection of the facility were studied.

  1. Neonatal neurological disorders involving the brainstem: neurosonographic approaches through the squamous suture and the foramen magnum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yi-Fang [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Emergency Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan); Chen, Cheng-Yu [National Defense Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Taipei (Taiwan); Lin, Yuh-Jey [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); Chang, Ying-Chao [Kaohsiung Chang Gung Children Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); Huang, Chao-Ching [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Tainan (Taiwan); National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Department of Institute of Molecular Medicine, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2005-09-01

    Brainstem damage which often indicates a critical condition is usually underestimated by trans-anterior-fontanel neurosonography (NS) owing to the far-field limitations. Instead, NS alternately scanning through the squamous suture of the temporal bones and the foramen magnum could provide a better visualization of the brainstem structures. The NS characteristics of brainstem lesions caused by various neonatal neurological disorders, such as hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), metabolic encephalopathy, birth trauma and bacterial meningoencephalitis, can be depicted at the acute stage. An echogenic change in the midbrain was found in patients with HIE or metabolic encephalopathy. In addition to the echogenic change, bilateral transtentorial temporal lobe herniation distorting the contour of the midbrain was observed in a patient with group B streptococcus meningoencephalitis, whereas echogenic changes at the level of the pons and/or the medulla oblongata, mainly localized in the dorsal part, could be observed in newborns with severe HIE, maple syrup urine disease or birth trauma. In this pictorial assay, we demonstrate the feasibility of NS imaging in evaluating the entire brainstem structure of critically ill neonates in the near field and illustrate the characteristic features of brainstem involvement in various neonatal neurological disorders along with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging correlation. (orig.)

  2. DNM1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Spiczak, Sarah; Helbig, Katherine L; Shinde, Deepali N

    2017-01-01

    evolving into Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Two patients had profound global developmental delay without seizures. In addition, we describe a single patient with normal development before the onset of a catastrophic epilepsy, consistent with febrile infection-related epilepsy syndrome at 4 years. All mutations...... cluster within the GTPase or middle domains, and structural modeling and existing functional data suggest a dominant-negative effect on DMN1 function. CONCLUSIONS: The phenotypic spectrum of DNM1-related encephalopathy is relatively homogeneous, in contrast to many other genetic epilepsies. Up to one...

  3. EEG background features that predict outcome in term neonates with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy: A structured review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awal, Md Abdul; Lai, Melissa M; Azemi, Ghasem; Boashash, Boualem; Colditz, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in the term infant. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a useful tool in the assessment of newborns with HIE. This systematic review of published literature identifies those background features of EEG in term neonates with HIE that best predict neurodevelopmental outcome. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed, EMBASE and CINAHL databases from January 1960 to April 2014. Studies included in the review described recorded EEG background features, neurodevelopmental outcomes at a minimum age of 12 months and were published in English. Pooled sensitivities and specificities of EEG background features were calculated and meta-analyses were performed for each background feature. Of the 860 articles generated by the initial search strategy, 52 studies were identified as potentially relevant. Twenty-one studies were excluded as they did not distinguish between different abnormal background features, leaving 31 studies from which data were extracted for the meta-analysis. The most promising neonatal EEG features are: burst suppression (sensitivity 0.87 [95% CI (0.78-0.92)]; specificity 0.82 [95% CI (0.72-0.88)]), low voltage (sensitivity 0.92 [95% CI (0.72-0.97)]; specificity 0.99 [95% CI (0.88-1.0)]), and flat trace (sensitivity 0.78 [95% CI (0.58-0.91)]; specificity 0.99 [95% CI (0.88-1.0)]). Burst suppression, low voltage and flat trace in the EEG of term neonates with HIE most accurately predict long term neurodevelopmental outcome. This structured review and meta-analysis provides quality evidence of the background EEG features that best predict neurodevelopmental outcome. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemann, S; Glockshuber, R

    1998-09-18

    Scrapie, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), and the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) belong to a group of lethal neurodegenerative disorders in mammals. Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are characterized by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform (PrPSc) of the host-encoded cellular prion protein (PrPC) in the brain. The infectious agent, the 'prion,' is believed to be devoid of informational nucleic acid and to consist largely, if not entirely, of PrPSc. The PrP isoforms contain identical amino acid sequences yet differ in their overall secondary structure with the PrPSc isoform possessing a higher beta-sheet and lower alpha-helix content than PrPC. Elucidation of the three-dimensional structure of PrPC has provided important clues on the molecular basis of inherited human TSEs and on the species barrier phenomenon of TSEs. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism of the conformational rearrangement of PrPC into PrPSc is still unknown, mainly due to the lack of detailed structural information on PrPSc. Within the framework of the 'protein only' hypothesis, two plausible models for the self-replication of prions have been suggested, the conformational model and the nucleation-dependent polymerization model.

  5. Transport of cryo module 2 for HIE ISOLDE, Part 1 HD

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Transport of the second Cryo Module for the HIE ISOLDE superconducting LINAC by truck at 0.5km/h. The cryo module contains 5 superconductive RF resonance cavities and one superconducting solenoid. These elements are suspended from the top plate of the vessel and transportation and handling must be done with great care. The CM comes from SM18 where it was assembled in a dedicated cleanroom and is transported to the ISOLDE hall, building 170. This footage has been taken from when it arrives by truck at the CERN Meyrin site till the arrival in the ISOLDE experimental hall.

  6. Magnetic Interference Estimation on HIE-ISOLDE’s Beam Transfer Lines Diagnostic Box Stepper Motors’ Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Farantatos, P

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the HIE-ISOLDE project is to expand the physics programme compared to that of REX-ISOLDE. In total, 13 Diagnostic Boxes shall be installed in close proximity to the horizontal/vertical corrector magnets (steerers).The steerers’ shall have a maximum integrated magnetic field of 9.1 Tmm and their stray magnetic field could potentially cause perturbations to the nominal operation of the Diagnostic Boxes’ Stepper Motors due to magnetic interference. In the present report, the maximum stray magnetic field interference numerical calculation method in the volume occupied by the stepper motors is presented, followed by estimation results.

  7. [Prevention of hepatic encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Rosa M; Sala, Marga; Planas, Ramon

    2014-06-06

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a frequent complication of cirrhosis which, in addition to producing a great social impact, deteriorates the quality of life of patients and is considered a sign of advanced liver disease and therefore a clinical indication for liver transplant evaluation. Patients who have had episodes of HE have a high risk of recurrence. Thus, after the HE episode resolves, it is recommended: control and prevention of precipitating factors (gastrointestinal bleeding, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, use of diuretics with caution, avoid nervous system depressant medications), continued administration of non-absorbable disaccharides such as lactulose or lactitol, few or non-absorbable antibiotics such as rifaximin and assess the need for a liver transplant as the presence of a HE episode carries a poor prognosis in cirrhosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marlene; Schmutzhard, Erich

    2017-08-01

    The posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurological disorder of (sub)acute onset characterized by varied neurological symptoms, which may include headache, impaired visual acuity or visual field deficits, disorders of consciousness, confusion, seizures, and focal neurological deficits. In a majority of patients the clinical presentation includes elevated arterial blood pressure up to hypertensive emergencies. Neuroimaging, in particular magnetic resonance imaging, frequently shows a distinctive parieto-occipital pattern with a symmetric distribution of changes reflecting vasogenic edema. PRES frequently develops in the context of cytotoxic medication, (pre)eclampsia, sepsis, renal disease or autoimmune disorders. The treatment is symptomatic and is determined by the underlying condition. The overall prognosis is favorable, since clinical symptoms as well as imaging lesions are reversible in most patients. However, neurological sequelae including long-term epilepsy may persist in individual cases.

  9. Diabetic encephalopathy: a cerebrovascular disorder?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manschot, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Animal study: The aim was to investigate the role of vascular disturbances in the development of experimental diabetic encephalopathy. We describe the effects of treatment with the Angiotensin Converting Enzyme(ACE)-inhibitor enalapril (treatment aimed at the

  10. Dopamine agents for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junker, Anders Ellekær; Als-Nielsen, Bodil; Gluud, Christian

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hepatic encephalopathy may present with extrapyramidal symptoms and changes in basal ganglia. These changes are similar to those seen in patients with Parkinson's disease. Dopamine agents (such as bromocriptine and levodopa, used for patients with Parkinson's disease) have...... therefore been assessed as a potential treatment for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of dopamine agents versus placebo or no intervention for patients with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: Trials were identified through the Cochrane...... of the trials followed participants after the end of treatment. Only one trial reported adequate bias control; the remaining four trials were considered to have high risk of bias. Random-effects model meta-analyses showed that dopamine agents had no beneficial or detrimental effect on hepatic encephalopathy...

  11. Commissioning of the helium cryogenic system for the HIE- ISOLDE accelerator upgrade at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Leclercq, Y; Pirotte, O; Williams, L

    2015-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN. The most significant improvement will come from replacing the existing REX accelerating structure by a superconducting linear accelerator (SC linac) composed ultimately of six cryo-modules installed in series, each containing superconducting RF cavities and solenoids operated at 4.5 K. In order to provide the cooling capacity at all temperature levels between 300 K and 4.5 K for the six cryo-modules, an existing helium refrigerator, manufactured in 1986 and previously used to cool the ALEPH magnet during LEP operation from 1989 to 2000, has been refurbished, reinstalled and recommissioned in a dedicated building located next to the HIE-ISOLDE experimental hall. This helium refrigerator has been connected to a new cryogenic distribution line, consisting of a 30-meter long vacuum-insulated transfer line, a 2000-liter storage dewar and six interconnecting valve boxes, one for eac...

  12. High Performance Charge Breeder for HIE-ISOLDE and TSR@ISOLDE Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert C.; Pikin, Alexander; Wenander, Fredrik J.C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development of the HEC2 (High Energy Compression and Current) charge breeder, a possible high performance successor to REXEBIS at ISOLDE. The new breeder would match the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE linac upgrade and make full use of the possible installation of a storage ring at ISOLDE (the TSR@ISOLDE initiative [1]). Dictated by ion beam acceptance and capacity requirements, the breeder features a 2-3.5 A electron beam. In many cases very high charge states, including bare ions up to Z=70 and Li/Na-like up to Z=92 could be requested for experiments in the storage ring, therefore, electron beam energies up to 150 keV are required. The electron-beam current density needed for producing ions with such high charge states at an injection rate into TSR of 0.5-1 Hz is between 10 and 20 kA/cm2, which agrees with the current density needed to produce A/q<4.5 ions for the HIE-ISOLDE linac with a maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz. The first operation of a prototype electron gun with a pulsed elect...

  13. Coulomb excitation of doubly magic $^{132}$Sn with MINIBALL at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to study the vibrational first 2$^{+}$ and 3$^{-}$ states of the doubly magic nucleus $^{132}$ Sn via Coulomb excitation using the HIE-ISOLDE facility coupled with the highly efficient MINIBALL array. The intense $^{132}$Sn beam at ISOLDE, the high beam energy of HIE-ISOLDE, the high energy resolution and good efficiency of the MINIBALL provide a unique combination and favourable advantages to master this demanding measurement. Reliable B(E2;0$^{+}\\rightarrow$ 2$^{+}$) values for neutron deficient $^{106,108,110}$Sn were obtained with the MINIBALL at REX-ISOLDE. These measurements can be extended up to and beyond the shell closure at the neutron-rich side with $^{132}$Sn. The results on excited collective states in $^{132}$Sn will provide crucial information on 2p-2h cross shell configurations which are expected to be dominated by a strong proton contribution. Predictions are made within various large scale shell model calculations and new mean field calculations within the framework of different a...

  14. IDENTIFIKASI DAN EVALUASI AKSES PUBLIK DAN OPEN SPACE DI KAWASAN SENG HIE PONTIANAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontor Jumaylinda Br. Gultom

    2016-09-01

    Seng Hie area has a unique character that gives the image of the city of Pontianak. This area has the potential to be developed. This area already has the appeal of the inherent function, namely trade. This makes this area very easily become a magnet to invite more people to visit. REFERENCES Breen, Ann dan Dick Rigby. (1994. Waterfront, Cities Reclaim Their Edge. Mc.Graw Hill. New York Breen, Ann dan Dick Rigby. (1996. The New Waterfront: A Worldwide Urban Success Story. Mc.Graw Hill. New York Department of City Planning, Waterfront Urban Design Technical Advisory Committee. (1997. The Port of San Francisco Waterfront Design & Access: An Element of the Waterfront Land Use Plan, Port of San Francisco. San Francisco. Garnham, Harry Launce. (1985 Maintaining the Spirit of Place: a Process for the preservation of Town Character. PDA Publisher Corp. Madison Garnham. H. L. (1976. Maintaining the Spirit of Place: A Guidebook for Citizen/professional Participation in the Preservation and Enhancement of Small Texas Towns.  A & M University Printing. Texas. Jumaylinda. (2007. Kualitas Visual Fasad Bangunan Komersil Seng Hie. Thesis. UGM. Yogyakarta Maryono, Agus; Parikesit, Danang. (2003. Transportasi Sungai Mulai Ditinggalkan. Kompas, 01 Mei 2003 Wrenn, Douglas M, dkk. (1983. Urban Waterfront Development. Urban Land Institute. Michigan

  15. The ISOLDE facility and the HIE-HISOLDE project: Recent highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borge, M. J. G. [ISOLDE-PH, CERN, 1211 Geneva-23, Switzerland and Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 113bis, 28006-Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-23

    The ISOLDE facility at CERN has as objective the production, study and research of nuclei far from stability. The facility provides low energy radioactive beams and post-accelerated beams. In the last 45 years the ISOLDE facility has gathered unique expertise in research with radioactive beams. Over 700 isotopes of more than 70 elements have been used in a wide range of research domains, including cutting edge studies in nuclear structure, atomic physics, nuclear astrophysics, and fundamental interactions. These nuclear probes are also used to do frontier research in solid state and life sciences. There is an on-going upgrade of the facility, the HIE-ISOLDE project, which aims to improve the ISOLDE capabilities in a wide front, from an energy increase of the post-accelerated beam to improvements in beam quality and beam purity. The first phase of HIE-ISOLDE will start for physics in the autumn of 2015 with an upgrade of energy for all post-accelerated ISOLDE beams up to 5.5 MeV/u. In this contribution the most recent highlights of the facility are presented.

  16. Plasma metabolite score correlates with Hypoxia time in a newly born piglet model for asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kuligowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE secondary to perinatal asphyxia is a leading cause of mortality and acquired long-term neurologic co-morbidities in the neonate. The most successful intervention for the treatment of moderate to severe HIE is moderate whole body hypothermia initiated within 6 h from birth. The objective and prompt identification of infants who are at risk of developing moderate to severe HIE in the critical first hours still remains a challenge. This work proposes a metabolite score calculated based on the relative intensities of three metabolites (choline, 6,8-dihydroxypurine and hypoxanthine that showed maximum correlation with hypoxia time in a consolidated piglet model for neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. The metabolite score's performance as a biomarker for perinatal hypoxia and its usefulness for clinical grading and decision making have been assessed and compared to the performance of lactate which is currently considered the gold standard. For plasma samples withdrawn before and directly after a hypoxic insult, the metabolite score performed similar to lactate. However, it provided an enhanced predictive capacity at 2 h after resuscitation. The present study evidences the usefulness of the metabolite score for improving the early assessment of the severity of the hypoxic insult based on serial determinations in a minimally invasive biofluid. The applicability of the metabolite score for clinical diagnosis and patient stratification for hypothermia treatment has to be confirmed in multicenter trials involving newborns suffering from HIE.

  17. Hepatic dysfunction in asphyxiated neonates: prospective case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mukesh; Sharma, Deepak; Dabi, Dhanraj; Lamba, Mamta; Pandita, Aakash; Shastri, Sweta

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the occurrence of hypoxic hepatitis in full-term neonates after perinatal asphyxia and to correlate between the rise in enzymes and severity of asphyxia with Apgar score and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) grading of the neonates. This prospective case-controlled study was conducted in a tertiary-level hospital in India for a period of 12 months. The study group A comprised 70 newborns suffering from birth asphyxia, while 30 healthy neonates were included in group B (control). All biochemical parameters of liver function, ie, serum alanine transferase (ALT), aspartate transferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total protein, serum albumin, bilirubin (total and direct), and international normalized ratio (INR), were measured on postnatal days 1, 3, and 10 in both study and control groups. In group A, 22.8% newborns had severe (Apgar score 0-3), 47.1% had moderate (Apgar score 4-5), and 30% had mild (Apgar score 6-7) birth asphyxia at five minutes. In all, 14.28% babies were in HIE stage I, 25.73% babies were in HIE stage II, and 11.42% babies were in HIE stage III. The rest of the newborns, 48.57%, were normal. The prevalence of liver function impairment was seen in 42.85% of asphyxiated neonates. On day 1, ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, PT, and INR were significantly higher, and total protein and serum albumin were significantly lower in group A than in group B. However, ALT and AST correlated well with increasing severity of HIE score. On day 3, there was a rising trend observed in the concentration of mean LDH as HIE staging of neonates progressed from stage 0 to stage III, and among various HIE stages, the difference in LDH was statistically significant. We concluded that AST, ALT at 24 hours, and LDH at 72 hours of animation can be a utilitarian diagnostic tool to differentiate asphyxiated neonates from non-asphyxiated neonates and to discover the severity of perinatal asphyxia because of easy

  18. [Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M; Schmutzhard, E

    2016-06-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome refers to a neurological disorder characterized by headache, disorders of consciousness, visual disturbances, epileptic seizures, and subcortical vasogenic edema. About two thirds of patients develop neurological symptoms, which are associated with blood pressure fluctuations. One hypothesis is that hypertensive episodes cause autoregulatory failure, and values above the upper limit of cerebral autoregulation result in a breakthrough followed by hyperperfusion and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. In another hypothesis, endothelial dysfunction triggered by numerous factors including preeclampsia, immunosuppressive agents, chemotherapeutics, sepsis, or autoimmune disorders is thought to be the key pathomechanism. Endo- or exogenic toxic agents including pharmacological substances, cytokines, or bacterial toxins are supposed to trigger endothelial activation and dysfunction resulting in the release of vasoconstrictors, pro-inflammatory mediators, and vascular leakage. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical and neuroimaging findings that frequently show a bilateral, symmetric, and parietooccipital pattern. However, the diagnosis can often only be confirmed during the course of disease after excluding important differential diagnoses. Currently, there is no specific treatment available. Lowering of arterial blood pressure and eliminating the underlying cause usually leads to an improvement of clinical and neuroradiological findings. Admission to a critical care unit is required in about 40 % of patients due to complicating conditions including status epilepticus, cerebral vasoconstriction, ischemia, or intracerebral hemorrhage. Prognosis is favorable; in the majority of patients neurological deficits and imaging findings resolve completely.

  19. MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Shi Kyung; Han, Chun Hwan; Rho, Eun Jin [Kangnam General Hospital Public Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy is a rare syndrom characterized by developmental delay, acrocyanosis, petechiae, chronic diarrhea, and ethylmalonic, lactic, and methylsuccinic aciduria. We report the MRI finding of ethylmalonic encephalopathy including previously unreported intracranial hematoma.

  20. Case report of a young child with disseminated histoplasmosis and review of hyper immunoglobulin e syndrome (HIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Wilson S

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Type 1 hyper IgE syndrome (HIES, also known as Job's Syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder due to defects in STAT3 signaling and Th17 differentiation. Symptoms may present during infancy but diagnosis is often made in childhood or later. HIES is characterized by immunologic and non-immunologic findings such as recurrent sinopulmonary infections, recurrent skin infections, multiple fractures, atopic dermatitis and characteristic facies. These manifestations are accompanied by elevated IgE levels and reduced IL-17 producing CD3+CD4+ T cells. Diagnosis in young children can be challenging as symptoms accumulate over time along with confounding clinical dilemmas. A NIH clinical HIES scoring system was developed in 1999, and a more recent scoring system with fewer but more pathogonomonic clinical findings was reported in 2010. These scoring systems can be used as tools to help in grading the likelihood of HIES diagnosis. We report a young child ultimately presenting with disseminated histoplasmosis and a novel STAT3 variant in the SH2 domain.

  1. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMorrow, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only. PMID:29026534

  2. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Gluud, L L; Gluud, C

    2004-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be associated with accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists may have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  3. Pressure relief protection in cryostats: CERN’s experience on LHC and HIE Isolde

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Cryostats contain large cold surfaces, cryogenic fluids, and sometimes large stored energy (e.g. energized magnets), with the potential risk of sudden liberation of energy through thermodynamic transformations of the fluids, which can be uncontrolled and lead to a dangerous increase of pressure inside the cryostat envelopes. The consequence, in the case of a rupture of the envelopes, may be serious for personnel (injuries from deflagration, burns, and oxygen deficiency hazard) as well as for the equipment. Performing a thorough risk analysis is an essential step to identify and understand risk hazards that may cause a pressure increase and in order to assess consequences, define mitigation actions, and design adequate safety relief devices to limit pressure accordingly. Lessons learnt from real cases are essential for improving safety awareness for future projects: LHC and HIE Isolde are amongst these examples.

  4. DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE POWER COUPLER LINE FOR HIE-ISOLDE HIGH BETA CAVITY

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A

    2011-01-01

    The design parameters of the HIE-ISOLDE high beta superconducting (SC) cavity foresee to have a power dissipated on the cavity wall of 7W with a Q0=6.6·108 for an accelerating field of 6MV/m. The cavity will be fed via a moveable antenna that, in operating condition, is designed to reach a maximum overcoupled condition β=130 in order to get a bandwidth at the resonant frequency of ≈20Hz. A wide dynamic range (Qext ranging from 104 to 109) is requested in order to allow tests and conditioning both at room temperature and in superconducting operating mode. A “dust free” sliding mechanism has been integrated in the mechanical concept which will be presented below together the full e-m analysis of the coupler line.

  5. HIE-ISOLDE cavity production – results from thermal modelling of the cavity during sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Kupiainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project is in the phase of cavity production and optimization. Cavities are made of copper and sputtered niobium. We build an ANSYS model to model thermal distributions and heat flows in the cavity structure. We limited the analysis to handle the cavity during sputtering and investigated the effect of different coating power. The aim was to check how results compare to experimental data and vary boundary conditions to improve the model. With two boundary conditions (fixed room and cavity top temperatures), we observed a power loss due to fixed temperature, as expected. The temperature gradient between the bottom and top cavity did not reach the values of the experimental data. With one boundary condition (fixed temperature on sputtering chamber structure), the expected linear proportionality was observed clearly between the temperatures of the cavity and the power. The temperature gradients were also observed to increase with power. We observed an offset in the data compared to experimental dat...

  6. Preliminary Beam Tests at REX for an Automatic Cavity Phasing Routine at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Broere, J; Lanaia, D; Valuch, D

    2013-01-01

    The HIE upgrade at ISOLDE will use 32 independently phased superconducting quarterwave cavities, which will impose new demands on the operation and set-up of the linac. The large range of different radioactive species and the broad experimental programme means that the same beam species and energy are rarely studied twice, and the accelerator must be re-tuned for each experimental run. In order to expedite machine set-up it is foreseen to calculate and set automatically the cavity phases when the operator inputs the desired beam energy and A/q of the beam species. In this note we explore our understanding of the REX rf system and test our beam dynamics calculations with two independently phased 7-gap split-ring cavities.

  7. HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups tested with ion beams at TRIUMF

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D

    2014-01-01

    The future HIE-ISOLDE Faraday cups for both the intercryomodule regions and the HEBTs have been tested using 34S+7, 4He+, 23Na+6 and 20Ne+5 beams from the ISAC-II accelerator at TRIUMF. Their performance has been characterized together with the Faraday cups from REX-ISOLDE and those from ISAC-II. The measurements were done at E/A = 1.5, 2.85 and 5.5 MeV/u, with beam intensities in the range of 100 pA to 4 nA. The performance of these Faraday cups has been compared under the same beam conditions for different bias voltages up to -350 V. Within the experimental uncertainties, most of them coming from fluctuations in beam intensity, all devices showed similar results. Biasing the Faraday cup repeller ring to voltages of at least -60 V, the escape of secondary electrons was suppressed.

  8. Steady-state thermal studies on the HIE-ISOLDE high-$\\beta$ superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Alberty, L

    2013-01-01

    The activity of the High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project aims to construct a superconducting linac based on 101.28 MHz niobium sputtered Quarter Wave Resonators (QWRs). For this, several prototypes of superconducting cavities are currently being developed at CERN using OFE copper as substrate material for Niobium film coating. Two main concepts are currently under development: one consists of rolled, machined, deepdrawed and welded parts; the other is based on machined parts which are put together using electron beam welding. This study presents the results of simulations carried out in order to assess the thermal performance of different designs. The interest for such analysis was raised up before launching the manufacture of the first industrial series, since both rolled and bulk approaches seemed possible.

  9. Thin Film Coating Optimization For HIE-ISOLDE SRF Cavities: Coating Parameters Study and Film Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Sublet, A; Calatroni, S; Costa Pinto, P; Jecklin, N; Prunet, S; Sapountzis, A; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Vollenberg, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN requires the production of 32 superconducting Quarter Wave Resonators (QWRs) in order to increase the energy of the beam up to 10 MeV/u. The cavities, of complex cylindrical geometry (0.3m diameter and 0.8m height), are made of copper and are coated with a thin superconducting layer of niobium. In the present phase of the project the aim is to obtain a niobium film, using the DC bias diode sputtering technique, providing adequate high quality factor of the cavities and to ensure reproducibility for the future series production. After an overview of the explored coating parameters (hardware and process), the resulting film characteristics, thickness profile along the cavity, structure and morphology and Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) of the Nb film will be shown. The effect of the sputtering gas process pressure and configuration of the coating setup will be highlighted.

  10. The Tuning System for the HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P.; Arnaudon, L.; Artoos, K.; Calatroni, S.; Capatina, O.; D'Elia, A.; Kadi, Y.; Mondino, I.; Renaglia, T.; Valuch, D.; Venturini Delsolaro, W.

    2014-01-01

    A new linac using superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWR) is under construction at CERN in the framework of the HIE-ISOLDE project. The QWRs are made of niobium sputtered on a bulk copper substrate. The working frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and they will provide 6 MV/m accelerating gradient on the beam axis with a total maximum power dissipation of 10 W on cavity walls. A tuning system is required in order to both minimize the forward power variation in beam operation and to compensate the unavoidable uncertainties in the frequency shift during the cool-down process. The tuning system has to fulfil a complex combination of RF, structural and thermal requirements. The paper presents the functional specifications and details the tuning system RF and mechanical design and simulations. The results of the tests performed on a prototype system are discussed and the industrialization strategy is presented in view of final production.

  11. Metronidazole-Induced Encephalopathy in Chronic Diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Ashwathy; Trivedi, Trupti H; Moulick, Nivedita D; Joshi, Anagha R

    2015-06-01

    Metronidazole-induced encephalopathy (MIE) is a rare cause of drug-induced toxic encephalopathy. We report the clinical and neuroimaging findings of a patient with chronic diarrhoea who developed metronidazole-induced encephalopathy. After the drug was discontinued there was complete reversal of the condition.

  12. Investigation of metabolic encephalopathy | van der Watt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Encephalopathy may be a presenting sign in a wide range of medical conditions. This review focuses only on the diagnosis and initial management of those inherited metabolic diseases (IMDs) prevalent in South Africa that may present with encephalopathy in childhood. Metabolic encephalopathy is a medical emergency, ...

  13. High performance charge breeder for HIE-ISOLDE and TSR@ISOLDE applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shornikov, Andrey, E-mail: andrey.shornikov@cern.ch; Mertzig, Robert C.; Wenander, Fredrik J. C. [CERN, Geneva 23, CH-1211 (Switzerland); Beebe, Edward N.; Pikin, Alexander [Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    We report on the development of the HEC{sup 2} (High Energy Compression and Current) charge breeder, a possible high performance successor to REXEBIS at ISOLDE. The new breeder would match the performance of the HIE-ISOLDE linac upgrade and make full use of the possible installation of a storage ring at ISOLDE (the TSR@ISOLDE initiative [1]). Dictated by ion beam acceptance and capacity requirements, the breeder features a 2–3.5 A electron beam. In many cases very high charge states, including bare ions up to Z=70 and Li/Na-like up to Z=92 could be requested for experiments in the storage ring, therefore, electron beam energies up to 150 keV are required. The electron-beam current density needed for producing ions with such high charge states at an injection rate into TSR of 0.5–1 Hz is between 10 and 20 kA/cm{sup 2}, which agrees with the current density needed to produce A/q<4.5 ions for the HIE-ISOLDE linac with a maximum repetition rate of 100 Hz. The first operation of a prototype electron gun with a pulsed electron beam of 1.5 A and 30 keV was demonstrated in a joint experiment with BNL [2]. In addition, we report on further development aiming to achieve CW operation of an electron beam having a geometrical transverse ion-acceptance matching the injection of 1{sup +} ions (11.5 μm), and an emittance/energy spread of the extracted ion beam matching the downstream mass separator and RFQ (0.08 μm normalized / ± 1%)

  14. Design upgrade of the ISOLDE target unit for HIE-ISOLDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montaño, J., E-mail: Jacobo.Montano@cern.ch [CERN, ISOLDE, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Giles, T. [CERN, ISOLDE, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gottberg, A. [CERN, ISOLDE, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Requirements for a new target-source system for the radioactive facility HIE-ISOLDE. • For the upgraded facility a higher radiation field will be present. • The new design has to take into account the radiation field of the upgraded facility. -- Abstract: The High Intensity and Energy HIE-ISOLDE project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities with the objective of increasing the energy and the intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB) [1]. In order to accommodate the future increase of primary beam intensity delivered by the new LINAC4 H{sup −} driver to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) [2] and from this to ISOLDE, a major study is being carried out to upgrade the existing designs of the ISOLDE target and its supporting infrastructure. In particular, the extraction optics plays an important role in the initial beam transport and the quality of the beam supplied to the mass separators. Important factors include the emittance of the beam and the beam profile to avoid beam losses. A new double electrode extraction system has been developed for simplifying and improving the interface between the target unit and the frontend (target coupling table). Numerical and experimental studies have been performed in order to define the new extraction geometry, and the coupling table has been adapted to keep the compatibility. An alternative heating system is under study. An electron bombardment heating system is being developed as an option for avoiding the employment of big cross section cables. The results of these studies and the mechanical models developed are presented and discussed.

