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Sample records for hypoxia mediated tumorigenesis

  1. Hypoxia-mediated metastasis.

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    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for more than 90 % of deaths among cancer patient. It is a highly complex process that involves the interplay between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and even noncancerous host cells. Metastasis can be seen as a step-wise process: acquisition of malignant phenotype, invasion into surrounding tissue, intravasation into blood vessels, survival in circulation, extravasation to distant sites, and colonization of new organs. Before the actual metastatic process, the secondary site is also prepared for the arrival of the cancer cells through formation of "premetastatic niches." Hypoxia (low oxygen tension) is commonly found in solid tumors more than a few millimeters cubed and often is associated with a poor prognosis. Hypoxia increases angiogenesis, cancer cell survival, and metastasis. This chapter described how hypoxia regulates each step of the metastatic process and how blocking hypoxia-driven metastasis through targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1, or downstream effector molecules such as the lysyl oxidase family may represent highly effective preventive strategies against metastasis in cancer patients.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia with or without hypercapnia is associated with tumorigenesis by decreasing the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor and miR-34a in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jing; Guo Xu; Shi Yanwei; Ma Jing; Wang Guangfa

    2014-01-01

    Background Very recent studies revealed that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a contributor of the increased incidence and mortality of cancer in humans,but mechanisms of how OSA promotes tumorigenesis remains largely unknown.We investigated whether intermittent hypoxia with and without hypercapnia plays a role in tumorigenesis.Methods First,Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats (12 weeks old) were subjected to different hypoxia exposures:intermittent hypoxia and intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia; continuous hypoxia and normal air.The systemic application of chronic fast rate hypoxia with or without hypercapnia mimicked severe OSA patients with apnoea/hypopnea index equivalent to 60 events per hour.Then routine blood tests were performed and the levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and miR-34a were examined.Results In contrast to intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia,both intermittent hypoxia and continuous hypoxia treatments caused significantly higher levels of haematology parameters than normoxia treatments.Compared to normoxia,intermittent hypoxia with hypercapnia exposure resulted in substantial decrease of serum BDNF and,miR-34a in the lower brainstem,while less pronounced results were found in intermittent hypoxia and continuous hypoxia exposure.Conclusions The exposure of intermittent hypoxia with or without hypercapnia,mimicking the situations in severe OSA patients,was associated with,or even promoted tumorigenesis.

  3. Autophagy regulates UBC9 levels during viral-mediated tumorigenesis

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    Mattoscio, Domenico; Casadio, Chiara; Miccolo, Claudia; Maffini, Fausto; Raimondi, Andrea; Tacchetti, Carlo; Gheit, Tarik; Tagliabue, Marta; Galimberti, Viviana E.; De Lorenzi, Francesca; Chiesa, Fausto; Ansarin, Mohssen; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    UBC9, the sole E2-conjugating enzyme required for SUMOylation, is a key regulator of essential cellular functions and, as such, is frequently altered in cancers. Along these lines, we recently reported that its expression gradually increases during early stages of human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical lesions transformation. However, a better understanding of how UBC9 is exploited by transforming viral oncoproteins is still needed. In the present study, we show that in human samples HPV drives UBC9 up-regulation also in very early steps of head and neck tumorigenesis, pointing to the important role for UBC9 in the HPV-mediated carcinogenic program. Moreover, using HPV-infected pre-cancerous tissues and primary human keratinocytes as the natural host of the virus, we investigate the pathological meaning and the cellular mechanisms responsible for UBC9 de-regulation in an oncoviral context. Our results show that UBC9 overexpression is promoted by transforming viral proteins to increase host cells’ resistance to apoptosis. In addition, ultrastuctural, pharmacological and genetic approaches crucially unveil that UBC9 is physiologically targeted by autophagy in human cells. However, the presence of HPV E6/E7 oncoproteins negatively impacts the autophagic process through selective inhibition of autophagosome-lysosome fusion, finally leading to p53 dependent UBC9 accumulation during viral-induced cellular transformation. Therefore, our study elucidates how UBC9 is manipulated by HPV oncoproteins, details the physiological mechanism by which UBC9 is degraded in cells, and identifies how HPV E6/E7 impact on autophagy. These findings point to UBC9 and autophagy as novel hallmarks of HPV oncogenesis, and open innovative avenues towards the treatment of HPV-related malignancies. PMID:28253371

  4. A Zebrafish Model to Study and Therapeutically Manipulate Hypoxia Signaling in Tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santhakumar, Kirankumar; Judson, Emma C.; Elks, Philip M.; McKee, Sarah; Elworthy, Stone; van Rooijen, Ellen; Walmsley, Sarah S.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Cross, Simon S.; van Eeden, Fredericus J. M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic signaling is a central modulator of cellular physiology in cancer. Core members of oxygen-sensing pathway including the von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor protein (pVHL) and the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) transcription factors have been intensively studied, but improved organismal models

  5. MiR-218 Mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis: Perspectives and implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ying-fei [Institute Guangzhou of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Li [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Department of Anatomical and Cellular Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Waye, Mary Miu Yee [School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Fu, Wei-ming, E-mail: wm.fu@giat.ac.cn [Institute Guangzhou of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Zhang, Jin-fang, E-mail: zhangjf06@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong (China); School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen (China)

    2015-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. As a highly conserved miRNA across a variety of species, microRNA-218 (miR-218) was found to play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis and progression. A group of evidence has demonstrated that miR-218 acts as a tumor suppressor by targeting many oncogenes related to proliferation, apoptosis and invasion. In this review, we provide a complex overview of miR-218, including its regulatory mechanisms, known functions in cancer and future challenges as a potential therapeutic target in human cancers. - Highlights: • miR-218 is frequently down regulated in multiple cancers. • miR-218 plays pivotal roles in carcinogenesis. • miR-218 mediates proliferation, apoptosis, metastasis, invasion, etc. • miR-218 mediates tumorigenesis and metastasis via multiple pathways.

  6. SPAK mediates KCC3-enhanced cervical cancer tumorigenesis.

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    Chiu, Min-Hsi; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Wu, Yi-Hui; Shen, Meng-Ru; Chou, Cheng-Yang

    2014-05-01

    Ste20-related proline/alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) plays a role in regulating many biological activities, and interacts with K-Cl co-transporter 3 (KCC3); however, the importance of SPAK for KCC3 function has not been demonstrated. Here, we investigated the role of SPAK in KCC3-regulated cell invasiveness and tumor formation. We show that induction of KCC3 expression triggers activation of the NF-κB and SPAK signaling cascades, leading to activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2). A small interference RNA-mediated reduction in SPAK protein levels suppressed the invasive ability and oncogenic potential of cervical cancer cells, and decreased tumor formation in mouse xenografts. A combination of experimental approaches, including RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR, gelatin zymography, NF-κB luciferase activity and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, showed that the induction of KCC3 over-expression increased MMP2 expression and augmented binding of NF-κB to its putative SPAK promoter binding site, suggesting that the SPAK/MMP2 axis is up-regulated by NF-κB. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or MMP2 abrogated KCC3-triggered, SPAK-dependent cell invasiveness. Furthermore, p38 MAPK was identified as the upstream regulator of KCC3-dependent MMP2 activation. We conclude that SPAK may promote KCC3-mediated tumor aggressiveness via the NF-κB/p38 MAPK/MMP2 axis.

  7. Interleukin-6 mediates epithelial-stromal interactions and promotes gastric tumorigenesis.

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    Hiroto Kinoshita

    Full Text Available Interleukin-6 (IL-6 is a pleiotropic cytokine that affects various functions, including tumor development. Although the importance of IL-6 in gastric cancer has been documented in experimental and clinical studies, the mechanism by which IL-6 promotes gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-6 in the epithelial-stromal interaction in gastric tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human gastritis, gastric adenoma, and gastric cancer tissues revealed that IL-6 was frequently detected in the stroma. IL-6-positive cells in the stroma showed positive staining for the fibroblast marker α-smooth muscle actin, suggesting that stromal fibroblasts produce IL-6. We compared IL-6 knockout (IL-6(-/- mice with wild-type (WT mice in a model of gastric tumorigenesis induced by the chemical carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. The stromal fibroblasts expressed IL-6 in tumors from WT mice. Gastric tumorigenesis was attenuated in IL-6(-/- mice, compared with WT mice. Impaired tumor development in IL-6(-/- mice was correlated with the decreased activation of STAT3, a factor associated with gastric cancer cell proliferation. In vitro, when gastric cancer cell line was co-cultured with primary human gastric fibroblast, STAT3-related genes including COX-2 and iNOS were induced in gastric cancer cells and this response was attenuated with neutralizing anti-IL-6 receptor antibody. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was increased when fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of gastric cancer cell-conditioned media. IL-6 production from fibroblasts was suppressed by an interleukin-1 (IL-1 receptor antagonist and siRNA inhibition of IL-1α in the fibroblasts. IL-1α mRNA and protein were increased in fibroblast lysate, suggesting that cell-associated IL-1α in fibroblasts may be involved. Our results suggest the importance of IL-6 mediated stromal-epithelial cell interaction in gastric tumorigenesis.

  8. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

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    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  9. Elevated NIBP/TRAPPC9 mediates tumorigenesis of cancer cells through NFκB signaling.

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    Zhang, Yonggang; Liu, Shu; Wang, Hong; Yang, Wensheng; Li, Fang; Yang, Fan; Yu, Daohai; Ramsey, Frederick V; Tuszyski, George P; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-03-20

    Regulatory mechanisms underlying constitutive and inducible NFκB activation in cancer remain largely unknown. Here we investigated whether a novel NIK- and IKK2-binding protein (NIBP) is required for maintaining malignancy of cancer cells in an NFκB-dependent manner. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of a human cancer survey tissue-scan cDNA array, immunostaining of a human frozen tumor tissue array and immunoblotting of a high-density reverse-phase cancer protein lysate array showed that NIBP is extensively expressed in most tumor tissues, particularly in breast and colon cancer. Lentivirus-mediated NIBP shRNA knockdown significantly inhibited the growth/proliferation, invasion/migration, colony formation and xenograft tumorigenesis of breast (MDA-MB-231) or colon (HCT116) cancer cells. NIBP overexpression in HCT116 cells promoted cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. Mechanistically, NIBP knockdown in cancer cells inhibited cytokine-induced activation of NFκB luciferase reporter, thus sensitizing the cells to TNFα-induced apoptosis. Endogenous NIBP bound specifically to the phosphorylated IKK2 in a TNFα-dependent manner. NIBP knockdown transiently attenuated TNFα-stimulated phosphorylation of IKK2/p65 and degradation of IκBα. In contrast, NIBP overexpression enhanced TNFα-induced NFκB activation, thus inhibiting constitutive and TNFα-induced apoptosis. Collectively, our data identified important roles of NIBP in promoting tumorigenesis via NFκΒ signaling, spotlighting NIBP as a promising target in cancer therapeutic intervention.

  10. Angiogenin contributes to bladder cancer tumorigenesis by DNMT3b-mediated MMP2 activation.

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    Peres, Rafael; Furuya, Hideki; Pagano, Ian; Shimizu, Yoshiko; Hokutan, Kanani; Rosser, Charles J

    2016-07-12

    Epigenetic-mediated gene activation/silencing plays a crucial role in human tumorigenesis. Eliciting the underlying mechanism behind certain epigenetic changes is essential for understanding tumor biology. Previous studies in human cancers revealed an unrecognized interplay between Angiogenin (ANG) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) leading to pronounced tumorigenesis. Here we provide multiple lines of evidence further indicating ANG oncogenic potential. ANG expression resulted in the hypomethylated state of the MMP2 gene, which led to increased gene expression of MMP2. More than that, our global DNA methylation microarray analysis showed that gene manipulation of ANG affected a variety of pathways, such as cell migration, angiogenesis and specifically, tumor suppressor genes. Mechanistically, ANG negatively regulated DNA methyltransferase 3b (DNMT3b) enzymatic activity by down-regulating its expression and inhibiting its recruitment to the MMP2 promoter. Consistent with this, ANG-MMP2 overexpression and DNMT3b underexpression correlated with reduction in disease free survival of human bladder cancer patients. Together, the results continue to establish ANG as an oncoprotein and further reveal that ANG contributes to oncogenesis by the activation of MMP2 through modulation of DNMT3b functions.

  11. piggyBac mediates efficient in vivo CRISPR library screening for tumorigenesis in mice.

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    Xu, Chunlong; Qi, Xiaolan; Du, Xuguang; Zou, Huiying; Gao, Fei; Feng, Tao; Lu, Hengxing; Li, Shenglan; An, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Lijun; Wu, Yuanyuan; Liu, Ying; Li, Ning; Capecchi, Mario R; Wu, Sen

    2017-01-24

    CRISPR/Cas9 is becoming an increasingly important tool to functionally annotate genomes. However, because genome-wide CRISPR libraries are mostly constructed in lentiviral vectors, in vivo applications are severely limited as a result of difficulties in delivery. Here, we examined the piggyBac (PB) transposon as an alternative vehicle to deliver a guide RNA (gRNA) library for in vivo screening. Although tumor induction has previously been achieved in mice by targeting cancer genes with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, in vivo genome-scale screening has not been reported. With our PB-CRISPR libraries, we conducted an in vivo genome-wide screen in mice and identified genes mediating liver tumorigenesis, including known and unknown tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). Our results demonstrate that PB can be a simple and nonviral choice for efficient in vivo delivery of CRISPR libraries.

  12. Xanthine oxidase mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-2α degradation by intermittent hypoxia.

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    Jayasri Nanduri

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apnea produces chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH. We previously reported that IH leads to down-regulation of HIF-2α protein via a calpain-dependent signaling pathway resulting in oxidative stress. In the present study, we delineated the signaling pathways associated with calpain-dependent HIF-2α degradation in cell cultures and rats subjected to chronic IH. Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers prevented HIF-2α degradation by IH and ROS mimetic decreased HIF-2α protein levels in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell cultures, suggesting that ROS mediate IH-induced HIF-2α degradation. IH activated xanthine oxidase (XO by increased proteolytic conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase to XO. ROS generated by XO activated calpains, which contributed to HIF-2α degradation by IH. Calpain-induced HIF-2α degradation involves C-terminus but not the N-terminus of the HIF-2α protein. Pharmacological blockade as well as genetic knock down of XO prevented IH induced calpain activation and HIF-2α degradation in PC12 cells. Systemic administration of allopurinol to rats prevented IH-induced hypertension, oxidative stress and XO activation in adrenal medulla. These results demonstrate that ROS generated by XO activation mediates IH-induced HIF-2α degradation via activation of calpains.

  13. Slit2/Robo1 signaling promotes intestinal tumorigenesis through Src-mediated activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

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    Zhang, Qian-Qian; Zhou, Da-Lei; Lei, Yan; Zheng, Li; Chen, Sheng-Xia; Gou, Hong-Ju; Gu, Qu-Liang; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Qi, Cui-Ling; Li, Jiang-Chao; Ding, Yan-Qing; Qiao, Liang; Wang, Li-Jing

    2015-02-20

    Slit2 is often overexpressed in cancers. Slit2 is a secreted protein that binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors to regulate cell growth and migration. Here, we employed several complementary mouse models of intestinal cancers, including the Slit2 transgenic mice, the ApcMin/+ spontaneous intestinal adenoma mouse model, and the DMH/DSS-induced colorectal carcinoma model to clarify function of Slit2/Robo1 signaling in intestinal tumorigenesis. We showed that Slit2 and Robo1 are overexpressed in intestinal tumors and may contribute to tumor generation. The Slit2/Robo1 signaling can induce precancerous lesions of the intestine and tumor progression. Ectopic expression of Slit2 activated Slit2/Robo1 signaling and promoted tumorigenesis and tumor growth. This was mediated in part through activation of the Src signaling, which then down-regulated E-cadherin, thereby activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Thus, Slit2/Robo1 signaling is oncogenic in intestinal tumorigenesis.

  14. The p53 inhibitor MDM2 facilitates Sonic Hedgehog-mediated tumorigenesis and influences cerebellar foliation.

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    Reem Malek

    Full Text Available Disruption of cerebellar granular neuronal precursor (GNP maturation can result in defects in motor coordination and learning, or in medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain tumor. The Sonic Hedgehog (Shh pathway is important for GNP proliferation; however, the factors regulating the extent and timing of GNP proliferation, as well as GNP differentiation and migration are poorly understood. The p53 tumor suppressor has been shown to negatively regulate the activity of the Shh effector, Gli1, in neural stem cells; however, the contribution of p53 to the regulation of Shh signaling in GNPs during cerebellar development has not been determined. Here, we exploited a hypomorphic allele of Mdm2 (Mdm2(puro, which encodes a critical negative regulator of p53, to alter the level of wild-type MDM2 and p53 in vivo. We report that mice with reduced levels of MDM2 and increased levels of p53 have small cerebella with shortened folia, reminiscent of deficient Shh signaling. Indeed, Shh signaling in Mdm2-deficient GNPs is attenuated, concomitant with decreased expression of the Shh transducers, Gli1 and Gli2. We also find that Shh stimulation of GNPs promotes MDM2 accumulation and enhances phosphorylation at serine 166, a modification known to increase MDM2-p53 binding. Significantly, loss of MDM2 in Ptch1(+/- mice, a model for Shh-mediated human medulloblastoma, impedes cerebellar tumorigenesis. Together, these results place MDM2 at a major nexus between the p53 and Shh signaling pathways in GNPs, with key roles in cerebellar development, GNP survival, cerebellar foliation, and MB tumorigenesis.

  15. RNAi technology and lentiviral delivery as a powerful tool to suppress Tpr-Met-mediated tumorigenesis.

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    Taulli, Riccardo; Accornero, Paolo; Follenzi, Antonia; Mangano, Tony; Morotti, Alessandro; Scuoppo, Claudio; Forni, Paolo E; Bersani, Francesca; Crepaldi, Tiziana; Chiarle, Roberto; Naldini, Luigi; Ponzetto, Carola

    2005-05-01

    Tpr-Met, the oncogenic counterpart of the Met receptor, has been detected in gastric cancers, as well as in precursor lesions and in the adjacent normal gastric mucosa. This has prompted the suggestion that Tpr-Met may predispose to the development of gastric tumors. Given the sequence specificity of RNA interference, oncogenes activated by point mutation or rearrangements can be targeted while spearing the product of the wild-type allele. In this work, we report specific suppression of Tpr-Met expression and inhibition of Tpr-Met-mediated transformation and tumorigenesis by means of a short interfering RNA (siRNA) directed toward the Tpr-Met junction (anti-TM2). When delivered by a lentiviral vector, anti-TM2 siRNA was effective also in mouse embryonal fibroblasts or epithelial cells expressing high levels of Tpr-Met. Our results suggest that lentiviral-mediated delivery of anti-TM2 siRNA may be developed into a powerful tool to treat Tpr-Met-positive cancers.

  16. Macrophage-mediated response to hypoxia in disease

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    Tazzyman S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon Tazzyman,1 Craig Murdoch,2 James Yeomans,1 Jack Harrison,1 Munitta Muthana3 1Department of Oncology, 2School of Clinical Dentistry, 3Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathobiology of various inflamed, diseased tissues, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, myocardial infarcts, the synovia of rheumatoid arthritic joints, healing wounds, and sites of bacterial infection. These areas of hypoxia form when the blood supply is occluded and/or the oxygen supply is unable to keep pace with cell growth and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in all tissues of the body and exhibit great plasticity, allowing them to perform divergent functions, including, among others, patrolling tissue, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells, orchestrating wound healing, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response. The number of tissue macrophages increases markedly with the onset and progression of many pathological states, with many macrophages accumulating in avascular and necrotic areas, where they are exposed to hypoxia. Recent studies show that these highly versatile cells then respond rapidly to the hypoxia present by altering their expression of a wide array of genes. Here we review the evidence for hypoxia-driven macrophage inflammatory responses in various disease states, and how this influences disease progression and treatment. Keywords: macrophage, hypoxia, inflammation, cytokine

  17. Mesenteric microvascular inflammatory responses to systemic hypoxia are mediated by PAF and LTB4.

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    Casillan, Alfred J; Gonzalez, Norberto C; Johnson, Jennifer S; Steiner, Dawn R S; Wood, John G

    2003-06-01

    Systemic hypoxia produces a rapid microvascular inflammatory response characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, leukocyte-endothelial adherence and emigration, and increased vascular permeability. The lipid inflammatory mediator leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) is involved in the early hypoxia-induced responses (ROS generation and leukocyte adherence). Whether other lipid inflammatory mediators participate in this phenomenon is not known. The objective of these experiments was to study the role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in the microvascular inflammatory response to hypoxia and its potential interactions with LTB(4) in this response. Intravital microscopy was used to examine mesenteric venules of anesthetized rats. We found that WEB-2086, a PAF receptor antagonist, completely prevented the increase in ROS levels and leukocyte adherence during a brief reduction in inspired Po(2) to anesthetized rats; administration of either WEB-2086 or the LTB(4) antagonist LTB(4)-DMA attenuated leukocyte emigration and the increase in vascular permeability to the same extent during prolonged systemic hypoxia in conscious rats. Furthermore, no additive effect was observed in either response when both antagonists were administered simultaneously. This study demonstrates a role for PAF in the rapid microvascular inflammatory response to hypoxia, as well as contributions of PAF and LTB(4) to the slowly developing responses observed during sustained hypoxia. The incomplete blockade of the hypoxia-induced increases in vascular permeability and leukocyte emigration by combined administration of both antagonists indicates that factors in addition to LTB(4) and PAF participate in these phenomena.

