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Sample records for hypoxia translation regulators

  1. Regulation of mRNA translation influences hypoxia tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, M.; Wouters, B.G.; Koumenis, C.

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia is a heterogenous but common characteristic of human tumours and poor oxygenation is associated with poor prognosis. We believe that the presence of viable hypoxic tumor cells reflects in part an adaptation and tolerance of these cells to oxygen deficiency. Since oxidative phosphorylation is compromized during hypoxia, adaptation may involve both the upregulation of glycolysis as well as downregulation of energy consumption. mRNA translation is one of the most energy costly cellular processes, and we and others have shown that global mRNA translation is rapidly inhibited during hypoxia. However, some mRNAs, including those coding for HIF-1 α and VEGF, remain efficiently translated during hypoxia. Clearly, the mechanisms responsible for the overall inhibition of translation during hypoxia does not compromize the translation of certain hypoxia-induced mRNA species. We therefore hypothesize that the inhibition of mRNA translation serves to promote hypoxia tolerance in two ways: i) through conservation of energy and ii) through differential gene expression involved in hypoxia adaptation. We have recently identified two pathways that are responsible for the global inhibition of translation during hypoxia. The phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2 α by the ER resident kinase PERK results in down-regulation of protein synthesis shortly after the onset of hypoxia. In addition, the initiation complex eIF4F is disrupted during long lasting hypoxic conditions. The identification of the molecular pathways responsible for the inhibition of overall translation during hypoxia has rendered it possible to investigate their importance for hypoxia tolerance. We have found that mouse embryo fibroblasts that are knockout for PERK and therefore not able to inhibit protein synthesis efficiently during oxygen deficiency are significantly less tolerant to hypoxia than their wildtype counterparts. We are currently also investigating the functional significance

  2. Regulation of Cited2 expression provides a functional link between translational and transcriptional responses during hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beucken, Twan van den; Magagnin, Michael G.; Savelkouls, Kim; Lambin, Philippe; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Protein synthesis rates are greatly reduced under hypoxic conditions as a consequence of an overall inhibition of mRNA translation. Certain specific mRNA species have the ability to escape this general translational repression. At the cellular level this results in differential protein expression during hypoxic conditions. The objective of this study was to characterize the translational regulation of the postulated HIF-1α antagonist Cited2. Materials and methods: DU145 prostate carcinoma cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts with a homozygous knock-in mutation for eIF2α (S51A) or wild-type eIF2α were exposed to severe hypoxia after which both total mRNA and efficiently translated mRNA were isolated. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure and compare changes in transcription (total mRNA) with changes in translation (efficiently translated mRNA fraction). Results: We show using HIF-1α null MEF cells that transcriptional induction of Cited2 during hypoxia is dependent on HIF-1α. Although global mRNA translation is inhibited during hypoxia Cited2 mRNA remains efficiently translated. An evolutionary conserved upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the 5'UTR of Cited2 did not stimulate translation in an eIF2α dependent manner during hypoxia. Conclusions: Selective translation Cited2 by an eIF2α independent mechanism establishes a link between translation and HIF-1 dependent transcription during hypoxia

  3. The role of mRNA translation in the adaptation to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, M.; Wouters, B.G.; Koumenis, C.

    2003-01-01

    Hypoxia commonly occurs in human tumours and is associated with a poor prognosis. We and others have shown that global mRNA translation is rapidly inhibited during hypoxia. However, some mRNAs, such as those coding for HIF-1 α and VEGF, remain efficiently translated. We therefore hypothesize that the inhibition of mRNA translation serves to promote hypoxia tolerance in two ways: i) through conservation of energy and ii) through differential gene expression involved in hypoxia adaptation. We are investigating the mechanisms responsible for the down regulation of protein synthesis during hypoxia, and how specific mRNAs maintain their ability to be translated under such conditions. Our goal is to understand the significance of these regulatory mechanisms for hypoxia tolerance in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. We have previously shown that one mechanism responsible for inhibiting protein synthesis during hypoxia is the activation of PERK, which inhibits the essential translation factor eIF2 α . Here we show that PERK-/- MEFs are not able to inhibit protein synthesis efficiently during hypoxia and are significantly less tolerant to hypoxia than wt cells. We also show that other mechanisms are important for sustained low protein synthesis during chronic hypoxia. We demonstrate that the eIF4F complex is disrupted during prolonged hypoxia, and that this is mediated by 4E-BP1 and 4E-T. eIF4F is essential for translation which is dependent upon the 5'mRNA cap-structure. These studies therefore indicate a switch from the inhibition of all translation through eIF2 α during acute hypoxia, to the inhibition of only cap-dependent translation during chronic hypoxia. This model predicts the differential induction of genes that can be translated cap-independently during chronic hypoxia, which is consistent with the observed differential translation of HIF-1 α and VEGF. The functional significance of the disruption of the eIF4F complex during hypoxia is currently being addressed

  4. Phosphorylation of eIF2α is required for mRNA translation inhibition and survival during moderate hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.; Beucken, Twan van den; Magagnin, Michael G.; Savelkouls, Kim; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2007-01-01

    Abstracts: Background and purpose: Human tumors are characterized by temporal fluctuations in oxygen tension. The biological pathways that respond to the dynamic tumor microenvironment represent potential molecular targets for cancer therapy. Anoxic conditions result in eIF2α dependent inhibition of overall mRNA translation, differential gene expression, hypoxia tolerance and tumor growth. The signaling pathway which governs eIF2α phosphorylation has therefore emerged as a potential molecular target. In this study, we investigated the role of eIF2α in regulating mRNA translation and hypoxia tolerance during moderate hypoxia. Since other molecular pathways that regulate protein synthesis are frequently mutated in cancer, we also assessed mRNA translation in a panel of cell lines from different origins. Materials and methods: Immortalized human fibroblast, transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and cells from six cancer cell lines were exposed to 0.2% or 0.0% oxygen. We assayed global mRNA translation efficiency by polysome analysis, as well as proliferation and clonogenic survival. The role of eIF2α was assessed in MEFs harboring a homozygous inactivating mutation (S51A) as well as in U373-MG cells overexpressing GADD34 (C-term) under a tetracycline-dependent promoter. The involvement of eIF4E regulation was investigated in HeLa cells stably expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting 4E-BP1. Results: All cells investigated inhibited mRNA translation severely in response to anoxia and modestly in response to hypoxia. Two independent genetic cell models demonstrated that inhibition of mRNA translation in response to moderate hypoxia was dependent on eIF2α phosphorylation. Disruption of eIF2α phosphorylation caused sensitivity to hypoxia and anoxia. Conclusions: Disruption of eIF2α phosphorylation is a potential target for hypoxia-directed molecular cancer therapy

  5. Hepcidin: A Critical Regulator of Iron Metabolism during Hypoxia

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    Korry J. Hintze

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron status affects cognitive and physical performance in humans. Recent evidence indicates that iron balance is a tightly regulated process affected by a series of factors other than diet, to include hypoxia. Hypoxia has profound effects on iron absorption and results in increased iron acquisition and erythropoiesis when humans move from sea level to altitude. The effects of hypoxia on iron balance have been attributed to hepcidin, a central regulator of iron homeostasis. This paper will focus on the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia affects hepcidin expression, to include a review of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF/hypoxia response element (HRE system, as well as recent evidence indicating that localized adipose hypoxia due to obesity may affect hepcidin signaling and organismal iron metabolism.

  6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat, represses hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha expression through translational inhibition.

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    Darren M Hutt

    Full Text Available Hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α is a master regulator of tumor angiogenesis being one of the major targets for cancer therapy. Previous studies have shown that Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi block tumor angiogenesis through the inhibition of HIF-1α expression. As such, Vorinostat (Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid/SAHA and Romidepsin, two HDACis, were recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T cell lymphoma. Although HDACis have been shown to affect HIF-1α expression by modulating its interactions with the Hsp70/Hsp90 chaperone axis or its acetylation status, the molecular mechanisms by which HDACis inhibit HIF-1α expression need to be further characterized. Here, we report that the FDA-approved HDACi Vorinostat/SAHA inhibits HIF-1α expression in liver cancer-derived cell lines, by a new mechanism independent of p53, prolyl-hydroxylases, autophagy and proteasome degradation. We found that SAHA or silencing of HDAC9 mechanism of action is due to inhibition of HIF-1α translation, which in turn, is mediated by the eukaryotic translation initiation factor--eIF3G. We also highlighted that HIF-1α translation is dramatically inhibited when SAHA is combined with eIF3H silencing. Taken together, we show that HDAC activity regulates HIF-1α translation, with HDACis such as SAHA representing a potential novel approach for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Translational control is a major contributor to hypoxia induced gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beucken, Twan van den; Magagnin, Michael G.; Jutten, Barry; Seigneuric, Renaud; Lambin, Philippe; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors that is associated with an aggressive phenotype, resistance to therapy and poor prognosis. Major contributors to these adverse effects are the transcriptional program activated by the HIF family of transcription factors as well as the translational response mediated by PERK-dependent phosphorylation of eIF2α and inhibition of mTORC1 activity. In this study we determined the relative contribution of both transcriptional and translational responses to changes in hypoxia induced gene expression. Material and methods: Total and efficiently translated (polysomal) mRNA was isolated from DU145 prostate carcinoma cells that were exposed for up to 24 h of hypoxia ( 2 ). Changes in transcription and translation were assessed using affymetrix microarray technology. Results: Our data reveal an unexpectedly large contribution of translation control on both induced and repressed gene expression at all hypoxic time points, particularly during acute hypoxia (2-4 h). Gene ontology analysis revealed that gene classes like transcription and signal transduction are stimulated by translational control whereas expression of genes involved in cell growth and protein metabolism are repressed during hypoxic conditions by translational control. Conclusions: Our data indicate that translation influences gene expression during hypoxia on a scale comparable to that of transcription.

  8. Anthrax lethal toxin inhibits translation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and causes decreased tolerance to hypoxic stress.

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    Ouyang, Weiming; Torigoe, Chikako; Fang, Hui; Xie, Tao; Frucht, David M

    2014-02-14

    Hypoxia is considered to be a contributor to the pathology associated with administration of anthrax lethal toxin (LT). However, we report here that serum lactate levels in LT-treated mice are reduced, a finding inconsistent with the anaerobic metabolism expected to occur during hypoxia. Reduced lactate levels are also observed in the culture supernatants of LT-treated cells. LT inhibits the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a subunit of HIF-1, the master regulator directing cellular responses to hypoxia. The toxin has no effect on the transcription or protein turnover of HIF-1α, but instead it acts to inhibit HIF-1α translation. LT treatment diminishes phosphorylation of eIF4B, eIF4E, and rpS6, critical components of the intracellular machinery required for HIF-1α translation. Moreover, blockade of MKK1/2-ERK1/2, but not p38 or JNK signaling, lowers HIF-1α protein levels in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, consistent with a role for MKK1 and MKK2 as the major targets of LT responsible for the inhibition of HIF-1α translation. The physiological importance of the LT-induced translation blockade is demonstrated by the finding that LT treatment decreases the survival of hepatocyte cell lines grown in hypoxic conditions, an effect that is overcome by preinduction of HIF-1α. Taken together, these data support a role for LT in dysregulating HIF-1α and thereby disrupting homeostatic responses to hypoxia, an environmental characteristic of certain tissues at baseline and/or during disseminated infection with Bacillus anthracis.

  9. Hypoxia, HIF-1 Regulation and Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen insufficiency (hypoxia) is a common feature of human cancer and associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are more resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy contributing to their unfavorable prognosis. The oxygen sensing pathway is

  10. Identification of Hypoxia-Regulated Proteins Using MALDI-Mass Spectrometry Imaging Combined with Quantitative Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Djidja, Marie-Claude; Chang, Joan; Hadjiprocopis, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is present in most solid tumors and is clinically correlated with increased metastasis and poor patient survival. While studies have demonstrated the role of hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in cancer progression, no attempts have been made to identify hypoxia-regulated proteins using...

  11. Pathophysiological response to hypoxia - from the molecular mechanisms of malady to drug discovery: epigenetic regulation of the hypoxic response via hypoxia-inducible factor and histone modifying enzymes.

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    Mimura, Imari; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Wada, Youichiro; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Nangaku, Masaomi

    2011-01-01

    The hypoxia response regulated primarily by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) influences metabolism, cell survival, and angiogenesis to maintain biological homeostasis. In addition to the traditional transcriptional regulation by HIF, recent studies have shown that epigenetic modulation such as histone methylation, acetylation, and DNA methylation could change the regulation of the response to hypoxia. Eukaryotic chromatin is known to be modified by multiple post-translational histone methylation and demethylation, which result in the chromatin conformation change to adapt to hypoxic stimuli. Interestingly, some of the histone demethylase enzymes, which have the Jumonji domain-containing family, require oxygen to function and are induced by hypoxia in an HIF-1-dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that histone modifiers play important roles in the hypoxic environment such as that in cancer cells and that they may become new therapeutic targets for cancer patients. It may lead to finding a new therapy for cancer to clarify a new epigenetic mechanism by HIF and histone demethylase such as JMJD1A (KDM3A) under hypoxia.

  12. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors as regulators of T cell development, differentiation, and function

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    McNamee, Eóin N.; Johnson, Darlynn Korns; Homann, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is a molecule that is central to cellular respiration and viability, yet there are multiple physiologic and pathological contexts in which cells experience conditions of insufficient oxygen availability, a state known as hypoxia. Given the metabolic challenges of a low oxygen environment, hypoxia elicits a range of adaptive responses at the cellular, tissue, and systemic level to promote continued survival and function. Within this context, T lymphocytes are a highly migratory cell type of the adaptive immune system that frequently encounters a wide range of oxygen tensions in both health and disease. It is now clear that oxygen availability regulates T cell differentiation and function, a response orchestrated in large part by the hypoxia-inducible factor transcription factors. Here, we discuss the physiologic scope of hypoxia and hypoxic signaling, the contribution of these pathways in regulating T cell biology, and current gaps in our understanding. Finally, we discuss how emerging therapies that modulate the hypoxic response may offer new modalities to alter T cell function and the outcome of acute and chronic pathologies. PMID:22961658

  13. Regulation of HIF prolyl hydroxylases by hypoxia-inducible factors.

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    Aprelikova, Olga; Chandramouli, Gadisetti V R; Wood, Matthew; Vasselli, James R; Riss, Joseph; Maranchie, Jodi K; Linehan, W Marston; Barrett, J Carl

    2004-06-01

    Hypoxia and induction of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha) is a hallmark of many tumors. Under normal oxygen tension HIF-alpha subunits are rapidly degraded through prolyl hydroxylase dependent interaction with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor protein, a component of E3 ubuiquitin ligase complex. Using microarray analysis of VHL mutated and re-introduced cells, we found that one of the prolyl hydroxylases (PHD3) is coordinately expressed with known HIF target genes, while the other two family members (PHD1 and 2) did not respond to VHL. We further tested the regulation of these genes by HIF-1 and HIF-2 and found that siRNA targeted degradation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha results in decreased hypoxia-induced PHD3 expression. Ectopic overexpression of HIF-2alpha in two different cell lines provided a much better induction of PHD3 gene than HIF-1alpha. In contrast, we demonstrate that PHD2 is not affected by overexpression or downregulation of HIF-2alpha. However, induction of PHD2 by hypoxia has HIF-1-independent and -dependent components. Short-term hypoxia (4 h) results in induction of PHD2 independent of HIF-1, while PHD2 accumulation by prolonged hypoxia (16 h) was decreased by siRNA-mediated degradation of HIF-1alpha subunit. These data further advance our understanding of the differential role of HIF factors and putative feedback loop in HIF regulation. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Erythropoietin inhibits HIF-1α expression via upregulation of PHD-2 transcription and translation in an in-vitro model of hypoxia ischemia

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    Souvenir, Rhonda; Flores, Jerry J.; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Manaenko, Anatol; Duris, Kamil; Tang, Jiping

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α is the central transcriptional factor for the regulation of oxygen-associated genes in response to hypoxia. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hematopoietic growth factor, increases oxygen availability during hypoxia/ischemia and is associated with neuroprotection following hypoxia ischemia in laboratory models of stroke. However, EPO has failed to translate in a clinical setting. Thus it is critical to elucidate the key players in EPO-induced neuroprotection. Our preliminary studies have shown that EPO, as a downstream gene of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), inhibits HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner in an in-vitro model of hypoxia ischemia. This study is designed to elucidate the primary mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent cell survival/neuroprotection. Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of nerve growth factor (NGF) differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were used to model hypoxia ischemia in an in vitro environment. The profile of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and PHD-2 expression, HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD-2) mRNA levels, MMP-9 and cell death was evaluated in the presence and absence of either EPO or PHD-2 inhibitor during OGD. Our findings showed that EPO treatment resulted in an increase in PHD-2 transcription and translation, inhibition of HIF-1α expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 activity, resulting in increased cell survival after OGD. We also observed that EPO-induced cell survival/neuroprotection was reversed by siRNA silencing of PHD-2. This led to the conclusion that PHD-2 is a key mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent neuroprotection in an in vitro model of hypoxia ischemia. PMID:24323731

  15. Hepcidin: A Critical Regulator Of Iron Metabolism During Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    inducible factor (HIF)/hypoxia response element ( HRE ) system, as well as recent evidence indicating that localized adipose hypoxia due to obesity may...mechanisms by which hypoxia affects hepcidin expression, to include a review of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/hypoxia response element ( HRE ) system, as...a battery of genes are induced by the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)/hypoxia response element ( HRE ) system. The HIF system senses O2 levels through

  16. Erythropoietin inhibits HIF-1α expression via upregulation of PHD-2 transcription and translation in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvenir, Rhonda; Flores, Jerry J; Ostrowski, Robert P; Manaenko, Anatol; Duris, Kamil; Tang, Jiping

    2014-02-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α is the central transcriptional factor for the regulation of oxygen-associated genes in response to hypoxia. Erythropoietin (EPO), a hematopoietic growth factor, increases oxygen availability during hypoxia/ischemia and is associated with neuroprotection following hypoxia-ischemia in laboratory models of stroke. However, EPO has failed to translate in a clinical setting. Thus, it is critical to elucidate the key players in EPO-induced neuroprotection. Our preliminary studies have shown that EPO, as a downstream gene of HIF, inhibits HIF-1α in a dose-dependent manner in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia. This study is designed to elucidate the primary mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent cell survival/neuroprotection. Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) of nerve growth factor-differentiated rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells were used to model hypoxia-ischemia in an in vitro environment. The profile of HIF-1α, HIF-2α and prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 (PHD-2) expression; HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD-2) mRNA levels; matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9; and cell death was evaluated in the presence and absence of either EPO or PHD-2 inhibitor during OGD. Our findings showed that EPO treatment resulted in an increase in PHD-2 transcription and translation, inhibition of HIF-1α expression, reactive oxygen species formation, and MMP-9 activity, resulting in increased cell survival after OGD. We also observed that EPO-induced cell survival/neuroprotection was reversed by siRNA silencing of PHD-2. This led to the conclusion that PHD-2 is a key mediator of EPO-induced HIF-1α inhibition and subsequent neuroprotection in an in vitro model of hypoxia-ischemia.

  17. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

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    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  18. Hypoxia and hypoglycaemia in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma: regulation and phenotypic effects of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, Helen J; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Dirksen, Uta; Athanasou, Nicholas A

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia regulates gene expression via the transcription factor HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor). Little is known regarding HIF expression and function in primary bone sarcomas. We describe HIF expression and phenotypic effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and HIF in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma. HIF-1α and HIF-2α immunohistochemistry was performed on a Ewing's tumour tissue array. Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines were assessed for HIF pathway induction by Western blot, luciferase assay and ELISA. Effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and isoform-specific HIF siRNA were assessed on proliferation, apoptosis and migration. 17/56 Ewing's tumours were HIF-1α-positive, 15 HIF-2α-positive and 10 positive for HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Expression of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase 3 localised to necrotic areas. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α and HIF-2α in Ewing's and osteosarcoma cell lines while hypoglycaemia specifically induced HIF-2α in Ewing's. Downstream transcription was HIF-1α-dependent in Ewing's sarcoma, but regulated by both isoforms in osteosarcoma. In both cell types hypoglycaemia reduced cellular proliferation by ≥ 45%, hypoxia increased apoptosis and HIF siRNA modulated hypoxic proliferation and migration. Co-localisation of HIF-1α and necrosis in Ewing's sarcoma suggests a role for hypoxia and/or hypoglycaemia in in vivo induction of HIF. In vitro data implicates hypoxia as the primary HIF stimulus in both Ewing's and osteosarcoma, driving effects on proliferation and apoptosis. These results provide a foundation from which to advance understanding of HIF function in the pathobiology of primary bone sarcomas

  19. Hypoxia and hypoglycaemia in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma: regulation and phenotypic effects of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirksen Uta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia regulates gene expression via the transcription factor HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor. Little is known regarding HIF expression and function in primary bone sarcomas. We describe HIF expression and phenotypic effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and HIF in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma. Methods HIF-1α and HIF-2α immunohistochemistry was performed on a Ewing's tumour tissue array. Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines were assessed for HIF pathway induction by Western blot, luciferase assay and ELISA. Effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and isoform-specific HIF siRNA were assessed on proliferation, apoptosis and migration. Results 17/56 Ewing's tumours were HIF-1α-positive, 15 HIF-2α-positive and 10 positive for HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Expression of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase 3 localised to necrotic areas. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α and HIF-2α in Ewing's and osteosarcoma cell lines while hypoglycaemia specifically induced HIF-2α in Ewing's. Downstream transcription was HIF-1α-dependent in Ewing's sarcoma, but regulated by both isoforms in osteosarcoma. In both cell types hypoglycaemia reduced cellular proliferation by ≥ 45%, hypoxia increased apoptosis and HIF siRNA modulated hypoxic proliferation and migration. Conclusions Co-localisation of HIF-1α and necrosis in Ewing's sarcoma suggests a role for hypoxia and/or hypoglycaemia in in vivo induction of HIF. In vitro data implicates hypoxia as the primary HIF stimulus in both Ewing's and osteosarcoma, driving effects on proliferation and apoptosis. These results provide a foundation from which to advance understanding of HIF function in the pathobiology of primary bone sarcomas.

  20. Hypoxia and hypoglycaemia in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma: regulation and phenotypic effects of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Helen J; Schaefer, Karl-Ludwig; Dirksen, Uta; Athanasou, Nicholas A

    2010-07-16

    Hypoxia regulates gene expression via the transcription factor HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor). Little is known regarding HIF expression and function in primary bone sarcomas. We describe HIF expression and phenotypic effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and HIF in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma. HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha immunohistochemistry was performed on a Ewing's tumour tissue array. Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines were assessed for HIF pathway induction by Western blot, luciferase assay and ELISA. Effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and isoform-specific HIF siRNA were assessed on proliferation, apoptosis and migration. 17/56 Ewing's tumours were HIF-1alpha-positive, 15 HIF-2alpha-positive and 10 positive for HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. Expression of HIF-1alpha and cleaved caspase 3 localised to necrotic areas. Hypoxia induced HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha in Ewing's and osteosarcoma cell lines while hypoglycaemia specifically induced HIF-2alpha in Ewing's. Downstream transcription was HIF-1alpha-dependent in Ewing's sarcoma, but regulated by both isoforms in osteosarcoma. In both cell types hypoglycaemia reduced cellular proliferation by >or= 45%, hypoxia increased apoptosis and HIF siRNA modulated hypoxic proliferation and migration. Co-localisation of HIF-1alpha and necrosis in Ewing's sarcoma suggests a role for hypoxia and/or hypoglycaemia in in vivo induction of HIF. In vitro data implicates hypoxia as the primary HIF stimulus in both Ewing's and osteosarcoma, driving effects on proliferation and apoptosis. These results provide a foundation from which to advance understanding of HIF function in the pathobiology of primary bone sarcomas.

  1. Study on radiation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression and its correlation with hepatoma radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wensen; Kong Zhaolu; Shen Zhifen; Tong Shungao; Ji Huajun; Jin Yizun

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To study the regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in hepatoma cells after irradiation and the expression of HIF-1α effect on the radiosensitivity of heptoma cells. Methods: HepG2 cells were pretreated by Cobalt chloride (COCl 2 ), a chemical hypoxia agent, to induce and stabilize the expression of HIF-1α, and then exposed to different γ-irradiation doses. Clonogenic assay was used to evaluate HepG2 cell survival fraction (SF) after irradiation under normoxia and chemical hypoxia. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblot assay (Western blot) were utilized to detect the changes of intracellular HIF-1α on the level of transcripation and translation. Results: Cell survival level was elevated by chemical hypoxia and there was a statistical difference between chemical hypoxic group and normoxic group. The ratios of SF(SF co /SF o 2 )on two different conditions were increased with irradiation doses. Meanwhile, the irradiation induced up-regulation of HIF-1α in dose-dependent manner. The expression of HIF-1α was correlated with HepG2 cell survival level to some extent. Conclusions: Irradiation could up-regulate the level of HIF-1α expression in HepG2 cells under chemical hypoxic condition. The cells survival level might be influenced by the changes in HIF-1α expression. (authors)

  2. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation.

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    Shin, Yong-Jun; Chen, Kai-Yuan; Sayed, Ali H; Hencey, Brandon; Shen, Xiling

    2013-08-30

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control.

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factors - regulation, role and comparative aspects in tumourigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A E; Kristensen, A T; Law, I

    2011-01-01

    important prognostic information and may help identify potential hypoxia circumventing and targeting strategies. This review summarizes current knowledge on HIF regulation and function in tumour cells and discusses the aspects of using companion animals as comparative spontaneous cancer models. Spontaneous...... tumours in companion animals hold a great research potential for the evaluation and understanding of tumour hypoxia and in the development of hypoxia-targeting therapeutics....

  4. Hypoxia regulates the expression of the neuromedin B receptor through a mechanism dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

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    Hyun-Joo Park

    Full Text Available The neuromedin B receptor (NMB-R, a member of the mammalian bombesin receptor family, is frequently overexpressed in various tumors. In the present study, we found that exposure to hypoxic conditions increases the levels of NMBR mRNA and protein in breast cancer cells, which are tightly regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. We confirmed the effect of HIF-1α on NMBR transcription by performing an NMBR promoter-driven reporter assay and then identified a functional hypoxia-responsive element (HRE in the human NMBR promoter region. Further, the binding of HIF-1α to the NMBR promoter was corroborated by electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, which showed that HIF-1α specifically and directly bound to the NMBR promoter in response to hypoxia. Immunohistochemical analysis of a xenograft and a human breast cancer tissue array revealed a significant correlation between NMB-R and HIF-1α expression. Taken together, our findings indicate that hypoxia induces NMB-R expression through a novel mechanism to regulate HIF-1α expression in breast cancer cells.

  5. Regulation of translation during cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petz, M.

    2012-01-01

    Laminin B1 (LamB1) is a main component of the extracellular matrix and is involved in the regulation of tumor cell migration and invasion of during carcinogenesis. Metastasis of carcinoma cells is crucially linked to the process of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows tumor cells to acquire a more motile phenotype and to dissociate from the epithelial cell cluster of the tumor. Expression profiling of polysome-associated mRNA revealed LamB1 to be translationally upregulated upon EMT of malignant hepatocytes. The enhanced translation of LamB1 in metastatic hepatocytes proved to be regulated by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) located within the 5’-untranslated region (UTR) of the LamB1 transcript. IRES activity was detected by employing two independent reporter systems and verified by stringent assays for the presence of cryptic promoter or splice sites. The minimal cis-acting IRES sequence of 293 nucleotides that is required for cap-independent translation was localized directly upstream of the start codon. Notably, the IRES trans-acting factor (ITAF) La was identified by RNA affinity purification as regulatory factor that interacts with LamB1 5’-UTR. This interaction was verified by RNA-immunoprecipitation in vivo, which revealed enhanced binding of La to the minimal IRES motif of LamB1 after EMT. Consistently, cytoplasmic levels of La were elevated in EMT-transformed cells and correlated with increased LamB1 protein expression. Furthermore, IRES-driven translation of LamB1 was elevated in the presence of La in vitro. Importantly, the EMT-induced cytoplasmic translocation of La was found to be triggered by platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) that is downstream of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling. Together, these data demonstrate that La interacts with the LamB1 IRES in the cytoplasm, resulting in enhanced cap-independent translation of LamB1 in malignant hepatocytes that have undergone EMT. (author) [de

  6. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is essential for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tariq, Mohammad [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Ito, Akihiro, E-mail: akihiro-i@riken.jp [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED-CREST, 1-7-1 Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-0004 (Japan); Ishfaq, Muhammad; Bradshaw, Elliot [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Chemical Genetics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Chemical Genomics Research Group, RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 645 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, AMED-CREST, 1-7-1 Otemachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-0004 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is an essential protein involved in translation elongation and cell proliferation. eIF5A undergoes several post-translational modifications including hypusination and acetylation. Hypusination is indispensable for the function of eIF5A. On the other hand, the precise function of acetylation remains unknown, but it may render the protein inactive since hypusination blocks acetylation. Here, we report that acetylation of eIF5A increases under hypoxia. During extended hypoxic periods an increase in the level of eIF5A acetylation correlated with a decrease in HIF-1α, suggesting involvement of eIF5A activity in HIF-1α expression under hypoxia. Indeed, suppression of eIF5A by siRNA oligo-mediated knockdown or treatment with GC7, a deoxyhypusine synthase inhibitor, led to significant reduction of HIF-1α activity. Furthermore, knockdown of eIF5A or GC7 treatment reduced tumor spheroid formation with a concomitant decrease in HIF-1α expression. Our results suggest that functional, hypusinated eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α expression during hypoxia and that eIF5A is an attractive target for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces acetylation of eIF5A. • Active eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia. • Active eIF5A is important for tumor spheroid growth.

  7. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is essential for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, Mohammad; Ito, Akihiro; Ishfaq, Muhammad; Bradshaw, Elliot; Yoshida, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) is an essential protein involved in translation elongation and cell proliferation. eIF5A undergoes several post-translational modifications including hypusination and acetylation. Hypusination is indispensable for the function of eIF5A. On the other hand, the precise function of acetylation remains unknown, but it may render the protein inactive since hypusination blocks acetylation. Here, we report that acetylation of eIF5A increases under hypoxia. During extended hypoxic periods an increase in the level of eIF5A acetylation correlated with a decrease in HIF-1α, suggesting involvement of eIF5A activity in HIF-1α expression under hypoxia. Indeed, suppression of eIF5A by siRNA oligo-mediated knockdown or treatment with GC7, a deoxyhypusine synthase inhibitor, led to significant reduction of HIF-1α activity. Furthermore, knockdown of eIF5A or GC7 treatment reduced tumor spheroid formation with a concomitant decrease in HIF-1α expression. Our results suggest that functional, hypusinated eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α expression during hypoxia and that eIF5A is an attractive target for cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Hypoxia induces acetylation of eIF5A. • Active eIF5A is necessary for HIF-1α activation in hypoxia. • Active eIF5A is important for tumor spheroid growth.

  8. Stromal Expression of Hypoxia Regulated Proteins Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor in Colorectal Carcinomas

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    Arjen H. G. Cleven

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia modifies the phenotype of tumors in a way that promotes tumor aggressiveness and resistance towards chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the expression and influence of hypoxia-regulated proteins on tumor biology are not well characterized in colorectal tumors. We studied the role of protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 133 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of hypoxia markers was correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall patient survival. Results: Expression of these hypoxia markers was detected in the epithelial compartment of the tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated stromal cells. Although tumor cells frequently showed expression of one or more of the investigated hypoxia markers, no correlation among these markers or with clinical response was found. However, within the tumor stroma, positive correlations between the hypoxia markers HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 were observed. Furthermore expression of HIF-2α and CA9 in tumor-associated stroma were both associated with a significantly reduced overall survival. In the Cox proportional hazard model, stromal HIF-2α expression was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusion: These observations show, that expression of hypoxia regulated proteins in tumor-associated stromal cells, as opposed to their expression in epithelial tumor cells, is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. This study suggests that tumor hypoxia may influence tumor-associated stromal cells in a way that ultimately contributes to patient prognosis.

  9. Extensive translational regulation during seed germination revealed by polysomal profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Bing; Peviani, Alessia; Horst, van der Sjors; Gamm, Magdalena; Snel, Berend; Bentsink, Leónie; Hanson, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    This work investigates the extent of translational regulation during seed germination. The polysome occupancy of each gene is determined by genome-wide profiling of total mRNA and polysome-associated mRNA. This reveals extensive translational regulation during Arabidopsis thaliana seed

  10. The significance of translation regulation in the stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The stress response in bacteria involves the multistage control of gene expression but is not entirely understood. To identify the translational response of bacteria in stress conditions and assess its contribution to the regulation of gene expression, the translational states of all mRNAs were compared under optimal growth condition and during nutrient (isoleucine) starvation. Results A genome-scale study of the translational response to nutritional limitation was performed in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis. Two measures were used to assess the translational status of each individual mRNA: the fraction engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy) and ribosome density (number of ribosomes per 100 nucleotides). Under isoleucine starvation, half of the mRNAs considered were translationally down-regulated mainly due to decreased ribosome density. This pattern concerned genes involved in growth-related functions such as translation, transcription, and the metabolism of fatty acids, phospholipids and bases, contributing to the slowdown of growth. Only 4% of the mRNAs were translationally up-regulated, mostly related to prophagic expression in response to stress. The remaining genes exhibited antagonistic regulations of the two markers of translation. Ribosome occupancy increased significantly for all the genes involved in the biosynthesis of isoleucine, although their ribosome density had decreased. The results revealed complex translational regulation of this pathway, essential to cope with isoleucine starvation. To elucidate the regulation of global gene expression more generally, translational regulation was compared to transcriptional regulation under isoleucine starvation and to other post-transcriptional regulations related to mRNA degradation and mRNA dilution by growth. Translational regulation appeared to accentuate the effects of transcriptional changes for down-regulated growth-related functions under isoleucine starvation although m

  11. Regulation of mRNA translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Weissman, Jonathan S; Vale, Ronald D

    2015-08-25

    Passage through mitosis is driven by precisely-timed changes in transcriptional regulation and protein degradation. However, the importance of translational regulation during mitosis remains poorly understood. Here, using ribosome profiling, we find both a global translational repression and identified ~200 mRNAs that undergo specific translational regulation at mitotic entry. In contrast, few changes in mRNA abundance are observed, indicating that regulation of translation is the primary mechanism of modulating protein expression during mitosis. Interestingly, 91% of the mRNAs that undergo gene-specific regulation in mitosis are translationally repressed, rather than activated. One of the most pronounced translationally-repressed genes is Emi1, an inhibitor of the anaphase promoting complex (APC) which is degraded during mitosis. We show that full APC activation requires translational repression of Emi1 in addition to its degradation. These results identify gene-specific translational repression as a means of controlling the mitotic proteome, which may complement post-translational mechanisms for inactivating protein function.

  12. Sphingosine kinase-1 is a hypoxia-regulated gene that stimulates migration of human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwalm, Stephanie; Doell, Frauke; Roemer, Isolde; Bubnova, Svetlana; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Huwiler, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SK) catalyze the production of sphingosine-1-phosphate which in turn regulates cell responses such as proliferation and migration. Here, we show that exposure of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy 926 to hypoxia stimulates a increased SK-1, but not SK-2, mRNA, protein expression, and activity. This effect was due to stimulated SK-1 promoter activity which contains two putative hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive-elements (HRE). By deletion of one of the two HREs, hypoxia-induced promoter activation was abrogated. Furthermore, hypoxia upregulated the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, and both contributed to SK-1 gene transcription as shown by selective depletion of HIF-1α or HIF-2α by siRNA. The hypoxia-stimulated SK-1 upregulation was functionally coupled to increased migration since the selective depletion of SK-1, but not of SK-2, by siRNAs abolished the migratory response. In summary, these data show that hypoxia upregulates SK-1 activity and results in an accelerated migratory capacity of endothelial cells. SK-1 may thus serve as an attractive therapeutic target to treat diseases associated with increased endothelial migration and angiogenesis such as cancer growth and progression

  13. Loss of PINK1 attenuates HIF-1α induction by preventing 4E-BP1-dependent switch in protein translation under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, William; Wadlington, Natasha L; Chen, Linan; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Brorson, James R; Kang, Un Jung

    2014-02-19

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has multiple proposed etiologies with implication of abnormalities in cellular homeostasis ranging from proteostasis to mitochondrial dynamics to energy metabolism. PINK1 mutations are associated with familial PD and here we discover a novel PINK1 mechanism in cellular stress response. Using hypoxia as a physiological trigger of oxidative stress and disruption in energy metabolism, we demonstrate that PINK1(-/-) mouse cells exhibited significantly reduced induction of HIF-1α protein, HIF-1α transcriptional activity, and hypoxia-responsive gene upregulation. Loss of PINK1 impairs both hypoxia-induced 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation and increase in the ratio of internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent to cap-dependent translation. These data suggest that PINK1 mediates adaptive responses by activating IRES-dependent translation, and the impairments in translation and the HIF-1α pathway may contribute to PINK1-associated PD pathogenesis that manifests under cellular stress.

  14. The significance of translation regulation in the stress response

    OpenAIRE

    Picard, Flora; Loubière, Pascal; Girbal, Laurence; Bousquet, Muriel

    2013-01-01

    Background: The stress response in bacteria involves the multistage control of gene expression but is not entirely understood. To identify the translational response of bacteria in stress conditions and assess its contribution to the regulation of gene expression, the translational states of all mRNAs were compared under optimal growth condition and during nutrient (isoleucine) starvation. Results: A genome-scale study of the translational response to nutritional limitation was performed in t...

  15. Regulation of protein translation initiation in response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivigno, Donatella; Bornes, Laura; Huber, Stephan M; Rudner, Justine

    2013-01-01

    Proliferating tumor cells require continuous protein synthesis. De novo synthesis of most proteins is regulated through cap-dependent translation. Cellular stress such as ionizing radiation (IR) blocks cap-dependent translation resulting in shut-down of global protein translation which saves resources and energy needed for the stress response. At the same time, levels of proteins required for stress response are maintained or even increased. The study aimed to analyze the regulation of signaling pathways controlling protein translation in response to IR and the impact on Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic and radioprotective protein, which levels rapidly decline upon IR. Protein levels and processing were analyzed by Western blot. The assembly of the translational pre-initiation complex was examined by Immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments with 7-methyl GTP agarose. To analyze IR-induced cell death, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation were determined by flow cytometry. Protein levels of the different initiation factors were down-regulated using RNA interference approach. IR induced caspase-dependent cleavage of the translational initiation factors eIF4G1, eIF3A, and eIF4B resulting in disassembly of the cap-dependent initiation complex. In addition, DAP5-dependent initiation complex that regulates IRES-dependent translation was disassembled in response to IR. Moreover, IR resulted in dephosphorylation of 4EBP1, an inhibitor of cap-dependent translation upstream of caspase activation. However, knock-down of eIF4G1, eIF4B, DAP5, or 4EBP1 did not affect IR-induced decline of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Our data shows that cap-dependent translation is regulated at several levels in response to IR. However, the experiments indicate that IR-induced Mcl-1 decline is not a consequence of translational inhibition in Jurkat cells

  16. Regulation of protein translation initiation in response to ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trivigno Donatella

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proliferating tumor cells require continuous protein synthesis. De novo synthesis of most proteins is regulated through cap-dependent translation. Cellular stress such as ionizing radiation (IR blocks cap-dependent translation resulting in shut-down of global protein translation which saves resources and energy needed for the stress response. At the same time, levels of proteins required for stress response are maintained or even increased. The study aimed to analyze the regulation of signaling pathways controlling protein translation in response to IR and the impact on Mcl-1, an anti-apoptotic and radioprotective protein, which levels rapidly decline upon IR. Methods Protein levels and processing were analyzed by Western blot. The assembly of the translational pre-initiation complex was examined by Immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments with 7-methyl GTP agarose. To analyze IR-induced cell death, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation were determined by flow cytometry. Protein levels of the different initiation factors were down-regulated using RNA interference approach. Results IR induced caspase-dependent cleavage of the translational initiation factors eIF4G1, eIF3A, and eIF4B resulting in disassembly of the cap-dependent initiation complex. In addition, DAP5-dependent initiation complex that regulates IRES-dependent translation was disassembled in response to IR. Moreover, IR resulted in dephosphorylation of 4EBP1, an inhibitor of cap-dependent translation upstream of caspase activation. However, knock-down of eIF4G1, eIF4B, DAP5, or 4EBP1 did not affect IR-induced decline of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Conclusion Our data shows that cap-dependent translation is regulated at several levels in response to IR. However, the experiments indicate that IR-induced Mcl-1 decline is not a consequence of translational inhibition in Jurkat cells.

  17. The zinc transporter ZIP12 regulates the pulmonary vascular response to chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan; Oliver, Eduardo; Maratou, Klio; Atanur, Santosh S; Dubois, Olivier D; Cotroneo, Emanuele; Chen, Chien-Nien; Wang, Lei; Arce, Cristina; Chabosseau, Pauline L; Ponsa-Cobas, Joan; Frid, Maria G; Moyon, Benjamin; Webster, Zoe; Aldashev, Almaz; Ferrer, Jorge; Rutter, Guy A; Stenmark, Kurt R; Aitman, Timothy J; Wilkins, Martin R

    2015-08-20

    The typical response of the adult mammalian pulmonary circulation to a low oxygen environment is vasoconstriction and structural remodelling of pulmonary arterioles, leading to chronic elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (pulmonary hypertension) and right ventricular hypertrophy. Some mammals, however, exhibit genetic resistance to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We used a congenic breeding program and comparative genomics to exploit this variation in the rat and identified the gene Slc39a12 as a major regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling. Slc39a12 encodes the zinc transporter ZIP12. Here we report that ZIP12 expression is increased in many cell types, including endothelial, smooth muscle and interstitial cells, in the remodelled pulmonary arterioles of rats, cows and humans susceptible to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. We show that ZIP12 expression in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells is hypoxia dependent and that targeted inhibition of ZIP12 inhibits the rise in intracellular labile zinc in hypoxia-exposed pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells and their proliferation in culture. We demonstrate that genetic disruption of ZIP12 expression attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in rats housed in a hypoxic atmosphere. This new and unexpected insight into the fundamental role of a zinc transporter in mammalian pulmonary vascular homeostasis suggests a new drug target for the pharmacological management of pulmonary hypertension.

  18. Regulation of Translation Initiation under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B. Castro-Sanz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Plants have developed versatile strategies to deal with the great variety of challenging conditions they are exposed to. Among them, the regulation of translation is a common target to finely modulate gene expression both under biotic and abiotic stress situations. Upon environmental challenges, translation is regulated to reduce the consumption of energy and to selectively synthesize proteins involved in the proper establishment of the tolerance response. In the case of viral infections, the situation is more complex, as viruses have evolved unconventional mechanisms to regulate translation in order to ensure the production of the viral encoded proteins using the plant machinery. Although the final purpose is different, in some cases, both plants and viruses share common mechanisms to modulate translation. In others, the mechanisms leading to the control of translation are viral- or stress-specific. In this paper, we review the different mechanisms involved in the regulation of translation initiation under virus infection and under environmental stress in plants. In addition, we describe the main features within the viral RNAs and the cellular mRNAs that promote their selective translation in plants undergoing biotic and abiotic stress situations.

  19. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate as a Regulator of Hypoxia-Induced Factor-1α in Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Kalhori

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive lipid, which regulates several cancer-related processes including migration and angiogenesis. We have previously shown S1P to induce migration of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 (HIF-1 is an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor, which adapts cells to hypoxic conditions through increased survival, motility and angiogenesis. Due to these properties and its increased expression in response to intratumoral hypoxia, HIF-1 is considered a significant regulator of tumor biology. We found S1P to increase expression of the regulatory HIF-1α subunit in normoxic ML-1 cells. S1P also increased HIF-1 activity and expression of HIF-1 target genes. Importantly, inhibition or knockdown of HIF-1α attenuated the S1P-induced migration of ML-1 cells. S1P-induced HIF-1α expression was mediated by S1P receptor 3 (S1P3, Gi proteins and their downstream effectors MEK, PI3K, mTOR and PKCβI. Half-life measurements with cycloheximide indicated that S1P treatment stabilized the HIF-1α protein. On the other hand, S1P activated translational regulators eIF-4E and p70S6K, which are known to control HIF-1α synthesis. In conclusion, we have identified S1P as a non-hypoxic regulator of HIF-1 activity in thyroid cancer cells, studied the signaling involved in S1P-induced HIF-1α expression and shown S1P-induced migration to be mediated by HIF-1.

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate as a Regulator of Hypoxia-Induced Factor-1α in Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Muhammad Yasir; Bergelin, Nina; Jaakkola, Panu; Törnquist, Kid

    2013-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lipid, which regulates several cancer-related processes including migration and angiogenesis. We have previously shown S1P to induce migration of follicular ML-1 thyroid cancer cells. Hypoxia-induced factor-1 (HIF-1) is an oxygen-sensitive transcription factor, which adapts cells to hypoxic conditions through increased survival, motility and angiogenesis. Due to these properties and its increased expression in response to intratumoral hypoxia, HIF-1 is considered a significant regulator of tumor biology. We found S1P to increase expression of the regulatory HIF-1α subunit in normoxic ML-1 cells. S1P also increased HIF-1 activity and expression of HIF-1 target genes. Importantly, inhibition or knockdown of HIF-1α attenuated the S1P-induced migration of ML-1 cells. S1P-induced HIF-1α expression was mediated by S1P receptor 3 (S1P3), Gi proteins and their downstream effectors MEK, PI3K, mTOR and PKCβI. Half-life measurements with cycloheximide indicated that S1P treatment stabilized the HIF-1α protein. On the other hand, S1P activated translational regulators eIF-4E and p70S6K, which are known to control HIF-1α synthesis. In conclusion, we have identified S1P as a non-hypoxic regulator of HIF-1 activity in thyroid cancer cells, studied the signaling involved in S1P-induced HIF-1α expression and shown S1P-induced migration to be mediated by HIF-1. PMID:23824493

  1. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  2. Hypoxia regulates microRNA expression in the human carotid body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchian, Souren; Lee, Kian Leong; Kåhlin, Jessica; Ebberyd, Anette; Poellinger, Lorenz; Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I.

    2017-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the key sensing organ for physiological oxygen levels in the body. Under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia), the CB plays crucial roles in signaling to the cardiorespiratory center in the medulla oblongata for the restoration of oxygen homeostasis. How hypoxia regulates gene expression in the human CB remains poorly understood. While limited information on transcriptional regulation in animal CBs is available, the identity and impact of important post-transcriptional regulators such as non-coding RNAs, and in particular miRNAs are not known. Here we show using ex vivo experiments that indeed a number of miRNAs are differentially regulated in surgically removed human CB slices when acute hypoxic conditions were applied. Analysis of the hypoxia-regulated miRNAs shows that they target biological pathways with upregulation of functions related to cell proliferation and immune response and downregulation of cell differentiation and cell death functions. Comparative analysis of the human CB miRNAome with the global miRNA expression patterns of a large number of different human tissues showed that the CB miRNAome had a unique profile which reflects its highly specialized functional status. Nevertheless, the human CB miRNAome is most closely related to the miRNA expression pattern of brain tissues indicating that they may have the most similar developmental origins. - Highlights: • Hypoxia triggers differential expression of many miRNAs in the human carotid body. • This can lead to the upregulation of proliferation and immune response functions. • CB expression profile in the carotid body resembles the miRNA expression pattern in the brain. • miRNAs are involved in the regulation of carotid body functions including oxygen sensing.

  3. Hypoxia regulates microRNA expression in the human carotid body

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchian, Souren, E-mail: souren.mkrtchian@ki.se [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Lee, Kian Leong, E-mail: csilkl@nus.edu.sg [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Kåhlin, Jessica [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Ebberyd, Anette [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Poellinger, Lorenz [Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, National University of Singapore, 117599 Singapore (Singapore); Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Fagerlund, Malin Jonsson; Eriksson, Lars I. [Section for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden); Function Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    The carotid body (CB) is the key sensing organ for physiological oxygen levels in the body. Under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia), the CB plays crucial roles in signaling to the cardiorespiratory center in the medulla oblongata for the restoration of oxygen homeostasis. How hypoxia regulates gene expression in the human CB remains poorly understood. While limited information on transcriptional regulation in animal CBs is available, the identity and impact of important post-transcriptional regulators such as non-coding RNAs, and in particular miRNAs are not known. Here we show using ex vivo experiments that indeed a number of miRNAs are differentially regulated in surgically removed human CB slices when acute hypoxic conditions were applied. Analysis of the hypoxia-regulated miRNAs shows that they target biological pathways with upregulation of functions related to cell proliferation and immune response and downregulation of cell differentiation and cell death functions. Comparative analysis of the human CB miRNAome with the global miRNA expression patterns of a large number of different human tissues showed that the CB miRNAome had a unique profile which reflects its highly specialized functional status. Nevertheless, the human CB miRNAome is most closely related to the miRNA expression pattern of brain tissues indicating that they may have the most similar developmental origins. - Highlights: • Hypoxia triggers differential expression of many miRNAs in the human carotid body. • This can lead to the upregulation of proliferation and immune response functions. • CB expression profile in the carotid body resembles the miRNA expression pattern in the brain. • miRNAs are involved in the regulation of carotid body functions including oxygen sensing.

  4. Hypoxia Induces Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition in Follicular Thyroid Cancer: Involvement of Regulation of Twist by Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yeon Ju; Na, Hwi Jung; Suh, Michelle J; Ban, Myung Jin; Byeon, Hyung Kwon; Kim, Won Shik; Kim, Jae Wook; Choi, Eun Chang; Kwon, Hyeong Ju; Chang, Jae Won; Koh, Yoon Woo

    2015-11-01

    Although follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a relatively fair prognosis, distant metastasis sometimes results in poor prognosis and survival. There is little understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the aggressiveness potential of thyroid cancer. We showed that hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) induced aggressiveness in FTC cells and identified the underlying mechanism of the HIF-1α-induced invasive characteristics. Cells were cultured under controlled hypoxic environments (1% O₂) or normoxic conditions. The effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) related markers were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Invasion and wound healing assay were conducted to identify functional character of EMT. The involvement of HIF-1α and Twist in EMT were studied using gene overexpression or silencing. After orthotopic nude mouse model was established using the cells transfected with lentiviral shHIF-1α, tissue analysis was done. Hypoxia induces HIF-1α expression and EMT, including typical morphologic changes, cadherin shift, and increased vimentin expression. We showed that overexpression of HIF-1α via transfection resulted in the aforementioned changes without hypoxia, and repression of HIF-1α with RNA interference suppressed hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and EMT. Furthermore, we also observed that Twist expression was regulated by HIF-1α. These were confirmed in the orthotopic FTC model. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α, which in turn induced EMT, resulting in the increased capacity for invasion and migration of cells via regulation of the Twist signal pathway in FTC cells. These findings provide insight into a possible therapeutic strategy to prevent invasive and metastatic FTC.

  5. Neuroprotection via RNA-binding protein RBM3 expression is regulated by hypothermia but not by hypoxia in human SK-N-SH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal LM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lisa-Maria Rosenthal,1 Giang Tong,1 Christoph Walker,1 Sylvia J Wowro,1 Jana Krech,1 Constanze Pfitzer,1,2 Georgia Justus,1 Felix Berger,1,3 Katharina Rose Luise Schmitt1 1Department of Congenital Heart Disease/Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Institute Berlin, 2Berlin Institute of Health (BIH, 3Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Charité – University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany Objective: Therapeutic hypothermia is an established treatment for perinatal asphyxia. Yet, many term infants continue to die or suffer from neurodevelopmental disability. Several experimental studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate hypothermia after hypoxic injury, but the understanding of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains incomplete. In general, global protein synthesis is attenuated by hypothermia, but a small group of RNA-binding proteins including the RNA-binding motif 3 (RBM3 is upregulated in response to cooling. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model to investigate the effects of hypoxia and hypothermia on neuronal cell survival, as well as to examine the kinetics of concurrent cold-shock protein RBM3 gene expression. Methods: Experiments were performed by using human SK-N-SH neurons exposed to different oxygen concentrations (21%, 8%, or 0.2% O2 for 24 hours followed by moderate hypothermia (33.5°C or normothermia for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Cell death was determined by quantification of lactate dehydrogenase and neuron-specific enolase releases into the cell cultured medium, and cell morphology was assessed by using immunofluorescence staining. The regulation of RBM3 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis.Results: Exposure to hypoxia (0.2% O2 for 24 hours resulted in significantly increased cell death in SK-N-SH neurons, whereas exposure to 8% O2 had no significant impact on cell viability. Post-hypoxia treatment with

  6. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 regulates erythropoiesis by controlling GATA1 translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Veiga, Diogo Ft; Maslowski, Kendle M; Andina, Nicola; Tardivel, Aubry; Yu, Eric Chi-Wang; Stilinovic, Martina; Simillion, Cedric; Duchosal, Michel A; Quadroni, Manfredo; Roberts, Irene; Sankaran, Vijay G; MacDonald, H Robson; Fasel, Nicolas; Angelillo-Scherrer, Anne; Schneider, Pascal; Hoang, Trang; Allam, Ramanjaneyulu

    2018-04-02

    Ribosomal proteins (RP) regulate specific gene expression by selectively translating subsets of mRNAs. Indeed, in Diamond-Blackfan anemia and 5q- syndrome, mutations in RP genes lead to a specific defect in erythroid gene translation and cause anemia. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of selective mRNA translation and involvement of ribosomal-associated factors in this process. Ribonuclease inhibitor 1 (RNH1) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that binds to and inhibits pancreatic-type ribonucleases. Here, we report that RNH1 binds to ribosomes and regulates erythropoiesis by controlling translation of the erythroid transcription factor GATA1. Rnh1-deficient mice die between embryonic days E8.5 and E10 due to impaired production of mature erythroid cells from progenitor cells. In Rnh1-deficient embryos, mRNA levels of Gata1 are normal, but GATA1 protein levels are decreased. At the molecular level, we found that RNH1 binds to the 40S subunit of ribosomes and facilitates polysome formation on Gata1 mRNA to confer transcript-specific translation. Further, RNH1 knockdown in human CD34+ progenitor cells decreased erythroid differentiation without affecting myelopoiesis. Our results reveal an unsuspected role for RNH1 in the control of GATA1 mRNA translation and erythropoiesis.

  7. Regulation of matrix stiffness on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition of breast cancer cells under hypoxia environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yonggang; Chen, Can; Zhao, Boyuan; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2017-06-01

    Substrate stiffness and hypoxia are associated with tumor development and progression, respectively. However, the synergy of them on the biological behavior of human breast cancer cell is still largely unknown. This study explored how substrate stiffness regulates the cell phenotype, viability, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of human breast cancer cells MCF-7 under hypoxia (1% O2). TRITC-phalloidin staining showed that MCF-7 cells transformed from round to irregular polygon with stiffness increase either in normoxia or hypoxia. While being accompanied with the upward tendency from a 0.5- to a 20-kPa substrate, the percentage of cell apoptosis was significantly higher in hypoxia than that in normoxia, especially on the 20-kPa substrate. Additionally, it was hypoxia, but not normoxia, that promoted the EMT of MCF-7 by upregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), vimentin, Snail 1, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP 2) and 9 (MMP 9), and downregulating E-cadherin simultaneously regardless of the change of substrate stiffness. In summary, this study discovered that hypoxia and stiffer substrate (20 kPa) could synergistically induce phenotype change, apoptosis, and EMT of MCF-7 cells. Results of this study have an important significance on further exploring the synergistic effect of stiffness and hypoxia on the EMT of breast cancer cells and its molecular mechanism.

  8. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  9. MDM2 regulates hypoxic hypoxia-inducible factor 1α stability in an E3 ligase, proteasome, and PTEN-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R; Durden, Donald L

    2014-08-15

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor containing an inducibly expressed HIF1α subunit and a constitutively expressed HIF1β subunit. Under hypoxic conditions, the HIF1α subunit accumulates because of a decrease in the rate of proteolytic degradation, and the resulting HIF1α-HIF1β heterodimers undergo post-translational modifications that promote transactivation. Previous reports suggest that amplified signaling through PI3K enhances HIF1-dependent gene expression; however, its role is controversial, and the mechanism is unclear. Using genetically engineered PTEN-deficient cell lines, we demonstrate that PTEN specifically inhibited the accumulation of HIF1α in response to hypoxia. Furthermore, we report that in glioblastoma cell lines, inhibition of PI3K pathway, using pan as well as isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors SF1126, PF4691502, BEZ-235, GDC0941, and TGX221 blocked the induction of HIF1α protein and its targets vascular endothelial growth factor, HK1, and GLUT1 mRNA in response to hypoxia. Herein, we describe the first evidence that HIF1α can be degraded under hypoxic conditions via the 26 S proteasome and that MDM2 is the E3 ligase that induces the hypoxic degradation of HIF1α. Moreover, the action of MDM2 on HIF1α under hypoxia occurs in the cytoplasm and is controlled by the PTEN-PI3K-AKT signaling axis. These data strongly suggest a new role for PTEN in the regulation of HIF1α and importantly that PI3K-AKT activation is required for the hypoxic stabilization of HIF1α and that hypoxia alone is not sufficient to render HIF1α resistant to proteasomal cleavage and degradation. Moreover, these findings suggest new therapeutic considerations for PI3K and/or AKT inhibitors for cancer therapeutics. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. MDM2 Regulates Hypoxic Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1α Stability in an E3 Ligase, Proteasome, and PTEN-Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase-AKT-dependent Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shweta; Singh, Alok R.; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor containing an inducibly expressed HIF1α subunit and a constitutively expressed HIF1β subunit. Under hypoxic conditions, the HIF1α subunit accumulates because of a decrease in the rate of proteolytic degradation, and the resulting HIF1α–HIF1β heterodimers undergo post-translational modifications that promote transactivation. Previous reports suggest that amplified signaling through PI3K enhances HIF1-dependent gene expression; however, its role is controversial, and the mechanism is unclear. Using genetically engineered PTEN-deficient cell lines, we demonstrate that PTEN specifically inhibited the accumulation of HIF1α in response to hypoxia. Furthermore, we report that in glioblastoma cell lines, inhibition of PI3K pathway, using pan as well as isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors SF1126, PF4691502, BEZ-235, GDC0941, and TGX221 blocked the induction of HIF1α protein and its targets vascular endothelial growth factor, HK1, and GLUT1 mRNA in response to hypoxia. Herein, we describe the first evidence that HIF1α can be degraded under hypoxic conditions via the 26 S proteasome and that MDM2 is the E3 ligase that induces the hypoxic degradation of HIF1α. Moreover, the action of MDM2 on HIF1α under hypoxia occurs in the cytoplasm and is controlled by the PTEN-PI3K-AKT signaling axis. These data strongly suggest a new role for PTEN in the regulation of HIF1α and importantly that PI3K-AKT activation is required for the hypoxic stabilization of HIF1α and that hypoxia alone is not sufficient to render HIF1α resistant to proteasomal cleavage and degradation. Moreover, these findings suggest new therapeutic considerations for PI3K and/or AKT inhibitors for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24982421

  11. Hypoxia-response element (HRE)-directed transcriptional regulation of the rat lysyl oxidase gene in response to cobalt and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Zhou, Jing; Zhao, Yinzhi; Toselli, Paul; Li, Wande

    2013-04-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5'-ACGTG-3') exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10-100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)-treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at -387/-383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation.