  15. Inflammation in Epileptic Encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandra, Oleksii; Moshé, Solomon L; Galanopoulou, Aristea S

    2017-01-01

    West syndrome (WS) is an infantile epileptic encephalopathy that manifests with infantile spasms (IS), hypsarrhythmia (in ~60% of infants), and poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. The etiologies of WS can be structural-metabolic pathologies (~60%), genetic (12%-15%), or of unknown origin. The current treatment options include hormonal treatment (adrenocorticotropic hormone and high-dose steroids) and the GABA aminotransferase inhibitor vigabatrin, while ketogenic diet can be given as add-on treatment in refractory IS. There is a need to identify new therapeutic targets and more effective treatments for WS. Theories about the role of inflammatory pathways in the pathogenesis and treatment of WS have emerged, being supported by both clinical and preclinical data from animal models of WS. Ongoing advances in genetics have revealed numerous genes involved in the pathogenesis of WS, including genes directly or indirectly involved in inflammation. Inflammatory pathways also interact with other signaling pathways implicated in WS, such as the neuroendocrine pathway. Furthermore, seizures may also activate proinflammatory pathways raising the possibility that inflammation can be a consequence of seizures and epileptogenic processes. With this targeted review, we plan to discuss the evidence pro and against the following key questions. Does activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain cause epilepsy in WS and does it contribute to the associated comorbidities and progression? Can activation of certain inflammatory pathways be a compensatory or protective event? Are there interactions between inflammation and the neuroendocrine system that contribute to the pathogenesis of WS? Does activation of brain inflammatory signaling pathways contribute to the transition of WS to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome? Are there any lead candidates or unexplored targets for future therapy development for WS targeting inflammation? © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Psychopathology and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Gama Marques

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Since Hippocrates that neuropsychiatric illness secondary to liver disease fascinates physicians, but only in the XIX century Marcel Nencki and Ivan Pavlov suggested the relation between high concentrations of ammonia and Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE. The reaction of ammonia and glutamate (origins glutamine, “the Trojan Horse of neurotoxicity of ammonia continues to be the main responsible for the neurologic lesions, recently confirmed by neurochemistry and neuroimagiology studies. Glutamine starts the inflammatory reaction at the central nervous sys- tem but other important actors seem to be manganese and the neurotransmitters systems of GABA and endocanabinoids. Nowadays there are three different etiologic big groups for HE: type A associated with acute liver failure; type B associated with portosystemic bypass; and type C associated with cirrhosis of the liver. The staging of HE is still based on classic West Haven system, but a latent Grade 0 was introduced (the so called minimal HE; remaining the aggra- vating HE from Grade 1 (subtle changes at clinical examination to Grade 4 (coma. In this work a bibliographic review was made on 30 of the most pertinent and recent papers, focusing in psychopathology, physiopathology, etiology and staging of this clinical entity transversal to Psychiatry and Gastroenterology. Alterations are described in vigility and conscience like temporal, spatial and personal disorientation. Attention, concentration and memory are impaired very early, on latent phase and can be accessed through neuropsychological tests. Mood oscillates between euphoric and depressive. Personality changes begin obviously and abruptly or in a subtle and insidious way. There can be changes in perception like visual hallucinations or even of acoustic-verbal. The thought disorders can be of delusional type, paranoid, systematized or not, but also monothematic ala Capgras Syndrome. Speech can be accelerated, slowed down or completely in

  17. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, B.E.C.; Somerville, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep has not been identified under natural conditions at the time of writing and remains a hypothetical issue. However, rumours about the possible finding of a BSE-like isolate in sheep have led to great unrest within the sheep industry, among the general

  18. Cell therapy for pediatric disorders of glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albuquerque Osório, Maria Joana; Goldman, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The childhood disorders of glia comprise a group of diseases that include the pediatric leukodystrophies and lysosomal storage disorders, cerebral palsies and perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathies, and selected neurodevelopmental disorders of glial origin. Essentially, all of these disorder...

  19. Effect of prophylactic phenobarbital on seizures, encephalopathy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the absence of inadequate monitoring or mechanical ventilation may be associated with high mortality, and it may not have an impact in infants who have had severe asphyxia. Sarkar et al. reported ndings similar to ours, i.e. that phenobarbital did not improve outcome in terms of neonatal death in infants with HIE.[28].

  20. Acceptance test for the linear motion actuator for the scanning slit of the HIE-ISOLDE short diagnostic boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Cantero, E D; Bravin, E; Sosa, A

    2014-01-01

    We performed experimental tests to characterize the mechanical accuracy of a linear actuator designed by the company AVS for the movement of the scanning slit of the HIE-ISOLDE short diagnostic boxes. The mechanism consists of a linear actuator composed of two guiding rods and a lead screw, with a full stroke of 135 mm. A specially designed blade was mounted on the actuator and the transverse positioning of the blade was monitored with a camera-based optical system while moving the actuator at speeds of up to 10 mm/s. The repeatability of the positioning of the blade after several cycles around predefined positions was also measured. The results of the measurements and a general inspection of the device show that the proposed solution fulfils the specifications. A full prototype of short diagnostic box for the HIE-ISOLDE project can now be built for testing.

  1. Design upgrade of the ISOLDE target unit for HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Montano, J; Gottberg, A

    2013-01-01

    The High Intensity and Energy HIE-ISOLDE project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities with the objective of increasing the energy and the intensity of the delivered radioactive ion beams (RIB) {[}1]. In order to accommodate the future increase of primary beam intensity delivered by the new LINAC4 H- driver to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) {[}2] and from this to ISOLDE, a major study is being carried out to upgrade the existing designs of the ISOLDE target and its supporting infrastructure. In particular, the extraction optics plays an important role in the initial beam transport and the quality of the beam supplied to the mass separators. Important factors include the emittance of the beam and the beam profile to avoid beam losses. A new double electrode extraction system has been developed for simplifying and improving the interface between the target unit and the frontend (target coupling table). Numerical and experimental studies have been performed in order to define ...

  2. The Status of Beam Diagnostics for the HIE-ISOLDE Linac at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, W; Cantero, ED; Sosa, A

    2014-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE project aims at upgrading the CERN ISOLDE radioactive ion beam facility for higher beam intensities and higher beam energies. New beam diagnostic devices have to be developed as part of this upgrade, in particular for the measurement of intensity, energy, transverse and longitudinal profiles, and transverse emittance. The beam energy ranges from 300 keV/u to 10 MeV/u and beam intensities are between 1 pA and 1 nA. Faraday cups will be used for the measurement of the beam intensity while silicon detectors will be used for the energy and longitudinal profile measurements. The transverse profiles will be measured by moving a V-shaped slit in front of a Faraday cup and the beam position will be calculated from the profiles. The transverse emittance can be measured using the existing REX-ISOLDE slit and grid system, or by the combined use of two scanning slits and a Faraday cup. The final design of the mentioned devices will be presented in this contribution, including the results of the experimenta...

  3. Niobium Coatings for the HIE-ISOLDE QWR Superconducting Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jecklin, N; Delaup, B; Ferreira, L; Mondino, I; Sublet, A; Therasse, M; Venturini Desolaro, W

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy at ISOLDE) project is the upgrade of the existing ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line DEvice) facility at CERN, which is dedicated to the production of a large variety of radioactive ion beams for nuclear physics experiments. A new linear accelerator made of 20 ȕ=10.3% and 12 ȕ=6.3% quarter-wave resonators (QWR) superconducting (SC) accelerating cavities at 101 MHz will be built, and in a first phase two cryomodules of 5 high-ȕ cavities each are scheduled to accelerate first beams in 2015. The cavities are made of a copper substrate, with a sputter-coated superconductive niobium (Nb) layer, operated at 4.5 K with an accelerating field of 6 MV/m at 10W Radio-Frequency (RF) losses (Q=4.5· 108). In this paper we will discuss the baseline surface treatment and coating procedure which allows obtaining the required performance, as well as the steps undertaken in order to prepare series production of the required number of cavities guaranteeing their quality and functional...

  4. The Copper Substrate Developments for the HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter Wave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Alberty, L; Aviles, I; Calatroni, S; Capatina, O; Foffano, G; Kadi, Y; Moyret, P; Schirm, K-M; Tardy, T; Venturini Delsolaro, W; D'Elia, A

    2013-01-01

    A new Linac using superconducting Quarter-Wave Resonators (QWRs) is under construction at CERN in the framework of the HIE-ISOLDE project. The QWRs are made by niobium sputtered on a bulk copper substrate. The working frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and they will provide 6 MV/m accelerating gradient on the beam axis with a total maximum power dissipation of 10 W. The properties of the cavity substrate have a direct impact on the final cavity performance. The copper substrate has to ensure an optimum surface for the niobium sputtered layer. It has also to fulfil the required geometrical tolerances, the mechanical stability during operation and the thermal performance to optimally extract the RF dissipated power on cavity walls. The paper presents the mechanical design of the high β cavities. The procurement process of the copper raw material is detailed, including specifications and tests. The manufacturing sequence of the complete cavity is then explained and the structural and thermo-mechanical behaviour...

  5. Highlights of the ISOLDE Facility and the HIE-ISOLDE Project

    CERN Document Server

    Borge, M.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The ISOLDE radioactive beam facility is the dedicated CERN installation for the production and acceleration of radioactive nuclei. Exotic nuclei of most chemical elements are available for the study of nuclear structure, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental symmetries and atomic physics, as well as for applications in condensed matter and life sciences. In order to broaden the scientific opportunities beyond the reach of the present facility, the on-going HIE-ISOLDE (High Intensity and Energy) project provides major improvements in energy range, beam intensity and beam quality. A major element of the project is the increase of the final energy of the post-accelerated beams to 10 MeV/u throughout the periodic table. Physics with post-accelerated beams at 4 MeV/u has started this autumn. The increase in energy up to 10 MeV/u is fully funded and it will be implemented at the rate of one cryo-module per year reaching 10 MeV/u for A∕q = 4.5 at the start of 2018. In this contribution, a description of the ISOLDE fac...

  6. Metabolic encephalopathies in the critical care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A

    2012-06-01

    This article summarizes the most common etiologies and approaches to management of metabolic encephalopathy. Metabolic encephalopathy is a frequent occurrence in the intensive care unit setting. Common etiologies include hepatic failure, renal failure, sepsis, electrolyte disarray, and Wernicke encephalopathy. Current treatment paradigms typically focus on supportive care and management of the underlying etiology. Directed therapies that target neurochemical and neurotransmitter pathways that mediate encephalopathy are not currently available and represent an important area for future research. Although commonly thought of as reversible neurologic insults, delirium and encephalopathy have been associated with increased mortality, prolonged length of stay and hospital complications, and worse long-term cognitive and functional outcomes. Recognition and treatment of encephalopathy is critical to improving outcomes in critically ill patients.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description STXBP1 encephalopathy with epilepsy is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures (epilepsy), ...

  8. Comparison of the four proposed Apgar scoring systems in the assessment of birth asphyxia and adverse early neurologic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalili, Hosein; Nili, Firouzeh; Sheikh, Mahdi; Hardani, Amir Kamal; Shariat, Mamak; Nayeri, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    To compare the Conventional, Specified, Expanded and Combined Apgar scoring systems in predicting birth asphyxia and the adverse early neurologic outcomes. This prospective cohort study was conducted on 464 admitted neonates. In the delivery room, after delivery the umbilical cord was double clamped and a blood samples was obtained from the umbilical artery for blood gas analysis, meanwhile on the 1- , 5- and 10- minutes Conventional, Specified, Expanded, and Combined Apgar scores were recorded. Then the neonates were followed and intracranial ultrasound imaging was performed, and the following information were recorded: the occurrence of birth asphyxia, hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE), intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and neonatal seizure. The Combined-Apgar score had the highest sensitivity (97%) and specificity (99%) in predicting birth asphyxia, followed by the Specified-Apgar score that was also highly sensitive (95%) and specific (97%). The Expanded-Apgar score was highly specific (95%) but not sensitive (67%) and the Conventional-Apgar score had the lowest sensitivity (81%) and low specificity (81%) in predicting birth asphyxia. When adjusted for gestational age, only the low 5-minute Combined-Apgar score was independently associated with the occurrence of HIE (B = 1.61, P = 0.02) and IVH (B = 2.8, P = 0.01). The newly proposed Combined-Apgar score is highly sensitive and specific in predicting birth asphyxia and also is a good predictor of the occurrence of HIE and IVH in asphyxiated neonates.

  9. Micturitional disturbance in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, R; Hattori, T; Yasuda, K; Yamanishi, T; Tojo, M; Mori, M

    1997-01-01

    A 24-year-old pregnant woman started to have hyperemesis gravidarum 6 weeks before admission. Four weeks later she had vertigo, diplopia, staggering gait, mild dyspnea, dysphagia, and incontinence of urine. On admission she presented with ophthalmoplegia, ptosis, ataxia, decreased tendon reflex, and memory disturbance. Brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormal intensities in medial thalamic-hypothalamic regions and the periaqueductal area, and she was diagnosed with Wernicke's encephalopathy. Urodynamic studies revealed decreased bladder volume and detrusor hyperreflexia. Six weeks after the administration of 100 mg/day of thiamine, urge incontinence gradually recovered, together with neurological signs. Lesions of the medial thalamic-hypothalamic area and the periaqueductal gray matter seemed to be mainly responsible for micturitional disturbance in our patient with Wernicke's encephalopathy.

  10. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  11. Ketogenic Diet in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Suvasini Sharma; Manjari Tripathi

    2013-01-01

    The ketogenic diet is a medically supervised high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that has been found useful in patients with refractory epilepsy. It has been shown to be effective in treating multiple seizure types and epilepsy syndromes. In this paper, we review the use of the ketogenic diet in epileptic encephalopathies such as Ohtahara syndrome, West syndrome, Dravet syndrome, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures, and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

  12. Metabolic Causes of Epileptic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Yuezhou Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathy can be induced by inborn metabolic defects that may be rare individually but in aggregate represent a substantial clinical portion of child neurology. These may present with various epilepsy phenotypes including refractory neonatal seizures, early myoclonic encephalopathy, early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile spasms, and generalized epilepsies which in particular include myoclonic seizures. There are varying degrees of treatability, but the outcome if untreated can often be catastrophic. The importance of early recognition cannot be overemphasized. This paper provides an overview of inborn metabolic errors associated with persistent brain disturbances due to highly active clinical or electrographic ictal activity. Selected diseases are organized by the defective molecule or mechanism and categorized as small molecule disorders (involving amino and organic acids, fatty acids, neurotransmitters, urea cycle, vitamers and cofactors, and mitochondria and large molecule disorders (including lysosomal storage disorders, peroxisomal disorders, glycosylation disorders, and leukodystrophies. Details including key clinical features, salient electrophysiological and neuroradiological findings, biochemical findings, and treatment options are summarized for prominent disorders in each category.

  13. Hypertensive Encephalopathy with Reversible Brainstem Edema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sungjoon; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    .... The patient's condition was thus interpreted as hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. While many consider this a vasogenic phenomenon, induced by sudden, severe hypertension, the precise mechanism remains unclear...

  14. Venlafaxine as single therapy associated with hypertensive encephalopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bengt Edvardsson

    2015-01-01

      Introduction Hypertensive encephalopathy with the clinicoradiological entity posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in the setting of venlafaxine as single therapy has not been reported earlier...

  15. Fatal encephalopathy complicating persistent vomiting in pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    care to a patient with persistent HEG resulted in a fatal metabolic encephalopathy with neurological signs probably in ... Fatal encephalopathy complicating persistent vomiting in pregnancy: Importance of clinical awareness on the .... Since assessment of serum thia mine levels is not routinely available, the diagnosis of WE ...

  16. Birth defects in children with newborn encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, JF; Badawi, N; Kurinczuk, JJ; Bower, C; Keogh, JM; Pemberton, PJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate birth defects found in association with newborn encephalopathy. All possible birth defects were ascertained in a population-based study of 276 term infants with moderate or severe encephalopathy and 564 unmatched term control infants. A strong association

  17. Normalization of the Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy score ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share ... encephalopathy score (PHES) and evaluate the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) among .... that can affect cognitive function; (3) diabetes mellitus;. (4) significant comorbid illness ...

  18. Ganciclovir-induced ataxia and encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlmann, M C; Stiksma, J; Kramer, M H H

    2016-12-01

    Ganciclovir can be used to treat a primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, however it can cause side effects. We describe a 60-year-old immunocompromised woman with a primary CMV infection who was treated with ganciclovir. She developed an encephalopathy which resolved after discontinuation of ganciclovir. A reversible encephalopathy as a side effect of ganciclovir.

  19. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ANNALS

    alcoholic populations at risk for thiamine deficiency and Wernicke's encephalopathy and carrying out a detailed neurological examination in such patients. References. 1. Loh Y, Watson WD, Verma A, Chang ST,. Stocker DJ, Labutta RJ. Acute Wernicke's encephalopathy following bariatric surgery: clinical course and MRI ...

  20. Adherence to hypothermia guidelines: a French multicenter study of fullterm neonates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Chevallier

    Full Text Available AIM: The objective of this study was to describe the French practice of hypothermia treatment (HT in full-term newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE and to analyze the deviations from the guidelines of the French Society of Neonatology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From May 2010 to March 2012 we recorded all cases of HIE treated by HT in a French national database. The population was divided into three groups, "optimal HT" (OHT, "late HT" (LHT and "non-indicated" HT (NIHT, according to the guidelines. RESULTS: Of the 311 newborns registered in the database and having HT, 65% were classified in the OHT group, 22% and 13% in the LHT and NIHT groups respectively. The severity of asphyxia and HIE were comparable between newborns with OHT and LHT, apart from EEG. HT was initiated at a mean time of 12 hours of life in the LHT group. An acute obstetrical event was more likely to be identified among newborns with LHT (46%, compared to OHT (34% and NIHT (22%. There was a gradation in the rate of complications from the NIHT group (29% to the LHT (38% group and the OHT group (52%. Despite an insignificant difference in the rates of death or abnormal neurological examination at discharge, nearly 60% of newborns in the OHT group had an MRI showing abnormalities, compared to 44% and 49% in the LHT and NIHT groups respectively. CONCLUSION: The conduct of the HT for HIE newborns is not consistent with French guidelines for 35% of newborns, 22% being explained by an excessive delay in the start of HT, 13% by the lack of adherence to the clinical indications. This first report illustrates the difficulties in implementing guidelines for HT and should argue for an optimization of perinatal care for HIE.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  2. Frequency Sensitivity to Cavity Geometry Errors of HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta QuarterWave Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Venturini Delsolaro, W

    2014-01-01

    Quarter-Wave Resonators (QWRs) are to be used in the linac upgrade in the framework of HIE-ISOLDE project. The QWRs are made of copper with niobium sputtered on the RF surface. The resonant frequency of the cavity is 101.28 MHz at 4.5 K. The resonant frequency changes due to cavity geometry variation. Thus the manufacturing tolerance has been set to 0.1 mm for the copper substrate. The frequency sensitivity to different geometry changes has been evaluated in this report.

  3. The Impact of Defects on Q0 for HIE-ISOLDE High-Beta Quarter-Wave Resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Venturini Delsolari, W

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting quarter-wave resonators (QWRs) will be used in the SC linac for the HIE-ISOLDE project at CERN. The QWRs will be working at 4.5 K with an operating frequency of 101.28 MHz. The maximum dissipated power in the cavity is required to be 10 W at a gradient of 6 MV/m. The QWRs are niobium coated on copper substrates, thus the niobium film quality has a direct impact on the cavity performance. This note calculates the impact of defects on cavity Q0 at different locations on the cavity inner surface.

  4. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung [Young-Deung-Po City Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-15

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study.

  5. The clinical outcomes of deep gray matter injury in children with cerebral palsy in relation with brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ja Young; Choi, Yoon Seong; Rha, Dong-Wook; Park, Eun Sook

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we investigated the nature and extent of clinical outcomes using various classifications and analyzed the relationship between brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and the extent of clinical outcomes in children with cerebral palsy (CP) with deep gray matter injury. The deep gray matter injuries of 69 children were classified into hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and kernicterus patterns. HIE patterns were divided into four groups (I-IV) based on severity. Functional classification was investigated using the gross motor function classification system-expanded and revised, manual ability classification system, communication function classification system, and tests of cognitive function, and other associated problems. The severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI was strongly correlated with the severity of clinical outcomes in these various domains. Children with a kernicterus pattern showed a wide range of clinical outcomes in these areas. Children with severe HIE are at high risk of intellectual disability (ID) or epilepsy and children with a kernicterus pattern are at risk of hearing impairment and/or ID. Grading severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI is useful for predicting overall outcomes. The clinical outcomes of children with a kernicterus pattern range widely from mild to severe. Delineation of the clinical outcomes of children with deep gray matter injury, which are a common abnormal brain MRI finding in children with CP, is necessary. The present study provides clinical outcomes for various domains in children with deep gray matter injury on brain MRI. The deep gray matter injuries were divided into two major groups; HIE and kernicterus patterns. Our study showed that severity of HIE pattern on brain MRI was strongly associated with the severity of impairments in gross motor function, manual ability, communication function, and cognition. These findings suggest that severity of HIE pattern can be useful for predicting the

  6. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. HIE-Isolde: Commissioning and first results of the Mathilde system monitoring the positions of cavities and solenoids inside cryomodules

    CERN Document Server

    Kautzmann, Guillaume; Klumb, Francis; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The new superconducting HIE-ISOLDE Linac replaced most of pre-existing REX ISOLDE facility at CERN. This upgrade involves the design, construction, installation and commissioning of 4 high-β cryomodules. Each high-β cryomodule houses five superconducting cavities and one superconducting solenoid. Beam-physics simulations show that the optimum linac working conditions are obtained when the main axes of the active components, located inside the cryostats, are aligned and permanently monitored on the REX Nominal Beam Line (NBL) within a precision of 0.3 mm for the cavities and 0.15 mm for the solenoids at one sigma level along directions perpendicular to the beam axis. The Monitoring and Alignment Tracking for HIE-ISOLDE (MATHILDE) system has been developed to fulfil the alignment and monitoring needs for components exposed to non-standard environmental conditions such as high vacuum or cryogenic temperatures. MATHILDE is based on opto-electronic sensors (HBCAM) observing, through high quality viewports, spher...

  8. Fundus Findings in Wernicke Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Serlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke encephalopathy (WE is an acute neuropsychiatric syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1 deficiency, classically characterized by the triad of ophthalmoplegia, confusion, and ataxia. While commonly associated with chronic alcoholism, WE may also occur in the setting of poor nutrition or absorption. We present a 37-year-old woman who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and presented with visual disturbance with bilateral horizontal nystagmus, confusion, and postural imbalance. Fundus examination revealed bilateral optic disc edema with a retinal hemorrhage in the left eye. Metabolic workup demonstrated thiamine deficiency. Her symptoms resolved after thiamine treatment. This case raises the awareness of the possibility of posterior segment findings in WE, which are underreported in WE.

  9. Suicide and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L

    2016-01-01

    For nearly 80 years, suicidality was not considered to be a core clinical feature of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In recent years, suicide has been widely cited as being associated with CTE, and now depression has been proposed to be one of three core diagnostic features alongside cognitive impairment and anger control problems. This evolution of the clinical features has been reinforced by thousands of media stories reporting a connection between mental health problems in former athletes and military veterans, repetitive neurotrauma, and CTE. At present, the science underlying the causal assumption between repetitive neurotrauma, depression, suicide, and the neuropathology believed to be unique to CTE is inconclusive. Epidemiological evidence indicates that former National Football League players, for example, are at lower, not greater, risk for suicide than men in the general population. This article aims to discuss the critical issues and literature relating to these possible relationships.

  10. Apgar scores at 10 min and outcomes at 6–7 years following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R; Pappas, Athina; Bann, Carla M; McDonald, Scott A; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D; Hintz, Susan R; Vohr, Betty R

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine the association between 10 min Apgar scores and 6–7-year outcomes in children with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (NICHD NRN) whole body cooling randomised controlled trial (RCT). Methods Evaluations at 6–7 years included the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence III or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children IV and Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale. Primary outcome was death/moderate or severe disability. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between 10 min Apgar scores and outcomes after adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, gender, outborn status, hypothermia treatment and centre. Results In the study cohort (n=174), 64/85 (75%) of those with 10 min Apgar score of 0–3 had death/disability compared with 40/89 (45%) of those with scores >3. Each point increase in 10 min Apgar scores was associated with a significantly lower adjusted risk of death/disability, death, death/IQ Apgar score of 0, five (20.8%) survived without disability. The risk-adjusted probabilities of death/disability were significantly lower in cooled infants with Apgar scores of 0–3; there was no significant interaction between cooling and Apgar scores (p=0.26). Conclusions Among children with perinatal HIE enrolled in the NICHD cooling RCT, 10 min Apgar scores were significantly associated with school-age outcomes. A fifth of infants with 10 min Apgar score of 0 survived without disability to school age, suggesting the need for caution in limiting resuscitation to a specified duration. PMID:23896791

  11. Apgar scores at 10 min and outcomes at 6-7 years following hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Girija; Shankaran, Seetha; Laptook, Abbot R; Pappas, Athina; Bann, Carla M; McDonald, Scott A; Das, Abhik; Higgins, Rosemary D; Hintz, Susan R; Vohr, Betty R

    2013-11-01

    To determine the association between 10 min Apgar scores and 6-7-year outcomes in children with perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) enrolled in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network (NICHD NRN) whole body cooling randomised controlled trial (RCT). Evaluations at 6-7 years included the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence III or Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children IV and Gross Motor Functional Classification Scale. Primary outcome was death/moderate or severe disability. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between 10 min Apgar scores and outcomes after adjusting for birth weight, gestational age, gender, outborn status, hypothermia treatment and centre. In the study cohort (n=174), 64/85 (75%) of those with 10 min Apgar score of 0-3 had death/disability compared with 40/89 (45%) of those with scores >3. Each point increase in 10 min Apgar scores was associated with a significantly lower adjusted risk of death/disability, death, death/IQ Apgar score of 0, five (20.8%) survived without disability. The risk-adjusted probabilities of death/disability were significantly lower in cooled infants with Apgar scores of 0-3; there was no significant interaction between cooling and Apgar scores (p=0.26). Among children with perinatal HIE enrolled in the NICHD cooling RCT, 10 min Apgar scores were significantly associated with school-age outcomes. A fifth of infants with 10 min Apgar score of 0 survived without disability to school age, suggesting the need for caution in limiting resuscitation to a specified duration.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: Some novel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transient and reversible neurological disorder clinically characterised by headache, seizures, blindness and altered consciousness associated with radiological ... presented with transient encephalopathy following blood transfusion but involving the anterior brain rather than the posterior part classically described in PRES.

  14. Ethylmalonic encephalopathy associated with crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweikat, Imad; Naser, Enas; Damsah, Nadera; Libdeh, Bassam Abu; Bakri, Izzeddin

    2012-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ETHE1 gene and characterized by chronic diarrhea, encephalopathy, relapsing petechiae and acrocyanosis. Nephrotic syndrome has been described in an infant with EE but the renal histology findings were not described in previous reports. We report a Palestinian girl with EE who presented with chronic diarrhea, encephalopathy, petechial rash and acrocyanosis. Subsequently, she developed progressive deterioration of renal function caused by rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis resulting in death within few days. This is, to our knowledge, the first reported occurrence of rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis in a child with ethylmalonic encephalopathy. Its presence is a serious complication associated with poor prognosis and may be explained by the diffuse vascular damage.

  15. Acute hepatic encephalopathy with diffuse cortical lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.M.; Spreer, J.; Schumacher, M. [Section of Neuroradiology, Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Els, T. [Dept. of Neurology, University of Freiburg (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Acute hepatic encephalopathy is a poorly defined syndrome of heterogeneous aetiology. We report a 49-year-old woman with alcoholic cirrhosis and hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia who developed acute hepatic coma induced by severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Laboratory analysis revealed excessively elevated blood ammonia. MRI showed lesions compatible with chronic hepatic encephalopathy and widespread cortical signal change sparing the perirolandic and occipital cortex. The cortical lesions resembled those of hypoxic brain damage and were interpreted as acute toxic cortical laminar necrosis. (orig.)

  16. Duloxetine-related posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zappella, Nathalie; Perier, Fran?ois; Pico, Fernando; Palette, Catherine; Muret, Alexandre; Merceron, Sybille; Girbovan, Andrei; Marquion, Fabien; Legriel,Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has well-established links with several drugs. Whether a link also exists with serotonin?norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor such as duloxetine is unclear. Methods: We report on a patient who developed PRES with a coma and myoclonus related to hypertensive encephalopathy a few days after starting duloxetine treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and catecholamine metabolites assayed. Results: The patient achie...

  17. Differentiation of ruminant transmissible spongiform encephalopathy isolate types, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy and CH1641 scrapie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.G.; Sauer, M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Tang, Y.; Bossers, A.; Langeveld, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    With increased awareness of the diversity of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) strains in the ruminant population, comes an appreciation of the need for improved methods of differential diagnosis. Exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been associated with the human TSE,

  18. Beam Dynamics Studies of a Multi-harmonic Buncher for 10 MHz Post-accelerated RIBs at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive beam dynamics study was carried out to assess the performance of a proposed bunching system at HIE-ISOLDE to increase the bunch spacing of post-accelerated radioactive ion beams by a factor of 10 to approximately 100 ns. In this note different layout options are presented that are based on a multi-harmonic buncher (MHB) with a fundamental sub-harmonic frequency of 10.128 MHz placed upstream of the REX-ISOLDE RFQ. The electrode geometry of the MHB is specified along with the required rf phase and voltage stability, and the transfer line between the ion source and RFQ including the MHB is designed and simulated. It is shown that for minimal losses in transmission a 10.128 MHz beam can be delivered to the experiments with only a slight degradation in beam quality. In certain scenarios the longitudinal emittance could be reduced significantly.

  19. Preliminary Results of Nb Thin Film Coating for HIE-ISOLDE SRF Cavities Obtained by Magnetron Sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Sublet, A; Calatroni, S; D'Elia, A; Jecklin, N; Mondino, I; Prunet, S; Therasse, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zhang, P

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the HIE-ISOLDE upgrade at CERN, several new facilities for the niobium sputter coating of QWR-type superconducting RF accelerating cavities have been developed, built, and successfully operated. In order to further optimize the production process of these cavities the magnetron sputtering technique has been further investigated and continued as an alternative to the already successfully operational DC bias diode sputtering method. The purpose of this poster is to present the results obtained with this technique. The Nb thickness profile along the cavity and its correlation with the electro-magnetic field distribution inside the cavity are discussed. Film structure, morphology and Residual Resistivity Ratio (RRR) will be considered as well and compared with films obtained by DC bias diode sputtering. Finally these results will be compared with RF measurement of a production-like magnetron-coated cavity.

  20. Thermal Design and Performance results of the first High-Beta Cryo-module for HIE-ISOLDE at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Valdarno, L; Leclercq, Y; Parma, V; Vandoni, G; Williams, L

    2015-01-01

    The High Energy and Intensity HIE-ISOLDE is a facility under construction at CERN whose target is ultimately, after the installation of six cryo-modules, to produce radioactive ion beams at 10MeV/u maximum energy in order to significantly expand the nuclear physics programme carried out by REX-ISOLDE. Since thermal control is essential to the performance of the whole cryo-module, a combination of a passive (materials, coatings, and surface finishes) and active (cryogenic loops, heaters) control has been designed to keep the cryostat operating within the allowable thermal budget. A numerical model based on Finite Element has been developed in order to generate a faithful global mapping of temperatures and heat fluxes inside the cryo-module. The numerical model, combined with the experimental results of the first test campaign, will serve as an optimization tool for the future cryo-modules in terms of improvement in the global and specific heat loads management.

  1. Liquid chromatographic high-throughput analysis of the new ultra-short acting hypnotic 'HIE-124' and its metabolite in mice serum using a monolithic silica column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadi, Adnan; Hefnawy, Mohamed; Al-Majed, Abdulrhman; Alonezi, Sanad; Asiri, Yousif; Attia, Sabry; Abourashed, Ehab; El-Subbagh, Hussein

    2011-02-07

    For the first time, a fast, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of the new ultra-short hypnotic HIE-124 and its metabolite in mice serum. Each compound, together with carbamazepine (internal standard) was extracted from the serum matrix using liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Chromatographic resolution of the analytes was performed on a Chromolith Speed Rod monolithic silica column (100 mm × 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions using a mobile phase of 65:35 (v/v), 20 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7.0 adjusted with phosphoric acid)-acetonitrile. The elution of the analytes were monitored at 240 nm and conducted at ambient temperature. Because of high column efficiency the mobile phase was pumped at a flow rate of 2.5 mL min(-1). The total run time of the assay was 2 min. The method was validated over the range of 60-2000 ng mL(-1) for HIE-124 and 200-1600 ng mL(-1) for the metabolite (r(2) = 0.99). The limit of detection (LOD) for HIE-124 and its metabolite were 20 ng mL(-1) and 65 ng mL(-1), respectively. The proposed method was validated in compliance with ICH guidelines, in terms of accuracy, precision, limits of detection and quantitation and other aspects of analytical validation. The developed method could be used for the trace analyses of HIE-124 and its metabolite in serum and was finally used for the pharmacokinetic study investigation of HIE-124 in mice serum.