  18. Distinct functions of epidermal and myeloid-derived VEGF-A in skin tumorigenesis mediated by HPV8.

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    Ding, Xiaolei; Lucas, Tina; Marcuzzi, Gian P; Pfister, Herbert; Eming, Sabine A

    2015-01-15

    Beta human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been suspected to be carcinogenic in nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSC), but the basis for potential viral contributions to these cancers is poorly understood. In particular, it is unresolved how HPV-infected keratinocytes escape cell-cycle control and whether their cross-talk with immune cells is critical for tumorigenesis. In nonviral preclinical models, the angiogenic cytokine VEGF-A has been identified as a critical regulator of NMSC. In this study, we dissected the contribution of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A in HPV-mediated skin cancer by interbreeding an HPV8 transgenic mouse model with a conditional disruption of VEGF-A restricted to either epidermal or myeloid cells. Although only epidermal-derived VEGF-A was essential for initiation of skin tumor development, both spontaneously and UV-light triggered, both epidermal and myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A contributed to regeneration-induced tumorigenesis upon HPV8 overexpression, partly not only through a paracrine effect on endothelial cells, but also most probably through an additional autocrine effect on epidermal cells. Our findings offer new mechanistic insights into distinct functions of epidermal versus myeloid cell-derived VEGF-A during HPV-mediated tumorigenesis, with possible implications for preventing this disease.

  19. A zebrafish transgenic model of Ewing’s sarcoma reveals conserved mediators of EWS-FLI1 tumorigenesis

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    Stefanie W. Leacock

    2012-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma, a malignant bone tumor of children and young adults, is a member of the small-round-blue-cell tumor family. Ewing’s sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs, which include peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs, are characterized by chromosomal translocations that generate fusions between the EWS gene and ETS-family transcription factors, most commonly FLI1. The EWS-FLI1 fusion oncoprotein represents an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of Ewing’s sarcoma. The cell of origin of ESFT and the molecular mechanisms by which EWS-FLI1 mediates tumorigenesis remain unknown, and few animal models of Ewing’s sarcoma exist. Here, we report the use of zebrafish as a vertebrate model of EWS-FLI1 function and tumorigenesis. Mosaic expression of the human EWS-FLI1 fusion protein in zebrafish caused the development of tumors with histology strongly resembling that of human Ewing’s sarcoma. The incidence of tumors increased in a p53 mutant background, suggesting that the p53 pathway suppresses EWS-FLI1-driven tumorigenesis. Gene expression profiling of the zebrafish tumors defined a set of genes that might be regulated by EWS-FLI1, including the zebrafish ortholog of a crucial EWS-FLI1 target gene in humans. Stable zebrafish transgenic lines expressing EWS-FLI1 under the control of the heat-shock promoter exhibit altered embryonic development and defective convergence and extension, suggesting that EWS-FLI1 interacts with conserved developmental pathways. These results indicate that functional targets of EWS-FLI1 that mediate tumorigenesis are conserved from zebrafish to human and provide a novel context in which to study the function of this fusion oncogene.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α plays roles in Epstein-Barr virus's natural life cycle and tumorigenesis by inducing lytic infection through direct binding to the immediate-early BZLF1 gene promoter.

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    Kraus, Richard J; Yu, Xianming; Cordes, Blue-Leaf A; Sathiamoorthi, Saraniya; Iempridee, Tawin; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Ma, Shidong; Romero-Masters, James C; McChesney, Kyle G; Lin, Zhen; Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis L; Lambert, Paul F; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C; Mertz, Janet E

    2017-06-01

    When confronted with poor oxygenation, cells adapt by activating survival signaling pathways, including the oxygen-sensitive transcriptional regulators called hypoxia-inducible factor alphas (HIF-αs). We report here that HIF-1α also regulates the life cycle of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Incubation of EBV-positive gastric carcinoma AGS-Akata and SNU-719 and Burkitt lymphoma Sal and KemIII cell lines with a prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor, L-mimosine or deferoxamine, or the NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 promoted rapid and sustained accumulation of both HIF-1α and lytic EBV antigens. ShRNA knockdown of HIF-1α significantly reduced deferoxamine-mediated lytic reactivation. HIF-1α directly bound the promoter of the EBV primary latent-lytic switch BZLF1 gene, Zp, activating transcription via a consensus hypoxia-response element (HRE) located at nt -83 through -76 relative to the transcription initiation site. HIF-1α did not activate transcription from the other EBV immediate-early gene, BRLF1. Importantly, expression of HIF-1α induced EBV lytic-gene expression in cells harboring wild-type EBV, but not in cells infected with variants containing base-pair substitution mutations within this HRE. Human oral keratinocyte (NOK) and gingival epithelial (hGET) cells induced to differentiate by incubation with either methyl cellulose or growth in organotypic culture accumulated both HIF-1α and Blimp-1α, another cellular factor implicated in lytic reactivation. HIF-1α activity also accumulated along with Blimp-1α during B-cell differentiation into plasma cells. Furthermore, most BZLF1-expressing cells observed in lymphomas induced by EBV in NSG mice with a humanized immune system were located distal to blood vessels in hypoxic regions of the tumors. Thus, we conclude that HIF-1α plays central roles in both EBV's natural life cycle and EBV-associated tumorigenesis. We propose that drugs that induce HIF-1α protein accumulation are good candidates for development of a lytic

  1. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

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    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P

    2010-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms that enable cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inhibit transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signaling during mammary tumorigenesis remain unknown. We show here that TGF-beta selectively stimulated the expression of the PGE2 receptor EP2, which increased normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell (MEC) invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and resistance to TGF-beta-induced cytostasis. Mechanistically, elevated EP2 expression in normal MECs inhibited the coupling of TGF-beta to Smad2/3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI1) expression, while EP2 deficiency in these same MECs augmented Smad2/3 activation and PAI expression stimulated by TGF-beta. Along these lines, engineering malignant MECs to lack EP2 expression prevented their growth in soft agar, restored their cytostatic response to TGF-beta, decreased their invasiveness in response to TGF-beta, and potentiated their activation of Smad2/3 and expression of PAI stimulated by TGF-beta. More important, we show that COX-2 or EP2 deficiency both significantly decreased the growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis of mammary tumors produced in mice. Collectively, this investigation establishes EP2 as a potent mediator of the anti-TGF-beta activities elicited by COX-2/PGE2 in normal and malignant MECs. Our findings also suggest that pharmacological targeting of EP2 receptors may provide new inroads to antagonize the oncogenic activities of TGF-beta during mammary tumorigenesis.-Tian, M., Schiemann, W. P. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-beta signaling during mammary tumorigenesis.

  2. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-β signaling during mammary tumorigenesis

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    Tian, Maozhen; Schiemann, William P.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that enable cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and its mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling during mammary tumorigenesis remain unknown. We show here that TGF-β selectively stimulated the expression of the PGE2 receptor EP2, which increased normal and malignant mammary epithelial cell (MEC) invasion, anchorage-independent growth, and resistance to TGF-β-induced cytostasis. Mechanistically, elevated EP2 expression in normal MECs inhibited the coupling of TGF-β to Smad2/3 activation and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI1) expression, while EP2 deficiency in these same MECs augmented Smad2/3 activation and PAI expression stimulated by TGF-β. Along these lines, engineering malignant MECs to lack EP2 expression prevented their growth in soft agar, restored their cytostatic response to TGF-β, decreased their invasiveness in response to TGF-β, and potentiated their activation of Smad2/3 and expression of PAI stimulated by TGF-β. More important, we show that COX-2 or EP2 deficiency both significantly decreased the growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis of mammary tumors produced in mice. Collectively, this investigation establishes EP2 as a potent mediator of the anti-TGF-β activities elicited by COX-2/PGE2 in normal and malignant MECs. Our findings also suggest that pharmacological targeting of EP2 receptors may provide new inroads to antagonize the oncogenic activities of TGF-β during mammary tumorigenesis.—Tian, M., Schiemann, W. P. PGE2 receptor EP2 mediates the antagonistic effect of COX-2 on TGF-β signaling during mammary tumorigenesis. PMID:19897661

  3. TAK1-mediated autophagy and fatty acid oxidation prevent hepatosteatosis and tumorigenesis.

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    Inokuchi-Shimizu, Sayaka; Park, Eek Joong; Roh, Yoon Seok; Yang, Ling; Zhang, Bi; Song, Jingyi; Liang, Shuang; Pimienta, Michael; Taniguchi, Koji; Wu, Xuefeng; Asahina, Kinji; Lagakos, William; Mackey, Mason R; Akira, Shizuo; Ellisman, Mark H; Sears, Dorothy D; Olefsky, Jerrold M; Karin, Michael; Brenner, David A; Seki, Ekihiro

    2014-08-01

    The MAP kinase kinase kinase TGFβ-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is activated by TLRs, IL-1, TNF, and TGFβ and in turn activates IKK-NF-κB and JNK, which regulate cell survival, growth, tumorigenesis, and metabolism. TAK1 signaling also upregulates AMPK activity and autophagy. Here, we investigated TAK1-dependent regulation of autophagy, lipid metabolism, and tumorigenesis in the liver. Fasted mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1 exhibited severe hepatosteatosis with increased mTORC1 activity and suppression of autophagy compared with their WT counterparts. TAK1-deficient hepatocytes exhibited suppressed AMPK activity and autophagy in response to starvation or metformin treatment; however, ectopic activation of AMPK restored autophagy in these cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) target genes and β-oxidation, which regulate hepatic lipid degradation, were also suppressed in hepatocytes lacking TAK1. Due to suppression of autophagy and β-oxidation, a high-fat diet challenge aggravated steatohepatitis in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1. Notably, inhibition of mTORC1 restored autophagy and PPARα target gene expression in TAK1-deficient livers, indicating that TAK1 acts upstream of mTORC1. mTORC1 inhibition also suppressed spontaneous liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis in animals with hepatocyte-specific deletion of Tak1. These data indicate that TAK1 regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and tumorigenesis via the AMPK/mTORC1 axis, affecting both autophagy and PPARα activity.

  4. Targeting hypoxia-mediated mucin 2 production as a therapeutic strategy for mucinous tumors.

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    Dilly, Ashok K; Lee, Yong J; Zeh, Herbert J; Guo, Zong Sheng; Bartlett, David L; Choudry, Haroon A

    2016-03-01

    Excessive accumulation of mucin 2 (MUC2; a gel-forming secreted mucin) protein in the peritoneal cavity is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP). Hypoxia (hypoxia-inducible factor-1α; HIF-1α) has been shown to regulate the expression of similar mucins (eg, MUC5AC). We hypothesized that hypoxia (HIF-1α) drives MUC2 expression in PMP and is therefore a novel target to reduce mucinous tumor growth. The regulation of MUC2 by 2% hypoxia (HIF-1α) was evaluated in MUC2-secreting LS174T cells. The effect of BAY 87-2243, an inhibitor of HIF-1α, on MUC2 expression and mucinous tumor growth was evaluated in LS174T cells, PMP explant tissue, and in a unique intraperitoneal murine xenograft model of PMP. In vitro exposure of LS174T cells to hypoxia increased MUC2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression and increased HIF-1α binding to the MUC2 promoter. Hypoxia-mediated MUC2 protein overexpression was downregulated by transfected HIF-1α small interfering RNA (siRNA) compared with scrambled siRNA in LS174T cells. BAY 87-2243 inhibited hypoxia-induced MUC2 mRNA and protein expression in LS174T cells and PMP explant tissue. In a murine xenograft model of PMP, chronic oral therapy with BAY 87-2243 inhibited mucinous tumor growth and MUC2, HIF-1α expression in the tumor tissue. Our data suggest that hypoxia (HIF-1α) induces MUC2 promoter activity to increase MUC2 expression. HIF-1α inhibition decreases MUC2 production and mucinous tumor growth, providing a preclinical rationale for the use of HIF-1α inhibitors to treat patients with PMP.

  5. A mechanism of hypoxia-mediated escape from adaptive immunity in cancer cells.

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    Barsoum, Ivraym B; Smallwood, Chelsea A; Siemens, D Robert; Graham, Charles H

    2014-02-01

    Immune escape is a fundamental trait of cancer in which mechanistic knowledge is incomplete. Here, we describe a novel mechanism by which hypoxia contributes to tumoral immune escape from cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Exposure of human or murine cancer cells to hypoxia for 24 hours led to upregulation of the immune inhibitory molecule programmed cell death ligand-1 (PD-L1; also known as B7-H1), in a manner dependent on the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). In vivo studies also demonstrated cellular colocalization of HIF-1α and PD-L1 in tumors. Hypoxia-induced expression of PD-L1 in cancer cells increased their resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Using glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), an agonist of nitric oxide (NO) signaling known to block HIF-1α accumulation in hypoxic cells, we prevented hypoxia-induced PD-L1 expression and diminished resistance to CTL-mediated lysis. Moreover, transdermal administration of GTN attenuated tumor growth in mice. We found that higher expression of PD-L1 induced in tumor cells by exposure to hypoxia led to increased apoptosis of cocultured CTLs and Jurkat leukemia T cells. This increase in apoptosis was prevented by blocking the interaction of PD-L1 with PD-1, the PD-L1 receptor on T cells, or by addition of GTN. Our findings point to a role for hypoxia/HIF-1 in driving immune escape from CTL, and they suggest a novel cancer immunotherapy to block PD-L1 expression in hypoxic-tumor cells by administering NO mimetics.

  6. TFF3 mediated induction of VEGF via hypoxia in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

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    Guleng, Bayasi; Han, Jia; Yang, Jin-Qiu; Huang, Qing-Wen; Huang, Jian-Kun; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Jing-Jing; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2012-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that in gastric epithelial cells, induction of TFF3 by hypoxia is mediated by HIF-1. Since VEGF is one of the most important angiogenic factors on cancer progression, we have started to investigate the possible link among HIF-1α, VEGF, and TFF3 in gastric cancer cells. We induced the hypoxic condition in SGC-7901cells using hypoxia-mimetic agent of CoCI2. SGC7901 cells were transfected with pcPUR + U6 plasmid carrying RNAi targeted to human TFF3 and selected puromycin-resistant pools to establish the stable knockdown of TFF3 cells. Our results showed the induction of HIF-1a via hypoxia and consequences of increased expressions of the TFF3 and VEGF in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Overexpression of TFF3 upregulated the mRNA expressions of VEGF and HIF-1a induced by hypoxia, and stable knockdown of TFF3 impaired the mRNA upregulations of VEGF and HIF-1a induced by hypoxia. Furthermore, knockdown of TFF3 reduced the VEGF protein secretion: as VEGF secretion was increased time dependent manner in response to the hypoxia induction in TFF3-WT cells; however, VEGF production was significantly decreased in TFF3-KD cells (621 ± 89 vs. 264 ± 73 at 6 h and 969 ± 97 vs. 508 ± 69 at 12 h, P TFF3 mediated regulation of VEGF expression induced by hypoxia, and implicated that TFF3 might be applied as a potential anti-angiogenic target for treatment of gastric cancer.

  7. REDD1 integrates hypoxia-mediated survival signaling downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

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    Schwarzer, Rolf; Tondera, Daniel; Arnold, Wolfgang; Giese, Klaus; Klippel, Anke; Kaufmann, Jörg

    2005-02-10

    Cancer cells frequently evade apoptosis during tumorigenesis by acquiring mutations in apoptotic regulators. Chronic activation of the PI 3-kinase-Akt pathway through loss of the tumor suppressor PTEN is one mechanism by which these cells can gain increased protection against apoptosis. We report here that REDD1 (RTP801) can act as a transcriptional downstream target of PI 3-kinase signaling in human prostate cancer cells (PC-3). REDD1 expression is markedly reduced in PC-3 cells treated with LY294002 (LY) or Rapamycin and strongly induced under hypoxic conditions in a hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent manner. Loss of function studies employing antisense molecules or RNA interference indicate that REDD1 is essential for invasive growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Reduced REDD1 levels can sensitize cells towards apoptosis, whereas elevated levels of REDD1 induced by hypoxia or overexpression desensitize cells to apoptotic stimuli. Taken together our data designate REDD1 as a novel target for therapeutic intervention in prostate cancer.

  8. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

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    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  9. Astrocyte Elevated Gene-1 Mediates Glycolysis and Tumorigenesis in Colorectal Carcinoma Cells via AMPK Signaling

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    Hong-tao Song

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of AEG-1 in glycolysis and tumorigenesis, we construct myc-AEG-1 expression vector and demonstrate a novel mechanism that AEG-1 may increase the activity of AMPK by Thr172 phosphorylation. The higher expression levels of AEG-1 in colorectal carcinoma cells were found but showed significant difference in different cell lines. To study the role of AEG-1 in colorectal cells, myc-AEG-1 vector was constructed and transfected into NCM460 colonic epithelial cells. We observed consistent increasing of glucose consumption and lactate production, typical features of anaerobic glycolysis, suggesting that AEG-1 may promote anaerobic glycolysis. Moreover, we noted that AMPK phosphorylation at Thr172 as well as pPFK2 (Ser466 was increased in NCM460 cells overexpressing AEG-1. Compound C may block AMPK and PFK2 phosphorylation in both control and AEG-1-overexpressed cells and decrease the glucose consumption and lactate production. The present findings indicated that reduced AEG-1 protein levels by RNAi may decrease the glucose consumption and lactate production in HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells. The present identified AEG-1/AMPK/PFK2 glycolysis cascade may be essential to cell proliferation and tumor growth. The present results may provide us with a mechanistic insight into novel targets controlled by AEG-1, and the components in the AEG-1/AMPK/PFK2 glycolysis process may be targeted for the clinical treatment of cancer.

  10. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  11. Chronic hypobaric hypoxia mediated skeletal muscle atrophy: role of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and calpains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Pooja; Suryakumar, Geetha; Prasad, Rajendra; Singh, Som Nath; Ali, Shakir; Ilavazhagan, Govindsamy

    2012-05-01

    The most frequently reported symptom of exposure to high altitude is loss of body mass and decreased performance which has been attributed to altered protein metabolism affecting skeletal muscles mass. The present study explores the mechanism of chronic hypobaric hypoxia mediated skeletal muscle wasting by evaluating changes in protein turnover and various proteolytic pathways. Male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing about 200 g were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (7,620 m) for different durations of exposure. Physical performance of rats was measured by treadmill running experiments. Protein synthesis, protein degradation rates were determined by (14)C-Leucine incorporation and tyrosine release, respectively. Chymotrypsin-like enzyme activity of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and calpains were studied fluorimetrically as well as using western blots. Declined physical performance by more than 20%, in terms of time taken in exhaustion on treadmill, following chronic hypobaric hypoxia was observed. Compared to 1.5-fold increase in protein synthesis, the increase in protein degradation was much higher (five-folds), which consequently resulted in skeletal muscle mass loss. Myofibrillar protein level declined from 46.79 ± 1.49 mg/g tissue at sea level to 37.36 ± 1.153 (P calpains (three-fold) has been found to be important factors for the enhanced protein degradation rate. The study provided strong evidences suggesting that elevated protein turnover rate lead to skeletal muscle atrophy under chronic hypobaric hypoxia via ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and calpains.