  12. Hypoxia-Response Element (HRE)–Directed Transcriptional Regulation of the Rat Lysyl Oxidase Gene in Response to Cobalt and Cadmium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wande

    2013-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LO) catalyzes crosslink of collagen, elastin, and histone H1, stabilizing the extracellular matrix and cell nucleus. This enzyme displays dual functions for tumorigenesis, i.e., as a tumor suppressor inactivating the ras oncogene and as a tumor promoter enhancing malignant cell metastasis. To elucidate LO transcriptional regulation, we have cloned the 804 base pair region upstream of the translation start site (ATG) of the rat LO gene with the maximal promoter activity. Computer analysis indicated that at least four hypoxia-response element (HRE) consensuses (5′-ACGTG-3′) exist in the cloned LO promoter. Treatment of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) with CoCl2 (Co, 10–100 μM), a chemical hypoxia reagent, enhanced LO mRNA expression and promoter activities. Overexpression of LO was associated with upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α at mRNA levels in cobalt (Co)–treated cells. Thus, LO is a hypoxia-responsive gene. Dominant negative-HIF-1α inhibited LO promoter activities stimulated by Co. Electrophoretic mobility shift, oligonucleotide competition, and in vitro translated HIF-1α binding assays indicated that only one HRE mapped at −387/−383 relative to ATG was functionally active among four consensuses. Site-directed mutation of this HRE significantly diminished the Co-induced and LO promoter-directed expression of the reporter gene. Cadmium (Cd), an inducer of reactive oxygen species, inhibited HIF-1α mRNA expression and HIF-1α binding to the LO gene in Co-treated cells as revealed by RT-PCR and ChIP assays, respectively. Thus, modulation of the HRE activity by Co and Cd plays a critical role in LO gene transactivation. PMID:23161664

  13. Hypoxia-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Stemness in Brain Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pankaj; Mittal, Shivani Arora; Chongtham, Jonita; Mohanty, Sujata; Srivastava, Tapasya

    2017-06-01

    Activation of pluripotency regulatory circuit is an important event in solid tumor progression and the hypoxic microenvironment is known to enhance the stemness feature of some cells. The distinct population of cancer stem cells (CSCs)/tumor initiating cells exist in a niche and augment invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance. Previously, studies have reported global hypomethylation and site-specific aberrant methylation in gliomas along with other epigenetic modifications as important contributors to genomic instability during glioma progression. Here, we have demonstrated the role of hypoxia-mediated epigenetic modifications in regulating expression of core pluripotency factors, OCT4 and NANOG, in glioma cells. We observe hypoxia-mediated induction of demethylases, ten-eleven-translocation (TET) 1 and 3, but not TET2 in our cell-line model. Immunoprecipitation studies reveal active demethylation and direct binding of TET1 and 3 at the Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions. Tet1 and 3 silencing assays further confirmed induction of the pluripotency pathway involving Oct4, Nanog, and Stat3, by these paralogues, although with varying degrees. Knockdown of Tet1 and Tet3 inhibited the formation of neurospheres in hypoxic conditions. We observed independent roles of TET1 and TET3 in differentially regulating pluripotency and differentiation associated genes in hypoxia. Overall, this study demonstrates an active demethylation in hypoxia by TET1 and 3 as a mechanism of Oct4 and Nanog overexpression thus contributing to the formation of CSCs in gliomas. Stem Cells 2017;35:1468-1478. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  14. The construction and identification of hypoxia-regulated recombinant plasmid with reporter gene hNIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qunchao; Wu Jinchang; Zhou Jundong; Gu Ke

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To construct pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS recombinant plasmid regulated by hypoxia-responsive element, which can possibly by used to detect the expression of hypoxia induced factor-α (HIF-1α) gene under hypoxia condition. Methods: Artificially synthesize the nucleotide sequences of five copies of hypoxia response elements (HREs) were cloned into pGL3-promoter vector to construct pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector. Human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) gene cDNA was amplified from human genome by RT-PCR, and subcloned into pGL3-promoter-5 × HRE vector then was sequenced. After treated with CoCl 2 as hypoxia mimic, HEK293 cells were transfected with recombinant plasmid with hNIS gene, while cells treated with DMSO as the control. Meanwhile, pcDNA3.1-HIF-1α and recombinant hNIS gene vectors were transfected into HEK293 cells at the ratio of 3 to 1, while co-transfection with pcDNA3.1 and pShuttle-NIS vectors cells were taken as the control. NIS mRNA expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR while function of NIS protein was tested by 99m TcO 4 - -uptake. Results: The sequence data of hNIS gene in recombinant plasmid were in accordance with those reported in the literatures. Compared with control groups, HEK293 cells co-transfected with both pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS and HIF-1α gene vectors and CoCl 2 -treated after pShuttle-NIS transfecting presented higher mRNA expressions of NIS and 99m TcO 4 - uptake (P<0.01). Conclusion: HIF-1α can be bound to and activate pShuttle-5 × HRE-CMV-NIS in cells to accumulate radioactive nuclide 99m TcO 4 - and this technique is potential for detection of expression and activity of HIF-1α, the indicator of cell hypoxia. (authors)

  15. Hypothesis: the regulation of the partial pressure of oxygen by the serotonergic nervous system in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Diana; Ikomi-Kumm, Julie

    2013-03-01

    The regulation of the partial pressure of oxygen by the serotonergic nervous system in hypoxia is a hypothesis, which proposes an inherent operative system in homo sapiens that allows central nervous system and endocrine-mediated vascular system adaption to variables in partial pressure of oxygen, pH and body composition, while maintaining sufficient oxygen saturation for the immune system and ensuring protection of major organs in hypoxic and suboptimal conditions. While acknowledging the importance of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation in the regulation of acid base balance, the hypothesis seeks to define the specific neuroendocrine/vascular mechanisms at work in regulating acid base balance in hypoxia and infection. The SIA (serotonin-immune-adrenergic) system is proposed as a working model, which allows central nervous system and endocrine-mediated macro- and micro vascular 'fine tuning'. The neurotransmitter serotonin serves as a 'hypoxic sensor' in concert with other operators to orchestrate homeostatic balance in normal and pathological states. The SIA system finely regulates oxygen, fuel and metabolic buffering systems at local sites to ensure optimum conditions for the immune response. The SIA system is fragile and its operation may be affected by infection, stress, diet, environmental toxins and lack of exercise. The hypothesis provides new insight in the area of neuro-gastroenterology, and emphasizes the importance of diet and nutrition as a complement in the treatment of infection, as well as the normalization of intestinal flora following antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α regulates branching morphogenesis during kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Kenji; Kitamura, Shinji; Makino, Hirofumi

    2014-04-25

    The kidneys are exposed to hypoxic conditions during development. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), an important mediator of the response to hypoxia, is believed to have an important role in development. However, the relationship between HIF and branching morphogenesis has not been elucidated clearly. In this study, we examined whether HIF regulates kidney development. We harvested kidneys from day 13 rat embryos (E13Ks) and cultured the organs under normoxic (20% O2/5% CO2) or hypoxic (5% O2/5% CO2) conditions. We evaluated the kidneys based on morphology and gene expression. E13Ks cultured under hypoxic conditions had significantly more ureteric bud (UB) branching than the E13Ks cultured under normoxic conditions. In addition, the mRNA levels of GDNF and GDNF receptor (GFR-α1), increased under hypoxic conditions in E13Ks. When we cultured E13Ks with the HIF-1α inhibitor digoxin or with siRNA targeting HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions, we did not observe increased UB branching. In addition, the expression of GDNF and GFR-α1 was inhibited under hypoxic conditions when the kidneys were treated with siRNA targeting HIF-1α. We also elucidated that hypoxia inhibited UB cell apoptosis and promoted the expression of FGF7 mRNA levels in metanephric mesenchymal (MM) cells in vitro. These findings suggest that hypoxic condition has important roles in inducing branching morphogenesis during kidney development. Hypoxia might mediate branching morphogenesis via not only GDNF/Ret but also FGF signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Translational control of human acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 mRNA is mediated by an internal ribosome entry site in response to ER stress, serum deprivation or hypoxia mimetic CoCl2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, Fabrizio; Testini, Mariangela; Tocci, Romina; Gnoni, Gabriele V; Siculella, Luisa

    2018-04-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) is a cytosolic enzyme catalyzing the rate limiting step in de novo fatty acid biosynthesis. There is mounting evidence showing that ACC1 is susceptible to dysregulation and that it is over-expressed in liver diseases associated with lipid accumulation and in several cancers. In the present study, ACC1 regulation at the translational level is reported. Using several experimental approaches, the presence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) has been established in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the ACC1 mRNA. Transfection experiments with the ACC1 5' UTR inserted in a dicistronic reporter vector show a remarkable increase in the downstream cistron translation, through a cap-independent mechanism. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress condition and the related unfolded protein response (UPR), triggered by treatment with thapsigargin and tunicamycin, cause an increase of the cap-independent translation of ACC1 mRNA in HepG2 cells, despite the overall reduction in global protein synthesis. Other stress conditions, such as serum starvation and incubation with hypoxia mimetic agent CoCl 2 , up-regulate ACC1 expression in HepG2 cells at the translational level. Overall, these findings indicate that the presence of an IRES in the ACC1 5' UTR allows ACC1 mRNA translation in conditions that are inhibitory to cap-dependent translation. A potential involvement of the cap-independent translation of ACC1 in several pathologies, such as obesity and cancer, has been discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Directs POMC Gene to Mediate Hypothalamic Glucose Sensing and Energy Balance Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Park, Sung-min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance. PMID:21814490

  20. Translational regulation shapes the molecular landscape of complex disease phenotypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schafer, S.; Adami, E.; Heinig, M.; Rodrigues, K. E. C.; Kreuchwig, F.; Šilhavý, Jan; van Heesch, S.; Simaite, D.; Rajewsky, N.; Cuppen, E.; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, M.; Cook, S. A.; Hubner, N.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, May 2015 (2015), s. 7200 ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GB14-36804G; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : translational regulation * RNA sequencing * ribosome profiling * rat Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.329, year: 2015

  1. Ursodeoxycholic acid protects cardiomyocytes against cobalt chloride induced hypoxia by regulating transcriptional mediator of cells stress hypoxia inducible factor 1α and p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Anis Syamimi; Hanafi, Noorul Izzati; Sheikh Abdul Kadir, Siti Hamimah; Md Noor, Julina; Abdul Hamid Hasani, Narimah; Ab Rahim, Sharaniza; Siran, Rosfaiizah

    2017-10-01

    In hepatocytes, ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) activates cell signalling pathways such as p53, intracellular calcium ([Ca 2+ ] i ), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-receptor via Gα i -coupled-receptor. Recently, UDCA has been shown to protect the heart against hypoxia-reoxygenation injury. However, it is not clear whether UDCA cardioprotection against hypoxia acts through a transcriptional mediator of cells stress, HIF-1α and p53. Therefore, in here, we aimed to investigate whether UDCA could protect cardiomyocytes (CMs) against hypoxia by regulating expression of HIF-1α, p53, [Ca 2+ ] i , and S1P-Gα i -coupled-receptor. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from newborn rats (0-2 days), and hypoxia was induced by using cobalt chloride (CoCl 2 ). Cardiomyocytes were treated with UDCA and cotreated with either FTY720 (S1P-receptor agonist) or pertussis toxin (PTX; Gα i inhibitor). Cells were subjected for proliferation assay, beating frequency, QuantiGene Plex assay, western blot, immunofluorescence, and calcium imaging. Our findings showed that UDCA counteracted the effects of CoCl 2 on cell viability, beating frequency, HIF-1α, and p53 protein expression. We found that these cardioprotection effects of UDCA were similar to FTY720, S1P agonist. Furthermore, we observed that UDCA protects CMs against CoCl 2 -induced [Ca 2+ ] i dynamic alteration. Pharmacological inhibition of the Gα i -sensitive receptor did not abolish the cardioprotection of UDCA against CoCl 2 detrimental effects, except for cell viability and [Ca 2+ ] i . Pertussis toxin is partially effective in inhibiting UDCA protection against CoCl 2 effects on CM cell viability. Interestingly, PTX fully inhibits UDCA cardioprotection on CoCl 2 -induced [Ca 2+ ] i dynamic changes. We conclude that UDCA cardioprotection against CoCl 2 -induced hypoxia is similar to FTY720, and its actions are not fully mediated by the Gα i -coupled protein sensitive pathways. Ursodeoxycholic acid is the most hydrophilic bile

  2. Hypoxia disrupts the Fanconi anemia pathway and sensitizes cells to chemotherapy through regulation of UBE2T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramaekers, Chantal H.M.A.; Beucken, Twan van den; Meng, Alice; Kassam, Shaqil; Thoms, John; Bristow, Robert G.; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia is a common feature of the microenvironment of solid tumors which has been shown to promote malignancy and poor patient outcome through multiple mechanisms. The association of hypoxia with more aggressive disease may be due in part to recently identified links between hypoxia and genetic instability. For example, hypoxia has been demonstrated to impede DNA repair by down-regulating the homologous recombination protein RAD51. Here we investigated hypoxic regulation of UBE2T, a ubiquitin ligase required in the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway. Materials and methods: We analysed UBE2T expression by microarray, quantitative PCR and western blot analysis in a panel of cancer cell lines as a function of oxygen concentration. The importance of this regulation was assessed by measuring cell survival in response to DNA damaging agents under normoxia or hypoxia. Finally, HIF dependency was determined using knockdown cell lines and RCC4 cells which constitutively express HIF1α. Results: Hypoxia results in rapid and potent reductions in mRNA levels of UBE2T in a panel of cancer cell lines. Reduced UBE2T mRNA expression is HIF independent and was not due to changes in mRNA or protein stability, but rather reflected reduced promoter activity. Exposure of tumor cells to hypoxia greatly increased their sensitivity to treatment with the interstrand crosslinking (ICL) agent mitomycin C. Conclusions: Exposure to hypoxic conditions down-regulates UBE2T expression which correlates with an increased sensitivity to crosslinking agents consistent with a defective Fanconi anemia pathway. This pathway can potentially be exploited to target hypoxic cells in tumors.

  3. The Factor Inhibiting HIF Asparaginyl Hydroxylase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism and Accelerates Metabolic Adaptation to Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Jingwei; Cowburn, Andrew S; Palazon, Asis; Madhu, Basetti; Tyrakis, Petros A; Macías, David; Bargiela, David M; Pietsch, Sandra; Gralla, Michael; Evans, Colin E; Kittipassorn, Thaksaon; Chey, Yu C J; Branco, Cristina M; Rundqvist, Helene; Peet, Daniel J; Johnson, Randall S

    2018-04-03

    Animals require an immediate response to oxygen availability to allow rapid shifts between oxidative and glycolytic metabolism. These metabolic shifts are highly regulated by the HIF transcription factor. The factor inhibiting HIF (FIH) is an asparaginyl hydroxylase that controls HIF transcriptional activity in an oxygen-dependent manner. We show here that FIH loss increases oxidative metabolism, while also increasing glycolytic capacity, and that this gives rise to an increase in oxygen consumption. We further show that the loss of FIH acts to accelerate the cellular metabolic response to hypoxia. Skeletal muscle expresses 50-fold higher levels of FIH than other tissues: we analyzed skeletal muscle FIH mutants and found a decreased metabolic efficiency, correlated with an increased oxidative rate and an increased rate of hypoxic response. We find that FIH, through its regulation of oxidation, acts in concert with the PHD/vHL pathway to accelerate HIF-mediated metabolic responses to hypoxia. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The retinoblastoma protein regulates hypoxia-inducible genetic programs, tumor cell invasiveness and neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Mark P.; Takhar, Mandeep K.; Nason, Rebecca; Santacruz, Stephanie; Tam, Kevin J.; Massah, Shabnam; Haegert, Anne; Bell, Robert H.; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Collins, Colin C.; Lee, Frank J.S.; Prefontaine, Gratien G.; Cox, Michael E.; Beischlag, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of tumor suppressor proteins, such as the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), results in tumor progression and metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by low oxygen availability within the tumor that is detected by hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The HIF1 complex, HIF1α and dimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), is the master regulator of the hypoxic response. Previously, we demonstrated that Rb represses the transcriptional response to hypoxia by virtue of its association with HIF1. In this report, we further characterized the role Rb plays in mediating hypoxia-regulated genetic programs by stably ablating Rb expression with retrovirally-introduced short hairpin RNA in LNCaP and 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. DNA microarray analysis revealed that loss of Rb in conjunction with hypoxia leads to aberrant expression of hypoxia-regulated genetic programs that increase cell invasion and promote neuroendocrine differentiation. For the first time, we have established a direct link between hypoxic tumor environments, Rb inactivation and progression to late stage metastatic neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for progression of benign prostate tumors to metastasized and lethal forms will aid in the development of more effective prostate cancer therapies. PMID:27015368

  5. Plasma levels of hypoxia-regulated factors in patients with age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna, Zygoula; Christian, Schori; Christian, Grimm; Daniel, Barthelmes

    2018-02-01

    Various hypoxia-related proteins are differentially expressed in the retina and secreted to the vitreous and/or aqueous humor of patients affected by dry or neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD). To determine whether these conditions alter concentrations of cytokines also in the systemic circulation, we measured plasma levels of six hypoxia-related proteins. Plasma was prepared from EDTA blood that was collected from patients affected by dry AMD (n = 5), nAMD (n = 11), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR; n = 9), and patients with an epiretinal membrane (ERM; n = 11). ERM samples served as negative controls, PDR samples as positive controls. Protein concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), erythropoietin (EPO), angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4), placental growth factor (PlGF), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The concentration of PlGF was significantly increased in plasma of patients affected by nAMD. Although no statistically significant differences were found for EPO, ANGPTL4, PlGF, TNF-α, and PEDF, the mean concentration of VEGF was lowest in the nAMD group. Plasma concentrations of the six factors did not correlate with gender or age of patients. nAMD may increase plasma concentrations of PlGF, making it a candidate as a biomarker for the neovascular form of AMD. Other factors, however, were not differentially regulated, suggesting that their systemic concentrations are not generally increased in hypoxia-related retinal diseases.

  6. Hypoxia promotes Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific up-regulation of granulysin in human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, Sebastian F; Vollmer, Michael; Schercher, Esra; Kallert, Stephanie; Kubis, Jan; Stenger, Steffen

    2016-06-01

    Oxygen tension affects local immune responses in inflammation and infection. In tuberculosis mycobacteria avoid hypoxic areas and preferentially persist and reactivate in the oxygen-rich apex of the lung. Oxygen restriction activates antimicrobial effector mechanisms in macrophages and restricts growth of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.Tb). The effect of oxygen restriction on T cell-mediated antimicrobial effector mechanisms is unknown. Therefore we determined the influence of hypoxia on the expression of granulysin, an antimicrobial peptide of lymphocytes. Hypoxia increased the antigen-specific up-regulation of granulysin mRNA and protein in human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. This observation was functionally relevant, because oxygen restriction supported the growth-limiting effect of antigen-specific T cells against virulent M.Tb residing in primary human macrophages. Our results provide evidence that oxygen restriction promotes the expression of granulysin and suggest that this effect-in conjunction with additional T cell-mediated immune responses-supports protection against mycobacteria. The therapeutic modulation of oxygen availability may offer a new strategy for the host-directed therapy of infectious diseases with intracellular pathogens.

  7. VHL-mediated hypoxia regulation of cyclin D1 in renal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Ranjit S; Vasselli, James R; Stearman, Robert; Linehan, W Marston; Klausner, Richard D

    2002-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is associated with mutation of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor gene. Cell lines derived from these tumors cannot exit the cell cycle when deprived of growth factors, and the ability to exit the cell cycle can be restored by the reintroduction of wild-type protein VHL (pVHL). Here, we report that cyclin D1 is overexpressed and remains inappropriately high in during contact inhibition in pVHL-deficient cell lines. In addition, hypoxia increased the expression of cyclin D1 specifically in pVHL-negative cell lines into which pVHL expression was restored. Hypoxic-induction of cyclin D1 was not observed in other pVHL-positive cell lines. This suggests a model whereby in some kidney cell types, pVHL may regulate a proliferative response to hypoxia, whereas the loss of pVHL leads to constitutively elevated cyclin D1 and abnormal proliferation under normal growth conditions.

  8. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... and display greater heterogeneity compared to AC. However, previous indications that the hypoxia classifier might hold prognostic significance in ESCC patients could not be confirmed. Ongoing work includes in vitro studies of esophageal cancer cell lines in order to identify alternative hypoxia induced genes...... and to further explore the prognostic value of hypoxia in patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer. (Figure Presented)....

  9. HIF-2α Expression Regulates Sprout Formation into 3D Fibrin Matrices in Prolonged Hypoxia in Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Tessa D; Duyndam, Monique C A; Weijers, Ester M; van Hinsbergh, Victor M W; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    During short-term hypoxia, Hypoxia Inducible Factors (particular their subunits HIF-1α and HIF-2α) regulate the expression of many genes including the potent angiogenesis stimulator VEGF. However, in some pathological conditions chronic hypoxia occurs and is accompanied by reduced angiogenesis. We investigated the effect of prolonged hypoxia on the proliferation and sprouting ability of human microvascular endothelial cells and the involvement of the HIFs and Dll4/Notch signaling. Human microvascular endothelial cells (hMVECs), cultured at 20% oxygen for 14 days and seeded on top of 3D fibrin matrices, formed sprouts when stimulated with VEGF-A/TNFα. In contrast, hMVECs precultured at 1% oxygen for 14 days were viable and proliferative, but did not form sprouts into fibrin upon VEGF-A/TNFα stimulation at 1% oxygen. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting, whereas HIF-1α or HIF-3α by si-RNA had no effect. No involvement of Dll4/Notch pathway in the inhibitory effect on endothelial sprouting by prolonged hypoxia was found. In addition, hypoxia decreased the production of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), needed for migration and invasion, without a significant effect on its inhibitor PAI-1. This was independent of HIF-2α, as si-HIF-2α did not counteract uPA reduction. Prolonged culturing of hMVECs at 1% oxygen inhibited endothelial sprouting into fibrin. Two independent mechanisms contribute. Silencing of HIF-2α with si-RNA partially restored the inhibition of endothelial sprouting pointing to a HIF-2α-dependent mechanism. In addition, reduction of uPA contributed to reduced endothelial tube formation in a fibrin matrix during prolonged hypoxia.

  10. Redox signaling during hypoxia in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia triggers a wide range of protective responses in mammalian cells, which are mediated through transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. Redox signaling in cells by reactive oxygen species (ROS such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 occurs through the reversible oxidation of cysteine thiol groups, resulting in structural modifications that can change protein function profoundly. Mitochondria are an important source of ROS generation, and studies reveal that superoxide generation by the electron transport chain increases during hypoxia. Other sources of ROS, such as the NAD(PH oxidases, may also generate oxidant signals in hypoxia. This review considers the growing body of work indicating that increased ROS signals during hypoxia are responsible for regulating the activation of protective mechanisms in diverse cell types.

  11. MiRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Hua

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of 20-24 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily through post-transcriptional repression or mRNA degradation in a sequence-specific manner. The roles of miRNAs are just beginning to be understood, but the study of miRNA function has been limited by poor understanding of the general principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Here we used CNE cells from a human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line as a cellular system to investigate miRNA-directed regulation of VEGF and other angiogenic factors under hypoxia, and to explore the principles of gene regulation by miRNAs. Through computational analysis, 96 miRNAs were predicted as putative regulators of VEGF. But when we analyzed the miRNA expression profile of CNE and four other VEGF-expressing cell lines, we found that only some of these miRNAs could be involved in VEGF regulation, and that VEGF may be regulated by different miRNAs that were differentially chosen from 96 putative regulatory miRNAs of VEGF in different cells. Some of these miRNAs also co-regulate other angiogenic factors (differential regulation and co-regulation principle. We also found that VEGF was regulated by multiple miRNAs using different combinations, including both coordinate and competitive interactions. The coordinate principle states that miRNAs with independent binding sites in a gene can produce coordinate action to increase the repressive effect of miRNAs on this gene. By contrast, the competitive principle states when multiple miRNAs compete with each other for a common binding site, or when a functional miRNA competes with a false positive miRNA for the same binding site, the repressive effects of miRNAs may be decreased. Through the competitive principle, false positive miRNAs, which cannot directly repress gene expression, can sometimes play a role in miRNA-mediated gene regulation. The competitive principle, differential regulation, multi-miRNA binding sites, and false

  12. Local translation in primary afferent fibers regulates nociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Jiménez-Díaz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of local protein synthesis for neuronal plasticity. In particular, local mRNA translation through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been shown to play a key role in regulating dendrite excitability and modulating long-term synaptic plasticity associated with learning and memory. There is also increased evidence to suggest that intact adult mammalian axons have a functional requirement for local protein synthesis in vivo. Here we show that the translational machinery is present in some myelinated sensory fibers and that active mTOR-dependent pathways participate in maintaining the sensitivity of a subpopulation of fast-conducting nociceptors in vivo. Phosphorylated mTOR together with other downstream components of the translational machinery were localized to a subset of myelinated sensory fibers in rat cutaneous tissue. We then showed with electromyographic studies that the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced the sensitivity of a population of myelinated nociceptors known to be important for the increased mechanical sensitivity that follows injury. Behavioural studies confirmed that local treatment with rapamycin significantly attenuated persistent pain that follows tissue injury, but not acute pain. Specifically, we found that rapamycin blunted the heightened response to mechanical stimulation that develops around a site of injury and reduced the long-term mechanical hypersensitivity that follows partial peripheral nerve damage--a widely used model of chronic pain. Our results show that the sensitivity of a subset of sensory fibers is maintained by ongoing mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis and uncover a novel target for the control of long-term pain states.

  13. The Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein is regulated by the proteasome and activated by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Bennitz, Joshua D; Huang, Ting; McBride, Skye; Willmore, William G

    2011-01-01

    Nrf1 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 1) is a transcription factor mediating cellular responses to xenobiotic and pro-oxidant stress. Nrf1 regulates the transcription of many stress-related genes through the electrophile response elements (EpREs) located in their promoter regions. Despite its potential importance in human health, the mechanisms controlling Nrf1 have not been addressed fully. We found that proteasomal inhibitors MG-132 and clasto-lactacystin-β-lactone stabilized the protein expression of full-length Nrf1 in both COS7 and WFF2002 cells. Concomitantly, proteasomal inhibition decreased the expression of a smaller, N-terminal Nrf1 fragment, with an approximate molecular weight of 23 kDa. The EpRE-luciferase reporter assays revealed that proteasomal inhibition markedly inhibited the Nrf1 transactivational activity. These results support earlier hypotheses that the 26 S proteasome processes Nrf1 into its active form by removing its inhibitory N-terminal domain anchoring Nrf1 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf1 is ubiquitinated and that proteasomal inhibition increased the degree of Nrf1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, Nrf1 protein had a half-life of approximately 5 hours in COS7 cells. In contrast, hypoxia (1% O(2)) significantly increased the luciferase reporter activity of exogenous Nrf1 protein, while decreasing the protein expression of p65, a shorter form of Nrf1, known to act as a repressor of EpRE-controlled gene expression. Finally, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid activated Nrf1 reporter activity, while the latter was repressed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Collectively, our data suggests that Nrf1 is controlled by several post-translational mechanisms, including ubiquitination, proteolytic processing and proteasomal-mediated degradation as well as by its phosphorylation status. © 2011 Chepelev et al.

  14. PTP1B controls non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption by regulating RNF213 to promote tumour survival during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banh, Robert S; Iorio, Caterina; Marcotte, Richard; Xu, Yang; Cojocari, Dan; Rahman, Anas Abdel; Pawling, Judy; Zhang, Wei; Sinha, Ankit; Rose, Christopher M; Isasa, Marta; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Ronald; Virtanen, Carl; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Koizumi, Akio; Wilkins, Sarah E; Kislinger, Thomas; Gygi, Steven P; Schofield, Christopher J; Dennis, James W; Wouters, Bradly G; Neel, Benjamin G

    2016-07-01

    Tumours exist in a hypoxic microenvironment and must limit excessive oxygen consumption. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) controls mitochondrial oxygen consumption, but how/if tumours regulate non-mitochondrial oxygen consumption (NMOC) is unknown. Protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B) is required for Her2/Neu-driven breast cancer (BC) in mice, although the underlying mechanism and human relevance remain unclear. We found that PTP1B-deficient HER2(+) xenografts have increased hypoxia, necrosis and impaired growth. In vitro, PTP1B deficiency sensitizes HER2(+) BC lines to hypoxia by increasing NMOC by α-KG-dependent dioxygenases (α-KGDDs). The moyamoya disease gene product RNF213, an E3 ligase, is negatively regulated by PTP1B in HER2(+) BC cells. RNF213 knockdown reverses the effects of PTP1B deficiency on α-KGDDs, NMOC and hypoxia-induced death of HER2(+) BC cells, and partially restores tumorigenicity. We conclude that PTP1B acts via RNF213 to suppress α-KGDD activity and NMOC. This PTP1B/RNF213/α-KGDD pathway is critical for survival of HER2(+) BC, and possibly other malignancies, in the hypoxic tumour microenvironment.

  15. Hypoxia regulates the expression and localization of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α by hypoxia inducible factor-1α in bladder transitional carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in various types of solid tumor in humans, including bladder cancer. HIF-1α regulates the expression of a series of genes, which are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, migration and invasion and represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human cancer. Despite extensive investigation of the effects of HIF-1α in the progression and metastasis of bladder cancer, the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of HIF-1α on bladder cancer cell proliferation and differentiation remain to be elucidated. It has been suggested that the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) acts as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer cell, which are involved in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. The present study confirmed that, in bladder cancer cells, the expression and localization of C/EBPα was regulated by hypoxia through an HIF-1α -dependent mechanism, which may be significant in bladder cancer cell proliferation and differentiation. The 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cell lines were incubated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The expression levels of HIF-1α and C/EBPα were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. The results revealed that, under hypoxic conditions, the protein expression levels of HIF-1α were markedly upregulated, but the mRNA levels were not altered. However, the mRNA and protein levels of C/EBPα were significantly reduced. The present study further analyzed the subcellular localization of C/EBPα, which was markedly decreased in the nuclei under hypoxic conditions. Following HIF-1α small interference RNA silencing of HIF-1α, downregulation of C/EBPα was prevented in the bladder cancer cells cultured under hypoxic conditions. In addition, groups of cells treated with 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl

  16. Model of cap-dependent translation initiation in sea urchin: a step towards the eukaryotic translation regulation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellé, Robert; Prigent, Sylvain; Siegel, Anne; Cormier, Patrick

    2010-03-01

    The large and rapid increase in the rate of protein synthesis following fertilization of the sea urchin egg has long been a paradigm of translational control, an important component of the regulation of gene expression in cells. This translational up-regulation is linked to physiological changes that occur upon fertilization and is necessary for entry into first cell division cycle. Accumulated knowledge on cap-dependent initiation of translation makes it suited and timely to start integrating the data into a system view of biological functions. Using a programming environment for system biology coupled with model validation (named Biocham), we have built an integrative model for cap-dependent initiation of translation. The model is described by abstract rules. It contains 51 reactions involved in 74 molecular complexes. The model proved to be coherent with existing knowledge by using queries based on computational tree logic (CTL) as well as Boolean simulations. The model could simulate the change in translation occurring at fertilization in the sea urchin model. It could also be coupled with an existing model designed for cell-cycle control. Therefore, the cap-dependent translation initiation model can be considered a first step towards the eukaryotic translation regulation network.

  17. Translational profiling in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: no evidence for glucocorticoid regulation of mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneichyk, Tatsiana; Bindreither, Daniel; Mantinger, Christine; Grazio, Daniela; Goetsch, Katrin; Kofler, Reinhard; Rainer, Johannes

    2013-12-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are natural stress induced steroid hormones causing cell cycle arrest and cell death in lymphoid tissues. Therefore they are the central component in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies, in particular childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (chALL). GCs act mainly via regulating gene transcription, which has been intensively studied by us and others. GC control of mRNA translation has also been reported but has never been assessed systematically. In this study we investigate the effect of GCs on mRNA translation on a genome-wide scale. Childhood T- (CCRF-CEM) and precursor B-ALL (NALM6) cells were exposed to GCs and subjected to "translational profiling", a technique combining sucrose-gradient fractionation followed by Affymetrix Exon microarray analysis of mRNA from different fractions, to assess the translational efficiency of the expressed genes. Analysis of GC regulation in ribosome-bound fractions versus transcriptional regulation revealed no significant differences, i.e., GC did not entail a significant shift between ribosomal bound and unbound mRNAs. In the present study we analyzed for the first time possible effects of GC on the translational efficiency of expressed genes in two chALL model systems employing whole genome polysome profiling. Our results did not reveal significant differences in translational efficiency of expressed genes thereby arguing against a potential widespread regulatory effect of GCs on translation at least in the investigated in vitro systems.

  18. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Wen-Hao; Chang, Shyue-Yih; Tai, Shyh-Kuan; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwei; Kao, Jung-Yie; Wu, Kou-Juey; Yang, Muh-Hwa

    2009-01-01

    The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP) is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis. PMID:20019845

  19. The hypoxic proteome is influenced by gene-specific changes in mRNA translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne; Seigneuric, Renaud; Magagnin, Michael G.; Beucken, Twan van den; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hypoxia causes a rapid reduction in mRNA translation efficiency. This inhibition does not affect all mRNA species to the same extent and can therefore contribute significantly to hypoxia-induced differential protein expression. Our aim in this study was to characterize changes in gene expression during acute hypoxia and evaluate the contribution of regulation via mRNA translation on these changes. For each gene, the contribution of changes in mRNA abundance versus mRNA translation was determined. Materials and methods: DU145 prostate carcinoma cells were exposed to 4 h of hypoxia ( 2 ). Efficiently translated mRNAs were isolated by sedimentation through a sucrose gradient. Affymetrix microarray technology was used to evaluate both the transcriptional and translational contribution to gene expression. Results were validated by quantitative PCR. Results: One hundred and twenty genes were more than 4-fold upregulated by hypoxia in the efficiently translated fraction of mRNA, in comparison to only 76 genes at the level of transcription. Of the 50 genes demonstrating the largest changes in translation, 11 were found to be more than 2-fold over represented in the translated fraction in comparison to their overall transcriptional level. The gene with the highest translational contribution to its induction was CITED-2, which is a negative regulator of HIF-1 transcriptional activity. Conclusions: Gene-specific regulation of mRNA translation contributes significantly to differential gene expression during hypoxia

  20. Cloning of the human TASK-2 (KCNK5) promoter and its regulation by chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazier, Stephen P.; Mason, Helen S.; Bateson, Alan N.; Kemp, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    The tandem P domain potassium channel family includes five members of the acid-sensing subfamily, TASK. TASK channels are active at resting potential and are inhibited by extracellular protons, suggesting they function as acid sensors and control excitability/ion homeostasis. Indeed, TASK-2 (KCNK5) has been shown to control excitability, volume regulation, bicarbonate handling, and apoptosis in a variety of tissues. With such diverse functions being ascribed to TASK-2, it is important to understand long-term as well as short-term regulation of this important channel. Thus, we have cloned the TASK-2 promoter, demonstrated that its transcriptional activity is dependent upon pO 2 , shown that deletion of overlapping consensus binding sites for NF-κB/Elk-1 ablates this O 2 sensitivity, and proved that Elk-1 binds preferentially to this site. Furthermore, the consequences of chronic hypoxia on natively expressed TASK-2 are decreased steady-state mRNA and cell depolarization showing that TASK-2 contributes to the excitability of this important lung cell type

  1. Bacterial translational regulations: high diversity between all mRNAs and major role in gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Picard Flora

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, the weak correlations at the genome scale between mRNA and protein levels suggest that not all mRNAs are translated with the same efficiency. To experimentally explore mRNA translational level regulation at the systemic level, the detailed translational status (translatome of all mRNAs was measured in the model bacterium Lactococcus lactis in exponential phase growth. Results Results demonstrated that only part of the entire population of each mRNA species was engaged in translation. For transcripts involved in translation, the polysome size reached a maximum of 18 ribosomes. The fraction of mRNA engaged in translation (ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were not constant for all genes. This high degree of variability was analyzed by bioinformatics and statistical modeling in order to identify general rules of translational regulation. For most of the genes, the ribosome density was lower than the maximum value revealing major control of translation by initiation. Gene function was a major translational regulatory determinant. Both ribosome occupancy and ribosome density were particularly high for transcriptional regulators, demonstrating the positive role of translational regulation in the coordination of transcriptional networks. mRNA stability was a negative regulatory factor of ribosome occupancy and ribosome density, suggesting antagonistic regulation of translation and mRNA stability. Furthermore, ribosome occupancy was identified as a key component of intracellular protein levels underlining the importance of translational regulation. Conclusions We have determined, for the first time in a bacterium, the detailed translational status for all mRNAs present in the cell. We have demonstrated experimentally the high diversity of translational states allowing individual gene differentiation and the importance of translation-level regulation in the complex process linking gene expression to protein

  2. D-Glucosamine down-regulates HIF-1{alpha} through inhibition of protein translation in DU145 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee-Young; Park, Jong-Wook; Suh, Seong-Il [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Won-Ki, E-mail: wonki@dsmc.or.kr [Chronic Disease Research Center, School of Medicine, Keimyung University, 194 Dongsan-Dong, Jung-Gu, Daegu 700-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-24

    D-Glucosamine has been reported to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in culture and in vivo. In this study we report a novel response to D-glucosamine involving the translation regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1{alpha} expression. D-Glucosamine caused a decreased expression of HIF-1{alpha} under normoxic and hypoxic conditions without affecting HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells. D-Glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} accumulation induced by proteasome inhibitor MG132 and prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG suggesting D-glucosamine reduces HIF-1{alpha} protein expression through proteasome-independent pathway. Metabolic labeling assays indicated that D-glucosamine inhibits translation of HIF-1{alpha} protein. In addition, D-glucosamine inhibited HIF-1{alpha} expression induced by serum stimulation in parallel with inhibition of p70S6K suggesting D-glucosamine inhibits growth factor-induced HIF-1{alpha} expression, at least in part, through p70S6K inhibition. Taken together, these results suggest that D-glucosamine inhibits HIF-1{alpha} expression through inhibiting protein translation and provide new insight into a potential mechanism of the anticancer properties of D-glucosamine.

  3. Hypoxic stress up-regulates the expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in macrophages via hypoxia-inducible factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So Young; Choi, Yong Jun; Joung, Sun Myung; Lee, Byung Ho; Jung, Yi-Sook; Lee, Joo Young

    2010-04-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germline-encoded innate immune receptors that recognize invading micro-organisms and induce immune and inflammatory responses. Deregulation of TLRs is known to be closely linked to various immune disorders and inflammatory diseases. Cells at sites of inflammation are exposed to hypoxic stress, which further aggravates inflammatory processes. We have examined if hypoxic stress modulates the TLR activity of macrophages. Hypoxia and CoCl(2) (a hypoxia mimetic) enhanced the expression of TLR4 messenger RNA and protein in macrophages (RAW264.7 cells), whereas the messenger RNA of other TLRs was not increased. To determine the underlying mechanism, we investigated the role of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in the regulation of TLR4 expression. Knockdown of HIF-1alpha expression by small interfering RNA inhibited hypoxia-induced and CoCl(2)-induced TLR4 expression in macrophages, while over-expression of HIF-1alpha potentiated TLR4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that HIF-1alpha binds to the TLR4 promoter region under hypoxic conditions. In addition, deletion or mutation of a putative HIF-1-binding motif in the TLR4 promoter greatly attenuated HIF-1alpha-induced TLR4 promoter reporter expression. Up-regulation of TLR4 expression by hypoxic stress enhanced the response of macrophages to lipopolysaccharide, resulting in increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2, interleukin-6, regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted, and interferon-inducible protein-10. These results demonstrate that TLR4 expression in macrophages is up-regulated via HIF-1 in response to hypoxic stress, suggesting that hypoxic stress at sites of inflammation enhances susceptibility to subsequent infection and inflammatory signals by up-regulating TLR4.

  4. MiRNA-486 regulates angiogenic activity and survival of mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia through modulating Akt signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xue-Feng [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining 810001 (China); Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Respiration, Qinghai Provincial People' s Hospital, Xining (China); Wang, Hua; Xiao, Feng-Jun [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Yin, Yue [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Hematology, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, Qin-Qin [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining 810001 (China); Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China); Ge, Ri-Li, E-mail: geriligao@hotmail.com [High Altitude Medicine of Ministry of Chinese Education and Research Center for High Altitude Medicine, Qinghai University, Xining 810001 (China); Wang, Li-Sheng, E-mail: wangls@bmi.ac.cn [Department of Experimental Hematology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2016-02-12

    MicroRNA-486 (miR-486) was first identified from human fetal liver cDNA library and validated as a regulator of hematopoiesis. Its roles in regulating the biological function of bone marrow-derived mesnechymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) under hypoxia have not been explored yet. In this study, we demonstrated that exposure to hypoxia upregulates miR-486 expression in BM-MSCs. Lentivirus-mediated overexpression of miR-486 resulted in increase of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor(VEGF) in both mRNA and protein levels. MiR-486 expression also promotes proliferation and reduces apoptosis of BM-MSCs. Whereas MiR-486 knockdown downregulated the secretion of HGF and VEGF and induced apoptosis of BM-MSCs. Furthermore, PTEN-PI3K/AKT signaling was validated to be involved in changes of BM-MSC biological functions regulated by miR-486. These results suggested that MiR-486 mediated the hypoxia-induced angiogenic activity and promoted the proliferation and survival of BM-MSCs through regulating PTEN-PI3K/AKT signaling. These findings might provide a novel understanding of effective therapeutic strategy for hypoxic-ischemic diseases. - Highlights: • miR-486 is a hypoxia-induced miRNA. • miR-486 regulates the secretion of HGF and VEGF, promotes proliferation, and inhibits apoptosis of BM-MSCs. • miR-486 enhances PI3K/AKT activity signaling by targeting PTEN molecule.

  5. 4EGI-1 represses cap-dependent translation and regulates genome-wide translation in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Arpita; Jacobson, Blake A; Peterson, Mark S; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Kratzke, Marian G; Sadiq, Ahad A; Patel, Manish R; Kratzke, Robert A

    2018-04-01

    Deregulation of cap-dependent translation has been implicated in the malignant transformation of numerous human tissues. 4EGI-1, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of cap-dependent translation, disrupts formation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F) complex. The effects of 4EGI-1-mediated inhibition of translation initiation in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) were examined. 4EGI-1 preferentially inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in MPM cells compared to normal mesothelial (LP9) cells. This effect was associated with hypophosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and decreased protein levels of the cancer-related genes, c-myc and osteopontin. 4EGI-1 showed enhanced cytotoxicity in combination with pemetrexed or gemcitabine. Translatome-wide polysome microarray analysis revealed a large cohort of genes that were translationally regulated upon treatment with 4EGI-1. The 4EGI-1-regulated translatome was negatively correlated to a previously published translatome regulated by eIF4E overexpression in human mammary epithelial cells, which is in agreement with the notion that 4EGI-1 inhibits the eIF4F complex. These data indicate that inhibition of the eIF4F complex by 4EGI-1 or similar translation inhibitors could be a strategy for treating mesothelioma. Genome wide translational profiling identified a large cohort of promising target genes that should be further evaluated for their potential significance in the treatment of MPM.

  6. Ribosome stalling regulates IRES-mediated translation in eukaryotes, a parallel to prokaryotic attenuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, James; Yaman, Ibrahim; Huang, Charles; Liu, Haiyan; Lopez, Alex B.; Komar, Anton A.; Caprara, Mark G.; Merrick, William C.; Snider, Martin D.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2005-01-01

    It was previously shown that the mRNA for the cat-1 Arg/Lys transporter is translated from an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is regulated by cellular stress. Amino acid starvation stimulated cat-1 translation via a mechanism that requires translation of an ORF in the mRNA leader and

  7. Hypoxia-regulated therapeutic gene as a preemptive treatment strategy against ischemia/reperfusion tissue injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachori, Alok S; Melo, Luis G; Hart, Melanie L; Noiseux, Nicholas; Zhang, Lunan; Morello, Fulvio; Solomon, Scott D; Stahl, Gregory L; Pratt, Richard E; Dzau, Victor J

    2004-08-17

    Ischemia and reperfusion represent major mechanisms of tissue injury and organ failure. The timing of administration and the duration of action limit current treatment approaches using pharmacological agents. In this study, we have successfully developed a preemptive strategy for tissue protection using an adenoassociated vector system containing erythropoietin hypoxia response elements for ischemia-regulated expression of the therapeutic gene human heme-oxygenase-1 (hHO-1). We demonstrate that a single administration of this vector several weeks in advance of ischemia/reperfusion injury to multiple tissues such as heart, liver, and skeletal muscle yields rapid and timely induction of hHO-1 during ischemia that resulted in dramatic reduction in tissue damage. In addition, overexpression of therapeutic transgene prevented long-term pathological tissue remodeling and normalized tissue function. Application of this regulatable system using an endogenous physiological stimulus for expression of a therapeutic gene may be a feasible strategy for protecting tissues at risk of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  8. Hypoxia-regulated therapeutic gene as a preemptive treatment strategy against ischemia/reperfusion tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachori, Alok S.; Melo, Luis G.; Hart, Melanie L.; Noiseux, Nicholas; Zhang, Lunan; Morello, Fulvio; Solomon, Scott D.; Stahl, Gregory L.; Pratt, Richard E.; Dzau, Victor J.

    2004-08-01

    Ischemia and reperfusion represent major mechanisms of tissue injury and organ failure. The timing of administration and the duration of action limit current treatment approaches using pharmacological agents. In this study, we have successfully developed a preemptive strategy for tissue protection using an adenoassociated vector system containing erythropoietin hypoxia response elements for ischemia-regulated expression of the therapeutic gene human heme-oxygenase-1 (hHO-1). We demonstrate that a single administration of this vector several weeks in advance of ischemia/reperfusion injury to multiple tissues such as heart, liver, and skeletal muscle yields rapid and timely induction of hHO-1 during ischemia that resulted in dramatic reduction in tissue damage. In addition, overexpression of therapeutic transgene prevented long-term pathological tissue remodeling and normalized tissue function. Application of this regulatable system using an endogenous physiological stimulus for expression of a therapeutic gene may be a feasible strategy for protecting tissues at risk of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  9. Expression of DDX3 is directly modulated by hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in breast epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahendran Botlagunta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available DEAD box protein, DDX3, is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer cells ranging from weakly invasive to aggressive phenotypes and functions as an important regulator of cancer cell growth and survival. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia inducible factor-1α is a transcriptional activator of DDX3 in breast cancer cells. Within the promoter region of the human DDX3 gene, we identified three putative hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements. By luciferase reporter assays in combination with mutated hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements, we determined that the hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive element at position -153 relative to the translation start site is essential for transcriptional activation of DDX3 under hypoxic conditions. We also demonstrated that hypoxia inducible factor-1 binds to the DDX3 promoter and that the binding is specific, as revealed by siRNA against hypoxia inducible factor-1 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Thus, the activation of DDX3 expression during hypoxia is due to the direct binding of hypoxia inducible factor-1 to hypoxia responsive elements in the DDX3 promoter. In addition, we observed a significant overlap in the protein expression pattern of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and DDX3 in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the role of DDX3 as a hypoxia-inducible gene that exhibits enhanced expression through the interaction of hypoxia inducible factor-1 with hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements in its promoter region.

  10. Translational regulation in the anoxic turtle, Trachemys scripta elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereszewski, Kama E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2017-12-14

    The red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta elegans), has developed remarkable adaptive mechanisms for coping with decreased oxygen availability during winter when lakes and ponds become covered with ice. Strategies for enduring anoxia tolerance include an increase in fermentable fuel reserves to support anaerobic glycolysis, the buffering of end products to minimize acidosis, altered expression in crucial survival genes, and strong metabolic rate suppression to minimize ATP-expensive metabolic processes such as protein synthesis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is at the center of the insulin-signaling pathway that regulates protein translation. The present study analyzed the responses of the mTOR signaling pathway to 5 (5H) or 20 h (20H) of anoxic submergence in liver and skeletal muscle of T. scripta elegans with a particular focus on regulatory changes in the phosphorylation states of targets. The data showed that phosphorylation of multiple mTOR targets was suppressed in skeletal muscle, but activated in the liver. Phosphorylated mTOR Ser2448 showed no change in skeletal muscle but had increased by approximately 4.5-fold in the liver after 20H of anoxia. The phosphorylation states of upstream positive regulators of mTOR (p-PDK-1 Ser241 , p-AKT Ser473 , and protein levels of GβL), the relative levels of dephosphorylated active PTEN, as well as phosphorylation state of negative regulators (TSC2 Thr1462 , p-PRAS40 Thr246 ) were generally found to be differentially regulated in skeletal muscle and in liver. Downstream targets of mTOR (p-p70 S6K Thr389 , p-S6 Ser235 , PABP, p-4E-BP1 Thr37/46 , and p-eIF4E Ser209 ) were generally unchanged in skeletal muscle but upregulated in most targets in liver. These findings indicate that protein synthesis is enhanced in the liver and suggests an increase in the synthesis of crucial proteins required for anoxic survival.

  11. Analyzing the temporal regulation of translation efficiency in mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Janich

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian physiology and behavior follow daily rhythms that are orchestrated by endogenous timekeepers known as circadian clocks. Rhythms in transcription are considered the main mechanism to engender rhythmic gene expression, but important roles for posttranscriptional mechanisms have recently emerged as well (reviewed in Lim and Allada (2013 [1]. We have recently reported on the use of ribosome profiling (RPF-seq, a method based on the high-throughput sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments, to explore the temporal regulation of translation efficiency (Janich et al., 2015 [2]. Through the comparison of around-the-clock RPF-seq and matching RNA-seq data we were able to identify 150 genes, involved in ribosome biogenesis, iron metabolism and other pathways, whose rhythmicity is generated entirely at the level of protein synthesis. The temporal transcriptome and translatome data sets from this study have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus under the accession number GSE67305. Here we provide additional information on the experimental setup and on important optimization steps pertaining to the ribosome profiling technique in mouse liver and to data analysis.

  12. Regulation of rat intrapulmonary arterial tone by arachidonic acid and prostaglandin E2 during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaoliang Yan

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid (AA and its metabolites, prostaglandins (PG are known to be involved in regulation of vascular homeostasis including vascular tone and vessel wall tension, but their potential role in Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of AA and PGE2 on the hypoxic response in isolated rat intrapulmonary arteries (IPAs.We carried out the investigation on IPAs by vessel tension measurement. Isotetrandrine (20 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (100 µM and NS398 attenuated KPSS-induced vessel contraction and phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of HPV, implying that COX-2 plays a primary role in the hypoxic response of rat IPAs. PGE2 alone caused a significant vasoconstriction in isolated rat IPAs. This constriction is mediated by EP4. Blockage of EP4 by L-161982 (1 µM significantly inhibited phase I, phase IIb and phase IIc of hypoxic vasoconstriction. However, AH6809 (3 µM, an antagonist of EP1, EP2, EP3 and DP1 receptors, exerted no effect on KPSS or hypoxia induced vessel contraction. Increase of cellular cAMP by forskolin could significantly reduce KPSS-induced vessel contraction and abolish phase I, phase II b and phase II c of HPV.Our results demonstrated a vasoconstrictive effect of PGE2 on rat IPAs and this effect is via activation of EP4. Furthermore, our results suggest that intracellular cAMP plays dual roles in regulation of vascular tone, depending on the spatial distribution of cAMP and its coupling with EP receptor and Ca(2+ channels.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 regulates heat and cold pain sensitivity and persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanngiesser, Maike; Mair, Norbert; Lim, Hee-Young; Zschiebsch, Katja; Blees, Johanna; Häussler, Annett; Brüne, Bernhard; Ferreiròs, Nerea; Kress, Michaela; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2014-06-01

    The present study assessed the functions of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in sensory neurons in models of acute, inflammatory, ischemic, and neuropathic pain. The alpha subunit, HIF1α, was specifically deleted in neurons of the dorsal root ganglia by mating HIF1α(fl/fl) mice with SNScre mice. SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice were more sensitive to noxious heat and cold pain stimulation than were HIF1α(fl/fl) control mice. They also showed heightened first-phase nociceptive responses in the formalin and capsaicin tests with increased numbers of cFos-positive neurons in the dorsal horn, and intensified hyperalgesia in early phases after paw inflammation and hind limb ischemia/reperfusion. The behavioral cold and heat pain hypersensitivity was explained by increased calcium fluxes after transient receptor potential channel activation in primary sensory neurons of SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice and lowered electrical activation thresholds of sensory fibers. SNS-HIF1α(-/-) mice however, developed less neuropathic pain after sciatic nerve injury, which was associated with an abrogation of HIF1-mediated gene up-regulation. The results suggest that HIF1α is protective in terms of acute heat and cold pain but in case of ongoing activation in injured neurons, it may promote the development of neuropathic pain. The duality of HIF1 in pain regulation may have an impact on the side effects of drugs targeting HIF1, which are being developed, for example, as anticancer agents. Specifically, in patients with cancer neuropathy, however, temporary HIF1 inhibition might provide a welcome combination of growth and pain reduction.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells cultured under hypoxia escape from senescence via down-regulation of p16 and extracellular signal regulated kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yonghui; Kato, Tomohisa; Furu, Moritoshi; Nasu, Akira; Kajita, Yoichiro; Mitsui, Hiroto; Ueda, Michiko; Aoyama, Tomoki; Nakayama, Tomitaka; Nakamura, Takashi; Toguchida, Junya

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia has been considered to affect the properties of tissue stem cells including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Effects of long periods of exposure to hypoxia on human MSCs, however, have not been clearly demonstrated. MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions (20% pO 2 ) ceased to proliferate after 15-25 population doublings, while MSCs cultured under hypoxic conditions (1% pO 2 ) retained the ability to proliferate with an additional 8-20 population doublings. Most of the MSCs cultured under normoxic conditions were in a senescent state after 100 days, while few senescent cells were found in the hypoxic culture, which was associated with a down-regulation of p16 gene expression. MSCs cultured for 100 days under hypoxic conditions were superior to those cultured under normoxic conditions in the ability to differentiate into the chondro- and adipogenic, but not osteogenic, lineage. Among the molecules related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) was significantly down-regulated by hypoxia, which helped to inhibit the up-regulation of p16 gene expression. Therefore, the hypoxic culture retained MSCs in an undifferentiated and senescence-free state through the down-regulation of p16 and ERK.

  15. Hypoxia-Inducible Regulation of a Prodrug-Activating Enzyme for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Shibata

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that tumor hypoxia could be exploited for cancer gene therapy. Using hypoxia-responsive elements derived from the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene, we have generated vectors expressing a bacterial nitroreductase. (20NTR gene that can activate the anticancer prodrug CB1954. Stable transfectants of human HT1080 tumor cells with hypoxia-inducible vectors were established with G418 selection. Hypoxic induction of NTR protein correlated with increased sensitivity to in vitro exposure of HT 1080 cells to the prodrug. Growth delay assays were performed with established tumor xenografts derived from the same cells to detect the in vivo efficacy of CB1954 conversion to its cytotoxic form. Significant antitumor effects were achieved with intraperitoneal injections of CB1954 both in tumors that express NTR constitutively or with a hypoxia-inducible promoter. In addition, respiration of 10% O2 increased tumor hypoxia in vivo and enhanced the antitumor effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible vectors may be useful for tumor-selective gene therapy, although the problem of delivery of the vector to the tumors, particularly to the hypoxic cells in the tumors, is not addressed by these studies.

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 and hypoxia-regulated proteins are modulated by basic fibroblast growth factor in acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Villanueva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF can be caused by injuries that induce tissue hypoxia, which in turn can trigger adaptive or inflammatory responses. We previously showed the participation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2 in renal repair. Based on this, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of FGF-2 signaling pathway manipulation at hypoxia-induced protein levels, as well as in key proteins from the vasoactive systems of the kidney. We injected rat kidneys with FGF-2 recombinant protein (r-FGF or FGF-2 receptor antisense oligonucleotide (FGFR2-ASO after bilateral ischemia, and evaluated the presence of iNOS, EPO and HO-1, in representation of hypoxia-induced proteins, as well as COX-2, renin, kallikrein, and B2KR, in representation of the vasoactive systems of the kidney. A reduction in iNOS, HO-1, EPO, renin, kallikrein, B2KR, and in renal damage was observed in animals treated with r-FGF. The opposite effect was found with FGF-2 receptor down-regulation. In contrast, COX-2 protein levels were higher in kidneys treated with r-FGF and lower in those that received FGFR2-ASO, as compared to saline treated kidneys. These results suggest that the protective role of FGF-2 in the pathogenesis of ARF induced by I/R is a complex process, through which a differential regulation of metabolic pathways takes place.

  17. PACAP and VIP inhibit the invasiveness of glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia through the regulation of HIFs and EGFR expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia eMaugeri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP through the binding of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs, perform a wide variety of effects in human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. This tumor is characterized by extensive areas of hypoxia, which triggers the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. HIFs not only mediate angiogenesis but also tumor cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, HIFs activation is linked to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR overexpression. Previous studies have shown that VIP interferes with the invasive nature of gliomas by regulating cell migration. However, the role of VIP family members in GBM infiltration under low oxygen tension has not been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study we have investigated, for the first time, the molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-invasive effect of PACAP or VIP in U87MG glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia induced by treatment with desferrioxamine (DFX. The results suggest that either PACAP or VIP exert an anti-infiltrative effect under low oxygen tension by modulating HIFs and EGFR expression, key elements involved in cell migration and angiogenesis. These peptides act through the inhibition of PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, which are known to have a crucial role in HIFs regulation. In conclusion, the modulation of hypoxic event and the anti-invasive effect exerted by some VIP family members might open new insights in the therapeutic approach to GBM.

  18. Unraveling the role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-2α in the adaption process of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) to hypoxia: Redundant HIF-dependent regulation of macrophage migration inhibitory factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Martin; Schumann, Peggy; Mursell, Mathias; Strehl, Cindy; Hoff, Paula; Buttgereit, Frank; Gaber, Timo

    2018-03-01

    Hypoxia driven angiogenesis is a prominent feature of tissue regeneration, inflammation and tumor growth and is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and -2. The distinct functions of HIFs in the hypoxia-induced angiogenesis and metabolic switch of endothelial cells are still unknown and therefore aim of this study. We investigated the role of HIF-1 and -2 in the adaptation of immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMEC-1) to hypoxic conditions (1% O 2 ) in terms of angiogenesis, cytokine secretion, gene expression and ATP/ADP-ratio using shRNA-mediated reduction of the oxygen sensitive α-subunits of either HIF-1 or HIF-2 or the combination of both. Reduction of HIF-1α diminished cellular energy, hypoxia-induced glycolytic gene expression, and angiogenesis not altering pro-angiogenic factors. Reduction of HIF-2α diminished hypoxia-induced pro-angiogenic factors, enhanced anti-angiogenic factors and attenuated angiogenesis not altering glycolytic gene expression. Reduction of both HIFs reduced cell survival, gene expression of glycolytic enzymes and pro-angiogenic factors as compared to the corresponding control. Finally, we identified the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to be redundantly regulated by HIF-1 and HIF-2 and to be essential in the process of hypoxia-driven angiogenesis. Our results demonstrate a major impact of HIF-1 and HIF-2 on hypoxia-induced angiogenesis indicating distinct but also overlapping functions of HIF-1 and HIF-2. These findings open new possibilities for therapeutic approaches by specifically targeting the HIF-1 and HIF-2 or their target MIF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Compound C prevents Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein stabilization by regulating the cellular oxygen availability via interaction with Mitochondrial Complex I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Thilo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The transcription factor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α is a master regulator of the cellular response to low oxygen concentration. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMP-activated kinase, has been reported to inhibit hypoxia dependent Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α activation via a mechanism that is independent of AMP-activated kinase but dependent on its interaction with the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The objective of this study is to characterize the interaction of Compound C with the mitochondrial electron transport chain and to determine the mechanism through which the drug influences the stability of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α protein. We found that Compound C functions as an inhibitor of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain as demonstrated by its effect on mitochondrial respiration. It also prevents hypoxia-induced Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stabilization in a dose dependent manner. In addition, Compound C does not have significant effects on reactive oxygen species production from complex I via both forward and reverse electron flux. This study provides evidence that similar to other mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitors, Compound C regulates Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α stability by controlling the cellular oxygen concentration.

  20. Post-translational modifications regulate signalling by Ror1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaucká, M.; Krejčí, Pavel; Plevová, K.; Pavlová, Š.; Procházková, Jiřina; Janovská, P.; Valnohová, J.; Kozubík, Alois; Pospíšilová, Š.; Bryja, Vítězslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 203, č. 3 (2011), s. 351-362 ISSN 1748-1708 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : chronic lymphocytic leukaemia * glycosylation * post-translational modification Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.090, year: 2011

  1. Regulation of dynamin family proteins by post-translational

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-04-22

    Apr 22, 2017 ... School of Biological Sciences, National Institute of Science Education and Research-. Bhubaneswar .... translational modifications provides the cell a dynamic and ..... Drp1 which confers cellular protection from mitochondrial.

  2. Regulation of human skeletal muscle perfusion and its heterogeneity during exercise in moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    , the results show that increased BF during one-leg exercise in moderate hypoxia is confined only to the contracting muscles, and the working muscle hyperemia appears not to be directly mediated by adenosine. Increased flow heterogeneity in noncontracting muscles likely reflects sympathetic nervous constraints...... healthy young men using positron emission tomography during one-leg dynamic knee extension exercise in normoxia and moderate physiological systemic hypoxia (14% O(2) corresponding to approximately 3,400 m of altitude) without and with local adenosine receptor inhibition with femoral artery infusion...... to curtail BF increments in areas other than working skeletal muscles, but this effect is not potentiated in moderate systemic hypoxia during small muscle mass exercise....

  3. pH, Lactate, and Hypoxia: Reciprocity in Regulating High-Affinity Monocarboxylate Transporter Expression in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Caruso

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Highly malignant brain tumors harbor the aberrant propensity for aerobic glycolysis, the excessive conversion of glucose to lactic acid even in the presence of ample tissue oxygen. Lactic acid is rapidly effluxed to the tumor microenvironment via a group of plasma-membrane transporters denoted monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs to prevent “self-poisoning.” One isoform, MCT2, has the highest affinity for lactate and thus should have the ability to respond to microenvironment conditions such as hypoxia, lactate, and pH to help maintain high glycolytic flux in the tumor. Yet, MCT2 is considered to not respond to hypoxia, which is counterintuitive. Its response to tumor lactate has not been reported. In this report, we experimentally identify the transcription initiation site/s for MCT2 in astrocytes (normal and glioma (tumor. We then use a BACmid library to isolate a 4.2-kbp MCT2 promoter-exon I region and examine promoter response to glycolysis-mediated stimuli in glioma cells. Reporter analysis of nested-promoter constructs indicated response of MCT2 to hypoxia, pH, lactate, and glucose, the major physiological “players” that facilitate a tumor's growth and proliferation. Immunoblot analysis of native MCT2 expression under altered pH and hypoxia reflected the reporter data. The pH-mediated gene-regulation studies we describe are the first to record H+-based reporter studies for any mammalian system and demonstrate the exquisite response of the MCT2 gene to minute changes in tumor pH. Identical promoter usage also provides the first evidence of astrocytes harnessing the same gene regulatory regions to facilitate astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttling, a metabolic feature of normal brain.

  4. The Drosophila PNG kinase complex regulates the translation of cyclin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardy, Leah; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila PAN GU (PNG) kinase complex regulates the developmental translation of cyclin B. cyclin B mRNA becomes unmasked during oogenesis independent of PNG activity, but PNG is required for translation from egg activation. We find that although polyadenylation of cyclin B augments translation, it is not essential, and a fully elongated poly(A) is not required for translation to proceed. In fact, changes in poly(A) tail length are not sufficient to account for PNG-mediated control of cyclin B translation and of the early embryonic cell cycles. We present evidence that PNG functions instead as an antagonist of PUMILIO-dependent translational repression. Our data argue that changes in poly(A) tail length are not a universal mechanism governing embryonic cell cycles, and that PNG-mediated derepression of translation is an important alternative mechanism in Drosophila.