  2. Towards the "baby connectome": mapping the structural connectivity of the newborn brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymofiyeva, Olga; Hess, Christopher P; Ziv, Etay; Tian, Nan; Bonifacio, Sonia L; McQuillen, Patrick S; Ferriero, Donna M; Barkovich, A James; Xu, Duan

    2012-01-01

    Defining the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain (the human "connectome") is a basic challenge in neuroscience. Recently, techniques for noninvasively characterizing structural connectivity networks in the adult brain have been developed using diffusion and high-resolution anatomic MRI. The purpose of this study was to establish a framework for assessing structural connectivity in the newborn brain at any stage of development and to show how network properties can be derived in a clinical cohort of six-month old infants sustaining perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Two different anatomically unconstrained parcellation schemes were proposed and the resulting network metrics were correlated with neurological outcome at 6 months. Elimination and correction of unreliable data, automated parcellation of the cortical surface, and assembling the large-scale baby connectome allowed an unbiased study of the network properties of the newborn brain using graph theoretic analysis. In the application to infants with HIE, a trend to declining brain network integration and segregation was observed with increasing neuromotor deficit scores.

  3. Towards the "baby connectome": mapping the structural connectivity of the newborn brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Tymofiyeva

    Full Text Available Defining the structural and functional connectivity of the human brain (the human "connectome" is a basic challenge in neuroscience. Recently, techniques for noninvasively characterizing structural connectivity networks in the adult brain have been developed using diffusion and high-resolution anatomic MRI. The purpose of this study was to establish a framework for assessing structural connectivity in the newborn brain at any stage of development and to show how network properties can be derived in a clinical cohort of six-month old infants sustaining perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Two different anatomically unconstrained parcellation schemes were proposed and the resulting network metrics were correlated with neurological outcome at 6 months. Elimination and correction of unreliable data, automated parcellation of the cortical surface, and assembling the large-scale baby connectome allowed an unbiased study of the network properties of the newborn brain using graph theoretic analysis. In the application to infants with HIE, a trend to declining brain network integration and segregation was observed with increasing neuromotor deficit scores.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, William; Mannix, Rebekah; Zafonte, Ross; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2015-10-27

    Recent case reports have described athletes previously exposed to repetitive head trauma while participating in contact sports who later in life developed mood disorders, headaches, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, difficulties with speech, and aggressive behavior. Postmortem discoveries show that some of these athletes have pathologic findings that are collectively termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Current hypotheses suggest that concussions or perhaps blows to the head that do not cause the signs and symptoms necessary for making the diagnosis of concussion, so-called subconcussive blows, cause both the clinical and pathologic findings. There are, however, some athletes who participate in contact sports who do not develop the findings ascribed to CTE. Furthermore, there are people who have headaches, mood disorders, cognitive difficulties, suicidal ideation, and other clinical problems who have neither been exposed to repeated head trauma nor possessed the pathologic postmortem findings of those currently diagnosed with CTE. The current lack of prospective data and properly designed case-control studies limits the current understanding of CTE, leading to debate about the causes of the neuropathologic findings and the clinical observations. Given the potential for referral and recall bias in available studies, it remains unclear whether or not the pathologic findings made postmortem cause the presumed neurobehavioral sequela and whether the presumed risk factors, such as sports activity, cerebral concussions, and subconcussive blows, are solely causative of the clinical signs and symptoms. This article discusses the current evidence and the associated limitations. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulle, Michael; Greenwald, Brian D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  6. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Saulle

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is a long-term consequence of single or repetitive closed head injuries for which there is no treatment and no definitive pre-mortem diagnosis. It has been closely tied to athletes who participate in contact sports like boxing, American football, soccer, professional wrestling and hockey. Risk factors include head trauma, presence of ApoE3 or ApoE4 allele, military service, and old age. It is histologically identified by the presence of tau-immunoreactive NFTs and NTs with some cases having a TDP-43 proteinopathy or beta-amyloid plaques. It has an insidious clinical presentation that begins with cognitive and emotional disturbances and can progress to Parkinsonian symptoms. The exact mechanism for CTE has not been precisely defined however, research suggest it is due to an ongoing metabolic and immunologic cascade called immunoexcitiotoxicity. Prevention and education are currently the most compelling way to combat CTE and will be an emphasis of both physicians and athletes. Further research is needed to aid in pre-mortem diagnosis, therapies, and support for individuals and their families living with CTE.

  7. Joseph Haydn's encephalopathy: new aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahak, Christian; Bäzner, Hansjörg; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    With increasing age, Joseph Haydn complained of progressive forgetfulness preventing him from composing for about the last 8 years of his life. He spent his days more and more inactive and immobilized, suffering from a disabling gait disturbance. Still, most biographers consider diffuse atherosclerosis and congestive heart failure to be reasons for Haydn's medical condition and physical decline during the last years of his life. A more sophisticated and detailed inspection of documents and sources, however, leads to the diagnosis of subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), caused by progressive cerebral small vessel disease. Important features of the disease are mood changes, urinary symptoms, and in particular a characteristic gait disturbance, while dementia is only mild and occurs later in the course. Haydn was severely disabled by the symptoms of SVE for several years and often reported difficulties in the completion of his last oratorio "Die Jahreszeiten" (The Seasons). Subsequently, the disease prevented him from composing another large oratorio, "Das jüngste Gericht" (The last judgement), which had been already drafted. Finally, the progress of SVE stopped his long career as a composer and conductor at the age of 73 years. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Asphyxia from the eyes of the neonatologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gancia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The perinatal asphyxia occurs at a frequency of 4-6‰ in developed countries The hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE has an incidence of 0.5-2‰, and is a frequent cause of death and severe disability. Cerebral hypothermia is a well-established therapy of HIE, and its benefits have been described by systematic reviews and meta-analyses of numerous controlled clinical trials. Authors describe their experience in implementation of cerebral hypotermia in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, the creation of a network to perform neurophysiologic study of asphyxiated infants ≥ 35 weeks gestation, potential hypothermia candidates. Neurodevelopmental prognosis of HIE infants is of paramount importance for parents. To improve the quality of prognosis and communication with the parents, two studies have been undertaken. First, EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI relationships analysis showed that the severity of the background EEG is associated with the severity and location of MRI lesion patterns in infants treated with hypothermia because of HIE. The second study aims to elucidate the relationships between MRI patterns and neurodevelopmental assessment by Griffiths scales. We found that neuroimaging findings correlate significantly with overall neurodevelopmental assessment at 12 and 24 months of life; in particular, this correlation is significant for the loco-motor and psycho-social sides. These instrumental data, with the EEG evaluation and clinical data, allow the neonatologist to predict quite precisely the neurological outcome of an infant. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  9. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), or Mad Cow Disease Note: ... gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of ...

  10. Irreversible encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, M.V.R.; Hofmeijer, J.; Sikma, M.A.; Meulenbelt, J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. OBJECTIVE: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. CASE SUMMARY: A

  11. Irreversible Encephalopathy After Treatment With High-Dose Intravenous Metronidazole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groothoff, Miriam V. R.; Hofmeijer, Jannette; Sikma, Maaike A.; Meulenbelt, Jan

    Background: Encephalopathy associated with metronidazole is rare and, in most cases, reversible following discontinuation. Objective: We describe a case of fatal encephalopathy after treatment with high-dose intravenous metronidazole and the potential causes of the irreversibility. Case summary: A

  12. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  13. Electroencephalography and Brain MRI Patterns in Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabulya, Angela; Lesser, Ronald P; Llinas, Rafael; Kaplan, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) and histology in patients with diffuse encephalopathy, Gloor et al reported that paroxysmal synchronous discharges (PSDs) on EEG required combined cortical gray (CG) and "subcortical" gray (SCG) matter pathology, while polymorphic delta activity (PDA) occurred in patients with white matter pathology. In patients with encephalopathy, we compared EEG findings and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine if MRI reflected similar pathological EEG correlations. Retrospective case control study of 52 cases with EEG evidence of encephalopathy and 50 controls without evidence of encephalopathy. Review of clinical, EEG and MRI data acquired within 4 days of each other. The most common EEG finding in encephalopathy was background slowing, in 96.1%. We found PSDs in 0% of cases with the combination of CG and SCG abnormalities. Although 13.5% (n=7) had PSDs on EEG; 3 of these had CG and 4 had SCG abnormalities. A total of 73.1% (38/52) had white matter abnormalities-of these 28.9% (11/38) had PDA. PSDs were found with either CG or "SCG" MRI abnormalities and did not require a combination of the two. In agreement with Gloor et al, PDA occurred with white matter MRI abnormalities in the absence of gray matter abnormalities. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2015.

  14. Branched-chain amino acids for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Koretz, R L; Kjaergard, L L

    2003-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy.......Hepatic encephalopathy may be caused by a decreased plasma ratio of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) to aromatic amino acids. Treatment with BCAA may therefore have a beneficial effect on patients with hepatic encephalopathy....

  15. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, ...

  16. Concussion in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Thor D; Alvarez, Victor E; McKee, Ann C

    2015-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that occurs in association with repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. It is associated with a variety of clinical symptoms in multiple domains, and there is a distinct pattern of pathological changes. The abnormal tau pathology in CTE occurs uniquely in those regions of the brain that are likely most susceptible to stress concentration during trauma. CTE has been associated with a variety of types of repetitive head trauma, most frequently contact sports. In cases published to date, the mean length of exposure to repetitive head trauma was 15.4 years. The clinical symptoms of the disease began after a mean latency of 14.5 years with a mean age of death of 59.3 years. Most subjects had a reported history of concussions with a mean of 20.3. However, 16 % of published CTE subjects did not have a history of concussion suggesting that subconcussive hits are sufficient to lead to the development of CTE. Overall, the number of years of exposure, not the number of concussions, was significantly associated with worse tau pathology in CTE. This suggests that it is the chronic and repetitive nature of head trauma, irrespective of concussive symptoms, that is the most important driver of disease. CTE and exposure to repetitive head trauma is also associated with a variety of other neurodegenerations, including Alzheimer disease. In fact, amyloid β peptide deposition is altered and accelerated in CTE and is associated with worse disease. Here, we review the current exposure, clinical, and pathological associations of CTE.

  17. [Wernicke encephalopathy: Guiding thiamine prescription].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, A S; Paquette, I; Létourneau, G; Richard-Devantoy, S

    2017-05-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a medical emergency. The objective of this paper is to systematically review the literature published over the past 15 years pertaining to prophylactic and curative treatment of WE with thiamine. A systematic literature search was performed using Medline to include all studies published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2015. Of the 316 abstracts identified, 20 met the final inclusion criteria. The evidence on the use of prophylactic thiamine was quite heterogeneous. The use of thiamine in this context largely depended on the evaluation of an individual's risk of developing WE. Use of prophylactic thiamine in low-risk patients is not universally indicated. When prescribed in this sub-population, the oral route is suggested but may be insufficient owing to its limited intestinal absorption and the high risk of non-compliance. High-risk patients need parenteral treatment with a recommended posology of 250 mg daily for 3 to 5 days. Intramuscular route is preferred in the outpatient setting, whereas intravenous route is suggested for inpatients. In cases where the diagnosis of WE is suspected or confirmed, a curative treatment with high-dose IV thiamine is justified. The evidence widely accepted in the literature is much clearer in this condition, with treatment regimens consisting of 500 mg IV 3 times daily for 3 to 5 days, followed by 250 mg IV daily for a minimum of 3 to 5 additional days. The literature does indicate that thiamine should be prescribed at high dosages, with the parenteral routes indicated in hospital settings and in high-risk patients. Based on the current literature review, we suggest treatment algorithms guiding thiamine prescription for WE. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Multicystic encephalopathy: review of eight cases with etiologic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, K M; Bodhireddy, S R; Nuovo, G J; Nelson, S J; Dickson, D W

    1995-03-01

    Multicystic encephalomalacia (MCE) is a rare lesion that arises during the perinatal period. Although hypoxic-ischemic insults may be responsible for this lesion, recent evidence suggests that herpesviruses may represent another etiologic agent. To elucidate the pathogenesis of MCE, eight cases collected over a 34-year period were evaluated for destructive lesions in gray and white matter. Immunocytochemical methods, in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology were employed to search for herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and JC variant of papovavirus (JCV). Review of the clinical histories revealed that there had been a complicated labor and delivery in 6/7 cases. Neuropathological lesions consisted of extensive tissue destruction, neuronal loss and gliosis in hemispheric white matter, cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, cerebellum and brainstem tegmentum. Only one case showed evidence of latent HSV infection by PCR. CMV, VZV, JCV and EBV were not detected. Arteriopathy was noted in one case. The widespread nature of the lesions and their association with perinatal ischemia suggest that severe hypoxia may be the more common etiology of MCE. Term infants appear especially susceptible to this type of cerebral damage.

  19. Qualifying and quantifying minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Marsha Y; Amodio, Piero; Cook, Nicola A

    2016-01-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables. There is ......Minimal hepatic encephalopathy is the term applied to the neuropsychiatric status of patients with cirrhosis who are unimpaired on clinical examination but show alterations in neuropsychological tests exploring psychomotor speed/executive function and/or in neurophysiological variables...... analytical techniques may provide better diagnostic information while the advent of portable wireless headsets may facilitate more widespread use. A large number of other diagnostic tools have been validated for the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy including Critical Flicker Frequency......, the Inhibitory Control Test, the Stroop test, the Scan package and the Continuous Reaction Time; each has its pros and cons; strengths and weaknesses; protagonists and detractors. Recent AASLD/EASL Practice Guidelines suggest that the diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy should be based on the PHES test...

  20. PRIONS AND THE TRANSMISSIBLE SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter is an invited, scholarly review of the mechanism(s) of TSEs for the 2nd edition of Metabolic Encephalopathies. Each chapter in the book assumes a professional knowledge of neuroscience and biochemistry, and the focus of the book is on the metabolic basis of dise...

  1. Pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy in sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keulen, van L.J.M.; Vromans, M.E.W.; Dolstra, C.H.; Bossers, A.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in sheep was studied by immunohistochemical detection of scrapie-associated prion protein (PrPSc) in the gastrointestinal, lymphoid and neural tissues following oral inoculation with BSE brain homogenate. First accumulation of PrPSc was

  2. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Nigerian with Schizophrenia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a well-characterized syndrome in alcoholism and malnutrition, little is written of its prevalence or presentation in patients with psychiatric illness. We present a case of a 37-year-old Nigerian male with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium and ophthalmoplegia ...

  3. Autopsy prevalence of Wernicke's encephalopathy in alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autopsy prevalence of Wernicke's encephalopathy in alcohol-related disease. ... The histological lesions were classified as either acute (5l, acute on chronic (9) or chronic (3) according to defined pathological criteria Macroscopic abnormalities were not obvious in any of the patients in the study group. Chart analysis ...

  4. Scanning slit for HIE-ISOLDE: vibrations test (linear motion actuator from UHV design, MAXON brushless motor, speed = 10 mm/s)

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Sosa, A

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a series of tests performed on the prototype HIE-ISOLDE diagnostic box (HIE-DB) regarding the vibrations and drifts in the transverse position of the scanning blade while moving in and out of beam path in the HIE-ISOLDE short box prototype. To monitor the transverse position of the blade, a series of 0.1 mm diameter holes were drilled on it and their positions were tracked with an optical system. The linear motion actuator was acquired from UHV design (model LSM38-150-SS), and it was adapted to be driven by a brushless EC motor from MAXON. The speed of the scanning blade during the tests was 10 mm/s. The transverse movement of the slit in the direction perpendicular to the movement was lower than 40 m, and is dominated by the displacement of the contact point of the applied force on the lead-screw. An offset on the slit position was observed while changing the direction of movement of the blade, its amplitude being of the order of 30 m. The amplitudes of the displacements...

  5. Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Pourali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: ″Wernicke’s Korsakoff″ syndrome is the most important complication of severe thiamine deficiency. The term refers to two different syndromes, each representing a different stage of the disease. Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE is an acute syndrome requiring emergent treatment to prevent death and neurologic morbidity. Korsakoff syndrome (KS refers to a chronic neurologic condition that usually occurs as a consequence of WE. It is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum that confusion, ocular signs, and gait ataxia are the most prevalent symptoms, respectively. Typical brain lesions of wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE are observed at autopsy in 0.4 to 2.8 percent of the general population in the western world and the majority of affected patients are alcoholic. The prevalence of wernicke’s encephalopathy lesions seen on autopsy was 12.5% of alcohol abusers in one report. Among those who with alcohol-related death, it has been reported to be even higher, 29 to 59%. The aim of this study was to report a case of wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old-pregnant woman in 19th weeks of gestation referred to the hospital with hyperemesis, gait ataxia, and dysarthria before that she had hyperemesis gravidarum with weight loss and unresponsive to outpatient and inpatient medical therapy. MRI showed hyperdense lesion around thalamus which was characteristic of wernicke’s encephalopathy. Rapid improvement in patient’s condition occurred after high dose thiamine infusion. Conclusion: In hyperemesis gravidarum, presence of either symptoms of ocular or mental disorder or ataxia must be considered to rule out and appropriate treatment of Wernicke’s syndrome which can cause maternal and fetal death.

  6. Development of a Silicon Detector Monitor for the HIE-ISOLDE Superconducting Upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Bravin, E; Pasini, M; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2011-01-01

    A silicon detector monitor has been developed and tested at REX-ISOLDE in the framework of the R&D program for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting (SC) linac upgrade. In the future setup the monitor is intended to be located downstream of the cryogenic SC modules, for beam energy and timing measurements and for the SC cavities phase scanning. In this very first test a passivated ion implanted silicon detector, suited for charge particle spectroscopy, was mounted inside a REX diagnostic box, downstream of the 9-gap resonator. A strongly attenuated stable ion beam with a mass-to-charge state (A/Q) of 4, mainly composed of 12C3+, 16O4+ and 20Ne5+, was used for the tests. The energy measurements carried out allowed for beam spectroscopy and ion identification with an energy resolution of ~ 3 % FWHM. The energy identification of the stable beam was suited for a rapid scan of the cavity; a procedure which could be demonstrated for the third 7-gap cavity. The time structure of the beam, characterized by a 9.87 ns per...

  7. Spectrum and outcome of neonatal emergencies seen in a free ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most frequent emergencies were neonatal sepsis (45.2%) and neurological emergencies, especially hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (22.1%) and acute bilirubin encephalopathy (14.6%). Furthermore, 6.1% of the infants presented with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The outcome of the emergencies was ...

  8. Isoflurane provides neuroprotection in neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury by suppressing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, De-An; Bi, Ling-Yun; Huang, Qian; Zhang, Fang-Min; Han, Zi-Ming

    Isoflurane is halogenated volatile ether used for inhalational anesthesia. It is widely used in clinics as an inhalational anesthetic. Neonatal hypoxic ischemia injury ensues in the immature brain that results in delayed cell death via excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Isoflurane has shown neuroprotective properties that make a beneficial basis of using isoflurane in both cell culture and animal models, including various models of brain injury. We aimed to determine the neuroprotective effect of isoflurane on hypoxic brain injury and elucidated the underlying mechanism. A hippocampal slice, in artificial cerebrospinal fluid with glucose and oxygen deprivation, was used as an in vitro model for brain hypoxia. The orthodromic population spike and hypoxic injury potential were recorded in the CA1 and CA3 regions. Amino acid neurotransmitters concentration in perfusion solution of hippocampal slices was measured. Isoflurane treatment caused delayed elimination of population spike and improved the recovery of population spike; decreased frequency of hypoxic injury potential, postponed the onset of hypoxic injury potential and increased the duration of hypoxic injury potential. Isoflurane treatment also decreased the hypoxia-induced release of amino acid neurotransmitters such as aspartate, glutamate and glycine induced by hypoxia, but the levels of γ-aminobutyric acid were elevated. Morphological studies showed that isoflurane treatment attenuated edema of pyramid neurons in the CA1 region. It also reduced apoptosis as evident by lowered expression of caspase-3 and PARP genes. Isoflurane showed a neuro-protective effect on hippocampal neuron injury induced by hypoxia through suppression of apoptosis. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroprotective properties of Madecassoside from Centella asiatica after hypoxic-ischemic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu Qing; Xie, Yong Sheng; Meng, Qing Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    Madecassoside is one of increasingly used constituent of Centella asiatica, a frequently prescribed crude drug in South eastern Asia and China for wound healing. In the present experiment, it exposes the neuroprotective nature of Madecassoside in GT1-7 cell lines, further, which the antioxidant activities are performed. The cellular toxicity was assessed using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay with increased cell viability with IC 50 2.5µg/ml. the regulation of antioxidant levels showed changes in madecassoside treated cell lysate viz., SOD assay. Also, the antioxidative assays confirmed the negligible cellular damage caused to the GT1-7 cell lines. Hence, the results advocate that the current antioxidant and antitumor activity be justified by the high concentration of phenolic constituents, primarily the triterpene present in the C. asiatica.

  10. Neuroprotective properties of Melissa officinalis after hypoxic-ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Khanavi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain ischemia initiates several metabolic events leading to neuronal death. These events mediate large amount of damage that arises after some neurodegenerative disorders as well as transient brain ischemia. Melissa officinalis is considered as a helpful herbal plant in the prevention of various neurological diseases like Alzheimer that is related with oxidative stress.MethodsWe examined the effect of Melissa officinalis on hypoxia induced neuronal death in a cortical neuronal culture system as in vitro model and transient hippocampal ischemia as in vivo model. Transient hippocampal ischemia was induced in male rats by tow vessel-occlusion for 20 min. After reperfusion, the histopathological changes and the levels inflammation, oxidative stress status, and caspase-3 activity in hippocampus were measured.ResultsCytotoxicity assays showed a significant protection of a 10 mug/ml dose of Melissa against hypoxia in cultured neurons which was confirmed by a conventional staining (P<0.05. Melissa treatment decrease caspase3 activity (P<0.05 and TUNEL-positive cells significantly (P<0.01. Melissa oil has also inhibited malon dialdehyde level and attenuated decrease of Antioxidant Capacity in the hippocampus. Pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and HIF-1alpha mRNA levels were highly increased after ischemia and treatment with Melissa significantly suppressed HIF-1alpha gene expression (P<0.05.DiscussionResults showed that Melissa officinalis could be considered as a protective agent in various neurological diseases associated with ischemic brain injury.

  11. Neuroprotective properties of Melissa officinalis after hypoxic-ischemic injury both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayat Mohammad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brain ischemia initiates several metabolic events leading to neuronal death. These events mediate large amount of damage that arises after some neurodegenerative disorders as well as transient brain ischemia. Melissa officinalis is considered as a helpful herbal plant in the prevention of various neurological diseases like Alzheimer that is related with oxidative stress. Methods We examined the effect of Melissa officinalis on hypoxia induced neuronal death in a cortical neuronal culture system as in vitro model and transient hippocampal ischemia as in vivo model. Transient hippocampal ischemia was induced in male rats by tow vessel-occlusion for 20 min. After reperfusion, the histopathological changes and the levels inflammation, oxidative stress status, and caspase-3 activity in hippocampus were measured. Results Cytotoxicity assays showed a significant protection of a 10 μg/ml dose of Melissa against hypoxia in cultured neurons which was confirmed by a conventional staining (P Discussion Results showed that Melissa officinalis could be considered as a protective agent in various neurological diseases associated with ischemic brain injury.

  12. Sex Differences in Behavioral Outcomes Following Temperature Modulation During Induced Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Injury in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain can cause various degrees of tissue damage, as well as subsequent cognitive/behavioral deficits such as motor, learning/memory, and auditory impairments. These outcomes frequently result from cardiovascular and/or respiratory events observed in premature infants. Data suggests that there is a sex difference in HI outcome, with males being more adversely affected relative to comparably injured females. Brain/body temperature may play a role in modulating the severity of an HI insult, with hypothermia during an insult yielding more favorable anatomical and behavioral outcomes. The current study utilized a postnatal day (P 7 rodent model of HI injury to assess the effect of temperature modulation during injury in each sex. We hypothesized that female P7 rats would benefit more from lowered body temperatures as compared to male P7 rats. We assessed all subjects on rota-rod, auditory discrimination, and spatial/non-spatial maze tasks. Our results revealed a significant benefit of temperature reduction in HI females as measured by most of the employed behavioral tasks. However, HI males benefitted from temperature reduction as measured on auditory and non-spatial tasks. Our data suggest that temperature reduction protects both sexes from the deleterious effects of HI injury, but task and sex specific patterns of relative efficacy are seen.

  13. Isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion attenuates oxidative and hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A Sosunov

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates that in mice subjected to hypoxia-ischemia (HI brain injury isoflurane anesthesia initiated upon reperfusion limits a release of mitochondrial oxidative radicals by inhibiting a recovery of complex-I dependent mitochondrial respiration. This significantly attenuates an oxidative stress and reduces the extent of HI brain injury. Neonatal mice were subjected to HI, and at the initiation of reperfusion were exposed to isoflurane with or without mechanical ventilation. At the end of HI and isoflurane exposure cerebral mitochondrial respiration, H2O2 emission rates were measured followed by an assessment of cerebral oxidative damage and infarct volumes. At 8 weeks after HI navigational memory and brain atrophy were assessed. In vitro, direct effect of isoflurane on mitochondrial H2O2 emission was compared to that of complex-I inhibitor, rotenone. Compared to controls, 15 minutes of isoflurane anesthesia inhibited recovery of the compex I-dependent mitochondrial respiration and decreased H2O2 production in mitochondria supported with succinate. This was associated with reduced oxidative brain injury, superior navigational memory and decreased cerebral atrophy compared to the vehicle-treated HI-mice. Extended isoflurane anesthesia was associated with sluggish recovery of cerebral blood flow (CBF and the neuroprotection was lost. However, when isoflurane anesthesia was supported with mechanical ventilation the CBF recovery improved, the event associated with further reduction of infarct volume compared to HI-mice exposed to isoflurane without respiratory support. Thus, in neonatal mice brief isoflurane anesthesia initiated at the onset of reperfusion limits mitochondrial release of oxidative radicals and attenuates an oxidative stress. This novel mechanism contributes to neuroprotective action of isoflurane. The use of mechanical ventilation during isoflurane anesthesia counterbalances negative effect of isoflurane anesthesia on recovery of cerebral circulation which potentiates protection against reperfusion injury.

  14. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate does not preserve ATP in hypoxic-ischemic neonatal cerebrocortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Hirai, Kiyoshi; Litt, Lawrence

    2008-10-31

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an endogenous intracellular metabolite in glycolysis, was found in many preclinical studies to be neuroprotective during hypoxia-ischemia (HI) when administered exogenously. We looked for HI neuroprotection from FBP in a neonatal rat brain slice model, using 14.1 T (1)H/(31)P/(13)C NMR spectroscopy of perchloric acid slice extracts to ask: 1) if FBP preserves high energy phosphates during HI; and 2) if exogenous [1-(13)C]FBP enters cells and is glycolytically metabolized to [3-(13)C]lactate. We also asked: 3) if substantial superoxide production occurs during and after HI, thinking such might be treatable by exogenous FBP's antioxidant effects. Superfused P7 rat cerebrocortical slices (350 mum) were treated with 2 mM FBP before and during 30 min of HI, and then given 4 h of recovery with an FBP-free oxygenated superfusate. Slices were removed before HI, at the end of HI, and at 1 and 4 h after HI. FBP did not improve high energy phosphate levels or change (1)H metabolite profiles. Large increases in [3-(13)C]lactate were seen with (13)C NMR, but the lactate fractional enrichment was always (1.1+/-0.5)%, implying that all of lactate's (13)C was natural abundance (13)C, that none was from metabolism of (13)C-FBP. FBP had no effect on the fluorescence of ethidium produced from superoxide oxidation of hydroethidine. Compared to control slices, ethidium fluorescence was 25% higher during HI and 50% higher at the end of recovery. Exogenous FBP did not provide protection or enter glycolysis. Its use as an antioxidant might be worth studying at higher FBP concentrations.

  15. Sodium valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegg, Emily Jane; Zaman, Fawad

    2014-04-10

    A 59-year-old man with a background of poststroke epilepsy, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertension, presented to the medical assessment unit with acute confusion and altered consciousness. Medications included sodium valproate, aspirin and antihypertensives. On examination he was confused, with his Glasgow Coma Scale fluctuating between 10 and 14. Routine blood tests, thyroid function tests, serum sodium valproate level, urine dip, CT of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were all normal. EEG revealed changes consistent with an encephalopathic process. Serum ammonia was elevated (75 µg/dL), consistent with a diagnosis of valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy. Sodium valproate was changed to a different antiepileptic drug and his confusion gradually resolved. Valproate-related hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a treatable condition which should be considered as a diagnosis in anyone taking sodium valproate with new onset confusion, even in the presence of therapeutic sodium valproate levels and normal liver function tests.

  16. Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus in Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a case of a 64-year-old male with a history of liver failure presenting with altered mental status, initially diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy but ultimately diagnosed with nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE by electroencephalogram (EEG. NCSE is a difficult diagnosis to make, given no clear consensus on diagnostic criteria. Especially in the intensive care unit setting of persistent altered mental status with no clear etiology, NCSE must be considered in the differential diagnosis, as the consequences of delayed diagnosis and treatment can be substantial. EEG can be useful in the evaluation of patients with hepatic encephalopathy who have persistently altered levels of consciousness despite optimal medical management. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:372–374.

  17. Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0399 TITLE: Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: John F...Include area code) October 2015 Annual Report 30 Sep 2014 - 29 Sep 2015 Molecular & Genetic Investigation of Tau in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy John...available, work will commence. Tau, genetics, susceptibility, MAPT, chronic traumatic encephalopathy , Alzheimer disease U U U U 1 USAMRMC Table of

  18. MINIM AL HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY IN AL COHOLIC CIRRHOSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Kavya; Jegan Niwas; Sarah; Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Minimal hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE) has severe and important health implications which affects the quality of life as well as the survival of patients with liver disease. Psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) has been validated for diagnosis of MHE. AIM OF THE STUDY : To detect the prevalence of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) in alcoholic cirrhosis patients and to compare the patterns of alcohol consumption in patients with MHE t...

  19. 'Khatatonia' - cathinone-induced hypertensive encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bede, P; El-Kininy, N; O'Hara, F; Menon, P; Finegan, E; Healy, D

    2017-12-01

    Khat consumption is an under-recognised cause of hypertensive encephalopathy and intraparenchymal brain haemorrhage. We report the radiological findings of extensive periventricular, subcortical and brain stem white matter pathology of a patient who had consumed excessive amounts of Khat. The Khat plant contains cathinone, an amphetamine-like alkaloid which has been associated with chronic hypertensive end-organ damage, but is seldom considered a cause of cerebrovascular events in northern Europe.