  12. Suppression of Akt-HIF-1α signaling axis by diacetyl atractylodiol inhibits hypoxia-induced angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sik-Won; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Lee, Jin Hwan; Kang, Hyeon Jung; Lee, Mi Ja; Kim, Hyun Young; Park, Kie-In; Kim, Sun-Lim; Shin, Hye Kyoung; Seo, Woo Duck

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is a key regulator associated with tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, and metastasis. HIF-1α regulation under hypoxia has been highlighted as a promising therapeutic target in angiogenesis-related diseases. Here, we demonstrate that diacetyl atractylodiol (DAA) from Atractylodes japonica (A. japonica) is a potent HIF-1α inhibitor that inhibits the Akt signaling pathway. DAA dose-dependently inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and downregulated Akt signaling without affecting the stability of HIF-1α protein. Furthermore, DAA prevented hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis based on in vitro tube formation and in vivo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays. Therefore, DAA might be useful for treatment of hypoxia-related tumorigenesis, including angiogenesis. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(9): 508-513] PMID:27439603

  13. Hypoxia-induced hypothermia mediated by the glutamatergic transmission in the lateral preoptic area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, T

    2012-12-13

    Hypoxia evokes a regulated decrease in the body core temperature, which response is mediated, at least in part, by noradrenaline (NA) and nitric oxide (NO) in the rostromedial preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. In the accompanying paper, it was shown that glutamatergic activation of the lateral POA also evokes hypothermic responses. Here, I tested the hypothesis that the glutamatergic transmission in the lateral POA is critically involved in the neural mechanism of hypoxia-induced hypothermia. Hypoxic ventilation (10% O(2)-90% N(2), 5 min) as well as a single microinjection of NA (50 pmol) or the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (8.4 nmol) into the rostromedial POA evoked an increase in the tail skin temperature and a decrease in the colonic temperature in urethane-chloralose-anesthetized, neuromuscularly blocked, artificially ventilated rats. All of these responses were greatly attenuated by pretreatment with multiple microinjections of kynurenic acid (10 nmol, four locations), a nonselective glutamate receptor antagonist, but not by those with saline solution, in the bilateral rostral and central parts of the lateral POA. These results suggest that the NA- and NO-sensitive structure in the rostromedial POA activated the glutamatergic transmission in the lateral POA to mediate hypoxia-induced hypothermia.

  14. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors: Mediators of Cancer Progression; Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

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    Sadri, Navid; Zhang, Paul J., E-mail: pjz@mail.med.upenn.edu [Anatomic Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 6th Floor Founders Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-04-02

    Soft-tissue sarcomas remain aggressive tumors that result in death in greater than a third of patients due to either loco-regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Surgical resection remains the main choice of treatment for soft tissue sarcomas with pre- and/or post-operational radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy employed in more advanced stage disease. However, in recent decades, there has been little progress in the average five-year survival for the majority of patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, highlighting the need for improved targeted therapeutic agents. Clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate that tumor hypoxia and up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is associated with decreased survival, increased metastasis, and resistance to therapy in soft tissue sarcomas. HIF-mediated gene expression regulates many critical aspects of tumor biology, including cell survival, metabolic programming, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance. In this review, we discuss HIFs and HIF-mediated genes as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in sarcomas. Many pharmacological agents targeting hypoxia-related pathways are in development that may hold therapeutic potential for treating both primary and metastatic sarcomas that demonstrate increased HIF expression.

  15. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine prevents HIF-1 stabilization under hypoxia in vitro but does not affect tumorigenesis in multiple breast cancer models in vivo.

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    Jaclyn Sceneay

    Full Text Available Intratumoral hypoxia is a poor prognostic factor associated with reduced disease-free survival in many cancer types, including breast cancer. Hypoxia encourages tumor cell proliferation, stimulates angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis, and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and metastasis. Tumor cells respond to a hypoxic state by stabilizing the Hif-1α subunit of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF transcription factor to promote expression of various tumor- and metastasis-promoting hypoxic response genes. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC was recently shown to prevent Hif-1α stabilization under hypoxia, and has been identified as a potential alternative method to target the hypoxic response in tumors. We utilized three orthotopic syngeneic murine models of breast cancer, the PyMT, EO771 and 4T1.2 models, to investigate the ability of NAC to modulate the hypoxic response in vitro and in vivo. While NAC prevented Hif-1α stabilization under hypoxia in vitro and increased levels of glutathione in the blood of mice in vivo, this did not translate to a difference in tumor growth or the hypoxic state of the tumor compared to untreated control mice. In addition, NAC treatment actually increased metastatic burden in an experimental metastasis model. This work raises questions regarding the validity of NAC as an anti-tumorigenic agent in breast cancer, and highlights the need to further investigate its properties in vivo in different cancer models.

  16. Hypoxia attenuates inflammatory mediators production induced by Acanthamoeba via Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in human corneal epithelial cells

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    Pan, Hong [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); The Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Xinyi, E-mail: xywu8868@163.com [Department of Ophthalmology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, 107, Wenhua Xi Road, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia attenuates Acanthamoeba-induced the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits TLR4 expression in a time-dependent manner in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2 in HCECs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hypoxia decreases Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory response via TLR4 signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPS-induced the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 is abated by hypoxia via TLR4 signaling. -- Abstract: Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a vision-threatening corneal infection that is intimately associated with contact lens use which leads to hypoxic conditions on the corneal surface. However, the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced host inflammatory response of corneal epithelial cells has not been studied. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hypoxia on the Acanthamoeba-induced production of inflammatory mediators interleukin-8 (IL-8) and interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) in human corneal epithelial cells and then evaluated its effects on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, including TLR4 and myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88) (MyD88) expression as well as the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-{kappa}B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2). We then studied the effect of hypoxia on a TLR4-specific inflammatory response triggered by the TLR4 ligand lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our data showed that hypoxia significantly decreased the production of IL-8 and IFN-{beta}. Furthermore, hypoxia attenuated Acanthamoeba-triggered TLR4 expression as well as the activation of NF-{kappa}B and ERK1/2, indicating that hypoxia abated Acanthamoeba-induced inflammatory responses by affecting TLR4 signaling. Hypoxia also inhibited LPS-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion, myeloid differentiation primary response gene (88

  17. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate intermittent hypoxia induced protection of canine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Juan A; Williams, Arthur G; Sun, Jie; Gonzalez, Leticia; Downey, H Fred; Caffrey, James L; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-03-01

    Intermittent, normobaric hypoxia confers robust cardioprotection against ischemia-induced myocardial infarction and lethal ventricular arrhythmias. δ-Opioid receptor (DOR) signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cardioprotective phenomena, but their roles in intermittent hypoxia are unknown. This study examined the contributions of DOR and ROS in mediating intermittent hypoxia-induced cardioprotection. Mongrel dogs completed a 20 day program consisting of 5-8 daily, 5-10 min cycles of moderate, normobaric hypoxia (FIO2 0.095-0.10), with intervening 4 min room air exposures. Subsets of dogs received the DOR antagonist naltrindole (200 μg/kg, sc) or antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (250 mg/kg, po) before each hypoxia session. Twenty-four hours after the last session, the left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min and then reperfused for 5 h. Arrhythmias detected by electrocardiography were scored according to the Lambeth II conventions. Left ventricles were sectioned and stained with 2,3,5-triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride, and infarct sizes were expressed as percentages of the area at risk (IS/AAR). Intermittent hypoxia sharply decreased IS/AAR from 41 ± 5 % (n = 12) to 1.8 ± 0.9 % (n = 9; P intermittent hypoxia). N-acetylcysteine (n = 6) interfered to a similar degree, with IS/AAR 42 ± 3 % and arrhythmia score 4.7 ± 0.3 (P intermittent hypoxia). Without the intervening reoxygenations, hypoxia (n = 4) was not cardioprotective (IS/AAR 50 ± 8 %; arrhythmia score 4.5 ± 0.5; P intermittent hypoxia). Thus DOR, ROS and cyclic reoxygenation were obligatory participants in the gradually evolving cardioprotection produced by intermittent hypoxia.

  18. The role of hypoxia and HIF1α in the regulation of STAR-mediated steroidogenesis in granulosa cells.

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    Kowalewski, Mariusz Pawel; Gram, Aykut; Boos, Alois

    2015-02-05

    The adaptive responses to hypoxia are mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α). Its role, however, in regulating steroidogenesis remains poorly understood. We examined the role of hypoxia and HIF1α in regulating steroid acute regulatory protein (STAR) expression and steroidogenesis in immortalized (KK1) mouse granulosa cells under progressively lowering O2 concentrations (20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%). Basal and dbcAMP-stimulated progesterone synthesis was decreased under severe hypoxia (1% and 5% O2). The partial hypoxia revealed opposing effects, with a significant increase in steroidogenic response at 10% O2 in dbcAMP-treated cells: Star-promoter activity, mRNA and protein expression were increased. The hypoxia-stimulated STAR expression was PKA-dependent. Binding of HIF1α to the Star-promoter was potentiated under partial hypoxia. Inhibition of the transcriptional activity or expression of HIF1α suppressed STAR-expression. HIF1α appears to be a positive regulator of basal and stimulated STAR-expression, which under partial hypoxia is capable of increasing the steroidogenic capacity of granulosa cells.

  19. Oxygen mediates vascular smooth muscle relaxation in hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Dada

    Full Text Available The activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC by nitric oxide (NO and other ligands has been extensively investigated for many years. In the present study we considered the effect of molecular oxygen (O2 on sGC both as a direct ligand and its affect on other ligands by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP production, as an index of activity, as well as investigating smooth muscle relaxation under hypoxic conditions. Our isolated enzyme studies confirm the function of sGC is impaired under hypoxic conditions and produces cGMP in the presence of O2, importantly in the absence of NO. We also show that while O2 could partially affect the magnitude of sGC stimulation by NO when the latter was present in excess, activation by the NO independent, haem-dependent sGC stimulator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl-1-benzylindazole (YC-1 was unaffected. Our in vitro investigation of smooth muscle relaxation confirmed that O2 alone in the form of a buffer bolus (equilibrated at 95% O2/5% CO2 had the ability to dilate vessels under hypoxic conditions and that this was dependent upon sGC and independent of eNOS. Our studies confirm that O2 can be a direct and important mediator of vasodilation through an increase in cGMP production. In the wider context, these observations are key to understanding the relative roles of O2 versus NO-induced sGC activation.

  20. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in chronic hypoxia- and antigen-mediated pulmonary vascular remodeling

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    Angelini Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both chronic hypoxia and allergic inflammation induce vascular remodeling in the lung, but only chronic hypoxia appears to cause PH. We investigate the nature of the vascular remodeling and the expression and role of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in explaining this differential response. Methods We induced pulmonary vascular remodeling through either chronic hypoxia or antigen sensitization and challenge. Mice were evaluated for markers of PH and pulmonary vascular remodeling throughout the lung vascular bed as well as HIMF expression and genomic analysis of whole lung. Results Chronic hypoxia increased both mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP and right ventricular (RV hypertrophy; these changes were associated with increased muscularization and thickening of small pulmonary vessels throughout the lung vascular bed. Allergic inflammation, by contrast, had minimal effect on mPAP and produced no RV hypertrophy. Only peribronchial vessels were significantly thickened, and vessels within the lung periphery did not become muscularized. Genomic analysis revealed that HIMF was the most consistently upregulated gene in the lungs following both chronic hypoxia and antigen challenge. HIMF was upregulated in the airway epithelial and inflammatory cells in both models, but only chronic hypoxia induced HIMF upregulation in vascular tissue. Conclusions The results show that pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice induced by chronic hypoxia or antigen challenge is associated with marked increases in HIMF expression. The lack of HIMF expression in the vasculature of the lung and no vascular remodeling in the peripheral resistance vessels of the lung is likely to account for the failure to develop PH in the allergic inflammation model.

  1. PPARδ deficiency disrupts hypoxia-mediated tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eunshil; Koo, Jung Eun; Yeon, Sang Hyeon; Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Hwang, Daniel H; Lee, Joo Young

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) δ is highly expressed in colon epithelial cells and closely linked to colon carcinogenesis. However, the role of PPARδ in colon cancer cells in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. We found that expression of the tumor-promoting cytokines, IL-8 and VEGF, induced by hypoxia (colon cancer cells. Consequently, PPARδ-knockout colon cancer cells exposed to hypoxia and deferoxamine failed to stimulate endothelial cell vascularization and macrophage migration/proliferation, whereas wild-type cells were able to induce angiogenesis and macrophage activation in response to hypoxic stress. Hypoxic stress induced transcriptional activation of PPARδ, but not its protein expression, in HCT116 cells. Exogenous expression of p300 potentiated deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation, while siRNA knockdown of p300 abolished hypoxia- and deferoxamine-induced PPARδ transactivation. PPARδ associated with p300 upon hypoxic stress as demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation studies. PI3K inhibitors or siRNA knockdown of Akt suppressed the PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxia and deferoxamine in HCT116 cells, leading to decreased expression of IL-8 and VEGF. Collectively, these results reveal that PPARδ is required for hypoxic stress-mediated cytokine expression in colon cancer cells, resulting in promotion of angiogenesis, macrophage recruitment, and macrophage proliferation in the tumor microenvironment. p300 and the PI3K/Akt pathway play a role in the regulation of PPARδ transactivation induced by hypoxic stress. Our results demonstrate the positive crosstalk between PPARδ in tumor cells and the hypoxic tumor microenvironment and provide potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer.

  2. Ras Oncogene-Mediated Progressive Silencing of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase in Tumorigenesis

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    Francesca Cammarota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3 is a secreted enzyme that uses superoxide anion as a substrate in a dismutase reaction that results in the formation of hydrogen peroxide. Both of these reactive oxygen species affect growth signaling in cells. Although SOD3 has growth-supporting characteristics, the expression of SOD3 is downregulated in epithelial cancer cells. In the current work, we studied the mechanisms regulating SOD3 expression in vitro using thyroid cell models representing different stages of thyroid cancer. We demonstrate that a low level of RAS activation increases SOD3 mRNA synthesis that then gradually decreases with increasing levels of RAS activation and the decreasing degree of differentiation of the cancer cells. Our data indicate that SOD3 regulation can be divided into two classes. The first class involves RAS–driven reversible regulation of SOD3 expression that can be mediated by the following mechanisms: RAS GTPase regulatory genes that are responsible for SOD3 self-regulation; RAS-stimulated p38 MAPK activation; and RAS-activated increased expression of the mir21 microRNA, which inversely correlates with sod3 mRNA expression. The second class involves permanent silencing of SOD3 mediated by epigenetic DNA methylation in cells that represent more advanced cancers. Therefore, the work suggests that SOD3 belongs to the group of ras oncogene-silenced genes.

  3. Impeded Nedd4-1-Mediated Ras Degradation Underlies Ras-Driven Tumorigenesis

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    Taoling Zeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available RAS genes are among the most frequently mutated proto-oncogenes in cancer. However, how Ras stability is regulated remains largely unknown. Here, we report a regulatory loop involving the E3 ligase Nedd4-1, Ras, and PTEN. We found that Ras signaling stimulates the expression of Nedd4-1, which in turn acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates Ras levels. Importantly, Ras activation, either by oncogenic mutations or by epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling, prevents Nedd4-1-mediated Ras ubiquitination. This leads to Ras-induced Nedd4-1 overexpression, and subsequent degradation of the tumor suppressor PTEN in both human cancer samples and cancer cells. Our study thus unravels the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of Ras, Nedd4-1, and PTEN and suggests a basis for the high prevalence of Ras-activating mutations and EGF hypersignaling in cancer.

  4. Wheatgrass extract inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells

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    Do, Nam Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in not only cancer development and metastasis but also non-cancerous conditions. Hypoxia is one of the proposed critical factors contributing to formation of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. Wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum) has antioxidant, anti-aging, and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we analyzed whether wheatgrass has an inhibitory effect on the EMT process in airway epithelial cells. MATERIALS/METHODS A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions (CO2 5%/O2 1%) for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of wheatgrass extract (50, 75, 100, and 150 µg/mL) and changes in expression of epithelial or mesenchymal markers were evaluated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Accordingly, associated EMT-related transcriptional factors, Snail and Smad, were also evaluated. RESULTS Hypoxia increased expression of N-cadherin and reduced expression of E-cadherin. Mechanistically, E-cadherin levels were recovered during hypoxia by silencing hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α or administering wheatgrass extract. Wheatgrass inhibited the hypoxia-mediated EMT by reducing the expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3) and Snail. It suppressed the hypoxia-mediated EMT processes of airway epithelial cells via HIF-1α and the pSmad3 signaling pathway. CONCLUSION These results suggest that wheatgrass has potential as a therapeutic or supplementary agent for HIF-1-related diseases.

  5. Protective effect of HDL on NADPH oxidase-derived super oxide anion mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Su-Ying; Tamilselvi, Shanmugam; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Chun, Li-Chin; Cheng, Li-Yi; Ou, Hsiu-Chung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death of death in Taiwan. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs when plaque builds up in the coronary arteries to cause the ischemic heart disease which will enhance myocardial remodeling and also induce myocardial hypoxia. High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to have cardio-protective effects. Under hypoxic conditions (1%O2 for 24hr), in H9c2 cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) is induced which leads to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction. Therefore, the present study described the protective effect of HDL on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte damage. We investigated the NADPH oxidase-produced ROS-related signaling pathways and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes under hypoxia conditions. Results showed that the ROS mediated cardiac damage might occur via AT1 and PKC activation. Furthermore, hypoxia downregulated the survival protein (p-AKTser473) and anti-apoptotic protein (BCL2), whereas pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and caspase 3 were upregulated. These detrimental effects by ROS and apoptosis were prevented by HDL pretreatment. Our findings revealed the underlying molecular mechanism by which HDL suppresses the hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Further, we elucidated the role of HDL on preventing hypoxia induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis is mediated through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS.

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Park, Sung-Min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

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    Hai Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  8. Luminal and basal-like breast cancer cells show increased migration induced by hypoxia, mediated by an autocrine mechanism

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    Zänker Kurt S

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some breast cancer patients receiving anti-angiogenic treatment show increased metastases, possibly as a result of induced hypoxia. The effect of hypoxia on tumor cell migration was assessed in selected luminal, post-EMT and basal-like breast carcinoma cell lines. Methods Migration was assessed in luminal (MCF-7, post-EMT (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435S, and basal-like (MDA-MB-468 human breast carcinoma cell lines under normal and oxygen-deprived conditions, using a collagen-based assay. Cell proliferation was determined, secreted cytokine and chemokine levels were measured using flow-cytometry and a bead-based immunoassay, and the hypoxic genes HIF-1α and CA IX were assessed using PCR. The functional effect of tumor-cell conditioned medium on the migration of neutrophil granulocytes (NG was tested. Results Hypoxia caused increased migratory activity but not proliferation in all tumor cell lines, involving the release and autocrine action of soluble mediators. Conditioned medium (CM from hypoxic cells induced migration in normoxic cells. Hypoxia changed the profile of released inflammatory mediators according to cell type. Interleukin-8 was produced only by post-EMT and basal-like cell lines, regardless of hypoxia. MCP-1 was produced by MDA-MB-435 and -468 cells, whereas IL-6 was present only in MDA-MB-231. IL-2, TNF-α, and NGF production was stimulated by hypoxia in MCF-7 cells. CM from normoxic and hypoxic MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435S cells and hypoxic MCF-7 cells, but not MDA-MB-468, induced NG migration. Conclusions Hypoxia increases migration by the autocrine action of released signal substances in selected luminal and basal-like breast carcinoma cell lines which might explain why anti-angiogenic treatment can worsen clinical outcome in some patients.

  9. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of cancer mediated by tumor hypoxia and HIF1α/OATPs signaling axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Shi, Changhong; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Dou, Xiaoliang; Sahu, Divya; Li, Wei; Harada, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Ruoxiang; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2014-09-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agents are promising tools for noninvasive cancer imaging. Here, we explored the mechanistic properties of a specific group of NIR heptamethine carbocyanines including MHI-148 dye we identified and synthesized, and demonstrated these dyes to achieve cancer-specific imaging and targeting via a hypoxia-mediated mechanism. We found that cancer cells and tumor xenografts exhibited hypoxia-dependent MHI-148 dye uptake in vitro and in vivo, which was directly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Microarray analysis and dye uptake assay further revealed a group of hypoxia-inducible organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs) responsible for dye uptake, and the correlation between OATPs and HIF1α was manifested in progressive clinical cancer specimens. Finally, we demonstrated increased uptake of MHI-148 dye in situ in perfused clinical tumor samples with activated HIF1α/OATPs signaling. Our results establish these NIRF dyes as potential tumor hypoxia-dependent cancer-targeting agents and provide a mechanistic rationale for continued development of NIRF imaging agents for improved cancer detection, prognosis and therapy.