  5. Regulation of Translational Efficiency by Disparate 5′-UTRs of PPARγ Splice Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn McClelland

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The PPAR-γ gene encodes for at least 7 unique transcripts due to alternative splicing of five exons in the 5′-untranslated region (UTR. The translated region is encoded by exons 1–6, which are identical in all isoforms. This study investigated the role of the 5′-UTR in regulating the efficiency with which the message is translated to protein. A coupled in vitro transcription-translation assay demonstrated that PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ5 are efficiently translated, whereas PPAR-γ4 and -γ7 are poorly translated. An in vivo reporter gene assay using each 5′-UTR upstream of the firefly luciferase gene showed that the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ1, -γ2, and -γ4 enhanced translation, whereas the 5′-UTRs for PPAR-γ5 and -γ7 inhibited translation. Models of RNA secondary structure, obtained by the mfold software, were used to explain the mechanism of regulation by each 5′-UTR. In general, it was found that the translational efficiency was inversely correlated with the stability of the mRNA secondary structure, the presence of base-pairing in the consensus Kozak sequence, the number of start codons in the 5′-UTR, and the length of the 5′-UTR. A better understanding of posttranscriptional regulation of translation will allow modulation of protein levels without altering transcription.

  6. Chloroplast Translation: Structural and Functional Organization, Operational Control, and Regulation[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Chloroplast translation is essential for cellular viability and plant development. Its positioning at the intersection of organellar RNA and protein metabolism makes it a unique point for the regulation of gene expression in response to internal and external cues. Recently obtained high-resolution structures of plastid ribosomes, the development of approaches allowing genome-wide analyses of chloroplast translation (i.e., ribosome profiling), and the discovery of RNA binding proteins involved in the control of translational activity have greatly increased our understanding of the chloroplast translation process and its regulation. In this review, we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the chloroplast translation machinery, its structure, organization, and function. In addition, we summarize the techniques that are currently available to study chloroplast translation and describe how translational activity is controlled and which cis-elements and trans-factors are involved. Finally, we discuss how translational control contributes to the regulation of chloroplast gene expression in response to developmental, environmental, and physiological cues. We also illustrate the commonalities and the differences between the chloroplast and bacterial translation machineries and the mechanisms of protein biosynthesis in these two prokaryotic systems. PMID:29610211

  7. Codon usage regulates protein structure and function by affecting translation elongation speed in Drosophila cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fangzhou; Yu, Chien-Hung; Liu, Yi

    2017-08-21

    Codon usage biases are found in all eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes and have been proposed to regulate different aspects of translation process. Codon optimality has been shown to regulate translation elongation speed in fungal systems, but its effect on translation elongation speed in animal systems is not clear. In this study, we used a Drosophila cell-free translation system to directly compare the velocity of mRNA translation elongation. Our results demonstrate that optimal synonymous codons speed up translation elongation while non-optimal codons slow down translation. In addition, codon usage regulates ribosome movement and stalling on mRNA during translation. Finally, we show that codon usage affects protein structure and function in vitro and in Drosophila cells. Together, these results suggest that the effect of codon usage on translation elongation speed is a conserved mechanism from fungi to animals that can affect protein folding in eukaryotic organisms. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Proteomic analysis of polyribosomes identifies splicing factors as potential regulators of translation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviner, Ranen; Hofmann, Sarah; Elman, Tamar; Shenoy, Anjana; Geiger, Tamar; Elkon, Ran; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Elroy-Stein, Orna

    2017-06-02

    Precise regulation of mRNA translation is critical for proper cell division, but little is known about the factors that mediate it. To identify mRNA-binding proteins that regulate translation during mitosis, we analyzed the composition of polysomes from interphase and mitotic cells using unbiased quantitative mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that mitotic polysomes are enriched with a subset of proteins involved in RNA processing, including alternative splicing and RNA export. To demonstrate that these may indeed be regulators of translation, we focused on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNP C) as a test case and confirmed that it is recruited to elongating ribosomes during mitosis. Then, using a combination of pulsed SILAC, metabolic labeling and ribosome profiling, we showed that knockdown of hnRNP C affects both global and transcript-specific translation rates and found that hnRNP C is specifically important for translation of mRNAs that encode ribosomal proteins and translation factors. Taken together, our results demonstrate how proteomic analysis of polysomes can provide insight into translation regulation under various cellular conditions of interest and suggest that hnRNP C facilitates production of translation machinery components during mitosis to provide daughter cells with the ability to efficiently synthesize proteins as they enter G1 phase. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Molecular characterization of factors involved in regulation of archaeal translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blombach, F.

    2010-01-01

    The three domains of life – Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukaryotes – can be easily distinguished based on how the genetic information is processed during transcription, translation, and (DNA) replication. Generally, Eukaryotes turned out to employ machineries for these processes that are in their essence

  10. Translation regulation in plants: an interesting past, an exciting present and a promising future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchante, Catharina; Stepanova, Anna N; Alonso, Jose M

    2017-05-01

    Changes in gene expression are at the core of most biological processes, from cell differentiation to organ development, including the adaptation of the whole organism to the ever-changing environment. Although the central role of transcriptional regulation is solidly established and the general mechanisms involved in this type of regulation are relatively well understood, it is clear that regulation at a translational level also plays an essential role in modulating gene expression. Despite the large number of examples illustrating the critical role played by translational regulation in determining the expression levels of a gene, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind such types of regulation has been slow to emerge. With the recent development of high-throughput approaches to map and quantify different critical parameters affecting translation, such as RNA structure, protein-RNA interactions and ribosome occupancy at the genome level, a renewed enthusiasm toward studying translation regulation is warranted. The use of these new powerful technologies in well-established and uncharacterized translation-dependent processes holds the promise to decipher the likely complex and diverse, but also fascinating, mechanisms behind the regulation of translation. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The translational regulator Cup controls NMJ presynaptic terminal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kaushiki P; Carrillo, Robert A; Zinn, Kai

    2015-07-01

    During oogenesis and early embryonic development in Drosophila, translation of proteins from maternally deposited mRNAs is tightly controlled. We and others have previously shown that translational regulatory proteins that function during oogenesis also have essential roles in the nervous system. Here we examine the role of Cup in neuromuscular system development. Maternal Cup controls translation of localized mRNAs encoding the Oskar and Nanos proteins and binds to the general translation initiation factor eIF4E. In this paper, we show that zygotic Cup protein is localized to presynaptic terminals at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). cup mutant NMJs have strong phenotypes characterized by the presence of small clustered boutons called satellite boutons. They also exhibit an increase in the frequency of spontaneous glutamate release events (mEPSPs). Reduction of eIF4E expression synergizes with partial loss of Cup expression to produce satellite bouton phenotypes. The presence of satellite boutons is often associated with increases in retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, and we show that synaptic BMP signaling is elevated in cup mutants. cup genetically interacts with two genes, EndoA and Dap160, that encode proteins involved in endocytosis that are also neuronal modulators of the BMP pathway. Endophilin protein, encoded by the EndoA gene, is downregulated in a cup mutant. Our results are consistent with a model in which Cup and eIF4E work together to ensure efficient localization and translation of endocytosis proteins in motor neurons and control the strength of the retrograde BMP signal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved Ribosome-Footprint and mRNA Measurements Provide Insights into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-11

    unlimited. Improved Ribosome-Footprint and mRNA Measurements Provide Insights into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation The views, opinions and...into Dynamics and Regulation of Yeast Translation Report Title Ribosome-footprint profiling provides genome-wide snapshots of translation, but...tend to slow translation. With the improved mRNA measurements, the variation attributable to translational control in exponentially growing yeast was

  13. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Totzeck

    Full Text Available The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  14. Cell physiology regulation by hypoxia inducible factor-1: Targeting oxygen-related nanomachineries of hypoxic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandani, Morteza; Vandghanooni, Somayeh; Barar, Jaleh; Nazemiyeh, Hossein; Omidi, Yadollah

    2017-06-01

    Any dysfunctionality in maintaining the oxygen homeostasis by mammalian cells may elicit hypoxia/anoxia, which results in inescapable oxidative stress and possible subsequent detrimental impacts on certain cells/tissues with high demands to oxygen molecules. The ischemic damage in turn can trigger initiation of a number of diseases including organs ischemia, metabolic disorders, inflammatory diseases, different types of malignancies, and alteration in wound healing process. Thus, full comprehension of molecular mechanism(s) and cellular physiology of the oxygen homeostasis is the cornerstone of the mammalian cells metabolism, energetic pathways and health and disease conditions. An imbalance in oxygen content within the cellular microenvironment activates a cascade of molecular events that are often compensated, otherwise pathologic condition occurs through a complexed network of biomolecules. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) plays a key transcriptional role in the adaptation of cell physiology in relation with the oxygen content within a cell. In this current study, we provide a comprehensive review on the molecular mechanisms of oxygen sensing and homeostasis and the impacts of HIF-1 in hypoxic/anoxic conditions. Moreover, different molecular and biochemical responses of the cells to the surrounding environment are discussed in details. Finally, modern technological approaches for targeting the hypoxia related proteins are articulated. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Post-translational regulation of Oct4 transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P Saxe

    Full Text Available Oct4 is a key component of the molecular circuitry which regulates embryonic stem cell proliferation and differentiation. It is essential for maintenance of undifferentiated, pluripotent cell populations, and accomplishes these tasks by binding DNA in multiple heterodimer and homodimer configurations. Very little is known about how formation of these complexes is regulated, or the mechanisms through which Oct4 proteins respond to complex extracellular stimuli which regulate pluripotency. Here, we provide evidence for a phosphorylation-based mechanism which regulates specific Oct4 homodimer conformations. Point mutations of a putative phosphorylation site can specifically abrogate transcriptional activity of a specific homodimer assembly, with little effect on other configurations. Moreover, we performed bioinformatic predictions to identify a subset of Oct4 target genes which may be regulated by this specific assembly, and show that altering Oct4 protein levels affects transcription of Oct4 target genes which are regulated by this assembly but not others. Finally, we identified several signaling pathways which may mediate this phosphorylation and act in combination to regulate Oct4 transcriptional activity and protein stability. These results provide a mechanism for rapid and reversible alteration of Oct4 transactivation potential in response to extracellular signals.

  16. Expression of angiopoietin-1 in hypoxic pericytes: Regulation by hypoxia-inducible factor-2α and participation in endothelial cell migration and tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Shin; Kim, Gyungah; Jin, Yoon Mi; Lee, Jee Young; Shin, Jong Wook; Jo, Inho

    2016-01-08

    We previously reported that hypoxia increases angiopoietin-1 (Ang1), but not Ang2, mRNA expression in bovine retinal pericytes (BRP). However, the mechanism underlying Ang1 expression is unknown. Here, we report that Ang1 protein expression increased in hypoxic BRP in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This increase was accompanied by an increase in hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF2α) expression. Transfection with an antisense oligonucleotide for HIF2α partially inhibited the hypoxia-induced increase in Ang1 expression. HIF2α overexpression further potentiated hypoxia-stimulated Ang1 expression, suggesting that HIF2α plays an important role in Ang1 regulation in BRP. When fused the Ang1 promoter (-3040 to +199) with the luciferase reporter gene, we found that hypoxia significantly increased promoter activity by 4.02 ± 1.68 fold. However, progressive 5'-deletions from -3040 to -1799, which deleted two putative hypoxia response elements (HRE), abolished the hypoxia-induced increase in promoter activity. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that HIF2α was predominantly bound to a HRE site, located specifically at nucleotides -2715 to -2712. Finally, treatment with conditioned medium obtained from hypoxic pericytes stimulated endothelial cell migration and tube formation, which was completely blocked by co-treatment with anti-Ang1 antibody. This study is the first to demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates Ang1 expression via HIF2α-mediated transcriptional activation in pericytes, which plays a key role in angiogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoxic induction of the regulator of G-protein signalling 4 gene is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam W Z Olechnowicz

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response to hypoxia is largely dependent on the Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF-1 and HIF-2 in mammalian cells. Many target genes have been characterised for these heterodimeric transcription factors, yet there is evidence that the full range of HIF-regulated genes has not yet been described. We constructed a TetON overexpression system in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line to search for novel HIF and hypoxia responsive genes. The Rgs4 gene encodes the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 (RGS4 protein, an inhibitor of signalling from G-protein coupled receptors, and dysregulation of Rgs4 is linked to disease states such as schizophrenia and cardiomyopathy. Rgs4 was found to be responsive to HIF-2α overexpression, hypoxic treatment, and hypoxia mimetic drugs in PC-12 cells. Similar responses were observed in human neuroblastoma cell lines SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2C, but not in endothelial cells, where Rgs4 transcript is readily detected but does not respond to hypoxia. Furthermore, this regulation was found to be dependent on transcription, and occurs in a manner consistent with direct HIF transactivation of Rgs4 transcription. However, no HIF binding site was detectable within 32 kb of the human Rgs4 gene locus, leading to the possibility of regulation by long-distance genomic interactions. Further research into Rgs4 regulation by hypoxia and HIF may result in better understanding of disease states such as schizophrenia, and also shed light on the other roles of HIF yet to be discovered.

  18. Hypoxic Induction of the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 Gene Is Mediated by the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olechnowicz, Sam W. Z.; Fedele, Anthony O.; Peet, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional response to hypoxia is largely dependent on the Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF-1 and HIF-2) in mammalian cells. Many target genes have been characterised for these heterodimeric transcription factors, yet there is evidence that the full range of HIF-regulated genes has not yet been described. We constructed a TetON overexpression system in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line to search for novel HIF and hypoxia responsive genes. The Rgs4 gene encodes the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 (RGS4) protein, an inhibitor of signalling from G-protein coupled receptors, and dysregulation of Rgs4 is linked to disease states such as schizophrenia and cardiomyopathy. Rgs4 was found to be responsive to HIF-2α overexpression, hypoxic treatment, and hypoxia mimetic drugs in PC-12 cells. Similar responses were observed in human neuroblastoma cell lines SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C, but not in endothelial cells, where Rgs4 transcript is readily detected but does not respond to hypoxia. Furthermore, this regulation was found to be dependent on transcription, and occurs in a manner consistent with direct HIF transactivation of Rgs4 transcription. However, no HIF binding site was detectable within 32 kb of the human Rgs4 gene locus, leading to the possibility of regulation by long-distance genomic interactions. Further research into Rgs4 regulation by hypoxia and HIF may result in better understanding of disease states such as schizophrenia, and also shed light on the other roles of HIF yet to be discovered. PMID:22970249

  19. Trichostatin A enhances estrogen receptor-alpha repression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells under hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Hyunggyun; Park, Joonwoo; Shim, Myeongguk; Lee, YoungJoo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a crucial determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy, which may change during the progression of breast cancer. We previously showed that hypoxia induces ESR1 gene repression and ERα protein degradation via proteasome-mediated pathway in breast cancer cells. HDAC plays important roles in the regulation of histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification. HDAC inhibitors can induce epigenetic changes and have therapeutic potential for targeting various cancers. Trichostatin A exerts potent antitumor activities against breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we show that TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level and downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxic conditions through a proteasome-mediated pathway. TSA-induced estrogen response element-driven reporter activity in the absence of estrogen was synergistically enhanced under hypoxia; however, TSA inhibited cell proliferation under both normoxia and hypoxia. Our data show that the hypoxia-induced repression of ESR1 and degradation of ERα are enhanced by concomitant treatment with TSA. These findings expand our understanding of hormone responsiveness in the tumor microenvironment; however, additional in-depth studies are required to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia. - Highlights: • TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level under hypoxia. • TSA downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxia. • TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia is essential for understanding the behavior and progression of breast cancer.

  20. Trichostatin A enhances estrogen receptor-alpha repression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells under hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyunggyun; Park, Joonwoo; Shim, Myeongguk; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2016-02-12

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a crucial determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy, which may change during the progression of breast cancer. We previously showed that hypoxia induces ESR1 gene repression and ERα protein degradation via proteasome-mediated pathway in breast cancer cells. HDAC plays important roles in the regulation of histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification. HDAC inhibitors can induce epigenetic changes and have therapeutic potential for targeting various cancers. Trichostatin A exerts potent antitumor activities against breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we show that TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level and downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxic conditions through a proteasome-mediated pathway. TSA-induced estrogen response element-driven reporter activity in the absence of estrogen was synergistically enhanced under hypoxia; however, TSA inhibited cell proliferation under both normoxia and hypoxia. Our data show that the hypoxia-induced repression of ESR1 and degradation of ERα are enhanced by concomitant treatment with TSA. These findings expand our understanding of hormone responsiveness in the tumor microenvironment; however, additional in-depth studies are required to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia. - Highlights: • TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level under hypoxia. • TSA downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxia. • TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia is essential for understanding the behavior and progression of breast cancer.

  1. Translational co-regulation of a ligand and inhibitor by a conserved RNA element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaucker, Andreas; Nagorska, Agnieszka; Kumari, Pooja

    2018-01-01

    In many organisms, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of components of pathways or processes has been reported. However, to date, there are few reports of translational co-regulation of multiple components of a developmental signaling pathway. Here, we show that an RNA element wh...

  2. Translation Control: A Multifaceted Regulator of Inflammatory Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Barsanjit; Li, Xiaoxia; Barik, Sailen

    2010-01-01

    A robust innate immune response is essential to the protection of all vertebrates from infection, but it often comes with the price tag of acute inflammation. If unchecked, a runaway inflammatory response can cause significant tissue damage, resulting in myriad disorders, such as dermatitis, toxicshock, cardiovascular disease, acute pelvic and arthritic inflammatory diseases, and various infections. To prevent such pathologies, cells have evolved mechanisms to rapidly and specifically shut off these beneficial inflammatory activities before they become detrimental. Our review of recent literature, including our own work, reveals that the most dominant and common mechanism is translational silencing, in which specific regulatory proteins or complexes are recruited to cis-acting RNA structures in the untranslated regions of single or multiple mRNAs that code for the inflammatory protein(s). Enhancement of the silencing function may constitute a novel pharmacological approach to prevent immunity-related inflammation. PMID:20304832

  3. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were essential for MGF E peptide regulating cell morphology and mobility but not proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs under severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yongqiang; Yang, Li; Lv, Yonggang

    2018-04-01

    Severe hypoxia inhibits the adhesion and mobility of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and limits their application in bone tissue engineering. In this study, CoCl 2 was used to simulate severe hypoxia and the effects of mechano-growth factor (MGF) E peptide on the morphology, adhesion, migration, and proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs under hypoxia were measured. It was demonstrated that severe hypoxia (500-μM CoCl 2 ) significantly caused cell contraction and reduced cell area, roundness, adhesion, and migration of BMSCs. RhoA and ROCK1 expression levels were upregulated by severe hypoxia, but p-RhoA and mobility-relevant protein (integrin β1, p-FAK and fibronectin) expression levels in BMSCs were inhibited. Fortunately, MGF E peptide could restore all abovementioned indexes except RhoA expression. MEK-ERK1/2 pathway was involved in MGF E peptide regulating cell morphological changes, mobility, and relevant proteins (except p-FAK). PI3K-Akt pathway was involved in MGF E peptide regulating cell area, mobility, and relevant proteins. Besides, severe hypoxia upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor α expression but was harmful for proangiogenic capacity of BMSCs. Our study suggested that MGF E peptide might be helpful for the clinical application of tissue engineering strategy in bone defect repair. Sever hypoxia impairs bone defect repair with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). This study proved that mechano-growth factor E (MGF E) peptide could improve the severe hypoxia-induced cell contraction and decline of cell adhesion and migration of BMSCs. Besides, MGF E peptide weakened the effects of severe hypoxia on the cytoskeleton arrangement- and mobility-relevant protein expression levels in BMSCs. The underlying molecular mechanism was also verified. Finally, it was confirmed that MGF E peptide showed an adverse effect on the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor α in BMSCs under severe hypoxia but could

  4. Interactive effects of hypoxia and PCB co-exposure on expression of CYP1A and its potential regulators in Atlantic croaker liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2018-04-01

    Although marine and coastal environments which are contaminated with xenobiotic organic compounds often become hypoxic during the summer, the interactive effects of hypoxia and xenobiotic exposure on marine species such as teleost fishes remain poorly understood. The expression and activity of monooxygenase enzyme cytochrome P450-1A (CYP1A) in fishes are upregulated by exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), whereas they are down-regulated during hypoxia exposure. We investigated the interactive effects of hypoxia and PCB co-exposure on hepatic CYP1A expression in Atlantic croaker and on potential regulators of CYP1A. Croaker were exposed to hypoxia (1.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen), 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77, dose: 2 and 8 µg/g body weight), and Aroclor 1254 (a common PCB mixture, dose: 0.5 and 1 µg/g body weight), alone and in combination for 4 weeks. PCB 77 exposure markedly increased hepatic CYP1A mRNA and protein expression, and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD, an indicator of CYP1A enzyme) activity and increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression. PCB 77 treatment also increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β, a cytokine) mRNA levels and protein carbonyl (PC, an indicator of reactive oxygen species, ROS) contents. These marked PCB 77- and Aroclor 1254-induced increases in CYP1A mRNA levels and EROD activity were significantly attenuated by co-exposure to hypoxia, whereas the increases in hepatic eNOS protein and IL-1β mRNA expression, and PC contents were augmented by hypoxia co-exposure. The results suggest that biotransformation of organic xenobiotics by CYP1A is reduced in fish during co-exposure to hypoxia and is accompanied by alterations in eNOS, ROS, and IL-1β levels. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 regulates glucose metabolism in bladder cancer cells through coactivation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Chang, Cunjie; Cui, Yangyan; Zhao, Xiaozhi; Yang, Jun; Shen, Lan; Zhou, Ji; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Zhen; Ye, Changxiao; Hasenmayer, Donald; Perkins, Robert; Huang, Xiaojing; Yao, Xin; Yu, Like; Huang, Ruimin; Zhang, Dianzheng; Guo, Hongqian; Yan, Jun

    2014-04-18

    Cancer cell proliferation is a metabolically demanding process, requiring high glycolysis, which is known as "Warburg effect," to support anabolic growth. Steroid receptor coactivator-3 (SRC-3), a steroid receptor coactivator, is overexpressed and/or amplified in multiple cancer types, including non-steroid targeted cancers, such as urinary bladder cancer (UBC). However, whether SRC-3 regulates the metabolic reprogramming for cancer cell growth is unknown. Here, we reported that overexpression of SRC-3 accelerated UBC cell growth, accompanied by the increased expression of genes involved in glycolysis. Knockdown of SRC-3 reduced the UBC cell glycolytic rate under hypoxia, decreased tumor growth in nude mice, with reduction of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and lactate dehydrogenase expression levels. We further revealed that SRC-3 could interact with hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α), which is a key transcription factor required for glycolysis, and coactivate its transcriptional activity. SRC-3 was recruited to the promoters of HIF1α-target genes, such as glut1 and pgk1. The positive correlation of expression levels between SRC-3 and Glut1 proteins was demonstrated in human UBC patient samples. Inhibition of glycolysis through targeting HK2 or LDHA decelerated SRC-3 overexpression-induced cell growth. In summary, overexpression of SRC-3 promoted glycolysis in bladder cancer cells through HIF1α to facilitate tumorigenesis, which may be an intriguing drug target for bladder cancer therapy.

  6. Roles and regulation of ketogenesis in cultured astroglia and neurons under hypoxia and hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Shinichi; Iizumi, Takuya; Mashima, Kyoko; Abe, Takato; Suzuki, Norihiro

    2014-09-11

    Exogenous ketone bodies (KBs), acetoacetate (AA), and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) act as alternative energy substrates in neural cells under starvation. The present study examined the endogenous ketogenic capacity of astroglia under hypoxia with/without glucose and the possible roles of KBs in neuronal energy metabolism. Cultured neurons and astroglia were prepared from Sprague-Dawley rats. Palmitic acid (PAL) and l-carnitine (LC) were added to the assay medium. The 4- to 24-hr production of AA and BHB was measured using the cyclic thio-NADH method. (14)C-labeled acid-soluble products (KBs) and (14)CO2 produced from [1-(14)C]PAL were also measured. l-[U-(14)C]lactic acid ([(14)C]LAC), [1-(14)C]pyruvic acid ([(14)C]PYR), or β-[1-(14)C]hydroxybutyric acid ([(14)C]BHB) was used to compare the oxidative metabolism of the glycolysis end products with that of the KBs. Some cells were placed in a hypoxic chamber (1% O2). PAL and LC induced a higher production of KBs in astroglia than in neurons, while the CO2 production from PAL was less than 5% of the KB production in both astroglia and neurons. KB production in astroglia was augmented by the AMP-activated protein kinase activators, AICAR and metformin, as well as hypoxia with/without glucose. Neuronal KB production increased under hypoxia in the absence of PAL and LC. In neurons, [(14)C]LAC and [(14)C]PYR oxidation decreased after 24 hr of hypoxia, while [(14)C]BHB oxidation was preserved. Astroglia responds to ischemia in vitro by enhancing KB production, and astroglia-produced KBs derived from fatty acid might serve as a neuronal energy substrate for the tricarboxylic acid cycle instead of lactate, as pyruvate dehydrogenase is susceptible to ischemia. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 regulates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α protein levels in endothelial cells under hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan K Alig

    Full Text Available The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 negatively influences endothelial function, such as VEGF signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, and has been shown to influence angiogenesis during tissue ischemia. In ischemic tissues, hypoxia induced angiogenesis is crucial for restoring oxygen supply. However, the exact mechanism how SHP-1 affects endothelial function during ischemia or hypoxia remains unclear. We performed in vitro endothelial cell culture experiments to characterize the role of SHP-1 during hypoxia.SHP-1 knock-down by specific antisense oligodesoxynucleotides (AS-Odn increased cell growth as well as VEGF synthesis and secretion during 24 hours of hypoxia compared to control AS-Odn. This was prevented by HIF-1α inhibition (echinomycin and apigenin. SHP-1 knock-down as well as overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-1 (SHP-1 CS further enhanced HIF-1α protein levels, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active SHP-1 (SHP-1 E74A resulted in decreased HIF-1α levels during hypoxia, compared to wildtype SHP-1. Proteasome inhibition (MG132 returned HIF-1α levels to control or wildtype levels respectively in these cells. SHP-1 silencing did not alter HIF-1α mRNA levels. Finally, under hypoxic conditions SHP-1 knock-down enhanced intracellular endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, as measured by oxidation of H2-DCF and DHE fluorescence.SHP-1 decreases half-life of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions resulting in decreased cell growth due to diminished VEGF synthesis and secretion. The regulatory effect of SHP-1 on HIF-1α stability may be mediated by inhibition of endothelial ROS formation stabilizing HIF-1α protein. These findings highlight the importance of SHP-1 in hypoxic signaling and its potential as therapeutic target in ischemic diseases.

  8. Investigating the Regulation and Potential Role of Nonhypoxic Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) in Aromatase Inhibitor Resistant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    hypoxia responsive element ( HRE ) to which HIF-1 binds in order to regulate vimentin gene expresson has not been identified. We have currently, analyzed...the vimentin promoter and have identified 2 potential HRE sites, based on sequence (Figure 5). Primers have been designed and ordered, and

  9. Sumoylation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ameliorates failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation in experimental brain death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Y H Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1, Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase.We conclude that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM ameliorates brain stem

  10. Oroxylin A regulates glucose metabolism in response to hypoxic stress with the involvement of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qinsheng; Yin, Qian; Wei, Libin; Zhou, Yuxin; Qiao, Chen; Guo, Yongjian; Wang, Xiaotang; Ma, Shiping; Lu, Na

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic alteration in cancer cells is one of the most conspicuous characteristics that distinguish cancer cells from normal cells. In this study, we investigated the influence and signaling ways of oroxylin A affecting cancer cell energy metabolism under hypoxia. The data showed that oroxylin A remarkably reduced the generation of lactate and glucose uptake under hypoxia in HepG2 cells. Moreover, oroxylin A inhibited HIF-1α expression and its stability. The downstream targets (PDK1, LDHA, and HK II), as well as their mRNA levels were also suppressed by oroxylin A under hypoxia. The silencing or the overexpression of HIF-1α assays suggested that HIF-1α is required for metabolic effect of oroxylin A in HepG2 cells during hypoxia. Furthermore, oroxylin A could reduce the expression of complex III in mitochondrial respiratory chain, and then decrease the accumulation of ROS at moderate concentrations (0-50 µM) under hypoxia, which was benefit for its inhibition on glycolytic activity by decreasing ROS-mediated HIF-1 expression. Besides, oroxylin A didn't cause the loss of MMP under hypoxia and had no obvious effects on the expression of OXPHOS complexes, suggesting that oroxylin A did not affect mitochondrial mass at the moderate stress of oroxylin A. The suppressive effect of oroxylin A on glycolysis led to a significantly repress of ATP generation, for ATP generation mostly depends on glycolysis in HepG2 cells. This study revealed a new aspect of glucose metabolism regulation of oroxylin A under hypoxia, which may contribute to its new anticancer mechanism. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The PTEN protein: cellular localization and post-translational regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Nick R; Kriplani, Nisha; Hermida, Miguel A; Alvarez-Garcia, Virginia; Wise, Helen M

    2016-02-01

    The phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) phosphatase dephosphorylates PIP3, the lipid product of the class I PI 3-kinases, and suppresses the growth and proliferation of many cell types. It has been heavily studied, in large part due to its status as a tumour suppressor, the loss of function of which is observed through diverse mechanisms in many tumour types. Here we present a concise review of our understanding of the PTEN protein and highlight recent advances, particularly in our understanding of its localization and regulation by ubiquitination and SUMOylation. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  12. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  13. Regulation of mRNA Translation Is a Novel Mechanism for Phthalate Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ling

    Full Text Available Phthalates are a group of plasticizers that are widely used in many consumer products and medical devices, thus generating a huge burden to human health. Phthalates have been known to cause a number of developmental and reproductive disorders functioning as endocrine modulators. They are also involved in carcinogenesis with mechanisms less understood. To further understand the molecular mechanisms of phthalate toxicity, in this study we reported a new effect of phthalates on mRNA translation/protein synthesis, a key regulatory step of gene expression. Butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP was found to directly inhibit mRNA translation in vitro but showed a complicated pattern of affecting mRNA translation in cells. In human kidney embryonic cell (HEK-293T, BBP increased cap-dependent mRNA translation at lower concentrations but showed inhibitory effect at higher concentrations. Cap-independent translation was not affected. On the other hand, mono (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP as a major metabolite of another important phthalate di (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP inhibited both can-dependent and -independent mRNA translation in vivo. In contrast, BBP and MEHP exhibited an overall promoting effect on mRNA translation in cancer cells. Mechanistic studies identified that the level and phosphorylation of eIF4E-BP (eIF4E binding protein and the amount of eIF4GI in eIF4F complex were altered in accordance with the effect of BBP on translation. BBP was also identified to directly bind to eIF4E, providing a further mechanism underlying the regulation of mRNA by phthalate. At the cellular level BBP inhibited normal cell growth but slightly promoted cancer cells (HT29 growth. Overall, this study provides the first evidence that phthalates can directly regulate mRNA translation as a novel mechanism to mediate their biological toxicities.

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factors regulate pluripotency factor expression by ZNF217- and ALKBH5-mediated modulation of RNA methylation in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanzhao; Zhi, Wanqing Iris; Lu, Haiquan; Samanta, Debangshu; Chen, Ivan; Gabrielson, Edward; Semenza, Gregg L

    2016-10-04

    Exposure of breast cancer cells to hypoxia increases the percentage of breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs), which are required for tumor initiation and metastasis, and this response is dependent on the activity of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). We previously reported that exposure of breast cancer cells to hypoxia induces the ALKBH5-mediated demethylation of N6-methyladenosine (m6A) in NANOG mRNA leading to increased expression of NANOG, which is a pluripotency factor that promotes BCSC specification. Here we report that exposure of breast cancer cells to hypoxia also induces ZNF217-dependent inhibition of m6A methylation of mRNAs encoding NANOG and KLF4, which is another pluripotency factor that mediates BCSC specification. Although hypoxia induced the BCSC phenotype in all breast-cancer cell lines analyzed, it did so through variable induction of pluripotency factors and ALKBH5 or ZNF217. However, in every breast cancer line, the hypoxic induction of pluripotency factor and ALKBH5 or ZNF217 expression was HIF-dependent. Immunohistochemistry revealed that expression of HIF-1α and ALKBH5 was concordant in all human breast cancer biopsies analyzed. ALKBH5 knockdown in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells significantly decreased metastasis from breast to lungs in immunodeficient mice. Thus, HIFs stimulate pluripotency factor expression and BCSC specification by negative regulation of RNA methylation.

  15. Effects of hypoxia on ionic regulation, glycogen utilization and antioxidative ability in the gills and liver of the aquatic air-breathing fish Trichogaster microlepis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Yen; Lin, Hui-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2015-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that Trichogaster microlepis, a fish with an accessory air-breathing organ, uses a compensatory strategy involving changes in both behavior and protein levels to enhance its gas exchange ability. This compensatory strategy enables the gill ion-regulatory metabolism to maintain homeostasis during exposure to hypoxia. The present study aimed to determine whether ionic regulation, glycogen utilization and antioxidant activity differ in terms of expression under hypoxic stresses; fish were sampled after being subjected to 3 or 12h of hypoxia and 12h of recovery under normoxia. The air-breathing behavior of the fish increased under hypoxia. No morphological modification of the gills was observed. The expression of carbonic anhydrase II did not vary among the treatments. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase enzyme activity did not decrease, but increases in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase protein expression and ionocyte levels were observed. The glycogen utilization increased under hypoxia as measured by glycogen phosphorylase protein expression and blood glucose level, whereas the glycogen content decreased. The enzyme activity of several components of the antioxidant system in the gills, including catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxidase dismutase, increased in enzyme activity. Based on the above data, we concluded that T. microlepis is a hypoxia-tolerant species that does not exhibit ion-regulatory suppression but uses glycogen to maintain energy utilization in the gills under hypoxic stress. Components of the antioxidant system showed increased expression under the applied experimental treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. T box riboswitches in Actinobacteria: Translational regulation via novel tRNA interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Anna V.; Grundy, Frank J.; Henkin, Tina M.

    2015-01-01

    The T box riboswitch regulates many amino acid-related genes in Gram-positive bacteria. T box riboswitch-mediated gene regulation was shown previously to occur at the level of transcription attenuation via structural rearrangements in the 5′ untranslated (leader) region of the mRNA in response to binding of a specific uncharged tRNA. In this study, a novel group of isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase gene (ileS) T box leader sequences found in organisms of the phylum Actinobacteria was investigated. The Stem I domains of these RNAs lack several highly conserved elements that are essential for interaction with the tRNA ligand in other T box RNAs. Many of these RNAs were predicted to regulate gene expression at the level of translation initiation through tRNA-dependent stabilization of a helix that sequesters a sequence complementary to the Shine–Dalgarno (SD) sequence, thus freeing the SD sequence for ribosome binding and translation initiation. We demonstrated specific binding to the cognate tRNAIle and tRNAIle-dependent structural rearrangements consistent with regulation at the level of translation initiation, providing the first biochemical demonstration, to our knowledge, of translational regulation in a T box riboswitch. PMID:25583497

  17. Amplified in Breast Cancer Regulates Transcription and Translation in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochnik, Aleksandra M; Peterson, Mark S; Avdulov, Svetlana V; Oh, Annabell S; Bitterman, Peter B; Yee, Douglas

    2016-02-01

    Control of mRNA translation is fundamentally altered in cancer. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling regulates key translation mediators to modulate protein synthesis (e.g. eIF4E, 4E-BP1, mTOR, and S6K1). Importantly the Amplified in Breast Cancer (AIB1) oncogene regulates transcription and is also a downstream mediator of IGF-I signaling. To determine if AIB1 also affects mRNA translation, we conducted gain and loss of AIB1 function experiments in estrogen receptor alpha (ERα)(+) (MCF-7L) and ERα(-) (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435 and LCC6) breast cancer cells. AIB1 positively regulated IGF-I-induced mRNA translation in both ERα(+) and ERα(-) cells. Formation of the eIF4E-4E-BP1 translational complex was altered in the AIB1 ERα(+) and ERα(-) knockdown cells, leading to a reduction in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 and eIF4G/4E-BP1 ratios. In basal and IGF-I stimulated MCF-7 and LCC6 cells, knockdown of AIB1 decreased the integrity of the cap-binding complex, reduced global IGF-I stimulated polyribosomal mRNA recruitment with a concomitant decrease in ten of the thirteen genes tested in polysome-bound mRNAs mapping to proliferation, cell cycle, survival, transcription, translation and ribosome biogenesis ontologies. Specifically, knockdown of AIB1 decreased ribosome-bound mRNA and steady-state protein levels of the transcription factors ERα and E2F1 in addition to reduced ribosome-bound mRNA of the ribosome biogenesis factor BYSL in a cell-line specific manner to regulate mRNA translation. The oncogenic transcription factor AIB1 has a novel role in the regulation of polyribosome recruitment and formation of the translational complex. Combinatorial therapies targeting IGF signaling and mRNA translation in AIB1 expressing breast cancers may have clinical benefit and warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Placental NFE2L2 is discordantly activated in monochorionic twins with selective intrauterine growth restriction and possibly regulated by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; He, Zhiming; Gao, Yu; Zhang, Guanglan; Huang, Xuan; Fang, Qun

    2017-04-01

    Nuclear factor, erythroid 2 like 2 (NFE2L2) is an important transcription factor that protects cells from oxidative stress (OS). NFE2L2 deficiency in placentas is associated with pregnancy complications. We have demonstrated that elevated OS existed in placental shares of the smaller fetus in selective intrauterine growth restriction (sIUGR); however, the role of NFE2L2 in the development of sIUGR remains unknown. In this study, we examined the levels of NFE2L2 and heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), a major antioxidant regulated by NFE2L2, in sIUGR placentas. We also investigated the relationship between hypoxia and NFE2L2 activation, which may be involved in the pathogenesis of sIUGR. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the levels of NFE2L2 and HMOX1 in placentas from 30 monochorionic diamniotic (MCDA) twin pregnancies. The trophoblast cell line HTR-8/SVneo was cultured under severe (3%) or mild (10%) hypoxia. NFE2L2 and HMOX1 were both up-regulated in placental shares of the smaller fetus in the sIUGR group. No significant inter-twin differences in NFE2L2 and HMOX1 were detected in the normal group. In vitro, NFE2L2 was suppressed under severe hypoxia (3% O 2 ) but was clearly up-regulated under mild hypoxia (10% O 2 ). Compared with the suppression of NFE2L2 in placentas of fetal growth restriction (FGR) in singleton pregnancies, NFE2L2 was up-regulated in placental shares of the smaller fetus in sIUGR pregnancies. The asymmetrical activation of NFE2L2 in placental shares of sIUGR twins may be a compensation for hypoxia that protects the smaller fetus from OS damage.

  19. 47 CFR 74.789 - Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... power television and television translator stations. 74.789 Section 74.789 Telecommunication FEDERAL... AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.789 Broadcast regulations applicable to digital low power television and television translator...

  20. Roles of Transcriptional and Translational Control Mechanisms in Regulation of Ribosomal Protein Synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Hector L; O'Connor, Kevin; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gourse, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Bacterial ribosome biogenesis is tightly regulated to match nutritional conditions and to prevent formation of defective ribosomal particles. In Escherichia coli , most ribosomal protein (r-protein) synthesis is coordinated with rRNA synthesis by a translational feedback mechanism: when r-proteins exceed rRNAs, specific r-proteins bind to their own mRNAs and inhibit expression of the operon. It was recently discovered that the second messenger nucleotide guanosine tetra and pentaphosphate (ppGpp), which directly regulates rRNA promoters, is also capable of regulating many r-protein promoters. To examine the relative contributions of the translational and transcriptional control mechanisms to the regulation of r-protein synthesis, we devised a reporter system that enabled us to genetically separate the cis -acting sequences responsible for the two mechanisms and to quantify their relative contributions to regulation under the same conditions. We show that the synthesis of r-proteins from the S20 and S10 operons is regulated by ppGpp following shifts in nutritional conditions, but most of the effect of ppGpp required the 5' region of the r-protein mRNA containing the target site for translational feedback regulation and not the promoter. These results suggest that most regulation of the S20 and S10 operons by ppGpp following nutritional shifts is indirect and occurs in response to changes in rRNA synthesis. In contrast, we found that the promoters for the S20 operon were regulated during outgrowth, likely in response to increasing nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) levels. Thus, r-protein synthesis is dynamic, with different mechanisms acting at different times. IMPORTANCE Bacterial cells have evolved complex and seemingly redundant strategies to regulate many high-energy-consuming processes. In E. coli , synthesis of ribosomal components is tightly regulated with respect to nutritional conditions by mechanisms that act at both the transcription and translation steps. In

  1. A Requirement for Mena, an Actin Regulator, in Local mRNA Translation in Developing Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidaki, Marina; Drees, Frauke; Saxena, Tanvi; Lanslots, Erwin; Taliaferro, Matthew J; Tatarakis, Antonios; Burge, Christopher B; Wang, Eric T; Gertler, Frank B

    2017-08-02

    During neuronal development, local mRNA translation is required for axon guidance and synaptogenesis, and dysregulation of this process contributes to multiple neurodevelopmental and cognitive disorders. However, regulation of local protein synthesis in developing axons remains poorly understood. Here, we uncover a novel role for the actin-regulatory protein Mena in the formation of a ribonucleoprotein complex that involves the RNA-binding proteins HnrnpK and PCBP1 and regulates local translation of specific mRNAs in developing axons. We find that translation of dyrk1a, a Down syndrome- and autism spectrum disorders-related gene, is dependent on Mena, both in steady-state conditions and upon BDNF stimulation. We identify hundreds of additional mRNAs that associate with the Mena complex, suggesting that it plays broader role(s) in post-transcriptional gene regulation. Our work establishes a dual role for Mena in neurons, providing a potential link between regulation of actin dynamics and local translation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A UV-induced mutation in neurospora that affects translational regulation in response to arginine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitag, M.; Dighde, N.; Sachs, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    The Neurospora crassa arg-2 gene encodes the small subunit of arginine-specific carbamoyl phosphate synthetase. The levels of arg-2 mRNA and mRNA translation are negatively regulated by arginine. An upstream open reading frame (uORF) in the transcript's 5' region has been implicated in arginine-specific control. An arg-2-hph fusion gene encoding hygromycin phosphotransferase conferred arginine-regulated resistance to hygromycin when introduced into N. crassa. We used an arg-2-hph strain to select for UV-induced mutants that grew in the presence of hygromycin and arginine, and we isolated 46 mutants that had either of two phenotypes. One phenotype indicated altered expression of both arg-2-hph and arg-2 genes; the other, altered expression of arg-2-hph but not arg-2. One of the latter mutations, which was genetically closely linked to arg-2-hph, was recovered from the 5' region of the arg-2-hph gene using PCR Sequence analyses and transformation experiments revealed a mutation at uORF codon 12 (Asp to Asn) that abrogated negative regulation. Examination of the distribution of ribosomes on arg-2-hph transcripts showed that loss of regulation had a translational component, indicating the uORF sequence was important for Arg-specific translational control. Comparisons with other uORFs suggest common elements in translational control mechanisms

  3. MicroRNA-210 regulates mitochondrial free radical response to hypoxia and krebs cycle in cancer cells by targeting iron sulfur cluster protein ISCU.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Favaro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in cancers results in the upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1 and a microRNA, hsa-miR-210 (miR-210 which is associated with a poor prognosis.In human cancer cell lines and tumours, we found that miR-210 targets the mitochondrial iron sulfur scaffold protein ISCU, required for assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, cofactors for key enzymes involved in the Krebs cycle, electron transport, and iron metabolism. Down regulation of ISCU was the major cause of induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS in hypoxia. ISCU suppression reduced mitochondrial complex 1 activity and aconitase activity, caused a shift to glycolysis in normoxia and enhanced cell survival. Cancers with low ISCU had a worse prognosis.Induction of these major hallmarks of cancer show that a single microRNA, miR-210, mediates a new mechanism of adaptation to hypoxia, by regulating mitochondrial function via iron-sulfur cluster metabolism and free radical generation.

  4. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells through directly transactivating the CX3CR1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansuo Zhao

    Full Text Available CX3CR1 is an important chemokine receptor and regulates the chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Up to now, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Here, we report that hypoxia upregulates the expression of CX3CR1 in pancreatic cancer cells. When hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α expression was knocked down in vitro and in vivo, the expression of CX3CR1 was significantly decreased. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α bound to the hypoxia-response element (HRE; 5'-A/GCGTG-3' of CX3CR1 promoter under normoxia, and this binding was significantly enhanced under hypoxia. Overexpression of HIF-1α significantly upregulated the expression of luciferase reporter gene under the control of the CX3CR1 promoter in pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that HIF-1α may regulate cancer cell migration through CX3CR1. The HIF-1α/CX3CR1 pathway might represent a valuable therapeutic target to prevent invasion and distant metastasis in PDAC.

  5. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Niepmann

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR, while also downstream elements like the cis-replication element (CRE in the coding region and the 3′ UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis-elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5′- and 3′-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA–RNA interactions (LRIs are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis-elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122 binds to two target sites at the 5′ end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3′ UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis-elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis-element in

  6. Signals Involved in Regulation of Hepatitis C Virus RNA Genome Translation and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepmann, Michael; Shalamova, Lyudmila A; Gerresheim, Gesche K; Rossbach, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) preferentially replicates in the human liver and frequently causes chronic infection, often leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. HCV is an enveloped virus classified in the genus Hepacivirus in the family Flaviviridae and has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive orientation. The HCV RNA genome is translated and replicated in the cytoplasm. Translation is controlled by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) in the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), while also downstream elements like the cis -replication element (CRE) in the coding region and the 3' UTR are involved in translation regulation. The cis -elements controlling replication of the viral RNA genome are located mainly in the 5'- and 3'-UTRs at the genome ends but also in the protein coding region, and in part these signals overlap with the signals controlling RNA translation. Many long-range RNA-RNA interactions (LRIs) are predicted between different regions of the HCV RNA genome, and several such LRIs are actually involved in HCV translation and replication regulation. A number of RNA cis -elements recruit cellular RNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of HCV translation and replication. In addition, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) binds to two target sites at the 5' end of the viral RNA genome as well as to at least three additional target sites in the coding region and the 3' UTR. It is involved in the regulation of HCV RNA stability, translation and replication, thereby largely contributing to the hepatotropism of HCV. However, we are still far from completely understanding all interactions that regulate HCV RNA genome translation, stability, replication and encapsidation. In particular, many conclusions on the function of cis -elements in HCV replication have been obtained using full-length HCV genomes or near-full-length replicon systems. These include both genome ends, making it difficult to decide if a cis -element in question acts on HCV

  7. Aspartyl-(asparaginyl β-Hydroxylase, Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α and Notch Cross-Talk in Regulating Neuronal Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot Lawton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartyl-(Asparaginyl-β-Hydroxylase (AAH promotes cell motility by hydroxylating Notch. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor, type 1 (IGF-I stimulate AAH through Erk MAP K and phosphoinositol-3-kinase-Akt (PI3K-Akt. However, hypoxia/oxidative stress may also regulate AAH . Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α regulates cell migration, signals through Notch, and is regulated by hypoxia/oxidative stress, insulin/IGF signaling and factor inhibiting HIF-1α (FIH hydroxylation. To examine cross-talk between HIF-1α and AAH , we measured AAH , Notch-1, Jagged-1, FIH, HIF-1α, HIF-1β and the hairy and enhancer of split 1 (HE S-1 transcription factor expression and directional motility in primitive neuroectodermal tumor 2 (PNET2 human neuronal cells that were exposed to H2O2 or transfected with short interfering RNA duplexes (siRNA targeting AAH , Notch-1 or HIF-1α. We found that: (1 AAH , HIF-1α and neuronal migration were stimulated by H2O2; (2 si-HIF-1α reduced AAH expression and cell motility; (3 si-AAH inhibited Notch and cell migration, but not HIF-1α and (4 si-Notch-1 increased FIH and inhibited HIF-1α. These findings suggest that AAH and HIF-1α crosstalk within a hydroxylation-regulated signaling pathway that may be transiently driven by oxidative stress and chronically regulated by insulin/IGF signaling.

  8. Translational regulation of ribosomal protein S15 drives characteristic patterns of protein-mRNA epistasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Saurav; Basu, Sudipto; Hait, Suman; Kundu, Sudip

    2018-04-21

    Do coding and regulatory segments of a gene co-evolve with each-other? Seeking answers to this question, here we analyze the case of Escherichia coli ribosomal protein S15, that represses its own translation by specifically binding its messenger RNA (rpsO mRNA) and stabilizing a pseudoknot structure at the upstream untranslated region, thus trapping the ribosome into an incomplete translation initiation complex. In the absence of S15, ribosomal protein S1 recognizes rpsO and promotes translation by melting this very pseudoknot. We employ a robust statistical method to detect signatures of positive epistasis between residue site pairs and find that biophysical constraints of translational regulation (S15-rpsO and S1-rpsO recognition, S15-mediated rpsO structural rearrangement, and S1-mediated melting) are strong predictors of positive epistasis. Transforming the epistatic pairs into a network, we find that signatures of two different, but interconnected regulatory cascades are imprinted in the sequence-space and can be captured in terms of two dense network modules that are sparsely connected to each other. This network topology further reflects a general principle of how functionally coupled components of biological networks are interconnected. These results depict a model case, where translational regulation drives characteristic residue-level epistasis-not only between a protein and its own mRNA but also between a protein and the mRNA of an entirely different protein. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Modifications to the translational apparatus which affect the regulation of protein synthesis in sea urchin embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalise, F.W.

    1988-01-01

    Protein synthesis can be regulated at a number of cellular levels. I have examined how modifications to specific components of the protein synthetic machinery are involved in regulating the efficiency of initiation of translation during early sea urchin embryogenesis. It is demonstrated that Ca 2+ concentrations exceeding 500 uM cause the inhibition of protein synthesis in cell-free translation lysates prepared from sea urchin embryos. Specific changes in the state of phosphorylation of at least 8 proteins occur during this Ca 2+ -mediated repression of translation. Analysis of these proteins has indicated that, unlike mammalian systems, there is no detectable level of Ca 2+ -dependent phosphorylation of the αsubunit eIF-2. Two of the proteins which do become phosphorylated in response to Ca 2+ are calmodulin and an isoelectric form of sea urchin eIF-4D. In addition, 2 proteins which share similarities with kinases involved in the regulation of protein synthesis in mammalian cells, also become phosphorylated. I have investigated the consequences of changes in eIF-4D during sea urchin embryogenesis because it has been proposed that a polyamine-mediated conversion of lysine to hypusine in this factor may enhance translational activity. It is demonstrated that [ 3 H] spermidine-derived radioactivity is incorporated into a number of proteins when sea urchin embryos are labeled in vivo, and that the pattern of individual proteins that become labeled changes over the course of the first 30 hr of development

  10. Mechanisms Regulating the Cardiac Output Response to Cyanide Infusion, a Model of Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chang-seng; Huckabee, William E.

    1973-01-01

    When tissue metabolic changes like those of hypoxia were induced by intra-aortic infusion of cyanide in dogs, cardiac output began to increase after 3 to 5 min, reached a peak (220% of the control value) at 15 min, and returned to control in 40 min. This pattern of cardiac output rise was not altered by vagotomy with or without atropine pretreatment. However, this cardiac output response could be differentiated into three phases by pretreating the animals with agents that block specific activities of the sympatho-adrenal system. First, ganglionic blockade produced by mecamylamine or sympathetic nerve blockade by bretylium abolished the middle phase of the cardiac output seen in the untreated animal, but early and late phases still could be discerned. Second, beta-adrenergic receptor blockade produced by propranolol shortened the total duration of the cardiac output rise by abolishing the late phase. Third, when given together, propranolol and mecamylamine (or bretylium) prevented most of the cardiac output rise that follows the early phase. When cyanide was given to splenectomized dogs, the duration of the cardiac output response was not shortened, but the response became biphasic, resembling that seen after chemical sympathectomy. A similar biphasic response of the cardiac output also resulted from splenic denervation; sham operation or nephrectomy had no effect on the monophasic pattern of the normal response. Splenic venous blood obtained from cyanide-treated dogs, when infused intraportally, caused an increase in cardiac output in recipient dogs; similar infusion of arterial blood had no effects. These results suggest that the cardiac output response to cyanide infusion consists of three components: an early phase, related neither to the autonomic nervous system nor to circulating catecholamines; a middle phase, caused by a nonadrenergic humoral substance released from the spleen by sympathetic stimulation; and a late phase, dependent upon adrenergic receptors

  11. Dual‑sensitive HRE/Egr1 promoter regulates Smac overexpression and enhances radiation‑induced A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell death under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang-Feng; Chen, Li-Bo; Li, Dan-Dan; Yang, Lei; Zhang, Bao-Gang; Jin, Jing-Peng; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Bin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to construct an expression vector carrying the hypoxia/radiation dual‑sensitive chimeric hypoxia response element (HRE)/early growth response 1 (Egr‑1) promoter in order to overexpress the therapeutic second mitochondria‑derived activator of caspases (Smac). Using this expression vector, the present study aimed to explore the molecular mechanism underlying radiotherapy‑induced A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell death and apoptosis under hypoxia. The plasmids, pcDNA3.1‑Egr1‑Smac (pE‑Smac) and pcDNA3.1‑HRE/Egr-1‑Smac (pH/E‑Smac), were constructed and transfected into A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells using the liposome method. CoCl2 was used to chemically simulate hypoxia, followed by the administration of 2 Gy X‑ray irradiation. An MTT assay was performed to detect cell proliferation and an Annexin V‑fluorescein isothiocyanate apoptosis detection kit was used to detect apoptosis. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses were used for the detection of mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Infection with the pE‑Smac and pH/E‑Smac plasmids in combination with radiation and/or hypoxia was observed to enhance the expression of Smac. Furthermore, Smac overexpression was found to enhance the radiation‑induced inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of cycle arrest and apoptosis. The cytochrome c/caspase‑9/caspase‑3 pathway was identified to be involved in this regulation of apoptosis. Plasmid infection in combination with X‑ray irradiation was found to markedly induce cell death under hypoxia. In conclusion, the hypoxia/radiation dual‑sensitive chimeric HRE/Egr‑1 promoter was observed to enhance the expression of the therapeutic Smac, as well as enhance the radiation‑induced inhibition of cell proliferation and promotion of cycle arrest and apoptosis under hypoxia. This apoptosis was found to involve the mitochondrial pathway.

  12. Expression of N-WASP is regulated by HiF1α through the hypoxia response element in the N-WASP promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Salvi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cell migration and invasion involves temporal and spatial regulation of actin cytoskeleton reorganization, which is regulated by the WASP family of proteins such as N-WASP (Neural- Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein. We have previously shown that expression of N-WASP was increased under hypoxic conditions. In order to characterize the regulation of N-WASP expression, we constructed an N-WASP promoter driven GFP reporter construct, N-WASPpro-GFP. Transfection of N-WASPpro-GFP construct and plasmid expressing HiF1α (Hypoxia Inducible factor 1α enhanced the expression of GFP suggesting that increased expression of N-WASP under hypoxic conditions is mediated by HiF1α. Sequence analysis of the N-WASP promoter revealed the presence of two hypoxia response elements (HREs characterized by the consensus sequence 5′-GCGTG-3′ at -132 bp(HRE1 and at -662 bp(HRE2 relative to transcription start site (TSS. Site-directed mutagenesis of HRE1(-132 but not HRE2(-662 abolished the HiF1α induced activation of N-WASP promoter. Similarly ChIP assay demonstrated that HiF1α bound to HRE1(-132 but not HRE2(-662 under hypoxic condition. MDA-MB-231 cells but not MDA-MB-231KD cells treated with hypoxia mimicking agent, DMOG showed enhanced gelatin degradation. Similarly MDA-MB-231KD(N-WASPpro-N-WASPR cells expressing N-WASPR under the transcriptional regulation of WT N-WASPpro but not MDA-MB-231KD(N-WASPproHRE1-N-WASPR cells expressing N-WASPR under the transcriptional regulation of N-WASPproHRE1 showed enhanced gelatin degradation when treated with DMOG. Thus indicating the importance of N-WASP in hypoxia induced invadopodia formation. Thus, our data demonstrates that hypoxia-induced activation of N-WASP expression is mediated by interaction of HiF1α with the HRE1(-132 and explains the role of N-WASP in hypoxia induced invadopodia formation.

  13. Hypoxic regulation of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 expression in nucleus pulposus cells of the rat intervertebral disc: role of hypoxia-inducible factor proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Shilpa S; Nasser, Rena; Shapiro, Irving M; Risbud, Makarand V

    2011-07-01

    To determine whether hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) proteins regulate expression of β-1,3-glucuronyltransferase 1 (GlcAT-1), a key enzyme in glycosaminoglycan synthesis in nucleus pulposus cells. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to measure GlcAT-1 expression. Transfections were performed to determine the effect of HIF-1α and HIF-2α on GlcAT-1 promoter activity. Under hypoxic conditions there was an increase in GlcAT-1 expression; a significant increase in promoter activity was seen both in nucleus pulposus cells and in N1511 chondrocytes. We investigated whether HIF controlled GlcAT-1 expression. Suppression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α induced GlcAT-1 promoter activity and expression only in nucleus pulposus cells. Transfection with CA-HIF-1α as well as with CA-HIF-2α suppressed GlcAT-1 promoter activity only in nucleus pulposus cells, suggesting a cell type-specific regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis and deletion constructs were used to further confirm the suppressive effect of HIFs on GlcAT-1 promoter function in nucleus pulposus cells. Although it was evident that interaction of HIF with hypoxia-responsive elements resulted in suppression of basal promoter activity, it was not necessary for transcriptional suppression. This result suggested both a direct and an indirect mode of regulation, possibly through recruitment of a HIF-dependent repressor. Finally, we showed that hypoxic expression of GlcAT-1 was also partially dependent on MAPK signaling. These studies demonstrate that hypoxia regulates GlcAT-1 expression through a signaling network comprising both activator and suppressor molecules, and that this regulation is unique to nucleus pulposus cells. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. ChIP-seq and in vivo transcriptome analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus SREBP SrbA reveals a new regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawoon Chung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Aspergillus fumigatus sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP SrbA belongs to the basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH family of transcription factors and is crucial for antifungal drug resistance and virulence. The latter phenotype is especially striking, as loss of SrbA results in complete loss of virulence in murine models of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA. How fungal SREBPs mediate fungal virulence is unknown, though it has been suggested that lack of growth in hypoxic conditions accounts for the attenuated virulence. To further understand the role of SrbA in fungal infection site pathobiology, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify genes under direct SrbA transcriptional regulation in hypoxia. These results confirmed the direct regulation of ergosterol biosynthesis and iron uptake by SrbA in hypoxia and revealed new roles for SrbA in nitrate assimilation and heme biosynthesis. Moreover, functional characterization of an SrbA target gene with sequence similarity to SrbA identified a new transcriptional regulator of the fungal hypoxia response and virulence, SrbB. SrbB co-regulates genes involved in heme biosynthesis and demethylation of C4-sterols with SrbA in hypoxic conditions. However, SrbB also has regulatory functions independent of SrbA including regulation of carbohydrate metabolism. Loss of SrbB markedly attenuates A. fumigatus virulence, and loss of both SREBPs further reduces in vivo fungal growth. These data suggest that both A. fumigatus SREBPs are critical for hypoxia adaptation and virulence and reveal new insights into SREBPs' complex role in infection site adaptation and fungal virulence.

  15. The long non-coding RNA GAS5 cooperates with the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E to regulate c-Myc translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzhen Hu

    Full Text Available Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are important regulators of transcription; however, their involvement in protein translation is not well known. Here we explored whether the lncRNA GAS5 is associated with translation initiation machinery and regulates translation. GAS5 was enriched with eukaryotic translation initiation factor-4E (eIF4E in an RNA-immunoprecipitation assay using lymphoma cell lines. We identified two RNA binding motifs within eIF4E protein and the deletion of each motif inhibited the binding of GAS5 with eIF4E. To confirm the role of GAS5 in translation regulation, GAS5 siRNA and in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA were used to knock down or overexpress GAS5, respectively. GAS5 siRNA had no effect on global protein translation but did specifically increase c-Myc protein level without an effect on c-Myc mRNA. The mechanism of this increase in c-Myc protein was enhanced association of c-Myc mRNA with the polysome without any effect on protein stability. In contrast, overexpression of in vitro transcribed GAS5 RNA suppressed c-Myc protein without affecting c-Myc mRNA. Interestingly, GAS5 was found to be bound with c-Myc mRNA, suggesting that GAS5 regulates c-Myc translation through lncRNA-mRNA interaction. Our findings have uncovered a role of GAS5 lncRNA in translation regulation through its interactions with eIF4E and c-Myc mRNA.

  16. Functional 5' UTR mRNA structures in eukaryotic translation regulation and how to find them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppek, Kathrin; Das, Rhiju; Barna, Maria

    2018-03-01

    RNA molecules can fold into intricate shapes that can provide an additional layer of control of gene expression beyond that of their sequence. In this Review, we discuss the current mechanistic understanding of structures in 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) of eukaryotic mRNAs and the emerging methodologies used to explore them. These structures may regulate cap-dependent translation initiation through helicase-mediated remodelling of RNA structures and higher-order RNA interactions, as well as cap-independent translation initiation through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), mRNA modifications and other specialized translation pathways. We discuss known 5' UTR RNA structures and how new structure probing technologies coupled with prospective validation, particularly compensatory mutagenesis, are likely to identify classes of structured RNA elements that shape post-transcriptional control of gene expression and the development of multicellular organisms.

  17. Blood Pressure Regulation by the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla in Conscious Rats: Effects of Hypoxia, Hypercapnia, Baroreceptor Denervation, and Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Ian C.; Abe, Chikara; Viar, Kenneth E.; Stornetta, Daniel S.