  20. Wernicke's encephalopathy induced by hyperemesis gravidarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Marqués, Ana; Delgado-García, Silvia; Martín-Bayón, Tina; Martínez-Escoriza, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) is a reversible neurological emergency caused by thiamine deficiency. Prolonged vomiting in pregnancy results in thiamine depletion. The early recognition of its clinical signs and symptoms is essential to establish the suspected diagnosis and can be confirmed by MRI. Prompt administration of thiamine is important for preventing the occurrence of sequelae in the mother and for improving the fetal prognostic. We report a case of WE induced by hyperemesis gravidarum with a good maternal and fetal outcome. PMID:22684836

  1. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Adnane Berdai; Smael Labib; Mustapha Harandou

    2016-01-01

    Wernicke’s encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis...

  2. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Agadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditions that are responsive to vitamin or vitamin derivatives.

  3. Vitamin-Responsive Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Satish Agadi; Quach, Michael M.; Zulfi Haneef

    2013-01-01

    Untreated epileptic encephalopathies in children may potentially have disastrous outcomes. Treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) often may not control the seizures, and even if they do, this measure is only symptomatic and not specific. It is especially valuable to identify potential underlying conditions that have specific treatments. Only a few conditions have definitive treatments that can potentially modify the natural course of disease. In this paper, we discuss the few such conditio...

  4. COMPLEX THERAPY FOR HYPERTENSIVE AND MIXED ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sof'ya Alekseevna Rumyantseva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension (AH is one of the main causes of the occurrence and progression of different types of vascular pathology. AH-associated functional and morphological impairments of the brain are the severe symptom complexes of hypertensive encephalopathy (HE, which require continuous correction. The measures for the prevention and treatment of all cardiovascular diseases, including HE, involve adequate correction of AH, correction of energy neuronal homeostatic disorders, as well as a harmonious combination of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological exposures

  5. Norovírus Associated Encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Salva, I; Brito, MJ; Farela Neves, J

    2011-01-01

    clinical presentation is self limited. It is classified into five groups (genogroups I through V). There are numerous reports of neurologic complications, namely afebrile seizures, but only two reports of associated encephalopathy. Case Report: A 12 month old girl with previous history of a pneumonia treated with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and clarythromycin, presented in our emergency department with strabismus, ataxia for 3 days, later associated with vomiting and diarrhea. On admission...

  6. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne Hughes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  7. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Adrienne Hughes; Alisha Brown; Matthew Valento

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. [West J Emerg Med. 20XX;XX(X...

  8. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  9. Brain-aluminium concentration in dialysis encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, J R; Smith, A I; Ward, M K; Parkinson, I S; Kerr, D N

    1978-04-29

    Brain-aluminium concentrations were found to be significantly higher in 7 patients dying with dialysis encephalopathy (mean 15.9 microgram aluminium/g dry weight) than in 11 dialysed controls (4.4 microgram/g) and in 2 uraemic patients who were not dialysed (2.7 microgram/g). The grey matter from the patients with dialysis encephalopathy contained about three times as much aluminium as white matter. The results suggest that dialysis with untreated and/or softened tap-water (aluminium concentration 0.1-1.2 mg/1) makes the major contribution to brain-aluminium levels; dialysis with deionised water (aluminium concentration normally less than 0.02 mg/1) and intake of phosphate-binding AL(OH)3 gel are less important. Brain aluminium levels remain elevated for up to four years after restoration of good renal function by transplantation. The association of dialysis encephalopathy with high levels of aluminium in the brain and in the dialysis water emphasises the potential neurotoxicity of aluminium in man.

  10. Epileptic encephalopathies (including severe epilepsy syndromes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covanis, Athanasios

    2012-09-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies represent a group of devastating epileptic disorders that appear early in life and are characterized by pharmacoresistant generalized or focal seizures, persistent severe electroencephalography (EEG) abnormalities, and cognitive dysfunction or decline. The ictal and interictal epileptic discharges are age-specific and are the main etiologic factors causing cognitive deterioration. This is most obvious in the idiopathic group. In the symptomatic group, the most common causes are structural, congenital, or acquired and rarely some metabolic disorders. In certain cases, clinical and EEG abnormalities persist and may evolve from one type to another as the child grows older. Various factors trigger and sustain the underlying pathophysiologic process and the ongoing epileptic and epileptiform activity during the most critical periods of brain maturation, perpetuating their deleterious effect on the brain. Immune-mediated mechanisms may have a role, suggested by certain encephalopathies responding to immune-modulating treatments and by the finding of various autoimmune antibodies. The chance of a better cognitive outcome improves with early diagnosis and treatment that is appropriate and effective. Current antiepileptic drugs are, in general, not effective: we urgently need new trials in this very special epileptic category. This article briefly reviews the most common epileptic encephalopathies and analyzes the most important clinical issues. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2012 International League Against Epilepsy.

  11. Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy: Can My Patient Drive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jawaid; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2017-02-01

    Liver cirrhosis is a public health problem and hepatic encephalopathy is one of its main complications, which can be either overt meaning thereby evident and readily diagnosed, or covert/minimal (covert hepatic encephalopathy-CHE) needing psychometric testing for diagnosis. Patients with CHE hepatic encephalopathy have deficits in multiple domains including visuospatial assessment, attention, response inhibition, working memory, along with psychomotor speed to name a few areas. These patients have poor navigational skills, get fatigued easily, and demonstrate poor insight into their driving deficits. The combination of all these leads them to have poor driving skills leading to traffic violations and crashes as demonstrated not only on the simulation testing but also in real-life driving events. There are multiple psychometric tests for CHE testing but these are not easily available and there is no uniform consensus on the gold standard testing as of yet. It does not automatically connote that all patients who test positive on driving simulation testing are unfit to drive. The physicians are encouraged to take driving history from the patient and the caregivers on every encounter and focus their counseling efforts more on patients with recent history of traffic crashes, with abnormal simulation studies and history of alcohol cessation within last year. As physicians are not trained to determine fitness to drive, their approach toward CHE patients in regards to driving restrictions should be driven by ethical principles while as respecting the local laws.

  12. Hepatic Dysfunction in Asphyxiated Neonates: Prospective Case-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Choudhary

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study was performed to determine the occurrence of hypoxic hepatitis in full-term neonates after perinatal asphyxia and to correlate between the rise in enzymes and severity of asphyxia with Apgar score and hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE grading of the neonates. Method and Material This prospective case-controlled study was conducted in a tertiary-level hospital in India for a period of 12 months. The study group A comprised 70 newborns suffering from birth asphyxia, while 30 healthy neonates were included in group B (control. All biochemical parameters of liver function, ie, serum alanine transferase (ALT, aspartate transferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, total protein, serum albumin, bilirubin (total and direct, and international normalized ratio (INR, were measured on postnatal days 1, 3, and 10 in both study and control groups. Results In group A, 22.8% newborns had severe (Apgar score 0–3, 47.1% had moderate (Apgar score 4–5, and 30% had mild (Apgar score 6–7 birth asphyxia at five minutes. In all, 14.28% babies were in HIE stage I, 25.73% babies were in HIE stage II, and 11.42% babies were in HIE stage III. The rest of the newborns, 48.57%, were normal. The prevalence of liver function impairment was seen in 42.85% of asphyxiated neonates. On day 1, ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, PT, and INR were significantly higher, and total protein and serum albumin were significantly lower in group A than in group B. However, ALT and AST correlated well with increasing severity of HIE score. On day 3, there was a rising trend observed in the concentration of mean LDH as HIE staging of neonates progressed from stage 0 to stage III, and among various HIE stages, the difference in LDH was statistically significant. Conclusion We concluded that AST, ALT at 24 hours, and LDH at 72 hours of animation can be a utilitarian diagnostic tool to differentiate asphyxiated neonates from non-asphyxiated neonates and

  13. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children's Specialized Hospital during the period between January 2013 and December 2013. A total of 85 full term asphyxiated neonates who were admitted in NICU and diagnosed as HIE were enrolled in this study. with 50 (58.8%) less than 7 days of age, 31(36.5%) between (8-15) days and 4(4.7%) between (16-28) days. Males were found to be more affected than females (58.9% and 41.1%) respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery was the mode of delivery in 48(56.4%), assisted vaginal delivery in 14(16.5%), emergency caesarian in 19(22.4%) and elective caesarian section in. Percentage of AKI in those babies was 54.1%(46). With 30(65%) from those had non-oliguric type. Ten babies (21.7%) had serum creatinine between (1.5 - 2mg/dl), 29 (63.04%) between (2 - 3mg/dl) and 7(15.22%) between (3-4mg/ dl). This means that the majority of patients presented in injury stage. Hyperkalemia was found in (37.6%), hyponatremia in (27.1%) and hypocalceamia in (25.8%). Most of the babies with AKI had stage (ii) HIE. All babies were treated conservatively and 4(8.6%) died. In conclusion AKI was observed to be a common complication in asphyxiated neonates.

  14. Serum copeptin and neuron specific enolase are markers of neonatal distress and long-term neurodevelopmental outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelen, Dorottya; Andorka, Csilla; Szabó, Miklós; Alafuzoff, Aleksander; Kaila, Kai; Summanen, Milla

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the early changes in serial serum levels of copeptin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in neonates diagnosed with birth asphyxia, and to determine whether these biomarkers measured in the first 168 hours after birth are predictive of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Copeptin and NSE levels were measured from serum samples collected 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after birth from 75 term neonates diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and treated with therapeutic hypothermia for 72 hours. In addition, serum copeptin levels after birth were measured from 10 HIE diagnosed neonates, who were randomized to the normothermic arm of the TOBY cohort. All neonates underwent neurodevelopmental assessment using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-II at two years of age. Copeptin levels were highest at 6 hours after birth and steadily decreased, whereas the highest NSE levels were measured at 24 hours after birth. The biomarker levels correlated with blood-gas parameters (base excess, pH and lactate) at 6 and 12 hours after birth. Copeptin and NSE levels in the early postnatal period were significantly higher in neonates with poor outcome compared to those with favorable outcome at two years of age. Furthermore, in the TOBY cohort, copeptin levels were significantly lower in hypothermic compared to normothermic neonates. To conclude, copeptin and NSE measured in the early postnatal period are potential prognostic biomarkers of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in term neonates diagnosed with HIE and treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  15. Serum copeptin and neuron specific enolase are markers of neonatal distress and long-term neurodevelopmental outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Kelen

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the early changes in serial serum levels of copeptin and neuron-specific enolase (NSE in neonates diagnosed with birth asphyxia, and to determine whether these biomarkers measured in the first 168 hours after birth are predictive of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome. Copeptin and NSE levels were measured from serum samples collected 6, 12, 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after birth from 75 term neonates diagnosed with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE and treated with therapeutic hypothermia for 72 hours. In addition, serum copeptin levels after birth were measured from 10 HIE diagnosed neonates, who were randomized to the normothermic arm of the TOBY cohort. All neonates underwent neurodevelopmental assessment using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-II at two years of age. Copeptin levels were highest at 6 hours after birth and steadily decreased, whereas the highest NSE levels were measured at 24 hours after birth. The biomarker levels correlated with blood-gas parameters (base excess, pH and lactate at 6 and 12 hours after birth. Copeptin and NSE levels in the early postnatal period were significantly higher in neonates with poor outcome compared to those with favorable outcome at two years of age. Furthermore, in the TOBY cohort, copeptin levels were significantly lower in hypothermic compared to normothermic neonates. To conclude, copeptin and NSE measured in the early postnatal period are potential prognostic biomarkers of long-term neurodevelopmental outcome in term neonates diagnosed with HIE and treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  16. Rebuilding the injured brain: use of MRS in clinical regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Alina; Weiss, Michael; Gader, Paul

    2011-03-01

    Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) is the brain manifestation of systemic asphyxia that occurs in 20 out of 1000 births. HIE triggers an immediate neuronal and glial injury leading to necrosis secondary to cellular edema and lysis. Because of this destructive neuronal injury, up to 25% of neonates exhibit severe permanent neuropsychological handicaps in the form of cerebral palsy, with or without associated mental retardation, learning disabilities, or epilepsy. Due to the devastating consequences of HIE, much research has focused on interrupting the cascade of events triggered by HIE. To date, none of these therapies, with the exception of hypothermia, have been successful in the clinical environment. Even in the case of hypothermia, only neonates with mild to moderate HIE respond to therapy. Stem cell therapy offers an attractive potential treatment for HIE. The ability to replace necrotic cells with functional cells could limit the degree of long-term neurological deficits. The neonatal brain offers a unique milieu for stem cell therapy due to its overall plasticity and the continued division of cells in the sub-ventricular zones. New powerful imaging tools allow researchers to track stem cells in vivo post-transplant, as shown in Figure 1. However, neuroimaging still leaves numerous questions unresolved: How can we identify stem cells without using tracking agents, what cells types are destroyed in the brain post injury? What is the final phenotypic fate of transplanted cells? Are the transplanted cells still viable? Do the transplanted cells spare endogenous neuronal tissue? We hypothesize that magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), a broadly used clinical technique that can be performed at the time of a standard MRI scan, can provide answers to these questions when coupled with advanced computational approaches. MRS is widely available clinically, and is a relative measure of different metabolites within the sampled area. These measures are presented as a

  17. Probiotics for people with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Rohan; McGee, Richard G; Riordan, Stephen M; Webster, Angela C

    2017-02-23

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a disorder of brain function as a result of liver failure or portosystemic shunt or both. Both hepatic encephalopathy (clinically overt) and minimal hepatic encephalopathy (not clinically overt) significantly impair patient's quality of life and daily functioning, and represent a significant burden on healthcare resources. Probiotics are live micro-organisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, may confer a health benefit on the host. To determine the beneficial and harmful effects of probiotics in any dosage, compared with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment for people with any grade of acute or chronic hepatic encephalopathy. This review did not consider the primary prophylaxis of hepatic encephalopathy. We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, conference proceedings, reference lists of included trials, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform until June 2016. We included randomised clinical trials that compared probiotics in any dosage with placebo or no intervention, or with any other treatment in people with hepatic encephalopathy. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We conducted random-effects model meta-analysis due to obvious heterogeneity of participants and interventions. We defined a P value of 0.05 or less as significant. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as risk ratio (RR) and continuous outcomes as mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We included 21 trials with 1420 participants, of these, 14 were new trials. Fourteen trials compared a probiotic with placebo or no treatment, and seven trials compared a probiotic with lactulose. The trials used a variety of probiotics; the most commonly used group of probiotic was VSL#3, a proprietary name for a group of eight probiotics. Duration of administration

  18. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  19. Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity.

    OpenAIRE

    Seehra, H.; MacDermott, N.; Lascelles, R. G.; Taylor, T V

    1996-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency is known to lead to certain neurological sequelae including Wernicke- Korsakoff encephalopathy. Signs attributable to this condition include ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, and mental confusion. Recognised predisposing conditions include alcoholism gastric carcinoma, pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged intravenous feeding. We have recently encountered two cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity . O...

  20. Histopathological and imaging modifications in chronic ethanolic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folescu, Roxana; Zamfir, Carmen Lăcrămioara; Sişu, Alina Maria; Motoc, Andrei Gheorghe Marius; Ilie, Adrian Cosmin; Moise, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Chronic abuse of alcohol triggers different types of brain damage. The Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome gets together Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome. Another type of encephalopathy associated with chronic ethanol consumption is represented by the Marchiafava-Bignami malady or syndrome, an extremely rare neurological disorder, which is characterized by a demielinization of corpus callosum, extending as far as a necrosis. Because the frequency of ethanolic encephalopathy is increased and plays a major role in the sudden death of ethanolic patients, we have studied the chronic ethanolic encephalopathy both in deceased and in living patients, presenting different pathologies related to the chronic ethanol consumption. The present study investigated the effects of chronic ethanolic encephalopathy on the central nervous system based both on the histopathological exam of the tissular samples and the imaging investigation, such as MRI and CT.

  1. Reversible cortical blindness in a case of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amlan Kanti Biswas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy is a frequent and often fatal manifestation of chronic liver disease. The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is believed to be multifactorial including impaired blood-brain barrier function, imbalance between the excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in cortex, accumulation of various toxic and false neurotransmitters, and lack of nutrients like oxygen and glucose. Signs and symptoms of hepatic encephalopathy varies and commonly ranges from personality changes, disturbed consciousness, sleep pattern alternation, intellectual deterioration, speech disturbances, asterixis to frank coma and even death. Reversible or transient cortical blindness is rare manifestation of hepatic encephalopathy. It may even precede the phase of altered consciousness in such patients. Very few similar cases have been reported worldwide. Hence, we would like to report a case of transient cortical blindness in a patient of hepatic encephalopathy.

  2. Hashimoto encephalopathy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Koskinas, John; Tzannos, Konstatinos; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios; Mailis, Antonis; Tolis, George; Hadziyannis, Stephanos

    2005-10-01

    To report an instance of Hashimoto encephalopathy probably resulting from pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin. A 36-year-old woman with a 10-year history of autoimmune thyroiditis presented with symptoms and signs consistent with Hashimoto encephalopathy during therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin for chronic hepatitis C. Hashimoto encephalopathy is a rare autoimmune condition that occurs in patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis and high titers of antithyroid antibodies. It is characterized by a variety of nonspecific neuropsychiatric symptoms, increased cerebrospinal fluid protein level, and abnormal brain imaging and electroencephalogram. Prompt response to corticosteroids is observed in most cases. As of August 29, 2005, this is the first report of such an association. An objective causality assessment revealed that the Hashimoto encephalopathy was probably caused by the patient's medications. Hashimoto encephalopathy may rarely be triggered by interferon alfa therapy in susceptible patients.

  3. Cardiovascular dysfunction in infants with neonatal encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, Katey

    2012-04-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia with hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy occurs in approximately 1-2\\/1000 live births and is an important cause of cerebral palsy and associated neurological disabilities in children. Multiorgan dysfunction commonly occurs as part of the asphyxial episode, with cardiovascular dysfunction occurring in up to a third of infants. This narrative paper attempts to review the literature on the importance of early recognition of cardiac dysfunction using echocardiography and biomarkers such as troponin and brain type natriuretic peptide. These tools may allow accurate assessment of cardiac dysfunction and guide therapy to improve outcome.

  4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and the availability cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Gary S; Sills, Allen

    2014-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in sports has been known for > 85 years, and has experienced a resurgence of interest over the past decade, both in the media and in the scientific community. However, there appears to be a disconnection between the public's perception of CTE and the currently available scientific data. The cognitive bias known as the "availability cascade" has been suggested as a reason to explain this rift in knowledge. This review summarizes and updates the history of CTE in sports, discusses recent epidemiological and autopsy studies, summarizes the evidence base related to CTE in sports, and offers recommendations for future directions.

  5. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: Known Causes, Unknown Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacono, Diego; Shively, Sharon B; Edlow, Brian L; Perl, Daniel P

    2017-05-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neuropathologic diagnosis typically made in human brains with a history of repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI). It remains unknown whether CTE occurs exclusively after rTBI, or whether a single TBI (sTBI) can cause CTE. Similarly, it is unclear whether impact (eg, motor vehicle accidents) and non-impact (eg, blasts) types of energy transfer trigger divergent or common pathologies. While it is established that a history of rTBI increases the risk of multiple neurodegenerative diseases (eg, dementia, parkinsonism, and CTE), the possible pathophysiologic and molecular mechanisms underlying these risks have yet to be elucidated. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Post-partum posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Anne Albers; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Obaid, Hayder

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a complex clinical condition with vasogenic subcortical oedema caused by hypertension. Oedema is often seen on magnetic resonance imaging. The wide clinical spectrum ranges from headaches to vision loss and even death. Early diagnosis...... and treatment is important for the reversibility of the condition. In this case report we emphasize the importance of blood pressure control in a post-partum woman, who had a rather complicated pregnancy. The symptoms of PRES were not recognized immediately because of failure to use and acknowledge a blood...

  7. STXBP1 encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamberger, Hannah; Nikanorova, Marina; Willemsen, Marjolein H.

    2016-01-01

    %) with epileptic spasms or tonic seizures as main seizure type. We found no correlation between severity of seizures and severity of ID or between mutation type and seizure characteristics or cognitive outcome. Neurologic comorbidities including autistic features and movement disorders are frequent. We also report......, and the degree of ID. Accordingly, we hypothesize that seizure severity and ID present 2 independent dimensions of the STXBP1-E phenotype. STXBP1-E may be conceptualized as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder rather than a primary epileptic encephalopathy....

  8. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Movement Disorders: Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, Apameh; Tator, Charles H; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela

    2016-05-01

    Association of repetitive brain trauma with progressive neurological deterioration has been described since the 1920s. Punch drunk syndrome and dementia pugilistica (DP) were introduced first to explain symptoms in boxers, and more recently, chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been used to describe a neurodegenerative disease in athletes and military personal with a history of multiple concussions. Although there are many similarities between DP and CTE, a number of key differences are apparent especially when comparing movement impairments. The aim of this review is to compare clinical and pathological aspects of DP and CTE with a focus on disorders of movement.

  9. Repetitive Head Impacts and Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Alosco, Michael L; Huber, Bertrand R

    2016-10-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a distinctive neurodegenerative disease that occurs as a result of repetitive head impacts. CTE can only be diagnosed by postmortem neuropathologic examination of brain tissue. CTE is a unique disorder with a pathognomonic lesion that can be reliably distinguished from other neurodegenerative diseases. CTE is associated with violent behaviors, explosivity, loss of control, depression, suicide, memory loss and cognitive changes. There is increasing evidence that CTE affects amateur athletes as well as professional athletes and military veterans. CTE has become a major public health concern. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE, Mad Cow Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Bruckner

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Mad Cow Disease or BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy became a household name internationally and also in South Africa. International hysteria resulted following reports of a possible link between a disease diagnosed in cattle in Britain and a variant of the disease diagnosed in humans after the presumed ingestion or contact with meat from infected cattle. The European Union instituted a ban on the importation of beef from the United Kingdom during March 1996 that had a severe effect on the beef industry in the UK and also resulted in a world wide consumer resistance against beef consumption.

  11. Bilirubin encephalopathy due to Rh incompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taísa Roberta Ramos Nantes de Castilho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The authors present the case of a newborn of an Rh-factorsensitizedmother, who received early hospital discharge while icteric only to be readmitted at an Emergency Service at five days of age with signs of kernicterus. Despite treatment given, the neonate progressed with a clinical picture of bilirubin encephalopathy. The lack of interaction between the obstetric and neonatal teams, premature hospital discharge, and lack of concern of neonatologists with jaundice in a full-term infant are highlighted as causes of a condition that should have disappeared if there had been adequateprevention.

  12. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yun Jeong; Yum, Mi Sun; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Im, Ho Joon; Kim, Young Hwue; Park, Young Seo; Ko, Tae Sung

    2017-03-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 662 patients, 50 (7.6%) experienced encephalopathy after transplantation. The incidence of encephalopathy was significantly different according to the type of organ transplant: LT, 16/201 (8.0%), HT, 13/55 (23.6%), KT, 5/67 (7.5%), and HSCT, 16/339 (4.7%) (P encephalopathy (n = 14) was the most common encephalopathy for all transplant types, but particularly after HSCT. Hypertensive encephalopathy was the most common after KT and HT, whereas metabolic encephalopathy was the most common after LT. The median time to encephalopathy onset also differed according to the transplant type: 5 days after KT (range 0-491 days), 10 days after HT (1-296 days), 49.5 days after HSCT (9-1,405 days), and 39 days after LT (1-1,092 days) (P = 0.018). The mortality rate among patients with encephalopathy was 42.0% (n = 21/50). Only 5 patients died of neurologic complications. Transplant-associated encephalopathy presented different characteristics according to the type of transplant. Specialized diagnostic approach for neurologic complications specific to the type of transplant may improve survival and quality of life in children after transplantation.

  13. Investigating the Feasibility of a Travelling-wave Chopper for the Clean Separation of 10 MHz Bunches at HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, A; Calaga, R; Caspers, F; Paoluzzi, M

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of cleanly separating the main 10.128MHz bunches from the 101.28MHz satellite bunches with a travelling-wave type chopper at HIE-ISOLDE was investigated using a simple model comprising a chain of synchronised capacitors pulsed at high-voltage. Even with a relatively large transverse aperture of 30mm it appears feasible to remove the satellite bunches spaced at 75mm without significantly perturbing the main bunch. We estimate that for a chopping voltage of 1.2 kV a string of 20 capacitors is required to impart the required deflection of 4 mrad to beams with A=q = 4:5 and the mechanical length of the system can be kept under 0.5 m. The deflection imparted on the main pulse is . 1% of that received by the discarded satellite bunches and the transverse emittance growth of the beam is small if the rise/fall times are kept below 5 ns. The HIE-ISOLDE specification is similar to the specification of the meander strip-line chopper developed at CERN for Linac4 and the application of this technology at ...

  14. Scanning slit for HIE-ISOLDE: vibrational test (linear motion actuator from UHV design, speed = 2.5 mm/s)

    CERN Document Server

    Bravin, E; Sosa, A

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a series of tests performed on the prototype HIE-ISOLDE diagnostic box (HIE-DB) regarding the vibrations and drifts in the transverse position of the scanning blade while moving inside or outside the box. To monitor the transverse position of the blade, a series of 0.1 mm diameter holes were drilled on it and their positions were tracked with an optical system. The linear motion actuator was acquired from UHV design (model LSM38-150-SS), is driven by a stepper motor and has all the guiding mechanisms outside vacuum. The maximum speed of the scanning blade during the tests was 2.5 mm/s. The transverse movement of the slit in the direction perpendicular to the movement was lower than 50 m, and is dominated by the displacement of the contact point of the applied force on the lead-screw. An offset on the slit position was observed while changing the direction of movement of the blade, its amplitude being of the order of 30 m. The amplitudes of the displacements of the transve...

  15. Clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Baugh, Christine M.; Seichepine, Daniel R.; Montenigro, Philip H.; Riley, David O.; Fritts, Nathan G.; Stamm, Julie M.; Robbins, Clifford A.; McHale, Lisa; Simkin, Irene; Stein, Thor D.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Budson, Andrew E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Cantu, Robert C.; McKee, Ann C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to examine the clinical presentation of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in neuropathologically confirmed cases. Methods: Thirty-six adult male subjects were selected from all cases of neuropathologically confirmed CTE at the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy brain bank. Subjects were all athletes, had no comorbid neurodegenerative or motor neuron disease, and had next-of-kin informants to provide retrospective reports of the subjects' histories and clinical presentations. These interviews were conducted blind to the subjects' neuropathologic findings. Results: A triad of cognitive, behavioral, and mood impairments was common overall, with cognitive deficits reported for almost all subjects. Three subjects were asymptomatic at the time of death. Consistent with earlier case reports of boxers, 2 relatively distinct clinical presentations emerged, with one group whose initial features developed at a younger age and involved behavioral and/or mood disturbance (n = 22), and another group whose initial presentation developed at an older age and involved cognitive impairment (n = 11). Conclusions: This suggests there are 2 major clinical presentations of CTE, one a behavior/mood variant and the other a cognitive variant. PMID:23966253

  16. The why and wherefore of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover VPB

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Vijay PB Grover, Joshua M Tognarelli, Nicolas Massie, Mary ME Crossey, Nicola A Cook, Simon D Taylor-Robinson Liver Unit, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a common neuropsychiatric abnormality, which complicates the course of patients with liver disease. It was probably first described by Hippocrates over 2000 years ago, who said that "those whose madness arises from phlegm are quiet and neither shout nor make a disturbance, while those whose madness arises from bile shout, play tricks and will not keep still, but are always up to some mischief". He was presumably describing the differences between patients with pneumonia and acute liver failure. Despite the fact that the syndrome was probably first recognized thousands of years ago, the exact pathogenesis still remains unclear. Furthermore, a precise definition of the syndrome is lacking, as are definitive methods of diagnosing this condition. It is important as both patients with cirrhosis and the general population with whom they interact may be affected as a consequence. At a minimum, the individual may be affected by impaired quality of life, impaired ability to work, and slowed reaction times, which are relevant to the population at large if affected individuals operate heavy machinery or drive a car. Pathogenic mechanisms, diagnostic tools, and treatment options are discussed. Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhosis, ammonia, pathology, treatment, rifaximin, lactulose

  17. Prions and animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntes Polona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases are a unique group of neurodegenerative diseases of animals and humans, which always have a fatal outcome and are transmissible among animals of the same or different species. Scope and Approach. The aim of this work is to review some recent data about animal TSEs, with the emphasis on their causative agents and zoonotic potential, and to discuss why the surveillance and control measures over animal TSEs should remain in force. Key Findings and Conclusions. We still have incomplete knowledge of prions and prion diseases. Scrapie has been present for a very long time and controlled with varied success. Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE emerged unnoticed, and spread within a few years to epidemic proportions, entailing enormous economic consequences and public concerns. Currently, the classical BSE epidemic is under control, but atypical cases do, and probably will, persist in bovine populations. The Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD of the cervids has been spreading in North America and has recently been detected in Europe. Preventive measures for the control of classical BSE remain in force, including the feed ban and removal of specified risk materials. However, active BSE surveillance has considerably decreased. In the absence of such preventive and control measures, atypical BSE cases in healthy slaughtered bovines might persist in the human food chain, and BSE prions might resurface. Moreover, other prion strains might emerge and spread undetected if the appropriate preventive and surveillance measures were to cease, leaving behind inestimable consequences.

  18. [Clinical Features and Treatment of Hashimoto Encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yoshimitsu; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE) is characterized by heterogeneous neurological symptoms. HE is diagnosed based on three criteria-the presence of antithyroid antibodies, neurological symptoms from the cerebrum and/or cerebellum, and a positive response to immunotherapy. We clinically analyzed 18 patients (3 men, 15 women; age range, 38-81years) diagnosed with HE in our hospital from May 2013 to January 2016. Eleven patients showed sensory abnormalities such as strong pain, deep muscle pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia, or neuralgia. Surprisingly, the majority of the pain was distributed in a manner that was not explainable anatomically. Seventeen patients showed motor disturbances, such as weakness, paresis of extremities, or dexterity movement disorder, and eight patients showed give-way weakness, which is disruption of continuous muscle contraction. Other symptoms indicative of brain-related anomalies such as tremor, dystonia, involuntary movements, cerebellar ataxia, parkinsonism, memory loss, and chronic fatigue were also seen. In most patients, such motor, sensory, or higher brain functions were markedly improved with immunosuppressive therapies such as prednisolone, azathioprine, or immunoadsorption therapy. Although give-way weakness and anatomically unexplainable pain are typically considered as being psychogenic in origin, the presence of these symptoms is indicative of HE. HE exhibits diffuse involvement of the entire brain and thus, these symptoms are explainable. We propose that physicians should not diagnose somatoform disorders without first excluding autoimmune encephalopathy.

  19. Probiotics in management of hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barjesh Chander; Singh, Jatinderpal

    2016-12-01

    Gut microflora leads to production of ammonia and endotoxins which play important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). There is relationship between HE and absorption of nitrogenous substances from the intestines. Probiotics play a role in treatment of HE by causing alterations in gut flora by decreasing the counts of pathogen bacteria, intestinal mucosal acidification, decrease in production and absorption of ammonia, alterations in permeability of gut, decreased endotoxin levels and changes in production of short chain fatty acids. Role of gut microbiota using prebiotics, probiotics and synbiotics have been evaluated in the management of minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), overt HE and prevention of HE. Many studies have shown efficacy of probiotics in reduction of blood ammonia levels, treatment of MHE and prevention of HE. However these trials have problems like inclusion of small number of patients, short treatment durations, variability in HE/MHE related outcomes utilized and high bias risk, errors of systematic and random types. Systematic reviews also have shown different results with one systematic review showing clinical benefits whereas another concluded that probiotics do not have any role in treatment of MHE or HE. Also practical questions on optimal dose, ideal combination of organisms, and duration of treatment and persistence of benefits on long term follow-up are still to be clarified. At present, there are no recommendations for use of probiotics in patients with HE.