  10. The p130 isoform of angiomotin is required for Yap-mediated hepatic epithelial cell proliferation and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chunling; Shen, Zhewei; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat; Dawany, Noor; Troutman, Scott; Showe, Louise C; Liu, Qin; Shimono, Akihiko; Sudol, Marius; Holmgren, Lars; Stanger, Ben Z; Kissil, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    The Hippo-Yap signaling pathway regulates a number of developmental and adult cellular processes, including cell fate determination, tissue growth, and tumorigenesis. Members of the scaffold protein angiomotin (Amot) family interact with several Hippo pathway components, including Yap (Yes-associated protein), and either stimulate or inhibit Yap activity. We used a combination of genetic, biochemical, and transcriptional approaches to assess the functional consequences of the Amot-Yap interaction in mice and in human cells. Mice with a liver-specific Amot knockout exhibited reduced hepatic "oval cell" proliferation and tumorigenesis in response to toxin-induced injury or when crossed with mice lacking the tumor suppressor Nf2. Biochemical examination of the Amot-Yap interaction revealed that the p130 splicing isoform of Amot (Amot-p130) and Yap interacted in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, which involved binding of PPxY and LPxY motifs in Amot-p130 to WW domains of Yap. In the cytoplasm, Amot-p130 prevented the phosphorylation of Yap by blocking access of the WW domains to the kinase Lats1. Within the nucleus, Amot-p130 was associated with the transcriptional complex containing Yap and Teads (TEA domain family members) and contributed to the regulation of a subset of Yap target genes, many of which are associated with tumorigenesis. These findings indicated that Amot acts as a Yap cofactor, preventing Yap phosphorylation and augmenting its activity toward a specific set of genes that facilitate tumorigenesis.

  11. Physiological and Therapeutic Vascular Remodeling Mediated by Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Kakali; Semenza, Gregg L.

    Angiogenesis along with arteriogenesis and vasculogenesis is a fundamental process in ischemic repair in adult animals including humans. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) plays a central role in mediating adaptive responses to hypoxia/ischemia by expressing angiogenic cytokines/growth factors and their cognate receptors. Angiogenic growth factors are the homing signal for circulating angiogenic cells (CACs), which are mobilized to peripheral blood from bone marrow, recruited to target tissues, and promote vascularization. Impairment of HIF-1-mediated gene transcription contributes to the impaired vascular responses in peripheral vascular disease that are associated with aging and diabetes. Promoting neovascularization in ischemic tissues is a promising strategy for the treatment of peripheral vascular disease when surgical or catheter-based revascularization is not possible. Intramuscular injection of an adenovirus encoding a constitutively active form of HIF-1α (AdCA5), into the ischemic limb of diabetic mice increases the recovery of limb perfusion and function, rescues the diabetes-associated impairment of CACs, and increases vascularization. Administration of AdCA5 overcomes the effect of aging on recovery of blood flow in middle-aged mice following femoral artery ligation in a mouse model of age-dependent critical limb ischemia. Intramuscular injection of AdCA5 along with intravenous injection of bone-marrow-derived angiogenic cells cultured in the presence of prolyl-4-hydroxylase inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine, increases blood flow and limb salvage in old mice following femoral artery ligation. HIF-1α gene therapy increases homing of bone-marrow-derived cells, whereas induction of HIF-1 in these cells increases their retention in the ischemic tissue by increasing their adhesion to endothelium leading to synergistic effects of combined therapy on improving blood flow.

  12. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Shasha [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Wang, Shuang [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China); Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Zhu, Daling, E-mail: dalingz@yahoo.com [Department of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Harbin Medical, University (Daqing), Daqing 163319 (China); Biopharmaceutical Key Laboratory of Heilongjiang Province, Harbin 150081 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  13. Ethanol-induced mast cell-mediated inflammation leads to increased susceptibility of intestinal tumorigenesis in the APC Δ468 min mouse model of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimberly, Andre L; Forsyth, Christopher B; Khan, Mohammad W; Pemberton, Alan; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Chronic and frequent alcohol (ethanol [EtOH]) intake has been associated with an increased incidence of several types of cancers including breast, mouth, throat, esophageal, stomach, and colorectal (CRC). The underlying mechanism of this deleterious carcinogenic effect of alcohol has not been clearly established but inflammation may be 1 unifying feature of these cancers. We have recently shown that intestinal mast cells play a central role in intestinal carcinogenesis. In this study, we tested our hypothesis that mast cell-mediated inflammation is 1 underlying mechanism by which chronic alcohol promotes intestinal tumorigenesis. APC(Δ468) mice were fed either an alcohol-containing Nanji liquid diet or isocaloric dextrose-containing Nanji diet for 10 weeks and then sacrificed to collect small and large intestine samples. Assessments of tumor number and size as well as mast cell number and mast cell activity and histology score for invasion were compared between Control (dextrose-fed) and alcohol-fed APC(∆468) mice. The effect of alcohol on mast cell-mediated tumor migration was also assessed using an in vitro migration assay. Alcohol feeding increased both polyp number and size within both the small and the large intestines of APC(∆468) mice. Only alcohol-fed mice showed evidence of tumor invasion. Chronic alcohol feeding also resulted in an increased mast cell number and activity in tumor stroma and invading borders. In vitro migration assay showed that alcohol significantly increases mast cell-mediated tumor migration in vitro. Our data show that chronic alcohol intake promotes: (i) intestinal tumorigenesis and tumor invasion in genetically susceptible mice; (ii) increases in polyp-associated mast cells; and (iii) mast cell-mediated tumor migration in vitro. Both our in vivo and in vitro studies suggest that mast cell-mediated inflammation could be 1 mechanism by which alcohol promotes carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

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    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Early Cellular Responses of Purine Nucleoside-mediated Protection of Hypoxia-induced Injuries of Neuronal PC12 Cells

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    Bettina Tomaselli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in brain may lead to cell death by apoptosis and necrosis. In parallel adenosine, a powerful endogenous neuroprotectant is formed. We wanted to investigate the effect of adenosine and its purine nucleoside relatives, inosine and guanosine on early cellular responses to hypoxia. O2-sensitive neuronal PC12-cells were subjected to chemical hypoxia induced with rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. Loss of viability after hypoxic insult was impressively rescued by adenosine, guanosine and inosine. PC12-cells mainly express the A2A adenosine receptor. Its inhibition with a specific antagonist (CSC induced cell death of PC12-cells, which could be salvaged by adenosine but not with guanosine or inosine. We have previously demonstrated the important role of mitogen activated protein kinases 1/2 (p42/44 MAPK in purine-mediated rescue. In this study we were interested in the involvement of protein kinases whose activities mediate these processes, including protein kinase A (PKA, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K and protein kinase C-related kinases (PRK 1/2. Pharmacological inhibition of PKA and PI3-K increased hypoxia-induced toxicity and likewise also affected the rescue by purine nucleosides. Nerve growth factor (NGF and purine nucleosides induced an activation of PRK 1/2, which to our knowledge indicates for the first time that these kinases are potentially involved in purine nucleoside-mediated rescue of hypoxic neuronal cells. Results suggest that A2A receptor expressing cells are mainly dependent on the purine nucleoside adenosine for their rescue after hypoxic insult. In addition to PKA, PI3-K is an important effector molecule in A2A-mediated signaling and for the rescue of PC12-cells after hypoxic insult.

  16. Hypoxia induced amoeboid microglial cell activation in postnatal rat brain is mediated by ATP receptor P2X4

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    Li Fan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of amoeboid microglial cells (AMC and its related inflammatory response have been linked to the periventricular white matter damage after hypoxia in neonatal brain. Hypoxia increases free ATP in the brain and then induces various effects through ATP receptors. The present study explored the possible mechanism in ATP induced AMC activation in hypoxia. Results We first examined the immunoexpression of P2X4, P2X7 and P2Y12 in the corpus callosum (CC and subependyma associated with the lateral ventricles where both areas are rich in AMC. Among the three purinergic receptors, P2X4 was most intensely expressed. By double immunofluorescence, P2X4 was specifically localized in AMC (from P0 to P7 but the immunofluorescence in AMC was progressively diminished with advancing age (P14. It was further shown that P2X4 expression was noticeably enhanced in P0 day rats subjected to hypoxia and killed at 4, 24, 72 h and 7 d versus their matching controls by double labeling and western blotting analysis. P2X4 expression was most intense at 7 d whence the inflammatory response was drastic after hypoxia. We then studied the association of P2X4 with cytokine release in AMC after hypoxic exposure. In primary microglial cells exposed to hypoxia, IL-1β and TNF-α protein levels were up-regulated. Blockade of P2X4 receptor with 2', 3'-0-(2, 4, 6-Trinitrophenyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate, a selective P2X1-7 blocker resulted in partial suppression of IL-1β (24% vs hypoxic group and TNF-α expression (40% vs hypoxic group. However, pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo (benzene-2, 4-disulfonic acid tetrasodium salt hydrate, a selective P2X1-3, 5-7 blocker did not exert any significant effect on the cytokine expression. Conclusions It is concluded that P2X4 which is constitutively expressed by AMC in postnatal rats was enhanced in hypoxia. Hypoxia induced increase in IL-1β and TNF-α expression was reversed by 2', 3'-0-(2, 4, 6-Trinitrophenyl adenosine

  17. Acute hypoxia and cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic drug metabolism in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgens, Gesche; Christensen, Hanne Rolighed; Brøsen, Kim;

    2002-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes.......Our objective was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes....

  18. CRHR1 mediates p53 transcription induced by high altitude hypoxia through ERK 1/2 signaling in rat hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Ming-Yang; Hao, Ke; Chen, Xue-Qun; Du, Ji-Zeng

    2013-06-01

    We have previously reported that hypoxia activates corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the expression of its type-1 receptor (CRHR1) and induces disorders of the brain-endocrine-immune network. p53 is activated by hypoxia and involved in tumorigenesis and apoptosis. Whether CRHR1 regulates p53 transactivation to further influence apoptotic genes remains unclear. Here, we showed that hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 5km or 7km for 8 and 24h increased p53 protein and mRNA, and reduced apoptotic bax and IGFBP3 gene expression while upregulating the cell-arrest gene p21 for 8h in rat liver cells. The upregulation of p53 mRNA and downregulation of bax mRNA induced by hypoxia were blocked by pretreatment with the specific CRHR1 antagonist CP-154,526, but the downregulation of IGFBP3 and upregulation of p21 mRNA were not. Furthermore, CRH stimulated p53 mRNA via the ERK 1/2 pathway in the BRL-3A cell line and this was blocked by the ERK 1/2 antagonist U0126. These data provide novel evidence that the CRHR1-triggered ERK 1/2 pathway is involved in the activation of p53 and suppression of the apoptotic bax gene by hypoxia in rat liver.

  19. Tariquidar sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors via reduction of hypoxia-induced P-gp-mediated drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muz, Barbara; Kusdono, Hubert D; Azab, Feda; de la Puente, Pilar; Federico, Cinzia; Fiala, Mark; Vij, Ravi; Salama, Noha N; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2017-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) presents a poor prognosis and high lethality of patients due to development of drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug-efflux transporter, is upregulated in MM patients post-chemotherapy and is involved in the development of drug resistance since many anti-myeloma drugs (including proteasome inhibitors) are P-gp substrates. Hypoxia develops in the bone marrow niche during MM progression and has long been linked to chemoresistance. Additionally, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1α) was demonstrated to directly regulate P-gp expression. We found that in MM patients P-gp expression positively correlated with the hypoxic marker, HIF-1α. Hypoxia increased P-gp protein expression and its efflux capabilities in MM cells in vitro using flow cytometry. We reported herein that hypoxia-mediated resistance to carfilzomib and bortezomib in MM cells is due to P-gp activity and was reversed by tariquidar, a P-gp inhibitor. These results suggest combining proteasome inhibitors with P-gp inhibition for future clinical studies.

  20. Effect of Ca2EDTA on zinc mediated inflammation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of an in vivo mouse model of hypobaric hypoxia.

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    Udayabanu Malairaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage. METHODS: Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation, pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2, NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose polymerase (PARP activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain. RESULTS: Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6. Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. CONCLUSION: We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia

  1. Hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon promotes trail-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Giuliana; Masselli, Elena; Micheloni, Cristina; Nouvenne, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Santi, Patrizia; Matteucci, Alessandro; Cocco, Lucio; Vitale, Marco; Mirandola, Prisco

    2010-09-01

    Tumor oxygen status is considered as a prognostic marker that impacts on malignant progression and outcome of tumor therapy. TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) plays a key role in cancer immunity, with potential applications in cancer therapy. Protein kinase C (PKC)epsilon, a transforming oncogene, has a role in the protection of cardiomyocytes and neurons from hypoxia-induced damage while, it can also modulate the susceptibility of tumor cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia induces a tumor cell phenotype highly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL. Based on the observation that: i) PKCepsilon expression levels are impaired during hypoxia, ii) the overexpression of PKCepsilon, but not of a kinase-inactive PKCepsilon mutant, is able to revert the hypoxia-induced sensitivity to TRAIL, iii) the down-modulation of PKCepsilon levels by RNA interference, on the contrary, induces the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype, iv) the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) by specific siRNA blocks both the hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon and the induction of the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype; we conclude that the HIF-1alpha upregulation during hypoxia is associated to PKCepsilon down-modulation that likely represents the key molecular event promoting the apoptogenic effects of TRAIL in hypoxic tumor cells.

  2. Cdh1 inhibits WWP2-mediated ubiquitination of PTEN to suppress tumorigenesis in an APC-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Wan, Lixin; Liu, Jing; Yuan, Zhu; Zhang, Jinfang; Guo, Jianfeng; Malumbres, Marcos; Liu, Jiankang; Zou, Weiguo; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-01-01

    Anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome/Cdh1 is a multi-subunit ubiquitin E3 ligase that drives M to G1 cell cycle progression through primarily earmarking various substrates for ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Notably, emerging evidence suggested that Cdh1 could also function in various cellular processes independent of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. To this end, we recently identified an anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-independent function of Cdh1 in modulating osteoblast differentiation through activating Smurf1, one of the NEDD4 family of HECT domain-containing E3 ligases. However, it remains largely unknown whether Cdh1 could exert its tumor suppressor role through similarly modulating the E3 ligase activities of other NEDD4 family members, most of which have characterized important roles in tumorigenesis. Here we report that in various tumor cells, Cdh1, conversely, suppresses the E3 ligase activity of WWP2, another NEDD4 family protein, in an anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome-independent manner. As such, loss of Cdh1 activates WWP2, leading to reduced abundance of WWP2 substrates including PTEN, which subsequently activates PI3K/Akt oncogenic signaling to facilitate tumorigenesis. This study expands the non-anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome function of Cdh1 in regulating the NEDD4 family E3 ligases, and further suggested that enhancing Cdh1 to inhibit the E3 ligase activity of WWP2 could be a promising strategy for treating human cancers.

  3. Hypoxia-inducible factors and RAB22A mediate formation of microvesicles that stimulate breast cancer invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Gilkes, Daniele M; Takano, Naoharu; Xiang, Lisha; Luo, Weibo; Bishop, Corey J; Chaturvedi, Pallavi; Green, Jordan J; Semenza, Gregg L

    2014-08-05

    Extracellular vesicles such as exosomes and microvesicles (MVs) are shed by cancer cells, are detected in the plasma of cancer patients, and promote cancer progression, but the molecular mechanisms regulating their production are not well understood. Intratumoral hypoxia is common in advanced breast cancers and is associated with an increased risk of metastasis and patient mortality that is mediated in part by the activation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). In this paper, we report that exposure of human breast cancer cells to hypoxia augments MV shedding that is mediated by the HIF-dependent expression of the small GTPase RAB22A, which colocalizes with budding MVs at the cell surface. Incubation of naïve breast cancer cells with MVs shed by hypoxic breast cancer cells promotes focal adhesion formation, invasion, and metastasis. In breast cancer patients, RAB22A mRNA overexpression in the primary tumor is associated with decreased overall and metastasis-free survival and, in an orthotopic mouse model, RAB22A knockdown impairs breast cancer metastasis.

  4. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 protects hepatocytes from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rius, Bibiana; Duran-Güell, Marta; Flores-Costa, Roger; López-Vicario, Cristina; Lopategi, Aritz; Alcaraz-Quiles, José; Casulleras, Mireia; Lozano, Juan José; Titos, Esther; Clària, Joan

    2017-08-02

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) are hallmarks of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome associated with obesity. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 (MaR1) preserves tissue homeostasis by exerting cytoprotective actions, dampening inflammation, and expediting its timely resolution. Here, we explored whether MaR1 protects liver cells from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced ER stress. Mice were rendered obese by high-fat diet feeding, and experiments were performed in primary hepatocytes, Kupffer cells, and precision-cut liver slices (PCLSs). Palmitate-induced lipotoxicity increased ER stress and altered autophagy in hepatocytes, effects that were prevented by MaR1. MaR1 protected hepatocytes against lipotoxicity-induced apoptosis by activating the UPR prosurvival mechanisms and preventing the excessive up-regulation of proapoptotic pathways. Protective MaR1 effects were also seen in hepatocytes challenged with hypoxia and TNF-α-induced cell death. High-throughput microRNA (miRNA) sequencing revealed that MaR1 actions were associated with specific miRNA signatures targeting both protein folding and apoptosis. MaR1 also prevented lipotoxic-triggered ER stress and hypoxia-induced inflammation in PCLSs and enhanced Kupffer cell phagocytic capacity. Together, these findings describe the ability of MaR1 to oppose ER stress in liver cells under conditions frequently encountered in NAFLD.-Rius, B., Duran-Güell, M., Flores-Costa, R., López-Vicario, C., Lopategi, A., Alcaraz-Quiles, J., Casulleras, M., Lozano, J. J., Titos, E., Clària, J. The specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator maresin 1 protects hepatocytes from lipotoxic and hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. © FASEB.

  5. P-Selectin-Mediated Adhesion between Platelets and Tumor Cells Promotes Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cuiling; Li, Bin; Guo, Simei; Wei, Bo; Shao, Chunkui; Li, Jialin; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Qianqian; Li, Jiangchao; He, Xiaodong; Wang, Lijing; Zhang, Yajie

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that platelets play an important role in tumorigenesis, and an abundance of platelets accumulate in the ovarian tumor microenvironment outside the vasculature. However, whether cancer cells recruit platelets within intestinal tumors and how they signal adherent platelets to enter intestinal tumor tissues remain unknown. Here, we unexpectedly found that large numbers of platelets were deposited within human colorectal tumor specimens using immunohistochemical staining, and these platelets were fully associated with tumor development. We further report the robust adhesion of platelet aggregates to tumor cells within intestinal tumors, which occurs via a mechanism that is dependent on P-selectin (CD62P), a cell adhesion molecule that is abundantly expressed on activated platelets. Using spontaneous intestinal tumor mouse models, we determined that the genetic deletion of P-selectin suppressed intestinal tumor growth, which was rescued by the infusion of wild-type platelets but not P-selectin(-/-) platelets. Mechanistically, platelet adhesion to tumor cells induced the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to promote angiogenesis and accelerate intestinal tumor cell proliferation. Our results indicate that the adherence of platelets to tumor cells could promote tumor growth and metastasis. By targeting this platelet-tumor cell interaction, recombinant soluble P-selectin may have therapeutic value for the treatment of intestinal tumors.

  6. Aspergillus fumigatus mitochondrial electron transport chain mediates oxidative stress homeostasis, hypoxia responses, and fungal pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahl, Nora; Dinamarco, Taisa Magnani; Willger, Sven D.; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary We previously observed that hypoxia is an important component of host microenvironments during pulmonary fungal infections. However, mechanisms of fungal growth in these in vivo hypoxic conditions are poorly understood. Here, we report that mitochondrial respiration is active in hypoxia (1% oxygen) and critical for fungal pathogenesis. We generated Aspergillus fumigatus alternative oxidase (aoxA) and cytochrome C (cycA) null mutants and assessed their ability to tolerate hypoxia, macrophage killing, and virulence. In contrast to ΔaoxA, ΔcycA was found to be significantly impaired in conidia germination, growth in normoxia and hypoxia, and displayed attenuated virulence. Intriguingly, loss of cycA results in increased levels of AoxA activity, which results in increased resistance to oxidative stress, macrophage killing, and long-term persistence in murine lungs. Thus, our results demonstrate a previously unidentified role for fungal mitochondrial respiration in the pathogenesis of aspergillosis, and lay the foundation for future research into its role in hypoxia signaling and adaptation. PMID:22443190

  7. HIF-1α mediates tumor hypoxia to confer a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype for malignant progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Young-Gun; Christensen, Jared; Gu, Jie; Huang, L Eric

    2011-06-21

    Although tumor progression involves genetic and epigenetic alterations to normal cellular biology, the underlying mechanisms of these changes remain obscure. Numerous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in many human cancers and up-regulates a host of hypoxia-responsive genes for cancer growth and survival. We recently identified an alternative mechanism of HIF-1α function that induces genetic alterations by suppressing DNA repair. Here, we show that long-term hypoxia, which mimics the tumor microenvironment, drives a perpetual epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through up-regulation of the zinc finger E-box binding homeobox protein ZEB2, whereas short-term hypoxia induces a reversible EMT that requires the transcription factor Twist1. Moreover, we show that the perpetual EMT driven by chronic hypoxia depends on HIF-1α induction of genetic alterations rather than its canonical transcriptional activator function. These mesenchymal tumor cells not only acquire tumorigenicity but also display characteristics of advanced cancers, including necrosis, aggressive invasion, and metastasis. Hence, these results reveal a mechanism by which HIF-1α promotes a perpetual mesenchymal phenotype, thereby advancing tumor progression.