    2017-01-01

    Current understanding of the contribution of C1 neurons to blood pressure (BP) regulation derives predominantly from experiments performed in anesthetized animals or reduced ex vivo preparations. Here, we use ArchaerhodopsinT3.0 (ArchT) loss-of-function optogenetics to explore BP regulation by C1 neurons in intact, unanesthetized rats. Using a lentivirus that expresses ArchT under the Phox2b-activated promoter PRSx8 (PRSx8-ArchT), ∼65% of transduced neurons were C1 (balance retrotrapezoid nucleus, RTN). Other rats received CaMKII-ArchT3.0 AAV2 (CaMKII-ArchT), which transduced C1 neurons and larger numbers of unidentified glutamatergic and GABAergic cells. Under anesthesia, ArchT photoactivation reduced sympathetic nerve activity and BP and silenced/strongly inhibited most (7/12) putative C1 neurons. In unanesthetized PRSx8-ArchT-treated rats breathing room air, bilateral ArchT photoactivation caused a very small BP reduction that was only slightly larger under hypercapnia (6% FiCO2), but was greatly enhanced during hypoxia (10 and 12% FiO2), after sino-aortic denervation, or during isoflurane anesthesia. The degree of hypotension correlated with percentage of ArchT-transduced C1 neurons. ArchT photoactivation produced similar BP changes in CaMKII-ArchT-treated rats. Photoactivation in PRSX8-ArchT rats reduced breathing frequency (FR), whereas FR increased in CaMKII-ArchT rats. We conclude that the BP drop elicited by ArchT activation resulted from C1 neuron inhibition and was unrelated to breathing changes. C1 neurons have low activity under normoxia, but their activation is important to BP stability during hypoxia or anesthesia and contributes greatly to the hypertension caused by baroreceptor deafferentation. Finally, C1 neurons are marginally activated by hypercapnia and the large breathing stimulation caused by this stimulus has very little impact on resting BP. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT C1 neurons are glutamatergic/peptidergic/catecholaminergic neurons located

  18. The role of hypoxia-induced factor in the regulation of oxygen homeostasis during reparative regeneration in compromised microcirculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. Izmaylov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present review is to find an answer to the clinically important question on the mechanisms regulating the activity of reparative regeneration in hypoxic conditions and potential ways to modify this process. In the recent studies, compensated hypoxia is characterized as a trigger for the regeneration, with the central regulating factor being the member of the cytokine family, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. Changes in the concentration of this protein modulates cell migration, angiogenesis and epithelialmesenchymal integration; it also stimulates the proliferation of endothelial cells and fibroblasts, playing a  major role in the stimulation of wound healing, especially with compromised microcirculation, for example, diabetes mellitus. 

  19. Down-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor by HEXIM1 attenuates myocardial angiogenesis in hypoxic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Ojima, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Hosono, Osamu; Tanaka, Hirotoshi

    2014-10-24

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) sustains elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance and ultimately leads to right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy and failure and death. Recently, proangiogenic factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) have been known to promote left ventricular myocardial angiogenesis and lead to cardiac hypertrophy, and this would be involved in RV hypertrophy of PH patients. Previously, we revealed that overexpression of HEXIM1 prevents endothelin-1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and hypertrophic genes expression, and that cardiomyocyte-specific HEXIM1 transgenic mice ameliorates RV hypertrophy in hypoxia-induced PH model. Given these results, here we analyzed the effect of HEXIM1 on the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF and on myocardial angiogenesis of RV in PH. We revealed that overexpression of HEXIM1 prevented hypoxia-induced expression of HIF-1α protein and its target genes including VEGF in the cultured cardiac myocytes and fibroblasts, and that cardiomyocyte-specific HEXIM1 transgenic mice repressed RV myocardial angiogenesis in hypoxia-induced PH model. Thus, we conclude that HEXIM1 could prevent RV hypertrophy, at least in part, via suppression of myocardial angiogenesis through down-regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF in the myocardium under hypoxic condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha up-regulates the expression of phospholipase D2 in colon cancer cells under hypoxic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoxi; Du, Kunli; Fu, Zhongxue; Zhang, Shouru; Wu, Xingye

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. Recent studies confirmed that phospholipase D2 (PLD2) plays significant roles in cancer progression. In this study, correlation between the expression of PLD2 and the change in the protein level of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1-α) was studied. Thirty human colon cancer tissues were examined for the expression of HIF1-α and PLD2 protein, and mRNA levels. SW480 and SW620 cells were exposed to normoxia (20 %) or hypoxia (Hypoxic stress induced PLD2 mRNA and protein expression in SW480 and SW620 cells. Cells transfected with HIF1-α siRNA showed attenuation of hypoxia stress-induced PLD2 expression. In vivo growth decreased in response to HIF1-α and PLD2 inhibition. These results suggest that PLD2 expression in colon cancer cells is up-regulated via HIF1-α in response to hypoxic stress and underscores the crucial role of HIF1-α-induced PLD2 in tumor growth.

  1. PRMT5 regulates IRES-dependent translation via methylation of hnRNP A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guozhen; Dhar, Surbhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The type II arginine methyltransferase PRMT5 is responsible for the symmetric dimethylation of histone to generate the H3R8me2s and H4R3me2s marks, which correlate with the repression of transcription. However, the protein level of a number of genes (MEP50, CCND1, MYC, HIF1a, MTIF and CDKN1B) are reported to be downregulated by the loss of PRMT5, while their mRNA levels remain unchanged, which is counterintuitive for PRMT5's proposed role as a transcription repressor. We noticed that the majority of the genes regulated by PRMT5, at the posttranscriptional level, express mRNA containing an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Using an IRES-dependent reporter system, we established that PRMT5 facilitates the translation of a subset of IRES-containing genes. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein, hnRNP A1, is an IRES transacting factor (ITAF) that regulates the IRES-dependent translation of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc. We showed that hnRNP A1 is methylated by PRMT5 on two residues, R218 and R225, and that this methylation facilitates the interaction of hnRNP A1 with IRES RNA to promote IRES-dependent translation. This study defines a new role for PRMT5 regulation of cellular protein levels, which goes beyond the known functions of PRMT5 as a transcription and splicing regulator. PMID:28115626

  2. Translational control by the DEAD Box RNA helicase belle regulates ecdysone-triggered transcriptional cascades.

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    Robert J Ihry

    Full Text Available Steroid hormones act, through their respective nuclear receptors, to regulate target gene expression. Despite their critical role in development, physiology, and disease, however, it is still unclear how these systemic cues are refined into tissue-specific responses. We identified a mutation in the evolutionarily conserved DEAD box RNA helicase belle/DDX3 that disrupts a subset of responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone during Drosophila melanogaster metamorphosis. We demonstrate that belle directly regulates translation of E74A, an ets transcription factor and critical component of the ecdysone-induced transcriptional cascade. Although E74A mRNA accumulates to abnormally high levels in belle mutant tissues, no E74A protein is detectable, resulting in misregulation of E74A-dependent ecdysone response genes. The accumulation of E74A mRNA in belle mutant salivary glands is a result of auto-regulation, fulfilling a prediction made by Ashburner nearly 40 years ago. In this model, Ashburner postulates that, in addition to regulating secondary response genes, protein products of primary response genes like E74A also inhibit their own ecdysone-induced transcription. Moreover, although ecdysone-triggered transcription of E74A appears to be ubiquitous during metamorphosis, belle-dependent translation of E74A mRNA is spatially restricted. These results demonstrate that translational control plays a critical, and previously unknown, role in refining transcriptional responses to the steroid hormone ecdysone.

  3. Investigation of Endogenous Retrovirus Sequences in the Neighborhood of Genes Up-regulated in a Neuroblastoma Model after Treatment with Hypoxia-Mimetic Cobalt Chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brütting, Christine; Narasimhan, Harini; Hoffmann, Frank; Kornhuber, Malte E; Staege, Martin S; Emmer, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have been found to be associated with different diseases, e.g., multiple sclerosis (MS). Most human ERVs integrated in our genome are not competent to replicate and these sequences are presumably silent. However, transcription of human ERVs can be reactivated, e.g., by hypoxia. Interestingly, MS has been linked to hypoxia since decades. As some patterns of demyelination are similar to white matter ischemia, hypoxic damage is discussed. Therefore, we are interested in the association between hypoxia and ERVs. As a model, we used human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells after treatment with the hypoxia-mimetic cobalt chloride and analyzed differences in the gene expression profiles in comparison to untreated cells. The vicinity of up-regulated genes was scanned for endogenous retrovirus-derived sequences. Five genes were found to be strongly up-regulated in SH-SY5Y cells after treatment with cobalt chloride: clusterin, glutathione peroxidase 3, insulin-like growth factor 2, solute carrier family 7 member 11, and neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 9. In the vicinity of these genes we identified large (>1,000 bp) open reading frames (ORFs). Most of these ORFs showed only low similarities to proteins from retro-transcribing viruses. However, we found very high similarity between retrovirus envelope sequences and a sequence in the vicinity of neural precursor cell expressed developmentally down-regulated protein 9. This sequence encodes the human endogenous retrovirus group FRD member 1, the encoded protein product is called syncytin 2. Transfection of syncytin 2 into the well-characterized Ewing sarcoma cell line A673 was not able to modulate the low immunostimulatory activity of this cell line. Future research is needed to determine whether the identified genes and the human endogenous retrovirus group FRD member 1 might play a role in the etiology of MS.

  4. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated...

  5. Up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by cobalt chloride correlates with proliferation and apoptosis in PC-2 cells

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    Dai Zhi-Jun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exact mechanism of the effects of hypoxia on the proliferation and apoptosis in carcinoma cells is still conflicting. This study investigated the variation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α(HIF-1α expression and the apoptosis effect of hypoxia stimulated by cobalt chloride (CoCl2 in pancreatic cancer PC-2 cells. Methods PC-2 cells were cultured with different concentration (50-200 μmol/L of CoCl2 after 24-120 hours to simulate hypoxia in vitro. The proliferation of PC-2 cells was examined by MTT assay. The cellular morphology of PC-2 cells were observed by light inverted microscope and transmission electron microscope(EM. The expression of HIF-1α on mRNA and protein level was measured by semi-quantitive RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Apoptosis of PC-2 cells were demonstrated by flow cytometry with Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining. Results MTT assay showed that the proliferation of PC-2 cells were stimulated in the first 72 h, while after treated over 72 h, a dose- dependent inhibition of cell growth could be observed. By using transmission electron microscope, swollen chondrosomes, accumulated chromatin under the nuclear membrane and apoptosis bodies were observed. Flow cytometer(FCM analysis showed the apoptosis rate was correlated with the dosage of CoCl2. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis indicated that hypoxia could up-regulate the expression of HIF-1α on both mRNA and protein levels. Conclusion Hypoxic microenvironment stimulated by CoCl2 could effectively induce apoptosis and influence cell proliferation in PC-2 cells, the mechanism could be related to up-expression of HIF-1α.

  6. Hypoxia-inducing factors as master regulators of stemness properties and altered metabolism of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating lines of experimental evidence have revealed that hypoxia-inducible factors, HIF-1α and HIF-2α, are key regulators of the adaptation of cancer- and metastasis-initiating cells and their differentiated progenies to oxygen and nutrient deprivation during cancer progression under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Particularly, the sustained stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor KIT, transforming growth factor-β receptors (TGF-βRs) and Notch and their downstream signalling elements such as phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/molecular target of rapamycin (mTOR) may lead to an enhanced activity of HIFs. Moreover, the up-regulation of HIFs in cancer cells may also occur in the hypoxic intratumoral regions formed within primary and secondary neoplasms as well as in leukaemic cells and metastatic prostate and breast cancer cells homing in the hypoxic endosteal niche of bone marrow. The activated HIFs may induce the expression of numerous gene products such as induced pluripotency-associated transcription factors (Oct-3/4, Nanog and Sox-2), glycolysis- and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programme-associated molecules, including CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4), snail and twist, microRNAs and angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These gene products in turn can play critical roles for high self-renewal ability, survival, altered energy metabolism, invasion and metastases of cancer cells, angiogenic switch and treatment resistance. Consequently, the targeting of HIF signalling network and altered metabolic pathways represents new promising strategies to eradicate the total mass of cancer cells and improve the efficacy of current therapies against aggressive and metastatic cancers and prevent disease relapse. PMID:23301832

  7. Hypoxia inducible factor-2α regulates the development of retinal astrocytic network by maintaining adequate supply of astrocyte progenitors.

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    Li-Juan Duan

    Full Text Available Here we investigate the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-2α in coordinating the development of retinal astrocytic and vascular networks. Three Cre mouse lines were used to disrupt floxed Hif-2α, including Rosa26(CreERT2, Tie2(Cre, and GFAP(Cre. Global Hif-2α disruption by Rosa26(CreERT2 led to reduced astrocytic and vascular development in neonatal retinas, whereas endothelial disruption by Tie2(Cre had no apparent effects. Hif-2α deletion in astrocyte progenitors by GFAP(Cre significantly interfered with the development of astrocytic networks, which failed to reach the retinal periphery and were incapable of supporting vascular development. Perplexingly, the abundance of strongly GFAP(+ mature astrocytes transiently increased at P0 before they began to lag behind the normal controls by P3. Pax2(+ and PDGFRα(+ astrocytic progenitors and immature astrocytes were dramatically diminished at all stages examined. Despite decreased number of astrocyte progenitors, their proliferation index or apoptosis was not altered. The above data can be reconciled by proposing that HIF-2α is required for maintaining the supply of astrocyte progenitors by slowing down their differentiation into non-proliferative mature astrocytes. HIF-2α deficiency in astrocyte progenitors may accelerate their differentiation into astrocytes, a change which greatly interferes with the replenishment of astrocyte progenitors due to insufficient time for proliferation. Rapidly declining progenitor supply may lead to premature cessation of astrocyte development. Given that HIF-2α protein undergoes oxygen dependent degradation, an interesting possibility is that retinal blood vessels may regulate astrocyte differentiation through their oxygen delivery function. While our findings support the consensus that retinal astrocytic template guides vascular development, they also raise the possibility that astrocytic and vascular networks may mutually regulate each other

  8. Meta-analysis of archived DNA microarrays identifies genes regulated by hypoxia and involved in a metastatic phenotype in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre, Michael; DeHertogh, Benoît; Gaigneaux, Anthoula; DeMeulder, Bertrand; Berger, Fabrice; Bareke, Eric; Michiels, Carine; Depiereux, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cancer-related cause of death. Recent studies have described metastasis pathways. However, the exact contribution of each pathway remains unclear. Another key feature of a tumor is the presence of hypoxic areas caused by a lack of oxygen at the center of the tumor. Hypoxia leads to the expression of pro-metastatic genes as well as the repression of anti-metastatic genes. As many Affymetrix datasets about metastasis and hypoxia are publicly available and not fully exploited, this study proposes to re-analyze these datasets to extract new information about the metastatic phenotype induced by hypoxia in different cancer cell lines. Affymetrix datasets about metastasis and/or hypoxia were downloaded from GEO and ArrayExpress. AffyProbeMiner and GCRMA packages were used for pre-processing and the Window Welch t test was used for processing. Three approaches of meta-analysis were eventually used for the selection of genes of interest. Three complementary approaches were used, that eventually selected 183 genes of interest. Out of these 183 genes, 99, among which the well known JUNB, FOS and TP63, have already been described in the literature to be involved in cancer. Moreover, 39 genes of those, such as SERPINE1 and MMP7, are known to regulate metastasis. Twenty-one genes including VEGFA and ID2 have also been described to be involved in the response to hypoxia. Lastly, DAVID classified those 183 genes in 24 different pathways, among which 8 are directly related to cancer while 5 others are related to proliferation and cell motility. A negative control composed of 183 random genes failed to provide such results. Interestingly, 6 pathways retrieved by DAVID with the 183 genes of interest concern pathogen recognition and phagocytosis. The proposed methodology was able to find genes actually known to be involved in cancer, metastasis and hypoxia and, thus, we propose that the other genes selected based on the same methodology are of prime interest in

  9. PACAP and VIP inhibit the invasiveness of glioblastoma cells exposed to hypoxia through the regulation of HIFs and EGFR expression

    OpenAIRE

    Grazia eMaugeri; Agata Grazia eD'Amico; Agata Grazia eD'Amico; Rita eReitano; Gaetano eMagro; Sebastiano eCavallaro; Salvatore eSalomone; Velia eD'Agata

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) through the binding of vasoactive intestinal peptide receptors (VIPRs), perform a wide variety of effects in human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). This tumor is characterized by extensive areas of hypoxia, which triggers the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs not only mediate angiogenesis but also tumor cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, HIFs activation...

  10. Identification of nuclear protein targets for six leukemogenic tyrosine kinases governed by post-translational regulation.

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    Andrew Pierce

    Full Text Available Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases.

  11. The β3-Integrin Binding Protein β3-Endonexin Is a Novel Negative Regulator of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kračun, Damir; Rieß, Florian; Kanchev, Ivan; Gawaz, Meinrad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Integrins are multifunctional heterodimeric adhesion receptors that mediate the attachment between a cell and the extracellular matrix or other surrounding cells. In endothelial cells, integrins can modulate cell migration and motility. In particular, β3-integrin is expressed in angiogenic vessels. Signal transduction by β3-integrins requires the recruitment of intracellular signaling molecules. β3-endonexin is a highly spliced molecule that has been identified as a β3-integrin binding protein. β3-endonexin isoforms are expressed in endothelial cells and have been suggested to act as shuttle proteins between the membrane and the nucleus. However, their functional role in angiogenesis is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether β3-endonexin isoforms are involved in endothelial angiogenic processes under hypoxia. Results: The overexpression of β3-endonexin isoforms decreased endothelial proliferation and tube formation under hypoxia, while the depletion of β3-endonexin by RNAi promoted angiogenic responses in vitro and in vivo. In hypoxia, β3-endonexin accumulated in the nucleus, and prevention of this response by depletion of β3-endonexin increased hypoxic activation and induction of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and its target genes VEGF and PAI-1. β3-endonexin diminished nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activation and decreased NFκB binding to the HIF-1α promoter under hypoxia, subsequently diminishing NFκB-dependent transcription of HIF-1α under hypoxia. Innovation: Our results indicate for the first time that the overexpression of β3-endonexin can decrease hypoxic induction and activation of HIF-1α and can prevent hypoxic endothelial proliferation and angiogenic responses. Conclusion: β3-endonexin can act as a novel anti-angiogenic factor specifically in the response to hypoxia due to its negative impact on the activation of HIF-1. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1964–1976. PMID:24386901

  12. Apigenin ameliorates hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy and down-regulates cardiac hypoxia inducible factor-lα in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zeng-Yan; Gao, Tian; Huang, Yan; Xue, Jie; Xie, Mei-Lin

    2016-04-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavonoid compound that can inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression in cultured tumor cells under hypoxic conditions. Hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy is always accompanied by abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism due to an increase of HIF-1α. However, whether or not apigenin may ameliorate the cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism remains unknown. This study aimed to examine the effects of apigenin. Rats with cardiac hypertrophy induced by renovascular hypertension were treated with apigenin 50-100 mg kg(-1) (the doses can be achieved by pharmacological or dietary supplementation for an adult person) by gavage for 4 weeks. The results showed that after treatment with apigenin, the blood pressure, heart weight, heart weight index, cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area, serum angiotensin II, and serum and myocardial free fatty acids were reduced. It is important to note that apigenin decreased the expression level of myocardial HIF-1α protein. Moreover, apigenin simultaneously increased the expression levels of myocardial peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT)-1, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)-4 proteins and decreased the expression levels of myocardial PPARγ, glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase genes (GPAT), and glucose transporter (GLUT)-4 proteins. These findings demonstrated that apigenin could improve hypertensive cardiac hypertrophy and abnormal myocardial glucolipid metabolism in rats, and its mechanisms might be associated with the down-regulation of myocardial HIF-1α expression and, subsequently increasing the expressions of myocardial PPARα and its target genes CPT-1 and PDK-4, and decreasing the expressions of myocardial PPARγ and its target genes GPAT and GLUT-4.

  13. Translation Initiation from Conserved Non-AUG Codons Provides Additional Layers of Regulation and Coding Capacity

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    Ivaylo P. Ivanov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurospora crassa cpc-1 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae GCN4 are homologs specifying transcription activators that drive the transcriptional response to amino acid limitation. The cpc-1 mRNA contains two upstream open reading frames (uORFs in its >700-nucleotide (nt 5′ leader, and its expression is controlled at the level of translation in response to amino acid starvation. We used N. crassa cell extracts and obtained data indicating that cpc-1 uORF1 and uORF2 are functionally analogous to GCN4 uORF1 and uORF4, respectively, in controlling translation. We also found that the 5′ region upstream of the main coding sequence of the cpc-1 mRNA extends for more than 700 nucleotides without any in-frame stop codon. For 100 cpc-1 homologs from Pezizomycotina and from selected Basidiomycota, 5′ conserved extensions of the CPC1 reading frame are also observed. Multiple non-AUG near-cognate codons (NCCs in the CPC1 reading frame upstream of uORF2, some deeply conserved, could potentially initiate translation. At least four NCCs initiated translation in vitro. In vivo data were consistent with initiation at NCCs to produce N-terminally extended N. crassa CPC1 isoforms. The pivotal role played by CPC1, combined with its translational regulation by uORFs and NCC utilization, underscores the emerging significance of noncanonical initiation events in controlling gene expression.

  14. Asymmetric distribution of hypoxia-inducible factor α regulates dorsoventral axis establishment in the early sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Li, Han-Ru; Pai, Chih-Yu; Chen, Jen-Hao; Su, Yi-Hsien

    2017-08-15

    Hypoxia signaling is an ancient pathway by which animals can respond to low oxygen. Malfunction of this pathway disturbs hypoxic acclimation and can result in various diseases, including cancers. The role of hypoxia signaling in early embryogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that in the blastula of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus , hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα), the downstream transcription factor of the hypoxia pathway, is localized and transcriptionally active on the future dorsal side. This asymmetric distribution is attributable to its oxygen-sensing ability. Manipulations of the HIFα level entrained the dorsoventral axis, as the side with the higher level of HIFα tends to develop into the dorsal side. Gene expression analyses revealed that HIFα restricts the expression of nodal to the ventral side and activates several genes encoding transcription factors on the dorsal side. We also observed that intrinsic hypoxic signals in the early embryos formed a gradient, which was disrupted under hypoxic conditions. Our results reveal an unprecedented role of the hypoxia pathway in animal development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Chronic Prenatal Hypoxia Down-Regulated BK Channel Β1 Subunits in Mesenteric Artery Smooth Muscle Cells of the Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailin Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic hypoxia in utero could impair vascular functions in the offspring, underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study investigated functional alteration in large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels in offspring mesenteric arteries following prenatal hypoxia. Methods: Pregnant rats were exposed to normoxic control (21% O2, Con or hypoxic (10.5% O2, Hy conditions from gestational day 5 to 21, their 7-month-old adult male offspring were tested for blood pressure, vascular BK channel functions and expression using patch clamp and wire myograh technique, western blotting, and qRT-PCR. Results: Prenatal hypoxia increased pressor responses and vasoconstrictions to phenylephrine in the offspring. Whole-cell currents density of BK channels and amplitude of spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs, not the frequency, were significantly reduced in Hy vascular myocytes. The sensitivity of BK channels to voltage, Ca2+, and tamoxifen were reduced in Hy myocytes, whereas the number of channels per patch and the single-channel conductance were unchanged. Prenatal hypoxia impaired NS1102- and tamoxifen-mediated relaxation in mesenteric arteries precontracted with phenylephrine in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. The mRNA and protein expression of BK channel β1, not the α-subunit, was decreased in Hy mesenteric arteries. Conclusions: Impaired BK channel β1-subunits in vascular smooth muscle cells contributed to vascular dysfunction in the offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia.

  16. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicknell, Katrina; Brooks, Gavin; Kaiser, Pete; Chen Hongying; Dove, Brian K.; Hiscox, Julian A.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally

  17. Celecoxib Down-Regulates the Hypoxia-Induced Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF Through the PI3K/AKT Pathway in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

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    Yi-zhou Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The goal of this study was to detect the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in human retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells treated with celecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitor, under hypoxic and normoxic conditions and to explore the signaling mechanism involved in regulating the hypoxia-induced expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in RPE cells. Methods: D407 cells were cultured in normoxic or hypoxic conditions, with or without celecoxib or a PI3K inhibitor (LY294002. The anti-proliferative effect of celecoxib was assessed using the MTT assay. RT-PCR, Western blotting and ELISA were performed to detect the levels of PI3K, phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT, HIF-1α, VEGF and COX-2. Results: Celecoxib inhibited the proliferation of RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. Celecoxib suppressed the expression of VEGF at both the mRNA and protein levels and decreased HIF-1α protein expression. HIF-1α activation was regulated by the PI3K/AKT pathway. The celecoxib-induced down-regulation of HIF-1α and VEGF required the suppression of the hypoxia-induced PI3K/AKT pathway. However, the down-regulation of COX-2 did not occur in cells treated with celecoxib. Conclusions: The antiangiogenic effects of celecoxib in RPE cells under hypoxic conditions resulted from the inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF expression, which may be partly mediated by a COX-2-independent, PI3K/AKT-dependent pathway.

  18. Dengue virus-induced regulation of the host cell translational machinery

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    C.S.A. Villas-Bôas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DV-induced changes in the host cell protein synthesis machinery are not well understood. We investigated the transcriptional changes related to initiation of protein synthesis. The human hepatoma cell line, HepG2, was infected with DV serotype 2 for 1 h at a multiplicity of infection of one. RNA was extracted after 6, 24 and 48 h. Microarray results showed that 36.5% of the translation factors related to initiation of protein synthesis had significant differential expression (Z-score ≥ ±2.0. Confirmation was obtained by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. Of the genes involved in the activation of mRNA for cap-dependent translation (eIF4 factors, eIF4A, eIF4G1 and eIF4B were up-regulated while the negative regulator of translation eIF4E-BP3 was down-regulated. This activation was transient since at 24 h post-infection levels were not significantly different from control cells. However, at 48 h post-infection, eIF4A, eIF4E, eIF4G1, eIF4G3, eIF4B, and eIF4E-BP3 were down-regulated, suggesting that cap-dependent translation could be inhibited during the progression of infection. To test this hypothesis, phosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1, which induce cap-dependent protein synthesis, was assayed. Both proteins remained phosphorylated when assayed at 6 h after infection, while infection induced dephosphorylation of p70S6K and 4E-BP1 at 24 and 48 h of infection, respectively. Taken together, these results provide biological evidence suggesting that in HepG2 cells DV sustains activation of the cap-dependent machinery at early stages of infection, but progression of infection switches protein synthesis to a cap-independent process.

  19. Influence exerted by new pyrimidine derivatives on cerebral circulation auto-regulation and vasodilatating function of vessels endothelium in rats' brains under chronic hemic hypoxia

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    A.V. Voronkov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Our research goal was to examine influences exerted by new pyrimidine derivatives coded as BL0 and BL2 on cerebral hemodynamics auto-regulation parameters and vasodilatating function of vessels endothelium as risk factors causing ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes under chronic hemic hypoxia. We performed an experiment on white Wistar rats to prove that endothelial dysfunction which evolves under chronic hemic hypoxia leads to disorders in endothelium-mediated mechanisms for cerebral circulation auto-regulation in rats. We modeled hypoxia in animals via granting them free access to 0.2 % sodium nitrite solution instead of ordinary drinking water. Endothelial dysfunction was confirmed as per disorders in vasodilatation and vasoconstriction reactions at intravenous introduction of acetyl choline (0.1 mg/kg and methyl ether hydrochloride nitro-L-arginine (10 mg/kg. Cerebral blood flow speed was measured with MM-D-K-Minimax v.2.1. ultrasound Doppler. We assessed cerebral circulation auto-regulation as per compression test results which allowed us to calculate overshoot coefficient and auto-regulation power. Examined pyrimidine derivatives and comparison preparations were introduced orally 60 minutes prior to taking readings. Mexidol doses were calculated on the basis of interspecific recalculation of a maximum daily dose for a man. Nicergoline dose was taken as a most effective one as per literature data. When new pyrimidine derivatives BL0 and BL2 are applied under chronic hemic hypoxia, it causes overshoot coefficient to grow authentically higher than in a negative control group but it doesn't exert any positive influence on collateral reserve parameter, namely auto-regulation power. BL0 and BL2 improve endothelium vasodilatating function at intravenous acetylcholine introduction (0.1 mg/kg and don't exert any influence on vasoconstricting function at L-NAME intravenous introduction (10 mg/kg. The examined substance BL0 has more apparent

  20. cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB) and NF-κB Transcription Factors Are Activated during Prolonged Hypoxia and Cooperatively Regulate the Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinase MMP1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Koh

    2013-01-01

    Responses to low levels of oxygen (hypoxia) are essential to maintain homeostasis. During the hypoxic response, gene expression is altered by various transcription factors. The transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), plays a central role in the hypoxic response. The α subunit of HIF, which is actively degraded during normoxia, becomes stabilized during hypoxia, which leads to HIF activation. A microarray analysis of HeLa cells showed that expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) was markedly induced during prolonged hypoxia. CREB and NF-κB binding sites were identified in the MMP1 promoter region between 1945 and 1896 nucleotides upstream of the transcription start site. Assays with luciferase reporters demonstrated that HIF activity was induced during the early phase of hypoxia, whereas CREB and NF-κB were activated during the later (prolonged) phase. Depletion of CREB and/or NF-κB reduced MMP1 induction during prolonged hypoxia both at the mRNA and protein levels. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated binding of CREB and NF-κB to the MMP1 promoter. Finally, cell migration and invasion on a collagen matrix and pulmonary metastasis in nude mice were inhibited after depletion of CREB and NF-κB in MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the cooperative action of CREB and NF-κB plays an important role to induce MMP1 expression during prolonged hypoxia and regulates cell migration and invasion in cancer cells. PMID:23775082

  1. Molecular basis for the regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α levels by 2-deoxy-D-ribose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ryuji; Tabata, Sho; Tajitsu, Yusuke; Nishizawa, Yukihiko; Minami, Kentaro; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Shinsato, Yoshinari; Akiyama, Shin-Ichi; Yamada, Katsushi; Takeda, Yasuo

    2013-09-01

    The angiogenic factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor/thymidine phosphorylase (PD-ECGF/TP), stimulates the chemotaxis of endothelial cells and confers resistance to apoptosis induced by hypoxia. 2-Deoxy-D-ribose, a degradation product of thymidine generated by TP enzymatic activity, inhibits the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1α, BNIP3 and caspase-3 induced by hypoxia. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for the suppressive effect of 2-deoxy-D-ribose on the upregulation of HIF-1α. 2-Deoxy-D-ribose enhanced the interaction of HIF-1α and the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein under hypoxic conditions. It did not affect the expression of HIF-1α, prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)1/2/3 and VHL mRNA under normoxic or hypoxic conditions, but enhanced the interaction of HIF-1α and PHD2 under hypoxic conditions. 2-Deoxy-D-ribose also increased the amount of hydroxy-HIF-1α in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG-132. The expression levels of TP are elevated in many types of malignant solid tumors and, thus, 2-deoxy-D-ribose generated by TP in these tumors may play an important role in tumor progression by preventing hypoxia-induced apoptosis.

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Lipid Droplet-Associated Is Not a Direct Physiological Regulator of Lipolysis in Adipose Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dijk, Wieneke; Mattijssen, Frits; de la Rosa Rodriguez, Montserrat

    2017-01-01

    Triglycerides are stored in specialized organelles called lipid droplets. Numerous proteins have been shown to be physically associated with lipid droplets and govern their function. Previously, the protein hypoxia-inducible lipid droplet-associated (HILPDA) was localized to lipid droplets and wa...

  3. Regulation of the tumor suppressor PML by sequential post-translational modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, M. Lienhard; Grishina, Inna

    2012-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate multiple biological functions of the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and also the fission, disassembly, and rebuilding of PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) during the cell cycle. Pathway-specific PML modification patterns ensure proper signal output from PML-NBs that suit the specific functional requirements. Here we comprehensively review the signaling pathways and enzymes that modify PML and also the oncogenic PML-RARα fusion protein. Many PTMs occur in a hierarchical and timely organized fashion. Phosphorylation or acetylation constitutes typical starting points for many PML modifying events, while degradative ubiquitination is an irreversible end point of the modification cascade. As this hierarchical organization of PTMs frequently turns phosphorylation events as primordial events, kinases or phosphatases regulating PML phosphorylation may be interesting drug targets to manipulate the downstream modifications and thus the stability and function of PML or PML-RARα.

  4. Promising effects of xanthine oxidase inhibition by allopurinol on autonomic heart regulation estimated by heart rate variability (HRV analysis in rats exposed to hypoxia and hyperoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Zajączkowski

    Full Text Available It has long been suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS play a role in oxygen sensing via peripheral chemoreceptors, which would imply their involvement in chemoreflex activation and autonomic regulation of heart rate. We hypothesize that antioxidant affect neurogenic cardiovascular regulation through activation of chemoreflex which results in increased control of sympathetic mechanism regulating heart rhythm. Activity of xanthine oxidase (XO, which is among the major endogenous sources of ROS in the rat has been shown to increase during hypoxia promote oxidative stress. However, the mechanism of how XO inhibition affects neurogenic regulation of heart rhythm is still unclear.The study aimed to evaluate effects of allopurinol-driven inhibition of XO on autonomic heart regulation in rats exposed to hypoxia followed by hyperoxia, using heart rate variability (HRV analysis.16 conscious male Wistar rats (350 g: control-untreated (N = 8 and pretreated with Allopurinol-XO inhibitor (5 mg/kg, followed by 50 mg/kg, administered intraperitoneally (N = 8, were exposed to controlled hypobaric hypoxia (1h in order to activate chemoreflex. The treatment was followed by 1h hyperoxia (chemoreflex suppression. Time-series of 1024 RR-intervals were extracted from 4kHz ECG recording for heart rate variability (HRV analysis in order to calculate the following time-domain parameters: mean RR interval (RRi, SDNN (standard deviation of all normal NN intervals, rMSSD (square root of the mean of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals, frequency-domain parameters (FFT method: TSP (total spectral power as well as low and high frequency band powers (LF and HF. At the end of experiment we used rat plasma to evaluate enzymatic activity of XO and markers of oxidative stress: protein carbonyl group and 8-isoprostane concentrations. Enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were measures in erythrocyte

  5. Promising effects of xanthine oxidase inhibition by allopurinol on autonomic heart regulation estimated by heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in rats exposed to hypoxia and hyperoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowski, Wiesław; Badtke, Piotr; Zajączkowski, Miłosz A.; Flis, Damian J.; Figarski, Adam; Smolińska-Bylańska, Maria; Wierzba, Tomasz H.

    2018-01-01

    Background It has long been suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a role in oxygen sensing via peripheral chemoreceptors, which would imply their involvement in chemoreflex activation and autonomic regulation of heart rate. We hypothesize that antioxidant affect neurogenic cardiovascular regulation through activation of chemoreflex which results in increased control of sympathetic mechanism regulating heart rhythm. Activity of xanthine oxidase (XO), which is among the major endogenous sources of ROS in the rat has been shown to increase during hypoxia promote oxidative stress. However, the mechanism of how XO inhibition affects neurogenic regulation of heart rhythm is still unclear. Aim The study aimed to evaluate effects of allopurinol-driven inhibition of XO on autonomic heart regulation in rats exposed to hypoxia followed by hyperoxia, using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. Material and methods 16 conscious male Wistar rats (350 g): control-untreated (N = 8) and pretreated with Allopurinol-XO inhibitor (5 mg/kg, followed by 50 mg/kg), administered intraperitoneally (N = 8), were exposed to controlled hypobaric hypoxia (1h) in order to activate chemoreflex. The treatment was followed by 1h hyperoxia (chemoreflex suppression). Time-series of 1024 RR-intervals were extracted from 4kHz ECG recording for heart rate variability (HRV) analysis in order to calculate the following time-domain parameters: mean RR interval (RRi), SDNN (standard deviation of all normal NN intervals), rMSSD (square root of the mean of the squares of differences between adjacent NN intervals), frequency-domain parameters (FFT method): TSP (total spectral power) as well as low and high frequency band powers (LF and HF). At the end of experiment we used rat plasma to evaluate enzymatic activity of XO and markers of oxidative stress: protein carbonyl group and 8-isoprostane concentrations. Enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione

  6. Amyloid Precursor Protein Translation Is Regulated by a 3'UTR Guanine Quadruplex.

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    Ezekiel Crenshaw

    Full Text Available A central event in Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ peptides generated by the proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP. APP overexpression leads to increased Aβ generation and Alzheimer's disease in humans and altered neuronal migration and increased long term depression in mice. Conversely, reduction of APP expression results in decreased Aβ levels in mice as well as impaired learning and memory and decreased numbers of dendritic spines. Together these findings indicate that therapeutic interventions that aim to restore APP and Aβ levels must do so within an ideal range. To better understand the effects of modulating APP levels, we explored the mechanisms regulating APP expression focusing on post-transcriptional regulation. Such regulation can be mediated by RNA regulatory elements such as guanine quadruplexes (G-quadruplexes, non-canonical structured RNA motifs that affect RNA stability and translation. Via a bioinformatics approach, we identified a candidate G-quadruplex within the APP mRNA in its 3'UTR (untranslated region at residues 3008-3027 (NM_201414.2. This sequence exhibited characteristics of a parallel G-quadruplex structure as revealed by circular dichroism spectrophotometry. Further, as with other G-quadruplexes, the formation of this structure was dependent on the presence of potassium ions. This G-quadruplex has no apparent role in regulating transcription or mRNA stability as wild type and mutant constructs exhibited equivalent mRNA levels as determined by real time PCR. Instead, we demonstrate that this G-quadruplex negatively regulates APP protein expression using dual luciferase reporter and Western blot analysis. Taken together, our studies reveal post-transcriptional regulation by a 3'UTR G-quadruplex as a novel mechanism regulating APP expression.

  7. A vigilant, hypoxia-regulated heme oxygenase-1 gene vector in the heart limits cardiac injury after ischemia-reperfusion in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao Liang; Qian, Keping; Zhang, Y Clare; Shen, Leping; Phillips, M Ian

    2005-12-01

    The effect of a cardiac specific, hypoxia-regulated, human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) vector to provide cardioprotection from ischemia-reperfusion injury was assessed. When myocardial ischemia and reperfusion is asymptomatic, the damaging effects are cumulative and patients miss timely treatment. A gene therapy approach that expresses therapeutic genes only when ischemia is experienced is a desirable strategy. We have developed a cardiac-specific, hypoxia-regulated gene therapy "vigilant vector'' system that amplifies cardioprotective gene expression. Vigilant hHO-1 plasmids, LacZ plasmids, or saline (n = 40 per group) were injected into mouse heart 2 days in advance of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Animals were exposed to 60 minutes of ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. For that term (24 hours) effects, the protein levels of HO-1, inflammatory responses, apoptosis, and infarct size were determined. For long-term (3 week) effects, the left ventricular remodeling and recovery of cardiac function were assessed. Ischemia-reperfusion resulted in a timely overexpression of HO-1 protein. Infarct size at 24 hours after ischemia-reperfusion was significantly reduced in the HO-1-treated animals compared with the LacZ-treated group or saline-treated group (P < .001). The reduction of infarct size was accompanied by a decrease in lipid peroxidant activity, inflammatory cell infiltration, and proapoptotic protein level in ischemia-reperfusion-injured myocardium. The long-term study demonstrated that timely, hypoxia-induced HO-1 overexpression is beneficial in conserving cardiac function and attenuating left ventricle remodelling. The vigilant HO-1 vector provides a protective therapy in the heart for reducing cellular damage during ischemia-reperfusion injury and preserving heart function.

  8. Deregulation of cap-dependent mRNA translation increases tumour radiosensitivity through reduction of the hypoxic fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouschop, Kasper M.A.; Dubois, Ludwig; Schaaf, Marco B.E.; Beucken, Twan van den; Lieuwes, Natasja; Keulers, Tom G.H.; Savelkouls, Kim G.M.; Bussink, Johan; Kogel, Albert J. van der; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tumour hypoxia is an important limiting factor in the successful treatment of cancer. Adaptation to hypoxia includes inhibition of mTOR, causing scavenging of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), the rate-limiting factor for cap-dependent translation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of preventing mTOR-dependent translation inhibition on hypoxic cell survival and tumour sensitivity towards irradiation. Material and methods: The effect of eIF4E-overexpression on cell proliferation, hypoxia-tolerance, and radiation sensitivity was assessed using isogenic, inducible U373 and HCT116 cells. Results: We found that eIF4E-overexpression significantly enhanced proliferation of cells under normal conditions, but not during hypoxia, caused by increased cell death during hypoxia. Furthermore, eIF4E-overexpression stimulated overall rates of tumour growth, but resulted in selective loss of hypoxic cells in established tumours and increased levels of necrosis. This markedly increased overall tumour sensitivity to irradiation. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that hypoxia induced inhibition of translational control through regulation of eIF4E is an important mediator of hypoxia tolerance and radioresistance of tumours. These data also demonstrate that deregulation of metabolic pathways such as mTOR can influence the proliferation and survival of tumour cells experiencing metabolic stress in opposite ways of nutrient replete cells.

  9. Oxygen-dependent regulation of aquaporin-3 expression

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    Hoogewijs D

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available David Hoogewijs,1,2 Melanie Vogler,3 Eveline Zwenger,3 Sabine Krull,3 Anke Zieseniss3 1Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany; 2Institute of Physiology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Cardiovascular Physiology, University Medical Center Göttingen, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, GermanyAbstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether aquaporin-3 (AQP3 expression is altered in hypoxia and whether hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1 regulates the hypoxic expression. AQP3 mRNA expression was studied in L929 fibrosarcoma cells and in several tissues derived from mice that were subjected to hypoxia. Computational analysis of the AQP3 promoter revealed conserved HIF binding sites within close proximity to the translational start site, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed binding of HIF-1 to the endogenous hypoxia response elements. Furthermore, hypoxia resulted in increased expression of AQP3 mRNA in L929 fibrosarcoma cells. Consistently, shRNA-mediated knockdown of HIF-1 greatly reduced the hypoxic induction of AQP3. In addition, mRNA analysis of organs from mice exposed to inspiratory hypoxia demonstrated pronounced hypoxia-inducible expression of AQP3 in the kidney. Overall, our findings suggest that AQP3 expression can be regulated at the transcriptional level and that AQP3 represents a novel HIF-1 target gene. Keywords: transcriptional regulation, oxygen, hypoxia-inducible factor, hypoxia response element

  10. Investigating the Regulation and Potential Role of Nonhypoxic Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1 (HIF 1) in Aromatase Inhibitor Resistant Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    hypoxia response element ( HRE , 5’-GCGTG- 3’) occurs under basal conditions in LTLTCa cells and is significantly decreased by treatment with HER2...inhibitor lapatinib. Experiments to accomplish this task for vimentin were completed and reported in the 2014 annual summary. A potential HRE was located... HRE to which HIF-1 binds, were used for real-time PCR. ChIP real-time PCR results are expressed as the fold increase, compared with vehicle-treated

  11. Effect of hypoxia on cerebral blood flow regulation during rest and exercise : role of cerebral oxygen delivery on performance

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, J.-L.

    2014-01-01

    Adequate supply of oxygen to the brain is critical for maintaining normal brain function. Severe hypoxia, such as that experienced during high altitude ascent, presents a unique challenge to brain oxygen (O2) supply. During high-intensity exercise, hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia leads to cerebral vasoconstriction, followed by reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen delivery (DO2), and tissue oxygenation. This reduced O2 supply to the brain could potentially account for the reduce...

  12. Bi-polarized translation of ascidian maternal mRNA determinant pem-1 associated with regulators of the translation machinery on cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum (cER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paix, Alexandre; Le Nguyen, Phuong Ngan; Sardet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Polarized cortical mRNA determinants such as maternal macho-1 and pem-1 in ascidians, like budding yeast mating factor ASH1 reside on the cER-mRNA domain a subdomain of cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum(ER) and are translated in its vicinity. Using high resolution imaging and isolated cortical fragments prepared from eggs and embryos we now find that macho-1 and pem-1 RNAs co-localize with phospho-protein regulators of translation initiation (MnK/4EBP/S6K). Translation of cortical pem-1 RNA follows its bi-polarized relocalization. About 10 min after fertilization or artificial activation with a calcium ionophore, PEM1 protein is detected in the vegetal cortex in the vicinity of pem-1 RNA. About 40 min after fertilization-when pem-1 RNA and P-MnK move to the posterior pole-PEM1 protein remains in place forming a network of cortical patches anchored at the level of the zygote plasma membrane before disappearing. Cortical PEM1 protein is detected again at the 4 cell stage in the posterior centrosome attracting body (CAB) region where the cER-mRNA domain harboring pem-1/P-MnK/P-4EBP/P-S6K is concentrated. Bi-polarized PEM1 protein signals are not detected when pem-1 morpholinos are injected into eggs or zygotes or when MnK is inhibited. We propose that localized translation of the pem-1 RNA determinant is triggered by the fertilization/calcium wave and that the process is controlled by phospho-protein regulators of translation initiation co-localized with the RNA determinant on a sub-domain of the cortical Endoplasmic Reticulum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Human TM9SF4 Is a New Gene Down-Regulated by Hypoxia and Involved in Cell Adhesion of Leukemic Cells.

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    Rosa Paolillo

    Full Text Available The transmembrane 9 superfamily protein member 4, TM9SF4, belongs to the TM9SF family of proteins highly conserved through evolution. TM9SF4 homologs, previously identified in many different species, were mainly involved in cellular adhesion, innate immunity and phagocytosis. In human, the function and biological significance of TM9SF4 are currently under investigation. However, TM9SF4 was found overexpressed in human metastatic melanoma and in a small subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AMLs and myelodysplastic syndromes, consistent with an oncogenic function of this gene.In this study, we first analyzed the expression and regulation of TM9SF4 in normal and leukemic cells and identified TM9SF4 as a gene highly expressed in human quiescent CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs, regulated during monocytic and granulocytic differentiation of HPCs, both lineages giving rise to mature myeloid cells involved in adhesion, phagocytosis and immunity. Then, we found that TM9SF4 is markedly overexpressed in leukemic cells and in AMLs, particularly in M2, M3 and M4 AMLs (i.e., in AMLs characterized by the presence of a more or less differentiated granulocytic progeny, as compared to normal CD34+ HPCs. Proliferation and differentiation of HPCs occurs in hypoxia, a physiological condition in bone marrow, but also a crucial component of cancer microenvironment. Here, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on TM9SF4 expression in leukemic cells and identified TM9SF4 as a direct target of HIF-1α, downregulated in these cells by hypoxia. Then, we found that the hypoxia-mediated downregulation of TM9SF4 expression is associated with a decrease of cell adhesion of leukemic cells to fibronectin, thus demonstrating that human TM9SF4 is a new molecule involved in leukemic cell adhesion.Altogether, our study reports for the first time the expression of TM9SF4 at the level of normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells and its marked expression at the level of AMLs

  14. Regulation of multispanning membrane protein topology via post-translational annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-09-26

    The canonical mechanism for multispanning membrane protein topogenesis suggests that protein topology is established during cotranslational membrane integration. However, this mechanism is inconsistent with the behavior of EmrE, a dual-topology protein for which the mutation of positively charged loop residues, even close to the C-terminus, leads to dramatic shifts in its topology. We use coarse-grained simulations to investigate the Sec-facilitated membrane integration of EmrE and its mutants on realistic biological timescales. This work reveals a mechanism for regulating membrane-protein topogenesis, in which initially misintegrated configurations of the proteins undergo post-translational annealing to reach fully integrated multispanning topologies. The energetic barriers associated with this post-translational annealing process enforce kinetic pathways that dictate the topology of the fully integrated proteins. The proposed mechanism agrees well with the experimentally observed features of EmrE topogenesis and provides a range of experimentally testable predictions regarding the effect of translocon mutations on membrane protein topogenesis.

  15. A Heme-Sensing Mechanism in the Translational Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C.; Fontanesi, Flavia; Myers, Richard S.; Hamel, Patrice; Barrientos, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Heme plays fundamental roles as cofactor and signaling molecule in multiple pathways devoted to oxygen sensing and utilization in aerobic organisms. For cellular respiration, heme serves as a prosthetic group in electron transfer proteins and redox enzymes. Here we report that in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae a heme-sensing mechanism translationally controls the biogenesis of cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the terminal mitochondrial respiratory chain enzyme. We show that Mss51, a COX1 mRNA-specific translational activator and Cox1 chaperone, which coordinates Cox1 synthesis in mitoribosomes with its assembly in COX, is a heme-binding protein. Mss51 contains two heme regulatory motifs or Cys-Pro-X domains located in its N-terminus. Using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we have demonstrated that these motifs are important for heme binding and efficient performance of Mss51 functions. We conclude that heme sensing by Mss51 regulates COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production. PMID:23217259

  16. A pea chloroplast translation elongation factor that is regulated by abiotic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Mishra, R.N.; Agarwal, Pradeep K.; Goswami, Mamta; Nair, Suresh; Sopory, S.K.; Reddy, M.K.

    2004-01-01

    We report the cloning and characterization of both the cDNA (tufA) and genomic clones encoding for a chloroplast translation elongation factor (EF-Tu) from pea. The analysis of the deduced amino acids of the cDNA clone reveals the presence of putative transit peptide sequence and four GTP binding domains and two EF-Tu signature motifs in the mature polypeptide region. Using in vivo immunostaining followed by confocal microscopy pea EF-Tu was localized to chloroplast. The steady state transcript level of pea tufA was high in leaves and not detectable in roots. The expression of this gene is stimulated by light. The differential expression of this gene in response to various abiotic stresses showed that it is down-regulated in response to salinity and ABA and up-regulated in response to low temperature and salicylic acid treatment. These results indicate that regulation of pea tufA may have an important role in plant adaptation to environmental stresses

  17. Developmentally Regulated Post-translational Modification of Nucleoplasmin Controls Histone Sequestration and Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Onikubo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nucleoplasmin (Npm is an abundant histone chaperone in vertebrate oocytes and embryos. During embryogenesis, regulation of Npm histone binding is critical for its function in storing and releasing maternal histones to establish and maintain the zygotic epigenome. Here, we demonstrate that Xenopus laevis Npm post-translational modifications (PTMs specific to the oocyte and egg promote either histone deposition or sequestration, respectively. Mass spectrometry and Npm phosphomimetic mutations used in chromatin assembly assays identified hyperphosphorylation on the N-terminal tail as a critical regulator for sequestration. C-terminal tail phosphorylation and PRMT5-catalyzed arginine methylation enhance nucleosome assembly by promoting histone interaction with the second acidic tract of Npm. Electron microscopy reconstructions of Npm and TTLL4 activity toward the C-terminal tail demonstrate that oocyte- and egg-specific PTMs cause Npm conformational changes. Our results reveal that PTMs regulate Npm chaperoning activity by modulating Npm conformation and Npm-histone interaction, leading to histone sequestration in the egg.

  18. Self-Regulation and Mechanisms of Action in Psychotherapy: A Theory-Based Translational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauman, Timothy J.; Goetz, Elena L.; Detloff, Allison M.; MacDuffie, Katherine E.; Zaunmüller, Luisa; Lutz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Psychotherapy is a complex, multi-layered process with the potential to bring about changes at multiple levels of functioning, from the neurobiology of the brain to the individual’s role in the social world. Although studies of the mechanisms by which psychotherapy leads to change continue to appear, there remains much to be learned about how psychological interventions work. To guide explorations of how and for whom particular treatment approaches lead to change, researchers can rely on theory to identify potential loci for change and on translational research methods to integrate basic behavioral science and neuroscience with clinical science. In this article, we describe research linking individual differences in the self-regulation of personal goal pursuit with the etiology and treatment of mood disorders. The research draws upon regulatory focus theory as a model of self-regulation and on microintervention designs – controlled laboratory investigations of a specific therapeutic technique – to generate and test hypotheses about how psychological interventions can help to reverse maladaptive self-regulatory processes. PMID:23072383

  19. A Study of Translation Students' Self-Regulation and Metacognitive Awareness in Association with their Gender and Educational Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Hashempour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study sought to investigate the probable link between Iranian English translation studies students’ metacognitive awareness, self-regulation, and gender. Furthermore, the role of educational level of translation students in metacognitive awareness and self-regulation was explored. For the purpose of the study, a sample of 230 M.A and B.A senior English translation students comprised the participants of the research. They were asked to complete two questionnaires of Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI and Self-regulation Trait (SRT.The Metacognitive Awareness Inventory (MAI was developed by Schraw and Dennison (1994 and consists of 52 statements. It measures two components of metacognition: metacognitive knowledge and metacognitive regulation. Metacognitive knowledge comprises three subscales: Declarative knowledge, Procedural knowledge, and Conditional knowledge. Metacognitive regulation consists of five subscales: Planning, Information management, Monitoring, Debugging, and Evaluation. The self-regulation trait (SRT questionnaire was designed by O'Neil and Herl (1998. It was developed based on Zimmerman's self –regulation model. It consists of 32 Likert-scale questions. The scale seeks to measure metacognition and motivation dimensions.  Each dimension comprises two sub-scales. Meta-cognition covers the constructs of planning and self-monitoring, and motivation contains effort and self-efficacy. Independent samples t-tests were run to investigate the role of gender and educational level in the level of translation students’ metacognitive awareness and self-regulation. The results of t-test demonstrated that there are not any differences between male and female translation students regarding metacognitive awareness and self-regulation. It was also found that there is a negative significant impact of educational level on total metacognitive awareness, and some components of metacognitive awareness: declarative knowledge

  20. Decoding options and accuracy of translation of developmentally regulated UUA codon in Streptomyces: bioinformatic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokytskyy, Ihor; Koshla, Oksana; Fedorenko, Victor; Ostash, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    The gene bldA for leucyl [Formula: see text] is known for almost 30 years as a key regulator of morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in genus Streptomyces. Codon UUA is the rarest one in Streptomyces genomes and is present exclusively in genes with auxiliary functions. Delayed accumulation of translation-competent [Formula: see text] is believed to confine the expression of UUA-containing transcripts to stationary phase. Implicit to the regulatory function of UUA codon is the assumption about high accuracy of its translation, e.g. the latter should not occur in the absence of cognate [Formula: see text]. However, a growing body of facts points to the possibility of mistranslation of UUA-containing transcripts in the bldA-deficient mutants. It is not known what type of near-cognate tRNA(s) may decode UUA in the absence of cognate tRNA in Streptomyces, and whether UUA possesses certain inherent properties (such as increased/decreased accuracy of decoding) that would favor its use for regulatory purposes. Here we took bioinformatic approach to address these questions. We catalogued the entire complement of tRNA genes from several relevant Streptomyces and identified genes for posttranscriptional modifications of tRNA that might be involved in UUA decoding by cognate and near-cognate tRNAs. Based on tRNA gene content in Streptomyces genomes, we propose possible scenarios of UUA codon mistranslation. UUA is not associated with an increased rate of missense errors as compared to other leucyl codons, contrasting general belief that low-abundant codons are more error-prone than the high-abundant ones.

  1. Ectodermal-neural cortex 1 down-regulates Nrf2 at the translational level.

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    Xiao-Jun Wang

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Nrf2 is the master regulator of a cellular defense mechanism against environmental insults. The Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response is accomplished by the transcription of a battery of genes that encode phase II detoxifying enzymes, xenobiotic transporters, and antioxidants. Coordinated expression of these genes is critical in protecting cells from toxic and carcinogenic insults and in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis. Activation of the Nrf2 pathway is primarily controlled by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1, which is a molecular switch that turns on or off the Nrf2 signaling pathway according to intracellular redox conditions. Here we report our finding of a novel Nrf2 suppressor ectodermal-neural cortex 1 (ENC1, which is a BTB-Kelch protein and belongs to the same family as Keap1. Transient expression of ENC1 reduced steady-state levels of Nrf2 and its downstream gene expression. Although ENC1 interacted with Keap1 indirectly, the ENC1-mediated down-regulation of Nrf2 was independent of Keap1. The negative effect of ENC1 on Nrf2 was not due to a change in the stability of Nrf2 because neither proteasomal nor lysosomal inhibitors had any effects. Overexpression of ENC1 did not result in a change in the level of Nrf2 mRNA, rather, it caused a decrease in the rate of Nrf2 protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that ENC1 functions as a negative regulator of Nrf2 through suppressing Nrf2 protein translation, which adds another level of complexity in controlling the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  2. NFAT regulation of cystathionine γ-lyase expression in endothelial cells is impaired in rats exposed to intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V; Osmond, Jessica M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa K; Pace, Carolyn E; Riggs, Jennifer L; Jackson-Weaver, Olan; Kanagy, Nancy L

    2017-04-01

    Sleep apnea is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and intermittent hypoxia (IH, 20 episodes/h of 5% O 2 -5% CO 2 for 7 h/day) to mimic sleep apnea increases blood pressure and impairs hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S)-induced vasodilation in rats. The enzyme that produces H 2 S, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), is decreased in rat mesenteric artery endothelial cells (EC) following in vivo IH exposure. In silico analysis identified putative nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) binding sites in the CSE promoter. Therefore, we hypothesized that IH exposure reduces Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ]) activation of calcineurin/NFAT to lower CSE expression and impair vasodilation. In cultured rat aortic EC, inhibiting calcineurin with cyclosporine A reduced CSE mRNA, CSE protein, and luciferase activity driven by a full-length but not a truncated CSE promoter. In male rats exposed to sham or IH conditions for 2 wk, [Ca 2+ ] in EC in small mesenteric arteries from IH rats was lower than in EC from sham rat arteries (Δfura 2 ratio of fluorescence at 340 to 380 nm from Ca 2+ free: IH = 0.05 ± 0.02, sham = 0.17 ± 0.03, P intermittent hypoxia to mimic sleep apnea, nuclear factor of activated T cells c3 nuclear translocation and CSE expression are decreased, concomitant with decreased CSE-dependent vasodilation. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Effects of 12 metal ions on iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP-1) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and HIF-regulated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qin; Chen Haobin; Huang Xi; Costa, Max

    2006-01-01

    Several metal ions that are carcinogenic affect cellular iron homeostasis by competing with iron transporters or iron-regulated enzymes. Some metal ions can mimic a hypoxia response in cells under normal oxygen tension, and induce expression of HIF-1α-regulated genes. This study investigated whether 12 metal ions altered iron homeostasis in human lung carcinoma A549 cells as measured by an activation of IRP-1 and ferritin level. We also studied hypoxia signaling by measuring HIF-1α protein levels, hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter activity, and Cap43 protein level (an HIF-1α responsive gene). Our results show the following: (i) Ni(II), Co(II), V(V), Mn(II), and to a lesser extent As(III) and Cu(II) activated the binding of IRP-1 to IRE after 24 h, while the other metal ions had no effect; (ii) 10 of 12 metal ions induced HIF-1α protein but to strikingly different degrees. Two of these metal ions, Al(III) and Cd(II), did not induce HIF-1α protein; however, as indicated below, only Ni(II), Co (II), and to lesser extent Mn(II) and V(V) activated HIF-1α-dependent transcription. The combined effects of both [Ni(II) + As(III)] and [Ni(II) + Cr(VI)] on HIF-1α protein were synergistic; (iii) Addition of Fe(II) with Ni(II), Co(II), and Cr(VI) attenuated the induction of HIF-1α after 4 h treatment; (iv) Ni(II), Co(II), and Mn(II) significantly decrease ferritin level after 24 h exposure; (v) Ni(II), Co(II), V(V), and Mn(II) activated HRE reporter gene after 20 h treatment; (vi) Ni(II), Co(II), V(V), and Mn(II) increased the HIF-1-dependent Cap43 protein level after 24 h treatment. In conclusion, only Ni (II), Co (II), and to a lesser extent Mn(II) and V(V) significantly stabilized HIF-1α protein, activated IRP, decreased the levels of ferritin, induced the transcription of HIF-dependent reporter, and increased the expression of Cap43 protein levels (HIF-dependent gene). The mechanism for the significant stabilization and elevation of HIF-1

  4. Reverse translation of phase I biomarker findings links the activity of angiotensin-(1–7) to repression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α in vascular sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, W Jeffrey; Aklilu, Mebea; Varela, Victor A; Lovato, James; Savage, Paul D; Miller, Antonius A

    2012-01-01

    In a phase I study of angiotensin-(1–7) [Ang-(1–7)], clinical benefit was associated with reduction in plasma placental growth factor (PlGF) concentrations. The current study examines Ang-(1–7) induced changes in biomarkers according to cancer type and investigates mechanisms of action engaged in vitro. Plasma biomarkers were measured prior to Ang-(1–7) administration as well as 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours after treatment. Tests for interaction were performed to determine the impact of cancer type on angiogenic hormone levels. If a positive interaction was detected, treatment-induced biomarker changes for individual cancer types were assessed. To investigate mechanisms of action, in vitro growth assays were performed using a murine endothelioma cell line (EOMA). PCR arrays were performed to identify and statistically validate genes that were altered by Ang-(1–7) treatment in these cells. Tests for interaction controlled for dose cohort and clinical response indicated a significant impact of cancer type on post-treatment VEGF and PlGF levels. Following treatment, PlGF levels decreased over time in patients with sarcoma (P = .007). Treatment of EOMA cells with increasing doses of Ang-(1–7) led to significant growth suppression at doses as low as 100 nM. PCR arrays identified 18 genes that appeared to have altered expression after Ang-(1–7) treatment. Replicate analyses confirmed significant changes in 8 genes including reduction in PlGF (P = .04) and hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression (P < .001). Ang-(1–7) has clinical and pre-clinical activity for vascular sarcomas that is linked to reduced HIF-1α and PlGF expression

  5. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate...ol. 2007 Feb;147(2):199-207. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Translational mini-review series on Toll-lik... immunity. PubmedID 17223959 Title Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulat

  6. Protein redox chemistry: post-translational cysteine modifications that regulate signal transduction and drug pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revati eWani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The perception of reactive oxygen species (ROS has evolved over the past decade from agents of cellular damage to secondary messengers which modify signaling proteins in physiology and the disease state (e.g. cancer. New protein targets of specific oxidation are rapidly being identified. One emerging class of redox modification occurs to the thiol side chain of cysteine residues which can produce multiple chemically-distinct alterations to the protein (e.g. sulfenic/sulfinic/sulfonic acid, disulfides. These post-translational modifications (PTM are shown to affect the protein structure and function. Because redox-sensitive proteins can traffic between subcellular compartments that have different redox environments, cysteine oxidation enables a spatio-temporal control to signaling. Understanding ramifications of these oxidative modifications to the functions of signaling proteins is crucial for understanding cellular regulation as well as for informed-drug discovery process. The effects of EGFR oxidation of Cys797 on inhibitor pharmacology are presented to illustrate the principle. Taken together, cysteine redox PTM can impact both cell biology and drug pharmacology.