  20. Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pan; Zhao, Yanling; Wei, Zhenman; Chen, Jing; Yan, Lilong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early recognition and diagnosis of Wernicke encephalopathy is pivotal for the prognosis of this medical emergency, especially in patients with liver failure which predisposes individuals to develop hepatic encephalopathy. For these patients, distinguishing between hepatic encephalopathy and Wernicke encephalopathy is a challenge in real-world clinical practice. A male patient with 21-year medical history of liver cirrhosis presented diarrhea and ascites. One month before this visit, he was noted to have poor appetite and progressive fatigue. After admission, although several major symptoms, including diarrhea, ascites, hyponatremia, and hypoproteinemia, were greatly improved through appropriate treatments, his laboratory indicators were not changed much. His appetite was not reversed at discharge. On the 5th day after discharge, the patient suddenly became reluctant to speak and did not remember the recent happenings. Simultaneously, unsteady gait and strabismus occurred. On the basis of clinical manifestations and brain magnetic resonance imaging scan results, the patient was diagnosed as Wernicke encephalopathy and these relative symptoms were resolved after intravenous vitamin B1. To our knowledge, this is the second case report of Wernicke encephalopathy developing in a critically ill cirrhotic patient without hepatocellular carcinoma or operative intervention. Wernicke encephalopathy may be underdiagnosed in these patients and this case raises physicians’ awareness of its possible onset. PMID:27399058

  1. Dengue viral infections as a cause of encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavige G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics and poor prognostic factors associated with high mortality in dengue encephalopathy. Fifteen patients with confirmed dengue infections, who developed encephalopathy, were recruited from two tertiary care hospitals in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Among the factors that contributed to encephalopathy were: Acute liver failure (73%, electrolyte imbalances (80% and shock (40%. Five (33.3% patients developed seizures. Disseminated intravascular coagulation was seen in five (33.3%. Secondary bacterial infections were observed in 8 (53.3% of our patients. The overall mortality rate was 47%.

  2. Current concepts in the assessment and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cash, W J

    2012-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is defined as a metabolically induced, potentially reversible, functional disturbance of the brain that may occur in acute or chronic liver disease. Standardized nomenclature has been proposed but a standardized approach to the treatment, particularly of persistent, episodic and recurrent encephalopathy associated with liver cirrhosis has not been proposed. This review focuses on the pathogenesis and treatment of HE in patients with cirrhosis. The pathogenesis and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in fulminant hepatic failure is quite different and is reviewed elsewhere.

  3. Severe early onset ethylmalonic encephalopathy with West syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papetti, Laura; Garone, Giacomo; Schettini, Livia; Giordano, Carla; Nicita, Francesco; Papoff, Paola; Zeviani, Massimo; Leuzzi, Vincenzo; Spalice, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by early onset encephalopathy, chronic diarrhoea, petechiae, orthostatic acrocyanosis and defective cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in muscle and brain. High levels of lactic, ethylmalonic and methylsuccinic acids are detected in body fluids. EE is caused by mutations in ETHE1 gene, a mitochondrial sulfur dioxygenase. Neurologic signs and symptoms include progressively delayed development, hypotonia, seizures, and abnormal movements. We report on the clinical, electroencephalographic and MRI findings of a baby with a severe early onset encephalopathy associated with novel ETHE1 gene mutation. This is the first case described in literature with an early pure epileptic onset, presenting with West syndrome.

  4. Isolated Brainstem Involvement in a Patient with Hypertensive Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertensive encephalopathy typically presents with headache, confusion, and bilateral parietooccipital vasogenic edema. Brainstem edema in hypertensive encephalopathy usually occurs in association with typical supratentorial parieto-occipital changes and is usually asymptomatic. We report here a patient with hypertensive encephalopathy, with isolated brain stem involvement on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Rapid treatment of hypertension resulted in clinical and radiological improvement. Prompt recognition of the condition and aggressive treatment of hypertension in such patients is crucial to relieve edema and prevent life-threatening progression.

  5. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: contributions from the Boston University Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, David O; Robbins, Clifford A; Cantu, Robert C; Stern, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with repetitive brain trauma (RBT). Initially described in boxers, CTE has now been found in other contact sport athletes with a history of RBT. In recent years, there has been tremendous media attention regarding CTE, primarily because of the deaths of high profile American football players who were found to have CTE upon neuropathological examination. However, the study of CTE remains in its infancy. This review focuses on research from the Centre for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) at Boston University. This study reviews the formation of the CSTE, major CSTE publications and current ongoing research projects at the CSTE. The neuropathology of CTE has been well-described. Current research focuses on: methods of diagnosing the disease during life (including the development of biomarkers), examination of CTE risk factors (including genetic susceptibility and head impact exposure variables); description of the clinical presentation of CTE; development of research diagnostic criteria for Traumatic Encephalopathy Syndrome; and assessment of mechanism and pathogenesis. Current research at the BU CSTE is aimed at increasing understanding of the long-term consequences of repetitive head impacts and attempting to begin to answer several of the unanswered questions regarding CTE.

  6. Maintenance of whole-body therapeutic hypothermia during patient transport and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tai-Wei; McLean, Claire; Friedlich, Philippe; Seri, Istvan [Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Center for Fetal and Neonatal Medicine and the USC Division of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Grimm, John; Bluml, Stefan [University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Children' s Hospital Los Angeles, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Therapeutic hypothermia has become standard treatment for neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), with brain MRI commonly performed after the child has been rewarmed. However, early imaging during hypothermia might provide information important in designing clinical trials that refine and personalize therapeutic hypothermia. We tested a protocol to ensure safety and maintenance of hypothermia during in-hospital transport and MRI. MRI during therapeutic hypothermia was performed in 13 newborns on the 2nd-3rd postnatal days. Mean one-way transport time was 20.0 ± 3.3 min. Mean rectal temperatures ( C) leaving the unit, upon arrival at the MR suite, during MRI scan and upon return to the unit were 33.5 ± 0.3 C, 33.3 ± 0.3 C, 33.1 ± 0.4 C and 33.4 ± 0.3 C, respectively. Using our protocol therapeutic hypothermia was safely and effectively continued during in-hospital transport and MRI without adverse effects. (orig.)

  7. A Case of Valproate Induced Hyperammonemic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjit Tarafdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-years-old man on phenytoin, levetiracetam, and sodium valproate presented with acute confusion. Routine investigations including serum valproate and phenytoin concentration were normal. His serum ammonia concentration was raised. His valproate was held and 2 days later he recovered with concordant normalisation of serum ammonia concentration. Urea acid cycle disorder was ruled out, and a diagnosis of valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE was made. Asymptomatic hyperammonemia occurs in 15–50% of valproate-treated patients, and while the true incidence of VHE is not known, it is a recognized complication of sodium valproate treatment. VHE typically presents acutely with impaired consciousness, lethargy, and vomiting. Valproate concentrations may be in the therapeutic range, and liver function tests are typically “normal.” Treatment for VHE consists of ceasing valproate and providing supportive care. Some have advocated carnitine replacement.

  8. Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Impact on Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgano, Michael A; Cantu, Robert; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-03-14

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a devastating neuropsychological condition afflicting a small percentage of athletes partaking in high-impact sports. The onset of symptoms lags years behind the inciting events. Repetitive minor head injuries are felt to be the main etiology behind CTE. Routine radiographic imaging generally is unremarkable in cases of CTE. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are advanced MRI-based sequences that have shown promise in detecting early radiographic findings that may be reflective of CTE. Progressive neuronal loss is the histopathological hallmark of this neurodegenerative disease. Strategizing earlier detection techniques is paramount in delivering optimal care to athletes afflicted with CTE.

  9. Transcranial electrostimulation in patients with alcoholic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barylnik Yu.B.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The method of transcranial electrostimulation (TES was used for treating patients with alcoholic encephalopathy against the background of the basic treatment, which includes nootropics, normotimics, soporifics, over-all strengthening therapy and other devices. The course of treatment consisted of 10 daily procedures lasting for 30 minutes. The TES influence was evaluated according to the clinical state, the neurologic status, including EEG (electroencephalogram, the psychometric scales were also used for evaluating the manifestation of depression, anxiety and working memory in comparison with appropriate indices in the control group of patients, who were being treated by the traditional method. TES led to normalization of health state, neurologic status and vegetative innervation, the reduction in pathologic inclination, which corresponded to general improvement of the state of patients, EEG indices and psychometric scales

  10. Brain MRI findings in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklund, Meredith R; Knopman, David S

    2013-08-01

    A 71-year-old woman with myelofibrosis on chemotherapy experienced an acute illness with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Two weeks later, she developed an acute confusional state characterized by disorientation and fluctuating alertness with normal speech and language. Her neurologic examination demonstrated an upper motor neuron pattern of right hemiparesis. She reported double vision though ophthalmoparesis was not appreciated. Her gait was normal. While hospitalized, she developed generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Brain MRI revealed a small area of restricted diffusion of the left precentral gyrus (figure). She was diagnosed with a stroke with secondary seizures; however, as the confusional state resolved, she developed profound retrograde and anterograde amnesia. Review of the brain MRI showed high T2 signal in the medial thalamus and contrast enhancement of the mamillary bodies; a diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome was entertained and she was started on thiamine replacement. The encephalopathy and hemiparesis resolved though she remains severely amnestic.

  11. Hashimoto encephalopathy: Neurological and psychiatric perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlović D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Hashimoto encephalopathy (HE is an autoimmune disease with neurological and neuropsychiatric manifestations and elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Patients are mostly women. Age varies from 8 to 86 years. Prevalence of HE is estimated to be 2.1/100,000. Neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms and signs constitute the clinical picture. The disease responds well to corticosteroid therapy, but sometimes other immunomodulatory therapies must be applied. Autoimmune mechanisms with antibodies against antigens in the brain cortex are suspected. The course of the disease can be acute, subacute, chronic, or relapsing/remitting. Some patients improve spontaneously, but a few died in spite of adequate therapy.

  12. Does this patient have hypertensive encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Foteini; Rizos, Evangelos C; Kosta, Paraskevi; Argyropoulou, Maria I; Elisaf, Moses

    2016-05-01

    A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for further investigation and management of brain metastases. The patient was initially presented with a 4-day history of confusion. On the day of admission, the patient was confused, agitated, disorientated in place and time, and had visual disturbances. His blood pressure was repeatedly recorded high, with levels of systolic blood pressure between 170-210 mm Hg. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of high signal on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, located bilaterally in the white matter of the occipital regions and unilateral in the left frontal lobe, suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Aggressive treatment of hypertension resulted in complete resolution of the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Wernicke encephalopathy and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, A; Brandel, J P; Grignon, Y; Sazdovitch, V; Seilhean, D; Faucheux, B; Privat, N; Brault, J L; Vital, A; Uro-Coste, E; Pluot, M; Chapon, F; Maurage, C A; Letournel, F; Vespignani, H; Place, G; Degos, C F; Peoc'h, K; Haïk, S; Hauw, J J

    2009-06-01

    We assessed the prevalence of Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) in all 657 cases suspected of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD) referred from 2001 to 2006 to the French Neuropathology Network of CJD. Clinical, biological and imaging data were reviewed when the diagnosis of WE was made at autopsy. No CJD was found in five cases suspected of sporadic CJD. In these five cases, myoclonus had been observed in four, CSF 14-3-3 protein in two. In 14 other cases, WE was combined with CJD, 13 of which were sporadic. These belonged mainly to the molecular variants of sporadic CJD associated with a long duration of disease. This stresses the necessity of remaining alert to the diagnosis of WE when CJD is suspected.

  14. Is chronic traumatic encephalopathy a real disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has received widespread media attention and is treated in the lay press as an established disease, characterized by suicidality and progressive dementia. The extant literature on CTE is reviewed here. There currently are no controlled epidemiological data to suggest that retired athletes are at increased risk for dementia or that they exhibit any type of unique neuropathology. There remain no established clinical or pathological criteria for diagnosing CTE. Despite claims that CTE occurs frequently in retired National Football League (NFL) players, recent studies of NFL retirees report that they have an all-cause mortality rate that is approximately half of the expected rate, and even lower suicide rates. In addition, recent clinical studies of samples of cognitively impaired NFL retirees have failed to identify any unique clinical syndrome. Until further controlled studies are completed, it appears to be premature to consider CTE a verifiable disease.

  15. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Dejan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by the following symptoms: seizures, impaired consciousness and/or vision, vomiting, nausea, and focal neurological signs. Diagnostic imaging includes examination by magnetic resonance (MR and computed tomography (CT, where brain edema is visualized bi-laterally and symmetrically, predominantly posteriorly, parietally, and occipitally. Case report. We presented a 73-year-old patient with the years-long medical history of hipertension and renal insufficiency, who developed PRES with the symptomatology of the rear cranium. CT and MR verified changes in the white matter involving all lobes on both sides of the brain. After a two-week treatment (antihypertensive, hypolipemic and rehydration therapy clinical improvement with no complications occurred, with complete resolution of changes in the white matter observed on CT and MR. Conclusion. PRES is a reversible syndrome in which the symptoms withdraw after several days to several weeks if early diagnosis is made and appropriate treatment started without delay.

  16. Quantitative Risk Assessment of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Toshiyuki; Kasuga, Fumiko

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a progressive neurological disease of cattle affecting the central nervous system and was first diagnosed in the United Kingdom (UK) in 1986 (Wells et al., 1987). This disease is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) which includes Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans and scrapie in sheep. The causative agent of TSE is considered to be an abnormal form of prion protein. However, the details of its pathogenic mechanism have not been fully identified. Scrapie, which causes neurological symptoms in sheep and goats, has existed in the UK for 200 years (Hoinville, 1996) and spread across the rest of the world in the 1900s (Detwiler & Baylis, 2003). There has been no report so far that scrapie can be transmitted to humans. Initially, BSE was also considered as a disease affecting only animals. However, a variant type of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the UK, and exposure to a BSE agent was suspected (Collinge, Sidle, Meads, Ironside, & Hill, 1996). vCJD is clinically and pathologically different from the sporadic type of CJD, and age at clinical onset of vCJD is younger than sporadic type (Will et al., 1996). Since the UK government announced the possible association between BSE and vCJD in 1996, BSE has become a huge public health concern all over the world. Of particular concern about vCJD, the fatal disease in younger age, distorted consumer confidence in beef safety, and as a result reduced beef consumption has been seen in many BSE-affected countries.

  17. Encephalopathy in Wilson disease: copper toxicity or liver failure?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferenci, Peter; Litwin, Tomasz; Seniow, Joanna; Czlonkowska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a complex syndrome of neurological and psychiatric signs and symptoms that is caused by portosystemic venous shunting with or without liver disease irrespective of its etiology...

  18. Uremic encephalopathy and other brain disorders associated with renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifter, Julian Lawrence; Samuels, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Kidney failure is one of the leading causes of disability and death and one of the most disabling features of kidney failure and dialysis is encephalopathy. This is probably caused by the accumulation of uremic toxins. Other important causes are related to the underlying disorders that cause kidney failure, particularly hypertension. The clinical manifestations of uremic encephalopathy include mild confusional states to deep coma, often with associated movement disorders, such as asterixis. Most nephrologists consider cognitive impairment to be a major indication for the initiation of renal replacement therapy with dialysis with or without subsequent transplantation. Sleep disorders, including Ekbom's syndrome (restless legs syndrome) are also common in patients with kidney failure. Renal replacement therapies are also associated with particular neurologic complications including acute dialysis encephalopathy and chronic dialysis encephalopathy, formerly known as dialysis dementia. The treatments and prevention of each are discussed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  19. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  20. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: An atypical postpartum complication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul, Debashish; Kulkarni, SachinNarayan; Choudhury, MiliDas; Maity, GD

    2016-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is presented by headache, altered mental status, blurring of vision, vomiting and seizure in conjunction with radiological finding of posterior cerebral white matter edema...

  1. Safety, efficacy, and patient acceptability of rifaximin for hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimer, Nina; Krag, Aleksander; Gluud, Lise L

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a complex disease entity ranging from mild cognitive dysfunction to deep coma. Traditionally, treatment has focused on a reduction of ammonia through a reduced production, absorption, or clearance. Rifaximin is a nonabsorbable antibiotic, which reduces the production of ...... and safety of long-term treatment with rifaximin and evaluate effects of combination therapy with lactulose and branched-chain amino acids for patients with liver cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy....... of ammonia by gut bacteria and, to some extent, other toxic derivatives from the gut. Clinical trials show that these effects improve episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. A large randomized trial found that rifaximin prevents recurrent episodes of hepatic encephalopathy. Most patients were treated...

  2. Gene Panel Testing in Epileptic Encephalopathies and Familial Epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S.; Larsen, Line H.G.; Johannesen, Katrine M.

    2016-01-01

    to epileptic encephalopathies (EEs). Potentially causative variants were evaluated by literature and database searches, submitted to bioinformatic prediction algorithms, and validated by Sanger sequencing. If possible, parents were included for segregation analysis. We identified a presumed disease...

  3. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2017-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. Objectives: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. Search methods: We identified trials through...... included randomised clinical trials, irrespective of the bias control, language, or publication status. Data collection and analysis: The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update...

  4. Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Through FDDNP PET Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    characteristic distribution is felt to be the cardinal pathologic feature of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This project will examine whether FDDNP PET...chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Pathological series have indicated that a characteristic feature of CTE is accumulation of tau protein in the...with age . Table 1 - Regional uptake in ROIs with Age , Years of Pro Fighting, and Number of Pro Fights (Pearson’s correlations; ns – non significant

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Epileptic Encephalopathies in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puneet Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic encephalopathies refer to a group of disorders in which the unremitting epileptic activity contributes to severe cognitive and behavioral impairments above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and these can worsen over time leading to progressive cerebral dysfunction. Several syndromes have been described based on their electroclinical features (age of onset, seizure type, and EEG pattern. This review briefly describes the clinical evaluation and management of commonly encountered epileptic encephalopathies in children.

  6. Early progressive encephalopathy in boys and MECP2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankirawatana, P; Leonard, H; Ellaway, C; Scurlock, J; Mansour, A; Makris, C M; Dure, L S; Friez, M; Lane, J; Kiraly-Borri, C; Fabian, V; Davis, M; Jackson, J; Christodoulou, J; Kaufmann, W E; Ravine, D; Percy, A K

    2006-07-11

    MECP2 mutations mainly occur in females with Rett syndrome. Mutations have been described in 11 boys with progressive encephalopathy: seven of nine with affected sisters and two de novo. The authors report four de novo occurrences: three pathogenic and one potentially pathogenic. Common features include failure to thrive, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly, and abnormal motor control. MECP2 mutations should be assessed in boys with progressive encephalopathy and one or more of respiratory insufficiency, abnormal movements or tone, and intractable seizures.

  7. Pathology of the Superior Colliculus in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A; McKee, Ann C; Cairns, Nigel J

    2017-01-01

    To investigate neuropathological changes in the superior colliculus in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. The densities of the tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, dot-like grains, astrocytic tangles, and neuritic plaques, together with abnormally enlarged neurons, typical neurons, vacuolation, and frequency of contacts with blood vessels, were studied across the superior colliculus from pia mater to the periaqueductal gray in eight chronic traumatic encephalopathy and six control cases. Tau-immunoreactive pathology was absent in the superior colliculus of controls but present in varying degrees in all chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, significant densities of tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, NT, or dot-like grains being present in three cases. No significant differences in overall density of the tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, dot-like grains, enlarged neurons, vacuoles, or contacts with blood vessels were observed in control and chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, but chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases had significantly lower mean densities of neurons. The distribution of surviving neurons across the superior colliculus suggested greater neuronal loss in intermediate and lower laminae in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Changes in density of the tau-immunoreactive pathology across the laminae were variable, but in six chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases, densities of tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, or dot-like grains were significantly greater in intermediate and lower laminae. Pathological changes were not correlated with the distribution of blood vessels. The data suggest significant pathology affecting the superior colliculus in a proportion of chronic traumatic encephalopathy cases with a laminar distribution which could compromise motor function rather than sensory analysis.

  8. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    della Faille, Laetitia; Fieuws, Steffen; Van Paesschen, W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914-925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or o...

  9. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Faille, Laetitia della; Fieuws, S.; Van Paesschen, W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914?925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or o...

  10. Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehra, H.; MacDermott, N.; Lascelles, R. G.; Taylor, T. V.

    1996-01-01

    Thiamine deficiency is known to lead to certain neurological sequelae including Wernicke- Korsakoff encephalopathy. Signs attributable to this condition include ataxia, ophthalmoplegia, nystagmus, and mental confusion. Recognised predisposing conditions include alcoholism gastric carcinoma, pyloric obstruction, hyperemesis gravidarum, and prolonged intravenous feeding. We have recently encountered two cases of Wernicke's encephalopathy after vertical banded gastroplasty for morbid obesity . Other neurological sequelae are recognised after vertical banded gastroplasty, including Guillain-Barre syndrome, psychosis, and pseudoathetosis, but the causes are multifactorial. PMID:8601118

  11. Simulations of the HIE-ISOLDE radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher vacuum using the Monte Carlo test particle code Molflow

    CERN Document Server

    Hermann, M; Vandoni, G; Kersevan, R

    2013-01-01

    The existing ISOLDE radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher (RFQCB) will be upgraded in the framework of the HIE-ISOLDE design study. In order to improve beam properties, the upgrade includes vacuum optimization with the aim of tayloring the overall pressure profile: increasing gas pressure at the injection to enhance cooling and reducing it at the extraction to avoid emittance blow up while the beam is being bunched. This paper describes the vacuum modelling of the present RFQCB using Test Particle Monte Carlo (Molflow+). In order to benchmark the simulation results, real pressure profiles along the existing RFQCB are measured using variable helium flux in the cooling section and compared with the pressure profiles obtained with Molflow+. Vacuum conditions of the improved future RFQCB can then be simulated to validate its design. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Wernicke encephalopathy after obesity surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sonal; Kumar, Abhay

    2007-03-13

    To characterize the clinical features, risk factors, radiographic findings, and prognosis of Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase, Ovid, ISI (Science Citation Index), and Google Scholar for case reports, case series, or cohort studies of Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. We found 32 cases (27 of whom were women) reported, from 2 weeks to 18 months after the procedure. Most patients had vomiting as a risk factor (n = 25) and presented with the triad of Wernicke encephalopathy (confusion, ataxia, and nystagmus; n = 21). Optic neuropathy, papilledema, deafness, seizures, asterixis, weakness, and sensory and motor neuropathy were also reported. Characteristic radiographic findings were hyperintense signals in the periaqueductal gray area and dorsal medial nucleus of the thalamus; radiographs were normal in 15 patients. One series from Brazil reported 4 patients (among 50 patients) with Wernicke encephalopathy; all presented with vomiting and concomitant peripheral neuropathy at a median of 2.5 months (1.5 to 3 months) after bariatric surgery. Another series identified 2 of 23 patients (both women) with Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery. Wernicke encephalopathy after bariatric surgery usually occurs between 4 and 12 weeks postoperatively, especially in young women with vomiting. Atypical neurologic features are common. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, because radiographic findings are normal in some patients. Prospective studies to determine the prevalence of this problem and protocols for preventive thiamine supplementation need evaluation.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress implicated in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Nguyen, Linda; Bailes, Julian E; Lee, John M; Robson, Matthew J; Omalu, Bennet I; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L

    2016-03-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by neurofibrillary tau tangles following repetitive neurotrauma. The underlying mechanism linking traumatic brain injury to chronic traumatic encephalopathy has not been elucidated. The authors investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress as a link between acute neurotrauma and chronic neurodegeneration. The authors used pharmacological, biochemical, and behavioral tools to assess the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in linking acute repetitive traumatic brain injury to the development of chronic neurodegeneration. Data from the authors' clinically relevant and validated rodent blast model were compared with those obtained from postmortem human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens from a National Football League player and World Wrestling Entertainment wrestler. The results demonstrated strong correlation of endoplasmic reticulum stress activation with subsequent tau hyperphosphorylation. Various endoplasmic reticulum stress markers were increased in human chronic traumatic encephalopathy specimens, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response was associated with an increase in the tau kinase, glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Docosahexaenoic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, improved cognitive performance in the rat model 3 weeks after repetitive blast exposure. The data showed that docosahexaenoic acid administration substantially reduced tau hyperphosphorylation (t = 4.111, p chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Docosahexaenoic acid therefore warrants further investigation as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  14. Clinical predictors and differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faille, Laetitia Della; Fieuws, S; Van Paesschen, W

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the clinical predictors and the differential diagnosis of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) in patients presenting with acute neurological symptoms and risk factors for PRES. Using the diagnostic algorithm for PRES from Fugate and Rabinstein (Lancet Neurol 14(9):914-925, 1), we carried out a retrospective study on 220 patients, presenting with acute neurological symptoms such as seizures, encephalopathy, headache, visual disturbances or other focal neurological signs that appear in the clinical setting of risk factors such as hypertension/blood pressure fluctuations, chemotherapy, renal failure, autoimmune disorders, or eclampsia, in whom imaging of the brain was performed to exclude PRES. Seventeen percent of patients had a radiologically confirmed diagnosis of PRES. Univariable logistic regression showed a significant association between PRES and epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, hypertension, chemotherapy and renal failure. Multivariable logistic regression of acute neurological symptoms and risk factors showed a significant association of epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, hypertension and chemotherapy with PRES. Using these variables to predict PRES yielded a discriminative ability (AUC) equal to 0.793. Diagnoses when PRES was not confirmed included primary or secondary headaches (26%), toxic-metabolic encephalopathy (21%), vascular pathology (12%) and other less frequent disorders. Epileptic seizures, encephalopathy, visual disturbances, hypertension, renal failure and chemotherapy were the best clinical predictors of PRES, while headache, immune suppression and autoimmune disease were not useful for the clinical diagnosis of PRES in our study.

  15. Development of cerebral gray and white matter injury and cerebral inflammation over time after inflammatory perinatal asphyxia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonestroo, Hilde J C; Heijnen, Cobi J.; Groenendaal, Floris|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073282596; Van Bel, Frank|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072811455; Nijboer, Cora H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311481000

    2015-01-01

    Antenatal inflammation is associated with increased severity of hypoxic-ischemic (HI) encephalopathy and adverse outcome in human neonates and experimental rodents. We investigated the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the timing of HI-induced cerebral tissue loss and gray matter injury, white

  16. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy characterized by parallel use of the continuous reaction time and portosystemic encephalopathy tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, M M; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B; Vilstrup, H

    2015-01-01

    based vs. paper and pencil). To compare results of the Continuous Reaction time (CRT) and the Portosystemic Encephalopathy (PSE) tests in a large unselected cohort of cirrhosis patients without clinically detectable brain impairment and to clinically characterize the patients according to their test...... results. The CRT method is a 10-minute computerized test of a patient's motor reaction time stability (CRTindex) to 150 auditory stimuli. The PSE test is a 20-minute paper-pencil test evaluating psychomotor speed. Both tests were performed at the same occasion in 129 patients. Both tests were normal...

  17. Higher Grades and Repeated Recurrence of Hepatic Encephalopathy May Be Related to High Serum Manganese Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobtan, Abdelrahman A; El-Kalla, Ferial S; Soliman, Hanan H; Zakaria, Soha S; Goda, Mohamed A

    2016-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a serious complication of liver failure. Until now, the precise pathophysiologic mechanisms are not fully determined. It has been demonstrated that manganese plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Therefore, we studied manganese levels in serum of cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy in relation to grading and recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy. One hundred persons were enrolled in the study, 80 cirrhotic patients with or without encephalopathy and 20 healthy controls. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed clinically and by laboratory findings. Serum manganese levels were measured in all participants. The grading of hepatic encephalopathy was significantly correlated to the severity of liver dysfunction. The mean serum manganese level was significantly higher in cirrhotic patients than in controls and in cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy than in those without encephalopathy. It was also significantly higher in patients with advanced grading of hepatic encephalopathy. Serum manganese level was positively correlated to number of recurrences of encephalopathy during a 6-month follow-up period. Serum manganese levels were able to predict recurrence of hepatic encephalopathy within 6 months following the episode. Serum manganese levels are positively correlated to the modified Child-Pugh score of cirrhosis as well as grading and number of recurrences of hepatic encephalopathy. Higher manganese levels seem to be related to worsening of the condition, and its measurement may be used as a predictor of repeated recurrences.

  18. Defining Optimal Head-Tilt Position of Resuscitation in Neonates and Young Infants Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal S Bhalala

    Full Text Available Head-tilt maneuver assists with achieving airway patency during resuscitation. However, the relationship between angle of head-tilt and airway patency has not been defined. Our objective was to define an optimal head-tilt position for airway patency in neonates (age: 0-28 days and young infants (age: 29 days-4 months. We performed a retrospective study of head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of neonates and infants to define the angle of head-tilt for airway patency. We excluded those with an artificial airway or an airway malformation. We defined head-tilt angle a priori as the angle between occipito-ophisthion line and ophisthion-C7 spinous process line on the sagittal MR images. We evaluated medical records for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE and exposure to sedation during MRI. We analyzed MRI of head and neck regions of 63 children (53 neonates and 10 young infants. Of these 63 children, 17 had evidence of airway obstruction and 46 had a patent airway on MRI. Also, 16/63 had underlying HIE and 47/63 newborn infants had exposure to sedative medications during MRI. In spontaneously breathing and neurologically depressed newborn infants, the head-tilt angle (median ± SD associated with patent airway (125.3° ± 11.9° was significantly different from that of blocked airway (108.2° ± 17.1° (Mann Whitney U-test, p = 0.0045. The logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of patent airways progressively increased with an increasing head-tilt angle, with > 95% probability of a patent airway at head-tilt angle 144-150°.