  8. Hypoxia sensing in the fetal chicken femoral artery is mediated by the mitochondrial electron transport chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoer, Bea; Cogolludo, Angel L; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    nitroprusside, or forskolin were not affected by the mETC blockers. Hypoxia induced a slight increase in ROS production (as measured by 2,7-dichlorofluorescein-fluorescence), but hypoxia-induced relaxation was not affected by scavenging of superoxide (polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase) or H(2)O(2......) (polyethylene glycol-catalase) or by NADPH-oxidase inhibition (apocynin). Also, the K(+) channel inhibitors tetraethylammonium (nonselective), diphenyl phosphine oxide-1 (voltage-gated K(+) channel 1.5), glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K(+) channel), iberiotoxin (large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel...

  9. Hypoxia-inducible factor-mediated induction of WISP-2 contributes to attenuated progression of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuady JH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jerry H Fuady,1,* Mattia R Bordoli,1,* Irene Abreu-Rodríguez,1,* Glen Kristiansen,2 David Hoogewijs,1,** Daniel P Stiehl,1,** Roland H Wenger1,**1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2University Hospital Bonn, Institute of Pathology, Bonn, Germany*,**These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Hypoxia and the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF signaling pathway trigger the expression of several genes involved in cancer progression and resistance to therapy. Transcriptionally active HIF-1 and HIF-2 regulate overlapping sets of target genes, and only few HIF-2 specific target genes are known so far. Here we investigated oxygen-regulated expression of Wnt-1 induced signaling protein 2 (WISP-2, which has been reported to attenuate the progression of breast cancer. WISP-2 was hypoxically induced in low-invasive luminal-like breast cancer cell lines at both the messenger RNA and protein levels, mainly in a HIF-2α-dependent manner. HIF-2-driven regulation of the WISP2 promoter in breast cancer cells is almost entirely mediated by two phylogenetically and only partially conserved functional hypoxia response elements located in a microsatellite region upstream of the transcriptional start site. High WISP-2 tumor levels were associated with increased HIF-2α, decreased tumor macrophage density, and a better prognosis. Silencing WISP-2 increased anchorage-independent colony formation and recovery from scratches in confluent cell layers of normally low-invasive MCF-7 cancer cells. Interestingly, these changes in cancer cell aggressiveness could be phenocopied by HIF-2α silencing, suggesting that direct HIF-2-mediated transcriptional induction of WISP-2 gene expression might at least partially explain the association of high HIF-2α tumor levels with prolonged overall survival of patients with breast cancer.Keywords: invasion, metastasis, motility, oxygen, tumor, transcriptional

  10. Targeting mitochondria by α-tocopheryl succinate overcomes hypoxia-mediated tumor cell resistance to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, Andrey V; Vdovin, Alexander S; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Gogvadze, Vladimir

    2014-06-01

    Rapidly proliferating tumor cells easily become hypoxic. This results in acquired stability towards treatment with anticancer drugs. Here, we show that cells grown at 0.1 % oxygen are more resistant towards treatment with the conventionally used anticancer drugs doxorubicin and cisplatin. The stimulation of apoptosis, as assessed by the number of cells in the SubG1 fraction of the cell cycle, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of PARP, was markedly suppressed under low oxygen content or when hypoxia was mimicked by deferoxamine. Hypoxia or deferoxamine treatment was accompanied by stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1). The downregulation of HIF-1 using siRNA technique restored cell sensitivity to treatment under hypoxic conditions to the levels detected under normoxic conditions. In contrast to cisplatin or doxorubicin, α-tocopheryl succinate (α-TOS), a compound that targets mitochondria, stimulated cell death irrespective of the oxygen concentration. Moreover, under hypoxic condition cell death induced by α-TOS was even enhanced. Thus, α-TOS can successfully overcome resistance to treatment caused by hypoxia, which makes α-TOS an attractive candidate for antitumor therapy via mitochondrial targeting.

  11. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  12. Tris DBA palladium overcomes hypoxia-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Muz, Barbara; Luderer, Micah; Arbiser, Jack; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent progress in novel and targeted therapies, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a therapeutically challenging incurable disease. The regulation of important cellular processes and its link to cancer presented Src as an attractive target for MM. We suggest a novel strategy to improve the treatment of MM and overcome the drug resistance for the current therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of Src in MM cells by Tris (Dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium (Tris DBA). Tris DBA reduces proliferation, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. Tris DBA showed additive effect with proteasome inhibitors reducing proliferation, cell cycle signaling, and increasing apoptosis more than each drug alone. Tris DBA overcame hypoxia-induced effects such as enhanced chemotaxis or drug resistance to proteasome inhibitors by inhibition of HIF1α expression. Moreover, we found that Tris DBA is an effective anti-myeloma agent alone or in combination with other targeted drugs and that it reverses hypoxia-induced drug resistance in myeloma.

  13. Mesenchymal stromal cells reverse hypoxia-mediated suppression of α-smooth muscle actin expression in human dermal fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulknor, Renea A.; Olekson, Melissa A.; Nativ, Nir I.; Ghodbane, Mehdi; Gray, Andrea J.; Berthiaume, François, E-mail: fberthia@rci.rutgers.edu

    2015-02-27

    During wound healing, fibroblasts deposit extracellular matrix that guides angiogenesis and supports the migration and proliferation of cells that eventually form the scar. They also promote wound closure via differentiation into α-smooth muscle actin (SMA)-expressing myofibroblasts, which cause wound contraction. Low oxygen tension typical of chronic nonhealing wounds inhibits fibroblast collagen production and differentiation. It has been suggested that hypoxic mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) secrete factors that promote wound healing in animal models; however, it is unclear whether these factors are equally effective on the target cells in a hypoxic wound environment. Here we investigated the impact of MSC-derived soluble factors on the function of fibroblasts cultured in hypoxic fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs). Hypoxia alone significantly decreased FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression. MSC-conditioned medium restored hypoxic FPCL contraction and α-SMA expression to levels similar to normoxic FPCLs. (SB431542), an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β{sub 1} (TGF-β{sub 1})-mediated signaling, blocked most of the MSC effect on FPCL contraction, while exogenous TGF-β{sub 1} at levels similar to that secreted by MSCs reproduced the MSC effect. These results suggest that TGF-β{sub 1} is a major paracrine signal secreted by MSCs that can restore fibroblast functions relevant to the wound healing process and that are impaired in hypoxia. - Highlights: • Fibroblasts were cultured in collagen lattices (FPCLs) as model contracting wounds. • Hypoxia decreased FPCL contraction and fibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. • Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) restored function of hypoxic fibroblasts. • MSCs regulate fibroblast function mainly via secreted transforming growth factor-β{sub 1}.

  14. PD-L1 is a novel direct target of HIF-1α, and its blockade under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Muhammad Zaeem; Desantis, Giacomo; Janji, Bassam; Hasmim, Meriem; Karray, Saoussen; Dessen, Philippe; Bronte, Vincenzo; Chouaib, Salem

    2014-05-01

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) form an important component of the hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Here, we investigated the influence of hypoxia on immune checkpoint receptors (programmed death [PD]-1 and CTLA-4) and their respective ligands (PD-1 ligand 1 [PD-L1], PD-L2, CD80, and CD86) on MDSCs. We demonstrate that MDSCs at the tumor site show a differential expression of PD-L1 as compared with MDSCs from peripheral lymphoid organ (spleen). Hypoxia caused a rapid, dramatic, and selective up-regulation of PD-L1 on splenic MDSCs in tumor-bearing mice. This was not limited to MDSCs, as hypoxia also significantly increased the expression of PD-L1 on macrophages, dendritic cells, and tumor cells. Furthermore, PD-L1 up-regulation under hypoxia was dependent on hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) but not HIF-2α. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and luciferase reporter assay revealed direct binding of HIF-1α to a transcriptionally active hypoxia-response element (HRE) in the PD-L1 proximal promoter. Blockade of PD-L1 under hypoxia enhanced MDSC-mediated T cell activation and was accompanied by the down-regulation of MDSCs IL-6 and IL-10. Finally, neutralizing antibodies against IL-10 under hypoxia significantly abrogated the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Simultaneous blockade of PD-L1 along with inhibition of HIF-1α may thus represent a novel approach for cancer immunotherapy.

  15. CD36 upregulation mediated by intranasal LV-NRF2 treatment mitigates hypoxia-induced progression of Alzheimer's-like pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Zhan-You; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu; An, Li

    2014-12-01

    There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression.

  16. Gain-of-function mutations in the Toll-like Receptor pathway: TPL2-mediated ERK1/ERK2 MAPK activation, a path to tumorigenesis in lymphoid neoplasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eRousseau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoid neoplasms form a family of cancers affecting B-cells, T-cells and NK cells. The Toll-Like Receptor (TLR signalling adapter molecule MYD88 is the most frequently mutated gene in these neoplasms. This signalling adaptor relays signals from TLRs to downstream effector pathways such as the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFB and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK pathways to regulate innate immune responses (Kawai and Akira, 2010. Gain-of-function mutations such as MYD88[L265P] activate downstream signalling pathways in absence of cognate ligands for TLRs, resulting in increased cellular proliferation and survival. This article reports an analysis of non-synonymous somatic mutations found in the TLR signaling network in lymphoid neoplasms. In accordance with previous reports, mutations map to MYD88 pro-inflammatory signaling and not TRIF-mediated Type I IFN production. Interestingly, the analysis of somatic mutations found downstream of the core TLR-signaling network uncovered a strong association with the ERK1/2 MAPK cascade. In support of this analysis, heterologous expression of MYD88[L265P] in HEK 293 cells led to ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation in addition to NFB activation. Moreover, this activation is dependent on the protein kinase Tumour Promoting Locus-2 (TPL-2, activated downstream of the IKK complex. Activation of ERK1/2 would then lead to activation, amongst others, of MYC and hnRNP A1, two proteins previously shown to contribute to tumour formation in lymphoid neoplasms. Taken together, this analysis suggests that TLR-mediated tumorigenesis occurs via the TPL2-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Therefore, the hypothesis proposed is that inhibition of ERK1/2 MAPK activation would prevent tumour growth downstream of MYD88[L265]. It will be interesting to test whether pharmacological inhibitors of this pathway show efficacy in primary tumour cells derived from hematologic malignancies such as Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia, where the

  17. Hypoxia inducible factor-1α mediates protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on ECV-304 endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu-Bin Shi; Jian-Hua Huang; Bao-San Han

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is linked to the protective effects of ischemic preconditioning (IP) on sinusoidal endothelial cells against ischemia/reperfusion injury.METHODS: Sinusoidal endothelial cell lines ECV-304 were cultured and divided into four groups: control group, cells were cultured in complete DMEM medium; cold anoxia/warm reoxygenation (A/R) group, cells were preserved in a 4℃ UW solution in a mixture of 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 24 h; anoxia-preconditioning (ARC) group, cells were treated with 4 cycles of short anoxia and reoxygenation before prolonged anoxia-preconditioning treatment; and anoxia-preconditioning and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) inhibitor (I-HIF-1) group, cells were pretreated with 5 μm of HIF-1α inhibitor NS398 in DMEM medium before subjected to the same treatment as group ARC. After the anoxia treatment, each group was reoxygenated in a mixture of 95% air and 5% CO2 incubator for 6 h. Cytoprotections were evaluated by cell viabilities from Trypan blue, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release rates, and intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressions. Expressions of HIF-1α mRNA and HIF-1α protein from each group were determined by the RT-PCR method and Western blotting, respectively.RESULTS: Ischemia preconditioning increased cell viability, and reduced LDH release and ICAM-1 expressions. Ischemia preconditioning also upregulated the HIF-1α mRNA level and HIF-1α protein expression. However, all of these changes were reversed by HIF-1α inhibitor NS398.CONCLUSION: Ischemia preconditioning effectively inhibited cold hypoxia/warm reoxygenation injury to endothelial cells, and the authors showed for the first time HIF-1α is causally linked to the protective effects of ischemic preconditioning on endothelial cells.

  18. Noscapine inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression andangiogenesis in vitro: a novel function for an old drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Elizabeth W; Lukyanov, Yevgeniy; Schnee, Tona; Ali, M Aktar; Lan, Li; Zagzag, David

    2006-05-01

    Overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a common feature in solid malignancies related to oxygen deficiency. Since increased HIF-1 expression correlates with advanced disease stage, increased angiogenesis and poor prognosis, HIF-1 and its signaling pathway have become targets for cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we identified noscapine to be a novel small molecule inhibitor of the HIF-1 pathway based on its structure-function relation-ships with HIF-1 pathway inhibitors belonging to the benzylisoquinoline class of plant metabolites and/or to microtubule binding agents. We demonstrate that noscapine treatment of human glioma U87MG and T98G cell lines exposed to the hypoxic mimetic agent, CoCl2, inhibits hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression and transcriptional activity as measured by decreased secretion of VEGF, a HIF-1 target gene. Inhibition of hypoxia-mediated HIF-1alpha expression was due, in part, to its ability to inhibit accumulation of HIF-1alpha in the nucleus and target it for degradation via the proteasome. One mechanism of action of microtubule binding agents is their antiangiogenic activity associated with disruption of endothelial tubule formation. We show that noscapine has similar properties in vitro. Thus, noscapine may possess novel antiangiogenic activity associated with two broad mechanisms of action: first, by decreasing HIF-1alpha expression in hypoxic tumor cells, upregulation of target genes, such as VEGF, would be decreased concomitant with its associated angiogenic activity; second, by inhibiting endothelial cells from forming blood vessels in response to VEGF stimulation, it may limit the process of neo-vascularization, correlating with antitumor activity in vivo. For more than 75 years, noscapine has traditionally been used as an oral cough suppressant with no known toxic side effects in man. Thus, the studies reported here have found a novel function for an old drug. Given its low toxicity profile, its demonstrated

  19. Hypoxia-activated microglial mediators of neuronal survival are differentially regulated by tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Todd, Kathryn G

    2006-06-01

    The tetracycline derivatives minocycline (MINO) and doxycycline (DOXY) have been shown to be neuroprotective in in vivo and in vitro models of stroke. This neuroprotection is thought to be due to the suppression of microglial activation. However, the specific molecular parameters in microglia of the tetracyclines' effect are not understood. We subjected cultured rat microglial and neuronal cells to in vitro hypoxia and examined the effects of MINO and DOXY pre-treatments. Our data showed that MINO and DOXY protect against hypoxia-induced neuronal death by a mechanism dependent on regulation of microglial factors, but likely unrelated to regulation of microglial proliferation/viability. Both MINO and DOXY suppressed the hypoxic activation of ED-1, a marker for microglial activation. Morphological analyses of hypoxic microglia using the microglial marker Iba1 revealed that treatment with MINO and DOXY caused a higher percentage of microglia to remain in a non-activated state. MINO suppressed the hypoxic upregulation of pro-inflammatory agents nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), while DOXY down-regulated only NO and IL-1beta. In contrast, the hypoxic activation of pro-survival/neuroprotective microglial proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), were unaffected by tetracycline treatments. Taken together, these results suggest that MINO and DOXY may provide neuroprotection against stroke by selectively down-regulating microglial toxic factors while maintaining functional pro-survival factors.

  20. Hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of Bid and Bax in tumors occurs via hypoxia-inducible factor 1-dependent and -independent mechanisms and contributes to drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Cawthorne, Christopher J; Williams, Kaye J;

    2004-01-01

    of the Bcl-2 protein family. Oxygen deprivation of human colon cancer cells in vitro provoked decreased mRNA and protein levels of proapoptotic Bid and Bad. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) was dispensable for the down-regulation of Bad but required for that of Bid, consistent with the binding of HIF-1......alpha to a hypoxia-responsive element (positions -8484 to -8475) in the bid promoter. Oxygen deprivation resulted in proteosome-independent decreased expression of Bax in vitro, consistent with a reduction in global translation efficiency. The physiological relevance of Bid and Bax down...

  1. Hypoxia-targeted 131I therapy of hepatocellular cancer after systemic mesenchymal stem cell-mediated sodium iodide symporter gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andrea M; Schmohl, Kathrin A; Knoop, Kerstin; Schug, Christina; Urnauer, Sarah; Hagenhoff, Anna; Clevert, Dirk-André; Ingrisch, Michael; Niess, Hanno; Carlsen, Janette; Zach, Christian; Wagner, Ernst; Bartenstein, Peter; Nelson, Peter J; Spitzweg, Christine

    2016-08-23

    Adoptively transferred mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) home to solid tumors. Biologic features within the tumor environment can be used to selectively activate transgenes in engineered MSCs after tumor invasion. One of the characteristic features of solid tumors is hypoxia. We evaluated a hypoxia-based imaging and therapy strategy to target expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene to experimental hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) delivered by MSCs.MSCs engineered to express transgenes driven by a hypoxia-responsive promoter showed robust transgene induction under hypoxia as demonstrated by mCherry expression in tumor cell spheroid models, or radioiodide uptake using NIS. Subcutaneous and orthotopic HCC xenograft mouse models revealed significant levels of perchlorate-sensitive NIS-mediated tumoral radioiodide accumulation by tumor-recruited MSCs using 123I-scintigraphy or 124I-positron emission tomography. Functional NIS expression was further confirmed by ex vivo 123I-biodistribution analysis. Administration of a therapeutic dose of 131I in mice treated with NIS-transfected MSCs resulted in delayed tumor growth and reduced tumor perfusion, as shown by contrast-enhanced sonography, and significantly prolonged survival of mice bearing orthotopic HCC tumors. Interestingly, radioiodide uptake into subcutaneous tumors was not sufficient to induce therapeutic effects. Our results demonstrate the potential of using tumor hypoxia-based approaches to drive radioiodide therapy in non-thyroidal tumors.

  2. Cyclooxygenase-derived vasoconstriction restrains hypoxia-mediated cerebral vasodilation in young adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, John W; Schrage, William G

    2014-01-15

    Poor cerebrovascular function in metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) likely contributes to elevated risk of cerebrovascular disease in this growing clinical population. Younger MetSyn adults without clinical evidence of cerebrovascular disease exhibit preserved hypercapnic vasodilation yet markedly impaired hypoxic vasodilation, but the mechanisms behind reduced hypoxic vasodilation are unknown. Based on data from rats, we tested the hypothesis that younger adults with MetSyn exhibit reduced cerebral hypoxic vasodilation due to loss of vasodilating prostaglandins. Middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv) was measured with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in adults with MetSyn (n = 13, 33 ± 3 yr) and healthy controls (n = 15, 31 ± 2 yr). Isocapnic hypoxia was induced by titrating inspired oxygen to lower arterial saturation to 90% and 80% for 5 min each. Separately, hypercapnia was induced by increasing end-tidal CO2 10 mmHg above baseline levels. Cyclooxygenase inhibition (100 mg indomethacin) was conducted in a randomized double-blind, placebo controlled design. MCAv was normalized for group differences in blood pressure (healthy: 89 ± 2 mmHg vs. MetSyn: 102 ± 2 mmHg) as cerebrovascular conductance index (CVCi), and used to assess cerebral vasodilation. Hypoxia increased CVCi in both groups; however, vasodilation was ∼55% lower in MetSyn at SpO2 = 80% (P vasodilation in healthy controls, and unexpectedly increased dilation in MetSyn (P vasodilation was similar between groups, as was the decrease in vasodilation with indomethacin. These data indicate increased production of vasoconstrictor prostaglandins restrains hypoxic cerebral vasodilation in MetSyn, preventing them from responding appropriately to this important physiological stressor.