  7. Plasticity of cardiovascular function in snapping turtle embryos (Chelydra serpentina): chronic hypoxia alters autonomic regulation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eme, John; Rhen, Turk; Tate, Kevin B; Gruchalla, Kathryn; Kohl, Zachary F; Slay, Christopher E; Crossley, Dane A

    2013-06-01

    Reptile embryos tolerate large decreases in the concentration of ambient oxygen. However, we do not fully understand the mechanisms that underlie embryonic cardiovascular short- or long-term responses to hypoxia in most species. We therefore measured cardiac growth and function in snapping turtle embryos incubated under normoxic (N21; 21% O₂) or chronic hypoxic conditions (H10; 10% O₂). We determined heart rate (fH) and mean arterial pressure (Pm) in acute normoxic (21% O₂) and acute hypoxic (10% O₂) conditions, as well as embryonic responses to cholinergic, adrenergic, and ganglionic pharmacological blockade. Compared with N21 embryos, chronic H10 embryos had smaller bodies and relatively larger hearts and were hypotensive, tachycardic, and following autonomic neural blockade showed reduced intrinsic fH at 90% of incubation. Unlike other reptile embryos, cholinergic and ganglionic receptor blockade both increased fH. β-Adrenergic receptor blockade with propranolol decreased fH, and α-adrenergic blockade with phentolamine decreased Pm. We also measured cardiac mRNA expression. Cholinergic tone was reduced in H10 embryos, but cholinergic receptor (Chrm2) mRNA levels were unchanged. However, expression of adrenergic receptor mRNA (Adrb1, Adra1a, Adra2c) and growth factor mRNA (Igf1, Igf2, Igf2r, Pdgfb) was lowered in H10 embryos. Hypoxia altered the balance between cholinergic receptors, α-adrenoreceptor and β-adrenoreceptor function, which was reflected in altered intrinsic fH and adrenergic receptor mRNA levels. This is the first study to link gene expression with morphological and cardioregulatory plasticity in a developing reptile embryo.

  8. BAG3 regulates total MAP1LC3B protein levels through a translational but not transcriptional mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Andrea E; López-Crisosto, Camila; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Salas, Daniela; Parra, Valentina; Quiroga, Clara; Morawe, Tobias; Chiong, Mario; Behl, Christian; Lavandero, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is mainly regulated by post-translational and lipid modifications of ATG proteins. In some scenarios, the induction of autophagy is accompanied by increased levels of certain ATG mRNAs such as MAP1LC3B/LC3B, ATG5 or ATG12. However, little is known about the regulation of ATG protein synthesis at the translational level. The cochaperone of the HSP70 system BAG3 (BCL2-associated athanogene 3) has been associated to LC3B lipidation through an unknown mechanism. In the present work, we studied how BAG3 controls autophagy in HeLa and HEK293 cells. Our results showed that BAG3 regulates the basal amount of total cellular LC3B protein by controlling its mRNA translation. This effect was apparently specific to LC3B because other ATG protein levels were not affected. BAG3 knockdown did not affect LC3B lipidation induced by nutrient deprivation or proteasome inhibition. We concluded that BAG3 maintains the basal amount of LC3B protein by controlling the translation of its mRNA in HeLa and HEK293 cells.

  9. Inflammation and hypoxia in the kidney: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Volker H

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxic injury is commonly associated with inflammatory-cell infiltration, and inflammation frequently leads to the activation of cellular hypoxia response pathways. The molecular mechanisms underlying this cross-talk during kidney injury are incompletely understood. Yamaguchi and colleagues identify CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ as a cytokine- and hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that fine-tunes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling in renal epithelial cells and thus provide a novel molecular link between hypoxia and inflammation in kidney injury.

  10. miR-140-5p regulates hypoxia-mediated human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by targeting Dnmt1 and promoting SOD2 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Jing, E-mail: xujingdoc@163.com

    2016-04-22

    miR-140-5p is down-regulated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and experimental models of PAH, and inhibits hypoxia-mediated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation in vitro. Delivery of synthetic miR-140-5p prevents and treats established, experimental PAH. DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is up-regulated in PAH associated human PASMCs (HPASMCs), which promotes the development of PAH by hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoter for superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and down-regulating SOD2 expression. We searched for miR-140-5p targets using TargetScan, PicTar and MiRanda tools, and found that Dnmt1 is a potential target of miR-140-5p. Based on these findings, we speculated that miR-140-5p might target Dnmt1 and regulate SOD2 expression to regulate hypoxia-mediated HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. We detected the expression of miR-140-5p, Dnmt1 and SOD2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found down-regulation of miR-140-5p and SOD2 and up-regulation of Dnmt1 exist in PAH tissues and hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation detection showed that miR-140-5p inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia, while the effect of Dnmt1 on hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs is reversed. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-140-5p targets Dnmt1 directly. An inverse correlation is also found between miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 in HPASMCs. In addition, we further investigated whether miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 regulate HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by regulating SOD2 expression, and the results confirmed our speculation. Taken together, these results indicated that miR-140-5p at least partly targets Dnmt1 and regulates SOD2 expression to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia. - Highlights: • miR-140-5p and SOD2 are down-regulated

  11. PRMT1-Mediated Translation Regulation Is a Crucial Vulnerability of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jessie Hao-Ru; Hubbell-Engler, Benjamin; Adelmant, Guillaume; Huang, Jialiang; Joyce, Cailin E; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Montgomery, Philip; Tsherniak, Aviad; Giacomelli, Andrew O; Perry, Jennifer A; Trowbridge, Jennifer; Fujiwara, Yuko; Cowley, Glenn S; Xie, Huafeng; Kim, Woojin; Novina, Carl D; Hahn, William C; Marto, Jarrod A; Orkin, Stuart H

    2017-09-01

    Through an shRNA screen, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt1 as a vulnerable intervention point in murine p53/Rb-null osteosarcomas, the human counterpart of which lacks effective therapeutic options. Depletion of Prmt1 in p53-deficient cells impaired tumor initiation and maintenance in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies reveal that translation-associated pathways were enriched for Prmt1 downstream targets, implicating Prmt1 in translation control. In particular, loss of Prmt1 led to a decrease in arginine methylation of the translation initiation complex, thereby disrupting its assembly and inhibiting translation. p53/Rb-null cells were sensitive to p53-induced translation stress, and analysis of human cancer cell line data from Project Achilles further revealed that Prmt1 and translation-associated pathways converged on the same functional networks. We propose that targeted therapy against Prmt1 and its associated translation-related pathways offer a mechanistic rationale for treatment of osteosarcomas and other cancers that exhibit dependencies on translation stress response. Cancer Res; 77(17); 4613-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Toll-like Receptor 3 Regulates Angiogenesis and Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cell Lines through Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α

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    Alessio Paone

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLRs recognize microbial/viral-derived components that trigger innate immune response and conflicting data implicate TLR agonists in cancer, either as protumor or antitumor agents. We previously demonstrated that TLR3 activation mediated by its agonist poly(I:C induces antitumor signaling, leading to apoptosis of prostate cancer cells LNCaP and PC3 with much more efficiency in the former than in the second more aggressive line. The transcription factor hypoxia-induciblefactor 1 (HIF-1regulates several cellular processes, includingapoptosis, in response to hypoxia and to other stimuli also in normoxic conditions. Here we describe a novel protumor machinery triggered by TLR3 activation in PC3 cells consisting of increased expression of the specific 1.3 isoform of HIF-1α and nuclear accumulation of HIF-1 complex in normoxia, resulting in reduced apoptosis and in secretion of functional vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Moreover, we report that, in the less aggressive LNCaP cells, TLR3 activation fails to induce nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. However, the transfection of 1.3 isoform of hif-1α in LNCaP cells allows poly(I:CI-induced HIF-1 activation, resulting in apoptosis protection and VEGF secretion. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that differences in the basal level of HIF-1α expression in different prostate cancer cell lines underlie their differential response to TLR3 activation, suggesting a correlation between different stages of malignancy, hypoxic gene expression, and beneficial responsiveness to TLR agonists.

  13. Functional 5′ UTR mRNA structures in eukaryotic translation regulation and how to find them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppek, Kathrin; Das, Rhiju; Barna, Maria

    2017-01-01

    RNA molecules can fold into intricate shapes that can provide an additional layer of control of gene expression beyond that of their sequence. In this Review, we discuss the current mechanistic understanding of structures in 5′ untranslated regions (UTRs) of eukaryotic mRNAs and the emerging methodologies used to explore them. These structures may regulate cap-dependent translation initiation through helicase-mediated remodelling of RNA structures and higher-order RNA interactions, as well as cap-independent translation initiation through internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs), mRNA modifications and other specialized translation pathways. We discuss known 5′ UTR RNA structures and how new structure probing technologies coupled with prospective validation, particularly compensatory mutagenesis, are likely to identify classes of structured RNA elements that shape post-transcriptional control of gene expression and the development of multicellular organisms. PMID:29165424

  14. The translational repressor Crc controls the Pseudomonas putida benzoate and alkane catabolic pathways using a multi-tier regulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Metabolically versatile bacteria usually perceive aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons as non-preferred carbon sources, and their assimilation is inhibited if more preferable substrates are available. This is achieved via catabolite repression. In Pseudomonas putida, the expression of the genes allowing the assimilation of benzoate and n-alkanes is strongly inhibited by catabolite repression, a process controlled by the translational repressor Crc. Crc binds to and inhibits the translation of benR and alkS mRNAs, which encode the transcriptional activators that induce the expression of the benzoate and alkane degradation genes respectively. However, sequences similar to those recognized by Crc in benR and alkS mRNAs exist as well in the translation initiation regions of the mRNA of several structural genes of the benzoate and alkane pathways, which suggests that Crc may also regulate their translation. The present results show that some of these sites are functional, and that Crc inhibits the induction of both pathways by limiting not only the translation of their transcriptional activators, but also that of genes coding for the first enzyme in each pathway. Crc may also inhibit the translation of a gene involved in benzoate uptake. This multi-tier approach probably ensures the rapid regulation of pathway genes, minimizing the assimilation of non-preferred substrates when better options are available. A survey of possible Crc sites in the mRNAs of genes associated with other catabolic pathways suggested that targeting substrate uptake, pathway induction and/or pathway enzymes may be a common strategy to control the assimilation of non-preferred compounds. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Identifying intrinsic and extrinsic determinants that regulate internal initiation of translation mediated by the FMR1 5' leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman Stephanie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulating synthesis of the Fragile X gene (FMR1 product, FMRP alters neural plasticity potentially through its role in the microRNA pathway. Cap-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA, a process requiring ribosomal scanning through the 5' leader, is likely impeded by the extensive secondary structure generated by the high guanosine/cytosine nucleotide content including the CGG triplet nucleotide repeats in the 5' leader. An alternative mechanism to initiate translation – internal initiation often utilizes secondary structure to recruit the translational machinery. Consequently, studies were undertaken to confirm and extend a previous observation that the FMR1 5' leader contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES. Results Cellular transfection of a dicistronic DNA construct containing the FMR1 5' leader inserted into the intercistronic region yielded significant translation of the second cistron, but the FMR1 5' leader was also found to contain a cryptic promoter possibly confounding interpretation of these results. However, transfection of dicistronic and monocistronic RNA ex vivo or in vitro confirmed that the FMR1 5' leader contains an IRES. Moreover, inhibiting cap-dependent translation ex vivo did not affect the expression level of endogenous FMRP indicating a role for IRES-dependent translation of FMR1 mRNA. Analysis of the FMR1 5' leader revealed that the CGG repeats and the 5' end of the leader were vital for internal initiation. Functionally, exposure to potassium chloride or intracellular acidification and addition of polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid as mimics of neural activity and double stranded RNA, respectively, differentially affected FMR1 IRES activity. Conclusion Our results indicate that multiple stimuli influence IRES-dependent translation of the FMR1 mRNA and suggest a functional role for the CGG nucleotide repeats.

  16. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) and 5’ mRNA leader sequences as agents of translational regulation in Arabidopsis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Arnim, Albrecht G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-02-04

    Protein synthesis, or translation, consumes a sizable fraction of the cell’s energy budget, estimated at 5% and up to 50% in differentiated and growing cells, respectively. Plants also invest significant energy and biomass to construct and maintain the translation apparatus. Translation is regulated by a variety of external stimuli. Compared to transcriptional control, attributes of translational control include reduced sensitivity to stochastic fluctuation, a finer gauge of control, and more rapid responsiveness to environmental stimuli. Yet, our murky understanding of translational control allows few generalizations. Consequently, translational regulation is underutilized in the context of transgene regulation, although synthetic biologists are now beginning to appropriate RNA-level gene regulation into their regulatory circuits. We also know little about how translational control contributes to the diversity of plant form and function. This project explored how an emerging regulatory mRNA sequence element, upstream open reading frames (uORFs), is integrated with the general translation initiation machinery to permit translational regulation on specific mRNAs.

  17. Hypoxia in Tumor Angiogenesis and Metastasis: Evaluation of VEGF and MMP Over-expression and Down-Regulation of HIF-1alpha with RNAi in Hypoxic Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shruti

    Background: As tumor mass grows beyond a few millimeters in diameter, the angiogenic "switch" is turned on leading to recruitment of blood vessels from surrounding artery and veins. However, the tumor mass is poorly perfused and there are pockets of hypoxia or lower oxygen concentrations relative to normal tissue. Hypoxia-inducing factor-1a (HIF-1a), a transcription factor, is activated when the oxygen concentration is low. Upon activation of HIF-1a, a number of other genes also turn on that allows the tumor to become more aggressive and resistant to therapy. Purpose: The main objectives of this study were to evaluate the effect of hypoxia-induced HIF-1a followed by over-expression of angiogenic and metastatic markers in tumor cells and down-regulation of HIF-1a using nanoparticle-delivered RNA interference therapy. Methods: Human ovarian (SKOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231) adenocarcinoma cells were incubated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Following hypoxia treatment of the cells, HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2), and MMP-9 expression was analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. For intracellular delivery of HIF-1a gene silencing small interfering RNA (siRNA), type B gelatin nanoparticles were fabricated using the solvent displacement method and the surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, Mol. wt. 2kDa). Cellular uptake and distribution of the nanoparticles was observed with Cy3-siRNA loaded, FITC-conjugated gelatin nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity of the nanoparticle formulations was evaluated in both the cell lines. siRNA was transfected in the gelatin nanoparticles under hypoxic conditions. Total cellular protein and RNA were extracted for analysis of HIF1a, VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression. Results: MDA-MB-231 and SKOV3 cells show increased expression of HIF1a under hypoxic conditions compared to baseline levels at normoxic conditions. ELISA and western blots of VEGF, MMP-2 and MMP-9 appear to

  18. PRMT1-Mediated Translation Regulation is a Crucial Vulnerability of Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through an shRNA screen, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt1 as a vulnerable intervention point in murine p53/Rb-null osteosarcomas, the human counterpart of which lacks effective therapeutic options. Depletion of Prmt1 in p53-deficient cells impaired tumor initiation and maintenance in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies reveal that translation-associated pathways were enriched for Prmt1 downstream targets, implicating Prmt1 in translation control.

  19. LncRNA TUG1 serves an important role in hypoxia-induced myocardial cell injury by regulating the miR-145-5p-Binp3 axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongwei; Zhao, Shengji; Li, Chunfu; Liu, Chaoquan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of long non-coding RNA TUG1 in hypoxia-induced myocardial cell injury and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. The cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2 was cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. TUG1 expression under hypoxic conditions was then detected. The effects of TUG1 overexpression on viability, apoptosis, migration and invasion were assayed. In addition, the microRNA (miR)-145-5p expression was detected. Following H9c2 cell transfection with miR-145-5p mimics, the H9c2 cell viability, apoptosis, migration and invasion were also detected. Additionally, the target gene of miR-145-5p was assayed by Luciferase reporter assay. The protein expressions of Wnt-3a, Wnt5a, and β-catenin in H9c2 cells under hypoxic conditions were also determined. The results revealed that hypoxia induced injury in H9c2 cells, including inhibiting cell viability, migration and invasion, and promoting cell apoptosis. Overexpression of TUG1 aggravated hypoxia-induced injury in H9c2 cells. In addition, miR-145-5p was negatively regulated by TUG1, and TUG1 overexpression aggravated hypoxia-induced injury via the downregulation of miR-145-5p. Furthermore, B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) was a target of miR-145-5p, and overexpression of Bnip3 aggravated hypoxia-induced cell injury by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in H9c2 cells. In conclusion, overexpression of TUG1 aggravated hypoxia-induced injury in cardiomyocytes by regulating the miR-145-5p-Binp3 axis. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may be a key mechanism to mediate the role of TUG1 in regulating hypoxia-induced myocardial injury. TUG1 may be an effective diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for myocardial ischemia. PMID:29207102

  20. Ecosystem impacts of hypoxia: thresholds of hypoxia and pathways to recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steckbauer, A; Duarte, C M; Vaquer-Sunyer, R; Carstensen, J; Conley, D J

    2011-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is increasing in the global coastal zone, where it is recognized as a major threat to biota. Managerial efforts to prevent hypoxia and achieve recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia are largely based on nutrient reduction plans. However, these managerial efforts need to be informed by predictions on the thresholds of hypoxia (i.e. the oxygen levels required to conserve biodiversity) as well as the timescales for the recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia. The thresholds for hypoxia in coastal ecosystems are higher than previously thought and are not static, but regulated by local and global processes, being particularly sensitive to warming. The examination of recovery processes in a number of coastal areas managed for reducing nutrient inputs and, thus, hypoxia (Northern Adriatic; Black Sea; Baltic Sea; Delaware Bay; and Danish Coastal Areas) reveals that recovery timescales following the return to normal oxygen conditions are much longer than those of loss following the onset of hypoxia, and typically involve decadal timescales. The extended lag time for ecosystem recovery from hypoxia results in non-linear pathways of recovery due to hysteresis and the shift in baselines, affecting the oxygen thresholds for hypoxia through time.

  1. Essential role for SphK1/S1P signaling to regulate hypoxia-inducible factor 2α expression and activity in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquerel, P; Gstalder, C; Müller, D; Laurent, J; Brizuela, L; Sabbadini, R A; Malavaud, B; Pyronnet, S; Martineau, Y; Ader, I; Cuvillier, O

    2016-03-14

    The sphingosine kinase-1/sphingosine 1-phosphate (SphK1/S1P) signaling pathway has been reported to modulate the expression of the canonical transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α in multiple cell lineages. HIF-2α is also frequently overexpressed in solid tumors but its role has been mostly studied in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. In this study, the role of SphK1/S1P signaling with regard to HIF-2α was investigated in various cancer cell models including ccRCC cells. Under hypoxic conditions or in ccRCC lacking a functional von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene and expressing high levels of HIF-2α, SphK1 activity controls HIF-2α expression and transcriptional activity through a phospholipase D (PLD)-driven mechanism. SphK1 silencing promotes a VHL-independent HIF-2α loss of expression and activity and reduces cell proliferation in ccRCC. Importantly, downregulation of SphK1 is associated with impaired Akt and mTOR signaling in ccRCC. Taking advantage of a monoclonal antibody neutralizing extracellular S1P, we show that inhibition of S1P extracellular signaling blocks HIF-2α accumulation in ccRCC cell lines, an effect mimicked when the S1P transporter Spns2 or the S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) is silenced. Here, we report the first evidence that the SphK1/S1P signaling pathway regulates the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible HIF-2α in diverse cancer cell lineages notably ccRCC, where HIF-2α has been established as a driver of a more aggressive disease. These findings demonstrate that SphK1/S1P signaling may act as a canonical regulator of HIF-2α expression in ccRCC, giving support to its inhibition as a therapeutic strategy that could contribute to reduce HIF-2 activity in ccRCC.

  2. Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis Is Regulated by the Redox State of a Heme-Binding Translational Activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Iliana C; Barrientos, Antoni

    2016-02-20

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the respiratory chain, catalyzes the reduction of oxygen to water and therefore is essential for cell function and viability. COX is a multimeric complex, whose biogenesis is extensively regulated. One type of control targets cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (Cox1), a key COX enzymatic core subunit translated on mitochondrial ribosomes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cox1 synthesis and COX assembly are coordinated through a negative feedback regulatory loop. This coordination is mediated by Mss51, a heme-sensing COX1 mRNA-specific processing factor and translational activator that is also a Cox1 chaperone. In this study, we investigated whether Mss51 hemylation and Mss51-mediated Cox1 synthesis are both modulated by the reduction-oxidation (redox) environment. We report that Cox1 synthesis is attenuated under oxidative stress conditions and have identified one of the underlying mechanisms. We show that in vitro and in vivo exposure to hydrogen peroxide induces the formation of a disulfide bond in Mss51 involving CPX motif heme-coordinating cysteines. Mss51 oxidation results in a heme ligand switch, thereby lowering heme-binding affinity and promoting its release. We demonstrate that in addition to affecting Mss51-dependent heme sensing, oxidative stress compromises Mss51 roles in COX1 mRNA processing and translation. H2O2-induced downregulation of mitochondrial translation has so far not been reported. We show that high H2O2 concentrations induce a global attenuation effect, but milder concentrations specifically affect COX1 mRNA processing and translation in an Mss51-dependent manner. The redox environment modulates Mss51 functions, which are essential for regulation of COX biogenesis and aerobic energy production.

  3. Reciprocal regulation by hypoxia-inducible factor-2α and the NAMPT-NAD(+)-SIRT axis in articular chondrocytes is involved in osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, H; Kwak, J-S; Yang, S; Gong, M-K; Kim, J-H; Rhee, J; Kim, S K; Kim, H-E; Ryu, J-H; Chun, J-S

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) transcriptionally upregulates Nampt in articular chondrocytes. NAMPT, which exhibits nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase activity, in turn causes osteoarthritis (OA) in mice by stimulating the expression of matrix-degrading enzymes. Here, we sought to elucidate whether HIF-2α activates the NAMPT-NAD(+)-SIRT axis in chondrocytes and thereby contributes to the pathogenesis of OA. Assays of NAD levels, SIRT activity, reporter gene activity, mRNA, and protein levels were conducted in primary cultured mouse articular chondrocytes. Experimental OA in mice was induced by intra-articular (IA) injection of adenovirus expressing HIF-2α (Ad-Epas1) or NAMPT (Ad-Nampt). The functions of SIRT in OA were examined by IA co-injection of SIRT inhibitors or adenovirus expressing individual SIRT isoforms or shRNA targeting specific SIRT isoforms. HIF-2α activated the NAMPT-NAD(+)-SIRT axis in chondrocytes by upregulating NAMPT, which stimulated NAD(+) synthesis and thereby activated SIRT family members. The activated NAMPT-SIRT pathway, in turn, promoted HIF-2α protein stability by negatively regulating its hydroxylation and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in increased HIF-2α transcriptional activity. Among SIRT family members (SIRT1-7), SIRT2 and SIRT4 were positively associated with HIF-2α stability and transcriptional activity in chondrocytes. This reciprocal regulation was required for the expression of catabolic matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP12, and MMP13) and OA cartilage destruction caused by IA injection of Ad-Epas1 Ad-Nampt. The reciprocal regulation of HIF-2α and the NAMPT-NAD(+)-SIRT axis in articular chondrocytes is involved in OA cartilage destruction caused by HIF-2α or NAMPT. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Control of PNG kinase, a key regulator of mRNA translation, is coupled to meiosis completion at egg activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masatoshi; Petrova, Boryana; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2017-05-30

    The oocyte-to-embryo transition involves extensive changes in mRNA translation, regulated in Drosophila by the PNG kinase complex whose activity we show here to be under precise developmental control. Despite presence of the catalytic PNG subunit and the PLU and GNU activating subunits in the mature oocyte, GNU is phosphorylated at Cyclin B/CDK1sites and unable to bind PNG and PLU. In vitro phosphorylation of GNU by CyclinB/CDK1 blocks activation of PNG. Meiotic completion promotes GNU dephosphorylation and PNG kinase activation to regulate translation. The critical regulatory effect of phosphorylation is shown by replacement in the oocyte with a phosphorylation-resistant form of GNU, which promotes PNG-GNU complex formation, elevation of Cyclin B, and meiotic defects consistent with premature PNG activation. After PNG activation GNU is destabilized, thus inactivating PNG. This short-lived burst in kinase activity links development with maternal mRNA translation and ensures irreversibility of the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

  5. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  6. Regulation of glucose transporter protein-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor by hypoxia inducible factor 1α under hypoxic conditions in Hep-2 human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ou; Li, Xiaoming; Qu, Yongtao; Liu, Shuang; An, Jie; Wang, Maoxin; Sun, Qingjia; Zhang, Wen; Lu, Xiuying; Pi, Lihong; Zhang, Min; Shen, Yupeng

    2012-12-01

    The present study evaluated the regulation of glucose transporter protein-1 (Glut-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) under hypoxic conditions in Hep-2 human cells to explore the feasibility of these three genes as tumor markers. Hep-2 cells were cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h. The proliferation of Hep-2 cells was evaluated using an MTT assay. The protein and mRNA expression levels of HIF-1α, Glut-1 and VEGF were detected using the S-P immunocytochemical method, western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results revealed that the expression levels of HIF-1α, Glut-1 and VEGF protein in Hep-2 cells were significantly elevated under hypoxic conditions compared with those under normoxic conditions over 36 h. Under hypoxic conditions, mRNA levels of HIF-1α were stable, while mRNA levels of Glut-1 and VEGF changed over time. In conclusion, Glut-1 and VEGF were upregulated by HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions in a time-dependent manner in Hep-2 cells and their co-expression serves as a tumor marker.

  7. Hypoxia: From Placental Development to Fetal Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajersztajn, Lais; Veras, Mariana Matera

    2017-10-16

    Hypoxia may influence normal and different pathological processes. Low oxygenation activates a variety of responses, many of them regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, which is mostly involved in cellular control of O 2 consumption and delivery, inhibition of growth and development, and promotion of anaerobic metabolism. Hypoxia plays a significant physiological role in fetal development; it is involved in different embryonic processes, for example, placentation, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. More recently, fetal hypoxia has been associated directly or indirectly with fetal programming of heart, brain, and kidney function and metabolism in adulthood. In this review, the role of hypoxia in fetal development, placentation, and fetal programming is summarized. Hypoxia is a basic mechanism involved in different pregnancy disorders and fetal health developmental complications. Although there are scientific data showing that hypoxia mediates changes in the growth trajectory of the fetus, modulates gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, and determines the health status later in adulthood, more mechanistic studies are needed. Furthermore, if we consider that intrauterine hypoxia is not a rare event, and can be a consequence of unavoidable exposures to air pollution, nutritional deficiencies, obesity, and other very common conditions (drug addiction and stress), the health of future generations may be damaged and the incidence of some diseases will markedly increase as a consequence of disturbed fetal programming. Birth Defects Research 109:1377-1385, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Regulation by nitrate of protein synthesis and translation of RNA in maize roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, P.R.; Bouthyette, P.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Roots of maize seedlings were exposed to 35 S-methionine in the presence or absence of nitrate. Using SDS-PAGE, nitrate-induced changes in labeled polypeptides were noted in the soluble (at 92, 63 and 21kD) and organellar(at 14kD) fractions, as well as in a membrane fraction of putative tonoplast origin (at 31kD). No nitrate-induced changes were noted in a plasmamembrane-enriched fraction or in a membrane fraction of mixed origin. Total RNA from nitrate-treated and control roots was translated in a rabbit reticulocyte system. Five translation products (94, 63, 41, 39 and 21kD) were identified as nitrate-inducible by comparative gel electrophoresis. Changes in protein synthesis and translation of mRNA were apparent within 2-3 h after introduction of nitrate. Within 4-6 h after removal of nitrate, the level of nitrate-inducible translation products diminished to that of control roots. In contrast, the 31kD tonoplast polypeptide was still labeled 26 h after removal of external nitrate and 35 S-methionine. The results will be discussed in relation to the nitrate induction of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, and the nitrate uptake system

  9. Mixed messages: Re-initiation factors regulate translation of animal mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Obermayer, Benedikt; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    When ribosomes encounter upstream open reading frames (uORFs) during scanning of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR), translation of the downstream ORF requires re-initiation. In a recent paper in Nature, Schleich et al. describe metazoan factors which specifically promote re-initiation.

  10. PTENα, a PTEN isoform translated through alternative initiation, regulates mitochondrial function and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hui; He, Shiming; Yang, Jingyi; Jia, Xinying; Wang, Pan; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Zhong; Zou, Xiajuan; McNutt, Michael A; Shen, Wen Hong; Yin, Yuxin

    2014-05-06

    PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. It is known that PTEN has a wide range of biological functions beyond tumor suppression. Here, we report that PTENα, an N-terminally extended form of PTEN, functions in mitochondrial metabolism. Translation of PTENα is initiated from a CUG codon upstream of and in-frame with the coding region of canonical PTEN. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2A (eIF2A) controls PTENα translation, which requires a CUG-centered palindromic motif. We show that PTENα induces cytochrome c oxidase activity and ATP production in mitochondria. TALEN-mediated somatic deletion of PTENα impairs mitochondrial respiratory chain function. PTENα interacts with canonical PTEN to increase PINK1 protein levels and promote energy production. Our studies demonstrate the importance of eIF2A-mediated alternative translation for generation of protein diversity in eukaryotic systems and provide insights into the mechanism by which the PTEN family is involved in multiple cellular processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. tRNA-like structure regulates translation of Brome mosaic virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barends, Sharief; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Kraal, Barend

    2004-04-01

    For various groups of plant viruses, the genomic RNAs end with a tRNA-like structure (TLS) instead of the 3' poly(A) tail of common mRNAs. The actual function of these TLSs has long been enigmatic. Recently, however, it became clear that for turnip yellow mosaic virus, a tymovirus, the valylated TLS(TYMV) of the single genomic RNA functions as a bait for host ribosomes and directs them to the internal initiation site of translation (with N-terminal valine) of the second open reading frame for the polyprotein. This discovery prompted us to investigate whether the much larger TLSs of a different genus of viruses have a comparable function in translation. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a bromovirus, has a tripartite RNA genome with a subgenomic RNA4 for coat protein expression. All four RNAs carry a highly conserved and bulky 3' TLS(BMV) (about 200 nucleotides) with determinants for tyrosylation. We discovered TLS(BMV)-catalyzed self-tyrosylation of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase but could not clearly detect tyrosine incorporation into any virus-encoded protein. We established that BMV proteins do not need TLS(BMV) tyrosylation for their initiation. However, disruption of the TLSs strongly reduced the translation of genomic RNA1, RNA2, and less strongly, RNA3, whereas coat protein expression from RNA4 remained unaffected. This aberrant translation could be partially restored by providing the TLS(BMV) in trans. Intriguingly, a subdomain of the TLS(BMV) could even almost fully restore translation to the original pattern. We discuss here a model with a central and dominant role for the TLS(BMV) during the BMV infection cycle.

  12. Nuclear Protein Sam68 Interacts with the Enterovirus 71 Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Positively Regulates Viral Protein Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Song, Lei; Cong, Haolong; Tien, Po

    2015-10-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) recruits various cellular factors to assist in the replication and translation of its genome. Identification of the host factors involved in the EV71 life cycle not only will enable a better understanding of the infection mechanism but also has the potential to be of use in the development of antiviral therapeutics. In this study, we demonstrated that the cellular factor 68-kDa Src-associated protein in mitosis (Sam68) acts as an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) trans-acting factor (ITAF) that binds specifically to the EV71 5' untranslated region (5'UTR). Interaction sites in both the viral IRES (stem-loops IV and V) and the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K homology (KH) domain of Sam68 protein were further mapped using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and biotin RNA pulldown assay. More importantly, dual-luciferase (firefly) reporter analysis suggested that overexpression of Sam68 positively regulated IRES-dependent translation of virus proteins. In contrast, both IRES activity and viral protein translation significantly decreased in Sam68 knockdown cells compared with the negative-control cells treated with short hairpin RNA (shRNA). However, downregulation of Sam68 did not have a significant inhibitory effect on the accumulation of the EV71 genome. Moreover, Sam68 was redistributed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and interacts with cellular factors, such as poly(rC)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), during EV71 infection. The cytoplasmic relocalization of Sam68 in EV71-infected cells may be involved in the enhancement of EV71 IRES-mediated translation. Since Sam68 is known to be a RNA-binding protein, these results provide direct evidence that Sam68 is a novel ITAF that interacts with EV71 IRES and positively regulates viral protein translation. The nuclear protein Sam68 is found as an additional new host factor that interacts with the EV71 IRES during infection and could potentially

  13. Mechanisms of Neuroprotection from Hypoxia-Ischemia (HI) Brain Injury by Up-regulation of Cytoglobin (CYGB) in a Neonatal Rat Model*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shu-Feng; Yang, Han-Hua; Xiao, Dan-Ping; Huang, Yue-Jun; He, Gu-Yu; Ma, Hai-Ran; Xia, Fang; Shi, Xue-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression profile of CYGB, its potential neuroprotective function, and underlying molecular mechanisms using a model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury. Cygb mRNA and protein expression were evaluated within the first 36 h after the HI model was induced using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Cygb mRNA expression was increased at 18 h in a time-dependent manner, and its level of protein expression increased progressively in 24 h. To verify the neuroprotective effect of CYGB, a gene transfection technique was employed. Cygb cDNA and shRNA delivery adenovirus systems were established (Cygb-cDNA-ADV and Cygb-shRNA-ADV, respectively) and injected into the brains of 3-day-old rats 4 days before they were induced with HI treatment. Rats from different groups were euthanized 24 h post-HI, and brain samples were harvested. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride, TUNEL, and Nissl staining indicated that an up-regulation of CYGB resulted in reduced acute brain injury. The superoxide dismutase level was found to be dependent on expression of CYGB. The Morris water maze test in 28-day-old rats demonstrated that CYGB expression was associated with improvement of long term cognitive impairment. Studies also demonstrated that CYGB can up-regulate mRNA and protein levels of VEGF and increase both the density and diameter of the microvessels but inhibits activation of caspase-2 and -3. Thus, this is the first in vivo study focusing on the neuroprotective role of CYGB. The reduction of neonatal HI injury by CYGB may be due in part to antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms and by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:23585565

  14. Conceptualising Multilevel Regulation in the EU: A Legal Translation of Multilevel Governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhury, Nupur; Wessel, Ramses A.

    2012-01-01

    How should we conceive of regulation in the European context? This paper attempts to answer this by developing multilevel regulation as a theoretical concept. The basic aim of the paper is to explore the difference and convergence between regulation and governance and develop multilevel governance

  15. Post-translational regulation and trafficking of the granulin-containing protease RD21 of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gu

    Full Text Available RD21-like proteases are ubiquitous, plant-specific papain-like proteases typified by carrying a C-terminal granulin domain. RD21-like proteases are involved in immunity and associated with senescence and various types of biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we interrogated Arabidopsis RD21 regulation and trafficking by site-directed mutagenesis, agroinfiltration, western blotting, protease activity profiling and protein degradation. Using an introduced N-glycan sensor, deglycosylation experiments and glyco-engineered N. benthamiana plants, we show that RD21 passes through the Golgi where it becomes fucosylated. Our studies demonstrate that RD21 is regulated at three post-translational levels. Prodomain removal is not blocked in the catalytic Cys mutant, indicating that RD21 is activated by a proteolytic cascade. However, RD21 activation in Arabidopsis does not require vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs or aleurain-like protease AALP. In contrast, granulin domain removal requires the catalytic Cys and His residues and is therefore autocatalytic. Furthermore, SDS can (re-activate latent RD21 in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, indicating the existence of a third layer of post-translational regulation, possibly mediated by endogenous inhibitors. RD21 causes a dominant protease activity in Arabidopsis leaf extracts, responsible for SDS-induced proteome degradation.

  16. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit e controls intracellular calcium homeostasis by regulation of cav1.2 surface expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Buda

    Full Text Available Inappropriate surface expression of voltage-gated Ca(2+channels (CaV in pancreatic ß-cells may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. First, failure to increase intracellular Ca(2+ concentrations at the sites of exocytosis impedes insulin release. Furthermore, excessive Ca(2+ influx may trigger cytotoxic effects. The regulation of surface expression of CaV channels in the pancreatic β-cells remains unknown. Here, we used real-time 3D confocal and TIRFM imaging, immunocytochemistry, cellular fractionation, immunoprecipitation and electrophysiology to study trafficking of L-type CaV1.2 channels upon β-cell stimulation. We found decreased surface expression of CaV1.2 and a corresponding reduction in L-type whole-cell Ca(2+ currents in insulin-secreting INS-1 832/13 cells upon protracted (15-30 min stimulation. This internalization occurs by clathrin-dependent endocytosis and could be prevented by microtubule or dynamin inhibitors. eIF3e (Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 subunit E is part of the protein translation initiation complex, but its effect on translation are modest and effects in ion channel trafficking have been suggested. The factor interacted with CaV1.2 and regulated CaV1.2 traffic bidirectionally. eIF3e silencing impaired CaV1.2 internalization, which resulted in an increased intracellular Ca(2+ load upon stimulation. These findings provide a mechanism for regulation of L-type CaV channel surface expression with consequences for β-cell calcium homeostasis, which will affect pancreatic β-cell function and insulin production.

  17. Regulation of cap-dependent translation initiation in the early stage porcine parthenotes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šušor, Andrej; Jelínková, Lucie; Karabínová, Pavla; Torner, H.; Tomek, W.; Kovářová, Hana; Kubelka, Michal

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 12 (2008), s. 1716-1725 ISSN 1040-452X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/04/0104; GA ČR GA524/07/1087 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : meiosis * translation initiation * porcine parthenotes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.287, year: 2008

  18. Effects of prolonged exposure to hypobaric hypoxia on oxidative stress, inflammation and gluco-insular regulation: the not-so-sweet price for good regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siervo, Mario; Riley, Heather L; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Leckstrom, Carl A; Martin, Daniel S; Mitchell, Kay; Levett, Denny Z H; Montgomery, Hugh E; Mythen, Monty G; Grocott, Michael P W; Feelisch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which low oxygen availability are associated with the development of insulin resistance remain obscure. We thus investigated the relationship between such gluco-insular derangements in response to sustained (hypobaric) hypoxemia, and changes in biomarkers of oxidative stress, inflammation and counter-regulatory hormone responses. After baseline testing in London (75 m), 24 subjects ascended from Kathmandu (1,300 m) to Everest Base Camp (EBC;5,300 m) over 13 days. Of these, 14 ascended higher, with 8 reaching the summit (8,848 m). Assessments were conducted at baseline, during ascent to EBC, and 1, 6 and 8 week(s) thereafter. Changes in body weight and indices of gluco-insular control were measured (glucose, insulin, C-Peptide, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]) along with biomarkers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-HNE), inflammation (Interleukin-6 [IL-6]) and counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, adrenalin, noradrenalin). In addition, peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and venous blood lactate concentrations were determined. SpO2 fell significantly from 98.0% at sea level to 82.0% on arrival at 5,300 m. Whilst glucose levels remained stable, insulin and C-Peptide concentrations increased by >200% during the last 2 weeks. Increases in fasting insulin, HOMA-IR and glucagon correlated with increases in markers of oxidative stress (4-HNE) and inflammation (IL-6). Lactate levels progressively increased during ascent and remained significantly elevated until week 8. Subjects lost on average 7.3 kg in body weight. Sustained hypoxemia is associated with insulin resistance, whose magnitude correlates with the degree of oxidative stress and inflammation. The role of 4-HNE and IL-6 as key players in modifying the association between sustained hypoxia and insulin resistance merits further investigation.

  19. Crystal Structure of the CTP1L Endolysin Reveals How Its Activity Is Regulated by a Secondary Translation Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Matthew; Leicht, Stefan; Krichel, Boris; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Thompson, Andrew; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Svergun, Dmitri I; Gómez-Torres, Natalia; Garde, Sonia; Uetrecht, Charlotte; Narbad, Arjan; Mayer, Melinda J; Meijers, Rob

    2016-03-04

    Bacteriophages produce endolysins, which lyse the bacterial host cell to release newly produced virions. The timing of lysis is regulated and is thought to involve the activation of a molecular switch. We present a crystal structure of the activated endolysin CTP1L that targets Clostridium tyrobutyricum, consisting of a complex between the full-length protein and an N-terminally truncated C-terminal cell wall binding domain (CBD). The truncated CBD is produced through an internal translation start site within the endolysin gene. Mutants affecting the internal translation site change the oligomeric state of the endolysin and reduce lytic activity. The activity can be modulated by reconstitution of the full-length endolysin-CBD complex with free CBD. The same oligomerization mechanism applies to the CD27L endolysin that targets Clostridium difficile and the CS74L endolysin that targets Clostridium sporogenes. When the CTP1L endolysin gene is introduced into the commensal bacterium Lactococcus lactis, the truncated CBD is also produced, showing that the alternative start codon can be used in other bacterial species. The identification of a translational switch affecting oligomerization presented here has implications for the design of effective endolysins for the treatment of bacterial infections. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Up-Regulation of Antioxidant Proteins in the Plasma Proteome during Saturation Diving: Unique Coincidence under Hypobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoto, Hideharu; Iwaya, Keiichi; Ikomi, Fumitaka; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tadano, Yutaka; Fujii, Shigenori; Tachi, Kazuyoshi; Itoh, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Michiya; Inoue, Kimitoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Saturation diving (SD) is one of the safest techniques for tolerating hyperbaric conditions for long durations. However, the changes in the human plasma protein profile that occur during SD are unknown. To identify differential protein expression during or after SD, 65 blood samples from 15 healthy Japanese men trained in SD were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. The expression of two proteins, one 32.4 kDa with an isoelectric point (pI) of 5.8 and the other 44.8 kDa with pI 4.0, were elevated during SD to 60, 100, and 200 meters sea water (msw). The expression of these proteins returned to pre-diving level when the SD training was completed. The two proteins were identified using in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis; the 32.4 kDa protein was transthyretin and the 44.8 kDa protein was alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1. Oxidation was detected at methionine 13 of transthyretin and at methionine 129 of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1 by tandem mass spectrometry. Moreover, haptoglobin was up-regulated during the decompression phase of 200 msw. These plasma proteins up-regulated during SD have a common function as anti-oxidants. This suggests that by coordinating their biological effects, these proteins activate a defense mechanism to counteract the effects of hyperbaric-hyperoxic conditions during SD.

  1. Up-Regulation of Antioxidant Proteins in the Plasma Proteome during Saturation Diving: Unique Coincidence under Hypobaric Hypoxia.

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    Hideharu Domoto

    Full Text Available Saturation diving (SD is one of the safest techniques for tolerating hyperbaric conditions for long durations. However, the changes in the human plasma protein profile that occur during SD are unknown. To identify differential protein expression during or after SD, 65 blood samples from 15 healthy Japanese men trained in SD were analyzed by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. The expression of two proteins, one 32.4 kDa with an isoelectric point (pI of 5.8 and the other 44.8 kDa with pI 4.0, were elevated during SD to 60, 100, and 200 meters sea water (msw. The expression of these proteins returned to pre-diving level when the SD training was completed. The two proteins were identified using in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis; the 32.4 kDa protein was transthyretin and the 44.8 kDa protein was alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1. Oxidation was detected at methionine 13 of transthyretin and at methionine 129 of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1 by tandem mass spectrometry. Moreover, haptoglobin was up-regulated during the decompression phase of 200 msw. These plasma proteins up-regulated during SD have a common function as anti-oxidants. This suggests that by coordinating their biological effects, these proteins activate a defense mechanism to counteract the effects of hyperbaric-hyperoxic conditions during SD.

  2. Regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α expression by interleukin-1β (IL-1 β, insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

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    Angelica Rossi Sartori-Cintra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha regulates genes related to cellular survival under hypoxia. This factor is present in osteroarthritic chondrocytes, and cytokines, such as interleukin-1 beta, participate in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis, thereby increasing the activities of proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases, and accelerating cartilage destruction. We hypothesize that Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α can regulate cytokines (catabolic action and/or growth factors (anabolic action in osteoarthritis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of HIF-1α in human osteoarthritic chondrocytes by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and insulin-like growth factors I (IGF-I and II (IGF-II and to determine the involvement of the phosphatidylinositol-3kinase (PI-3K pathway in this process. METHODS: Human osteroarthritic chondrocytes were stimulated with IL-1β, IGF-I and IGF-II and LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI-3K. Nuclear protein levels and gene expression were analyzed by western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, respectively. RESULTS: HIF-1α expression was upregulated by IL-1β at the protein level but not at the gene level. IGF-I treatment resulted in increases in both the protein and mRNA levels of HIF-1α , whereas IGF-II had no effect on its expression. However, all of these stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway. CONCLUSION: IL-1β upregulated the levels of HIF-1α protein post-transcriptionally, whereas IGF-I increased HIF-1α at the transcript level. In contrast, IGF-II did not affect the protein or gene expression levels of HIF-1α . Furthermore, all of the tested stimuli exploited the PI-3K pathway to some degree. Based on these findings, we are able to suggest that Hypoxia inducible Factor-1 exhibits protective activity in chondrocytes during osteoarthritis.

  3. Tribute to P.L. Lutz: cardiac performance and cardiovascular regulation during anoxia/Hypoxia in freshwwater turtles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, J.; Gesser, Hans; Wang, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    Freshwater turtles overwintering in ice-covered ponds in North America may be exposed to prolonged anoxia, and survive this hostile environment by metabolic depression. Here, we review their cardiovascular function and regulation, with particular emphasis on the factors limiting cardiac performance....... The pronounced anoxia tolerance of the turtle heart is based on the ability to match energy consumption with the low anaerobic ATP production during anoxia. Together with a well-developed temporal and spatial energy buffering by creatine kinase, this allows for cellular energy charge to remain high during anoxia....... Furthermore, the turtle heart is well adapted to handle the adverse effects of free phosphate arising when phosphocreatine stores are used. Anoxia causes tenfold reductions in heart rate and blood flows that match the metabolic depression, and blood pressure is largely maintained through increased systemic...

  4. Multifaceted regulation of translational readthrough by RNA replication elements in a tombusvirus.

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    Peter A Cimino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Translational readthrough of stop codons by ribosomes is a recoding event used by a variety of viruses, including plus-strand RNA tombusviruses. Translation of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp in tombusviruses is mediated using this strategy and we have investigated this process using a variety of in vitro and in vivo approaches. Our results indicate that readthrough generating the RdRp requires a novel long-range RNA-RNA interaction, spanning a distance of ∼3.5 kb, which occurs between a large RNA stem-loop located 3'-proximal to the stop codon and an RNA replication structure termed RIV at the 3'-end of the viral genome. Interestingly, this long-distance RNA-RNA interaction is modulated by mutually-exclusive RNA structures in RIV that represent a type of RNA switch. Moreover, a different long-range RNA-RNA interaction that was previously shown to be necessary for viral RNA replicase assembly was also required for efficient readthrough production of the RdRp. Accordingly, multiple replication-associated RNA elements are involved in modulating the readthrough event in tombusviruses and we propose an integrated mechanistic model to describe how this regulatory network could be advantageous by (i providing a quality control system for culling truncated viral genomes at an early stage in the replication process, (ii mediating cis-preferential replication of viral genomes, and (iii coordinating translational readthrough of the RdRp with viral genome replication. Based on comparative sequence analysis and experimental data, basic elements of this regulatory model extend to other members of Tombusviridae, as well as to viruses outside of this family.

  5. Down-regulation of vascular PPAR-γ contributes to endothelial dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obese mice exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Zhang, Chunlian; Li, Haiou; Hou, Jingdong

    2017-10-14

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is associated with endothelial dysfunction. The prevalence of OSA is linked to an epidemic of obesity. CIH has recently been reported to cause endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obese animals by exaggerating oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PPAR-γ, a ligand-inducible transcription factor that exerts anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, is down-regulated in the peripheral tissues in diet-induce obesity. We tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of vascular PPAR-γ in diet-induced obesity enhances inflammation and oxidative stress in response to CIH, resulting in endothelial dysfunction. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD) or a low-fat diet (LFD) and simultaneously exposed to CIH or intermittent air for 6 weeks. An additional HFD group received a combination of CIH and PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone for 6 weeks. Endothelial-dependent vasodilation was impaired only in HFD group exposed to CIH, compared with other groups, but was restored by concomitant pioglitazone treatment. Molecular studies revealed that vascular PPAR-γ expression and activity were reduced in HFD groups, compared with LFD groups, but were reversed by pioglitazone treatment. In addition, CIH elevated vascular expression of NADPH oxidase 4 and dihydroethidium fluorescence, and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in both LFD and HFD groups, but these increases was significantly greater in HFD group, along with decreased vascular eNOS activity. Pioglitazone treatment of HFD group prevented CIH-induced changes in above molecular markers. The results suggest that HFD-induced obesity down-regulates vascular PPAR-γ, which results in exaggerated oxidative stress and inflammation in response to CIH, contributing to endothelial dysfunction. This finding may provide new insights into the mechanisms by which OSA

  6. Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

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    Lin, Hui-Hsuan [School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chou, Fen-Pi [Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chau-Jong [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsuan, Shu-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine and Life Science, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, No.89, Wen Hwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 717, Taiwan (China); Wang, Cheng-Kun [E-Chyun Dermatology Clinic, No.70, Sec. 3, Jhonghua E. Rd., East District, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Jing-Hsien [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine and Life Science, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, No.89, Wen Hwa 1st St., Rende Shiang, Tainan County 717, Taiwan (China)

    2011-02-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in A549 cells. HIF-1{alpha} plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1{alpha} was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1{alpha}, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1{alpha} and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1{alpha} inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGF{beta}1/PHD2/HIF-1{alpha} pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGF{beta}1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1{alpha} transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

  7. Andrographolide down-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in human non-small cell lung cancer A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Hui-Hsuan; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chou, Fen-Pi; Wang, Chau-Jong; Hsuan, Shu-Wen; Wang, Cheng-Kun; Chen, Jing-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone isolated from a traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is known to possess multiple pharmacological activities. In our previous study, Andro had been shown to inhibit non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cell migration and invasion via down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway. Here we demonstrated that Andro inhibited the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in A549 cells. HIF-1α plays an important role in tumor growth, angiogenesis and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC. The Andro-induced decrease of cellular protein level of HIF-1α was correlated with a rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of HIF-1α, and was accompanied by increased expressions of hydroxyl-HIF-1α and prolyl hydroxylase (PHD2), and a later decrease of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon the treatment of Andro. The Andro-inhibited VEGF expression appeared to be a consequence of HIF-1α inactivation, because its DNA binding activity was suppressed by Andro. Molecular data showed that all these effects of Andro might be mediated via TGFβ1/PHD2/HIF-1α pathway, as demonstrated by the transfection of TGFβ1 overexpression vector and PHD2 siRNA, and the usage of a pharmacological MG132 inhibitor. Furthermore, we elucidated the involvement of Andro in HIF-1α transduced VEGF expression in A549 cells and other NSCLC cell lines. In conclusion, these results highlighted the potential effects of Andro, which may be developed as a chemotherapeutic or an anti-angiogenesis agent for NSCLC in the future.

  8. Cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 differentially regulate blood pressure and cerebrovascular responses to acute and chronic intermittent hypoxia: implications for sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Andrew E; Pun, Matiram; Yang, Christina; Nicholl, David D M; Steinback, Craig D; Slater, Donna M; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine E; Hanly, Patrick J; Ahmed, Sofia B; Poulin, Marc J

    2014-05-09

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease resulting from intermittent hypoxia (IH)-induced inflammation. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-formed prostanoids mediate the inflammatory response, and regulate blood pressure and cerebral blood flow (CBF), but their role in blood pressure and CBF responses to IH is unknown. Therefore, this study's objective was to determine the role of prostanoids in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular responses to IH. Twelve healthy, male participants underwent three, 6-hour IH exposures. For 4 days before each IH exposure, participants ingested a placebo, indomethacin (nonselective COX inhibitor), or Celebrex(®) (selective COX-2 inhibitor) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study design. Pre- and post-IH blood pressure, CBF, and urinary prostanoids were assessed. Additionally, blood pressure and urinary prostanoids were assessed in newly diagnosed, untreated OSA patients (n=33). Nonselective COX inhibition increased pre-IH blood pressure (P ≤ 0.04) and decreased pre-IH CBF (P=0.04) while neither physiological variable was affected by COX-2 inhibition (P ≥ 0.90). Post-IH, MAP was elevated (P ≤ 0.05) and CBF was unchanged with placebo and nonselective COX inhibition. Selective COX-2 inhibition abrogated the IH-induced MAP increase (P=0.19), but resulted in lower post-IH CBF (P=0.01). Prostanoids were unaffected by IH, except prostaglandin E2 was elevated with the placebo (P=0.02). Finally, OSA patients had elevated blood pressure (P ≤ 0.4) and COX-1 formed thromboxane A2 concentrations (P=0.02). COX-2 and COX-1 have divergent roles in modulating vascular responses to acute and chronic IH. Moreover, COX-1 inhibition may mitigate cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity in OSA. www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01280006.

  9. MicroRNAs regulate T-cell production of interleukin-9 and identify hypoxia-inducible factor-2α as an important regulator of T helper 9 and regulatory T-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Garden, Oliver A; Lang, Florian; Cobb, Bradley S

    2016-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate many aspects of helper T cell (Th) development and function. Here we found that they are required for the suppression of interleukin-9 (IL-9) expression in Th9 cells and other Th subsets. Two highly related miRNAs (miR-15b and miR-16) that we previously found to play an important role in regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation were capable of suppressing IL-9 expression when they were over-expressed in Th9 cells. We used these miRNAs as tools to identify novel regulators of IL-9 expression and found that they could regulate the expression of Epas1, which encodes hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α. HIF proteins regulate metabolic pathway usage that is important in determining appropriate Th differentiation. The related protein, HIF-1α enhances Th17 differentiation and inhibits Treg cell differentiation. Here we found that HIF-2α was required for IL-9 expression in Th9 cells, but its expression was not sufficient in other Th subsets. Furthermore, HIF-2α suppressed Treg cell differentiation like HIF-1α, demonstrating both similar and distinct roles of the HIF proteins in Th differentiation and adding a further dimension to their function. Ironically, even though miR-15b and miR-16 suppressed HIF-2α expression in Treg cells, inhibiting their function in Treg cells did not lead to an increase in IL-9 expression. Therefore, the physiologically relevant miRNAs that regulate IL-9 expression in Treg cells and other subsets remain unknown. Nevertheless, the analysis of miR-15b and miR-16 function led to the discovery of the importance of HIF-2α so this work demonstrated the utility of studying miRNA function to identify novel regulatory pathways in helper T-cell development. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Glycobiology Modifications in Intratumoral Hypoxia: The Breathless Side of Glycans Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio F. Silva-filho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational and co-translational enzymatic addition of glycans (glycosylation to proteins, lipids, and other carbohydrates, is a powerful regulator of the molecular machinery involved in cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, and signal transduction, and is usually seen in both in vivo and in vitro cancer models. Glycosyltransferases can alter the glycosylation pattern of normal cells, subsequently leading to the establishment and progression of several diseases, including cancer. Furthermore, a growing amount of research has shown that different oxygen tensions, mainly hypoxia, leads to a markedly altered glycosylation, resulting in altered glycan-receptor interactions. Alteration of intracellular glucose metabolism, from aerobic cellular respiration to anaerobic glycolysis, inhibition of integrin 3α1β translocation to the plasma membrane, decreased 1,2-fucosylation of cell-surface glycans, and galectin overexpression are some consequences of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Additionally, increased expression of gangliosides carrying N-glycolyl sialic acid can also be significantly affected by hypoxia. For all these reasons, it is possible to realize that hypoxia strongly alters glycobiologic events within tumors, leading to changes in their behavior. This review aims to analyze the complexity and importance of glycoconjugates and their molecular interaction network in the hypoxic context of many solid tumors.

  11. The multi-targeted kinase inhibitor sorafenib inhibits enterovirus 71 replication by regulating IRES-dependent translation of viral proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Duan, Hao; Liu, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xin; Zhu, Meng; Guo, Jitao; Zhao, Zhenlong; Meng, Lirong; Peng, Yihong

    2014-06-01

    The activation of ERK and p38 signal cascade in host cells has been demonstrated to be essential for picornavirus enterovirus 71 (EV71) replication and up-regulation of virus-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandins E2 (PGE2) expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of sorafenib, a clinically approved anti-cancer multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, on the propagation and pathogenesis of EV71, with a view to its possible mechanism and potential use in the design of therapy regimes for Hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) patients with life threatening neurological complications. In this study, non-toxic concentrations of sorafenib were shown to inhibit the yield of infectious progeny EV71 (clinical BC08 strain) by about 90% in three different cell types. A similar inhibitory effect of sorafenib was observed on the synthesis of both viral genomic RNA and the VP1 protein. Interestingly, sorafenib exerted obvious inhibition of the EV71 internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-mediated translation, the first step in picornavirus replication, by linking it to a firefly luciferase reporter gene. Sorafenib was also able to prevent both EV71-induced CPE and the activation of ERK and p38, which contributes to up-regulation COX-2/PGE2 expression induced by the virus. Overall, this study shows that sorafenib strongly inhibits EV71 replication at least in part by regulating viral IRES-dependent translation of viral proteins, indicating a novel potential strategy for the treatment of HFMD patients with severe neurological complications. To our knowledge, this is the first report that investigates the mechanism by which sorafenib inhibits EV71 replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MicroRNA, SND1, and alterations in translational regulation in colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression by microRNA (miRNA) has recently attracted major interest in relation to its involvement in cancer development. miRNA is a member of small non-coding RNA, consists of 22-24 nucleotides and regulates expression of target mRNA species in a post-transcriptional manner by being incorporated with RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). Staphylococcal nuclease homology domain containing 1 (SND1), a component of RISC, is frequently up-regulated in human colon cancers and also chemically induced colon cancers in animals. We here showed that SDN1 is involved in miRNA-mediated gene suppression and overexpression of SND1 in colon cancer cells causes down-regulation of APC without altering APC mRNA levels. As for the miRNA expression profile in human colon cancer, miR-34a was among the list of down-regulated miRNA. Expression of miR-34a is tightly regulated by p53, and ectopic expression of miR-34a in colon cancer cells causes remarkable reduction of cell proliferation and induces senescence-like phenotypes. MiR-34a also participates in the positive feedback loop of the p53 tumor suppressor network. This circuitry mechanism for p53 activation is of interest in understanding the tumor suppressive function of miR-34a in colon carcinogenesis. miRNA should also be considered as novel anti-cancer agents in tumor suppressive therapeutic applications.

  13. KNK437, abrogates hypoxia-induced radioresistance by dual targeting of the AKT and HIF-1α survival pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oommen, Deepu; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► KNK437, a benzylidene lactam compound, is a novel radiosensitizer. ► KNK437 inhibits AKT signaling and abrogates the accumulation of HIF-1α under hypoxia. ► KNK437 abrogates hypoxia induced resistance to radiation. -- Abstract: KNK437 is a benzylidene lactam compound known to inhibit stress-induced synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPs promote radioresistance and play a major role in stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). HIF-1α is widely responsible for tumor resistance to radiation under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that KNK437 sensitizes cancer cells to radiation and overrides hypoxia-induced radioresistance via destabilizing HIF-1α. Treatment of human cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and T98G with KNK437 sensitized them to ionizing radiation (IR). Surprisingly, IR did not induce HSPs in these cell lines. As hypothesized, KNK437 abrogated the accumulation of HIF-1α in hypoxic cells. However, there was no induction of HSPs under hypoxic conditions. Moreover, the proteosome inhibitor MG132 did not restore HIF-1α levels in KNK437-treated cells. This suggested that the absence of HIF-1α in hypoxic cells was not due to the enhanced protein degradation. HIF-1α is mainly regulated at the level of post-transcription and AKT is known to modulate the translation of HIF-1α mRNA. Interestingly, pre-treatment of cells with KNK437 inhibited AKT signaling. Furthermore, down regulation of AKT by siRNA abrogated HIF-1α levels under hypoxia. Interestingly, KNK437 reduced cell survival in hypoxic conditions and inhibited hypoxia-induced resistance to radiation. Taken together, these data suggest that KNK437 is an effective radiosensitizer that targets multiple pro-survival stress response pathways.

  14. The regulation of protein synthesis and translation factors by CD3 and CD28 in human primary T lymphocytes

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    Proud Christopher G

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of human resting T lymphocytes results in an immediate increase in protein synthesis. The increase in protein synthesis after 16–24 h has been linked to the increased protein levels of translation initiation factors. However, the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation has not been studied in great detail. We studied the regulation of protein synthesis after 1 h of activation using αCD3 antibody to stimulate the T cell receptor and αCD28 antibody to provide the co-stimulus. Results Activation of the T cells with both antibodies led to a sustained increase in the rate of protein synthesis. The activities and/or phosphorylation states of several translation factors were studied during the first hour of stimulation with αCD3 and αCD28 to explore the mechanism underlying the activation of protein synthesis. The initial increase in protein synthesis was accompanied by activation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF 2B, and of p70 S6 kinase and by dephosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF 2. Similar signal transduction pathways, as assessed using signal transduction inhibitors, are involved in the regulation of protein synthesis, eIF2B activity and p70 S6 kinase activity. A new finding was that the p38 MAPK α/β pathway was involved in the regulation of overall protein synthesis in primary T cells. Unexpectedly, no changes were detected in the phosphorylation state of the cap-binding protein eIF4E and the eIF4E-binding protein 4E-BP1, or the formation of the cap-binding complex eIF4F. Conclusions Both eIF2B and p70 S6 kinase play important roles in the regulation of protein synthesis during the early onset of T cell activation.