  19. Defining Optimal Head-Tilt Position of Resuscitation in Neonates and Young Infants Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalala, Utpal S; Hemani, Malvi; Shah, Meehir; Kim, Barbara; Gu, Brian; Cruz, Angelo; Arunachalam, Priya; Tian, Elli; Yu, Christine; Punnoose, Joshua; Chen, Steven; Petrillo, Christopher; Brown, Alisa; Munoz, Karina; Kitchen, Grant; Lam, Taylor; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Allen, Robert H; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2016-01-01

    Head-tilt maneuver assists with achieving airway patency during resuscitation. However, the relationship between angle of head-tilt and airway patency has not been defined. Our objective was to define an optimal head-tilt position for airway patency in neonates (age: 0-28 days) and young infants (age: 29 days-4 months). We performed a retrospective study of head and neck magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of neonates and infants to define the angle of head-tilt for airway patency. We excluded those with an artificial airway or an airway malformation. We defined head-tilt angle a priori as the angle between occipito-ophisthion line and ophisthion-C7 spinous process line on the sagittal MR images. We evaluated medical records for Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE) and exposure to sedation during MRI. We analyzed MRI of head and neck regions of 63 children (53 neonates and 10 young infants). Of these 63 children, 17 had evidence of airway obstruction and 46 had a patent airway on MRI. Also, 16/63 had underlying HIE and 47/63 newborn infants had exposure to sedative medications during MRI. In spontaneously breathing and neurologically depressed newborn infants, the head-tilt angle (median ± SD) associated with patent airway (125.3° ± 11.9°) was significantly different from that of blocked airway (108.2° ± 17.1°) (Mann Whitney U-test, p = 0.0045). The logistic regression analysis showed that the proportion of patent airways progressively increased with an increasing head-tilt angle, with > 95% probability of a patent airway at head-tilt angle 144-150°.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of S100B urinary testing at birth in full-term asphyxiated newborns to predict neonatal death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Gazzolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neonatal death in full-term infants who suffer from perinatal asphyxia (PA is a major subject of investigation, since few tools exist to predict patients at risk of ominous outcome. We studied the possibility that urine S100B measurement may identify which PA-affected infants are at risk of early postnatal death. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a cross-sectional study between January 1, 2001 and December 1, 2006 we measured S100B protein in urine collected from term infants (n = 132, 60 of whom suffered PA. According to their outcome at 7 days, infants with PA were subsequently classified either as asphyxiated infants complicated by hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy with no ominous outcome (HIE Group; n = 48, or as newborns who died within the first post-natal week (Ominous Outcome Group; n = 12. Routine laboratory variables, cerebral ultrasound, neurological patterns and urine concentrations of S100B protein were determined at first urination and after 24, 48 and 96 hours. The severity of illness in the first 24 hours after birth was measured using the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology-Perinatal Extension (SNAP-PE. Urine S100B levels were higher from the first urination in the ominous outcome group than in healthy or HIE Groups (p1.0 microg/L S100B had a sensitivity/specificity of 100% for predicting neonatal death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Increased S100B protein urine levels in term newborns suffering PA seem to suggest a higher risk of neonatal death for these infants.

  1. Xenon and Sevoflurane Provide Analgesia during Labor and Fetal Brain Protection in a Perinatal Rat Model of Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Zhuang, Lei; Rei Fidalgo, António M.; Petrides, Evgenia; Terrando, Niccolo; Wu, Xinmin; Sanders, Robert D.; Robertson, Nicola J.; Johnson, Mark R.; Maze, Mervyn; Ma, Daqing

    2012-01-01

    It is not possible to identify all pregnancies at risk of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Many women use some form of analgesia during childbirth and some anesthetic agents have been shown to be neuroprotective when used as analgesics at subanesthetic concentrations. In this study we sought to understand the effects of two anesthetic agents with presumptive analgesic activity and known preconditioning-neuroprotective properties (sevoflurane or xenon), in reducing hypoxia-induced brain damage in a model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. The analgesic and neuroprotective effects at subanesthetic levels of sevoflurane (0.35%) or xenon (35%) were tested in a rat model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. Analgesic effects were measured by assessing maternal behavior and spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activation using c-Fos. In separate experiments, intrauterine fetal asphyxia was induced four hours after gas exposure; on post-insult day 3 apoptotic cell death was measured by caspase-3 immunostaining in hippocampal neurons and correlated with the number of viable neurons on postnatal day (PND) 7. A separate cohort of pups was nurtured by a surrogate mother for 50 days when cognitive testing with Morris water maze was performed. Both anesthetic agents provided analgesia as reflected by a reduction in the number of stretching movements and decreased c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Both agents also reduced the number of caspase-3 positive (apoptotic) neurons and increased cell viability in the hippocampus at PND7. These acute histological changes were mirrored by improved cognitive function measured remotely after birth on PND 50 compared to control group. Subanesthetic doses of sevoflurane or xenon provided both analgesia and neuroprotection in this model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. These data suggest that anesthetic agents with neuroprotective properties may be effective in preventing HIE and should be tested in clinical

  2. Psychiatric phenotypes in chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Ian; Alosco, Michael L; McKee, Ann C

    2017-09-06

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disorder involving cognitive, motor, and psychiatrically-relevant symptoms resulting from repetitive head impacts. Psychiatric phenotypes of CTE, including depression and suicidality, present particular challenges for CTE research, given that the diagnosis requires postmortem neuropathological examination. The pathognomonic lesion of CTE is the perivascular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau) protein at the depths of cortical sulci. These lesions are found in the earliest disease stages, and with advancing pathological severity, ptau deposition occurs in widespread brain regions in a four-stage scheme of severity. We review the psychiatric phenotypes of individuals neuropathologically diagnosed with CTE, and suggest that earlier CTE stages hold particular interest for psychiatric CTE research. In the early CTE stages, there is ptau pathology in frontal cortex and axonal loss in the frontal white matter, followed by progressive ptau neurofibrillary degeneration in the amygdala and hippocampus. Neuropathological changes in the frontal and medial temporal lobes may underlie psychiatric phenotypes. Additional insight into the association between CTE pathology and psychiatric sequelae may come from advancements in in vivo methods of CTE detection. Further epidemiological, clinical, and postmortem studies are needed to validate the nature of psychiatric sequelae in CTE. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. A critical review of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Grant L; Gardner, Andrew J; McCrory, Paul; Zafonte, Ross; Castellani, Rudy J

    2015-09-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) has been described in the literature as a neurodegenerative disease with: (i) localized neuronal and glial accumulations of phosphorylated tau (p-tau) involving perivascular areas of the cerebral cortex, sulcal depths, and with a preference for neurons within superficial cortical laminae; (ii) multifocal axonal varicosities and axonal loss involving deep cortex and subcortical white matter; (iii) relative absence of beta-amyloid deposits; (iv) TDP-43 immunoreactive inclusions and neurites; and (v) broad and diverse clinical features. Some of the pathological findings reported in the literature may be encountered with age and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, the focality of the p-tau cortical findings in particular, and the regional distribution, are believed to be unique to CTE. The described clinical features in recent cases are very similar to how depression manifests in middle-aged men and with frontotemporal dementia as the disease progresses. It has not been established that the described tau pathology, especially in small amounts, can cause complex changes in behavior such as depression, substance abuse, suicidality, personality changes, or cognitive impairment. Future studies will help determine the extent to which the neuropathology is causally related to the diverse clinical features. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Corpus callosum atrophy in Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Young-Min; Na, Duk L; Park, Seong Ho; Kim, Manho

    2005-10-01

    Neuropathologic changes in Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) involve variable brain structures. Corpus callosum involvement in WE, however, is largely unknown. The authors investigated the degree and the pattern of corpus callosum changes in WE according to the etiologies. Nineteen patients with WE (between 34 and 81 years) and 19 age- and sex-matched control participants were included. The total cross-sectional callosal area and 5 callosal subregions (C1-C5) were measured by tracing outer margins in the midsagittal sections. Subregions were determined by placing radial dividers with 10 rays. The pixel numbers for corpus callosums were calculated, and the values obtained were adjusted for head size variations. The causes of WE were alcoholism (10), intestinal surgery (5), anorexia (3), and hyperemesis gravidarum (1). The mean size of the total corpus callosum was significantly reduced in alcoholic WE (P< .001; 527.8 +/- 70.8 mm2 for alcoholic WE; 664.6 +/- 58.1 mm2 for the corresponding controls), but not in nonalcoholic WE. In subregion analysis, prefrontal callosum (C2) atrophy was the most prominent in alcoholic WE. In contrast, only splenium (C5) was atrophied in nonalcoholic WE. The degree of atrophy did not change throughout the follow-up period (mean 5.3 weeks). This study suggests that the extent and location of corpus callosum atrophy differs between alcoholic WE and nonalcoholic WE, implying separate contribution of alcohol neurotoxicity and nutritional deficiency.

  5. Neuroimaging of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Korsakoff's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young-Chul; Chanraud, Sandra; Sullivan, Edith V

    2012-06-01

    There is considerable evidence that neuroimaging findings can improve the early diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in clinical settings. The most distinctive neuroimaging finding of acute WE are cytotoxic edema and vasogenic edema, which are represented by bilateral symmetric hyperintensity alterations on T2-weighted MR images in the periphery of the third ventricle, periaqueductal area, mammillary bodies and midbrain tectal plate. An initial bout of WE can result in Korsakoff's syndrome (KS), but repeated bouts in conjunction with its typical comorbidity, chronic alcoholism, can result in signs of tissue degeneration in vulnerable brain regions. Chronic abnormalities identified with neuroimaging enable examination of brain damage in living patients with KS and have expanded the understanding of the neuropsychological deficits resulting from thiamine deficiency, alcohol neurotoxicity, and their comorbidity. Brain structure and functional studies indicate that the interactions involving the thalamus, mammillary bodies, hippocampus, frontal lobes, and cerebellum are crucial for memory formation and executive functions, and the interruption of these circuits by WE and chronic alcoholism can contribute substantially to the neuropsychological deficits in KS.

  6. Pathogenetic aspects of alcoholic encephalopathy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchetinin S.G.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered to be the most common exogenous toxins, causing encephalopathy. The defeat of almost all parts of the nervous system should be assigned to the special features of ethanol. Neurophysiological mechanisms of development of substance dependence are based in the stem and limbic structures of the brain that are involved in ensuring the regulation of emotional state, mood, motivation sphere, psychophysical tone of human behavior in general and its adaptation to the environment. Stress or disruption of the normal functioning of these structures can lead to the formation of abstinence syndrome, affective disorders in remission and craving for alcohol. Dopaminergic and opioid (endorphin system play an important role in the genesis of various mental and motor disorders. In some way alcohol dependence can be regarded as an endorfinodefitsitnoe disease with a pathogenetic point of view. Activating of opioidereal system by trans-cranial electrical stimulation promotes the restoration of disturbed emotional, cognitive and autonomic functions, reduces craving for alcohol and in that way increases the effectiveness of rehabilitation treatment

  7. The neuropathology of chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C; Stein, Thor D; Kiernan, Patrick T; Alvarez, Victor E

    2015-05-01

    Repetitive brain trauma is associated with a progressive neurological deterioration, now termed as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Most instances of CTE occur in association with the play of sports, but CTE has also been reported in association with blast injuries and other neurotrauma. Symptoms of CTE include behavioral and mood changes, memory loss, cognitive impairment and dementia. Like many other neurodegenerative diseases, CTE is diagnosed with certainty only by neuropathological examination of brain tissue. CTE is a tauopathy characterized by the deposition of hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) protein as neurofibrillary tangles, astrocytic tangles and neurites in striking clusters around small blood vessels of the cortex, typically at the sulcal depths. Severely affected cases show p-tau pathology throughout the brain. Abnormalities in phosphorylated 43 kDa TAR DNA-binding protein are found in most cases of CTE; beta-amyloid is identified in 43%, associated with age. Given the importance of sports participation and physical exercise to physical and psychological health as well as disease resilience, it is critical to identify the genetic risk factors for CTE as well as to understand how other variables, such as stress, age at exposure, gender, substance abuse and other exposures, contribute to the development of CTE. © 2015 International Society of Neuropathology.

  8. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmela Tartaglia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE is described as a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease believed to result from multiple concussions. Traditionally, concussions were considered benign events and although most people recover fully, about 10% develop a post-concussive syndrome with persisting neurological, cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms. CTE was once thought to be unique to boxers, but it has now been observed in many different athletes having suffered multiple concussions as well as in military personal after repeated blast injuries. Much remains unknown about the development of CTE but its pathological substrate is usually tau, similar to that seen in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. The aim of this perspective is to compare and contrast clinical and pathological CTE with the other neurodegenerative proteinopathies and highlight that there is an urgent need for understanding the relationship between concussion and the development of CTE as it may provide a window into the development of a proteinopathy and thus new avenues for treatment.

  9. [Definition and diagnostic principles of encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göllnitz, G

    1968-01-01

    Definition of the collecting terms "early infantile brain damages" and "encephalopathy" as well as temporal delimination of the prenatal, perinatal and postnatal injury period. The diagnostical value of anamnesis, of neurological findings (tone, reflex-mechanisms in the different infantile developmental stages), motometric examinations, radiographs of cranial and hand skeleton, electroencephalogram, pneumoencephalogram and liquor is discussed thoroughly. The termed slighter early infantile brain damages are somatic the easier to demonstrate the earlier after birth this is performed. If the children are prejudged not till 4-6 years, the diagnostical pains transpose first of all to psychosomatic methods, except some basic somatic examinations. By reason of a review of the infantile patients in the children's department for neuropsychiatry at Rostock during the the last five years, the main point of diagnosis is formed by turns: a very profound and detailed developmental anamnesis, extensive examinations of the motoric function and coordination, radiographs of cranial and hand skeleton, electroencephalograms at several course-controls and at provocation-controls, examinations of the corporal proportions, vegetative and endocrine function tests as well as a pneumencephalogram may be called in additional. This methods are fewer suitable for routine examinations. They demand to express a strict opinion on indication. Non of the mentioned examinations has a reliability of 100%. The more extensive the diagnostical base, the more frequent controls are performed, the more reliable are the results.

  10. Neuropsychological and educational problems at school age associated with neonatal encephalopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marlow, N; Rose, A S; Rands, C E; Draper, E S

    2005-01-01

    .... To investigate neurocognitive and behavioural outcomes after neonatal encephalopathy. Sixty five children with neonatal encephalopathy, identified using the Trent Neonatal Survey database for 1992-1994, were followed up at the age of 7 years...

  11. Quantitative EEG in hospital encephalopathy: review and microstate analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkis, Rani A; Lee, Jong Woo

    2013-10-01

    Hospital-acquired encephalopathy is a widely prevalent disorder. The quantitative changes in EEG associated with this condition have long been noted, including slowing of the background frequency and changes in the frequency band power. EEG has had limited clinical use, despite its ability to continuously track clinical severity. We review the development of the use of EEG and particularly quantitative EEG in the assessment of hospital-acquired encephalopathy. Recent advances in EEG technology have included network and microstate analyses, and continuous EEG monitoring, leading to renewed interest in the use of quantitative EEG. We describe the development of microstate analysis that has allowed novel quantitative analysis of the resting state background. We examined the microstates of 16 inpatients with encephalopathy and 20 control patients. The global variance explained by the four standard resting microstates was smaller in patients with encephalopathy. This suggests a decrease in microstate stability, indicating a breakdown in the resting state network dynamics. Modern analysis and acquisition techniques hold the promise of renewed interest in quantitative EEG techniques in the assessment of hospital-acquired encephalopathy.

  12. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a patient with lupus nephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Kadikoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is characterized by acute onset of headache, nausea, focal neurological deficits or seizures along with radiological findings of white matter defects in the parietal and occipital lobes. Causes of PRES include uremia, hypertensive encephalopathy, eclampsia and immunosuppressive medications. Usually, the treat-ment of choice involves correcting the underlying abnormality. We describe an unusual case of recurrent PRES caused by uremia during a lupus flare in a patient with biopsy-proven Class IV Lupus Nephritis (LN with vasculitis. PRES in systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE is a rare clin-ical phenomenon and, when reported, it is associated with hypertensive encephalopathy. Our patient did not have hypertensive crisis, but had uremic encephalopathy. The patient′s PRES-related symptoms resolved after initiation of hemodialysis. The temporal correlation of the correc-tion of the uremia and the resolution of the symptoms of PRES show the etiology to be uremic encephalopathy, making this the first reported case of uremia-induced PRES in Class IV LN with vasculitis.

  13. Recent advances in hepatic encephalopathy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Liere

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy describes the array of neurological alterations that occur during acute liver failure or chronic liver injury. While key players in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy, such as increases in brain ammonia, alterations in neurosteroid levels, and neuroinflammation, have been identified, there is still a paucity in our knowledge of the precise pathogenic mechanism. This review gives a brief overview of our understanding of the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy and then summarizes the significant recent advances made in clinical and basic research contributing to our understanding, diagnosis, and possible treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. A literature search using the PubMed database was conducted in May 2017 using “hepatic encephalopathy” as a keyword, and selected manuscripts were limited to those research articles published since May 2014. While the authors acknowledge that many significant advances have been made in the understanding of hepatic encephalopathy prior to May 2014, we have limited the scope of this review to the previous three years only.

  14. Chronotypology and melatonin alterations in minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polychronopoulos Panagiotis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background "Minimal (subclinical hepatic encephalopathy" is a term that describes impairment of every day life activities in cirrhosis patients without clinical neurologic abnormalities. Melatonin diurnal pattern disruption and metabolic changes due to liver insufficiency can affect the human biologic clock. Our study was conducted to measure plasma melatonin levels in an attempt to correlate plasma melatonin abnormalities with liver insufficiency severity, and describe chronotypology in cirrhosis patients with minimal encephalopathy. Methods Twenty-six cirrhotic patients enrolled in the study and thirteen patients without liver or central nervous system disease served as controls. All patients had full clinical and biochemical evaluation, chronotypology analysis, neurological evaluation, melatonin profile and quality of life assessment. Results Cirrhotic patients with minimal encephalopathy exhibit melatonin secretion abnormalities. Cirrhosis patients with more severe hepatic insufficiency (Child-Pugh score > 5 had significantly (p Chronotypology analysis revealed Morning Type pattern in 88% of cirrhosis patients. Discussion The presence of abnormal plasma melatonin levels before the onset of clinical hepatic encephalopathy, and the finding that patients with more severe cirrhosis have lower evening melatonin levels are the most important findings of this study. Despite these melatonin abnormalities, chronotypology revealed Morning Type pattern in 23 of 26 cirrhosis patients. We believe these findings are important and deserve further study. Conclusion Melatonin abnormalities occur in cirrhosis patients without clinical encephalopathy, are related to liver insufficiency severity, may influence chronotypology patterns, and certainly deserve further investigation.

  15. Effect of Creatine Monohydrate Supplementation on Various Hematological and Serum Biochemical Parameters of Male Albino Mice following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Nabia; Gillani, Quratulane; Akbar, Atif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Present study was designed to report the effect of 2% creatine monohydrate supplementation for 8, 12 and 15 weeks on hematology and serum biochemical profile of male albino mouse following hypoxic ischemic insult on postnatal day 10. Methods. 66 Blood samples (2% creatine monohydrate supplemented (N = 34) and unsupplemented (N = 32)) were analyzed for various hematological (blood glucose, packed cell volume, total WBC count, total RBC count) and serum biochemical parameters (cholesterol, AST, ALT, HDL, LDL, total protein, triglycerides). Results. ALT had higher concentrations in mice feeding on normal diet for 8 (P > 0.01) and 12 weeks (P > 0.01) following asphyxia and in 12 weeks treatment without asphyxia (P = 0.006) when compared with the creatine supplemented mice. LDL (P = 0.011) and cholesterol (P > 0.01) had higher concentrations in mice on normal diet for 12 weeks following hypoxia ischemia. Cholesterol (P > 0.01) in 12 and glucose (P = 0.006) in 15 week treatment group had significantly lower concentrations in creatine supplemented male albino mice when compared with untreated group following hxpoic-ischemic insult. Conclusion. We concluded that creatine supplementation following hypoxic ischemic insult helps in maintain the normal blood chemistry. PMID:24170981

  16. The relationship between plasma free fatty acids and experimentally induced hepatic encephalopathy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, J. J.; Bosman, D. K.; Jörning, G. G.; de Haan, J. G.; Maas, M. A.; Chamuleau, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in the rat have been investigated in order to study the postulated relationship between plasma free fatty acids concentration (C6 - C22:0) and the degree of hepatic encephalopathy. As a model of chronic hepatic encephalopathy, porta caval shunted

  17. Unusual Reversible MR Signal Abnormalities In Hypertensive Encephalopathy : A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertensive encephalopathy is an acute neurological emergency comprising of headache, seizures, visual disturbances and altered sensorium associated with elevated systemic blood pressure. We report a patient who suffered from two episodes of hypertensive encephalopathy secondary to primary renal disease, with the unusual MRI features involving the cerebellar lobes secondary to hypertensive encephalopathy and subsequent resolution.

  18. Wernicke’s Encephalopathy Complicating Hyperemesis during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Adnane Berdai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is caused by severe thiamine deficiency; it is mostly observed in alcoholic patients. We report the case of a 28-year-old woman, at 17 weeks of gestational age, with severe hyperemesis gravidarum. She presented with disturbance of consciousness, nystagmus, ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia. The resonance magnetic imagery showed bilaterally symmetrical hyperintensities of thalamus and periaqueductal area. The case was managed with very large doses of thiamine. The diagnosis of Wernicke’s encephalopathy was confirmed later by a low thiamine serum level. The patient was discharged home on day 46 with mild ataxia and persistent nystagmus. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a rare complication of hyperemesis gravidarum. It should be diagnosed as early as possible to prevent long-term neurological sequela or death. Thiamine supplementation in pregnant women with prolonged vomiting should be initiated, especially before parenteral dextrose infusion. Early thiamine replacement will reduce maternal morbidity and fetal loss rate.

  19. A Critical Case of Wernicke's Encephalopathy Induced by Hyperemesis Gravidarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Ju Kang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wernicke’s encephalopathy is a reversible but potentially critical disease caused by thiamine deficiency. Most patients complain of symptoms such as ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and confusion. Heavy alcohol drinking is commonly associated with the disease, but other clinical conditions also can provoke it. In pregnant women, hyperemesis gravidarum can lead to the depletion of body thiamine due to poor oral intake and a high metabolic demand. We report a case of Wernicke’s encephalopathy following hyperemesis gravidarum in a 36-year-old female at 20 weeks of pregnancy, who visited our hospital because of shock with vaginal bleeding. This case suggests that although the initial presentation may include atypical symptoms (e.g., shock or bleeding, Wernicke’s encephalopathy should be considered, and thiamine replacement should be performed in pregnant women with neurologic symptoms and poor oral intake.

  20. Neuroimaging findings in acute Wernicke's encephalopathy: review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccoli, Giulio; Pipitone, Nicolò

    2009-02-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is an acute neurological syndrome resulting from thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Early recognition is important because timely thiamine supplementation can reverse the clinical features of the disease. The aim of this article is to provide an update on the typical and atypical neuroimaging findings of the acute phase of the disease. Wernicke's encephalopathy is characterized by a quite distinct pattern of MR alterations, which include symmetrical alterations in the thalami, mamillary bodies, tectal plate, and periaqueductal area, but atypical alterations may also been seen. A thorough knowledge of the neuroimaging findings of Wernicke's encephalopathy will assist in arriving at an early diagnosis, thus reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with this disease.

  1. Clinical and radiological features of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qiu LI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. Methods  The clinical and imaging data of 3 cases of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy were summarized and analyzed for the purpose of improving the acumen in diagnosis and treatment. Results All the 3 patients showed relatively mild clinical symptoms, and they were misdiagnosed in different degrees during the treatment, but their clinical symptoms were improved by rapid and effective antihypertensive therapy. Cerebral CT and MRI scans revealed extensive abnormal signals in brain stem, with or without supratentorial lesions and brain stem hemorrhage. The lesions as revealed by imaging were improved significantly after treatment. Conclusions Clinical-radiographic dissociation is the classic feature of hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. The clinical symptoms and lesions as shown by imaging could be improved after active treatment. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.06.03

  2. EPILEPTIC ENCEPHALOPATHY WITH CONTINUOUS SPIKES-WAVES ACTIVITY DURING SLEEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Belousova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The author represents the review and discussion of current scientific literature devoted to epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikes-waves activity during sleep — the special form of partly reversible age-dependent epileptic encephalopathy, characterized by triad of symptoms: continuous prolonged epileptiform (spike-wave activity on EEG in sleep, epileptic seizures and cognitive disorders. The author describes the aspects of classification, pathogenesis and etiology, prevalence, clinical picture and diagnostics of this disorder, including the peculiar anomalies on EEG. The especial attention is given to approaches to the treatment of epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spikeswaves activity during sleep. Efficacy of valproates, corticosteroid hormones and antiepileptic drugs of other groups is considered. The author represents own experience of treatment this disorder with corticosteroids, scheme of therapy and assessment of efficacy.

  3. Hippocampal sclerosis and chronic epilepsy following posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapina, Viktoria; Vargas, Maria-Isabel; Wohlrab, Gabriele; Vulliemoz, Serge; Fluss, Joel; Seeck, Margitta

    2013-12-01

    Chronic epilepsy has rarely been reported after posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) and the association with hippocampal sclerosis has been suggested only once before. We report the case of a girl admitted at the age of 8 years with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. On the second day of admission, she presented with focal complex seizures and cerebral MRI showed posterior encephalopathy and no hippocampal sclerosis. MRI after one month confirmed the diagnosis of PRES. The seizures recurred and the girl developed pharmacoresistant epilepsy and was admitted to our hospital for further investigation. Cerebral MRI three years after the diagnosis of PRES showed hippocampal sclerosis which was not present on the initial MRI. We conclude that there is a triggering role of PRES in the development of hippocampal sclerosis. Hippocampal sclerosis may have resulted from seizure-associated damage, alternatively, hypertensive encephalopathy may have led to hippocampal damage via a vascular mechanism.

  4. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings and clinical presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Nichtweiss, Michael; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E

    2003-05-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. The aim of the study was to analyse MRI findings typical for this disease and to evaluate the significance of their correlations with clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance images and clinical features of 12 patients with WE were analysed. The patients underwent MR imaging within 3-14 days after onset of clinical symptoms. In 7 of 12 patients MR imaging showed symmetrical diencephalic and midbrain lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images from 5 of 9 patients examined during the initial 6 days of acute WE showed a subtle enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the tectal plate, the periaqueductal area and the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei. In addition, T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images revealed hyperintense signals in these regions (except for 2 patients where the mamillary bodies were normal). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images without any enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images were detected in 2 patients by MR imaging performed 11 or 14 days after onset of WE. Patients with hyperintensities on T2-weighted images of the periventricular region of the third ventricle and the paramedian thalamic nuclei had poor recovery from their mental dysfunction. The MR examination in case of WE shows a typical pattern of lesions in 58% of cases. Enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei, and the periaqueductal area on postcontrast T1-weighted images can be observed in the initial period after clinical onset of symptoms and are characteristic signs of the acute stage of WE. Hyperintense lesions in the periventricular region and the paramedian thalamic nuclei on T2-weighted and FLAIR images in the subacute stage of WE and enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images of the mamillary bodies and the

  5. Wernicke encephalopathy: MR findings and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidauer, Stefan; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Zanella, Friedhelm E. [Institute of Neuroradiology, University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt (Germany); Nichtweiss, Michael [Department of Neurology, Municipal Hospital of Wismar, Wismar (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) is a severe neurological disorder caused by vitamin B1 deficiency. The aim of the study was to analyse MRI findings typical for this disease and to evaluate the significance of their correlations with clinical symptoms. Magnetic resonance images and clinical features of 12 patients with WE were analysed. The patients underwent MR imaging within 3-14 days after onset of clinical symptoms. In 7 of 12 patients MR imaging showed symmetrical diencephalic and midbrain lesions. Postcontrast T1-weighted images from 5 of 9 patients examined during the initial 6 days of acute WE showed a subtle enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the tectal plate, the periaqueductal area and the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei. In addition, T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images revealed hyperintense signals in these regions (except for 2 patients where the mamillary bodies were normal). Hyperintense lesions on T2-weighted images without any enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images were detected in 2 patients by MR imaging performed 11 or 14 days after onset of WE. Patients with hyperintensities on T2-weighted images of the periventricular region of the third ventricle and the paramedian thalamic nuclei had poor recovery from their mental dysfunction. The MR examination in case of WE shows a typical pattern of lesions in 58% of cases. Enhancement of the mamillary bodies, the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the paramedian thalamic nuclei, and the periaqueductal area on postcontrast T1-weighted images can be observed in the initial period after clinical onset of symptoms and are characteristic signs of the acute stage of WE. Hyperintense lesions in the periventricular region and the paramedian thalamic nuclei on T2-weighted and FLAIR images in the subacute stage of WE and enhancement on postcontrast T1-weighted images of the mamillary bodies and the

  6. Is vaccination against transmissible spongiform encephalopathy feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, T; Chabalgoity, J A; Goni, F

    2007-04-01

    Prion diseases are a unique category of illness, affecting both animals and humans, where the underlying pathogenesis is related to a conformation change of the cellular form of a normal, self-protein called a prion protein (PrP(c) [C for cellular]) to a pathological and infectious conformation known as scrapie form (PrPsc [Sc for scrapie]). Currently, all prion diseases are without effective treatment and are universally fatal. The emergence of bovine spongiform encephalopathy and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has highlighted the need to develop possible therapies. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has similarities to prion diseases, both passive and active immunisation have been shown to be highly effective at preventing disease and cognitive deficits in model animals. In a human trial of active vaccination in AD, despite indications of cognitive benefits in patients with an adequate humoral response, 6% of patients developed significant complications related to excessive cell-mediated immunity. This experience highlights that immunotherapies designed to be directed against a self-antigen have to finely balance an effective humoral immune response with potential autoimmune toxicity. Many prion diseases have the gut as a portal of infectious agent entry. This makes mucosal immunisation a potentially very attractive method to partially or completely prevent prion entry across the gut barrier and to also produce a modulated immune response that is unlikely to be associated with any toxicity. The authors' recent results using an attenuated Salmonella vaccine strain expressing the prion protein show that mucosal vaccination can partially protect against prion infection from a peripheral source, suggesting the feasibility of this approach.

  7. Potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneville, Romain; de Montmollin, Etienne; Poujade, Julien; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maïté; Souweine, Bertrand; Darmon, Michael; Mariotte, Eric; Argaud, Laurent; Barbier, François; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Marcotte, Guillaume; Dumenil, Anne-Sylvie; Jamali, Samir; Lacave, Guillaume; Ruckly, Stéphane; Mourvillier, Bruno; Timsit, Jean-François

    2017-08-01

    Identifying modifiable factors for sepsis-associated encephalopathy may help improve patient care and outcomes. We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective multicenter database. Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) was defined by a score on the Glasgow coma scale (GCS) encephalopathy. After adjusting for baseline characteristics, site of infection, and type of admission, the following factors remained independently associated with sepsis-associated encephalopathy: acute renal failure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-1.67], hypoglycemia 10 mmol/l (aOR = 1.37, 95% CI 1.09-1.72), hypercapnia >45 mmHg (aOR = 1.91, 95% CI 1.53-2.38), hypernatremia >145 mmol/l (aOR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.48-3.57), and S. aureus (aOR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.05-2.25). Sepsis-associated encephalopathy was associated with higher mortality, higher use of ICU resources, and longer hospital stay. After adjusting for age, comorbidities, year of admission, and non-neurological SOFA score, even mild alteration of mental status (i.e., a score on the GCS of 13-14) remained independently associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.38, 95% CI 1.09-1.76). Acute renal failure and common metabolic disturbances represent potentially modifiable factors contributing to sepsis-associated encephalopathy. However, a true causal relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Our study confirms the prognostic significance of mild alteration of mental status in patients with sepsis.

  8. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  9. Branched-chain amino acids for people with hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Dam, Gitte; Les, Iñigo

    2015-01-01

    -chain amino acids (BCAA) versus control interventions has evaluated if BCAA may benefit people with hepatic encephalopathy. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the beneficial and harmful effects of BCAA versus any control intervention for people with hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We identified trials through...... control, language, or publication status. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently extracted data based on published reports and collected data from the primary investigators. We changed our primary outcomes in this update of the review to include mortality (all cause), hepatic...

  10. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-03-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland, Ltd.