  3. Endothelin-1 mediates intermittent hypoxia-induced inflammatory vascular remodeling through HIF-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Emmanuelle; Belaidi, Elise; Briançon-Marjollet, Anne; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Arnaud, Claire; Godin-Ribuot, Diane

    2016-02-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular mortality, and apnea-induced intermittent hypoxia (IH) is known to promote various cardiovascular alterations such as vascular remodeling. However, the mechanisms that underlie IH remain incompletely investigated. We previously demonstrated that the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and endothelin-1 (ET-1) are involved in arterial hypertension and myocardial susceptibility to infarction induced by IH. Thus the objective of the present study was to investigate whether both ET-1 and HIF-1 were also involved in the vascular inflammatory remodeling induced by IH. Mice partially deficient for the Hif1α gene (HIF-1α(+/-)) and their wild-type equivalents, as well as C57BL/6J mice, treated or not with bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist, were exposed to IH or normoxia for 2 wk, 8 h/day. Splenocyte proliferative and secretory capacities, aortic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and HIF-1 activities, and expression of cytokines and intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured. IH induced a systemic and aortic inflammation characterized by an increase in splenocyte proliferative and secretory capacities, aortic NF-κB activity, and cytokine expression in the aortic wall. This was accompanied by an increase in IMT. These modifications were prevented in HIF-1α(+/-) and bosentan-treated mice. The results of this study suggest that ET-1 is a major contributor to the vascular inflammatory remodeling induced by OSA-related IH, probably through HIF-1-dependent activation of NF-κB.

  4. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates dormancy of glioblastoma multiforme-derived tumor stem-like cells during hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph P Hofstetter

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The hypoxic microenvironment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is thought to increase resistance to cancer therapies. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia induces protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, a regulator of cell cycle and cell death. The effects of PP2A on GBM tumor cell proliferation and survival during hypoxic conditions have not been studied. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Expression of PP2A subunits and HIF-α proteins was measured in 65 high-grade astrocytoma and 18 non-neoplastic surgical brain specimens by western blotting. PP2A activity was measured by an immunoprecipitation assay. For in vitro experiments, GBM-derived tumor stem cell-like cells (TSCs were exposed to severe hypoxia produced by either CoCl₂ or 1% O₂. PP2A activity was inhibited either by okadaic acid or by shRNA depletion of the PP2A C subunit. Effects of PP2A activity on cell cycle progression and cell survival during hypoxic conditions were assessed using flow cytometry. RESULTS: In our patient cohort, PP2A activity was positively correlated with HIF-1∝ protein expression (P = 0.002. Patients with PP2A activity levels above 160 pMP had significantly worse survival compared to patients with levels below this threshold (P = 0.002. PP2A activity was an independent predictor of survival on multivariable analysis (P = 0.009. In our in vitro experiments, we confirmed that severe hypoxia induces PP2A activity in TSCs 6 hours after onset of exposure. PP2A activity mediated G1/S phase growth inhibition and reduced cellular ATP consumption in hypoxic TSCs. Conversely, inhibition of PP2A activity led to increased cell proliferation, exhaustion of intracellular ATP, and accelerated P53-independent cell death of hypoxic TSCs. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that PP2A activity predicts poor survival in GBM. PP2A appears to reduce the metabolic demand of hypoxic TSCs and enhances tumor cell survival. Modulation of PP2A may be a potential target for cancer therapy.

  5. Lysyl oxidase is essential for hypoxia-induced metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Bennewith, Kevin L; Nicolau, Monica

    2006-01-01

    role in tumorigenesis seems dependent on cellular location, cell type and transformation status. Here we show that LOX expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is associated with hypoxia in human breast and head and neck tumours. Patients with high LOX-expressing tumours have poor...

  6. ERK signaling mediates enhanced angiotensin Ⅱ-induced rat aortic constriction following chronic intermittent hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xue-ling; DENG Yan; SHANG Jin; LIU Kui; XU Yong-jian; LIU Hui-guo

    2013-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been recognized as an independent risk factor for systemic hypertension.The study investigated the functional consequences of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on aortic constriction induced by angiotensin Ⅱ (Ang Ⅱ) and the possible signaling involving ERK1/2 and contractile proteins such as myosin light chain kinase (MLCK),myosin phosphatase targeting subunit (MYPT1) and myosin light chain (MLC).Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into CIH group and normoxia group and exposed to either CIH procedure or air-air cycles.Phosphorylation of ERK1/2,MYPT1 and MLC was assessed by Western blotting following constrictor studies in the presence or absence of PD98059 (10 μmol/L).Results CIH-exposure resulted in more body weight gain and elevated blood pressure,which could be attenuated by pretreatment with PD98059.Endothelium-removed aortic rings from CIH rats exhibited higher constrictor sensitivity to Ang Ⅱ (Emax:(138.56±5.78)% versus (98.45±5.31)% of KCI; pD2:7.98±0.14 versus 8.14±0.05,respectively).CIH procedure exerted complex effects on ERK expressions (total ERK1/2 decreased whereas the ratio of phosphorylated to total ERK1/2increased).CIH aortas had higher MLCK mRNA and basal phosphorylation of MYPT1 and MLC.In parallel to greater increases in phosphorylation of ERK1/2,MYPT1 and MLC,Ang Ⅱ-induced aortic constriction was significantly enhanced in CIH rats,which was largely reversed by PD98059.However vascular constriction of normoxia rats remained unchanged despite similar but smaller changing tendency of proteins phosphorylation.Conclusion These data suggest that CIH exposure results in aortic hyperresponsiveness to Ang Ⅱ,presumably owing to more activated ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  7. Adenosine mediates decreased cerebral metabolic rate and increased cerebral blood flow during acute moderate hypoxia in the near-term fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood, Arlin B; Hunter, Christian J; Power, Gordon G

    2003-12-15

    Exposure of the fetal sheep to moderate to severe hypoxic stress results in both increased cortical blood flow and decreased metabolic rate. Using intravenous infusion of 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist that is permeable to the blood brain barrier, we examine the role of adenosine A1 receptors in mediating cortical blood flow and metabolic responses to moderate hypoxia. The effects of DPCPX blockade are compared to controls as well as animals receiving intravenous 8-(p-sulfophenyl)-theophylline) (8-SPT), a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist which has been found to be blood brain barrier impermeable. Laser Doppler flow probes, tissue PO2, and thermocouples were implanted in the cerebral cortices of near-term fetal sheep. Catheters were placed in the brachial artery and sagittal sinus vein for collection of samples for blood gas analysis. Three to seven days later responses to a 30-min period of fetal hypoxemia (arterial PO2 10-12 mmHg) were studied with administration of 8-SPT, DPCPX, or vehicle. Cerebral metabolic rate was determined by calculation of both brain heat production and oxygen consumption. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 42 +/- 7 % decrease in cortical heat production and a 35 +/- 10 % reduction in oxygen consumption. In contrast, DPCPX infusion during hypoxia resulted in no significant change in brain heat production or oxygen consumption, suggesting the adenosine A1 receptor is involved in lowering metabolic rate during hypoxia. The decrease in cerebral metabolic rate was not altered by 8-SPT infusion, suggesting that the response is not mediated by adenosine receptors located outside the blood brain barrier. In response to hypoxia, control experiments demonstrated a 35 +/- 7 % increase in cortical blood flow. DPCPX infusion did not change this increase in cortical blood flow, however 8-SPT infusion attenuated increases in flow, indicating that hypoxic

  8. Transcriptomic changes triggered by hypoxia: evidence for HIF-1α-independent, [Na+]i/[K+]i-mediated, excitation-transcription coupling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V Koltsova

    Full Text Available This study examines the relative impact of canonical hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha- (HIF-1α and Na+i/K+i-mediated signaling on transcriptomic changes evoked by hypoxia and glucose deprivation. Incubation of RASMC in ischemic conditions resulted in ∼3-fold elevation of [Na+]i and 2-fold reduction of [K+]i. Using global gene expression profiling we found that Na+,K+-ATPase inhibition by ouabain or K+-free medium in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (RASMC led to the differential expression of dozens of genes whose altered expression was previously detected in cells subjected to hypoxia and ischemia/reperfusion. For further investigations, we selected Cyp1a1, Fos, Atf3, Klf10, Ptgs2, Nr4a1, Per2 and Hes1, i.e. genes possessing the highest increments of expression under sustained Na+,K+-ATPase inhibition and whose implication in the pathogenesis of hypoxia was proved in previous studies. In ouabain-treated RASMC, low-Na+, high-K+ medium abolished amplification of the [Na+]i/[K+]i ratio as well as the increased expression of all tested genes. In cells subjected to hypoxia and glucose deprivation, dissipation of the transmembrane gradient of Na+ and K+ completely eliminated increment of Fos, Atf3, Ptgs2 and Per2 mRNAs and sharply diminished augmentation expression of Klf10, Edn1, Nr4a1 and Hes1. In contrast to low-Na+, high-K+ medium, RASMC transfection with Hif-1a siRNA attenuated increments of Vegfa, Edn1, Klf10 and Nr4a1 mRNAs triggered by hypoxia but did not impact Fos, Atf3, Ptgs2 and Per2 expression. Thus, our investigation demonstrates, for the first time, that Na+i/K+i-mediated, Hif-1α- -independent excitation-transcription coupling contributes to transcriptomic changes evoked in RASMC by hypoxia and glucose deprivation.

  9. Non-invasive Bioluminescence Imaging of Myoblast-Mediated Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Alpha Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheysens, Olivier; Chen, Ian Y.; Rodriguez-Porcel, Martin; Chan, Carmel; Rasooly, Julia; Vaerenberg, Caroline; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Willmann, Juergen K.; Deroose, Christophe; Wu, Joseph; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We tested a novel imaging strategy, in which both the survival of transplanted myoblasts and their therapeutic transgene expression, a recombinant hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α-VP2), can be monitored using firefly luciferase (fluc) and Renilla luciferase (hrl) bioluminescence reporter genes, respectively. Procedures The plasmid pUbi-hrl-pUbi-HIF-1α-VP2, which expresses both hrl and HIF-1α-VP2 using two ubiquitin promoters, was characterized in vitro. C2c12 myoblasts stably expressing fluc and transiently transfected with pUbi-hrl-pUbi-HIF-1α-VP2 were injected into the mouse hindlimb. Both hrl and fluc expression were monitored using bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results Strong correlations existed between the expression of hRL and each of HIF-1α-VP2, VEGF, and PlGF (r2>0.83, r2>0.82, and r2>0.97, respectively). In vivo, both transplanted cells and HIF-1α-VP2 transgene expression were successfully imaged using BLI. Conclusions An objective evaluation of myoblast-mediated gene transfer in living mice can be performed by monitoring both the survival and the transgene expression of transplanted myoblasts using the techniques developed herein. PMID:21267661

  10. Intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate decreases brain inflammatory mediators and provides neuroprotection after brain hypoxia-ischemia in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Zhao, Huijuan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2013-11-01

    Brain injury due to birth asphyxia is the major cause of death and long-term disabilities in newborns. We determined whether intranasal pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) could provide neuroprotection in neonatal rats after brain hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Seven-day old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to brain HI. They were then treated with intranasal PDTC. Neurological outcomes were evaluated 7 or 30 days after the brain HI. Brain tissues were harvested 6 or 24 h after the brain HI for biochemical analysis. Here, PDTC dose-dependently reduced brain HI-induced brain tissue loss with an effective dose (ED)50 at 27 mg/kg. PDTC needed to be applied within 45 min after the brain HI for this neuroprotection. This treatment reduced brain tissue loss and improved neurological and cognitive functions assessed 30 days after the HI. PDTC attenuated brain HI-induced lipid oxidative stress, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and various inflammatory mediators in the brain tissues. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase after brain HI reduced brain tissue loss. Our results suggest that intranasal PDTC provides neuroprotection possibly via reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. Intranasal PDTC may have a potential to provide neuroprotection to human neonates after birth asphyxia.

  11. The involvement of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha in Toll-like receptor 7/8-mediated inflammatory response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sally A Nicholas; Vadim V Sumbayev

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 7 and 8 are crucial in host defence against single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses. Such viruses cause severe illnesses, which remain a serious medical burden in both industrialised and developing countries. TLR7/8 downstream signaling leads to a dramatic cellular stress associated with energy consumption. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell survival and adaptation to TLR7/8-induced stress, which give the cells an opportunity to initiate proper inflammatory reactions, are not clear at all. Here we report for the first time that ligand-induced ac-tivation of TLR7/8 leads to the accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein in THP-1 human myeloid macrophages via redox-and reactive nitrogen species-dependent mechanisms. MAP kinases and phosphoi-nositol-3K are not involved in TLR7/8-mediated HIF-1α accumulation. Experiments with HIF-la knockdown THP-1 cells have clearly demonstrated that HIF-1α is important for the protection of these cells against TLR7/8-induced depletion of ATP. Thus, HIF-1α might support both cell survival and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon TLR7/8 activation.

  12. Hypoxia-Mediated Down-Regulation of Bid and Bax in Tumors Occurs via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms and Contributes to Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Janine T.; Cawthorne, Christopher J.; Williams, Kaye J.; Koritzinsky, Marianne; Wouters, Bradley G.; Wilson, Clare; Miller, Crispin; Demonacos, Costas; Stratford, Ian J.; Dive, Caroline

    2004-01-01

    Solid tumors with disorganized, insufficient blood supply contain hypoxic cells that are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drug resistance, an obstacle to curative treatment of solid tumors, can occur via suppression of apoptosis, a process controlled by pro- and antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 protein family. Oxygen deprivation of human colon cancer cells in vitro provoked decreased mRNA and protein levels of proapoptotic Bid and Bad. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) was dispensable for the down-regulation of Bad but required for that of Bid, consistent with the binding of HIF-1α to a hypoxia-responsive element (positions −8484 to −8475) in the bid promoter. Oxygen deprivation resulted in proteosome-independent decreased expression of Bax in vitro, consistent with a reduction in global translation efficiency. The physiological relevance of Bid and Bax down-regulation was confirmed in tumors in vivo. Oxygen deprivation resulted in decreased drug-induced apoptosis and clonogenic resistance to agents with different mechanisms of action. The contribution of Bid and/or Bax down-regulation to drug responsiveness was demonstrated by the relative resistance of normoxic cells that had no or reduced expression of Bid and/or Bax and by the finding that forced expression of Bid in hypoxic cells resulted in increased sensitivity to the topoisomerase II inhibitor etoposide. PMID:15024076

  13. Protection of cardiomyocytes from the hypoxia-mediated injury by a peptide targeting the activator of G-protein signaling 8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiko Sato

    Full Text Available Signaling via heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in the development of human diseases including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. We previously identified an ischemia-inducible G-protein activator, activator of G-protein signaling 8 (AGS8, which regulates Gβγ signaling and plays a key role in the hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Here, we attempted to intervene in the AGS8-Gβγ signaling process and protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis with a peptide that disrupted the AGS8-Gβγ interaction. Synthesized AGS8-peptides, with amino acid sequences based on those of the Gβγ-binding domain of AGS8, successfully inhibited the association of AGS8 with Gβγ. The AGS8-peptide effectively blocked hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, as determined by DNA end-labeling and an increase in cleaved caspase-3. AGS8-peptide also inhibited the change in localization/permeability of channel protein connexin 43, which was mediated by AGS8-Gβγ under hypoxia. Small compounds that inhibit a wide range of Gβγ signals caused deleterious effects in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, AGS8-peptide did not cause cell damage under normoxia, suggesting an advantage inherent in targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signaling pathway. These data indicate a pivotal role for the interaction of AGS8 with Gβγ in hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and suggest that targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signal provides a novel approach for protecting the myocardium against ischemic injury.

  14. Estradiol-17β protects against hypoxia-induced hepatocyte injury through ER-mediated upregulation of Bcl-2 as well as ER-independent antioxidant effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Young Lee; Sun Chul Jung; Jang Hern Lee; Ho Jae Han

    2008-01-01

    Although many previous studies have suggested that estrogen functions as a cytoprotective agent under oxidative stress conditions, the underlying mechanism by which this effect is exerted remains to be elucidated. This study assessed the effects of estradiol-17β (E2) (10-8 M) on hypoxia-induced cell injury and its related signaling in primary cultured chicken hepatocytes. Hypoxic conditions were found to augment the level of DNA damage and to reduce cell viability and the level of [3H]-thymidine incorporation, and these phenomena were prevented through treatment with E2. Hy-poxia also increased caspase-3 expression, but showed no evidence of an influence on the expression of Bcl-2. However, E2 induced an increase in the level of Bcl-2 expression under hypoxic conditions and reduced the level of caspase-3 expression. The effects of E2 on Bcl-2 and caspase expression were blocked by ICI182780 (E2 receptor (ER) antagonist, 107 M). In addition, hypoxia resulted in an increase in the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated. These effects were blocked by E2, but not by E2-BSA and ICI 182780. Hypoxia also activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-JUN N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK) and nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB). These effects were blocked by E2, but not by ICI 182780. The inhibition of p38 MAPK and JNK/SAPK blocked NF-kB activation. In conclusion, E2 was found to protect against hypoxia-induced cell injury in chicken hepatocytes through ER-mediated upregulation of Bcl-2 expression and through reducing the activity of ROS-dependent p38 MAPK, JNK/ SAPK and NF-kB.

  15. Protection of cardiomyocytes from the hypoxia-mediated injury by a peptide targeting the activator of G-protein signaling 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Motohiko; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroko; Sakima, Miho; Mamun, Abdullah Al; Yamane, Yukiko; Fujita, Takayuki; Yokoyama, Utako; Okumura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in the development of human diseases including ischemia-reperfusion injury of the heart. We previously identified an ischemia-inducible G-protein activator, activator of G-protein signaling 8 (AGS8), which regulates Gβγ signaling and plays a key role in the hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes. Here, we attempted to intervene in the AGS8-Gβγ signaling process and protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia-induced apoptosis with a peptide that disrupted the AGS8-Gβγ interaction. Synthesized AGS8-peptides, with amino acid sequences based on those of the Gβγ-binding domain of AGS8, successfully inhibited the association of AGS8 with Gβγ. The AGS8-peptide effectively blocked hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, as determined by DNA end-labeling and an increase in cleaved caspase-3. AGS8-peptide also inhibited the change in localization/permeability of channel protein connexin 43, which was mediated by AGS8-Gβγ under hypoxia. Small compounds that inhibit a wide range of Gβγ signals caused deleterious effects in cardiomyocytes. In contrast, AGS8-peptide did not cause cell damage under normoxia, suggesting an advantage inherent in targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signaling pathway. These data indicate a pivotal role for the interaction of AGS8 with Gβγ in hypoxia-induced apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and suggest that targeted disruption of the AGS8-Gβγ signal provides a novel approach for protecting the myocardium against ischemic injury.

  16. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  17. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  18. Neuroprotection against hypoxia/ischemia: δ-opioid receptor-mediated cellular/molecular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaozhou; Sandhu, Harleen K; Yang, Yilin; Hua, Fei; Belser, Nathalee; Kim, Dong H; Xia, Ying

    2013-07-01

    Hypoxic/ischemic injury remains the most dreaded cause of neurological disability and mortality. Despite the humbling experiences due to lack of promising therapy, our understanding of the complex cascades underlying the neuronal insult has led to advances in basic science research. One of the most noteworthy has been the effect of opioid receptors, especially the delta-opioid receptor (DOR), on hypoxic/ischemic neurons. Our recent studies, and those of others worldwide, present strong evidence that sheds light on DOR-mediated neuroprotection in the brain, especially in the cortex. The mechanisms of DOR neuroprotection are broadly categorized as: (1) stabilization of the ionic homeostasis, (2) inhibition of excitatory transmitter release, (3) attenuation of disrupted neuronal transmission, (4) increase in antioxidant capacity, (5) regulation of intracellular pathways-inhibition of apoptotic signals and activation of pro-survival signaling, (6) regulation of specific gene and protein expression, and (7) up-regulation of endogenous opioid release and/or DOR expression. Depending upon the severity and duration of hypoxic/ischemic insult, the release of endogenous opioids and DOR expression are regulated in response to the stress, and DOR signaling acts at multiple levels to confer neuronal tolerance to harmful insult. The phenomenon of DOR neuroprotection offers a potential clue for a promising target that may have significant clinical implications in our quest for neurotherapeutics.