  15. Interplay between the catabolite repression control protein Crc, Hfq and RNA in Hfq-dependent translational regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Wulf, Alexander; Campagne, Sébastien; Pei, Xue-Yuan; Wolfinger, Michael T; Forlani, Giada; Prindl, Konstantin; Abdou, Laetitia; Resch, Armin; Allain, Frederic H-T; Luisi, Ben F; Urlaub, Henning; Bläsi, Udo

    2018-02-16

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa the RNA chaperone Hfq and the catabolite repression control protein (Crc) act as post-transcriptional regulators during carbon catabolite repression (CCR). In this regard Crc is required for full-fledged Hfq-mediated translational repression of catabolic genes. RNAseq based transcriptome analyses revealed a significant overlap between the Crc and Hfq regulons, which in conjunction with genetic data supported a concerted action of both proteins. Biochemical and biophysical approaches further suggest that Crc and Hfq form an assembly in the presence of RNAs containing A-rich motifs, and that Crc interacts with both, Hfq and RNA. Through these interactions, Crc enhances the stability of Hfq/Crc/RNA complexes, which can explain its facilitating role in Hfq-mediated translational repression. Hence, these studies revealed for the first time insights into how an interacting protein can modulate Hfq function. Moreover, Crc is shown to interfere with binding of a regulatory RNA to Hfq, which bears implications for riboregulation. These results are discussed in terms of a working model, wherein Crc prioritizes the function of Hfq toward utilization of favored carbon sources.

  16. Antioxidant systems are regulated by nitric oxide-mediated post-translational modifications (NO-PTMs

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    Juan Carlos Begara-Morales

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs peroxiredoxins (Prx and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance.

  17. Progress toward overcoming hypoxia-induced resistance to solid tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karakashev, Sergey V; Reginato, Mauricio J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic tumors are associated with poor clinical outcome for multiple types of human cancer. This may be due, in part, to hypoxic cancer cells being resistant to anticancer therapy, including radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and targeted therapy. Hypoxia inducible factor 1, a major regulator of cellular response to hypoxia, regulates the expression of genes that are involved in multiple aspects of cancer biology, including cell survival, proliferation, metabolism, invasion, and angiogenesis. Here, we review multiple pathways regulated by hypoxia/hypoxia inducible factor 1 in cancer cells and discuss the latest advancements in overcoming hypoxia-mediated tumor resistance

  18. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...... and possible aura in 4 of 15 patients. Hypoxia did not change glutamate concentration in the visual cortex compared to sham, but increased lactate concentration (P = 0.028) and circumference of the cranial arteries (P ... suggests that hypoxia may provoke migraine headache and aura symptoms in some patients. The mechanisms behind the migraine-inducing effect of hypoxia should be further investigated....

  19. Regulation of Human Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance by Hypoxia and the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1

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    Federica Raggi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages (Mf are a heterogeneous population of tissue-resident professional phagocytes and a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate at sites of inflammation, infection, and tumor growth. They can undergo diverse forms of activation in response to environmental factors, polarizing into specialized functional subsets. A common hallmark of the pathologic environment is represented by hypoxia. The impact of hypoxia on human Mf polarization has not been fully established. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of a hypoxic environment reflecting that occurring in vivo in diseased tissues on the ability of human Mf to polarize into classically activated (proinflammatory M1 and alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory M2 subsets. We present data showing that hypoxia hinders Mf polarization toward the M1 phenotype by decreasing the expression of T cell costimulatory molecules and chemokine homing receptors and the production of proinflammatory, Th1-priming cytokines typical of classical activation, while promoting their acquisition of phenotypic and secretory features of alternative activation. Furthermore, we identify the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1, a member of the Ig-like immunoregulatory receptor family, as a hypoxia-inducible gene in Mf and demonstrate that its engagement by an agonist Ab reverses the M2-polarizing effect of hypoxia imparting a M1-skewed phenotype to Mf. Finally, we provide evidence that Mf infiltrating the inflamed hypoxic joints of children affected by oligoarticular juvenile idiopatic arthritis express high surface levels of TREM-1 associated with predominant M1 polarization and suggest the potential of this molecule in driving M1 proinflammatory reprogramming in the hypoxic synovial environment.

  20. Regulation of Human Macrophage M1–M2 Polarization Balance by Hypoxia and the Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, Federica; Pelassa, Simone; Pierobon, Daniele; Penco, Federica; Gattorno, Marco; Novelli, Francesco; Eva, Alessandra; Varesio, Luigi; Giovarelli, Mirella; Bosco, Maria Carla

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages (Mf) are a heterogeneous population of tissue-resident professional phagocytes and a major component of the leukocyte infiltrate at sites of inflammation, infection, and tumor growth. They can undergo diverse forms of activation in response to environmental factors, polarizing into specialized functional subsets. A common hallmark of the pathologic environment is represented by hypoxia. The impact of hypoxia on human Mf polarization has not been fully established. The objective of this study was to elucidate the effects of a hypoxic environment reflecting that occurring in vivo in diseased tissues on the ability of human Mf to polarize into classically activated (proinflammatory M1) and alternatively activated (anti-inflammatory M2) subsets. We present data showing that hypoxia hinders Mf polarization toward the M1 phenotype by decreasing the expression of T cell costimulatory molecules and chemokine homing receptors and the production of proinflammatory, Th1-priming cytokines typical of classical activation, while promoting their acquisition of phenotypic and secretory features of alternative activation. Furthermore, we identify the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1, a member of the Ig-like immunoregulatory receptor family, as a hypoxia-inducible gene in Mf and demonstrate that its engagement by an agonist Ab reverses the M2-polarizing effect of hypoxia imparting a M1-skewed phenotype to Mf. Finally, we provide evidence that Mf infiltrating the inflamed hypoxic joints of children affected by oligoarticular juvenile idiopatic arthritis express high surface levels of TREM-1 associated with predominant M1 polarization and suggest the potential of this molecule in driving M1 proinflammatory reprogramming in the hypoxic synovial environment. PMID:28936211

  1. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Koshi N., E-mail: kishimoto@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuo [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  2. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  3. Comparative aspects of hypoxia tolerance of the ectothermic vertebrate heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gesser, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    This chapter reviews cardiac contractile performance and its regulation during hypoxia/anoxia with regard to cellular metabolism and energy state, in particular hypoxia-tolerant ectothermic vertebrates. Overall the contractile performance of the hypoxic isolated heart muscle varies in a way...

  4. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  5. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses.Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases.These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  6. Global regulation of mRNA translation and stability in the early Drosophila embryo by the Smaug RNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linan; Dumelie, Jason G; Li, Xiao; Cheng, Matthew Hk; Yang, Zhiyong; Laver, John D; Siddiqui, Najeeb U; Westwood, J Timothy; Morris, Quaid; Lipshitz, Howard D; Smibert, Craig A

    2014-01-07

    Smaug is an RNA-binding protein that induces the degradation and represses the translation of mRNAs in the early Drosophila embryo. Smaug has two identified direct target mRNAs that it differentially regulates: nanos and Hsp83. Smaug represses the translation of nanos mRNA but has only a modest effect on its stability, whereas it destabilizes Hsp83 mRNA but has no detectable effect on Hsp83 translation. Smaug is required to destabilize more than one thousand mRNAs in the early embryo, but whether these transcripts represent direct targets of Smaug is unclear and the extent of Smaug-mediated translational repression is unknown. To gain a panoramic view of Smaug function in the early embryo, we identified mRNAs that are bound to Smaug using RNA co-immunoprecipitation followed by hybridization to DNA microarrays. We also identified mRNAs that are translationally repressed by Smaug using polysome gradients and microarrays. Comparison of the bound mRNAs to those that are translationally repressed by Smaug and those that require Smaug for their degradation suggests that a large fraction of Smaug's target mRNAs are both translationally repressed and degraded by Smaug. Smaug directly regulates components of the TRiC/CCT chaperonin, the proteasome regulatory particle and lipid droplets, as well as many metabolic enzymes, including several glycolytic enzymes. Smaug plays a direct and global role in regulating the translation and stability of a large fraction of the mRNAs in the early Drosophila embryo, and has unanticipated functions in control of protein folding and degradation, lipid droplet function and metabolism.

  7. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pouly

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2, whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd, predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO, rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+.

  8. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe eBernier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane.All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e. homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in DRG sensory neurons and microglia.

  9. Proteomic analysis reveals APC-dependent post-translational modifications and identifies a novel regulator of β-catenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundon, Malachi A; Schlesinger, Danielle R; Parthasarathy, Amritha; Smith, Samantha L; Kolev, Hannah M; Vinson, David A; Kunttas-Tatli, Ezgi; McCartney, Brooke M; Minden, Jonathan S

    2016-07-15

    Wnt signaling generates patterns in all embryos, from flies to humans, and controls cell fate, proliferation and metabolic homeostasis. Inappropriate Wnt pathway activation results in diseases, including colorectal cancer. The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene encodes a multifunctional protein that is an essential regulator of Wnt signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Although progress has been made in defining the role of APC in a normal cellular context, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of APC-dependent cellular function and dysfunction. We expanded the APC-associated protein network using a combination of genetics and a proteomic technique called two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). We show that loss of Drosophila Apc2 causes protein isoform changes reflecting misregulation of post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are not dependent on β-catenin transcriptional activity. Mass spectrometry revealed that proteins involved in metabolic and biosynthetic pathways, protein synthesis and degradation, and cell signaling are affected by Apc2 loss. We demonstrate that changes in phosphorylation partially account for the altered PTMs in APC mutants, suggesting that APC mutants affect other types of PTM. Finally, through this approach Aminopeptidase P was identified as a new regulator of β-catenin abundance in Drosophila embryos. This study provides new perspectives on the cellular effects of APC that might lead to a deeper understanding of its role in development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Role of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Jahani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organisms are exposed to oxygen deprivation (Hypoxia in various physiological and pathological conditions. There are different conserve evolutionary responses to counterview with this stress that primary transcriptional response to stress related to hypoxia is interceded by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 in mammals. This factor can regulate different genes that have essential roles in adaptation to this condition. In this review, the role of this factor in physiological and pathological conditions under hypoxic condition has been evaluated after examining structural features and regulation characteristics of HIF-1. Methods: First, articles related to the keywords of hypoxia and HIF-1 (from 1991-2016 were searched from valid databases such as Springer Link, Google Scholar, PubMed and Science direct. Then, the articles correlated with hypoxia, HIF-1 and their roles in physiological and pathological conditions (120 articles were searched and just 64 articles were selected for this study. Result: According to studies, there are different genes in cells and organs that can be regulated by HIF-1. Activation of genes expression by this protein occurs through its linkage to cis-acting of 50 base pair hypoxia response element (HRE region located in their promotor and enhancer. Depending on circumstances, activation of these genes can be beneficial or harmful. Conclusion: Activation of different genes in hypoxia by HIF-1 has different effects on physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, HIF-1, as a hypoxia-inducible factor in hypoxic conditions, plays an essential role in the adaptation of cells and organs to changes related to the presence of oxygen.

  11. Expression of MUC17 is regulated by HIF1α-mediated hypoxic responses and requires a methylation-free hypoxia responsible element in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kitamoto

    Full Text Available MUC17 is a type 1 membrane-bound glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. Recent studies have demonstrated that the aberrant overexpression of MUC17 is correlated with the malignant potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs; however, the exact regulatory mechanism of MUC17 expression has yet to be identified. Here, we provide the first report of the MUC17 regulatory mechanism under hypoxia, an essential feature of the tumor microenvironment and a driving force of cancer progression. Our data revealed that MUC17 was significantly induced by hypoxic stimulation through a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α-dependent pathway in some pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., AsPC1, whereas other pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., BxPC3 exhibited little response to hypoxia. Interestingly, these low-responsive cells have highly methylated CpG motifs within the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, 5'-RCGTG-3', a binding site for HIF1α. Thus, we investigated the demethylation effects of CpG at HRE on the hypoxic induction of MUC17. Treatment of low-responsive cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine followed by additional hypoxic incubation resulted in the restoration of hypoxic MUC17 induction. Furthermore, DNA methylation of HRE in pancreatic tissues from patients with PDACs showed higher hypomethylation status as compared to those from non-cancerous tissues, and hypomethylation was also correlated with MUC17 mRNA expression. Taken together, these findings suggested that the HIF1α-mediated hypoxic signal pathway contributes to MUC17 expression, and DNA methylation of HRE could be a determinant of the hypoxic inducibility of MUC17 in pancreatic cancer cells.

  12. Reciprocal Regulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 2α and GLI1 Expression Associated With the Radioresistance of Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jiancheng [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wu, Kaijie [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Gao, Dexuan [Department of Urology, Shandong Provincial Hospital affiliated with Shandong University, Ji' nan (China); Zhu, Guodong; Wu, Dapeng; Wang, Xinyang; Chen, Yule; Du, Yuefeng; Song, Wenbin; Ma, Zhenkun [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Authement, Craig; Saha, Debabrata [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Hsieh, Jer-Tsong, E-mail: jt.hsieh@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Urology, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); He, Dalin, E-mail: dalinhe@yahoo.com [Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical School, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is often considered a radioresistant tumor, but the molecular mechanism underlying its radioresistance is poorly understood. This study explored the roles of hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF2α) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-GLI1 signaling in mediating the radioresistance of RCC cells and to unveil the interaction between these 2 signaling pathways. Methods and Materials: The activities of SHH-GLI1 signaling pathway under normoxia and hypoxia in RCC cells were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and luciferase reporter assay. The expression of HIF2α and GLI1 in RCC patients was examined by immunohistochemistry, and their correlation was analyzed. Furthermore, RCC cells were treated with HIF2α-specific shRNA (sh-HIF2α), GLI1 inhibitor GANT61, or a combination to determine the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on RCC cells based on clonogenic assay and double-strand break repair assay. Results: RCC cells exhibited elevated SHH-GLI1 activities under hypoxia, which was mediated by HIF2α. Hypoxia induced GLI1 activation through SMO-independent pathways that could be ablated by PI3K inhibitor or MEK inhibitor. Remarkably, the SHH-GLI1 pathway also upregulated HIF2α expression in normoxia. Apparently, there was a positive correlation between HIF2α and GLI1 expression in RCC patients. The combination of sh-HIF2α and GLI1 inhibitor significantly sensitized RCC cells to IR. Conclusions: Cross-talk between the HIF2α and SHH-GLI1 pathways was demonstrated in RCC. Cotargeting these 2 pathways, significantly sensitizing RCC cells to IR, provides a novel strategy for RCC treatment.

  13. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Y.K.; Hecht, N.B.

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA

  14. Possible involvement of caspase-6 and -7 but not caspase-3 in the regulation of hypoxia-induced apoptosis in tube-forming endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Tone, Shigenobu; Suzuki, Akio; Fujimori, Yoshihiro; Nakano, Takashi; Kaji, Kazuhiko; Ohta, Toshiro

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk failed, while p38 inhibitor SB203580 succeeded, to prevent chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation induced by hypoxia in tube-forming HUVECs. In this study, we investigated the reasons for zVAD-fmk's inability to inhibit these morphological changes at the molecular level. The inhibitor effectively inhibited DNA ladder formation and activation of caspase-3 and -6, but it surprisingly failed to inhibit caspase-7 activation. On the other hand, SB203580 successfully inhibited all of these molecular events. When zLEHD-fmk, which specifically inhibits initiator caspase-9 upstream of caspase-3, was used, it inhibited caspase-3 activation but failed to inhibit caspase-6 and -7 activation. It also failed to inhibit hypoxia-induced chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation and DNA ladder formation. Taken together, our results indicate that, during hypoxia, caspase-7 is responsible for chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation while caspase-6 is responsible for DNA ladder formation

  15. In vitro ischemia suppresses hypoxic induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α by inhibition of synthesis and not enhanced degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppagounder, Saravanan S; Basso, Manuela; Sleiman, Sama F; Ma, Thong C; Speer, Rachel E; Smirnova, Natalya A; Gazaryan, Irina G; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2013-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) mediates a broad, conserved adaptive response to hypoxia, and the HIF pathway is a potential therapeutic target in cerebral ischemia. This study investigated the mechanism by which in vitro ischemia (oxygen-glucose deprivation; OGD) affects canonical hypoxic HIF-1α stabilization. We validated the use of a reporter containing the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α fused to firefly luciferase (ODD-luc) to monitor quantitatively distinct biochemical events leading to hypoxic HIF-1α expression or stabilization in a human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y). When OGD was imposed following a 2-hr hypoxic stabilization of ODD-luc, the levels of the reporter were reduced, consistent with prior models proposing that OGD enhances HIF prolylhydroxylase (PHD) activity. Surprisingly, PHD inhibitors and proteasome inhibitors do not stabilize ODD-luc in OGD. Furthermore, OGD does not affect the half-life of ODD-luc protein following hypoxia, suggesting that OGD abrogates hypoxic HIF-1α induction by reducing HIF-1α synthesis rather than by enhancing its degradation. We observed ATP depletion under OGD vs. hypoxia and propose that ATP depletion enhances translational suppression, overcoming the selective synthesis of HIF concurrent with global decreases in protein synthesis in hypoxia. Taken together, these findings biochemically characterize a practical reporter for monitoring HIF-1α levels and support a novel model for HIF regulation in an in vitro model of human ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Translational control and differential RNA decay are key elements regulating postsegregational expression of the killer protein encoded by the parB locus of plasmid R1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, K; Helin, K; Christensen, O W

    1988-01-01

    The parB locus of plasmid R1, which mediates plasmid stability via postsegregational killing of plasmid-free cells, encodes two genes, hok and sok. The hok gene product is a potent cell-killing protein. The hok gene is regulated at the translational level by the sok gene-encoded repressor, a small...

  17. Inflammatory conditions induce IRES-dependent translation of cyp24a1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Rübsamen

    Full Text Available Rapid alterations in protein expression are commonly regulated by adjusting translation. In addition to cap-dependent translation, which is e.g. induced by pro-proliferative signaling via the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR-kinase, alternative modes of translation, such as internal ribosome entry site (IRES-dependent translation, are often enhanced under stress conditions, even if cap-dependent translation is attenuated. Common stress stimuli comprise nutrient deprivation, hypoxia, but also inflammatory signals supplied by infiltrating immune cells. Yet, the impact of inflammatory microenvironments on translation in tumor cells still remains largely elusive. In the present study, we aimed at identifying translationally deregulated targets in tumor cells under inflammatory conditions. Using polysome profiling and microarray analysis, we identified cyp24a1 (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 24-hydroxylase to be translationally upregulated in breast tumor cells co-cultured with conditioned medium of activated monocyte-derived macrophages (CM. Using bicistronic reporter assays, we identified and validated an IRES within the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR of cyp24a1, which enhances translation of cyp24a1 upon CM treatment. Furthermore, IRES-dependent translation of cyp24a1 by CM was sensitive to phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K inhibition, while constitutive activation of Akt sufficed to induce its IRES activity. Our data provide evidence that cyp24a1 expression is translationally regulated via an IRES element, which is responsive to an inflammatory environment. Considering the negative feedback impact of cyp24a1 on the vitamin D responses, the identification of a novel, translational mechanism of cyp24a1 regulation might open new possibilities to overcome the current limitations of vitamin D as tumor therapeutic option.

  18. A Canonical DREB2-Type Transcription Factor in Lily Is Post-translationally Regulated and Mediates Heat Stress Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on studies of monocot crops and eudicot model plants, the DREB2 class of AP2-type transcription factor has been shown to play crucial roles in various abiotic stresses, especially in the upstream of the heat stress response; however, research on DREB2s has not been reported in non-gramineous monocot plants. Here, we identified a novel DREB2 (LlDREB2B from lily (Lilium longiflorum, which was homologous to AtDREB2A of Arabidopsis, OsDREB2B of rice, and ZmDREB2A of maize. LlDREB2B was induced by heat, cold, salt, and mannitol stress, and its protein had transcriptional activity, was located in the nucleus, was able to bind to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE, and participated in the heat-responsive pathway of HsfA3. Overexpression of LlDREB2B in Arabidopsis activated expression of downstream genes and improved thermotolerance. LlDREB2B was not regulated by alternative splicing; functional transcripts accumulated under either normal or heat-stress conditions. A potential PEST sequence was predicted in LlDREB2B, but the stability of the LlDREB2B protein was not positively affected when the predicated PEST sequence was deleted. Further analysis revealed that the predicated PEST sequence lacked a SBC or SBC-like motif allowing interaction with BPMs and required for negative regulation. Nevertheless, LlDREB2B was still regulated at the post-translational level by interaction with AtDRIP1 and AtDRIP2 of Arabidopsis. In addition, LlDREB2B also interacted with AtRCD1 and LlRCD1 via a potential RIM motif located at amino acids 215–245. Taken together, our results show that LlDREB2B participated in the establishment of thermotolerance, and its regulation was different from that of the orthologs of gramineous and eudicot plants.

  19. A Canonical DREB2-Type Transcription Factor in Lily Is Post-translationally Regulated and Mediates Heat Stress Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ze; Liang, Jiahui; Zhang, Shuai; Zhang, Bing; Zhao, Qingcui; Li, Guoqing; Yang, Xi; Wang, Chengpeng; He, Junna; Yi, Mingfang

    2018-01-01

    Based on studies of monocot crops and eudicot model plants, the DREB2 class of AP2-type transcription factor has been shown to play crucial roles in various abiotic stresses, especially in the upstream of the heat stress response; however, research on DREB2s has not been reported in non-gramineous monocot plants. Here, we identified a novel DREB2 (LlDREB2B) from lily ( Lilium longiflorum ), which was homologous to AtDREB2A of Arabidopsis, OsDREB2B of rice, and ZmDREB2A of maize. LlDREB2B was induced by heat, cold, salt, and mannitol stress, and its protein had transcriptional activity, was located in the nucleus, was able to bind to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE), and participated in the heat-responsive pathway of HsfA3. Overexpression of LlDREB2B in Arabidopsis activated expression of downstream genes and improved thermotolerance. LlDREB2B was not regulated by alternative splicing; functional transcripts accumulated under either normal or heat-stress conditions. A potential PEST sequence was predicted in LlDREB2B, but the stability of the LlDREB2B protein was not positively affected when the predicated PEST sequence was deleted. Further analysis revealed that the predicated PEST sequence lacked a SBC or SBC-like motif allowing interaction with BPMs and required for negative regulation. Nevertheless, LlDREB2B was still regulated at the post-translational level by interaction with AtDRIP1 and AtDRIP2 of Arabidopsis. In addition, LlDREB2B also interacted with AtRCD1 and LlRCD1 via a potential RIM motif located at amino acids 215-245. Taken together, our results show that LlDREB2B participated in the establishment of thermotolerance, and its regulation was different from that of the orthologs of gramineous and eudicot plants.

  20. The upstream open reading frame of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A mRNA negatively regulates translation of the downstream main open reading frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Ki, E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN1A mRNA is a bona fide NMD substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uORF of CDKN1A mRNA is efficiently translated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Translation of downstream main ORF is negatively regulated by translation of uORF in CDKN1A mRNA. -- Abstract: The first round of translation occurs on mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), which is composed of nuclear cap-binding protein 80 and 20 (CBP80/20). During this round of translation, aberrant mRNAs are recognized and downregulated in abundance by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which is one of the mRNA quality control mechanisms. Here, our microarray analysis reveals that the level of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A; also known as Waf1/p21) mRNAs increases in cells depleted of cellular NMD factors. Intriguingly, CDKN1A mRNA contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF), which is a NMD-inducing feature. Using chimeric reporter constructs, we find that the uORF of CDKN1A mRNA negatively modulates translation of the main downstream ORF. These findings provide biological insights into the possible role of NMD in diverse biological pathways mediated by CDKN1A.

  1. Hypoxia and hypoxia mimetics decrease aquaporin 5 (AQP5 expression through both hypoxia inducible factor-1α and proteasome-mediated pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitesh D Kawedia

    Full Text Available The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5, we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70% decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the mouse lung epithelial cell line MLE-12. The action of hypoxia and cobalt on AQP5 transcription was demonstrated by directly quantifying heternonuclear RNA by real-time PCR. Dominant negative mutants of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF-1α and HIF-1α siRNA blocked the action of cobalt, showing that HIF-1α is a key component in this mechanism. The proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor-III completely abolished the effect of hypoxia and cobalt both at the protein and mRNA level indicating that the proteasome pathway is probably involved not only for the stability of HIF-1α protein, but for the stability of unidentified transcription factors that regulate AQP5 transcription. These studies reveal a potentially important physiological mechanism linking hypoxic stress and membrane water channels.

  2. Hypoxia and Hypoxia Mimetics Decrease Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) Expression through Both Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α and Proteasome-Mediated Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawedia, Jitesh D.; Yang, Fan; Sartor, Maureen A.; Gozal, David; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria; Menon, Anil G.

    2013-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium plays a central role in gas exchange and fluid transport, and is therefore critical for normal lung function. Since the bulk of water flux across this epithelium depends on the membrane water channel Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), we asked whether hypoxia had any effect on AQP5 expression. We show that hypoxia causes a significant (70%) decrease in AQP5 expression in the lungs of mice exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia and the hypoxia mimetic, cobalt, also caused similar decreases in AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the mouse lung epithelial cell line MLE-12. The action of hypoxia and cobalt on AQP5 transcription was demonstrated by directly quantifying heternonuclear RNA by real-time PCR. Dominant negative mutants of Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF-1α) and HIF-1α siRNA blocked the action of cobalt, showing that HIF-1α is a key component in this mechanism. The proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin or proteasome inhibitor-III completely abolished the effect of hypoxia and cobalt both at the protein and mRNA level indicating that the proteasome pathway is probably involved not only for the stability of HIF-1α protein, but for the stability of unidentified transcription factors that regulate AQP5 transcription. These studies reveal a potentially important physiological mechanism linking hypoxic stress and membrane water channels. PMID:23469202

  3. Protein phosphatase PPM1G regulates protein translation and cell growth by dephosphorylating 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianyu; Stevens, Payton D; Eshleman, Nichole E; Gao, Tianyan

    2013-08-09

    Protein translation initiation is a tightly controlled process responding to nutrient availability and mitogen stimulation. Serving as one of the most important negative regulators of protein translation, 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) binds to translation initiation factor 4E and inhibits cap-dependent translation in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Although it has been demonstrated previously that the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 is controlled by mammalian target of rapamycin in the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1, the mechanism underlying the dephosphorylation of 4E-BP1 remains elusive. Here, we report the identification of PPM1G as the phosphatase of 4E-BP1. A coimmunoprecipitation experiment reveals that PPM1G binds to 4E-BP1 in cells and that purified PPM1G dephosphorylates 4E-BP1 in vitro. Knockdown of PPM1G in 293E and colon cancer HCT116 cells results in an increase in the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 at both the Thr-37/46 and Ser-65 sites. Furthermore, the time course of 4E-BP1 dephosphorylation induced by amino acid starvation or mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition is slowed down significantly in PPM1G knockdown cells. Functionally, the amount of 4E-BP1 bound to the cap-dependent translation initiation complex is decreased when the expression of PPM1G is depleted. As a result, the rate of cap-dependent translation, cell size, and protein content are increased in PPM1G knockdown cells. Taken together, our study has identified protein phosphatase PPM1G as a novel regulator of cap-dependent protein translation by negatively controlling the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1.

  4. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by trophectoderm cells in response to hypoxia and epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Wooyoung; Bazer, Fuller W.; Song, Gwonhwa; Kim, Jinyoung

    2016-01-01

    The low oxygen environment in the uterine environment requires pre-implantation embryos to adapt to oxygen deficiency. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a master regulator whereby cells adapt to changes in oxygen concentrations. In addition to hypoxic conditions, non-hypoxic stimuli such as growth factors also activate expression of HIF-1. In this study, the mechanisms underlying low oxygen-dependent and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent expression of HIF-1α were explored using porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells. The results indicated that expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β mRNAs was not affected by low concentrations of oxygen; however, hypoxic conditions markedly increased the abundance of HIF-1α protein, especially in nuclei of pTr cells. Even under normoxic conditions, the abundance of HIF-1α protein increased in response to EGF. This EGF-mediated increase in HIF-1α protein was blocked through inhibition of translation by cycloheximide. The inhibitors LY294002 (PI3K-AKT inhibitor), U0126 (inhibitor of ERK1/2) and rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) also blocked the ability of EGF to increase HIF-1α protein and to phosphorylate AKT, ERK1/2 and mTOR proteins. Both hypoxia and EGF induced proliferation of pTr cells. This ability of EGF to stimulate proliferation of pTr cells was suppressed by EGFR siRNA, but not HIF-1α siRNA, but a significant decrease in EGF-induced HIF-1α protein occurred when pTr cells were transfected with HIF-1α siRNA. The results of the present study suggest that pTr cells adapt to oxygen deficiency and proliferate in response to an oxygen-dependent HIF-1 system, and that EGF at maternal–conceptus interface can increase the abundance of HIF-1α protein via translational regulation through AKT, ERK1/2 and mTOR signaling cascades. - Highlights: • HIF-1α expression is up-regulated in pTr cells under low oxygen concentrations. • EGF induces HIF-1α accumulation in pTr cells. • EGF-induced HIF-1α accumulation is blocked by de

  5. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 by trophectoderm cells in response to hypoxia and epidermal growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Wooyoung [Department of Animal Resources Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Bazer, Fuller W. [Center for Animal Biotechnology and Genomics and Department of Animal Science, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States); Song, Gwonhwa, E-mail: ghsong@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jinyoung, E-mail: jinyoungkim@dankook.ac.kr [Department of Animal Resources Science, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-08

    The low oxygen environment in the uterine environment requires pre-implantation embryos to adapt to oxygen deficiency. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a master regulator whereby cells adapt to changes in oxygen concentrations. In addition to hypoxic conditions, non-hypoxic stimuli such as growth factors also activate expression of HIF-1. In this study, the mechanisms underlying low oxygen-dependent and epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent expression of HIF-1α were explored using porcine trophectoderm (pTr) cells. The results indicated that expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1β mRNAs was not affected by low concentrations of oxygen; however, hypoxic conditions markedly increased the abundance of HIF-1α protein, especially in nuclei of pTr cells. Even under normoxic conditions, the abundance of HIF-1α protein increased in response to EGF. This EGF-mediated increase in HIF-1α protein was blocked through inhibition of translation by cycloheximide. The inhibitors LY294002 (PI3K-AKT inhibitor), U0126 (inhibitor of ERK1/2) and rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor) also blocked the ability of EGF to increase HIF-1α protein and to phosphorylate AKT, ERK1/2 and mTOR proteins. Both hypoxia and EGF induced proliferation of pTr cells. This ability of EGF to stimulate proliferation of pTr cells was suppressed by EGFR siRNA, but not HIF-1α siRNA, but a significant decrease in EGF-induced HIF-1α protein occurred when pTr cells were transfected with HIF-1α siRNA. The results of the present study suggest that pTr cells adapt to oxygen deficiency and proliferate in response to an oxygen-dependent HIF-1 system, and that EGF at maternal–conceptus interface can increase the abundance of HIF-1α protein via translational regulation through AKT, ERK1/2 and mTOR signaling cascades. - Highlights: • HIF-1α expression is up-regulated in pTr cells under low oxygen concentrations. • EGF induces HIF-1α accumulation in pTr cells. • EGF-induced HIF-1α accumulation is blocked by de

  6. Translation Theory 'Translated'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæraas, Arild; Nielsen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Translation theory has proved to be a versatile analytical lens used by scholars working from different traditions. On the basis of a systematic literature review, this study adds to our understanding of the ‘translations’ of translation theory by identifying the distinguishing features of the most...... common theoretical approaches to translation within the organization and management discipline: actor-network theory, knowledge-based theory, and Scandinavian institutionalism. Although each of these approaches already has borne much fruit in research, the literature is diverse and somewhat fragmented......, but also overlapping. We discuss the ways in which the three versions of translation theory may be combined and enrich each other so as to inform future research, thereby offering a more complete understanding of translation in and across organizational settings....

  7. Abolition of reflex bradycardia by cardiac vagotomy has no effect on the regulation of oxygen uptake by Atlantic cod in progressive hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenzie, David; Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Taylor, E.W.T.

    2009-01-01

    The functional significance of chemoreflexive hypoxic bradycardia was explored in Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. (mean mass similar to 800 g, acclimated to a seawater temperature of 11 degrees C) by investigating responses to progressive hypoxia following section of the cardiac branches of cranial...... nerve X Cardiac denervation had no effect on oxygen uptake rate (M-O2), gill ventilation rate (f(G)) or opercular pressure amplitude (P-OP) under normoxic conditions, but caused a significant increase in heart rate (f(H)), to 50 +/- 1 beats min(-1) by comparison to 40 +/- 2 beats min(-1) in sham...

  8. Predicted RNA Binding Proteins Pes4 and Mip6 Regulate mRNA Levels, Translation, and Localization during Sporulation in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Liang; Zhang, Kai; Sternglanz, Rolf; Neiman, Aaron M

    2017-05-01

    In response to starvation, diploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo meiosis and form haploid spores, a process collectively referred to as sporulation. The differentiation into spores requires extensive changes in gene expression. The transcriptional activator Ndt80 is a central regulator of this process, which controls many genes essential for sporulation. Ndt80 induces ∼300 genes coordinately during meiotic prophase, but different mRNAs within the NDT80 regulon are translated at different times during sporulation. The protein kinase Ime2 and RNA binding protein Rim4 are general regulators of meiotic translational delay, but how differential timing of individual transcripts is achieved was not known. This report describes the characterization of two related NDT80 -induced genes, PES4 and MIP6 , encoding predicted RNA binding proteins. These genes are necessary to regulate the steady-state expression, translational timing, and localization of a set of mRNAs that are transcribed by NDT80 but not translated until the end of meiosis II. Mutations in the predicted RNA binding domains within PES4 alter the stability of target mRNAs. PES4 and MIP6 affect only a small portion of the NDT80 regulon, indicating that they act as modulators of the general Ime2/Rim4 pathway for specific transcripts. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Translational Upregulation of an Individual p21Cip1 Transcript Variant by GCN2 Regulates Cell Proliferation and Survival under Nutrient Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey L Lehman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple transcripts encode for the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1. These transcripts produce identical proteins but differ in their 5' untranslated regions (UTRs. Although several stresses that induce p21 have been characterized, the mechanisms regulating the individual transcript variants and their functional significance are unknown. Here we demonstrate through (35S labeling, luciferase reporter assays, and polysome transcript profiling that activation of the Integrated Stress Response (ISR kinase GCN2 selectively upregulates the translation of a p21 transcript variant containing 5' upstream open reading frames (uORFs through phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF2α. Mutational analysis reveals that the uORFs suppress translation under basal conditions, but promote translation under stress. Functionally, ablation of p21 ameliorates G1/S arrest and reduces cell survival in response to GCN2 activation. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of p21 post-transcriptional regulation, offer functional significance for the existence of multiple p21 transcripts, and support a key role for GCN2 in regulating the cell cycle under stress.

  10. PKC δ Regulates Translation Initiation through PKR and eIF2 α in Response to Retinoic Acid in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ozpolat, Bulent; Akar, Ugur; Tekedereli, Ibrahim; Alpay, S. Neslihan; Barria, Magaly; Gezgen, Baki; Zhang, Nianxiang; Coombes, Kevin; Kornblau, Steve; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Translation initiation and activity of eukaryotic initiation factor-alpha (eIF2 α ), the rate-limiting step of translation initiation, is often overactivated in malignant cells. Here, we investigated the regulation and role of eIF2 α in acute promyelocytic (APL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells in response to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and arsenic trioxide (ATO), the front-line therapies in APL. ATRA and ATO induce Ser-51 phosphorylation (inactivation) of eIF2 α , through the induct...

  11. The Crc global regulator inhibits the Pseudomonas putida pWW0 toluene/xylene assimilation pathway by repressing the translation of regulatory and structural genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Renata; Fonseca, Pilar; Rojo, Fernando

    2010-08-06

    In Pseudomonas putida, the expression of the pWW0 plasmid genes for the toluene/xylene assimilation pathway (the TOL pathway) is subject to complex regulation in response to environmental and physiological signals. This includes strong inhibition via catabolite repression, elicited by the carbon sources that the cells prefer to hydrocarbons. The Crc protein, a global regulator that controls carbon flow in pseudomonads, has an important role in this inhibition. Crc is a translational repressor that regulates the TOL genes, but how it does this has remained unknown. This study reports that Crc binds to sites located at the translation initiation regions of the mRNAs coding for XylR and XylS, two specific transcription activators of the TOL genes. Unexpectedly, eight additional Crc binding sites were found overlapping the translation initiation sites of genes coding for several enzymes of the pathway, all encoded within two polycistronic mRNAs. Evidence is provided supporting the idea that these sites are functional. This implies that Crc can differentially modulate the expression of particular genes within polycistronic mRNAs. It is proposed that Crc controls TOL genes in two ways. First, Crc inhibits the translation of the XylR and XylS regulators, thereby reducing the transcription of all TOL pathway genes. Second, Crc inhibits the translation of specific structural genes of the pathway, acting mainly on proteins involved in the first steps of toluene assimilation. This ensures a rapid inhibitory response that reduces the expression of the toluene/xylene degradation proteins when preferred carbon sources become available.

  12. Dual Role for Hsc70 in the Biogenesis and Regulation of the Heme-Regulated Kinase of the α Subunit of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, Sheri; Thulasiraman, Vanitha; Matts, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    The heme-regulated kinase of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (HRI) is activated in rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) in response to a number of environmental conditions, including heme deficiency, heat shock, and oxidative stress. Activation of HRI causes an arrest of initiation of protein synthesis. Recently, we have demonstrated that the heat shock cognate protein Hsc70 negatively modulates the activation of HRI in RRL in response to these environmental conditions. Hsc70 is also known to be a critical component of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery in RRL, which plays an obligatory role for HRI to acquire and maintain a conformation that is competent to activate. Using de novo-synthesized HRI in synchronized pulse-chase translations, we have examined the role of Hsc70 in the regulation of HRI biogenesis and activation. Like Hsp90, Hsc70 interacted with nascent HRI and HRI that was matured to a state which was competent to undergo stimulus-induced activation (mature-competent HRI). Interaction of HRI with Hsc70 was required for the transformation of HRI, as the Hsc70 antagonist clofibric acid inhibited the folding of HRI into a mature-competent conformation. Unlike Hsp90, Hsc70 also interacted with transformed HRI. Clofibric acid disrupted the interaction of Hsc70 with transformed HRI that had been matured and transformed in the absence of the drug. Disruption of Hsc70 interaction with transformed HRI in heme-deficient RRL resulted in its hyperactivation. Furthermore, activation of HRI in response to heat shock or denatured proteins also resulted in a similar blockage of Hsc70 interaction with transformed HRI. These results indicate that Hsc70 is required for the folding and transformation of HRI into an active kinase but is subsequently required to negatively attenuate the activation of transformed HRI. PMID:10454533

  13. Signaling hypoxia by hypoxia-inducible factor protein hydroxylases: a historical overview and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Tammie; Ratcliffe, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    By the early 1900s, the close matching of oxygen supply with demand was recognized to be a fundamental requirement for physiological function, and multiple adaptive responses to environment hypoxia had been described. Nevertheless, the widespread operation of mechanisms that directly sense and respond to levels of oxygen in animal cells was not appreciated for most of the twentieth century with investigators generally stressing the regulatory importance of metabolic products. Work over the last 25 years has overturned that paradigm. It has revealed the existence of a set of “oxygen-sensing” 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases that catalyze the hydroxylation of specific amino acid residues and thereby control the stability and activity of hypoxia-inducible factor. The hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylase pathway regulates a massive transcriptional cascade that is operative in essentially all animal cells. It transduces a wide range of responses to hypoxia, extending well beyond the classical boundaries of hypoxia physiology. Here we review the discovery and elucidation of these pathways, and consider the opportunities and challenges that have been brought into focus by the findings, including new implications for the integrated physiology of hypoxia and therapeutic approaches to ischemic/hypoxic disease. PMID:27774477

  14. Selective regulation of YB-1 mRNA translation by the mTOR signaling pathway is not mediated by 4E-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2016-03-02

    The Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is a key regulator of gene expression at the level of both translation and transcription. The mode of its action on cellular events depends on its subcellular distribution and the amount in the cell. So far, the regulatory mechanisms of YB-1 synthesis have not been adequately studied. Our previous finding was that selective inhibition of YB-1 mRNA translation was caused by suppression of activity of the mTOR signaling pathway. It was suggested that this event may be mediated by phosphorylation of the 4E-binding protein (4E-BP). Here, we report that 4E-BP alone can only slightly inhibit YB-1 synthesis both in the cell and in vitro, although it essentially decreases binding of the 4F-group translation initiation factors to mRNA. With inhibited mTOR kinase, the level of mRNA binding to the eIF4F-group factors was decreased, while that to 4E-BP1 was increased, as was observed for both mTOR kinase-sensitive mRNAs and those showing low sensitivity. This suggests that selective inhibition of translation of YB-1 mRNA, and probably some other mRNAs as well, by mTOR kinase inhibitors is not mediated by the action of the 4E-binding protein upon functions of the 4F-group translation initiation factors.

  15. Inhibition of calcium uptake during hypoxia in developing zebrafish is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Raymond W M; Kumai, Yusuke; Tzaneva, Velislava; Azzi, Estelle; Hochhold, Nina; Robertson, Cayleih; Pelster, Bernd; Perry, Steve F

    2016-12-15

    The present study investigated the potential role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) in calcium homeostasis in developing zebrafish (Danio rerio). It was demonstrated that zebrafish raised in hypoxic water (30 mmHg; control, 155 mmHg P O 2 ) until 4 days post-fertilization exhibited a substantial reduction in whole-body Ca 2+ levels and Ca 2+ uptake. Ca 2+ uptake in hypoxia-treated fish did not return to pre-hypoxia (control) levels within 2 h of transfer back to normoxic water. Results from real-time PCR showed that hypoxia decreased the whole-body mRNA expression levels of the epithelial Ca 2+ channel (ecac), but not plasma membrane Ca 2+ -ATPase (pmca2) or Na + /Ca 2+ -exchanger (ncx1b). Whole-mount in situ hybridization revealed that the number of ecac-expressing ionocytes was reduced in fish raised in hypoxic water. These findings suggested that hypoxic treatment suppressed the expression of ecac, thereby reducing Ca 2+ influx. To further evaluate the potential mechanisms for the effects of hypoxia on Ca 2+ regulation, a functional gene knockdown approach was employed to prevent the expression of HIF-1αb during hypoxic treatment. Consistent with a role for HIF-1αb in regulating Ca 2+ balance during hypoxia, the results demonstrated that the reduction of Ca 2+ uptake associated with hypoxic exposure was not observed in fish experiencing HIF-1αb knockdown. Additionally, the effects of hypoxia on reducing the number of ecac-expressing ionocytes was less pronounced in HIF-1αb-deficient fish. Overall, the current study revealed that hypoxic exposure inhibited Ca 2+ uptake in developing zebrafish, probably owing to HIF-1αb-mediated suppression of ecac expression. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  17. Hypoxia targeting copper complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearling, J.L.

    1998-11-01

    The importance and incidence of tumour hypoxia, its measurement and current treatments available, including pharmacological and radiopharmacological methods of targeting hypoxia, are discussed. A variety of in vitro and in vivo methods for imposing hypoxia have been developed and are reviewed. Copper, its chemistry, biochemistry and radiochemistry, the potential for use of copper radionuclides and its use to date in this field is considered with particular reference to the thiosemicarbazones. Their biological activity, metal chelation, in vitro and in vivo studies of their radiocopper complexes and the potential for their use as hypoxia targeting radiopharmaceuticals is described. The reduction of the copper(II) complex to copper(l), its pivotal importance in their biological behaviour, and the potential for manipulation of this to effect hypoxia selectivity are described. An in vitro method for assessing the hypoxia selectivity of radiopharmaceuticals is reported. The rapid deoxygenation and high viability of a mammalian cell culture in this system is discussed and factors which may affect the cellular uptake of a radiopharmaceutical are described. The design, synthesis and complexation with copper and radiocopper of a range of bis(thiosemicarbazones) is reported. Synthesis of these compounds is simple giving high yields of pure products. The characteristics of the radiocopper complexes ( 64 Cu) including lipophilicity and redox activity are reported (reduction potentials in the range -0.314 - -0.590 V). High cellular uptakes of the radiocopper complexes of the ligands, in hypoxic and normoxic EMT6 and CHO320 cells, were observed. Extremes of selectivity are shown ranging from the hypoxia selective 64 Cu(II)ATSM to normoxic cell selective 64 Cu(II)GTS. The selectivities observed are compared with the physico chemical characteristics of the complexes. A good correlation exists between selectivity of the complex and its Cu(II)/Cu(I) reduction potential, with hypoxia

  18. Leucine-induced activation of translational initiation is partly regulated by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase complex in C2C12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Naoya; Shimomura, Yoshiharu; Tamura, Tomohiro; Tamura, Noriko; Hamada, Koichiro; Kawano, Fuminori; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2006-01-01

    Branched-chain amino acid leucine has been shown to activate the translational regulators through the mammalian target of rapamycin. However, the leucine's effects are self-limiting because leucine promotes its own disposal by an oxidative pathway. The irreversible and rate-limiting step in the leucine oxidation pathway is catalyzed by the branched-chain α-keto acid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. The complex contains E1 (α2β2), E2, and E3 subunits, and its activity is abolished by phosphorylation of the E1α subunit by BCKDH kinase. The relationship between the activity of BCKDH complex and leucine-mediated activation of the protein translation was investigated using the technique of RNA interference. The activity of BCKDH complex in C2C12 cell was modulated by transfection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) for BCKDH E2 subunit or BCKDH kinase. Transfection of siRNAs decreased the mRNA expression and protein amount of corresponding gene. Suppression of either E2 subunit or kinase produced opposite effects on the cell proliferation and the activation of translational regulators by leucine. Suppression of BCKDH kinase for 48 h resulted in decreasing cell proliferation. In contrast, E2 suppression led to increased amount of total cellular protein. The phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by leucine was increased in E2-siRNA transfected C2C12 cells, whereas the leucine's effect was diminished in kinase-siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that the activation of the translational regulators by leucine was partly regulated by the activity of BCKDH complex

  19. Kinetic Investigations of the Role of Factor Inhibiting Hypoxia-inducible Factor (FIH) as an Oxygen Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Hardy, Adam P; Howe, Emily A; Loik, Nikita D; Kramer, Holger B; McCullagh, James S O; Schofield, Christopher J; Flashman, Emily

    2015-08-07

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases regulate hypoxia sensing in animals. In humans, they comprise three prolyl hydroxylases (PHD1-3 or EGLN1-3) and factor inhibiting HIF (FIH). FIH is an asparaginyl hydroxylase catalyzing post-translational modification of HIF-α, resulting in reduction of HIF-mediated transcription. Like the PHDs, FIH is proposed to have a hypoxia-sensing role in cells, enabling responses to changes in cellular O2 availability. PHD2, the most important human PHD isoform, is proposed to be biochemically/kinetically suited as a hypoxia sensor due to its relatively high sensitivity to changes in O2 concentration and slow reaction with O2. To ascertain whether these parameters are conserved among the HIF hydroxylases, we compared the reactions of FIH and PHD2 with O2. Consistent with previous reports, we found lower Km(app)(O2) values for FIH than for PHD2 with all HIF-derived substrates. Under pre-steady-state conditions, the O2-initiated FIH reaction is significantly faster than that of PHD2. We then investigated the kinetics with respect to O2 of the FIH reaction with ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) substrates. FIH has lower Km(app)(O2) values for the tested ARDs than HIF-α substrates, and pre-steady-state O2-initiated reactions were faster with ARDs than with HIF-α substrates. The results correlate with cellular studies showing that FIH is active at lower O2 concentrations than the PHDs and suggest that competition between HIF-α and ARDs for FIH is likely to be biologically relevant, particularly in hypoxic conditions. The overall results are consistent with the proposal that the kinetic properties of individual oxygenases reflect their biological capacity to act as hypoxia sensors. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. An environmental analysis of genes associated with schizophrenia: hypoxia and vascular factors as interacting elements in the neurodevelopmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kastner, R; van Os, J; Esquivel, G; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F

    2012-12-01

    Investigating and understanding gene-environment interaction (G × E) in a neurodevelopmentally and biologically plausible manner is a major challenge for schizophrenia research. Hypoxia during neurodevelopment is one of several environmental factors related to the risk of schizophrenia, and links between schizophrenia candidate genes and hypoxia regulation or vascular expression have been proposed. Given the availability of a wealth of complex genetic information on schizophrenia in the literature without knowledge on the connections to environmental factors, we now systematically collected genes from candidate studies (using SzGene), genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and copy number variation (CNV) analyses, and then applied four criteria to test for a (theoretical) link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. In all, 55% of the schizophrenia candidate genes (n=42 genes) met the criteria for a link to ischemia-hypoxia and/or vascular factors. Genes associated with schizophrenia showed a significant, threefold enrichment among genes that were derived from microarray studies of the ischemia-hypoxia response (IHR) in the brain. Thus, the finding of a considerable match between genes associated with the risk of schizophrenia and IHR and/or vascular factors is reproducible. An additional survey of genes identified by GWAS and CNV analyses suggested novel genes that match the criteria. Findings for interactions between specific variants of genes proposed to be IHR and/or vascular factors with obstetric complications in patients with schizophrenia have been reported in the literature. Therefore, the extended gene set defined here may form a reasonable and evidence-based starting point for hypothesis-based testing of G × E interactions in clinical genetic and translational neuroscience studies.

  1. Response of skeletal muscle mitochondria to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppeler, Hans; Vogt, Michael; Weibel, Ewald R; Flück, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This review explores the current concepts relating the structural and functional modifications of skeletal muscle mitochondria to the molecular mechanisms activated when organisms are exposed to a hypoxic environment. In contrast to earlier assumptions it is now established that permanent or long-term exposure to severe environmental hypoxia decreases the mitochondrial content of muscle fibres. Oxidative muscle metabolism is shifted towards a higher reliance on carbohydrates as a fuel, and intramyocellular lipid substrate stores are reduced. Moreover, in muscle cells of mountaineers returning from the Himalayas, we find accumulations of lipofuscin, believed to be a mitochondrial degradation product. Low mitochondrial contents are also observed in high-altitude natives such as Sherpas. In these subjects high-altitude performance seems to be improved by better coupling between ATP demand and supply pathways as well as better metabolite homeostasis. The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) has been identified as a master regulator for the expression of genes involved in the hypoxia response, such as genes coding for glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HIF-1 achieves this by binding to hypoxia response elements in the promoter regions of these genes, whereby the increase of HIF-1 in hypoxia is the consequence of a reduced degradation of its dominant subunit HIF-1a. A further mechanism that seems implicated in the hypoxia response of muscle mitochondria is related to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria during oxidative phosphorylation. How exactly ROS interfere with HIF-1a as well as MAP kinase and other signalling pathways is debated. The current evidence suggests that mitochondria themselves could be important players in oxygen sensing.

  2. Role of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and its target genes in human lung adenocarcinoma cells after photon- versus carbon ion irradiation; Expression HIF-1-abhaengiger Gene in humanen Lungenadenokarzinom (A549)-Zellen und deren Regulation nach Photonen- und Schwerionenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, Verena Maria

    2013-11-26

    Exposed to hypoxia tumor cells are notably resistant to photon irradiation. The hypoxiainducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) seems to play a fundamental role in this resistance, while its role after heavy-ion beam remains unknown. The intention of this study was to determine how A549-cells (non-small-cell lung carcinoma) react in different oxygenation states after irradiation with photons or heavy ions, particularly in regards to their expression of HIF-1 target genes. Resistance of hypoxic A549 cells after photon irradiation was documented by cellular and clonogenic survival. In contrast, cellular survival after heavy-ion irradiation in hypoxic cells was not elevated to normoxic cells. Among the oxygen dependent regulation of HIF-1 target genes, gene expression analyses showed an increased expression of GLUT-1, LDH-A, PDK-1 and VEGF after photon irradiation but not after heavy-ion irradiation after 48 hours in normoxic cells. As expected, CDKN1A as inhibitor of cell cycle progression showed higher expression after both radiation forms; interestingly CDKN1A was also in an oxygen dependent manner lightly upregulated. In western blot analyses we demonstrated a significant increase of HIF-1 and GLUT-1 caused by hypoxia, but only a tendency of increased protein level in hypoxia after photon irradiation and no changes after heavy-ion irradiation. Significantly higher protein level of secreted VEGF-A could be measured 72 hours after photon irradiation in normoxic cells by ELISA analyses. Controversially discussed, I could not detect an association between HIF-1 and SCF or Trx-1 in A549-cells in this study. Whereas Trx-1-expression was neither influenced by changed oxygen partial pressure nor irradiation, I could show increased SCF mRNA by quantitative Real Time-PCR and secreted protein level by ELISA after photon irradiation independent of oxygen state. In summary, this study showed that HIF-1 and its target genes (GLUT-1, LDHA; PDK, VEGF) and also SCF was

  3. Understanding and exploiting the genomic response to hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaccia, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment influences both therapeutic outcome and malignant progression. Of the many factors that may be altered in the tumor microenvironment, changes in tumor oxygenation have been strongly associated with a lower probability of local tumor control and survival. In vitro studies indicate that cells exposed to a low oxygen environment exhibit multiple phenotypes, including cell-cycle arrest, increased expression of pro-angiogenic genes, increased invasive capacity, increased apoptosis, increased anaerobic metabolism and altered differentiation programs. While the mechanistic basis of hypoxia as an impediment to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is well understood, it is unclear what changes in the cellular phenotype are important in understanding how hypoxia modifies malignant progression. One insight into how hypoxia modulates malignant progression comes from understanding the critical transcriptional regulators of gene expression under hypoxic conditions such as hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) as well as changes in gene expression in untransformed and transformed cells. Overall, about 1.5% of the genome is found to be transcriptionally responsive to changes in oxygenation. Most importantly, the coordinated changes in gene expression under hypoxic conditions underscore the physiologic basis for altering gene expression in response to a low oxygen environment. In addition, some hypoxia-induced genes exhibit increased expression after reoxygenation, suggesting that they are regulated both by hypoxia and oxidative stress. Analysis of the genomic response to hypoxia has several therapeutic uses. First, it allows one to ask the question of what the cellular consequences are to inhibition of the transcriptional response to hypoxia such as by targeting the HIF-1 transcription factor. While the effect of loss of HIF-1 in tumors leads to inhibition of tumor growth, it does not eliminate tumors. In fact, studies indicate that inhibition of HIF-1 leads to a

  4. Translational control by eIF2α phosphorylation regulates vulnerability to the synaptic and behavioral effects of cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Placzek, Andon N; Viana Di Prisco, Gonzalo; Khatiwada, Sanjeev; Sidrauski, Carmela; Krnjević, Krešimir; Walter, Peter; Dani, John A; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are especially prone to drug addiction, but the underlying biological basis of their increased vulnerability remains unknown. We reveal that translational control by phosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF2α (p-eIF2α) accounts for adolescent hypersensitivity to cocaine. In adolescent (but not adult) mice, a low dose of cocaine reduced p-eIF2α in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), potentiated synaptic inputs to VTA dopaminergic neurons, and induced drug-reinforced behavior. Like adolescents, adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α-mediated translational control were more susceptible to cocaine-induced synaptic potentiation and behavior. Conversely, like adults, adolescent mice with increased p-eIF2α became more resistant to cocaine's effects. Accordingly, metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated long-term depression (mGluR-LTD)—whose disruption is postulated to increase vulnerability to drug addiction—was impaired in both adolescent mice and adult mice with reduced p-eIF2α mediated translation. Thus, during addiction, cocaine hijacks translational control by p-eIF2α, initiating synaptic potentiation and addiction-related behaviors. These insights may hold promise for new treatments for addiction. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12052.001 PMID:26928234

  5. Understanding Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  6. Translation Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Marcia Pinheiro

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss three translation techniques: literal, cultural, and artistic. Literal translation is a well-known technique, which means that it is quite easy to find sources on the topic. Cultural and artistic translation may be new terms. Whilst cultural translation focuses on matching contexts, artistic translation focuses on matching reactions. Because literal translation matches only words, it is not hard to find situations in which we should not use this technique.  Because a...

  7. Comparative and Experimental Studies on the Genes Altered by Chronic Hypoxia in Human Brain Microendothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mata-Greenwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A is a master regulator of acute hypoxia; however, with chronic hypoxia, HIF1A levels return to the normoxic levels. Importantly, the genes that are involved in the cell survival and viability under chronic hypoxia are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia leads to the upregulation of a core group of genes with associated changes in the promoter DNA methylation that mediates the cell survival under hypoxia.Results : We examined the effect of chronic hypoxia (3 days; 0.5% oxygen on human brain micro endothelial cells (HBMEC viability and apoptosis. Hypoxia caused a significant reduction in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Next, we examined chronic hypoxia associated changes in transcriptome and genome-wide promoter methylation. The data obtained was compared with 16 other microarray studies on chronic hypoxia. Nine genes were altered in response to chronic hypoxia in all 17 studies. Interestingly, HIF1A was not altered with chronic hypoxia in any of the studies. Furthermore, we compared our data to three other studies that identified HIF-responsive genes by various approaches. Only two genes were found to be HIF dependent. We silenced each of these 9 genes using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Downregulation of EGLN3 significantly increased the cell death under chronic hypoxia, whereas downregulation of ERO1L, ENO2, adrenomedullin, and spag4 reduced the cell death under hypoxia.Conclusions : We provide a core group of genes that regulates cellular acclimatization under chronic hypoxic stress, and most of them are HIF independent.

  8. Detailed characterisation of STC-1 cells and the pGIP/Neo sub-clone suggests the incretin hormones are translationally regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Anna L; Pan, Xiaobei; Marco-Ramell, Anna; Meharg, Caroline; Green, Brian D

    2017-10-01

    STC-1 is a heterogeneous plurihormonal cell line producing several prominent gut peptide hormones. pGIP/Neo is a genetically selected sub-clone of STC-1 with augmented levels of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP). Morphometric parameters, hormone concentrations, mRNA transcripts, hormone immunocytochemistry and nutrient utilisation/production of these two cell lines were compared. Proglucagon-derived peptides (Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and - 2(GLP-2)) were lower in sub-clone cells than progenitor cells. High Content Analysis found altered intracellular GLP-1, GIP, cholecystokinin (CCK) and peptide YY (PYY) levels and differing hormone co-localisation. The proportion pGIP/Neo cells containing GIP immunoreactivity (82%) was greater than STC-1 (65%), as were the proportion with 'GIP only', 'GLP-1+GIP' or 'GIP+PYY' immunoreactivity. Most surprisingly mRNA transcripts of the proglucagon and GIP genes were inversely correlated to the levels of their translated peptides. This strongly suggests that proglucagon and GIP are encoded on 'translationally regulated genes' - a characteristic possessed by other endocrine hormones. Metabolomic profiling revealed differences in cellular nutrient utilisation/production and that under normal culture conditions both cell lines exhibit signs of overflow metabolism. These studies provide an insight into the metabolism and properties of these valuable cells, suggesting for the first time that incretin hormone genes are translationally regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Induction of Gastrin Expression in Gastrointestinal Cells by Hypoxia or Cobalt Is Independent of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S.; Patel, Oneel

    2012-01-01

    Gastrin and its precursors have been shown to promote mitogenesis and angiogenesis in gastrointestinal tumors. Hypoxia stimulates tumor growth, but its effect on gastrin gene regulation has not been examined in detail. Here we have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the transcription of the gastrin gene in human gastric cancer (AGS) cells. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides were measured by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity was measured by dual-luciferase reporte...

  10. Repression of mitochondrial translation, respiration and a metabolic cycle-regulated gene, SLF1, by the yeast Pumilio-family protein Puf3p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Chatenay-Lapointe

    Full Text Available Synthesis and assembly of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS system requires genes located both in the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but how gene expression is coordinated between these two compartments is not fully understood. One level of control is through regulated expression mitochondrial ribosomal proteins and other factors required for mitochondrial translation and OXPHOS assembly, which are all products of nuclear genes that are subsequently imported into mitochondria. Interestingly, this cadre of genes in budding yeast has in common a 3'-UTR element that is bound by the Pumilio family protein, Puf3p, and is coordinately regulated under many conditions, including during the yeast metabolic cycle. Multiple functions have been assigned to Puf3p, including promoting mRNA degradation, localizing nucleus-encoded mitochondrial transcripts to the outer mitochondrial membrane, and facilitating mitochondria-cytoskeletal interactions and motility. Here we show that Puf3p has a general repressive effect on mitochondrial OXPHOS abundance, translation, and respiration that does not involve changes in overall mitochondrial biogenesis and largely independent of TORC1-mitochondrial signaling. We also identified the cytoplasmic translation factor Slf1p as yeast metabolic cycle-regulated gene that is repressed by Puf3p at the post-transcriptional level and promotes respiration and extension of yeast chronological life span when over-expressed. Altogether, these results should facilitate future studies on which of the many functions of Puf3p is most relevant for regulating mitochondrial gene expression and the role of nuclear-mitochondrial communication in aging and longevity.

  11. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  12. Internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation of a mammalian mRNA is regulated by amino acid availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, J.; Yaman, I.; Mishra, R.; Merrick, W. C.; Snider, M. D.; Lamers, W. H.; Hatzoglou, M.