  11. Risk factors and outcome of Shigella encephalopathy in Bangladeshi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afroze, Farzana; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Sarmin, Monira; Smsb Shahid, Abu; Shahunja, K M; Shahrin, Lubaba; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2017-04-01

    Although, Shigella encephalopathy, a serious extra-intestinal complication of shigellosis, significantly increases the risks of death, data are very limited on predicting factors particularly related to electrolyte profiles in children below five years of age with Shigella encephalopathy. Our objective was to determine the clinical as well as laboratory predicting factors and outcome of children with Shigella encephalopathy. In this unmatched case-control design, children aged 2-59 months having a positive stool culture for Shigella and who had their serum electrolytes been done from July 2012 to June 2015 were studied. Children with Shigella encephalopathy, defined as having abnormal mentation, constituted the cases, and those without encephalopathy constituted the controls. During the study period, we identified a total of 541 children less than five years of age, who had Shigella in their stool culture. Only 139 children fulfilled the study criteria and among them 69 were cases and 70 were controls. The cases more often had fatal outcome compared to the controls (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02). In logistic regression analysis, the cases were independently associated with shorter duration (1.2 ± 0.4 days) of diarrhea prior to admission, dehydrating diarrhea, sepsis and hyponatremia (pShigella isolates, S. flexneri (88/139, 63%) and S. sonnei(34/139, 24%) were the dominant species. S. dysenteriae was not isolated throughout the study period. S.sonnei was more frequently isolated from the cases (24/69, 35%) than the controls (10/70, 14%), whereas the isolation of S. flexneri was comparable between the groups (40/69, 58% vs 48/70, 69%). A total of 94 (67.6%) isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, 84 (60.4%) to ciprofloxacin, 66/138 (48%) to ampicillin, 5 (3.5%) to ceftriaxone, 17 (12.2%) to mecillinum and 35 (25%) to azithromycin. The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the children with Shigella encephalopathy compared to those without

  12. Risk factors and outcome of Shigella encephalopathy in Bangladeshi children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Afroze

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Although, Shigella encephalopathy, a serious extra-intestinal complication of shigellosis, significantly increases the risks of death, data are very limited on predicting factors particularly related to electrolyte profiles in children below five years of age with Shigella encephalopathy. Our objective was to determine the clinical as well as laboratory predicting factors and outcome of children with Shigella encephalopathy.In this unmatched case-control design, children aged 2-59 months having a positive stool culture for Shigella and who had their serum electrolytes been done from July 2012 to June 2015 were studied. Children with Shigella encephalopathy, defined as having abnormal mentation, constituted the cases, and those without encephalopathy constituted the controls. During the study period, we identified a total of 541 children less than five years of age, who had Shigella in their stool culture. Only 139 children fulfilled the study criteria and among them 69 were cases and 70 were controls. The cases more often had fatal outcome compared to the controls (7% vs. 0%, P = 0.02. In logistic regression analysis, the cases were independently associated with shorter duration (1.2 ± 0.4 days of diarrhea prior to admission, dehydrating diarrhea, sepsis and hyponatremia (p<0.05 for all. Among 139 Shigella isolates, S. flexneri (88/139, 63% and S. sonnei(34/139, 24% were the dominant species. S. dysenteriae was not isolated throughout the study period. S.sonnei was more frequently isolated from the cases (24/69, 35% than the controls (10/70, 14%, whereas the isolation of S. flexneri was comparable between the groups (40/69, 58% vs 48/70, 69%. A total of 94 (67.6% isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole, 84 (60.4% to ciprofloxacin, 66/138 (48% to ampicillin, 5 (3.5% to ceftriaxone, 17 (12.2% to mecillinum and 35 (25% to azithromycin.The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the children with Shigella encephalopathy

  13. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report......The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2013. The present annual report is the 18th on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  14. Laboratory examinations of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in Denmark during 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations.The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report......The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2016. The present annual report is the 21st on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  15. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report......The aim of this report is to give detailed information on the diagnostic examination on trans-missible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) performed in Denmark during 2012. The present annual report is the 17th on this topic published by the National Veterinary Institute, Technical University...

  16. Duloxetine-related posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappella, Nathalie; Perier, François; Pico, Fernando; Palette, Catherine; Muret, Alexandre; Merceron, Sybille; Girbovan, Andrei; Marquion, Fabien; Legriel, Stephane

    2016-08-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) has well-established links with several drugs. Whether a link also exists with serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor such as duloxetine is unclear. We report on a patient who developed PRES with a coma and myoclonus related to hypertensive encephalopathy a few days after starting duloxetine treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and catecholamine metabolites assayed. The patient achieved a full recovery after aggressive antihypertensive therapy and intravenous anticonvulsant therapy. The clinical history, blood and urinary catecholamine and serotonin levels, and response to treatment strongly suggest that PRES was induced by duloxetine. Duloxetine should be added to the list of causes of PRES.

  17. Treatment of chronic hepatic encephalopathy with levodopa 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunzer, Michael; James, I. M.; Weinman, J.; Sherlock, Sheila

    1974-01-01

    Three of six patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy treated with levodopa showed a significant improvement. One patient was probably improved whilst the remaining two patients failed to show any benefit. Serial electroencephalography did not demonstrate significant changes. Treatment with levodopa was associated with an improvement in `speed-based' tasks as assessed by computerized psychometry. A significant rise in cerebral oxygen consumption was found during levodopa therapy. Gastrointestinal side effects were dose limiting. It is concluded that a therapeutic trial of levodopa in patients with chronic hepatic encephalopathy is indicated when the response to conventional therapy has been poor. PMID:4430473

  18. Septic Encephalopathy Characterized by Acute Encephalopathy with Biphasic Seizures and Late Reduced Diffusion and Early Nonconvulsive Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yamaguchi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, whether viral or bacterial, can result in various forms of brain dysfunction (encephalopathy. Septic encephalopathy (SE is caused by an excessive immune reaction to infection, with clinical features including disturbed consciousness and seizures. Acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD is usually accompanied by viral infection in children and is characterized by biphasic seizures and impaired consciousness. The initial neurologic symptom of AESD is typically a febrile seizure that frequently lasts longer than 30 minutes. However, the possible forms this seizure takes are unclear. For example, it is unknown if nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE could be an early seizure symptomatic of AESD. In addition, thus far no cases of combined SE and AESD have been reported. Here, we describe the first reported case of SE with AESD that notably demonstrated NCSE as an early seizure.

  19. [Leigh's encephalopathy (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy). Documentation of its evolution through neuroimaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J A; González-Ferrer, S; Martínez, C; Prieto-Carrasquero, M; Delgado, W; Mora La Cruz, E

    1996-09-01

    A 30 months-old boy developed bilateral nistagmus, tremor, gait disturbance, hypotonia and disartria. The diagnose of Leigh encephalopathy was suggested on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and laboratory findings. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at an early stage revealed bilateral and symmetric lesions in the putamen, appearing as hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images. Twelve months later a relatively large hypertense area in the posterior brainstem was observed. At this stage, the patient exhibited marked deterioration, dystonic manifestations, rigidity and respiratory disturbances. He died 6 months later for respiratory arrest during bronconeumonic infection. We believe MRI is a valuable means to allow assessment of the evolution of the disease.

  20. MRI findings in acute hyperammonemic encephalopathy resulting from decompensated chronic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureka, Jyoti; Jakkani, Ravi Kanth; Panwar, Sanuj

    2012-06-01

    Hyperammonemic encephalopathy is a type of metabolic encephalopathy with diversified etiology. Hyperammonemia is the end result of several metabolic disorders such as congenital deficiencies of urea cycle enzymes, hepatic encephalopathy, Reye's syndrome and other toxic encephalopathies. Non-specific clinical presentation poses a great challenge in early diagnosis of this entity. Irrespective of the underlying etiology, hyperammonemia causes a distinctive pattern of brain parenchymal injury. The cingulate gyrus and insular cortex are more vulnerable to this type of toxic insult. Characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings in combination with laboratory parameters can help to differentiate this entity from other metabolic encephalopathy and thus aiding in early diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Development of a silicon detector monitor for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Bravin, E; Pasini, M; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    A silicon detector monitor has been developed and tested in the framework of the beam diagnostics development program for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac at CERN. The monitor is intended for beam energy and timing measurements aimed at the phase tuning of the superconducting cavities. Tests were performed with a stable ion beam, composed of carbon, oxygen and neon ions accelerated to energies from 300keV/u to 2.82MeV/u. The energy measurements performed allowed for beam spectroscopy and ion identification with a resolution of 1.4%-0.5% rms in the measured energy range. The achieved resolution is suited for a fast phase tuning of the cavities, which was demonstrated with the third REX 7-gap resonator. The time structure of the beam, characterised by a bunch period of 9.87ns, was measured with a resolution better than 200ps rms. This paper describes the results from all these tests and provides details of the detector set-up.

  2. Caractérisation du cuivre OFE pour la fabrication des cavités high-$\\beta$ dans le cadre du projet HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Trevidic, G

    2014-01-01

    Le cuivre OFE (Oxygen Free Electronic) est un cuivre d’une composition minimale en cuivre de 99.99% en masse, c’est la variété de cuivre qui présente les meilleures caractéristiques électriques possibles. C’est ce matériau qui constituera le substrat des cavités high-β du projet HIE-ISOLDE visant à améliorer les caractéristiques de l’accélérateur ISOLDE déjà existant. Pour cela, le CERN délèguera l’étape d’approvisionnement de matières pour la fabrication des cavités supraconductrice à une entreprise de forgeage de cuivre. Quatre firmes étaient potentiellement éligibles à cet approvisionnement et chacune a envoyé des prototypes de pièces forgées en cuivre OFE au CERN qui seront par la suite usinées pour la fabrication des cavités. Dans cet exposé, je présente les différents résultats des différents tests mécaniques et métallographiques effectués. Ceux-ci permettent de vérifier la bonne conformité, à la spécification technique du CERN, des échantillons de c...

  3. [Differential Diagnosis of Immune-Mediated Encephalopathies: "Neurological Symptoms of Diffuse Brain Damage": A New Concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Yoshimitsu; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, incidence of autoimmune encephalopathies has increased. The diagnosis of the severe form of autoimmune encephalopathy is not difficult; however, milder forms can be misdiagnosed as general encephalopathies. We often treat Hashimoto's encephalopathy, which has diverse clinical symptoms and is often misdiagnosed as a psychosomatic disease. We have found that the neurological findings and symptoms of patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy are similar to those of psychogenic diseases, such as giveway weakness and atypical sensory disorder. To understand the mechanism underlying these symptoms, we propose a new concept: neurological symptoms of diffuse brain damage. This theory is based on the premise that etiologically, symptoms observed were caused by diffuse, spotty, and shaded brain damage due to autoimmune encephalopathies. We also found similar neurological conditions in patients with anti-ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibody-related encephalopathy, encephalopathies that developed after injection of the cervical cancer vaccine, and encephalopathies associated with Stiff person syndrome. In conclusion, the clinical features of autoimmune encephalopathy include the "neurological symptoms of diffuse brain damage" as well as the presence of antibodies. We could diagnose autoimmune encephalopathy more easily, using this new diagnostic concept.

  4. Neuropsychological functioning in Wernicke′s encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushree Sangita Behura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Wernicke′s encephalopathy (WE is caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1 deficiency and most commonly found in chronic alcoholism and malnutrition. Clinically, the key features are mental status disturbances (global confusion, oculomotor abnormalities, and gait disturbances (ataxia. Apart from these clinical features, we can find deficits in neuropsychological functioning in patients with WE, which is more prominent after the improvement in the physical conditions. Neuropsychological functioning includes both basic cognitive processes (i.e., attention-concentration as well as higher order cognitive processes (i.e., memory, executive functioning, reasoning, which is much vital for the maintenance of quality of life of an individual. However, unfortunately, in most of the cases, neuropsychological functioning is ignored by the clinicians. Materials and Methods: In this study four case reports of WE have been presented. The patients were taken from the outdoor department of Mental Health Institute, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha. Neuropsychological functioning was measured by administration of PGIBBD and Quality of Life was measured by WHO-QOL BREF Odia Version. Discussion: As described in the literature, among the three cardinal signs ( global confusion, ataxia, and ocular sings, the first two were present in all cases, but nystagmus was present in only two cases.Memory dysfunction was so disabling that the persons were unable to maintain a good Quality of Life and occupational impairment was prominent. There are disturbances in recent, remote memory, immediate recall, delayed recall, and attention and concentration, ultimately creating both physical and mental disability. PGI-BBD findings also suggest the overall impairment in neuropsychological functioning other than memory, that is, executive functioning, visual acuity, and depth perception. Findings of WHO-QOL BREF suggest the impairment of four domains of QOL in all the cases, but

  5. [Clinical features and outcomes of patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Xing, Yi; Zhang, Jin; Jia, Jianping

    2014-03-11

    As an ill-defined syndrome consisting of heterogeneous neurological symptoms and high serum antithyroid antibody titers, Hashimoto's encephalopathy typically responds to steroids. More serial clinical studies are required to characterize the clinical, laboratory and imaging features and outcomes. We analyzed retrospectively the clinical, laboratory, and imaging features and outcomes of 15 consecutive patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy diagnosed at our hospital from 2005 to 2011. Cognitive impairment (11/15) and psychiatric symptoms (5/15) were the most frequent manifestations. Seizure (4/15) and myoclonus (1/15) were less common than previously described. Three (3/15) patients showed abnormal signals in hippocampus or temporal lobe related to memory disorders. Among 10 patients on steroid therapy, there were recovery (n = 5), improvement with residual deficits (n = 2) and relapse or no effect (n = 3). Among 5 patients on non-steroid, there were stable remission with antiepileptic drugs or general neurotrophic therapy (n = 3) and continuous deterioration (n = 2). Most patients respond well to steroids while someone improves without steroid therapy. In light of its reversible course, we recommend that Hashimoto's encephalopathy should always be considered in the differential diagnosis while evaluating disorders of central nervous system, even disorders those without manifestations of encephalopathy.

  6. Chronic liver disease and hepatic encephalopathy: Clinical profile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-03-08

    Mar 8, 2011 ... Background: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important neuropsychiatry complication of liver disease causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Efforts at ... Access this article online. Quick Response Code: Website: ... Brain imaging with computerized tomographic scan was done where ...

  7. About pathognomonic images: an infrequent case of acute encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Grasso

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The occurrence of acute encephalopathy is a dramatic clinical dilemma when usual diagnostic techniques (blood tests, cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid analysis show no abnormalities. CLINICAL CASE We describe a case of a 73 years old man admitted in our Internal Medicine Unit for acute diarrhoea with vomiting and fever who developed a prolonged gastrointestinal dysmotility syndrome with poor nutritional intake. Although a parenteral support was provided, he developed acute encephalopathy followed by hypotension and lactic acidosis without evidence of renal and hepatic disease or glycemic alterations. Likewise, no cerebral CT and cerebrospinal fluid alterations were found. Conversely, cerebral MRI showed marked and diffuse DP-2 and FLAIR hyperintensity of the mesencephalic tectal plate, of the periaqueductal area, and of the periventricular region of the third ventricle including the median thalamic area. These MRI descriptions were considered pathognomonic of Wernicke encephalopathy. Thus, the immediate use of ev thiamine was followed by a prompt and complete recovery of neurological, hemodinamic and metabolic conditions. CONCLUSIONS Non-alcoholic Wernicke encephalopathy is a rare and dramatic clinical event with high mortality. In this context, brain MRI is the best diagnostic tool providing a typical picture.

  8. Benzodiazepine receptor antagonists for acute and chronic hepatic encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy is unknown. It has been suggested that liver failure leads to the accumulation of substances that bind to a receptor-complex in the brain resulting in neural inhibition which may progress to coma. Several trials have assessed benzodiazepine receptor...

  9. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bi; Wei, QianQian; Wang, YunHan; Chen, YongPing; Shang, HuiFang

    2014-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria is an inherited disease that is rarely diagnosed in prepubertal children. It can affect the autonomic, peripheral, and central nervous system. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, seizures, altered consciousness, and visual disorder associated with potentially reversible neuroradiological abnormalities predominantly in the parieto-occipital lobes. We report a child with acute intermittent porphyria who presented with radiological manifestations suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. A 9-year-old girl underwent an appendectomy after developing abdominal pain. She subsequently developed bilateral visual disturbance, confusion, seizures, hypertension, tachycardia, nausea, vomiting, constipation, dark tea-colored urine, and recurrent abdominal pain. Initial brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense gyriform lesions on T2-weighted images and hypointense to isointense lesions on T1-weighted images in both parieto-occipital lobes with mild enhancement. The diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria was confirmed by increased urinary excretion of porphyrin precursors. Her clinical signs gradually improved after intravenous high-dose glucose treatment and symptomatic therapies. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging confirmed complete resolution of the parieto-occipital lesions, suggesting with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. The association of abdominal pain, mental status changes, and autonomic dysfunction should arouse the suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. Acute intermittent porphyria can be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A novel encephalopathy in a thiamine-deficient dog resembling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel encephalopathy in a thiamine-deficient dog resembling human Wernicke's disease with atypical MRI pattern. ... Thiamine is a water-soluble vitamin, which participates in several vital metabolic pathways involved in energy metabolism and neurotransmitter synthesis of mammals. In companion animals thiamine ...

  11. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: a case of Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2012-05-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed with Angelman syndrome in her fifth decade, in whom the intellectual disability and epilepsy had been assumed to be caused by a vaccine encephalopathy following smallpox vaccination. Clinical features of Angelman syndrome had faded away. The history of the present patient suggests that genetic conditions other than Dravet syndrome can be associated with an alleged vaccine encephalopathy. A history of vaccine encephalopathy is rare among patients with learning disability and refractory epilepsy (1.4% in our cohort), but it should lead to consideration of a comprehensive genetic work-up if Dravet syndrome is excluded. The early history of the patient, when available, should guide the investigations. Medico-legal aspects are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Another cause of vaccine encephalopathy: A case of Angelman syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novy, Jan; Catarino, Claudia B.; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Smith, Shelagh M.; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Hammond, Peter; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2012-01-01

    Dravet syndrome has been found recently as an important underlying condition in cases of alleged vaccine encephalopathy after pertussis vaccination, where vaccination seemed to have precipitated the occurrence of the disease without modifying the long-term course. We report on a patient diagnosed

  13. A quantitative risk assessment for bovine spongiform encephalopathy in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadohira, M.; Stevenson, M.A.; Hogasen, H.R.; Koeijer, de A.A.

    2012-01-01

    A predictive case-cohort model was applied to Japanese data to analyze the interaction between challenge and stability factors for bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) for the period 1985–2020. BSE risk in cattle was estimated as the expected number of detectable cases per year. The model was

  14. A case of chronic Wernicke's encephalopathy: A neuropsychological study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; Postma, Albert; Wijnia, Jan W.; Nijboer, Tanja C W

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old woman was referred to our Korsakoff Center because of extensive cognitive problems following acute Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE). She had a relatively short history of alcohol abuse and was found lying on the floor in her home by her son. After 5 days without treatment, she was

  15. Hepatic Encephalopathy: Early Diagnosis in Pediatric Patients With Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DARA, Naghi; SAYYARI, Ali-Akbar; IMANZADEH, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Objective As acute liver failure (ALF) and chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) continue to increase in prevalence, we will see more cases of hepatic encephalopathy. Primary care physician are often the first to suspect it, since they are familiar with the patient’s usual physical and mental status. This serious complication typically occurs in patients with severe comorbidities and needs multidisciplinary evaluation and care. Hepatic encephalopathy should be considered in any patient with acute liver failure and cirrhosis who presents with neuropsychiatric manifestations, decrease level of consciousness (coma), change of personality, intellectual and behavioral deterioration, speech and motor dysfunction. Every cirrhotic patient may be at risk; potential precipitating factors should be addressed in regular clinic visits. The encephalopathy of liver disease may be prominent, or can be present in subtle forms, such as decline of school performance, emotional outbursts, or depression. “Subtle form” of hepatic encephalopathy may not be obvious on clinical examination, but can be detected by neurophysiologic and neuropsychiatric testing. PMID:24665321

  16. Antithyroperoxidase Antibodies in Encephalopathy : Diagnostic Marker or Incidental Finding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dontje, B.; Van Santen, H. M.; Niermeijer, J. M.; Schonenberg-Meinema, D.; Van Trotsenburg, A. S P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute encephalopathy who are thoroughly examined for an underlying diagnosis and in whom infectious, metabolic, and malignant causes are excluded can form a true diagnostic dilemma. If antithyroperoxidase antibodies (anti-TPO abs) are present, the diagnosis steroid responsive

  17. MRI reveals reversible lesions resembling posterior reversible encephalopathy in porphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celik, M. [Huesrev Gerede c, 128/4 Tesvikiye, 80690 Istanbul (Turkey); Department of Neurology, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey); Forta, H.; Babacan, G. [Department of Neurology, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey); Dalkilic, Tuerker [Department of Neurosurgery, Sisli Etfal Education and Research Hospital, Sisli Etfal S., Sisli, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2002-10-01

    We report a 20-year-old woman who had an attack of acute intermittent porphyria with seizures, hallucinations, autonomic and somatic neuropathy. T2-weighted MRI revealed multiple lesions which were no longer visible 3 months later. We suggest a similar mechanism to posterior reversible encephalopathy underlying cerebral symptoms in porphyria. (orig.)

  18. Laboratory Examinations of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies in Denmark during 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre

    , Chapter 2.4.6 and Chapter 2.7.13) regarding diagnostic examinations. The DTU-VET is the national reference laboratory of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and TSE/Scrapie, and therefore the results of all neuropathological examinations on BSE and Scrapie in Denmark are given in the present report...

  19. Models for discovery of targeted therapy in genetic epileptic encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljevic, Snezana; Reid, Christopher A; Petrou, Steven

    2017-10-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe disorders emerging in the first days to years of life that commonly include refractory seizures, various types of movement disorders, and different levels of developmental delay. In recent years, many de novo occurring variants have been identified in individuals with these devastating disorders. To unravel disease mechanisms, the functional impact of detected variants associated with epileptic encephalopathies is investigated in a range of cellular and animal models. This review addresses efforts to advance and use such models to identify specific molecular and cellular targets for the development of novel therapies. We focus on ion channels as the best-studied group of epilepsy genes. Given the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of epileptic encephalopathy disorders, experimental models that can reflect this complexity are critical for the development of disease mechanisms-based targeted therapy. The convergence of technological advances in gene sequencing, stem cell biology, genome editing, and high throughput functional screening together with massive unmet clinical needs provides unprecedented opportunities and imperatives for precision medicine in epileptic encephalopathies. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Javier; Ranchal, Isidora; Nuñez, David; Díaz-Herrero, María del Mar; Maraver, Marta; del Campo, José Antonio; Rojas, Ángela; Camacho, Inés; Figueruela, Blanca; Bautista, Juan D; Romero-Gómez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin) and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment). Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82): 4.9% (2/41) in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41) in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002). In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8); p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2); p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6); p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4); p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM) decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05). Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity in vitro. Therefore, metformin use seems

  1. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. METHODS: Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment. Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. RESULTS: Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82: 4.9% (2/41 in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41 in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002. In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8; p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2; p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6; p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4; p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase

  2. CADASIL: Migraine, Encephalopathy, Stroke and Their Inter-Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Rhea Yan Ying; Markus, Hugh Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Migraine is common in Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) but its treatment responses are not well described, and its relationship to stroke risk unknown. Encephalopathy is a less common presentation; it has been suggested it is related to migraine. We characterised migraine patterns and treatment responses in CADASIL, and examined associations between migraine and both stroke risk and encephalopathy. 300 symptomatic CADASIL patients were prospectively recruited from a national referral clinic over a nineteen year period, from 1996 to 2015. Data was collected using a standardised questionnaire. Migraine was classified according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). A cross-sectional analysis was carried out on the data collected. Migraine was present in 226 (75.3%), and the presenting feature in 203 (67.7%). It was usually accompanied by aura (89.8%). Patients showed variable responses to a variety of drugs for migraine. Of 24 given triptans, 45.5% had consistent or partial responses. None had complications following triptans. Thirty-three (11.0%) patients experienced encephalopathy lasting on average 8.1 ± 3.4 days. Patients with migraine with aura had higher odds of encephalopathy (OR = 5.4; 95%CI 1.6-28.4; p = 0.002). Patients with confusional aura had higher odds of encephalopathy than those with other aura types (OR = 2.5, 95%CI = 1.0-5.8, p = 0.04). There was also no increase in risk of encephalopathy with sex or age at onset of migraine. Migraineurs had a lower stroke risk than non-migraineurs (HR = 0.46, 95%CI 0.3-0.6, p = 2.1x10-6). Migraine with aura is a prominent feature of CADASIL. Treatment responses are similar to those seen in the general migraine population and no complications were observed with triptans. Migraine with aura was associated with increased risk of encephalopathy suggesting they may share pathophysiological mechanisms

  3. The burden of hepatic encephalopathy in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávalos Moscol, Milagros; Bustios Sanchez, Carla

    2011-06-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by changes in cognitive function, behavior, and personality, as well as by transient neurological symptoms and electroencephalographic changes, which occur in the context of acute or chronic liver failure. Cirrhosis is the main disease associated to HE, and it is known that its incidence is increasing worldwide. As a cause of mortality, cirrhosis is ranked 14 worldwide, but 10 in developed countries. It has been demonstrated that the incidence of liver disease is increasing, in part because of the ascending prevalence of NAFLD, HCV, HCC, as well of alcohol consumption. The real incidence of cirrhosis in Latin America is unknown, although in some Latin American countries that provided national data, cirrhosis death rates were between 5 and 17/100,000 for men and 3 and 5/100,000 for women. Disability, quality of life, and social aspects should be considered when assessing the impact of a disease. In this context, preliminary estimates of the global burden of disease attributable to chronic liver disease seem to be substantial. Hepatic encephalopathy, a main complication of liver failure, occurs in 30-45% of patients as overt encephalopathy, but when subclinical or minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) is considered, estimates of the incidence of encephalopathy vary from 20 to 60%. In USA, the 2009 NIH Report on the Costs of Digestive Diseases stated that liver disease was the second most costly disease in direct and indirect costs (13.1 billion dollars). Although the economic cost of HE has not been assessed, it is obvious that the economic impact of HE on daily activities of living is extremely high, as the costs of diminished work performance and lost wages are substantial.

  4. Blood manganese levels in patients with hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerón, Hugo Mendieta; Rodríguez, Mónica Rodríguez; Montes, Sergio; Castañeda, Camilo Ríos

    2011-12-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is an increasingly common disease. Identification of prognosis risk factors in patients with liver damage may lead to preventive actions, towards decreasing its mortality. Manganese (Mn) levels are increased in basal ganglia of patients with hepatic encephalopathy as well as in cases of cirrhotic and liver failure patients. The present is a clinical, prospective, prolective and observational study developed at the Internal Medicine Service from "Dr. Darío Fernández Fierro" General Hospital, ISSSTE, Mexico City. The objective of this work was to report whole blood Mn levels and mortality in encephalopathic patients. Consecutive patients over 18 years of age, diagnosed with hepatic encephalopathy were recruited at the emergency room service. An informed consent, signed by their families was collected. Patients' clinical characteristics, biochemical tests of renal function, hemoglobin, glucose, bilirubins and albumin levels were obtained along with a blood sample to analyze Mn. Patients evolution was followed up for 6 months. Blood Mn in patients [median, (range)] [20.5, (10.5-39.5) μg/L] were higher than blood levels from a group of healthy volunteers [7.5, (6.1-12.8) μg/L] (P<0.001). Among 9 patients studied four died, 2 women and 2 men, those patients showed higher (P=0.032) Mn levels [28, (17-39.5) μg/L] than those alive [13.5, (10.5-32) μg/L] after the follow up period. In this pilot study, Mn blood levels were higher in hepatic encephalopathy that died as consequence of the disease that those that survived in a 6 month follow up period. Blood Mn could be a potential prognosis factor for death in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Spatial Working Memory Deficits in Male Rats Following Neonatal Hypoxic Ischemic Brain Injury Can Be Attenuated by Task Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-ischemia (HI; reduction in blood/oxygen supply is common in infants with serious birth complications, such as prolonged labor and cord prolapse, as well as in infants born prematurely (<37 weeks gestational age; GA. Most often, HI can lead to brain injury in the form of cortical and subcortical damage, as well as later cognitive/behavioral deficits. A common domain of impairment is working memory, which can be associated with heightened incidence of developmental disorders. To further characterize these clinical issues, the current investigation describes data from a rodent model of HI induced on postnatal (P7, an age comparable to a term (GA 36–38 human. Specifically, we sought to assess working memory using an eight-arm radial water maze paradigm. Study 1 used a modified version of the paradigm, which requires a step-wise change in spatial memory via progressively more difficult tasks, as well as multiple daily trials for extra learning opportunity. Results were surprising and revealed a small HI deficit only for the final and most difficult condition, when a delay before test trial was introduced. Study 2 again used the modified radial arm maze, but presented the most difficult condition from the start, and only one daily test trial. Here, results were expected and revealed a robust and consistent HI deficit across all weeks. Combined results indicate that male HI rats can learn a difficult spatial working memory task if it is presented in a graded multi-trial format, but performance is poor and does not appear to remediate if the task is presented with high initial memory demand. Male HI rats in both studies displayed impulsive characteristics throughout testing evidenced as reduced choice latencies despite more errors. This aspect of behavioral results is consistent with impulsiveness as a core symptom of ADHD—a diagnosis common in children with HI insult. Overall findings suggest that task specific behavioral modifications are crucial to accommodating memory deficits in children suffering from cognitive impairments following neonatal HI.

  6. Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Damage in 7-Days-Old Rats: Early Neuronal Changes and the Long-Term Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Ota Nakasone, Arturo; Departamento de Ginecología y Obstetricia Escuela de Medicina de Miyazaki Miyazaki, Japón; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Departamento de Ginecología y Obstetricia Escuela de Medicina de Miyazaki Miyazaki, Japón; Sameshima, Hiroshi; Departamento de Ginecología y Obstetricia Escuela de Medicina de Miyazaki Miyazaki, Japóni; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Departamento de Ginecología y Obstetricia Escuela de Medicina de Miyazaki Miyazaki, Japón; Toshimori, Kiyotaka; Departamento de Anatomía Escuela de Medicina de Miyazaki Miyazaki, Japón

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the changes after hypoxia-ischemia (HI), and to observe both, the vulnerability of the different regions of the brain to HI and the heat shock protein-72 kDa (HSP72) induction and its efects on the neuronal cell. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 7-days-old rats were exposed to left carotid artery ligation followed by 2 h of HI and then they were sacrificed at different time points. Brains extracted at 1-72 h were immunohistochemically study using the HSP-72 and the microtubule assoc...

  7. Temporal characterization of microglia/macrophage phenotypes in a mouse model of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Hellström Erkenstam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune cells display a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, which may facilitate their participation in both the progression and resolution of injury-induced inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the temporal expression of genes associated with classical and alternative polarization phenotypes described for macrophages and to identify related cell populations in the brain following neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI. HI was induced in 9-day old mice and brain tissue was collected up to 7 d post-insult to investigate expression of genes associated with macrophage activation. Using cell-markers, CD86 (classic activa-tion and CD206 (alternative activation, we assessed temporal changes of CD11b+ cell populations in the brain and studied the protein expression of the immunomodulatory factor galectin-3 in these cells. HI induced a rapid regulation (6h of genes associated with both classical and alternative polarization phenotypes in the injured hemisphere. FACS analysis showed a marked increase in the number of CD11+CD86+ positive cells at 24 h after HI (+3,667 %, which was coupled with a relative suppression of CD11+CD206+ cells and cells that did not express either CD86 or CD206. The CD11+CD206+ popula-tion was mixed with some cells also expressing CD86. Confocal microscopy confirmed that a subset of cells expressed both CD86 and CD206, particularly in injured grey and white matter. Protein con-centration of galectin-3 was markedly increased mainly in the cell population lacking CD86 or CD206 in the injured hemisphere. These cells were predominantly resident microglia as very few galectin-3 positive cells co-localized with infiltrating myeloid cells in Lys-EGFP-ki mice after HI.In summary, HI was characterized by an early mixed gene response, but with a large expansion of mainly the CD86 positive population during the first day. However, the injured hemisphere also con-tained a subset of cells expressing both CD86 and CD206 and a large population that expressed nei-ther activation marker CD86 nor CD206. Interestingly, these cells expressed the highest levels of ga-lectin-3 and were found to be predominantly resident microglia. Galectin-3 is a protein involved in chemotaxis and macrophage polarization suggesting a novel role in cell infiltration and immuno-modulation for this cell population after neonatal injury.