  19. Hypoxia stimulates invasion and migration of human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa through the Rab11 trafficking of integrin αvβ3/FAK/PI3K pathway-mediated Rac1 activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAO XU; YUAN YUAN; WENQIAN WU; MIN ZHOU; QIAN JIANG; LINJUN NIU; JIAYIN JI; NIANLI LIU; LONGZHEN ZHANG; XIA WANG

    2017-09-01

    Hypoxia plays a key role in tumour cell survival, invasion, and metastasis. An increasing number of studies have attemptedto characterize the tumour response to hypoxia and to identify predictive markers of disease. Here we show that hypoxiaincreases tumour cell invasion and migration by the modulation of Rab11, an important molecule for vesicular trafficking.In our study, we found that Rab11, together with the activation of Rac1, could stimulate invasion and migration of cervicalcancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa in hypoxia. Activation of Rac1 activity by hypoxia seems to be central to carcinoma invasion.We also found that these effects could be related to the integrin αvβ3. In addition, we studied the molecular pathway for thisprocess. Our results showed that in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa, Rac1 activation in hypoxia could stimulateinvasion and migration, and this process was mediated by integrin αvβ3-mediated FAK and PI3K phosphorylation.Furthermore, hypoxia induced a dramatic increase in αvβ3 integrin surface expression, and this increase is dependent onRab11. In conclusion, our study might provide a new mechanism for the effect of hypoxia on stimulating cervicalcarcinoma invasion.

  20. CaV3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels mediate the augmented calcium influx in carotid body glomus cells by chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Ahmmed, Gias U; Peng, Ying-Jie; Khan, Shakil A; Nanduri, Jayasri; Kumar, Ganesh K; Fox, Aaron P; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a hallmark manifestation of sleep apnea. A heightened carotid body activity and the resulting chemosensory reflex mediate increased sympathetic nerve activity by CIH. However, the mechanisms underlying heightened carotid body activity by CIH are not known. An elevation of intracellular calcium ion concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in glomus cells, the primary oxygen-sensing cells, is an essential step for carotid body activation by hypoxia. In the present study, we examined the effects of CIH on the glomus cell [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia and assessed the underlying mechanisms. Glomus cells were harvested from adult rats or wild-type mice treated with 10 days of either room air (control) or CIH (alternating cycles of 15 s of hypoxia and 5 min of room air; 9 episodes/h; 8 h/day). CIH-treated glomus cells exhibited an enhanced [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia, and this effect was absent in the presence of 2-(4-cyclopropylphenyl)-N-((1R)-1-[5-[(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)oxo]-pyridin-2-yl]ethyl)acetamide (TTA-A2), a specific inhibitor of T-type Ca(2+) channels, and in voltage-gated calcium channel, type 3.2 (CaV3.2), null glomus cells. CaV3.2 knockout mice exhibited an absence of CIH-induced hypersensitivity of the carotid body. CIH increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in glomus cells. A ROS scavenger prevented the exaggerated TTA-A2-sensitive [Ca(2+)]i response to hypoxia. CIH had no effect on CaV3.2 mRNA levels. CIH augmented Ca(2+) currents and increased CaV3.2 protein in plasma membrane fractions of human embryonic kidney-293 cells stably expressing CaV3.2, and either a ROS scavenger or brefeldin-A, an inhibitor of protein trafficking, prevented these effects. These findings suggest that CIH leads to an augmented Ca(2+) influx via ROS-dependent facilitation of CaV3.2 protein trafficking to the plasma membrane.

  1. Expression of MUC17 is regulated by HIF1α-mediated hypoxic responses and requires a methylation-free hypoxia responsible element in pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kitamoto

    Full Text Available MUC17 is a type 1 membrane-bound glycoprotein that is mainly expressed in the digestive tract. Recent studies have demonstrated that the aberrant overexpression of MUC17 is correlated with the malignant potential of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs; however, the exact regulatory mechanism of MUC17 expression has yet to be identified. Here, we provide the first report of the MUC17 regulatory mechanism under hypoxia, an essential feature of the tumor microenvironment and a driving force of cancer progression. Our data revealed that MUC17 was significantly induced by hypoxic stimulation through a hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α-dependent pathway in some pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., AsPC1, whereas other pancreatic cancer cells (e.g., BxPC3 exhibited little response to hypoxia. Interestingly, these low-responsive cells have highly methylated CpG motifs within the hypoxia responsive element (HRE, 5'-RCGTG-3', a binding site for HIF1α. Thus, we investigated the demethylation effects of CpG at HRE on the hypoxic induction of MUC17. Treatment of low-responsive cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine followed by additional hypoxic incubation resulted in the restoration of hypoxic MUC17 induction. Furthermore, DNA methylation of HRE in pancreatic tissues from patients with PDACs showed higher hypomethylation status as compared to those from non-cancerous tissues, and hypomethylation was also correlated with MUC17 mRNA expression. Taken together, these findings suggested that the HIF1α-mediated hypoxic signal pathway contributes to MUC17 expression, and DNA methylation of HRE could be a determinant of the hypoxic inducibility of MUC17 in pancreatic cancer cells.

  2. Arsenic and chromium in drinking water promote tumorigenesis in a mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model and the potential mechanism is ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin; Mandal, Ardhendu K. [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Saito, Hiroshi [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Pulliam, Joseph F.; Lee, Eun Y. [Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji; Lu, Jian; Ding, Songze [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Li, Li [Department of Family Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Shelton, Brent J.; Tucker, Thomas [Markey Cancer Control Program, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40504 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Department of Surgery and Physiology, Lucille P. Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Exposure to carcinogenic metals, such as trivalent arsenic [As(III)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], through drinking water is a major global public health problem and is associated with various cancers. However, the mechanism of their carcinogenicity remains unclear. In this study, we used azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate (AOM/DSS)-induced mouse colitis-associated colorectal cancer model to investigate their tumorigenesis. Our results demonstrate that exposure to As(III) or Cr(VI), alone or in combination, together with AOM/DSS pretreatment has a promotion effect, increasing the colorectal tumor incidence, multiplicity, size, and grade, as well as cell inflammatory response. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that As(III) or Cr(VI) treatment alone significantly changed the density of proteins. The expression of β-catenin and phospho-GSK was increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Concomitantly, the expression of NADPH oxidase1 (NOX1) and the level of 8-OHdG were also increased by treatment of carcinogenic metals alone. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, were decreased. Similarly, in an in vitro system, exposure of CRL-1807 to carcinogenic metals increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, the expression of β-catenin, phospho-GSK, and NOX1. Inhibition of ROS generation by addition of SOD or catalase inhibited β-catenin expression and activity. Our study provides a new animal model to study the carcinogenicity of As(III) and Cr(VI) and suggests that As(III) and Cr(VI) promote colorectal cancer tumorigenesis, at least partly, through ROS-mediated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Carcinogenic metals in drinking water promote colorectal tumor formation in vivo. ► Carcinogenic metals induce β-catenin activation in vivo and in vitro. ► ROS generation induced by carcinogenic metals mediated β-catenin activation.

  3. Experimental data suggesting that inflammation mediated rat liver mitochondrial dysfunction results from secondary hypoxia rather than from direct effects of inflammatory mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelheid eWeidinger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic inflammatory response (SIR comprises direct effects of inflammatory mediators (IM and indirect effects, such as secondary circulatory failure which results in tissue hypoxia (HOX. These two key components, SIR and HOX, cause multiple organ failure (MOF. Since HOX and IM occur and interact simultaneously in vivo, it is difficult to clarify their individual pathological impact. To eliminate this interaction, precision cut liver slices (PCLS were used in this study aiming to dissect the effects of HOX and IM on mitochondrial function, integrity of cellular membrane and the expression of genes associated with inflammation. HOX was induced by incubating PCLS or rat liver mitochondria at pO2<1% followed by reoxygenation (HOX/ROX model. Inflammatory injury was stimulated by incubating PCLS with IM (IM model. We found upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression only in the IM model, while heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1 expression was upregulated only in the HOX/ROX model. Elevated expression of interleukin 6 (IL-6 was found in both models reflecting converging pathways regulating the expression of this gene. Both models caused damage to hepatocytes resulting in the release of alanine aminotransferase (ALT. The leakage of aspartate aminotransferase (AST was observed only during the hypoxic phase in the HOX/ROX model. The reoxygenation phase of HOX, but not IM, drastically impaired mitochondrial electron supply via complex I and II. Additional experiments performed with isolated mitochondria showed that free iron, released during HOX, is likely a key prerequisite of mitochondrial dysfunction induced during the reoxygenation phase. Our data suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction, previously observed in in vivo SIR-models is the result of secondary circulatory failure inducing HOX rather than the result of a direct interaction of IM with liver cells.

  4. Implications of mitochondrial DNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Lu; Lokendra Kumar Sharma; Yidong Bai

    2009-01-01

    Alterations in oxidative phosphorylation resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondria have recently been shown to play an important role in regulating both programmed cell death and cell proliferation. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in various cancer cells. However, the role of these mtDNA mutations in tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. This review focuses on basic mitochondrial genetics, mtDNA mutations and consequential mitochondrial dysfunction associated with cancer. The potential molecular mechanisms, mediating the pathogenesis from mtDNA mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction to tumorigenesis are also discussed.

  5. Ambient oxygen promotes tumorigenesis.

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    Ho Joong Sung

    Full Text Available Oxygen serves as an essential factor for oxidative stress, and it has been shown to be a mutagen in bacteria. While it is well established that ambient oxygen can also cause genomic instability in cultured mammalian cells, its effect on de novo tumorigenesis at the organismal level is unclear. Herein, by decreasing ambient oxygen exposure, we report a ∼50% increase in the median tumor-free survival time of p53-/- mice. In the thymus, reducing oxygen exposure decreased the levels of oxidative DNA damage and RAG recombinase, both of which are known to promote lymphomagenesis in p53-/- mice. Oxygen is further shown to be associated with genomic instability in two additional cancer models involving the APC tumor suppressor gene and chemical carcinogenesis. Together, these observations represent the first report directly testing the effect of ambient oxygen on de novo tumorigenesis and provide important physiologic evidence demonstrating its critical role in increasing genomic instability in vivo.

  6. Hypoxia induces a phenotypic switch of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts through a MMP-2/TIMP mediated pathway: Implications for venous neointimal hyperplasia in hemodialysis access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sanjay; Fu, Alex A.; Misra, Khamal D.; Shergill, Uday M.; Leof, Edward B; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Hemodialysis grafts fail because of venous neointimal hyperplasia formation caused by adventitial fibroblasts which have become myofibroblasts (α-smooth muscle actin positive cells) and migrate to the neointima. There is increased expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α in venous neointimal hyperplasia formation in experimental animal model and clinical samples. We hypothesized that under hypoxic stimulus (HIF-1α fibroblasts will convert to myofibroblasts through a matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) mediated pathway. Materials and methods Murine AKR-2B fibroblasts were made hypoxic or normoxic for 24, 48, and 72 hours. Protein expression for HIF-1α, α-smooth muscle actin, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 was performed to determine the kinetic changes of these proteins. Immunostaining for α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and fibronectin was performed. Results At all time points, there was significantly increased expression of HIF-1α in the hypoxic fibroblasts when compared to normoxic fibroblasts (P<0.05). There was significantly increased expression α-smooth muscle actin at all time points which peaked by 48 hours in hypoxic fibroblasts when compared to normoxic fibroblasts (P<0.05). There was a significant increase in the expression of active MMP-2 by 48-72 hours and a significant increase in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) by 48-72 hours by hypoxic fibroblasts (P<0.05). By 72 hours, there was significant increase in TIMP-2 expression (P<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated increased expression for α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and fibronectin as the length of hypoxia increased. Conclusions Under hypoxia, fibroblasts will convert to myofibroblasts through a MMP-2 mediated pathway which may provide insight into the mechanism of venous neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:20434368

  7. 31. Antioxidant and hypoxia induce the human antioxidant response element-mediated expression of NAD(P) H: quinone oxidoreductase1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Background: NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an obligate two-electron reductase that is involved in protection of cells against redox cycling, oxidative stress, and neoplasia. and can also bioactivate certain antitumor quinones. Many antioxidants are cancer chemopreventive agents, and tumour hypoxia are now being exploited in cancer treatment which shows considerable promise to overcome the resistance to cancer chemotherapy. Antioxidant response element (ARE) is sensitive to perturbations of cellular redox states. Our previous studies have shown that β-tyrosol (β-TY), as a phenolic antioxidant, can protects cells against DNA damage resulting from toxic H2O2. Aim: We take the present study with the goal of whether antioxidants such as β-tyrosol, butylated hydroxyanisole(BHA) and β-Naphthooflavone(β-NF) and hypoxia (pO2 0.1% -0.5%) can induce gene expression of NQO1, inhibit proliferation of human hepatoma cells SMMC-7721 and the relationship between them; whether ARE can mediate gene expression in response to antioxidans and hypoxia. Methods: SMMC-7721 human hepatoma cells are planted in plates, grown for 24h. and exposed to antioxidants and hypoxia, each alone or in combination for another 24h. The enzyme activity was determinied by spectrophotometric assay using direct measurement of NQO1 from cells cultured in Microtiter wells. Semi-quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) technique was used to measure NQO1 mRNA levets. Proliferation was estimated using the crystal violet staining technique. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was employed to assess protein binding to the ARE under all of These conditions. Hypoxia cells were harvested in an anaerobic chamber at the end of the incubation period. Results: Antioxidant (90ug/ml β-TY、60μmol/L BHA、80μmol/L β-NF) potently induce an increase in the activity of NQO1. From 60μg/ml to 90μg/ml, β-TY caused NQO1 activity enhancement in a dose-dependent manner The NQO1 activity induced

  8. Krüppel-like factor 5 is a crucial mediator of intestinal tumorigenesis in mice harboring combined ApcMin and KRASV12 mutations

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    Robine Sylvie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both mutational inactivation of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumor suppressor gene and activation of the KRAS oncogene are implicated in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Mice harboring a germline ApcMin mutation or intestine-specific expression of the KRASV12 gene have been developed. Both mouse strains develop spontaneous intestinal tumors, including adenoma and carcinoma, though at a different age. The zinc finger transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5 has previously been shown to promote proliferation of intestinal epithelial cells and modulate intestinal tumorigenesis. Here we investigated the in vivo effect of Klf5 heterozygosity on the propensity of ApcMin/KRASV12 double transgenic mice to develop intestinal tumors. Results At 12 weeks of age, ApcMin/KRASV12 mice had three times as many intestinal tumors as ApcMin mice. This increase in tumor number was reduced by 92% in triple transgenic ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice. The reduction in tumor number in ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice was also statistically significant compared to ApcMin mice alone, with a 75% decrease. Compared with ApcMin/KRASV12, tumors from both ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- and ApcMin mice were smaller. In addition, tumors from ApcMin mice were more distally distributed in the intestine as contrasted by the more proximal distribution in ApcMin/KRASV12 and ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice. Klf5 levels in the normal-appearing intestinal mucosa were higher in both ApcMin and ApcMin/KRASV12 mice but were attenuated in ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice. The levels of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and Ki-67 were also reduced in the normal-appearing intestinal mucosa of ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice when compared to ApcMin/KRASV12 mice. Levels of pMek and pErk1/2 were elevated in the normal-appearing mucosa of ApcMin/KRASV12 mice and modestly reduced in ApcMin/KRASV12/Klf5+/- mice. Tumor tissues displayed higher levels of both Klf5 and β-catenin, irrespective of the

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress mediating downregulated StAR and 3-beta-HSD and low plasma testosterone caused by hypoxia is attenuated by CPU86017-RS and nifedipine

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    Liu Gui-Lai

    2012-01-01

    which mediates testis damage caused by oxygen deprivation. CPU86017-RS is potential in ameliorating hypoxia-induced testicular injuries, possibly by its calcium antagonist effects on the testis.

  10. Mitochondria-Translocated PGK1 Functions as a Protein Kinase to Coordinate Glycolysis and the TCA Cycle in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Jiang, Yuhui; Meisenhelder, Jill; Yang, Weiwei; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Xia, Yan; Aldape, Kenneth; He, Jie; Hunter, Tony; Wang, Liwei; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear how the Warburg effect that exemplifies enhanced glycolysis in the cytosol is coordinated with suppressed mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism. We demonstrate here that hypoxia, EGFR activation, and expression of K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E induce mitochondrial translocation of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1); this is mediated by ERK-dependent PGK1 S203 phosphorylation and subsequent PIN1-mediated cis-trans isomerization. Mitochondrial PGK1 acts as a protein kinase to phosphorylate pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDHK1) at T338, which activates PDHK1 to phosphorylate and inhibit the pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) complex. This reduces mitochondrial pyruvate utilization, suppresses reactive oxygen species production, increases lactate production, and promotes brain tumorigenesis. Furthermore, PGK1 S203 and PDHK1 T338 phosphorylation levels correlate with PDH S293 inactivating phosphorylation levels and poor prognosis in glioblastoma patients. This work highlights that PGK1 acts as a protein kinase in coordinating glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, which is instrumental in cancer metabolism and tumorigenesis.

  11. Aberrant methylation and associated transcriptional mobilization of Alu elements contributes to genomic instability in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Arnab; Srivastava, Tapasya; Sharma, Manish K; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Das, Prerna; Sinha, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is an integral part of tumorigenesis and contributes extensively to the neoplastic phenotype including drug resistance and genomic instability. It has also been reported that hypoxia results in global demethylation. Because a majority of the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands are found within the repeat elements of DNA, and are usually methylated under normoxic conditions, we suggested that retrotransposable Alu or short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) which show altered methylation and associated changes of gene expression during hypoxia, could be associated with genomic instability. U87MG glioblastoma cells were cultured in 0.1% O₂ for 6 weeks and compared with cells cultured in 21% O₂ for the same duration. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in SINE and reverse transcriptase coding long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) transcripts during hypoxia. Sequencing of bisulphite treated DNA as well as the Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) assay showed that the SINE loci studied underwent significant hypomethylation though there was patchy hypermethylation at a few sites. The inter-alu PCR profile of DNA from cells cultured under 6-week hypoxia, its 4-week revert back to normoxia and 6-week normoxia showed several changes in the band pattern indicating increased alu mediated genomic alteration. Our results show that aberrant methylation leading to increased transcription of SINE and reverse transcriptase associated LINE elements could lead to increased genomic instability in hypoxia. This might be a cause of genetic heterogeneity in tumours especially in variegated hypoxic environment and lead to a development of foci of more aggressive tumour cells.

  12. Hypoxia mediates mitochondrial biogenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma to promote tumor growth through HMGB1 and TLR9 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Samer; Yazdani, Hamza O; Liu, Yao; Loughran, Patricia; van der Windt, Dirk J; Huang, Hai; Simmons, Richard L; Shiva, Sruti; Tai, Sheng; Tsung, Allan

    2017-07-01

    The ability of cancer cells to survive and grow under hypoxic conditions has been known for decades, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Under certain conditions, cancer cells undergo changes in their bioenergetic profile to favor mitochondrial respiration by activating the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC-1α) and up-regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In this study, we hypothesized that augmented mitochondrial biogenesis plays a critical role for cancer cells to survive hypoxia. Consistent with this hypothesis, both hypoxic human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumors and HCC cell lines subjected to hypoxia increase mitochondrial biogenesis. Silencing of PGC-1α in hypoxic HCC cell lines halts their proliferation. Mechanistic investigations in vitro indicated that intracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a nuclear protein overexpressed in HCC, is essential for the process. Silencing of HMGB1 in hypoxic HCC cell lines resulted in a significant decrease in PGC-1α activation and mitochondrial biogenesis. Without HMGB1, hypoxic HCC cells had significantly reduced adenosine triphosphate production, decreased cellular proliferation, and increased apoptosis. In a diethylnitrosamine-induced murine model of HCC, genetic blocking of HMGB1 in hypoxic tumors resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth. Tumors lacking HMGB1 had a significant reduction in mitochondrial biogenesis and a significant increase in mitochondrial dysfunction. Further in vitro mechanistic experiments indicated that during hypoxia HMGB1 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and binds to cytoplasmic Toll-like receptor-9. This binding leads to activation of p38 and subsequent phosphorylation of PGC-1α, with resultant up-regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Taken together, our findings suggest that during hypoxia HMGB1 up-regulates mitochondrial biogenesis in HCC cancer cells, promoting tumor survival and proliferation

  13. Volatile Anaesthetic Depression of the Carotid Body Chemoreflex-Mediated Ventilatory Response to Hypoxia: Directions for Future Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Pandit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In assessing whether volatile anaesthetics directly depress the carotid body response to hypoxia it is necessary to combine in meta-analysis studies of when it is “functionally isolated” (e.g., recordings are made from its afferent nerve. Key articles were retrieved (full papers in English and subjected to quantitative analysis to yield an aggregate estimate of effect. Results from articles that did not use such methodology were assessed separately from this quantitative approach, to see what could be learned also from a nonquantitative overview. Just 7 articles met the inclusion criteria for hypoxia and just 6 articles for hypercapnia. Within these articles, the anaesthetic (mean dose 0.75, standard deviation (SD 0.40 minimum alveolar concentration, MAC statistically significantly depressed carotid body hypoxic response by 24% (P=0.041, but a similar dose (mean 0.81 (0.42 MAC did not affect the hypercapnic response. The articles not included in the quantitative analysis (31 articles, assessed qualitatively, also indicated that anaesthetics depress carotid body function. This conclusion helps direct future research on the anaesthetic effects on putative cellular/molecular processes that underlie the transduction of hypoxia in the carotid body.