    2001-01-01

    The cationic amino acid transporter, Cat-1, facilitates the uptake of the essential amino acids arginine and lysine. Amino acid starvation causes accumulation and increased translation of cat-1 mRNA, resulting in a 58-fold increase in protein levels and increased arginine uptake. A bicistronic mRNA

  13. Radiation, hypoxia and genetic stimulation: implications for future therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Gerald E.; Hasan, Na'il M.; Joiner, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    The cellular stress response, whereby very low doses of cytotoxic agents induce resistance to much higher doses, is an evolutionary defence mechanism and is stimulated following challenges by numerous chemical, biological and physical agents including particularly radiation, drugs, heat and hypoxia. There is much homology in the effects of these agents which are manifest through the up-regulation of various genetic pathways. Low-dose radiation stress influences processes involved in cell-cycle control, signal transduction pathways, radiation sensitivity, changes in cell adhesion and cell growth. There is also homology between radiation and other cellular stress agents, particularly hypoxia. Whereas traditionally, hypoxia was regarded mainly as an agent conferring resistance to radiation, there is now much evidence illustrating the cytokine-like properties of hypoxia as well as radiation. Stress phenomena are likely to be important in risks arising from low doses of radiation. Conversely, exploitation of the stress response in settings appropriate to therapy can be particularly beneficial not only in regard to radiation alone but in combinations of radiation and drugs. Similarly, tissue hypoxia can be exploited in novel ways of enhancing therapeutic efficacy. Bioreductive drugs, which are cytotoxically activated in hypoxic regions of tissue, can be rendered even more effective by hypoxia-induced increased expression of enzyme reductases. Nitric oxide pathways are influenced by hypoxia thereby offering possibilities for novel vascular based therapies. Other approaches are discussed

  14. Factors regulated by interferon gamma and hypoxia-inducible factor 1A contribute to responses that protect mice from Coccidioides immitis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woelk Christopher H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coccidioidomycosis results from airborne infections caused by either Coccidioides immitis or C. posadasii. Both are pathogenic fungi that live in desert soil in the New World and can infect normal hosts, but most infections are self-limited. Disseminated infections occur in approximately 5% of cases and may prove fatal. Mouse models of the disease have identified strains that are resistant (e.g. DBA/2 or susceptible (e.g. C57BL/6 to these pathogens. However, the genetic and immunological basis for this difference has not been fully characterized. Results Microarray technology was used to identify genes that were differentially expressed in lung tissue between resistant DBA/2 and sensitive C57BL/6 mice after infection with C. immitis. Differentially expressed genes were mapped onto biological pathways, gene ontologies, and protein interaction networks, which revealed that innate immune responses mediated by Type II interferon (i.e., IFNG and the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1 contribute to the resistant phenotype. In addition, upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1A (HIF1A, possibly as part of a larger inflammatory response mediated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA, may also contribute to resistance. Microarray gene expression was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR for a subset of 12 genes, which revealed that IFNG HIF1A and TNFA, among others, were significantly differentially expressed between the two strains at day 14 post-infection. Conclusion These results confirm the finding that DBA/2 mice express more Type II interferon and interferon stimulated genes than genetically susceptible strains and suggest that differential expression of HIF1A may also play a role in protection.

  15. Altered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α and its regulatory genes in gastric cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihan Wang

    Full Text Available Tissue hypoxia induces reprogramming of cell metabolism and may result in normal cell transformation and cancer progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α, the key transcription factor, plays an important role in gastric cancer development and progression. This study aimed to investigate the underlying regulatory signaling pathway in gastric cancer using gastric cancer tissue specimens. The integration of gene expression profile and transcriptional regulatory element database (TRED was pursued to identify HIF-1α ↔ NFκB1 → BRCA1 → STAT3 ← STAT1 gene pathways and their regulated genes. The data showed that there were 82 differentially expressed genes that could be regulated by these five transcription factors in gastric cancer tissues and these genes formed 95 regulation modes, among which seven genes (MMP1, TIMP1, TLR2, FCGR3A, IRF1, FAS, and TFF3 were hub molecules that are regulated at least by two of these five transcription factors simultaneously and were associated with hypoxia, inflammation, and immune disorder. Real-Time PCR and western blot showed increasing of HIF-1α in mRNA and protein levels as well as TIMP1, TFF3 in mRNA levels in gastric cancer tissues. The data are the first study to demonstrate HIF-1α-regulated transcription factors and their corresponding network genes in gastric cancer. Further study with a larger sample size and more functional experiments is needed to confirm these data and then translate into clinical biomarker discovery and treatment strategy for gastric cancer.

  16. Temporal and spatial regulation of translation in the mammalian oocyte via the mTOR-eIF4F pathway

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šušor, Andrej; Jansová, Denisa; Černá, Renata; Danylevska, Anna; Anger, Martin; Toralová, Tereza; Malík, Radek; Šupolíková, Jaroslava; Cook, M. S.; Oh, J. S.; Kubelka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6078 (2015) ISSN 2041-1723 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-12291S; GA ČR GAP502/12/2201; GA ČR GAP502/10/0944 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : oocyte meiosis * localized in situ translation * mTOR Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.329, year: 2015

  17. The PurR regulon in Lactococcus lactis – transcriptional regulation of the purine nucleotide metabolism and translational machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jendresen, Christian Bille; Martinussen, Jan; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    Purine nucleotides are either synthesized de novo from 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) or salvaged from the environment. In Lactococcus lactis, transcription of the de novo synthesis operons, purCSQLF and purDEK, has genetically been shown to be activated by the PurR protein when bound to......-related functions. Of special interest is the presence of PurBox motifs in rrn promoters, suggesting a novel connection between nucleotide availability and the translational machinery....

  18. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Serganova, Inna [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the {sup 124}I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 124}I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped {sup 124}I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of {sup 124}I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that {sup 124}I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future

  19. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  20. A Study of Translation Institutional Ethics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LuoXianfeng; ZhouJin

    2017-01-01

    Traditional translation ethics characterized by translators' ethics cannot provide a strong moral support to the translation practice,or guarantee the moral requirement towards translation activities in the social transformation caused by the market economy,because it does not have the power of punishment.Translation institutional ethics,however,a new form of translation ethics,integrates the translation ethic norm,translation regulations and relative laws together.As an inevitable outcome in the new era,it can escort the orderly and healthy translation activities.Its purpose is to strengthen the translators' moral consciousness,to sublimate their moral notions and to transfer from heteronomy to autonomy.

  1. Hypoxia activates muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein (MURC) expression via transforming growth factor-β in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Cheng, Wen-Pin; Wang, Bao-Wei; Chang, Hang

    2014-03-01

    The expression of MURC (muscle-restricted coiled-coil protein), a hypertrophy-regulated gene, increases during pressure overload. Hypoxia can cause myocardial hypertrophy; however, how hypoxia affects the regulation of MURC in cardiomyocytes undergoing hypertrophy is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that hypoxia induces MURC expression in cardiomyocytes during hypertrophy. The expression of MURC was evaluated in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in an in vivo model of AMI (acute myocardial infarction) to induce myocardial hypoxia in adult rats. MURC protein and mRNA expression were significantly enhanced by hypoxia. MURC proteins induced by hypoxia were significantly blocked after the addition of PD98059 or ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) siRNA 30 min before hypoxia. Gel-shift assay showed increased DNA-binding activity of SRF (serum response factor) after hypoxia. PD98059, ERK siRNA and an anti-TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β) antibody abolished the SRF-binding activity enhanced by hypoxia or exogenous administration of TGF-β. A luciferase promoter assay demonstrated increased transcriptional activity of SRF in cardiomyocytes by hypoxia. Increased βMHC (β-myosin heavy chain) and BNP (B-type natriuretic peptide) protein expression and increased protein synthesis was identified after hypoxia with the presence of MURC in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. MURC siRNA inhibited the hypertrophic marker protein expression and protein synthesis induced by hypoxia. AMI in adult rats also demonstrated increased MURC protein expression in the left ventricular myocardium. In conclusion, hypoxia in cultured rat neonatal cardiomyocytes increased MURC expression via the induction of TGF-β, SRF and the ERK pathway. These findings suggest that MURC plays a role in hypoxia-induced hypertrophy in cardiomyocytes.

  2. Mitotic protein kinase CDK1 phosphorylation of mRNA translation regulator 4E-BP1 Ser83 may contribute to cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Celestino; Cheng, Erdong; Shuda, Masahiro; Lee-Oesterreich, Paula J.; Pogge von Strandmann, Lisa; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2016-07-11

    mTOR-directed 4E-BP1 phosphorylation promotes cap-dependent translation and tumorigen-esis. During mitosis, CDK1 substitutes for mTOR and fully phosphorylates 4E-BP1 at canoni-cal as well a non-canonical S83 site resulting in a mitosis-specific hyperphosphorylated δ isoform. Colocalization studies with a phospho-S83 specific antibody indicate that 4E-BP1 S83 phosphorylation accumulates at centrosomes during prophase, peaks at metaphase, and decreases through telophase. While S83 phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 does not affect in vitro cap-dependent translation, nor eIF4G/4E-BP1 cap-binding, expression of an alanine substitution mutant 4E-BP1.S83A partially reverses rodent cell transformation induced by Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) small T (sT) antigen viral oncoprotein. In contrast to inhibitory mTOR 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, these findings suggest that mitotic CDK1-directed phosphorylation of δ-4E-BP1 may yield a gain-of-function, distinct from translation regulation, that may be important in tumorigenesis and mitotic centrosome function.

  3. Induction of gastrin expression in gastrointestinal cells by hypoxia or cobalt is independent of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Kovac, Suzana; Chang, Mike; Shulkes, Arthur; Baldwin, Graham S; Patel, Oneel

    2012-07-01

    Gastrin and its precursors have been shown to promote mitogenesis and angiogenesis in gastrointestinal tumors. Hypoxia stimulates tumor growth, but its effect on gastrin gene regulation has not been examined in detail. Here we have investigated the effect of hypoxia on the transcription of the gastrin gene in human gastric cancer (AGS) cells. Gastrin mRNA was measured by real-time PCR, gastrin peptides were measured by RIA, and gastrin promoter activity was measured by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Exposure to a low oxygen concentration (1%) increased gastrin mRNA concentrations in wild-type AGS cells (AGS) and in AGS cells overexpressing the gastrin receptor (AGS-cholecystokinin receptor 2) by 2.1 ± 0.4- and 4.1 ± 0.3-fold (P factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) or knockdown of either the HIF-1α or HIF-1β subunit did not affect gastrin promoter inducibility under hypoxia indicated that the hypoxic activation of the gastrin gene is likely HIF independent. Mutational analysis of previously identified Sp1 regulatory elements in the gastrin promoter also failed to abrogate the induction of promoter activity by hypoxia. The observations that hypoxia up-regulates the gastrin gene in AGS cells by HIF-independent mechanisms, and that this effect is enhanced by the presence of gastrin receptors, provide potential targets for gastrointestinal cancer therapy.

  4. Tissue hypoxia during ischemic stroke: adaptive clues from hypoxia-tolerant animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathaniel, Thomas I; Williams-Hernandez, Ashley; Hunter, Anan L; Liddy, Caroline; Peffley, Dennis M; Umesiri, Francis E; Imeh-Nathaniel, Adebobola

    2015-05-01

    The treatment and prevention of hypoxic/ischemic brain injury in stroke patients remain a severe and global medical issue. Numerous clinical studies have resulted in a failure to develop chemical neuroprotection for acute, ischemic stroke. Over 150 estimated clinical trials of ischemic stroke treatments have been done, and more than 200 drugs and combinations of drugs for ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes have been developed. Billions of dollars have been invested for new scientific breakthroughs with only limited success. The revascularization of occluded cerebral arteries such as anti-clot treatments of thrombolysis has proven effective, but it can only be used in a 3-4.5h time frame after the onset of a stroke, and not for every patient. This review is about novel insights on how to resist tissue hypoxia from unconventional animal models. Ability to resist tissue hypoxia is an extraordinary ability that is not common in many laboratory animals such as rat and mouse models. For example, we can learn from a naked mole-rat, Chrysemys picta, how to actively regulate brain metabolic activity to defend the brain against fluctuating oxygen tension and acute bouts of oxidative stress following the onset of a stroke. Additionally, a euthermic arctic ground squirrel can teach us how the brain of a stroke patient can remain well oxygenated during tissue hypoxia with no evidence of cellular stress. In this review, we discuss how these animals provide us with a system to gain insight into the possible mechanisms of tissue hypoxia/ischemia. This issue is of clinical significance to stroke patients. We describe specific physiological and molecular adaptations employed by different animals' models of hypoxia tolerance in aquatic and terrestrial environments. We highlight how these adaptations might provide potential clues on strategies to adapt for the clinical management of tissue hypoxia during conditions such as stroke where oxygen demand fails to match the supply. Copyright

  5. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...... is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented...

  6. One Gene and Two Proteins: a Leaderless mRNA Supports the Translation of a Shorter Form of the Shigella VirF Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Maria Letizia; Romilly, Cédric; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Colonna, Bianca; Prosseda, Gianni

    2016-11-08

    VirF, an AraC-like activator, is required to trigger a regulatory cascade that initiates the invasive program of Shigella spp., the etiological agents of bacillary dysentery in humans. VirF expression is activated upon entry into the host and depends on many environmental signals. Here, we show that the virF mRNA is translated into two proteins, the major form, VirF 30 (30 kDa), and the shorter VirF 21 (21 kDa), lacking the N-terminal segment. By site-specific mutagenesis and toeprint analysis, we identified the translation start sites of VirF 30 and VirF 21 and showed that the two different forms of VirF arise from differential translation. Interestingly, in vitro and in vivo translation experiments showed that VirF 21 is also translated from a leaderless mRNA (llmRNA) whose 5' end is at position +309/+310, only 1 or 2 nucleotides upstream of the ATG84 start codon of VirF 21 The llmRNA is transcribed from a gene-internal promoter, which we identified here. Functional analysis revealed that while VirF 30 is responsible for activation of the virulence system, VirF 21 negatively autoregulates virF expression itself. Since VirF 21 modulates the intracellular VirF levels, this suggests that transcription of the llmRNA might occur when the onset of the virulence program is not required. We speculate that environmental cues, like stress conditions, may promote changes in virF mRNA transcription and preferential translation of llmRNA. Shigella spp. are a major cause of dysentery in humans. In bacteria of this genus, the activation of the invasive program involves a multitude of signals that act on all layers of the gene regulatory hierarchy. By controlling the essential genes for host cell invasion, VirF is the key regulator of the switch from the noninvasive to the invasive phenotype. Here, we show that the Shigella virF gene encodes two proteins of different sizes, VirF 30 and VirF 21 , that are functionally distinct. The major form, VirF 30 , activates the genes

  7. Characterization of CgHIFα-Like, a Novel bHLH-PAS Transcription Factor Family Member, and Its Role under Hypoxia Stress in the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, a critical member of the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH-containing Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS protein family, is a master transcription factor involved in maintaining oxygen homeostasis. In the present study, we isolated and characterized a novel bHLH-PAS family member, CgHIFα-like gene, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, and determined its importance during hypoxia stress. The 3020-bp CgHIFα-like cDNA encoded a protein of 888 amino acids. The predicted CgHIFα-like amino acid sequence was conserved in the N-terminal bHLH, PAS, and PAC domains (but not in the C-terminal domain and was most closely related to the HIF family in the bHLH-PAS protein phylogenic tree. Similar to the mammalian HIF-1α, CgHIFα-like could be expressed as four mRNA isoforms containing alternative 5'-untranslated regions and different translation initiation codons. At the mRNA level, these isoforms were expressed in a tissue-specific manner and showed increased transcription to varying degrees under hypoxic conditions. Additionally, the western blot analysis demonstrated that CgHIFα-like was induced by hypoxia. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that CgHIFα-like could bind to the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, whereas dual-luciferase reporter analysis demonstrated that CgHIFα-like could transactivate the reporter gene containing the HREs. In addition to CgHIFα-like, we identified CgARNT from the C. gigas, analyzed its expression pattern, and confirmed its interaction with CgHIFα-like using a yeast two-hybrid assay. In conclusion, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of a novel hypoxia transcription factor in mollusks, which could accumulate under hypoxia and regulate hypoxia related gene expression by binding to HRE and dimerizing with CgARNT. As only one member of HIF has been identified in invertebrates to date, our results provide new insights into the unique mechanisms of hypoxia tolerance in

  8. Notch-mediated post-translational control of Ngn3 protein stability regulates pancreatic patterning and cell fate commitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaoling; Afelik, Solomon; Jensen, Jan Nygaard

    2013-01-01

    of ducts. On one hand, Ngn3 cell-intrinsically activates endocrine target genes; on the other, Ngn3 cell-extrinsically promotes lateral signaling via the Dll1>Notch>Hes1 pathway which substantially limits its ability to sustain endocrine formation. Prior to endocrine commitment, the Ngn3-mediated...... involves transcriptional repression as previously shown, but also incorporates a novel post-translational mechanism. In addition to its ability to promote endocrine fate, we provide evidence of a competing ability of Ngn3 in the patterning of multipotent progenitor cells in turn controlling the formation...

  9. Renal Cell Carcinoma Programmed Death-ligand 1, a New Direct Target of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-2 Alpha, is Regulated by von Hippel-Lindau Gene Mutation Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messai, Yosra; Gad, Sophie; Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Le Teuff, Gwenael; Couve, Sophie; Janji, Bassam; Kammerer, Solenne Florence; Rioux-Leclerc, Nathalie; Hasmim, Meriem; Ferlicot, Sophie; Baud, Véronique; Mejean, Arnaud; Mole, David Robert; Richard, Stéphane; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Albiges, Laurence; Mami-Chouaib, Fathia; Escudier, Bernard; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-10-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) frequently display a loss of function of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene. To elucidate the putative relationship between VHL mutation status and immune checkpoint ligand programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression. A series of 32 renal tumors composed of 11 VHL tumor-associated and 21 sporadic RCCs were used to evaluate PD-L1 expression levels after sequencing of the three exons and exon-intron junctions of the VHL gene. The 786-O, A498, and RCC4 cell lines were used to investigate the mechanisms of PD-L1 regulation. Fisher's exact test was used for VHL mutation and Kruskal-Wallis test for PD-L1 expression. If no covariate accounted for the association of VHL and PD-L1, then a Kruskal-Wallis test was used; otherwise Cochran-Mantel-Haenzsel test was used. We also used the Fligner-Policello test to compare two medians when the distributions had different dispersions. We demonstrated that tumors from ccRCC patients with VHL biallelic inactivation (ie, loss of function) display a significant increase in PD-L1 expression compared with ccRCC tumors carrying one VHL wild-type allele. Using the inducible VHL 786-O-derived cell lines with varying hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) stabilization levels, we showed that PD-L1 expression levels positively correlate with VHL mutation and HIF-2α expression. Targeting HIF-2α decreased PD-L1, while HIF-2α overexpression increased PD-L1 mRNA and protein levels in ccRCC cells. Interestingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays revealed a direct binding of HIF-2α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element in the human PD-L1 proximal promoter in 786-O cells. Our work provides the first evidence that VHL mutations positively correlate with PD-L1 expression in ccRCC and may influence the response to ccRCC anti-PD-L1/PD-1 immunotherapy. We investigated the relationship between von Hippel-Lindau mutations and programmed death-ligand 1 expression. We

  10. The translation initiation factor eIF4E regulates the sex-specific expression of the master switch gene Sxl in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L Graham

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In female fruit flies, Sex-lethal (Sxl turns off the X chromosome dosage compensation system by a mechanism involving a combination of alternative splicing and translational repression of the male specific lethal-2 (msl-2 mRNA. A genetic screen identified the translation initiation factor eif4e as a gene that acts together with Sxl to repress expression of the Msl-2 protein. However, eif4e is not required for Sxl mediated repression of msl-2 mRNA translation. Instead, eif4e functions as a co-factor in Sxl-dependent female-specific alternative splicing of msl-2 and also Sxl pre-mRNAs. Like other factors required for Sxl regulation of splicing, eif4e shows maternal-effect female-lethal interactions with Sxl. This female lethality can be enhanced by mutations in other co-factors that promote female-specific splicing and is caused by a failure to properly activate the Sxl-positive autoregulatory feedback loop in early embryos. In this feedback loop Sxl proteins promote their own synthesis by directing the female-specific alternative splicing of Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs. Analysis of pre-mRNA splicing when eif4e activity is compromised demonstrates that Sxl-dependent female-specific splicing of both Sxl-Pm and msl-2 pre-mRNAs requires eif4e activity. Consistent with a direct involvement in Sxl-dependent alternative splicing, eIF4E is associated with unspliced Sxl-Pm pre-mRNAs and is found in complexes that contain early acting splicing factors--the U1/U2 snRNP protein Sans-fils (Snf, the U1 snRNP protein U1-70k, U2AF38, U2AF50, and the Wilms' Tumor 1 Associated Protein Fl(2d--that have been directly implicated in Sxl splicing regulation.

  11. Crystal structure of a minimal eIF4E–Cup complex reveals a general mechanism of eIF4E regulation in translational repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinkelin, Kerstin; Veith, Katharina; Grünwald, Marlene; Bono, Fulvia

    2012-01-01

    Cup is an eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP) that plays a central role in translational regulation of localized mRNAs during early Drosophila development. In particular, Cup is required for repressing translation of the maternally contributed oskar, nanos, and gurken mRNAs, all of which are essential for embryonic body axis determination. Here, we present the 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure of a minimal eIF4E–Cup assembly, consisting of the interacting regions of the two proteins. In the structure, two separate segments of Cup contact two orthogonal faces of eIF4E. The eIF4E-binding consensus motif of Cup (YXXXXLΦ) binds the convex side of eIF4E similarly to the consensus of other eIF4E-binding proteins, such as 4E-BPs and eIF4G. The second, noncanonical, eIF4E-binding site of Cup binds laterally and perpendicularly to the eIF4E β-sheet. Mutations of Cup at this binding site were shown to reduce binding to eIF4E and to promote the destabilization of the associated mRNA. Comparison with the binding mode of eIF4G to eIF4E suggests that Cup and eIF4G binding would be mutually exclusive at both binding sites. This shows how a common molecular surface of eIF4E might recognize different proteins acting at different times in the same pathway. The structure provides insight into the mechanism by which Cup disrupts eIF4E–eIF4G interaction and has broader implications for understanding the role of 4E-BPs in translational regulation. PMID:22832024

  12. Skeletal muscle protein synthesis and the abundance of the mRNA translation initiation repressor PDCD4 are inversely regulated by fasting and refeeding in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Sana; Moreira, Tracy S; Samimi-Seisan, Helena; Jeganathan, Senthure; Kakade, Dhanshri; Islam, Nushaba; Campbell, Jonathan; Adegoke, Olasunkanmi A J

    2011-06-01

    Optimal skeletal muscle mass is vital to human health, because defects in muscle protein metabolism underlie or exacerbate human diseases. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 is critical in the regulation of mRNA translation and protein synthesis. These functions are mediated in part by the ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) through mechanisms that are poorly understood. The tumor suppressor programmed cell death 4 (PDCD4) has been identified as a novel substrate of S6K1. Here, we examined 1) the expression of PDCD4 in skeletal muscle and 2) its regulation by feed deprivation (FD) and refeeding. Male rats (~100 g; n = 6) were subjected to FD for 48 h; some rats were refed for 2 h. FD suppressed muscle fractional rates of protein synthesis and Ser(67) phosphorylation of PDCD4 (-50%) but increased PDCD4 abundance (P muscle fractional rates of protein synthesis and reduced PDCD4 abundance relative to FD. Finally, when myoblasts were grown in amino acid- and serum-free medium, phenylalanine incorporation into proteins in cells depleted of PDCD4 more than doubled the values in cells with a normal level of PDCD4 (P skeletal muscle in parallel with the reduction of the abundance of this mRNA translation inhibitor.

  13. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  15. Amyloid β production is regulated by β2-adrenergic signaling-mediated post-translational modifications of the ryanodine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussiere, Renaud; Lacampagne, Alain; Reiken, Steven; Liu, Xiaoping; Scheuerman, Valerie; Zalk, Ran; Martin, Cécile; Checler, Frederic; Marks, Andrew R; Chami, Mounia

    2017-06-16

    Alteration of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-mediated calcium (Ca 2+ ) signaling has been reported in Alzheimer disease (AD) models. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying altered RyR-mediated intracellular Ca 2+ release in AD remain to be fully elucidated. We report here that RyR2 undergoes post-translational modifications (phosphorylation, oxidation, and nitrosylation) in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells expressing the β-amyloid precursor protein (βAPP) harboring the familial double Swedish mutations (APPswe). RyR2 macromolecular complex remodeling, characterized by depletion of the regulatory protein calstabin2, resulted in increased cytosolic Ca 2+ levels and mitochondrial oxidative stress. We also report a functional interplay between amyloid β (Aβ), β-adrenergic signaling, and altered Ca 2+ signaling via leaky RyR2 channels. Thus, post-translational modifications of RyR occur downstream of Aβ through a β2-adrenergic signaling cascade that activates PKA. RyR2 remodeling in turn enhances βAPP processing. Importantly, pharmacological stabilization of the binding of calstabin2 to RyR2 channels, which prevents Ca 2+ leakage, or blocking the β2-adrenergic signaling cascade reduced βAPP processing and the production of Aβ in APPswe-expressing SH-SY5Y cells. We conclude that targeting RyR-mediated Ca 2+ leakage may be a therapeutic approach to treat AD. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Spastin subcellular localization is regulated through usage of different translation start sites and active export from the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudiani, Pamela; Riano, Elena; Errico, Alessia; Andolfi, Gennaro; Rugarli, Elena I.

    2005-01-01

    Most cases of autosomal-dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia are linked to mutations in SPG4 encoding spastin, a protein involved in microtubule dynamics and membrane trafficking. In pyramidal neurons of the motor cortex and in immortalized motor neurons, spastin is localized to the synaptic terminals and growth cones. However, in other neurons and in proliferating cells spastin is prevalently nuclear. The mechanisms that determine targeting of spastin to the nucleus or the cytoplasm are unknown. We show here that the SPG4 mRNA is able to direct synthesis of two spastin isoforms, 68 and 60 kDa, respectively, through usage of two different translational start sites. Both isoforms are imported into the nucleus, but the 68-kDa isoform contains two nuclear export signals that efficiently drive export to the cytoplasm. Nuclear export is leptomycin-B sensitive. The cytoplasmic 68-kDa spastin isoform is more abundant in the brain and the spinal cord than in other tissues. Our data indicate that spastin function is modulated through usage of alternative translational start sites and active nuclear import and export, and open new perspectives for the pathogenesis of hereditary spastic paraplegia

  17. Hypoxia-driven angiogenesis: role of tip cells and extracellular matrix scaffolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Stéphane; Monnot, Catherine; Muller, Laurent; Eichmann, Anne

    2010-05-01

    Angiogenesis is a highly coordinated tissue remodeling process leading to blood vessel formation. Hypoxia triggers angiogenesis via induction of expression of growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF instructs endothelial cells to form tip cells, which lead outgrowing capillary sprouts, whereas Notch signaling inhibits sprout formation. Basement membrane deposition and mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) induced by hypoxia may participate to coordinated vessel sprouting in conjunction with the VEGF and Notch signaling pathways. Hypoxia regulates ECM composition, deposition, posttranslational modifications and rearrangement. In particular, hypoxia-driven vascular remodeling is dynamically regulated through modulation of ECM-modifying enzyme activities that eventually affect both matricellular proteins and growth factor availability. Better understanding of the complex interplay between endothelial cells and soluble growth factors and mechanical factors from the ECM will certainly have significant implications for understanding the regulation of developmental and pathological angiogenesis driven by hypoxia.

  18. Machine Translation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Research Mt System Example: The 'Janus' Translating Phone Project. The Janus ... based on laptops, and simultaneous translation of two speakers in a dialogue. For more ..... The current focus in MT research is on using machine learning.

  19. Distinct responses of protein turnover regulatory pathways in hypoxia- and semistarvation-induced muscle atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Theije, Chiel C.; Langen, Ramon C. J.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Schols, Annemie M. W. J.; Köhler, S. Eleonore

    2013-01-01

    The balance of muscle protein synthesis and degradation determines skeletal muscle mass. We hypothesized that hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy and alterations in the regulation of muscle protein turnover include a hypoxia-specific component, in addition to the observed effects of reduction in food

  20. PKA activity exacerbates hypoxia-induced ROS formation and hypoxic injury in PC-12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozal, Evelyne; Metz, Cynthia J; Dematteis, Maurice; Sachleben, Leroy R; Schurr, Avital; Rane, Madhavi J

    2017-09-05

    Hypoxia is a primary factor in many pathological conditions. Hypoxic cell death is commonly attributed to metabolic failure and oxidative injury. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is activated in hypoxia and regulates multiple enzymes of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus may be implicated in cellular energy depletion and hypoxia-induced cell death. Wild type (WT) PC-12 cells and PKA activity-deficient 123.7 PC-12 cells were exposed to 3, 6, 12 and 24h hypoxia (0.1% or 5% O 2 ). Hypoxia, at 24h 0.1% O 2 , induced cell death and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in WT PC-12 cells. Despite lower ATP levels in normoxic 123.7 cells than in WT cells, hypoxia only decreased ATP levels in WT cells. However, menadione-induced oxidative stress similarly affected both cell types. While mitochondrial COX IV expression remained consistently higher in 123.7 cells, hypoxia decreased COX IV expression in both cell types. N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment blocked hypoxia-induced WT cell death without preventing ATP depletion. Transient PKA catα expression in 123.7 cells partially restored hypoxia-induced ROS but did not alter ATP levels or COX IV expression. We conclude that PKA signaling contributes to hypoxic injury, by regulating oxidative stress rather than by depleting ATP levels. Therapeutic strategies targeting PKA signaling may improve cellular adaptation and recovery in hypoxic pathologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  2. Hypoxic inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β promotes gastric tumor growth and angiogenesis by facilitating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Young San; Cho, Sung Jin; Park, Jinju; Choi, Yiseul; Lee, Jae-Seon; Youn, Hong-Duk; Kim, Woo Ho; Kim, Min A; Park, Jong-Wan; Lee, Byung Lan

    2016-09-01

    Since the molecular mechanism of hypoxic adaptation in cancer cells is cell-type specific, we investigated whether glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) activation is involved in hypoxia-induced gastric tumor promotion. Stable gastric cancer cell lines (SNU-638, SNU-484, MKN1, and MKN45) were cultured under hypoxic conditions. Cells overexpressing wild-type GSK-3β (WT-GSK-3β) or kinase-dead mutant of GSK-3β (KD-GSK-3β) were generated and used for cell culture and animal studies. In cell culture experiments, hypoxia decreased GSK-3β activation in gastric cancer cells. Cell viability and the expressions of HIF-1α protein and VEGF mRNA in gastric cancer cells were higher in KD-GSK-3β transfectants than in WT-GSK-3β transfectants under hypoxic conditions, but not under normoxic conditions. Gastric cancer xenografts showed that tumor growth, microvessel area, HIF-1α activation, and VEGF expression were higher in KD-GSK-3β tumors than in WT-GSK-3β tumors in vivo. In addition, the expression of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein was regulated by GSK-3β at the translational level. Our data suggest that GSK-3β is involved in hypoxic adaptation of gastric cancer cells as an inhibitory upstream regulator of the HIF-1α/VEGF signaling pathway. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Hypoxia as a biomarker for radioresistant cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Claudia; Perrin, Rosalind; Hill, Richard P; Dubrovska, Anna; Kurth, Ina

    2014-08-01

    Tumor initiation, growth and relapse after therapy are thought to be driven by a population of cells with stem cell characteristics, named cancer stem cells (CSC). The regulation of their radiation resistance and their maintenance is poorly understood. CSC are believed to reside preferentially in special microenvironmental niches located within tumor tissues. The features of these niches are of crucial importance for CSC self-renewal, metastatic potential and therapy resistance. One of the characteristics of solid tumors is occurrence of less oxygenated (hypoxic regions), which are believed to serve as so-called hypoxic niches for CSC. The purpose of this review was the critical discussion of the supportive role of hypoxia and hypoxia-related pathways during cancer progression and radiotherapy resistance and the relevance for therapeutic implications in the clinic. It is generally known since decades that hypoxia inside solid tumors impedes chemo- and radiotherapy. However, there is limited evidence to date that targeting hypoxic regions during conventional therapy is effective. Nonetheless improved hypoxia-imaging technologies and image guided individualized hypoxia targeted therapy in conjunction with the development of novel molecular targets may be able to challenge the protective effect on the tumor provided by hypoxia.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Muscle Hypertrophy Models Reveals Divergent Gene Transcription Profiles and Points to Translational Regulation of Muscle Growth through Increased mTOR Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo G. Pereira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal muscle mass is a result of the balance between protein breakdown and protein synthesis. It has been shown that multiple conditions of muscle atrophy are characterized by the common regulation of a specific set of genes, termed atrogenes. It is not known whether various models of muscle hypertrophy are similarly regulated by a common transcriptional program. Here, we characterized gene expression changes in three different conditions of muscle growth, examining each condition during acute and chronic phases. Specifically, we compared the transcriptome of Extensor Digitorum Longus (EDL muscles collected (1 during the rapid phase of postnatal growth at 2 and 4 weeks of age, (2 24 h or 3 weeks after constitutive activation of AKT, and (3 24 h or 3 weeks after overload hypertrophy caused by tenotomy of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. We observed an important overlap between significantly regulated genes when comparing each single condition at the two different timepoints. Furthermore, examining the transcriptional changes occurring 24 h after a hypertrophic stimulus, we identify an important role for genes linked to a stress response, despite the absence of muscle damage in the AKT model. However, when we compared all different growth conditions, we did not find a common transcriptional fingerprint. On the other hand, all conditions showed a marked increase in mTORC1 signaling and increased ribosome biogenesis, suggesting that muscle growth is characterized more by translational, than transcriptional regulation.

  5. Intersections between cardiac physiology, emotion regulation and interpersonal warmth in preschoolers: Implications for drug abuse prevention from translational neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Caron A C; Skowron, Elizabeth A; Giuliano, Ryan J; Fisher, Philip A

    2016-06-01

    Early childhood is characterized by dramatic gains in emotion regulation skills that support social adjustment and mental health. Understanding the physiological substrates of healthy emotion regulation may offer new directions for altering trajectories toward initiation and escalation of substance abuse. Here, we describe the intersections between parasympathetic and sympathetic tone, emotion regulation and prosocial behavior in a high-risk sample of preschoolers. Fifty-two 3-6 year old children completed an assessment of attention regulation in response to affective stimuli. Cardiac respiratory sinus arrhythmia, an index of parasympathetic tone, and pre-ejection period, a marker of sympathetic activation, were recorded at rest and while children engaged in social interactions with their mothers and an unfamiliar research assistant. Mothers reported on children's emotional reactivity and prosocial behavior. Controlling for age and psychosocial risk, higher parasympathetic tone predicted better attention regulation in response to angry emotion and higher levels of prosocial behavior, whereas a reciprocal pattern of higher parasympathetic tone and lower sympathetic arousal predicted better attention in response to positive emotion and lower emotional reactivity. Children exposed to fewer risk factors and higher levels of maternal warmth were more able to sustain a high level of parasympathetic tone during interaction episodes. Findings suggest that autonomic measures represent biomarkers for socio-emotional competence in young children. They also point to the importance of early experiences in the establishment of physiological regulation and the promise of family-based intervention to promote healthy emotion regulation and prevent substance dependence in high-risk populations. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 mediates erythropoietin-induced neuroprotection in hypoxia ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvenir, Rhonda; Fathali, Nancy; Ostrowski, Robert P; Lekic, Tim; Zhang, John H; Tang, Jiping

    2011-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that erythropoietin (EPO) is neuroprotective in both in vivo and in vitro models of hypoxia ischemia. However these studies hold limited clinical translations because the underlying mechanism remains unclear and the key molecules involved in EPO-induced neuroprotection are still to be determined. This study investigated if tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and its upstream regulator signaling molecule Janus kinase-2 (JAK-2) are critical in EPO-induced neuroprotection. Hypoxia ischemia (HI) was modeled in-vitro by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and in-vivo by a modified version of Rice-Vannucci model of HI in 10-day-old rat pups. EPO treated cells were exposed to AG490, an inhibitor of JAK-2 or TIMP-1 neutralizing antibody for 2h with OGD. Cell death, phosphorylation of JAK-2 and signal transducers and activators of transcription protein-3 (STAT-3), TIMP-1 expression, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity were measured and compared with normoxic group. Hypoxic ischemic animals were treated one hour following HI and evaluated 48 h after. Our data showed that EPO significantly increased cell survival, associated with increased TIMP-1 activity, phosphorylation of JAK-2 and STAT-3, and decreased MMP-9 activity in vivo and in vitro. EPO's protective effects were reversed by inhibition of JAK-2 or TIMP-1 in both models. We concluded that JAK-2, STAT-3 and TIMP-1 are key mediators of EPO-induced neuroprotection during hypoxia ischemia injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. eIF4A inhibition allows translational regulation of mRNAs encoding proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bottley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the main cause of dementia in our increasingly aging population. The debilitating cognitive and behavioral symptoms characteristic of AD make it an extremely distressing illness for patients and carers. Although drugs have been developed to treat AD symptoms and to slow disease progression, there is currently no cure. The incidence of AD is predicted to increase to over one hundred million by 2050, placing a heavy burden on communities and economies, and making the development of effective therapies an urgent priority. Two proteins are thought to have major contributory roles in AD: the microtubule associated protein tau, also known as MAPT; and the amyloid-beta peptide (A-beta, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. Oxidative stress is also implicated in AD pathology from an early stage. By targeting eIF4A, an RNA helicase involved in translation initiation, the synthesis of APP and tau, but not neuroprotective proteins, can be simultaneously and specifically reduced, representing a novel avenue for AD intervention. We also show that protection from oxidative stress is increased upon eIF4A inhibition. We demonstrate that the reduction of these proteins is not due to changes in mRNA levels or increased protein degradation, but is a consequence of translational repression conferred by inhibition of the helicase activity of eIF4A. Inhibition of eIF4A selectively and simultaneously modulates the synthesis of proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease: reducing A-beta and tau synthesis, while increasing proteins predicted to be neuroprotective.

  8. The expanding universe of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huafeng; Semenza, Gregg L

    2008-07-01

    Reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) is sensed and transduced into changes in the activity or expression of cellular macromolecules. These responses impact on virtually all areas of biology and medicine. In this meeting report, we summarize major developments in the field that were presented at the 2008 Keystone Symposium on Cellular, Physiological, and Pathogenic Responses to Hypoxia.

  9. Machine translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, M

    1982-04-01

    Each language has its own structure. In translating one language into another one, language attributes and grammatical interpretation must be defined in an unambiguous form. In order to parse a sentence, it is necessary to recognize its structure. A so-called context-free grammar can help in this respect for machine translation and machine-aided translation. Problems to be solved in studying machine translation are taken up in the paper, which discusses subjects for semantics and for syntactic analysis and translation software. 14 references.

  10. Translational up-regulation and high-level protein expression from plasmid vectors by mTOR activation via different pathways in PC3 and 293T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanthi Karyala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Though 293T cells are widely used for expression of proteins from transfected plasmid vectors, the molecular basis for the high-level expression is yet to be understood. We recently identified the prostate carcinoma cell line PC3 to be as efficient as 293T in protein expression. This study was undertaken to decipher the molecular basis of high-level expression in these two cell lines. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a survey of different cell lines for efficient expression of platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B, β-galactosidase (β-gal and green fluorescent protein (GFP from plasmid vectors, PC3 was found to express at 5-50-fold higher levels compared to the bone metastatic prostate carcinoma cell line PC3BM and many other cell lines. Further, the efficiency of transfection and level of expression of the reporters in PC3 were comparable to that in 293T. Comparative analyses revealed that the high level expression of the reporters in the two cell lines was due to increased translational efficiency. While phosphatidic acid (PA-mediated activation of mTOR, as revealed by drastic reduction in reporter expression by n-butanol, primarily contributed to the high level expression in PC3, multiple pathways involving PA, PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 appear to contribute to the abundant reporter expression in 293T. Thus the extent of translational up-regulation attained through the concerted activation of mTOR by multiple pathways in 293T could be achieved through its activation primarily by the PA pathway in PC3. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies reveal that the high-level expression of proteins from plasmid vectors is effected by translational up-regulation through mTOR activation via different signaling pathways in the two cell lines and that PC3 is as efficient as 293T for recombinant protein expression. Further, PC3 offers an advantage in that the level of expression of the protein can be regulated by simple addition of n-butanol to

  11. Hypoxia inhibits hypertrophic differentiation and endochondral ossification in explanted tibiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C H Leijten

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously described or whether alleviation of hypoxia and consequent changes in oxygen tension mediated signaling events also plays an active role in regulating the hypertrophic differentiation process itself.Fetal mouse tibiae (E17.5 explants were cultured up to 21 days under normoxic or hypoxic conditions (21% and 2.5% oxygen respectively. Tibiae were analyzed on growth kinetics, histology, gene expression and protein secretion.The oxygen level had a strong influence on the development of explanted fetal tibiae. Compared to hypoxia, normoxia increased the length of the tibiae, length of the hypertrophic zone, calcification of the cartilage and mRNA levels of hypertrophic differentiation-related genes e.g. MMP9, MMP13, RUNX2, COL10A1 and ALPL. Compared to normoxia, hypoxia increased the size of the cartilaginous epiphysis, length of the resting zone, calcification of the bone and mRNA levels of hyaline cartilage-related genes e.g. ACAN, COL2A1 and SOX9. Additionally, hypoxia enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of the secreted articular cartilage markers GREM1, FRZB and DKK1, which are able to inhibit hypertrophic differentiation.Collectively our data suggests that oxygen levels play an active role in the regulation of hypertrophic differentiation of hyaline chondrocytes. Normoxia stimulates hypertrophic differentiation evidenced by the expression of hypertrophic differentiation related genes. In contrast, hypoxia suppresses hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes, which might be at least partially explained by the induction of GREM1, FRZB and DKK1 expression.

  12. Transcription and translation products of the cytolysin gene psm-mec on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Kaito

    Full Text Available The F region downstream of the mecI gene in the SCCmec element in hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA contains two bidirectionally overlapping open reading frames (ORFs, the fudoh ORF and the psm-mec ORF. The psm-mec ORF encodes a cytolysin, phenol-soluble modulin (PSM-mec. Transformation of the F region into the Newman strain, which is a methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA strain, or into the MW2 (USA400 and FRP3757 (USA300 strains, which are community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA strains that lack the F region, attenuated their virulence in a mouse systemic infection model. Introducing the F region to these strains suppressed colony-spreading activity and PSMα production, and promoted biofilm formation. By producing mutations into the psm-mec ORF, we revealed that (i both the transcription and translation products of the psm-mec ORF suppressed colony-spreading activity and promoted biofilm formation; and (ii the transcription product of the psm-mec ORF, but not its translation product, decreased PSMα production. These findings suggest that both the psm-mec transcript, acting as a regulatory RNA, and the PSM-mec protein encoded by the gene on the mobile genetic element SCCmec regulate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Conserved Residues Lys57 and Lys401 of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Maintain an Active Site Conformation for Optimal Activity: Implications for Post-Translational Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Caba

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite its study since the 1960's, very little is known about the post-translational regulation of the multiple catalytic activities performed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, the primary protein folding catalyst of the cell. This work identifies a functional role for the highly conserved CxxC-flanking residues Lys57 and Lys401 of human PDI in vitro. Mutagenesis studies have revealed these residues as modulating the oxidoreductase activity of PDI in a pH-dependent manner. Non-conservative amino acid substitutions resulted in enzyme variants upwards of 7-fold less efficient. This attenuated activity was found to translate into a 2-fold reduction of the rate of electron shuttling between PDI and the intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum oxidase, ERO1α, suggesting a functional significance to oxidative protein folding. In light of this, the possibility of lysine acetylation at residues Lys57 and Lys401 was assessed by in vitro treatment using acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin. A total of 28 acetyllysine residues were identified, including acLys57 and acLys401. The kinetic behavior of the acetylated protein form nearly mimicked that obtained with a K57/401Q double substitution variant providing an indication that acetylation of the active site-flanking lysine residues can act to reversibly modulate PDI activity.

  14. Conserved Residues Lys57 and Lys401 of Protein Disulfide Isomerase Maintain an Active Site Conformation for Optimal Activity: Implications for Post-Translational Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caba, Cody; Ali Khan, Hyder; Auld, Janeen; Ushioda, Ryo; Araki, Kazutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Mutus, Bulent

    2018-01-01

    Despite its study since the 1960's, very little is known about the post-translational regulation of the multiple catalytic activities performed by protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), the primary protein folding catalyst of the cell. This work identifies a functional role for the highly conserved CxxC-flanking residues Lys 57 and Lys 401 of human PDI in vitro . Mutagenesis studies have revealed these residues as modulating the oxidoreductase activity of PDI in a pH-dependent manner. Non-conservative amino acid substitutions resulted in enzyme variants upwards of 7-fold less efficient. This attenuated activity was found to translate into a 2-fold reduction of the rate of electron shuttling between PDI and the intraluminal endoplasmic reticulum oxidase, ERO1α, suggesting a functional significance to oxidative protein folding. In light of this, the possibility of lysine acetylation at residues Lys 57 and Lys 401 was assessed by in vitro treatment using acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin). A total of 28 acetyllysine residues were identified, including acLys 57 and acLys 401 . The kinetic behavior of the acetylated protein form nearly mimicked that obtained with a K57/401Q double substitution variant providing an indication that acetylation of the active site-flanking lysine residues can act to reversibly modulate PDI activity.

  15. The measurement of reversible redox dependent post-translational modifications and their regulation of mitochondrial and skeletal muscle function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Kramer

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  16. The Measurement of Reversible Redox Dependent Post-translational Modifications and Their Regulation of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Wei-Jun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-11-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  17. Expression of StAR and Key Genes Regulating Cortisol Biosynthesis in Near Term Ovine Fetal Adrenocortical Cells: Effects of Long-Term Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Vladimir E; Myers, Dean A; Kaushal, Kanchan M; Ducsay, Charles A

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated decreased expression of key genes regulating cortisol biosynthesis in long-term hypoxic (LTH) sheep fetal adrenals compared to controls. We also showed that inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/ERK inhibitor UO126 limited adrenocorticotropic (ACTH)-induced cortisol production in ovine fetal adrenocortical cells (FACs), suggesting a role for ERKs in cortisol synthesis. This study was designed to determine whether the previously observed decrease in LTH cytochrome P45011A1/cytochrome P450c17 (CYP11A1/CYP17) in adrenal glands was maintained in vitro, and whether ACTH alone with or without UO126 treatment had altered the expression of CYP11A1, CYP17, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in control versus LTH FACs. Ewes were maintained at high altitude (3820 m) from ∼40 days of gestation (dG). At 138 to 141 dG, fetal adrenal glands were collected from LTH (n = 5) and age-matched normoxic controls (n = 6). Fetal adrenocortical cells were challenged with ACTH (10 -8 M) with or without UO126 (10 µM) for 18 hours. Media samples were collected for cortisol analysis and messenger RNA (mRNA) for CYP11A1, CYP17, and StAR was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cortisol was higher in the LTH versus control ( P StAR mRNA was decreased in LTH versus control ( P StAR expression.

  18. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weiwei; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Ning; Xin, Mingming; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Ni, Zhongfu; Du, Jinkun

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops.

  19. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Guo

    Full Text Available Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops.

  20. LncRNA TUG1 serves an important role in hypoxia-induced myocardial cell injury by regulating the miR‑145‑5p‑Binp3 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongwei; Zhao, Shengji; Li, Chunfu; Liu, Chaoquan

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of long non‑coding RNA TUG1 in hypoxia‑induced myocardial cell injury and to explore the potential molecular mechanisms. The cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2 was cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. TUG1 expression under hypoxic conditions was then detected. The effects of TUG1 overexpression on viability, apoptosis, migration and invasion were assayed. In addition, the microRNA (miR)‑145‑5p expression was detected. Following H9c2 cell transfection with miR‑145‑5p mimics, the H9c2 cell viability, apoptosis, migration and invasion were also detected. Additionally, the target gene of miR‑145‑5p was assayed by Luciferase reporter assay. The protein expressions of Wnt‑3a, Wnt5a, and β‑catenin in H9c2 cells under hypoxic conditions were also determined. The results revealed that hypoxia induced injury in H9c2 cells, including inhibiting cell viability, migration and invasion, and promoting cell apoptosis. Overexpression of TUG1 aggravated hypoxia‑induced injury in H9c2 cells. In addition, miR‑145‑5p was negatively regulated by TUG1, and TUG1 overexpression aggravated hypoxia‑induced injury via the downregulation of miR‑145‑5p. Furthermore, B‑cell lymphoma 2 interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) was a target of miR‑145‑5p, and overexpression of Bnip3 aggravated hypoxia‑induced cell injury by activating Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathways in H9c2 cells. In conclusion, overexpression of TUG1 aggravated hypoxia‑induced injury in cardiomyocytes by regulating the miR‑145‑5p‑Binp3 axis. Activation of the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway may be a key mechanism to mediate the role of TUG1 in regulating hypoxia‑induced myocardial injury. TUG1 may be an effective diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for myocardial ischemia.

  1. Translational regulation of gene expression by an anaerobically induced small non-coding RNA in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H.

    2010-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNA) have emerged as important elements of gene regulatory circuits. In enterobacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella many of these sRNAs interact with the Hfq protein, an RNA chaperone similar to mammalian Sm-like proteins and act in the post...... that adaptation to anaerobic growth involves the action of a small regulatory RNA....... of at least one sRNA regulator. Here, we extend this view by the identification and characterization of a highly conserved, anaerobically induced small sRNA in E. coli, whose expression is strictly dependent on the anaerobic transcriptional fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator (FNR). The sRNA, named Fnr...

  2. Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and HIF-target genes in cortical neurons by the novel multifunctional iron chelator anti-Alzheimer drug, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramovich-Tirosh, Y; Bar-Am, O; Amit, T; Youdim, M B H; Weinreb, O

    2010-06-01

    Based on a multimodal drug design paradigm, we have synthesized a multifunctional non-toxic, brain permeable iron chelator, M30, possessing the neuroprotective propargylamine moiety of the anti-Parkinsonian drug, rasagiline (Azilect) and antioxidant-iron chelator moiety of an 8-hydroxyquinoline derivative of our iron chelator, VK28. M30 was recently found to confer potential neuroprotective effects in vitro and in various preclinical neurodegenerative models and regulate the levels and processing of the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein and its toxic amyloidogenic derivative, Abeta. Here, we show that M30 activates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha signaling pathway, thus promoting HIF-1alpha mRNA and protein expression levels, as well as increasing transcription of HIF-1alpha-dependent genes, including vascular endothelial growth factor, erythropoietin, enolase-1, p21 and tyrosine hydroxylase in rat primary cortical cells. In addition, M30 also increased the expression levels of the transcripts of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Regarding aspects of relevance to Alzheimer's disease (AD), western blotting analysis of glycogen synthase kinase- 3beta (GSK-3beta) signaling pathway revealed that M30 enhanced the levels of phospho-AKT (Ser473) and phospho- GSK-3beta (Ser9) and attenuated Tau phosphorylation. M30 was also shown to protect cultured cortical neurons against Abeta(25-35) toxicity. All these multimodal pharmacological activities of M30 might be beneficial for its potent efficacy in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions, such as Parkinson's disease and AD in which oxidative stress and iron-mediated toxicity are involved.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-generating mitochondrial DNA mutation up-regulates hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha gene transcription via phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt/protein kinase C/histone deacetylase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshikawa, Nobuko; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi; Nakagawara, Akira; Takenaga, Keizo

    2009-11-27

    Lewis lung carcinoma-derived high metastatic A11 cells constitutively overexpress hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha mRNA compared with low metastatic P29 cells. Because A11 cells exclusively possess a G13997A mutation in the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) gene, we addressed here a causal relationship between the ND6 mutation and the activation of HIF-1alpha transcription, and we investigated the potential mechanism. Using trans-mitochondrial cybrids between A11 and P29 cells, we found that the ND6 mutation was directly involved in HIF-1alpha mRNA overexpression. Stimulation of HIF-1alpha transcription by the ND6 mutation was mediated by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt and protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways. The up-regulation of HIF-1alpha transcription was abolished by mithramycin A, an Sp1 inhibitor, but luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that Sp1 was necessary but not sufficient for HIF-1alpha mRNA overexpression in A11 cells. On the other hand, trichostatin A, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, markedly suppressed HIF-1alpha transcription in A11 cells. In accordance with this, HDAC activity was high in A11 cells but low in P29 cells and in A11 cells treated with the ROS scavenger ebselene, the PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and the PKC inhibitor Ro31-8220. These results suggest that the ROS-generating ND6 mutation increases HIF-1alpha transcription via the PI3K-Akt/PKC/HDAC pathway, leading to HIF-1alpha protein accumulation in hypoxic tumor cells.

  4. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvisha Misra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response.

  5. Regulation of Mammary Stem Cell Quiescence via Post-Translational Modification of DeltaNp63alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    This document is the Annual Summary Report on the training grant awarded to Andrew DeCastro entitled Regulation of Mammary Stem Cell Quiescence via...screen) mediated phosphorylation of deltaNPdelta3 on stem cell behavior and mitotic activity. Task 1 aims to determine the effects of wild-type, phospho...ablative and phospho-mimetic alleles of deltaNP63delta phosphorylation on stem cell behavior in vitro. Thus far, we demonstrate that stem cell enriched

  6. TG2 regulates the heat-shock response by the post-translational modification of HSF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossin, Federica; Villella, Valeria Rachela; D'Eletto, Manuela; Farrace, Maria Grazia; Esposito, Speranza; Ferrari, Eleonora; Monzani, Romina; Occhigrossi, Luca; Pagliarini, Vittoria; Sette, Claudio; Cozza, Giorgio; Barlev, Nikolai A; Falasca, Laura; Fimia, Gian Maria; Kroemer, Guido; Raia, Valeria; Maiuri, Luigi; Piacentini, Mauro

    2018-05-11

    Heat-shock factor 1 (HSF1) is the master transcription factor that regulates the response to proteotoxic stress by controlling the transcription of many stress-responsive genes including the heat-shock proteins. Here, we show a novel molecular mechanism controlling the activation of HSF1. We demonstrate that transglutaminase type 2 (TG2), dependent on its protein disulphide isomerase activity, triggers the trimerization and activation of HSF1 regulating adaptation to stress and proteostasis impairment. In particular, we find that TG2 loss of function correlates with a defect in the nuclear translocation of HSF1 and in its DNA-binding ability to the HSP70 promoter. We show that the inhibition of TG2 restores the unbalance in HSF1-HSP70 pathway in cystic fibrosis (CF), a human disorder characterized by deregulation of proteostasis. The absence of TG2 leads to an increase of about 40% in CFTR function in a new experimental CF mouse model lacking TG2. Altogether, these results indicate that TG2 plays a key role in the regulation of cellular proteostasis under stressful cellular conditions through the modulation of the heat-shock response. © 2018 The Authors.

  7. Hypoxia promotes apoptosis of neuronal cells through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-microRNA-204-B-cell lymphoma-2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuwen; Li, Ji; Wu, Dongjin; Bu, Xiangpeng; Qiao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal cells are highly sensitive to hypoxia and may be subjected to apoptosis when exposed to hypoxia. Several apoptosis-related genes and miRNAs involve in hypoxia-induced apoptosis. This study aimed to examine the role of HIF1α-miR-204-BCL-2 pathway in hypoxia-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells. Annexin V/propidium iodide assay was performed to analyze cell apoptosis in AGE1.HN and PC12 cells under hypoxic or normoxic conditions. The expression of BCL-2 and miR-204 were determined by Western blot and qRT-PCR. The effects of miR-204 overexpression or knockdown on the expression of BCL-2 were evaluated by luciferase assay and Western blot under hypoxic or normoxic conditions. HIF-1α inhibitor YC-1 and siHIF-1α were employed to determine the effect of HIF-1α on the up-regulation of miR-204 and down-regulation of BCL-2 induced by hypoxia. Apoptosis assay showed the presence of apoptosis induced by hypoxia in neuronal cells. Moreover, we found that hypoxia significantly down-regulated the expression of BCL-2, and increased the mRNA level of miR-204 in neuronal cells than that in control. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that miR-204 directly targeted and regulated the expression of BCL-2. Specifically, the expression of BCL-2 was inhibited by miR-204 mimic and enhanced by miR-204 inhibitor. Furthermore, we detected that hypoxia induced cell apoptosis via HIF-1α/miR-204/BCL-2 in neuronal cells. This study demonstrated that HIF-1α-miR-204-BCL-2 pathway contributed to apoptosis of neuronal cells induced by hypoxia, which could potentially be exploited to prevent spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. © 2015 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  8. Molecular network including eIF1AX, RPS7, and 14-3-3γ regulates protein translation and cell proliferation in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Cuiping; Luo, Chaochao; Qu, Bo; Khudhair, Nagam; Gu, Xinyu; Zang, Yanli; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Na; Li, Qingzhang; Gao, Xuejun

    2014-12-15

    14-3-3γ, an isoform of the 14-3-3 protein family, was proved to be a positive regulator of mTOR pathway. Here, we analyzed the function of 14-3-3γ in protein synthesis using bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs). We found that 14-3-3γ interacted with eIF1AX and RPS7 by 14-3-3γ coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) peptide mass fingerprinting analysis. These interactions of 14-3-3γ with eIF1AX and RPS7 were further confirmed by colocalization and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. We also found that methionine could promote protein synthesis and trigger the protein expression levels of 14-3-3γ, eIF1AX and RPS7. Analysis of overexpression and inhibition of 14-3-3γ confirmed that it positively affected the protein expression levels of eIF1AX, RPS7, Stat5 and mTOR pathway to promote protein synthesis and cell proliferation in BMECs. We further showed that overexpression of eIF1AX and RPS7 also triggered protein translation and cell proliferation. From these results, we conclude that molecular network including eIF1AX, RPS7, and 14-3-3γ regulates protein translation and cell proliferation in BMECs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Translating India

    CERN Document Server

    Kothari, Rita

    2014-01-01

    The cultural universe of urban, English-speaking middle class in India shows signs of growing inclusiveness as far as English is concerned. This phenomenon manifests itself in increasing forms of bilingualism (combination of English and one Indian language) in everyday forms of speech - advertisement jingles, bilingual movies, signboards, and of course conversations. It is also evident in the startling prominence of Indian Writing in English and somewhat less visibly, but steadily rising, activity of English translation from Indian languages. Since the eighties this has led to a frenetic activity around English translation in India's academic and literary circles. Kothari makes this very current phenomenon her chief concern in Translating India.   The study covers aspects such as the production, reception and marketability of English translation. Through an unusually multi-disciplinary approach, this study situates English translation in India amidst local and global debates on translation, representation an...

  10. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  11. Coastal hypoxia and sediment biogeochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Middelburg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity, duration and frequency of coastal hypoxia (oxygen concentration <63 μM are increasing due to human alteration of coastal ecosystems and changes in oceanographic conditions due to global warming. Here we provide a concise review of the consequences of coastal hypoxia for sediment biogeochemistry. Changes in bottom-water oxygen levels have consequences for early diagenetic pathways (more anaerobic at expense of aerobic pathways, the efficiency of re-oxidation of reduced metabolites and the nature, direction and magnitude of sediment-water exchange fluxes. Hypoxia may also lead to more organic matter accumulation and burial and the organic matter eventually buried is also of higher quality, i.e. less degraded. Bottom-water oxygen levels also affect the organisms involved in organic matter processing with the contribution of metazoans decreasing as oxygen levels drop. Hypoxia has a significant effect on benthic animals with the consequences that ecosystem functions related to macrofauna such as bio-irrigation and bioturbation are significantly affected by hypoxia as well. Since many microbes and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes depend on animal-induced transport processes (e.g. re-oxidation of particulate reduced sulphur and denitrification, there are indirect hypoxia effects on biogeochemistry via the benthos. Severe long-lasting hypoxia and anoxia may result in the accumulation of reduced compounds in sediments and elimination of macrobenthic communities with the consequences that biogeochemical properties during trajectories of decreasing and increasing oxygen may be different (hysteresis with consequences for coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  12. Hypoxia-Induced Signaling Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression: Exosomes Role as Messenger of Hypoxic Response in Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Gagan; Panigrahi, Gati K.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the leading malignancy in men and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Hypoxia (low O2 condition) is considered an early event in prostate carcinogenesis associated with an aggressive phenotype. In fact, clinically, hypoxia and hypoxia-related biomarkers are associated with treatment failure and disease progression. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is the key factor that is activated under hypoxia, and mediates adaptation of cells to hypoxic conditions through regulating the expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), metastasis, survival, proliferation, metabolism, stemness, hormone-refractory progression, and therapeutic resistance. Besides HIF-1, several other signaling pathways including PI3K/Akt/mTOR, NADPH oxidase (NOX), Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog are activated in cancer cells under hypoxic conditions, and also contribute in hypoxia-induced biological effects in HIF-1-dependent and -independent manners. Hypoxic cancer cells cause extensive changes in the tumor microenvironment both local and distant, and recent studies have provided ample evidence supporting the crucial role of nanosized vesicles “exosomes” in mediating hypoxia-induced tumor microenvironment remodeling. Exosomes’ role has been reported in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, stemness, activation of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), and EMT. Together, existing literature suggests that hypoxia plays a predominant role in PCA growth and progression, and PCA could be effectively prevented and treated via targeting hypoxia/hypoxia-related signaling pathways. PMID:27279239

  13. Cold shock protein YB-1 is involved in hypoxia-dependent gene transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauen, Thomas; Frye, Bjoern C.; Wang, Jialin; Raffetseder, Ute; Alidousty, Christina; En-Nia, Abdelaziz; Floege, Jürgen; Mertens, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-dependent gene regulation is largely orchestrated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), which associate with defined nucleotide sequences of hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). Comparison of the regulatory HRE within the 3′ enhancer of the human erythropoietin (EPO) gene with known binding motifs for cold shock protein Y-box (YB) protein-1 yielded strong similarities within the Y-box element and 3′ adjacent sequences. DNA binding assays confirmed YB-1 binding to both, single- and double-stranded HRE templates. Under hypoxia, we observed nuclear shuttling of YB-1 and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that YB-1 and HIF-1α physically interact with each other. Cellular YB-1 depletion using siRNA significantly induced hypoxia-dependent EPO production at both, promoter and mRNA level. Vice versa, overexpressed YB-1 significantly reduced EPO-HRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas this effect was minor under normoxia. HIF-1α overexpression induced hypoxia-dependent gene transcription through the same element and accordingly, co-expression with YB-1 reduced HIF-1α-mediated EPO induction under hypoxic conditions. Taken together, we identified YB-1 as a novel binding factor for HREs that participates in fine-tuning of the hypoxia transcriptome. - Highlights: • Hypoxia drives nuclear translocation of cold shock protein YB-1. • YB-1 physically interacts with hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. • YB-1 binds to the hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) within the erythropoietin (EPO) 3′ enhancer. • YB-1 trans-regulates transcription of hypoxia-dependent genes such as EPO and VEGF.