  8. Therapeutic Effect of Caffeine Treatment Immediately Following Neonatal Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury on Spatial Memory in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holly Fitch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia Ischemia (HI refers to the disruption of blood and/or oxygen delivery to the brain. Term infants suffering perinatal complications that result in decreased blood flow and/or oxygen delivery to the brain are at risk for HI. Among a variety of developmental delays in this population, HI injured infants demonstrate subsequent memory deficits. The Rice-Vannucci rodent HI model can be used to explore behavioral deficits following early HI events, as well as possible therapeutic agents to help reduce deleterious outcomes. Caffeine is an adenosine receptor antagonist that has recently shown promising results as a therapeutic agent following HI injury. The current study sought to investigate the therapeutic benefit of caffeine following early HI injury in male rats. On post-natal day (P 7, HI injury was induced (cauterization of the right common carotid artery, followed by two hours of 8% oxygen. Male sham animals received only a midline incision with no manipulation of the artery followed by room air exposure for two hours. Subsets of HI and sham animals then received either an intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of caffeine (10 mg/kg, or vehicle (sterile saline immediately following hypoxia. All animals later underwent testing on the Morris Water Maze (MWM from P90 to P95. Results show that HI injured animals (with no caffeine treatment displayed significant deficits on the MWM task relative to shams. These deficits were attenuated by caffeine treatment when given immediately following the induction of HI. We also found a reduction in right cortical volume (ipsilateral to injury in HI saline animals as compared to shams, while right cortical volume in the HI caffeine treated animals was intermediate. These findings suggest that caffeine is a potential therapeutic agent that could be used in HI injured infants to reduce brain injury and preserve subsequent cognitive function.

  9. Effect of Intranasally Delivered rh-VEGF165 on Angiogenesis Following Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia in the Cerebral Cortex of Newborn Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Jain

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF stimulates vascular genesis and angiogenesis. Cerebral Hypoxia-Ischemia (HI leads to the reduction of vasculature in the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets. Objective: The present study tests the hypothesis that post-hypoxia intranasal administration of recombinant human VEGF165 (rh-VEGF165 for 3 days increases the vascular density in the cerebral cortex of newborn piglets without promoting neovascularization. Design/Methods: Ventilated newborn piglets were divided into three groups (n = 5/group: normoxic (Nx, hypoxic-ischemic (HI, and HI treated with intranasal rh-VEGF165rh-VEGF165 (HI-VEGF. HI piglets were exposed to HI (0.05 FiO2 for 30 min. Recombinant h-VEGF165 (100 ng/kg was administered 15 min after HI and then once daily for 3 days. The animals were perfused transcardially and coronal brains sections were processed for Isolectin, Hoechst, and ki-67 cell proliferation marker staining. To assess the vascular density, 30–35 fields per animal section were manually counted using image J software. Results: The vascular density (vessels/mm2 was 42.0 ± 8.0 in the Nx group, 26.4 ± 4.8 (p < 0.05 vs. Nx in the HI group, and 46.0 ± 11.9 (p < 0.05 vs. HI in the HI-VEGF group. When stained for newly formed vessels, via Ki-67 staining, the vascular density was 5.4 ± 3.6 in the Nx group (p < 0.05 vs. HI, 10.2 ± 2.1 in the HI group, and 10.9 ± 2.9 in the HI-VEGF group (p = 0.72 vs. HI. HI resulted in a decrease in vascular density. Intranasal rh-VEGF165rh-VEGF165 resulted in the attenuation of the HI-induced decrease in vascular density. However, rh-VEGF165 did not result in the formation of new vascularity, as evident by ki-67 staining. Conclusions: Intranasal rh-VEGF165 may prevent the HI-induced decrease in the vascular density of the brain and could serve as a promising adjuvant therapy for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE.

  10. MRI and CT appearances in metabolic encephalopathies due to systemic diseases in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathla, G; Hegde, A N

    2013-06-01

    The term encephalopathy refers to a clinical scenario of diffuse brain dysfunction, commonly due to a systemic, metabolic, or toxic derangement. Often the clinical evaluation is unsatisfactory in this scenario and imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis, assessment of treatment response, and prognostication of the disorder. Hence, it is important for radiologists to be familiar with the imaging features of some relatively frequently acquired metabolic encephalopathies encountered in the hospital setting. This study reviews the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of a number of metabolic encephalopathies that occur as part of systemic diseases in adults. The following conditions are covered in this review: hypoglycaemic encephalopathy, hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy, non-ketotic hyperglycaemia, hepatic encephalopathy, uraemic encephalopathy, hyperammonaemic encephalopathy, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. MRI is the imaging method of choice in evaluating these conditions. Due to their high metabolic activity, bilateral basal ganglia changes are evident in the majority of cases. Concurrent imaging abnormalities in other parts of the central nervous system often provide useful diagnostic information about the likely underlying cause of the encephalopathy. Besides this, abnormal signal intensity and diffusion restriction patterns on MRI and MR spectroscopy features may provide important clues as to the diagnosis and guide further management. Frequently, the diagnosis is not straightforward and typical imaging features require correlation with clinical and laboratory data for accurate assessment. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of Hyponatremic Encephalopathy in the Critically Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinger, Steven G; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2017-10-01

    Hyponatremic encephalopathy, symptomatic cerebral edema due to a low osmolar state, is a medical emergency and often encountered in the ICU setting. This article provides a critical appraisal and review of the literature on identification of high-risk patients and the treatment of this life-threatening disorder. Online search of the PubMed database and manual review of articles involving risk factors for hyponatremic encephalopathy and treatment of hyponatremic encephalopathy in critical illness. Hyponatremic encephalopathy is a frequently encountered problem in the ICU. Prompt recognition of hyponatremic encephalopathy and early treatment with hypertonic saline are critical for successful outcomes. Manifestations are varied, depending on the extent of CNS's adaptation to the hypoosmolar state. The absolute change in serum sodium alone is a poor predictor of clinical symptoms. However, certain patient specific risks factors are predictive of a poor outcome and are important to identify. Gender (premenopausal and postmenopausal females), age (prepubertal children), and the presence of hypoxia are the three main clinical risk factors and are more predictive of poor outcomes than the rate of development of hyponatremia or the absolute decrease in the serum sodium. In patients with hyponatremic encephalopathy exhibiting neurologic manifestations, a bolus of 100 mL of 3% saline, given over 10 minutes, should be promptly administered. The goal of this initial bolus is to quickly treat cerebral edema. If signs persist, the bolus should be repeated in order to achieve clinical remission. However, the total change in serum sodium should not exceed 5 mEq/L in the initial 1-2 hours and 15-20 mEq/L in the first 48 hours of treatment. It has recently been demonstrated in a prospective fashion that 500 mL of 3% saline at an infusion rate of 100 mL per hour can be given safely. It is critical to recognize the early signs of cerebral edema (nausea, vomiting, and headache

  12. Clinical manifestations and treatment response of steroid in pediatric Hashimoto encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hee Joon; Lee, Jeehun; Seo, Dae Won; Lee, Munhyang

    2014-07-01

    Hashimoto encephalopathy is a steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with elevated titers of antithyroid antibodies. Clinical symptoms are characterized by behavioral and cognitive changes, speech disturbance, seizures, myoclonus, psychosis, hallucination, involuntary movements, cerebellar signs, and coma. The standard treatment is the use of corticosteroids along with the treatment of any concurrent dysthyroidism. Other options are immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis. We described symptoms and outcomes on 3 teenage girls with Hashimoto encephalopathy. Presenting symptoms were seizure or altered mental status. One patient took levothyroxine due to hypothyroidism before presentation of Hashimoto encephalopathy. After confirmation of elevated antithyroid antibodies, all patients were treated with steroids. One patient needed plasmapheresis because of the lack of response to steroids and immunoglobulins. Hashimoto encephalopathy should be considered in any patient presenting with acute or subacute unexplained encephalopathy and seizures. Even though the use of steroids is the first line of treatment, plasmapheresis can rescue steroid-resistant patients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Neonatal Encephalopathy: Update on Therapeutic Hypothermia and Other Novel Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ryan M; Juul, Sandra E

    2016-09-01

    Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is standard treatment for newborns at 36 weeks of gestation or greater with intrapartum hypoxia-related NE. Term and late preterm infants with moderate to severe encephalopathy show improved survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes at 18 months of age after TH. TH can increase survival without increasing major disability, rates of an IQ less than 70, or cerebral palsy. Neonates with severe NE remain at risk of death or severe neurodevelopmental impairment. This review discusses the evidence supporting TH for term or near term neonates with NE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy in a patient with severe hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugale, Lauren E; Young, Omar M; Streitman, David C

    2015-05-01

    Hyperemesis gravidarum complicates 0.5-2.0% of pregnancies and may lead to substantial nutritional deficiencies. Total parenteral nutrition can be used in severe cases in an attempt to avoid such deficiencies. Rarely, thiamine deficiency resulting in Wernicke encephalopathy occurs, with significant maternal morbidity. We present the case of a 30-year-old woman with hyperemesis gravidarum at 13 4/7 weeks of gestation treated with prolonged total parenteral nutrition that lacked thiamine supplementation, resulting in iatrogenic Wernicke encephalopathy. After high-dose intravenous thiamine repletion, she experienced slow resolution of her symptoms. Pregnancies complicated by hyperemesis gravidarum treated with total parenteral nutrition represent potential high-risk clinical scenarios for thiamine deficiency. Compositions of total parenteral nutrition are not standardized. Thus, physicians must confirm repletion of all essential components to avoid significant morbidity.

  15. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  16. [Wernicke's encephalopathy following sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, A; Saint-Georges, G

    2014-11-01

    Bariatric restrictive interventions, as sleeve gastrectomy or gastric banding can cause metabolic complications, especially when vomiting is present, such as thiamine deficiency that can lead to Wernicke's encephalopathy. A 31-year-old man with a 47kg/m(2) body mass index presented with Wernicke's encephalopathy, with ophtalmoplegia, nystagmus, ataxia and confusion, followed by a Korsakoff syndrome, occurring two months after a sleeve gastrectomy. MRI showed hyperintense signals on T2 and FLAIR image in both thalamus, periaqueducal area and mamillary bodies. A close clinical and biological monitoring is required in the first year after surgery, especially if vomiting occurs. Early diagnostic and treatment are needed to avoid severe sequelae. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Imaging in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Teena; Raince, Avtar; Manning, Erin; Tsiouris, Apostolos John

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) can only be made pathologically, and there is no concordance of defined clinical criteria for premorbid diagnosis. The absence of established criteria and the insufficient imaging findings to detect this disease in a living athlete are of growing concern. The article is a review of the current literature on CTE. Databases searched include Medline, PubMed, JAMA evidence, and evidence-based medicine guidelines Cochrane Library, Hospital for Special Surgery, and Cornell Library databases. Clinical review. Level 4. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy cannot be diagnosed on imaging. Examples of imaging findings in common types of head trauma are discussed. Further study is necessary to correlate the clinical and imaging findings of repetitive head injuries with the pathologic diagnosis of CTE. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. [Bio-ecological control of chronic liver disease and encephalopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengmark, S; Di Cocco, P; Clemente, K; Corona, L; Angelico, R; Manzia, T; Famulari, A; Pisani, F; Orlando, G

    2011-08-01

    Minimal encephalopathy was originally associated with chronic liver disease but is increasingly associated with most other chronic diseases and particularly with diabetes and also chronic disorders in other organs: kidneys, lungs, thyroid and with obesity. It is increasingly with dramatically increased and more or less permanent increase in systemic inflammation, most likely a result of Western lifestyle. Frequent physical exercise and intake of foods rich in vitamins, antioxidants, fibres, lactic acid bacteria etc in combination with reduction in intake of refined and processed foods is known to reduce systemic inflammation and prevent chronic diseases. Some lactic acid bacteria, especially Lb paracasei, lb plantarum and pediococcus pentosaceus have proven effective to reduce inflammation and eliminate encephalopathy. Significant reduction in blood ammonia levels and endotoxin levels were reported in parallel to improvement of liver disease. Subsequent studies with other lactic acid bacteria seem to demonstrate suppression of inflammation and one study also provides evidence of clinical improvement.

  19. Contributions of Microdialysis to New Alternative Therapeutics for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Carmona-Aparicio

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common complication of cirrhosis, of largely reversible impairment of brain function occurring in patients with acute or chronic liver failure or when the liver is bypassed by portosystemic shunts. The mechanisms causing this brain dysfunction are still largely unclear. The need to avoid complications caused by late diagnosis has attracted interest to understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal damage in order to find markers that will allow timely diagnosis and to propose new therapeutic alternatives to improve the care of patients. One of the experimental approaches to study HE is microdialysis; this technique allows evaluation of different chemical substances in several organs through the recollection of samples in specific places by semi-permeable membranes. In this review we will discuss the contributions of microdialysis in the understanding of the physiological alterations in human hepatic encephalopathy and experimental models and the studies to find novel alternative therapies for this disease.

  20. Constipation, renovascular hypertension, and posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Malavika; Wetzler, Graciela; Holtmann, Julia; Dapul, Heda; Kupferman, Juan C

    2016-03-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological entity characterized by variable associations of headaches, encephalopathy, seizures, vomiting, visual disturbance, and focal neurological signs. Neuroimaging shows cerebral edema of different patterns, classically involving the parieto-occipital white matter. PRES has been associated with several conditions predominantly hypertension, eclampsia, and immunosuppressive therapy. However, constipation has not been previously described in association with the development of PRES. In this report, we describe an 11-year-old child with history of severe functional constipation who developed PRES, as a consequence of renovascular hypertension from severe fecal impaction. Both hypertension and neurologic dysfunction resolved after resolution of fecal impaction. Severe functional constipation is a previously unrecognized cause of severe acute hypertension, resulting in life-threatening neurologic dysfunction. We highlight this unrecognized complication of severe functional constipation with fecal impaction that is potentially preventable if managed appropriately.

  1. Beef and bovine spongiform encephalopathy: the risk persists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dealler, S; Lacey, R

    1991-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is one of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) that are currently known to the authors to affect only mammals, including man. The diseases are progressive, fatal paralyses and dementias, for which there are no methods of certain diagnosis and no treatment. In this review the disease in cattle, the mode of transfer of these TSEs between animals by mouth, the possible presence of infective agents in the food that we eat, the resistance of BSE to cooking, and the likelihood that humans may become infected are discussed. The origins of BSE, whether from sheep, from cows, or as a mutation are considered. Whatever the origin of BSE, a substantial danger for man exists. Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (CJD), a TSE of man, may have been derived from eating infected animal tissue in the past. The possibility that this was of bovine origin and the implications that this would have for BSE infected meat in human food are discussed.

  2. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and motor neuron disease: a common autoimmune pathogenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzheim, Michael; Feucht, Jeanine; Pauleit, Dirk; Pöhlau, Dieter

    2006-09-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is a rare complication of autoimmune thyroiditis not associated with thyroidal function decline. We report a 50-year-old man presenting with lower motor neuron symptoms evolving over 3 years and changes in behavior associated with attentive and cognitive impairment occurring in the last few months. Memory deficits, emotional instability, marked dysarthria, mild symmetric weakness of the lower extremities and fasciculations were the most striking clinical features. EEG was diffusely slow, cranial MRI revealed multiple subcortical white matter lesions, CSF protein was slightly elevated, electromyographic recordings showed acute and chronic denervation and extremely high TPO antibody titers were found in the serum. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and lower motor neuron disease were diagnosed. As repeated high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone administration followed by oral tapering improved both central nervous system and lower motor neuron symptoms, the question was raised whether there was a common autoimmune pathogenesis of both clinically distinct diseases.

  3. Mutations of PTPN23 in developmental and epileptic encephalopathy

    KAUST Repository

    Sowada, Nadine

    2017-10-31

    Developmental and epileptic encephalopathies (DEE) are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders with poor prognosis. Recent discoveries have greatly expanded the repertoire of genes that are mutated in epileptic encephalopathies and DEE, often in a de novo fashion, but in many patients, the disease remains molecularly uncharacterized. Here, we describe a new form of DEE in patients with likely deleterious biallelic variants in PTPN23. The phenotype is characterized by early onset drug-resistant epilepsy, severe and global developmental delay, microcephaly, and sometimes premature death. PTPN23 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase with strong brain expression, and its knockout in mouse is embryonically lethal. Structural modeling supports a deleterious effect of the identified alleles. Our data suggest that PTPN23 mutations cause a rare severe form of autosomal-recessive DEE in humans, a finding that requires confirmation.

  4. Hyperammoneic encephalopathy, valproic acid, and benzodiazepine withdrawal: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starer, Jacquelyn; Chang, Grace

    2010-03-01

    Benzodiazepine withdrawal is accompanied by a risk of seizures, delirium, and death. While a gradual outpatient taper off of benzodiazepines is the most commonly recommended method for discontinuation, acute inpatient detoxification and seizure prophylaxis may be necessary for some. Complications related to the use of valproic acid for seizure prophylaxis are presented. The study's objectives are to highlight an uncommon and possibly unrecognized complication of valproic acid when used for seizure prophylaxis during acute inpatient detoxification from benzodiazepines in the context of current practice. Case series. Three patients with hyperammoneic encephalopathy are described. Hyperammoneic encephalopathy can occur as a distinct entity separate from hepatotoxicity with the use of valproic acid and may be an unrecognized complication among patients receiving this drug during benzodiazepine detoxification. A previously unreported complication among the addiction patient population is reported. This underscores the need for a better evidence base regarding the prevention of seizures during acute benzodiazepine detoxification, particularly in terms of indications, safety, and efficacy.

  5. Pathology of the superior colliculus in chronic traumatic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Richard A. Armstrong; McKee, Ann C.; Cairns, Nigel J.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate neuropathological changes in the superior colliculus in chronic traumatic encephalopathy. METHODS: The densities of the tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, dot-like grains, astrocytic tangles, and neuritic plaques, together with abnormally enlarged neurons, typical neurons, vacuolation, and frequency of contacts with blood vessels, were studied across the superior colliculus from pia mater to the periaqueductal gray in eight chronic traumatic ...

  6. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome due to seronegative systemic lupus erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Sawan Verma; Irfan Yousuf; Mushtaq Ahmad Wani; Ravouf Asimi; Sheikh Saleem; Mudasir Mushtaq; Irfan Shah; Skeikh Nawaz; Riyaz Ahmad Daga

    2014-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a neurotoxic state coupled with a unique computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearance. Recognized in the setting of a number of complex conditions (preeclampsia/eclampsia, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, organ transplantation, autoimmune disease and high-dose chemotherapy) in the imaging, clinical and laboratory features of this toxic state are becoming better elucidated. We are presenting a case of PRES due ...

  7. Clinical Characteristics of Transplant-associated Encephalopathy in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yun-Jeong; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Min-Jee; Kim, Kyung Mo; Im, Ho Joon; Kim, Young-Hwue; Park, Young Seo; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to analyze characteristics of encephalopathy after both hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ pediatric transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of 662 pediatric transplant recipients (201 with liver transplantation [LT], 55 with heart transplantation [HT], and 67 with kidney transplantation [KT], 339 with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]) who received their graft organs at Asan Medical Center between January 2000 and July 2014. Of the 6...

  8. Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Anil C.; Garg, Hitendra K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India. Most common etiology here is viral hepatitis (hepatitis E > hepatitis B> hepatitis A). Apart from ALF, one may also come across subacute hepatic failure (SAHF) as well as acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) due to viral hepatitis. Interestingly, a host of other conditions can mimic ALF because clinical presentation in these conditions can be dominated by jaundice and encephalopathy. Malarial hepatopathy is possibly the best-known condition out of these and is not an uncommon manifestation of severe malaria. A similar presentation can also be seen in other common infections in tropics such as dengue fever, typhoid fever, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, amoebic liver abscesses, tuberculosis and other bacterial and fungal infections with or without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) related disease. In many of these conditions, liver failure may not be underlying pathophysiology. Some pregnancy related liver diseases could also present with jaundice and encephalopathy. This review summarizes the commonly seen presentations in tropical country like India, where jaundice and encephalopathy dominate the clinical picture. PMID:26041951

  9. Quinoline Derivatives Are Therapeutic Candidates for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami-Kubo, Ikuko; Doh-ura, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Kensuke; Kawatake, Satoshi; Sasaki, Kensuke; Kira, Jun-ichi; Ohta, Shigeru; Iwaki, Toru

    2004-01-01

    We previously reported that quinacrine inhibited the formation of an abnormal prion protein (PrPres), a key molecule in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, or prion disease, in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. To elucidate the structural aspects of its inhibiting action, various chemicals with a quinoline ring were screened in the present study. Assays of the scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells revealed that chemicals with a side chain containing a quinuclidine ...

  10. Acute febrile encephalopathy in adults from Northwest India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Ashish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute onset fever with altered mentation is a common problem encountered by the physician practicing in tropical countries. Central nervous system (CNS infections are the most common cause resulting in fever with altered mentation in children. Aim : In this study, we have tried to analyze the cause of encephalopathy following short febrile illness in adults presenting to a tertiary care center in Northwestern part of India. Setting and Design : A prospective observational study carried out in a tertiary care center in the Northwestern India over a period of 1 year. Material and Methods : A total of 127 patients with fever of less than 2 weeks duration along with alteration in mentation were studied prospectively over a period of 12 months. The demographic variables were recorded in detail. In addition to routine investigations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, noncontrast- and contrast-enhanced computed tomography, along with magnetic resonance imaging were performed in all the subjects. Statistical Analysis : The results were analyzed using SPSS statistical software. The values were expressed as mean with standard deviation for contiguous variable as percentage for the others. Results and Conclusion : Out of these, 70% had primary CNS infection as the etiology. A total of 33% patients had meningitis, 29.9% had evidence of meningoencephalitis, and 12.7% were diagnosed as sepsis-associated encephalopathy. These were followed by cerebral malaria, leptospirosis, and brain abscess as the cause of febrile encephalopathy in adults. Among the noninfectious causes, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, cortical venous thrombosis, and neuroleptic malignant syndrome were documented in 2.36% each. In 11% of the patients, the final diagnosis could not be made in spite of the extensive investigations. Our study demonstrates that acute febrile encephalopathy in adults is a heterogeneous syndrome with primary CNS infections being the commonest

  11. Brainstem variant of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Fabio; Caranci, Ferdinando; Belfiore, Maria Paola; Manzi, Francesca; Pagliano, Pasquale; Cirillo, Sossio

    2015-12-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinico-radiological condition, generally observed in conjunction with severe and acute hypertension, that involves mainly the posterior head areas (occipital and temporal lobes) and anterior "watershed" areas. In this syndrome it is rare to observe a predominant involvement of the brainstem. We describe the clinical and radiological findings in a patient with brainstem involvement, discussing its pathophysiological features and possible differential diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: the dangers of getting "dinged"

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhan, Shaheen E; Kirchgessner, Annette

    2012-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a form of neurodegeneration that results from repetitive brain trauma. Not surprisingly, CTE has been linked to participation in contact sports such as boxing, hockey and American football. In American football getting "dinged" equates to moments of dizziness, confusion, or grogginess that can follow a blow to the head. There are approximately 100,000 to 300,000 concussive episodes occurring in the game of American football alone each year. It is beli...

  13. Medical image of the week: MRI of Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year old male presented to the ED with altered mental status after being found down at home with several beer cans around him. He was noted to have horizontal nystagmus on hospital day 2 and a MRI was performed. MRI showed bilateral thalamic enhancement (Figure 1, arrows on flair imaging consistent with Wernicke’s encephalopathy. His thiamine dose was increased with improvement in his mental status.

  14. Evaluation of two experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. García-Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The serious neuropsychological repercussions of hepatic encephalopathy have led to the creation of several experimental models in order to better understand the pathogenesis of the disease. In the present investigation, two possible causes of hepatic encephalopathy, cholestasis and portal hypertension, were chosen to study the behavioral impairments caused by the disease using an object recognition task. This working memory test is based on a paradigm of spontaneous delayed non-matching to sample and was performed 60 days after surgery. Male Wistar rats (225-250 g were divided into three groups: two experimental groups, microsurgical cholestasis (N = 20 and extrahepatic portal hypertension (N = 20, and a control group (N = 20. A mild alteration of the recognition memory occurred in rats with cholestasis compared to control rats and portal hypertensive rats. The latter group showed the poorest performance on the basis of the behavioral indexes tested. In particular, only the control group spent significantly more time exploring novel objects compared to familiar ones (P < 0.001. In addition, the portal hypertension group spent the shortest time exploring both the novel and familiar objects (P < 0.001. These results suggest that the existence of portosystemic collateral circulation per se may be responsible for subclinical encephalopathy.

  15. Persistent systemic monocyte and neutrophil activation in neonatal encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hare, F M; Watson, R W G; O'Neill, A; Blanco, A; Donoghue, V; Molloy, E J

    2016-01-01

    Circulating immune cell activation is associated with worse outcome in adult and animal models of brain injury. Our aim was to profile the systemic inflammatory response over the first week of life in infants at risk of neonatal encephalopathy and correlate early neutrophil and monocyte endotoxin and activation responses with outcome. Prospective observational study in a tertiary referral university hospital including 22 infants requiring resuscitation at birth who had serial (five time points) neutrophil and monocyte CD11b (marker of cell adhesion) (intracellular Reactive oxygen intermediates) ROI (cell activation), and Toll-like receptor (endotoxin recognition) before and after endotoxin stimulation ex vivo compared to neonatal controls. All neonates requiring resuscitation at delivery (n = 122 samples) had higher neutrophil and monocyte CD11b and TLR-4 expressions compared with adults and neonatal controls. Neonates with abnormal neuroimaging and/or severe neonatal encephalopathy had increased CD11b, ROI and TLR-4. Increased PMN TLR-4 expression was associated with increased mortality in infants with neonatal encephalopathy (NE). Innate immune dysregulation in the first week of life is associated with severity of outcome in neonatal brain injury in this cohort and may be amenable to immunomodulation.

  16. Current trends in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Rasm Al Sibae, Brendan M McGuireDepartment of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE is a common reversible neuropsychiatric syndrome associated with chronic and acute liver dysfunction and significant morbidity and mortality. Although a clear pathogenesis is yet to be determined, elevated ammonia in the serum and central nervous system are the mainstay for pathogenesis and treatment. Management includes early diagnosis and prompt treatment of precipitating factors (infection, gastrointestinal bleeding, electrolyte disturbances, hepatocellular carcinoma, dehydration, hypotension, and use of benzodiazepines, psychoactive drugs, and/or alcohol. Clinical trials have established the efficacy of lactulose and lactitol enemas in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy. Extensive clinical experience has demonstrated the efficacy of oral lactulose and lactitol with the goal of two to three soft bowel movements a day for the treatment of chronic HE. However, lactulose and lactitol have significant gastrointestinal side effects. For patients unable to tolerate lactulose or lactitol or who still have persistent chronic HE with lactulose or lactitol, neomycin, metronidazole and rifaximin are second-line agents. More recent data supports the benefits of rifaximin used solely and as an additional agent with fewer side effects than neomycin or metronidazole. Newer therapies being investigated in humans with clinical promise include nitazoxanide, the molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS, L-ornithine phenylacetate, sodium benzoate, and/or sodium phenylacetate and Kremezin® (AST-120.Keywords: hepatic encephalopathy, liver dysfunction, lactulose, lactitol

  17. Clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Hoon; Han, Seung-A; Kong, Young Hwa; Kim, Sun Jun

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy according to the underlying etiologies in children. We retrospectively evaluated 33 pediatric patients who were diagnosed as having hypertensive encephalopathy in Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital. Among the patients, 18 were excluded because of incomplete data or because brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not performed. Finally, 17 patients were enrolled and divided into a renal-origin hypertension group and a non-renal-origin hypertension group according to the underlying cause. We compared the clinical features and brain MRI findings between the 2 groups. The renal group included renal artery stenosis (4), acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (2), lupus nephritis (2), and acute renal failure (1); the nonrenal group included essential hypertension (4), pheochromocytoma (2), thyrotoxicosis (1), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (1). The mean systolic blood pressure of the renal group (172.5±36.9 mmHg) was higher than that of the nonrenal group (137.1±11.1 mmHg, Pencephalopathy syndrome (PRES), which is the most typical finding of hypertensive encephalopathy, was found predominantly in the renal group as compared with the nonrenal group (66.6% vs. 12.5%, Phypertension had a more severe clinical course than those with non-renal-origin hypertension. Furthermore, the renal-origin group was highly associated with PRES on brain MRI.

  18. Clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Hoon; Han, Seung-A; Kong, Young Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the clinical characteristics of hypertensive encephalopathy according to the underlying etiologies in children. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 33 pediatric patients who were diagnosed as having hypertensive encephalopathy in Chonbuk National University Children's Hospital. Among the patients, 18 were excluded because of incomplete data or because brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was not performed. Finally, 17 patients were enrolled and divided into a renal-origin hypertension group and a non-renal-origin hypertension group according to the underlying cause. We compared the clinical features and brain MRI findings between the 2 groups. Results The renal group included renal artery stenosis (4), acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis (2), lupus nephritis (2), and acute renal failure (1); the nonrenal group included essential hypertension (4), pheochromocytoma (2), thyrotoxicosis (1), and acute promyelocytic leukemia (1). The mean systolic blood pressure of the renal group (172.5±36.9 mmHg) was higher than that of the nonrenal group (137.1±11.1 mmHg, PSeizure was the most common neurologic symptom, especially in the renal group (Phypertensive encephalopathy, was found predominantly in the renal group as compared with the nonrenal group (66.6% vs. 12.5%, Phypertension had a more severe clinical course than those with non-renal-origin hypertension. Furthermore, the renal-origin group was highly associated with PRES on brain MRI. PMID:29042869

  19. Guillain-Barre syndrome with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraj F Banakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES is a clinicoradiologic entity commonly associated with eclampsia, septicemia, chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Concurrent occurrence of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS with PRES is a rare entity. Dysautonomia is a proposed mechanism for such occurrence. Here we present a non-diabetic, non-hypertensive 63-year-old male patient, who came with acute onset flaccid quadriparesis, developing generalized seizures, altered sensorium and raised blood pressure on fifth day of illness. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of brain showed altered signal intensities involving the parieto-occipital areas suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed albuminocytological dissociation, nerve conduction studies revealed demyelinating type of polyneuropathy. The patient was treated with antihypertensives and antiepileptics. After resolution of the encephalopathy, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg was given. The patient recovered gradually over few months. Our case concludes GBS as independent risk factor, for PRES may be secondary to dysautonomia and physicians should be aware of such rare coexistence so that early treatment can be done to reduce the mortality and morbidity.

  20. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.