  14. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the Aspergillus fumigatus hypoxia response using an oxygen-controlled fermenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Bridget M

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a mold responsible for the majority of cases of aspergillosis in humans. To survive in the human body, A. fumigatus must adapt to microenvironments that are often characterized by low nutrient and oxygen availability. Recent research suggests that the ability of A. fumigatus and other pathogenic fungi to adapt to hypoxia contributes to their virulence. However, molecular mechanisms of A. fumigatus hypoxia adaptation are poorly understood. Thus, to better understand how A. fumigatus adapts to hypoxic microenvironments found in vivo during human fungal pathogenesis, the dynamic changes of the fungal transcriptome and proteome in hypoxia were investigated over a period of 24 hours utilizing an oxygen-controlled fermenter system. Results Significant increases in transcripts associated with iron and sterol metabolism, the cell wall, the GABA shunt, and transcriptional regulators were observed in response to hypoxia. A concomitant reduction in transcripts was observed with ribosome and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis, TCA cycle, amino acid metabolism and RNA degradation. Analysis of changes in transcription factor mRNA abundance shows that hypoxia induces significant positive and negative changes that may be important for regulating the hypoxia response in this pathogenic mold. Growth in hypoxia resulted in changes in the protein levels of several glycolytic enzymes, but these changes were not always reflected by the corresponding transcriptional profiling data. However, a good correlation overall (R2 = 0.2, p A. fumigatus. Conclusions Taken together, our data suggest a robust cellular response that is likely regulated both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in response to hypoxia by the human pathogenic mold A. fumigatus. As with other pathogenic fungi, the induction of glycolysis and transcriptional down-regulation of the TCA cycle and oxidative phosphorylation appear to major

  15. Assessment of hypoxia and TNF-alpha response by a vector with HRE and NF-kappaB response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhilin; Eadie, Ashley L; Hall, Sean R; Ballantyne, Laurel; Ademidun, David; Tse, M Yat; Pang, Stephen C; Melo, Luis G; Ward, Christopher A; Brunt, Keith R

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and inflammatory cytokine activation (H&I) are common processes in many acute and chronic diseases. Thus, a single vector that responds to both hypoxia and inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-alpha, is useful for assesing the severity of such diseases. Adaptation to hypoxia is regulated primarily by hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF alpha) nuclear proteins that engage genes containing a hypoxia response element (HRE). Inflammation activates a multitude of cytokines, including TNF-alpha, that invariably modulate activation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) transcription factor. We constructed a vector that encompassed both a hypoxia response element (HRE), and a NF-kappaB responsive element. We show that this vector was functionally responsive to both hypoxia and TNF-alpha, in vitro and in vivo . Thus, this vector might be suitable for the detection and assessment of hypoxia or TNF-alpha.

  16. Cytoglobin expression is upregulated in all tissues upon hypoxia: an in vitro and in vivo study by quantitative real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fordel, E.; Geuens, E.; Dewilde, S.; Rottiers, P.; Carmeliet, P.; Grooten, J.; Moens, L.

    2004-01-01

    The vertebrate globin family has been extended with two members: neuroglobin and cytoglobin. We here investigate the changes of expression levels upon hypoxia of cytoglobin in parallel with neuroglobin, in vivo and in vitro, by using real-time quantitative PCR. Our data prove that cytoglobin is upregulated upon hypoxia in all tissues. The mechanism of induction of cytoglobin is regulated by the hypoxia-inducible factor 1, a posttranscriptionally regulated transcription factor controlling several hypoxia-inducible genes. The latter is argumented by: (1) cytoglobin is significantly upregulated upon hypoxia and this is dependent on the tissue and severity of hypoxia; (2) the regulation of cytoglobin expression in HIF-1 (+/-) knockout mice is affected; (3) the variations of the expression regulation are in the same manner as seen in the expression of our control gene VEGF, that is proven to be regulated by the HIF-1-pathway; and (4) cytoglobin promoter region contains HRE sites

  17. Compositional translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Appelo, Lisette; Janssen, Theo; Jong, de F.M.G.; Landsbergen, S.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    This book provides an in-depth review of machine translation by discussing in detail a particular method, called compositional translation, and a particular system, Rosetta, which is based on this method. The Rosetta project is a unique combination of fundamental research and large-scale

  18. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite: Lessons from extreme animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; B. Jensen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....

  19. Yak response to high-altitude hypoxic stress by altering mRNA expression and DNA methylation of hypoxia-inducible factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xianrong; Fu, Mei; Lan, Daoliang; Li, Jian; Zi, Xiangdong; Zhong, Jincheng

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are oxygen-dependent transcriptional activators, which play crucial roles in tumor angiogenesis and mammalian development, and regulate the transcription of genes involved in oxygen homeostasis in response to hypoxia. However, information on HIF-1α and HIF-2α in yak (Bos grunniens) is scarce. The complete coding region of yak HIF-2α was cloned, its mRNA expression in several tissues were determined, and the expression levels were compared with those of closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus), and the methylation status of promoter regions were analyzed to better understand the roles of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in domesticated yak. The yak HIF-2α cDNA was cloned and sequenced in the present work reveals the evolutionary conservation through multiple sequence alignment, although 15 bases changed, resulting in 8 amino acid substitutions in the translated proteins in cattle. The tissue-specific expression results showed that HIF-1α is ubiquitously expressed, whereas HIF-2α expression is limited to endothelial tissues (kidney, heart, lung, spleen, and liver) and blood in yak. Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α expressions were higher in yak tissues than in cattle. The HIF-1α expression level is much higher in yak than cattle in these organs, except for the lung (P hypoxic stress response mechanism and may assist current medical research to understand hypoxia-related diseases.

  20. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Savransky, Vladimir; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Bevans, Shannon; Smith, Philip L.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition leading to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is associated with hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, and a high cardiovascular risk. A causal link between obstructive sleep apnea and atherosclerosis has not been established.

  1. Hypoxia signaling pathways: modulators of oxygen-related organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönenberger, Miriam J.; Kovacs, Werner J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential substrate in cellular metabolism, bioenergetics, and signaling and as such linked to the survival and normal function of all metazoans. Low O2 tension (hypoxia) is a fundamental feature of physiological processes as well as pathophysiological conditions such as cancer and ischemic diseases. Central to the molecular mechanisms underlying O2 homeostasis are the hypoxia-inducible factors-1 and -2 alpha (HIF-1α and EPAS1/HIF-2α) that function as master regulators of the adaptive response to hypoxia. HIF-induced genes promote characteristic tumor behaviors, including angiogenesis and metabolic reprogramming. The aim of this review is to critically explore current knowledge of how HIF-α signaling regulates the abundance and function of major O2-consuming organelles. Abundant evidence suggests key roles for HIF-1α in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis. An essential adaptation to sustained hypoxia is repression of mitochondrial respiration and induction of glycolysis. HIF-1α activates several genes that trigger mitophagy and represses regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis. Several lines of evidence point to a strong relationship between hypoxia, the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and activation of the unfolded protein response. Surprisingly, although peroxisomes depend highly on molecular O2 for their function, there has been no evidence linking HIF signaling to peroxisomes. We discuss our recent findings that establish HIF-2α as a negative regulator of peroxisome abundance and suggest a mechanism by which cells attune peroxisomal function with O2 availability. HIF-2α activation augments peroxisome turnover by pexophagy and thereby changes lipid composition reminiscent of peroxisomal disorders. We discuss potential mechanisms by which HIF-2α might trigger pexophagy and place special emphasis on the potential pathological implications of HIF-2α-mediated pexophagy for human health. PMID:26258123

  2. Activation by insulin and amino acids of signaling components leading to translation initiation in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs is developmentally regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawan, Agus; Orellana, Renan A; Nguyen, Hanh V; Jeyapalan, Asumthia S; Fleming, Jillian R; Davis, Teresa A

    2007-12-01

    Insulin and amino acids act independently to stimulate protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs, and the responses decrease with development. The purpose of this study was to compare the separate effects of fed levels of INS and AA on the activation of signaling components leading to translation initiation and how these responses change with development. Overnight-fasted 6- (n = 4/group) and 26-day-old (n = 6/ group) pigs were studied during 1) euinsulinemic-euglycemiceuaminoacidemic conditions (controls), 2) euinsulinemic-euglycemichyperaminoacidemic clamps (AA), and 3) hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic-euaminoacidemic clamps (INS). INS, but not AA, increased the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB) and tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2). Both INS and AA increased protein synthesis and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), ribosomal protein S6 kinase-1, and eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF)4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and these responses were higher in 6-day-old compared with 26-day-old pigs. Both INS and AA decreased the binding of 4E-BP1 to eIF4E and increased eIF4E binding to eIF4G; these effects were greater in 6-day-old than in 26-day-old pigs. Neither INS nor AA altered the composition of mTORC1 (raptor, mTOR, and GbetaL) or mTORC2 (rictor, mTOR, and GbetaL) complexes. Furthermore, neither INS, AA, nor age had any effect on the abundance of Rheb and the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase and eukaryotic elongation factor 2. Our results suggest that the activation by insulin and amino acids of signaling components leading to translation initiation is developmentally regulated and parallels the developmental decline in protein synthesis in skeletal muscle of neonatal pigs.

  3. Prader-Willi Critical Region, a Non-Translated, Imprinted Central Regulator of Bone Mass: Possible Role in Skeletal Abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee-Cheng Khor

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS, a maternally imprinted disorder and leading cause of obesity, is characterised by insatiable appetite, poor muscle development, cognitive impairment, endocrine disturbance, short stature and osteoporosis. A number of causative loci have been located within the imprinted Prader-Willi Critical Region (PWCR, including a set of small non-translated nucleolar RNA's (snoRNA. Recently, micro-deletions in humans identified the snoRNA Snord116 as a critical contributor to the development of PWS exhibiting many of the classical symptoms of PWS. Here we show that loss of the PWCR which includes Snord116 in mice leads to a reduced bone mass phenotype, similar to that observed in humans. Consistent with reduced stature in PWS, PWCR KO mice showed delayed skeletal development, with shorter femurs and vertebrae, reduced bone size and mass in both sexes. The reduction in bone mass in PWCR KO mice was associated with deficiencies in cortical bone volume and cortical mineral apposition rate, with no change in cancellous bone. Importantly, while the length difference was corrected in aged mice, consistent with continued growth in rodents, reduced cortical bone formation was still evident, indicating continued osteoblastic suppression by loss of PWCR expression in skeletally mature mice. Interestingly, deletion of this region included deletion of the exclusively brain expressed Snord116 cluster and resulted in an upregulation in expression of both NPY and POMC mRNA in the arcuate nucleus. Importantly, the selective deletion of the PWCR only in NPY expressing neurons replicated the bone phenotype of PWCR KO mice. Taken together, PWCR deletion in mice, and specifically in NPY neurons, recapitulates the short stature and low BMD and aspects of the hormonal imbalance of PWS individuals. Moreover, it demonstrates for the first time, that a region encoding non-translated RNAs, expressed solely within the brain, can regulate bone mass in health

  4. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  5. Hypoxia, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, and TET-Mediated Epigenetic Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Han Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor hypoxia is a pathophysiologic outcome of disrupted microcirculation with inadequate supply of oxygen, leading to enhanced proliferation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Epigenetic changes induced by hypoxia are well documented, and they lead to tumor progression. Recent advances show that DNA demethylation mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (TET proteins induces major epigenetic changes and controls key steps of cancer development. TET enzymes serve as 5mC (5-methylcytosine-specific dioxygenases and cause DNA demethylation. Hypoxia activates the expression of TET1, which also serves as a co-activator of HIF-1α transcriptional regulation to modulate HIF-1α downstream target genes and promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition. As HIF is a negative prognostic factor for tumor progression, hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAPs may provide a favorable therapeutic approach to lessen hypoxia-induced malignancy.

  6. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  7. Optical Imaging of Tumor Hypoxia and Evaluation of Efficacy of a Hypoxia-Targeting Drug in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Harada

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors containing more hypoxic regions show a more malignant phenotype by increasing the expression of genes encoding angiogenic and metastatic factors. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a master transcriptional activator of such genes, and thus, imaging and targeting hypoxic tumor cells where HIF-1 is active are important in cancer therapy. In the present study, HIF-1 activity was monitored via an optical in vivo imaging system by using a luciferase reporter gene under the regulation of an artificial HIF-1-dependent promoter, 5HRE. To monitor tumor hypoxia, we isolated a stable reporter-transfectant, HeLa/5HRE-Luc, which expressed more than 100-fold luciferase in response to hypoxic stress, and observed bioluminescence from its xenografts. Immunohistochemical analysis of the xenografts with a hypoxia marker, pimonidazole, confirmed that the luciferase-expressing cells were hypoxic. Evaluation of the efficacy of a hypoxia-targeting prodrug, TOP3, using this optical imaging system revealed that hypoxic cells were significantly diminished by TOP3 treatment. Immunohistochemical analysis of the TOP3-treated xenografts confirmed that hypoxic cells underwent apoptosis and were removed after TOP3 treatment. These results demonstrate that this model system using the 5HRE-luciferase reporter construct provides qualitative information (hypoxic status of solid tumors and enables one to conveniently evaluate the efficacy of cancer therapy on hypoxia in malignant solid tumors.

  8. Multiple roles of hypoxia in ovarian function: roles of hypoxia-inducible factor-related and -unrelated signals during the luteal phase

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Ryo; Okuda, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the role of oxygen conditions in the microenvironment of organs because of the discovery of a hypoxia-specific transcription factor, namely hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1. Ovarian function has several phases that change day by day, including ovulation, follicular growth and corpus luteum formation and regression. These phases are regulated by many factors, including pituitary hormones and local hormones, such as steroids, peptides and cytokines, as well as ox...

  9. Binary translation using peephole translation rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Sorav; Aiken, Alex

    2010-05-04

    An efficient binary translator uses peephole translation rules to directly translate executable code from one instruction set to another. In a preferred embodiment, the translation rules are generated using superoptimization techniques that enable the translator to automatically learn translation rules for translating code from the source to target instruction set architecture.

  10. The prognostic value of temporal in vitro and in vivo derived hypoxia gene-expression signatures in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starmans, Maud H.W.; Chu, Kenneth C.; Haider, Syed; Nguyen, Francis; Seigneuric, Renaud; Magagnin, Michael G.; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Kasprzyk, Arek; Boutros, Paul C.; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Recent data suggest that in vitro and in vivo derived hypoxia gene-expression signatures have prognostic power in breast and possibly other cancers. However, both tumour hypoxia and the biological adaptation to this stress are highly dynamic. Assessment of time-dependent gene-expression changes in response to hypoxia may thus provide additional biological insights and assist in predicting the impact of hypoxia on patient prognosis. Materials and methods: Transcriptome profiling was performed for three cell lines derived from diverse tumour-types after hypoxic exposure at eight time-points, which include a normoxic time-point. Time-dependent sets of co-regulated genes were identified from these data. Subsequently, gene ontology (GO) and pathway analyses were performed. The prognostic power of these novel signatures was assessed in parallel with previous in vitro and in vivo derived hypoxia signatures in a large breast cancer microarray meta-dataset (n = 2312). Results: We identified seven recurrent temporal and two general hypoxia signatures. GO and pathway analyses revealed regulation of both common and unique underlying biological processes within these signatures. None of the new or previously published in vitro signatures consisting of hypoxia-induced genes were prognostic in the large breast cancer dataset. In contrast, signatures of repressed genes, as well as the in vivo derived signatures of hypoxia-induced genes showed clear prognostic power. Conclusions: Only a subset of hypoxia-induced genes in vitro demonstrates prognostic value when evaluated in a large clinical dataset. Despite clear evidence of temporal patterns of gene-expression in vitro, the subset of prognostic hypoxia regulated genes cannot be identified based on temporal pattern alone. In vivo derived signatures appear to identify the prognostic hypoxia induced genes. The prognostic value of hypoxia-repressed genes is likely a surrogate for the known importance of

  11. Hypoxia-Related Hormonal Appetite Modulation in Humans during Rest and Exercise: Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Debevec

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with numerous chronic ailments and represents one of the major health and economic issues in the modernized societies. Accordingly, there is an obvious need for novel treatment approaches. Recently, based on the reports of reduced appetite and subsequent weight loss following high-altitude sojourns, exposure to hypoxia has been proposed as a viable weight-reduction strategy. While altitude-related appetite modulation is complex and not entirely clear, hypoxia-induced alterations in hormonal appetite modulation might be among the key underlying mechanisms. The present paper summarizes the up-to-date research on hypoxia/altitude-induced changes in the gut and adipose tissue derived peptides related to appetite regulation. Orexigenic hormone ghrelin and anorexigenic peptides leptin, glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY, and cholecystokinin have to-date been investigated as potential modulators of hypoxia-driven appetite alterations. Current evidence suggests that hypoxia can, especially acutely, lead to decreased appetite, most probably via reduction of acylated ghrelin concentration. Hypoxia-related short and long-term changes in other hormonal markers are more unclear although hypoxia seems to importantly modulate leptin levels, especially following prolonged hypoxic exposures. Limited evidence also suggests that different activity levels during exposures to hypoxia do not additively affect hormonal appetite markers. Although very few studies have been performed in obese/overweight individuals, the available data indicate that hypoxia/altitude exposures do not seem to differentially affect appetite regulation via hormonal pathways in this cohort. Given the lack of experimental data, future well-controlled acute and prolonged studies are warranted to expand our understanding of hypoxia-induced hormonal appetite modulation and its kinetics in health and disease.

  12. Precision translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, Robert P.; Crawford, Daniel W.

    1984-01-01

    A precision translator for focusing a beam of light on the end of a glass fiber which includes two turning fork-like members rigidly connected to each other. These members have two prongs each with its separation adjusted by a screw, thereby adjusting the orthogonal positioning of a glass fiber attached to one of the members. This translator is made of simple parts with capability to keep adjustment even in condition of rough handling.

  13. Nitroimidazoles and imaging hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunn, A.; Linder, K.; Strauss, H.W.

    1995-01-01

    A class of compounds known to undergo different intracellular metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen in tissue, the nitroimidazoles, have been advocated for imaging hypoxic tissue. In the presence of normal oxygen levels the molecule is immediately reoxidized. In hypoxic tissue the low oxygen concentration is not able to effectively compete to reoxidize the molecule and further reduction appears to take place. The association is not irreversible. Nitroimidazoles for in vivo imaging using radiohalogenated derivatives of misonidazole have recently been employed in patients. Two major problems with fluoromisonidazole are its relatively low concentration within the lesion and the need to wait several hours to permit clearance of the agent from the normoxic background tissue. Even with high-resolution positron emission tomographic imaging, this combination of circumstances makes successful evaluation of hypoxic lesions a challenge. Single-photon agents, with their longer half-lives and comparable biological properties, offer a greater opportunity for successful imaging. In 1992 technetium-99m labeled nitroimidazoles were described that seem to have at least comparable in vivo characteristics. Laboratory studies have demonstrated preferential binding of these agents to hypoxic tissue in the myocardium, in the brain, and in tumors. These investigations indicate that imaging can provide direct evidence of tissue with low oxygen levels that is viable. Even from this early vantage point the utility of measuring tissue oxygen levels with external imaging suggests that hypoxia imaging could play a major role in clinical decision making. (orig./MG)

  14. Hypoxia-induced cytotoxic drug resistance in osteosarcoma is independent of HIF-1Alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Adamski

    Full Text Available Survival rates from childhood cancer have improved dramatically in the last 40 years, such that over 80% of children are now cured. However in certain subgroups, including metastatic osteosarcoma, survival has remained stubbornly poor, despite dose intensive multi-agent chemotherapy regimens, and new therapeutic approaches are needed. Hypoxia is common in adult solid tumours and is associated with treatment resistance and poorer outcome. Hypoxia induces chemotherapy resistance in paediatric tumours including neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma, in vitro, and this drug resistance is dependent on the oxygen-regulated transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. In this study the effects of hypoxia on the response of the osteosarcoma cell lines 791T, HOS and U2OS to the clinically relevant cytotoxics cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide were evaluated. Significant hypoxia-induced resistance to all three agents was seen in all three cell lines and hypoxia significantly reduced drug-induced apoptosis. Hypoxia also attenuated drug-induced activation of p53 in the p53 wild-type U2OS osteosarcoma cells. Drug resistance was not induced by HIF-1α stabilisation in normoxia by cobalt chloride nor reversed by the suppression of HIF-1α in hypoxia by shRNAi, siRNA, dominant negative HIF or inhibition with the small molecule NSC-134754, strongly suggesting that hypoxia-induced drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells is independent of HIF-1α. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway using the inhibitor PI-103 did not reverse hypoxia-induced drug resistance, suggesting the hypoxic activation of Akt in osteosarcoma cells does not play a significant role in hypoxia-induced drug resistance. Targeting hypoxia is an exciting prospect to improve current anti-cancer therapy and combat drug resistance. Significant hypoxia-induced drug resistance in osteosarcoma cells highlights the potential importance of hypoxia as a target

  15. HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Junye; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xiaowu; Li, Yan; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu; Zhang, Jian; Yao, Libo; Guo, Guozhen

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

  16. Perinatal Hypoxia and Ischemia in Animal Models of Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Hefter

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Intrauterine or perinatal complications constitute a major risk for psychiatric diseases. Infants who suffered from hypoxia–ischemia (HI are at twofold risk to develop schizophrenia in later life. Several animal models attempt to reproduce these complications to study the yet unknown steps between an insult in early life and outbreak of the disease decades later. However, it is very challenging to find the right type and severity of insult leading to a disease-like phenotype in the animal, but not causing necrosis and focal neurological deficits. By contrast, too mild, repetitive insults may even be protective via conditioning effects. Thus, it is not surprising that animal models of hypoxia lead to mixed results. To achieve clinically translatable findings, better protocols are urgently needed. Therefore, we compare widely used models of hypoxia and HI and propose future directions for the field.

  17. Ezh2 regulates transcriptional and post-translational expression of T-bet and promotes Th1 cell responses mediating aplastic anemia in mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; He, Shan; Xie, Fang; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Liu, Yongnian; Mochizuki, Izumi; Meng, Lijun; Sun, Hongxing; Zhang, Yanyun; Guo, Yajun; Hexner, Elizabeth; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia (AA) is a potentially fatal bone marrow (BM) failure syndrome. IFN-γ-producing T helper (Th)1 CD4+ T cells mediate the immune destruction of hematopoietic cells, and are central to the pathogenesis. However, the molecular events that control the development of BM-destructive Th1 cells remain largely unknown. Ezh2 is a chromatin-modifying enzyme that regulates multiple cellular processes primarily by silencing gene expression. We recently reported that Ezh2 is crucial for inflammatory T cell responses after allogeneic BM transplantation. To elucidate whether Ezh2 mediates pathogenic Th1 responses in AA and the mechanism of Ezh2 action in regulating Th1 cells, we studied the effects of Ezh2 inhibition in CD4+ T cells using a mouse model of human AA. Conditionally deleting Ezh2 in mature T cells dramatically reduced the production of BM-destructive Th1 cells in vivo, decreased BM-infiltrating Th1 cells, and rescued mice from BM failure. Ezh2 inhibition resulted in significant decrease in the expression of Tbx21 and Stat4 (which encode transcription factors T-bet and STAT4, respectively). Introduction of T-bet but not STAT4 into Ezh2-deficient T cells fully rescued their differentiation into Th1 cells mediating AA. Ezh2 bound to the Tbx21 promoter in Th1 cells, and directly activated Tbx21 transcription. Unexpectedly, Ezh2 was also required to prevent proteasome-mediated degradation of T-bet protein in Th1 cells. Our results identify T-bet as the transcriptional and post-translational Ezh2 target that acts together to generate BM-destructive Th1 cells, and highlight the therapeutic potential of Ezh2 inhibition in reducing AA and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:24760151

  18. The Drosophila nerfin-1 mRNA requires multiple microRNAs to regulate its spatial and temporal translation dynamics in the developing nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Brody, Thomas; Odenwald, Ward F

    2007-10-01

    The mRNA encoding the Drosophila Zn-finger transcription factor Nerfin-1, required for CNS axon pathfinding events, is subject to post-transcriptional silencing. Although nerfin-1 mRNA is expressed in many neural precursor cells including all early delaminating CNS neuroblasts, the encoded Nerfin-1 protein is detected only in the nuclei of neural precursors that divide just once to generate neurons and then only transiently in nascent neurons. Using a nerfin-1 promoter-controlled reporter transgene, replacement of the nerfin-1 3' UTR with the viral SV-40 3' UTR releases the neuroblast translational block and prolongs reporter protein expression in neurons. Comparative genomics analysis reveals that the nerfin-1 mRNA 3' UTR contains multiple highly conserved sequence blocks that either harbor and/or overlap 21 predicted binding sites for 18 different microRNAs. To determine the functional significance of these microRNA-binding sites and less conserved microRNA target sites, we have studied their ability to block or limit the expression of reporter protein in nerfin-1-expressing cells during embryonic development. Our results indicate that no single microRNA is sufficient to fully inhibit protein expression but rather multiple microRNAs that target different binding sites are required to block ectopic protein expression in neural precursor cells and temporally restrict expression in neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that multiple microRNAs play a cooperative role in the post-transcriptional regulation of nerfin-1 mRNA, and the high degree of microRNA-binding site evolutionary conservation indicates that all members of the Drosophila genus employ a similar strategy to regulate the onset and extinction dynamics of Nerfin-1 expression.

  19. Interaction proteins of invertase and invertase inhibitor in cold-stored potato tubers suggested a protein complex underlying post-translational regulation of invertase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xun; Ou, Yongbin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Huiling; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2013-12-01

    The activity of vacuolar invertase (VI) is vital to potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS). A post-translational regulation of VI activity has been proposed which involves invertase inhibitor (VIH), but the mechanism for the interaction between VI and VIH has not been fully understood. To identify the potential partners of VI and VIH, two cDNA libraries were respectively constructed from CIS-resistant wild potato species Solanum berthaultii and CIS-sensitive potato cultivar AC035-01 for the yeast two-hybrid analysis. The StvacINV1 (one of the potato VIs) and StInvInh2B (one of the potato VIHs), previously identified to be associated with potato CIS, were used as baits to screen the two libraries. Through positive selection and sequencing, 27 potential target proteins of StvacINV1 and eight of StInvInh2B were clarified. The Kunitz-type protein inhibitors were captured by StvacINV1 in both libraries and the interaction between them was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco cells, reinforcing a fundamental interaction between VI and VIH. Notably, a sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 1 was captured by both the baits, suggesting that a protein complex could be necessary for fine turning of the invertase activity. The target proteins clarified in present research provide a route to elucidate the mechanism by which the VI activity can be subtly modulated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor -β/δ, -γ Agonists and Resveratrol Modulate Hypoxia Induced Changes in Nuclear Receptor Activators of Muscle Oxidative Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy R. H. Regnault

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PPAR-α, PPAR-β, and PPAR-γ, and RXR in conjunction with PGC-1α and SIRT1, activate oxidative metabolism genes determining insulin sensitivity. In utero, hypoxia is commonly observed in Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR, and reduced insulin sensitivity is often observed in these infants as adults. We sought to investigate how changes in oxygen tension might directly impact muscle PPAR regulation of oxidative genes. Following eight days in culture at 1% oxygen, C2C12 muscle myoblasts displayed a reduction of PGC-1α, PPAR-α, and RXR-α mRNA, as well as CPT-1b and UCP-2 mRNA. SIRT1 and PGC-1α protein was reduced, and PPAR-γ protein increased. The addition of a PPAR-β agonist (L165,041 for the final 24 hours of 1% treatment resulted in increased levels of UCP-2 mRNA and protein whereas Rosiglitazone induced SIRT1, PGC-1α, RXR-α, PPAR-α, CPT-1b, and UCP-2 mRNA and SIRT1 protein. Under hypoxia, Resveratrol induced SIRT1, RXR-α, PPAR-α mRNA, and PPAR-γ and UCP-2 protein. These findings demonstrate that hypoxia alters the components of the PPAR pathway involved in muscle fatty acid oxidative gene transcription and translation. These results have implications for understanding selective hypoxia adaptation and how it might impact long-term muscle oxidative metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  1. Deregulation of cap-dependent mRNA translation increases tumour radiosensitivity through reduction of the hypoxic fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rouschop, K.M.; Dubois, L.; Schaaf, M.B.; Beucken, T. van den; Lieuwes, N.; Keulers, T.G.; Savelkouls, K.G.; Bussink, J.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Koritzinsky, M.; Wouters, B.G.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Tumour hypoxia is an important limiting factor in the successful treatment of cancer. Adaptation to hypoxia includes inhibition of mTOR, causing scavenging of eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E), the rate-limiting factor for cap-dependent translation. The aim of this

  2. Hypoxia activated EGFR signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Misra

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a multi-step process which requires the conversion of polarized epithelial cells to mesenchymal cells, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT. EMT is essential during embryonic morphogenesis and has been implicated in the progression of primary tumors towards metastasis. Hypoxia is known to induce EMT; however the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. Using the A431 epithelial cancer cell line, we show that cells grown under hypoxic conditions migrated faster than cells grown under normal oxygen environment. Cells grown under hypoxia showed reduced adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM probably due to reduced number of Vinculin patches. Growth under hypoxic conditions also led to down regulation of E-cadherin and up regulation of vimentin expression. The increased motility of cells grown under hypoxia could be due to redistribution of Rac1 to the plasma membrane as opposed to increased expression of Rac1. EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor is a known inducer of EMT and growth of A431 cells in the absence of oxygen led to increased expression of EGFR (EGF Receptor. Treatment of A431 cells with EGF led to reduced cell adhesion to ECM, increased cell motility and other EMT characteristics. Furthermore, this transition was blocked by the monoclonal antibody Cetuximab. Cetuximab also blocked the hypoxia-induced EMT suggesting that cell growth under hypoxic conditions led to activation of EGFR signaling and induction of EMT phenotype.

  3. Physiological determinants of human acute hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    AbstractIntroduction. We investigated possible physiological determinants of variability in hypoxia tolerance in subjects given a 5-minute normobaric exposure to 25,000 ft equivalent. Physiological tolerance to hypoxia was defined as the magnitude of...

  4. HIF1 Contributes to Hypoxia-Induced Pancreatic Cancer Cells Invasion via Promoting QSOX1 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ye Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1, which oxidizes sulfhydryl groups to form disulfide bonds in proteins, is found to be over-expressed in various pancreatic cancer cell lines and patients. QSOX1 promotes invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by activating MMP-2 and MMP-9. However, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Methods: Real-time PCR and Western blot were employed to detect the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines under hypoxic condition. Luciferase reporter and ChIP assays were used to assess the regulation of QSOX1 by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Small interfering RNA (siRNA was applied to knock down endogenous expression of QSOX1. Matrigel-coated invasion chamber essays were conducted to detect the invasion capacity of QSOX1-depleted cells. Results: Both hypoxia and hypoxia mimicking reagent up-regulated the expression of QSOX1 in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown of HIF-1α eliminated hypoxia induced QSOX1 expression. HIF-1α was found directly bound to two hypoxia-response elements (HRE of QSOX1 gene, both of which were required for HIF-1 induced QSOX1 expression. Moreover, QSOX1 silencing blocked hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion. Conclusion: QSOX1 is a direct target of HIF-1 and may contribute to hypoxia-induced pancreatic cancer cells invasion.

  5. Developmental control of hypoxia during bud burst in grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitha, Karlia; Agudelo-Romero, Patricia; Signorelli, Santiago; Gibbs, Daniel J; Considine, John A; Foyer, Christine H; Considine, Michael J

    2018-05-01

    Dormant or quiescent buds of woody perennials are often dense and in the case of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) have a low tissue oxygen status. The precise timing of the decision to resume growth is difficult to predict, but once committed, the increase in tissue oxygen status is rapid and developmentally regulated. Here, we show that more than a third of the grapevine homologues of widely conserved hypoxia-responsive genes and nearly a fifth of all grapevine genes possessing a plant hypoxia-responsive promoter element were differentially regulated during bud burst, in apparent harmony with resumption of meristem identity and cell-cycle gene regulation. We then investigated the molecular and biochemical properties of the grapevine ERF-VII homologues, which in other species are oxygen labile and function in transcriptional regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes. Each of the 3 VvERF-VIIs were substrates for oxygen-dependent proteolysis in vitro, as a function of the N-terminal cysteine. Collectively, these data support an important developmental function of oxygen-dependent signalling in determining the timing and effective coordination bud burst in grapevine. In addition, novel regulators, including GASA-, TCP-, MYB3R-, PLT-, and WUS-like transcription factors, were identified as hallmarks of the orderly and functional resumption of growth following quiescence in buds. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seok Jong, E-mail: seok-hong@northwestern.edu; Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A., E-mail: tmustoe@nmh.org

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  7. Hypoxia silences retrotrapezoid nucleus respiratory chemoreceptors via alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, Tyler M; Burke, Peter G R; Kanbar, Roy; Viar, Kenneth E; Stornetta, Daniel S; Stornetta, Ruth L; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2015-01-14

    In conscious mammals, hypoxia or hypercapnia stimulates breathing while theoretically exerting opposite effects on central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs). We tested this theory by examining how hypoxia and hypercapnia change the activity of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN), a putative CRC and chemoreflex integrator. Archaerhodopsin-(Arch)-transduced RTN neurons were reversibly silenced by light in anesthetized rats. We bilaterally transduced RTN and nearby C1 neurons with Arch (PRSx8-ArchT-EYFP-LVV) and measured the cardiorespiratory consequences of Arch activation (10 s) in conscious rats during normoxia, hypoxia, or hyperoxia. RTN photoinhibition reduced breathing equally during non-REM sleep and quiet wake. Compared with normoxia, the breathing frequency reduction (Δf(R)) was larger in hyperoxia (65% FiO2), smaller in 15% FiO2, and absent in 12% FiO2. Tidal volume changes (ΔV(T)) followed the same trend. The effect of hypoxia on Δf(R) was not arousal-dependent but was reversed by reacidifying the blood (acetazolamide; 3% FiCO2). Δf(R) was highly correlated with arterial pH up to arterial pH (pHa) 7.5 with no frequency inhibition occurring above pHa 7.53. Blood pressure was minimally reduced suggesting that C1 neurons were very modestly inhibited. In conclusion, RTN neurons regulate eupneic breathing about equally during both sleep and wake. RTN neurons are the first putative CRCs demonstrably silenced by hypocapnic hypoxia in conscious mammals. RTN neurons are silent above pHa 7.5 and increasingly active below this value. During hyperoxia, RTN activation maintains breathing despite the inactivity of the carotid bodies. Finally, during hypocapnic hypoxia, carotid body stimulation increases breathing frequency via pathways that bypass RTN. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/350527-17$15.00/0.

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α upregulation in microglia following hypoxia protects against ischemia-induced cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Weiyi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lei; Xie, Caijun; Zhu, Dongan; Peng, Zizhuang; Chen, Jiehan

    2014-10-01

    Activated microglia were considered to be the toxic inflammatory mediators that induce neuron degeneration after brain ischemia. Hypoxia can enhance the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in microglia and cause microglial activation. However, intermittent hypoxia has been reported recently to be capable of protecting the body from myocardial ischemia. We established a high-altitude environment as the hypoxic condition in this study. The hypoxic condition displayed a neuroprotective effect after brain ischemia, and mice exposed to this condition presented better neurological performance and smaller infarct size. At the same time, a high level of HIF-1α, low level of isoform of nitric oxide synthase, and a reduction in microglial activation were also seen in ischemic focus of hypoxic mice. However, this neuroprotective effect could be blocked by 2-methoxyestradiol, the HIF-1α inhibitor. Our finding suggested that HIF-1α expression was involved in microglial activation in vitro and was regulated by oxygen supply. The microglia were inactivated by re-exposure to hypoxia, which might be due to overexpression of HIF-1α. These results indicated that hypoxic conditions can be exploited to achieve maximum neuroprotection after brain ischemia. This mechanism possibly lies in microglial inactivation through regulation of the expression of HIF-1α.

  9. Oxidative Stress and Hypoxia Contribute to Alzheimer's Disease Pathogenesis: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmotto, Michela; Tamagno, Elena; Danni, Oliviero

    2009-01-01

    While it is well established that stroke and cerebral hypoperfusion are risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the molecular link between ischemia/hypoxia and amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing has only been recently established. Here we review the role of the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the mitochondrial electron chain in response to hypoxia, providing evidence that hypoxia fosters the amyloidogenic APP processing through a biphasic mechanism that up-regulates β-secretase activity, which involves an early release of ROS and an activation of HIF-1α. PMID:19705038

  10. Reflex bradycardia does not influence oxygen consumption during hypoxia in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Nina Kerting; McKenzie, David; Malte, H.

    2010-01-01

    the bradycardia on oxygen consumption (MO2), standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the critical oxygen partial pressure for regulation of SMR in hypoxia (Pcrit) in European eels Anguilla anguilla (mean ± SEM mass 528 ± 36 g; n = 14). Eels were instrumented with a Transonic flow probe around the ventral aorta......Most teleost fish reduce heart rate when exposed to acute hypoxia. This hypoxic bradycardia has been characterised for many fish species, but it remains uncertain whether this reflex contributes to the maintenance of oxygen uptake in hypoxia. Here we describe the effects of inhibiting...

  11. Machine Translation and Other Translation Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melby, Alan

    1996-01-01

    Examines the application of linguistic theory to machine translation and translator tools, discusses the use of machine translation and translator tools in the real world of translation, and addresses the impact of translation technology on conceptions of language and other issues. Findings indicate that the human mind is flexible and linguistic…

  12. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  13. Hypoxia induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition via activation of SNAI1 by hypoxia-inducible factor -1α in hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lin; Feng, Xiaobin; Dong, Jiahong; Qian, Cheng; Huang, Gang; Li, Xiaowu; Zhang, Yujun; Jiang, Yan; Shen, Junjie; Liu, Jia; Wang, Qingliang; Zhu, Jin

    2013-01-01

    High invasion and metastasis are the primary factors causing poor prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these biological behaviors have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanism by which hypoxia promotes HCC invasion and metastasis through inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The expression of EMT markers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Effect of hypoxia on induction of EMT and ability of cell migration and invasion were performed. Luciferase reporter system was used for evaluation of Snail regulation by hypoxia-inducible factor -1α (HIF-1α). We found that overexpression of HIF-1α was observed in HCC liver tissues and was related to poor prognosis of HCC patients. HIF-1α expression profile was correlated with the expression levels of SNAI1, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and Vimentin. Hypoxia was able to induce EMT and enhance ability of invasion and migration in HCC cells. The same phenomena were also observed in CoCl2-treated cells. The shRNA-mediated HIF-1α suppression abrogated CoCl2-induced EMT and reduced ability of migration and invasion in HCC cells. Luciferase assay showed that HIF-1α transcriptional regulated the expression of SNAI1 based on two hypoxia response elements (HREs) in SNAI1 promoter. We demonstrated that hypoxia-stabilized HIF1α promoted EMT through increasing SNAI1 transcription in HCC cells. This data provided a potential therapeutic target for HCC treatment

  14. Neuroprotective effect of peroxiredoxin 6 against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Anil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to respond to changes in the extra-intracellular environment is prerequisite for cell survival. Cellular responses to the environment include elevating defense systems, such as the antioxidant defense system. Hypoxia-evoked reactive oxygen species (ROS-driven oxidative stress is an underlying mechanism of retinal ganglion cell (RGC death that leads to blinding disorders. The protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 plays a pleiotropic role in negatively regulating death signaling in response to stressors, and thereby stabilizes cellular homeostasis. Results We have shown that RGCs exposed to hypoxia (1% or hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride display reduced expression of PRDX6 with higher ROS expression and activation of NF-κB. These cells undergo apoptosis, while cells with over-expression of PRDX6 demonstrate resistance against hypoxia-driven RGC death. The RGCs exposed to hypoxia either with 1% oxygen or cobalt chloride (0-400 μM, revealed ~30%-70% apoptotic cell death after 48 and 72 h of exposure. Western analysis and real-time PCR showed elevated expression of PRDX6 during hypoxia at 24 h, while PRDX6 protein and mRNA expression declined from 48 h onwards following hypoxia exposure. Concomitant with this, RGCs showed increased ROS expression and activation of NF-κB with IkB phosphorylation/degradation, as examined with H2DCF-DA and transactivation assays. These hypoxia-induced adverse reactions could be reversed by over-expression of PRDX6. Conclusion Because an abundance of PRDX6 in cells was able to attenuate hypoxia-induced RGC death, the protein could possibly be developed as a novel therapeutic agent acting to postpone RGC injury and delay the progression of glaucoma and other disorders caused by the increased-ROS-generated death signaling related to hypoxia.

  15. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  16. The Subjectivity of the Translator and Socio-Cultural Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Denghua

    2010-01-01

    This thesis attempts to probe into the dialectical relationship between the subjectivity of the translator and socio-cultural norms. The socio-cultural norms inevitably regulate the translator's translating activity, as acceptability of the translated text is the primary concern of most translators. However, this does not mean that the…

  17. Advancing hypoxic training in team sports: from intermittent hypoxic training to repeated sprint training in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiss, Raphaël; Girard, Olivier; Millet, Grégoire P

    2013-12-01

    Over the past two decades, intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), that is, a method where athletes live at or near sea level but train under hypoxic conditions, has gained unprecedented popularity. By adding the stress of hypoxia during 'aerobic' or 'anaerobic' interval training, it is believed that IHT would potentiate greater performance improvements compared to similar training at sea level. A thorough analysis of studies including IHT, however, leads to strikingly poor benefits for sea-level performance improvement, compared to the same training method performed in normoxia. Despite the positive molecular adaptations observed after various IHT modalities, the characteristics of optimal training stimulus in hypoxia are still unclear and their functional translation in terms of whole-body performance enhancement is minimal. To overcome some of the inherent limitations of IHT (lower training stimulus due to hypoxia), recent studies have successfully investigated a new training method based on the repetition of short (<30 s) 'all-out' sprints with incomplete recoveries in hypoxia, the so-called repeated sprint training in hypoxia (RSH). The aims of the present review are therefore threefold: first, to summarise the main mechanisms for interval training and repeated sprint training in normoxia. Second, to critically analyse the results of the studies involving high-intensity exercises performed in hypoxia for sea-level performance enhancement by differentiating IHT and RSH. Third, to discuss the potential mechanisms underpinning the effectiveness of those methods, and their inherent limitations, along with the new research avenues surrounding this topic.

  18. Translation Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandepitte, Sonia; Mousten, Birthe; Maylath, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    After Kiraly (2000) introduced the collaborative form of translation in classrooms, Pavlovic (2007), Kenny (2008), and Huertas Barros (2011) provided empirical evidence that testifies to the impact of collaborative learning. This chapter sets out to describe the collaborative forms of learning at...

  19. Translating Harbourscapes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diedrich, Lisa Babette

    -specific design are proposed for all actors involved in harbour transformation. The study ends with an invitation to further investigate translation as a powerful metaphor for the way existing qualities of a site can be transformed, rather than erased or rewritten, and to explore how this metaphor can foster new...

  20. Word translation entropy in translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaeffer, Moritz; Dragsted, Barbara; Hvelplund, Kristian Tangsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on an investigation into the relationship between the number of translation alternatives for a single word and eye movements on the source text. In addition, the effect of word order differences between source and target text on eye movements on the source text is studied....... In particular, the current study investigates the effect of these variables on early and late eye movement measures. Early eye movement measures are indicative of processes that are more automatic while late measures are more indicative of conscious processing. Most studies that found evidence of target...... language activation during source text reading in translation, i.e. co-activation of the two linguistic systems, employed late eye movement measures or reaction times. The current study therefore aims to investigate if and to what extent earlier eye movement measures in reading for translation show...

  1. Metformin anti-tumor effect via disruption of the MID1 translational regulator complex and AR downregulation in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Ummuhan; Koehler, Andrea; Schneider, Rainer; Schweiger, Susann; Klocker, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is an approved drug prescribed for diabetes. Its role as an anti-cancer agent has drawn significant attention because of its minimal side effects and low cost. However, its mechanism of anti-tumour action has not yet been fully clarified. The effect on cell growth was assessed by cell counting. Western blot was used for analysis of protein levels, Boyden chamber assays for analyses of cell migration and co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) followed by western blot, PCR or qPCR for analysis of protein-protein and protein-mRNA interactions. Metformin showed an anti-proliferative effect on a wide range of prostate cancer cells. It disrupted the AR translational MID1 regulator complex leading to release of the associated AR mRNA and subsequently to downregulation of AR protein in AR positive cell lines. Inhibition of AR positive and negative prostate cancer cells by metformin suggests involvement of additional targets. The inhibitory effect of metformin was mimicked by disruption of the MID1-α4/PP2A protein complex by siRNA knockdown of MID1 or α4 whereas AMPK activation was not required. Findings reported herein uncover a mechanism for the anti-tumor activity of metformin in prostate cancer, which is independent of its anti-diabetic effects. These data provide a rationale for the use of metformin in the treatment of hormone naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer and suggest AR is an important indirect target of metformin

  2. Intracellular kinases mediate increased translation and secretion of netrin-1 from renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calpurnia Jayakumar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Netrin-1 is a laminin-related secreted protein, is highly induced after tissue injury, and may serve as a marker of injury. However, the regulation of netrin-1 production is not unknown. Current study was carried out in mouse and mouse kidney cell line (TKPTS to determine the signaling pathways that regulate netrin-1 production in response to injury. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ischemia reperfusion injury of the kidney was induced in mice by clamping renal pedicle for 30 minutes. Cellular stress was induced in mouse proximal tubular epithelial cell line by treating with pervanadate, cisplatin, lipopolysaccharide, glucose or hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Netrin-1 expression was quantified by real time RT-PCR and protein production was quantified using an ELISA kit. Cellular stress induced a large increase in netrin-1 production without increase in transcription of netrin-1 gene. Mitogen activated protein kinase, ERK mediates the drug induced netrin-1 mRNA translation increase without altering mRNA stability. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that netrin-1 expression is suppressed at the translational level and MAPK activation leads to rapid translation of netrin-1 mRNA in the kidney tubular epithelial cells.

  3. Intracellular Kinases Mediate Increased Translation and Secretion of Netrin-1 from Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Mohamed, Riyaz; Ranganathan, Punithavathi Vilapakkam; Ramesh, Ganesan

    2011-01-01

    Background Netrin-1 is a laminin-related secreted protein, is highly induced after tissue injury, and may serve as a marker of injury. However, the regulation of netrin-1 production is not unknown. Current study was carried out in mouse and mouse kidney cell line (TKPTS) to determine the signaling pathways that regulate netrin-1 production in response to injury. Methods and Principal Findings Ischemia reperfusion injury of the kidney was induced in mice by clamping renal pedicle for 30 minutes. Cellular stress was induced in mouse proximal tubular epithelial cell line by treating with pervanadate, cisplatin, lipopolysaccharide, glucose or hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Netrin-1 expression was quantified by real time RT-PCR and protein production was quantified using an ELISA kit. Cellular stress induced a large increase in netrin-1 production without increase in transcription of netrin-1 gene. Mitogen activated protein kinase, ERK mediates the drug induced netrin-1 mRNA translation increase without altering mRNA stability. Conclusion Our results suggest that netrin-1 expression is suppressed at the translational level and MAPK activation leads to rapid translation of netrin-1 mRNA in the kidney tubular epithelial cells. PMID:22046354

  4. Proteomic Alterations in Response to Hypoxia Inducible Factor 2α in Normoxic Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, Flora; Pezone, Lucia; Avitabile, Marianna; Persano, Luca; Vitale, Monica; Sassi, Mauro; Bresolin, Silvia; Serafin, Valentina; Zambrano, Nicola; Scaloni, Andrea; Basso, Giuseppe; Iolascon, Achille; Capasso, Mario

    2016-10-07

    Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α protein expression in solid tumors promotes stem-like phenotype in cancer stem cells and increases tumorigenic potential in nonstem cancer cells. Recently, we have shown that HIF-1/2α gene expression is correlated to neuroblastoma (NB) poor survival and to undifferentiated tumor state; HIF-2α protein was demonstrated to enhance aggressive features of the disease. In this study, we used proteomic experiments on NB cells to investigate HIF-2α downstream-regulated proteins or pathways with the aim of providing novel therapeutic targets or bad prognosis markers. We verified that pathways mostly altered by HIF-2α perturbation are involved in tumor progression. In particular, HIF-2α induces alteration of central metabolism and splicing control pathways. Simultaneously, WNT, RAS/MAPK, and PI3K/AKT activity or expression are affected and may impact the sensitivity and the intensity of HIF-2α-regulated pathways. Furthermore, genes coding the identified HIF-2α-related markers built a signature able to stratify NB patients with unfavorable outcome. Taken together, our findings underline the relevance of dissecting the downstream effects of a poor survival marker in developing targeted therapy and improving patient stratification. Future prospective studies are needed to translate the use of these data into the clinical practice.

  5. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...

  6. Preeclampsia, Hypoxia, Thrombosis, and Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A. Shamshirsaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reductions in uteroplacental flow initiate a cascade of molecular effects leading to hypoxia, thrombosis, inflammation, and endothelial cell dysfunction resulting in untoward pregnancy outcomes. In this review, we detail these effects and their relationship to preeclampsia (PE and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR.

  7. Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent hypoxia of obstructive sleep apnea is implicated in the development and progression of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to systemic inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia leads to pro-inflammatory gene up-regulation in cell culture, but the effects of intermittent hypoxia on gene expression in humans have not been elucidated. A cross-over study was performed exposing eight healthy men to intermittent hypoxia or control conditions for five hours with peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation before and after exposures. Total RNA was isolated followed by gene microarrays and confirmatory real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Intermittent hypoxia led to greater than two fold up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory gene toll receptor 2 (TLR2), which was not increased in the control exposure. We hypothesize that up-regulation of TLR2 by intermittent hypoxia may lead to systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  8. Chenodeoxycholic Acid Reduces Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α Protein and Its Target Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunwon Moon

    Full Text Available This study evaluated HIF-1α inhibitors under different hypoxic conditions, physiological hypoxia (5% O2 and severe hypoxia (0.1% O2. We found that chenodeoxy cholic acid (CDCA reduced the amount of HIF-1α protein only under physiological hypoxia but not under severe hypoxia without decreasing its mRNA level. By using a proteasome inhibitor MG132 and a translation inhibitor cyclohexamide, we showed that CDCA reduced HIF-1α protein by decreasing its translation but not by enhancing its degradation. The following findings indicated that farnesoid X receptor (FXR, a CDCA receptor and its target gene, Small heterodimer partner (SHP are not involved in this effect of CDCA. Distinctly from CDCA, MG132 prevented SHP and an exogenous FXR agonist, GW4064 from reducing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore a FXR antagonist, guggulsterone failed to prevent CDCA from decreasing HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, guggulsterone by itself reduced HIF-1α protein even in the presence of MG132. These findings suggested that CDCA and guggulsterone reduced the translation of HIF-1α in a mechanism which FXR and SHP are not involved. This study reveals novel therapeutic functions of traditional nontoxic drugs, CDCA and guggulsterone, as inhibitors of HIF-1α protein.

  9. Prolonged hypoxia modulates platelet activating factor receptor-mediated responses by fetal ovine pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renteria, Lissette S; Raj, J Usha; Ibe, Basil O

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxia augments PAF receptor (PAFr) binding and PAFr protein expression in venous SMC (SMC-PV). We compared effect of acute and prolonged hypoxia (pO(2)<40 torr) on PAFr-mediated responses in arterial SMC (SMC-PA) and SMC-PV. Cells were studied for 30 min (acute) or for 48 h (prolonged) hypoxia and compared to normoxic (pO(2) ~100 torr) conditions. PAF binding was quantified in fmol/10(6) cells (mean ± SEM). PAF binding in normoxia were SMC-PA, 5.2 ± 0.2 and in SMC-PV, 19.3 ± 1.1; values in acute hypoxia were SMC-PA, 7.7 ± 0.4 and in SMC-PV, 27.8 ± 1.7. Prolonged hypoxia produced 6-fold increase in binding in SMC-PA, but only 2-fold increase in SMC-PV, but binding in SMC-PV was still higher. Acute hypoxia augmented inositol phosphate release by 50% and 40% in SMC-PA and SMC-PV, respectively. During normoxia, PAFr mRNA expression by both cell types was similar, but expression in hypoxia by SMC-PA was greater. In SMC-PA, hypoxia and PAF augmented intracellular calcium flux. Re-exposure of cells to 30 min normoxia after 48 h hypoxia decreased binding by 45-60%, suggesting immediate down-regulation of hypoxia-induced PAFr-mediated effects. We speculate that re-oxygenation immediately reverses hypoxia effect probably due to oxygen tension-dependent reversibility of PAFr activation and suggest that exposure of the neonate to prolonged state of hypoxia will vilify oxygen exchange capacity of the neonatal lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Translation Factors Specify Cellular Metabolic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Shah et al. present evidence that a subcomplex of the eIF3 translation initiation factor regulates translation of mRNAs encoding components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and glycolytic enzymes, thus linking translational control with energy metabolism.

  11. Screening of hypoxia-inducible genes in sporadic ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variations in two hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes, VEGF and ANG, have been linked with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). Common variations in these genes may reduce the levels or functioning of their products. VEGF and ANG belong to a larger group of angiogenic genes that are up-regulated under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that common genetic variation across other members of this group may also predispose to sporadic ALS. To screen other hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes for association with SALS, we selected 112 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tgSNPs) that captured the common genetic variation across 16 VEGF-like and eight ANG-like hypoxia-inducible genes. Screening for association was performed in 270 Irish individuals with typical SALS and 272 ethnically matched unrelated controls. SNPs showing association in the Irish phase were genotyped in a replication sample of 281 Swedish sporadic ALS patients and 286 Swedish controls. Seven markers showed association in the Irish. The one modest replication signal observed in the Swedish replication sample, at rs3801158 in the gene inhibin beta A, was for the opposite allele vs. the Irish cohort. We failed to detect association of common variation across 24 candidate hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes with SALS.

  12. The yeast genome may harbor hypoxia response elements (HRE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Túlio César; Hertzberg, Libi; Gassmann, Max; Campos, Elida Geralda

    2007-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a heterodimeric transcription factor activated when cells are submitted to hypoxia. The heterodimer is composed of two subunits, HIF-1alpha and the constitutively expressed HIF-1beta. During normoxia, HIF-1alpha is degraded by the 26S proteasome, but hypoxia causes HIF-1alpha to be stabilized, enter the nucleus and bind to HIF-1beta, thus forming the active complex. The complex then binds to the regulatory sequences of various genes involved in physiological and pathological processes. The specific regulatory sequence recognized by HIF-1 is the hypoxia response element (HRE) that has the consensus sequence 5'BRCGTGVBBB3'. Although the basic transcriptional regulation machinery is conserved between yeast and mammals, Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not express HIF-1 subunits. However, we hypothesized that baker's yeast has a protein analogous to HIF-1 which participates in the response to changes in oxygen levels by binding to HRE sequences. In this study we screened the yeast genome for HREs using probabilistic motif search tools. We described 24 yeast genes containing motifs with high probability of being HREs (p-value<0.1) and classified them according to biological function. Our results show that S. cerevisiae may harbor HREs and indicate that a transcription factor analogous to HIF-1 may exist in this organism.

  13. Delayed innocent bystander cell death following hypoxia in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C-L; Kim, E; Crowder, C M

    2014-04-01

    After hypoxia, cells may die immediately or have a protracted course, living or dying depending on an incompletely understood set of cell autonomous and nonautonomous factors. In stroke, for example, some neurons are thought to die from direct hypoxic injury by cell autonomous primary mechanisms, whereas other so called innocent bystander neurons die from factors released from the primarily injured cells. A major limitation in identifying these factors is the inability of current in vivo models to selectively target a set of cells for hypoxic injury so that the primarily injured cells and the innocent bystanders are clearly delineated. In order to develop such a model, we generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains where 2-3% of somatic cells were made selectively sensitive to hypoxia. This was accomplished by cell type-specific wild-type rescue in either pharyngeal myocytes or GABAergic neurons of a hypoxia resistance-producing translation factor mutation. Surprisingly, hypoxic targeting of these relatively small subsets of non-essential cells produced widespread innocent bystander cell injury, behavioral dysfunction and eventual organismal death. The hypoxic injury phenotypes of the myocyte or neuron sensitized strains were virtually identical. Using this model, we show that the C. elegans insulin receptor/FOXO transcription factor pathway improves survival when activated only after hypoxic injury and blocks innocent bystander death.

  14. Low Molecular Weight Fucoidan Inhibits Tumor Angiogenesis through Downregulation of HIF-1/VEGF Signaling under Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chuan Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factors-1 (HIF-1 plays a critical role in promoting tumor angiogenesis, growth and metastasis. Low molecular weight fucoidan (LMWF is prepared from brown algae, and exhibits anticancer activity. However, whether LMWF attenuates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in bladder cancer cells and the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. This is the first study to demonstrate that LMWF can inhibit hypoxia-stimulated H2O2 formation, HIF-1 accumulation and transcriptional activity vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion, and the migration and invasion in hypoxic human bladder cancer cells (T24 cells. LMWF also downregulated hypoxia-activated phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR/p70S6K/4EBP-1 signaling in T24 cells. Blocking PI3K/AKT or mTOR activity strongly diminished hypoxia-induced HIF-1α expression and VEGF secretion in T24 cells, supporting the involvement of PI3K/AKT/mTOR in the induction of HIF-1α and VEGF. Additionally, LMWF significantly attenuated angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo evidenced by reduction of tube formation of hypoxic human umbilical vascular endothelial cells and blood capillary generation in the tumor. Similarly, administration of LMWF also inhibited the HIF-1α and VEGF expression in vivo, accompanied by a reduction of tumor growth. In summary, under hypoxia conditions, the antiangiogenic activity of LMWF in bladder cancer may be associated with suppressing HIF-1/VEGF-regulated signaling pathway.

  15. Translational genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kussmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term “Translational Genomics” reflects both title and mission of this new journal. “Translational” has traditionally been understood as “applied research” or “development”, different from or even opposed to “basic research”. Recent scientific and societal developments have triggered a re-assessment of the connotation that “translational” and “basic” are either/or activities: translational research nowadays aims at feeding the best science into applications and solutions for human society. We therefore argue here basic science to be challenged and leveraged for its relevance to human health and societal benefits. This more recent approach and attitude are catalyzed by four trends or developments: evidence-based solutions; large-scale, high dimensional data; consumer/patient empowerment; and systems-level understanding.

  16. Beyond Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olwig, Mette Fog

    2013-01-01

    This article contributes to the growing scholarship on local development practitioners by re-examining conceptualizations of practitioners as ‘brokers’ strategically translating between ‘travelling’ (development institution) rationalities and ‘placed’ (recipient area) rationalities in relation...... and practice spurred by new challenges deriving from climate change anxiety, the study shows how local practitioners often make local activities fit into travelling development rationalities as a matter of habit, rather than as a conscious strategy. They may therefore cease to ‘translate’ between different...... rationalities. This is shown to have important implications for theory, research and practice concerning disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation in which such translation is often expected....

  17. Revising Translations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kirsten Wølch; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the theoretical background and findings of an empirical study of revision policies, using Denmark as a case in point. After an overview of important definitions, types and parameters, the paper explains the methods and data gathered from a questionnaire survey and an interview...... survey. Results clearly show that most translation companies regard both unilingual and comparative revisions as essential components of professional quality assurance. Data indicate that revision is rarely fully comparative, as the preferred procedure seems to be a unilingual revision followed by a more...... or less comparative rereading. Though questionnaire data seem to indicate that translation companies use linguistic correctness and presentation as the only revision parameters, interview data reveal that textual and communicative aspects are also considered. Generally speaking, revision is not carried...

  18. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests...

  19. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin; Zhu, Daling

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway

  20. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Shasha [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China); Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Zhu, Daling, E-mail: dalingz@yahoo.com [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  1. Hypoxia-induced oxidative base modifications in the VEGF hypoxia-response element are associated with transcriptionally active nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchko, Mykhaylo V; Gorodnya, Olena M; Pastukh, Viktor M; Swiger, Brad M; Middleton, Natavia S; Wilson, Glenn L; Gillespie, Mark N

    2009-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in hypoxic pulmonary artery endothelial cells cause transient oxidative base modifications in the hypoxia-response element (HRE) of the VEGF gene that bear a conspicuous relationship to induction of VEGF mRNA expression (K.A. Ziel et al., FASEB J. 19, 387-394, 2005). If such base modifications are indeed linked to transcriptional regulation, then they should be detected in HRE sequences associated with transcriptionally active nucleosomes. Southern blot analysis of the VEGF HRE associated with nucleosome fractions prepared by micrococcal nuclease digestion indicated that hypoxia redistributed some HRE sequences from multinucleosomes to transcriptionally active mono- and dinucleosome frac