  14. Ferritin-Mediated Iron Sequestration Stabilizes Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α upon LPS Activation in the Presence of Ample Oxygen

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    Isabel Siegert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Both hypoxic and inflammatory conditions activate transcription factors such as hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α and nuclear factor (NF-κB, which play a crucial role in adaptive responses to these challenges. In dendritic cells (DC, lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced HIF1α accumulation requires NF-κB signaling and promotes inflammatory DC function. The mechanisms that drive LPS-induced HIF1α accumulation under normoxia are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that LPS inhibits prolyl hydroxylase domain enzyme (PHD activity and thereby blocks HIF1α degradation. Of note, LPS-induced PHD inhibition was neither due to cosubstrate depletion (oxygen or α-ketoglutarate nor due to increased levels of reactive oxygen species, fumarate, and succinate. Instead, LPS inhibited PHD activity through NF-κB-mediated induction of the iron storage protein ferritin and subsequent decrease of intracellular available iron, a critical cofactor of PHD. Thus, hypoxia and LPS both induce HIF1α accumulation via PHD inhibition but deploy distinct molecular mechanisms (lack of cosubstrate oxygen versus deprivation of co-factor iron.

  15. ROCK2 mediates the proliferation of pulmonary arterial endothelial cells induced by hypoxia in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Feng; ZOU, ZHITIAN; Liu, Chunhui; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; YANG, CHENGPENG; JIANG, TENGJIAO; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that RhoA activation and Rho-kinase (ROCK) expression are increased in chronic hypoxic lungs, and the long-term inhibition of ROCK markedly improves the survival of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, whether Rho-kinase α (ROCK2) participates in regulation of the growth of pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of PAECs and the role o...

  16. ROCK2 mediates the proliferation of pulmonary arterial endothelial cells induced by hypoxia in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Qiao, Feng; ZOU, ZHITIAN; Liu, Chunhui; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoqiang; YANG, CHENGPENG; JIANG, TENGJIAO; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that RhoA activation and Rho-kinase (ROCK) expression are increased in chronic hypoxic lungs, and the long-term inhibition of ROCK markedly improves the survival of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, whether Rho-kinase α (ROCK2) participates in regulation of the growth of pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of PAECs and the role o...

  17. SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels mediates the early response to acute hypoxia in central neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Leigh D; Marks, Jeremy D; Goldstein, Steve AN

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism for the earliest response of central neurons to hypoxia—an increase in voltage-gated sodium current (INa)—has been unknown. Here, we show that hypoxia activates the Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) pathway in rat cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) and that SUMOylation of NaV1.2 channels increases INa. The time-course for SUMOylation of single NaV1.2 channels at the cell surface and changes in INa coincide, and both are prevented by mutation of NaV1.2-Lys38 or application of a deSUMOylating enzyme. Within 40 s, hypoxia-induced linkage of SUMO1 to the channels is complete, shifting the voltage-dependence of channel activation so that depolarizing steps evoke larger sodium currents. Given the recognized role of INa in hypoxic brain damage, the SUMO pathway and NaV1.2 are identified as potential targets for neuroprotective interventions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20054.001 PMID:28029095

  18. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  19. Hypoxia Mediated Release of Endothelial Microparticles and Increased Association of S100A12 with Circulating Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca V. Vince

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles are released from the endothelium under normal homeostatic conditions and have been shown elevated in disease states, most notably those characterised by endothelial dysfunction. The endothelium is sensitive to oxidative stress/status and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression is upregulated upon activated endothelium, furthermore the presence of VCAM-1 on microparticles is known. S100A12, a calcium binding protein part of the S100 family, is shown to be present on circulating leukocytes and is thought a sensitive marker to local inflammatory process, which may be driven by oxidative stress. Eight healthy males were subjected to breathing hypoxic air (15% O2, approximately equivalent to 3000 metres altitude for 80 minutes in a temperature controlled laboratory and venous blood samples were processed immediately for VCAM-1 microparticles (VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with leukocytes by flow cytometry. A pre-hypoxic blood sample was used for comparison. Both VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with neutrophils were significantly elevated post hypoxic breathing later declining to levels observed in the pre-test samples. A similar trend was observed in both cases and a correlation may exist between these two markers in response to hypoxia. These data offer evidence using novel markers of endothelial and circulating blood responses to hypoxia.

  20. Coastal hypoxia and sediment biogeochemistry

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    J. J. Middelburg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity, duration and frequency of coastal hypoxia (oxygen concentration <63 μM are increasing due to human alteration of coastal ecosystems and changes in oceanographic conditions due to global warming. Here we provide a concise review of the consequences of coastal hypoxia for sediment biogeochemistry. Changes in bottom-water oxygen levels have consequences for early diagenetic pathways (more anaerobic at expense of aerobic pathways, the efficiency of re-oxidation of reduced metabolites and the nature, direction and magnitude of sediment-water exchange fluxes. Hypoxia may also lead to more organic matter accumulation and burial and the organic matter eventually buried is also of higher quality, i.e. less degraded. Bottom-water oxygen levels also affect the organisms involved in organic matter processing with the contribution of metazoans decreasing as oxygen levels drop. Hypoxia has a significant effect on benthic animals with the consequences that ecosystem functions related to macrofauna such as bio-irrigation and bioturbation are significantly affected by hypoxia as well. Since many microbes and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes depend on animal-induced transport processes (e.g. re-oxidation of particulate reduced sulphur and denitrification, there are indirect hypoxia effects on biogeochemistry via the benthos. Severe long-lasting hypoxia and anoxia may result in the accumulation of reduced compounds in sediments and elimination of macrobenthic communities with the consequences that biogeochemical properties during trajectories of decreasing and increasing oxygen may be different (hysteresis with consequences for coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  1. The up regulation of phosphofructokinase1 (PFK1) protein during chemically induced hypoxia is mediated by the hypoxia-responsive internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element, present in its 5'untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Rehana; Ul Hussain, Mahboob

    2017-08-01

    Astrocytes cope-up the hypoxia conditions by up regulating the activity of the enzymes catalyzing the irreversible steps of the glycolytic pathway. The phosphofructokinase1 (PFK1), which converts fructose-6-phosphate to fructose-1, 6-bisphosphate, is the major regulatory enzyme of the glycolytic pathway. For this purpose, we investigated the expression regulation of the PFK1 during chemically induced hypoxia. After 48 h of the chemically induced hypoxia induction of the C6 glioma cells, the PFK1 protein depicted strong up regulation, with no appreciable change in its mRNA levels. The di-cistronic assay indicated the presence of a weak internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element in the 5'UTR of the PFK1 mRNA. Interestingly, the weak IRES element of the PFK1 was strongly up regulated after 48 h of the chemically induced hypoxia, indicative of a possible mechanism responsible for the induction of the PFK1 protein. The authenticity of the hypoxia-regulated IRES element of the PFK1, relative to the presence of the cryptic promoter element and/or the cryptic splicing was established using promoterless di-cistronic assay and the RT-PCR analysis. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the polypyrimidine tract binding (PTB) protein resulted in the enhanced activity of the IRES element of the PFK1. Additionally, it was established that the chemically induced hypoxia resulted in the increased shuttling of the PTB from the cell nucleus to the cytosol. The presence of a hypoxia responsive IRES element, in the 5'UTR of the PFK1 was established to be the possible mechanism responsible for the up regulation of the PFK1 protein. Our data provides an interesting mechanism that may explain the increased glycolytic capacity of the astrocytes after brain hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  2. Pheochromocytomas: the (pseudo)-hypoxia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxia and pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma have a long common history. Since the description, almost 40 years ago, of an increased incidence of head and neck paragangliomas in chronic hypoxia, discoveries on oxygen-sensing and on hereditary paraganglioma in the beginning of years 2000 provided the proof of concept of a strong link between these neuroendocrine tumors and the hypoxic pathway. It was demonstrated that both SDH and VHL genes mutations lead to the abnormal stabilization and activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, and to the subsequent regulation of multiple target genes, the products of which are implicated in proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, energy metabolism or invasiveness and metastases. Altogether, physiological, genetic, cellular and molecular data collected over years all point to a central role of the hypoxic or pseudohypoxic pathway in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma tumorigenesis. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Increased accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α with reduced transcriptional activity mediates the antitumor effect of triptolide

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    Li Zheng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, a critical transcription factor to reduced O2 availability, has been demonstrated to be extensively involved in tumor survival, aggressive progression, drug resistance and angiogenesis. Thus it has been considered as a potential anticancer target. Triptolide is the main principle responsible for the biological activities of the Traditional Chinese Medicine tripterygium wilfordii Hook F. Triptolide possesses great chemotherapy potential for cancer with its broad-spectrum anticancer, antiangiogenesis, and drug-resistance circumvention activities. Numerous biological molecules inhibited by triptolide have been viewed as its possible targets. However, the anticancer action mechanisms of triptolide remains to be further investigated. Here we used human ovarian SKOV-3 cancer cells as a model to probe the effect of triptolide on HIF-1α. Results Triptolide was observed to inhibit the proliferation of SKOV-3 cells, and meanwhile, to enhance the accumulation of HIF-1α protein in SKOV-3, A549 and DU145 cells under different conditions. Triptolide did not change the kinetics or nuclear localization of HIF-1α protein or the 26 S proteasome activity in SKOV-3 cells. However, triptolide was found to increase the levels of HIF-1α mRNA. Unexpectedly, the HIF-1α protein induced by triptolide appeared to lose its transcriptional activity, as evidenced by the decreased mRNA levels of its target genes including VEGF, BNIP3 and CAIX. The results were further strengthened by the lowered secretion of VEGF protein, the reduced sprout outgrowth from the rat aorta rings and the inhibitory expression of the hypoxia responsive element-driven luciferase reporter gene. Moreover, the silencing of HIF-1α partially prevented the cytotoxicity and apoptosis triggered by triptolide. Conclusions The potent induction of HIF-1α protein involved in its cytotoxicity, together with the suppression of HIF-1 transcriptional

  4. SIRT IS REQUIRED FOR EDP-MEDIATED PROTECTIVE RESPONSES TOWARD HYPOXIA-REOXYGEANTION INJURY IN CARDIAC CELLS

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    Victor eSamokhvalov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3 is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs, have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways.

  5. SIRT Is Required for EDP-Mediated Protective Responses toward Hypoxia-Reoxygenation Injury in Cardiac Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Victor; Jamieson, Kristi L; Fedotov, Ilia; Endo, Tomoko; Seubert, John M

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-reoxygenation (H/R) injury is known to cause extensive injury to cardiac myocardium promoting development of cardiac dysfunction. Despite the vast number of studies dedicated to studying H/R injury, the molecular mechanisms behind it are multiple, complex, and remain very poorly understood, which makes development of novel pharmacological agents challenging. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n - 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid obtained from dietary sources, which produces numerous effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. The beneficial effects of DHA toward the cardiovascular system are well documented but the relative role of DHA or one of its more potent metabolites is unresolved. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), have more potent biological activity than DHA in cardiac cells. In this study we examined whether EDPs protect HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R injury. Our observations demonstrate that treatment with 19,20-EDP protected HL-1 cardiac cells from H/R damage through a mechanism(s) protecting and enhancing mitochondrial quality. EDP treatment increased the relative rates of mitobiogenesis and mitochondrial respiration in control and H/R exposed cardiac cells. The observed EDP protective response toward H/R injury involved SIRT1-dependent pathways.

  6. Adenovirus-mediated hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha gene transfer induces angiogenesis and neurogenesis following cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanfu Wu; Xiu Chen; Zhen Yu; Changlin Hu; Wenqin Cai

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) accumulates under conditions of hypoxia. HIF-1α target genes have pleiotropic effects on neurogenesis, neuroprotection and angiogenesis in the brain.OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether a recombinant adenovirus carrying HIF-1α can increase the expression of HIF-1α in vivo and thus promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: The randomized, controlled experiment was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Third Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from September 2006 to October 2007.MATERIALS: 68 healthy adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 230-250 g, were used. HIF-1α antibody was purchased from Wuhan Boster Company. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antibody was purchased from Santa Cruz Biotech Company.METHODS: All 68 rats were induced with a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), according to the method of intra-luminal vascular occlusion. 54 rats, in which MCAO was successfully induced, were randomly divided into adenovirus (Ad) group and recombinant adenovirus with HIF-1αgene (Ad-HIF-1α) group (27 rats for each group). Rats were injected with 10 μL Ad (Ad group) or Ad-HIF-1α (Ad-HIF-1α group) into the lateral ventricle, 1 day after MCAO induction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to measure the expression of HIF-1α and of VEGF. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the localization of HIF-1α, VEGF and factor Ⅷ in ischemic penumbra. Rat newborn nerve cells were labeled with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) after ischemia. BrdU/neurofilament 200 (NF200) and BrdU/glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) double labeled immunofluorescent histochemistry was used to identify the differentiation of newborn cells. Neurological function was evaluated using the modified neurological severity score (NSS).RESULTS: Compared with Ad, Ad-HIF-1αenhanced the expression of HIF-1

  7. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Parvalbumin-Immunoreactive Interneurons Loss and Neurobehavioral Impairment is Mediated by NADPH-Oxidase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Jiang; Li, Guowei; Liang, Dong

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea usually contribute to psychiatric diseases and cognitive impairments in adults. Loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive interneurons (PV-IN) in the brain cortex is an important feature of psychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. Here we investigate the causal contribution of oxidative stress in the brain cortex to neuropathological alterations in a mouse model of sleep apnea. Wild-type (WT) and the NADPH-oxidase-2 (gp91-phox/NOX2) knock-out adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH) or standard room air in the same chamber. In vivo we determined the impact (1) of IH exposures on NOX2 expression, (2) of genetic gp91-phox/NOX2 knock-out and (3) of pharmacological NOX2 inhibition on IH-induced neuropathological alterations in adult mice. Endpoints were oxidative stress, PV-IN and neurobehavioral alterations. The results showed IH exposures increased NOX2 expression in the prefrontal cortex of WT mice, which was accompanied with elevations of indirect markers of oxidative stress (HNE, HIF-1α, 8-OHDG). WT mice showed loss of PV-IN in the prefrontal cortex and increased locomotion activity and anxiety levels after exposed to IH, while no change emerged in NOX2 knock-out mice. Treatment of WT mice with the antioxidant/NOX inhibitor apocynin prevented the neuropathological and neurobehavioral alterations induced by IH exposures. Our data suggest that NOX2-derived oxidative stress is involved in the loss of PV-IN in the prefrontal cortex and development of neurobehavioral alterations for adult mice exposed to IH. These results provide a molecular mechanism for the coupling between sleep apnea and brain oxidative stress as well as potential new therapeutic avenues.

  8. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  9. Blunted inflammation mediated by NF-κB activation in hippocampus alleviates chronic normobaric hypoxia-induced anxiety-like behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junming; Fan, Xiaofang; Li, Yang; Guo, Jinbin; Xia, Dongmei; Ding, Lu; Zheng, Qingqing; Wang, Wei; Xue, Feng; Chen, Ran; Liu, Shouting; Hu, Lianggang; Gong, Yongsheng

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to investigate whether inflammation mediated by NF-κB activation is involved in the induction of anxiety-like behavior in chronic normobaric hypoxia (CNH) exposed rats and to investigate the underlying mechanism. To this end, rats were exposed in a normobaric hypoxic chamber with a fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2) of ∼ 10%, 23 h/d, continues for 2 weeks. Anxiety-like behavior was tested by elevated plus maze and open field, inflammatory response, nucleus translocation of NF-κB, and signaling pathway in hippocampus were examined. CNH induced a significant increase of anxiety- like behavior and inflammation responses, which were ameliorated by NF-κB inhibitor, PDTC pretreatment, suggesting that the anxiogenic effect induced by inflammation is through NF-κB activation. CNH treatment significantly increased nucleus translocation of p65 and p105 in hippocampus, which was suppressed by PDTC pretreatment. In addition, CNH treatment significantly increased Iba-1, iNOS, COX-2, and p-PKA in hippocampus, which were blocked by PDTC pretreatment, suggesting CNH may activate microglia cells in hippocampus through NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, our results illustrate a mechanism that, activation of NF-κB in hippocampus may trigger the proinflammatory response of microglia cells, and iNOS-PKA pathway may involve in anxiogenic effect in CNH exposed rats.

  10. RAGE mediates S100A4-induced cell motility via MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling and is a prognostic biomarker for human colorectal cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlmann, Mathias; Okhrimenko, Anna; Marcinkowski, Patrick; Osterland, Marc; Herrmann, Pia; Smith, Janice; Heizmann, Claus W.; Schlag, Peter M.; Stein, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Survival of colorectal cancer patients is strongly dependent on development of distant metastases. S100A4 is a prognostic biomarker and inducer for colorectal cancer metastasis. Besides exerting intracellular functions, S100A4 is secreted extracellularly. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is one of its interaction partners. The impact of the S100A4-RAGE interaction for cell motility and metastasis formation in colorectal cancer has not been elucidated so far. Here we demonstrate the RAGE-dependent increase in migratory and invasive capabilities of colorectal cancer cells via binding to extracellular S100A4. We show the direct interaction of S100A4 and RAGE, leading to hyperactivated MAPK/ERK and hypoxia signaling. The S100A4-RAGE axis increased cell migration (PRAGE and RAGE-specific antibodies. In colorectal cancer patients, not distantly metastasized at surgery, high RAGE expression in primary tumors correlated with metachronous metastasis, reduced overall (P=0.022) and metastasis-free survival (P=0.021). In summary, interaction of S100A4-RAGE mediates S100A4-induced colorectal cancer cell motility. RAGE by itself represents a biomarker for prognosis of colorectal cancer. Thus, therapeutic approaches targeting RAGE or intervening in S100A4-RAGE-dependent signaling early in tumor progression might represent alternative strategies restricting S100A4-induced colorectal cancer metastasis. PMID:24952599

  11. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  12. miR-140-5p regulates hypoxia-mediated human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by targeting Dnmt1 and promoting SOD2 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Jing, E-mail: xujingdoc@163.com

    2016-04-22

    miR-140-5p is down-regulated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and experimental models of PAH, and inhibits hypoxia-mediated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation in vitro. Delivery of synthetic miR-140-5p prevents and treats established, experimental PAH. DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is up-regulated in PAH associated human PASMCs (HPASMCs), which promotes the development of PAH by hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoter for superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and down-regulating SOD2 expression. We searched for miR-140-5p targets using TargetScan, PicTar and MiRanda tools, and found that Dnmt1 is a potential target of miR-140-5p. Based on these findings, we speculated that miR-140-5p might target Dnmt1 and regulate SOD2 expression to regulate hypoxia-mediated HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. We detected the expression of miR-140-5p, Dnmt1 and SOD2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found down-regulation of miR-140-5p and SOD2 and up-regulation of Dnmt1 exist in PAH tissues and hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation detection showed that miR-140-5p inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia, while the effect of Dnmt1 on hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs is reversed. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-140-5p targets Dnmt1 directly. An inverse correlation is also found between miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 in HPASMCs. In addition, we further investigated whether miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 regulate HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by regulating SOD2 expression, and the results confirmed our speculation. Taken together, these results indicated that miR-140-5p at least partly targets Dnmt1 and regulates SOD2 expression to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia. - Highlights: • miR-140-5p and SOD2 are down

  13. Brain dysfunction in mild to moderate hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G E; Pulsinelli, W; Blass, J P; Duffy, T E

    1981-06-01

    Hypoxia is commonly invoked to explain alterations in mental function, particularly in patients with cardiac pulmonary failure. The effects of acute graded hypoxia or higher integrative functions are well documented experimentally in man. Hypoxia in experimental animal models demonstrates that the pathophysiology is complex. In mild to moderate hypoxia, in contrast to severe hypoxia and to ischemia, the supply of energy for the brain is not impaired; cerebral levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenylate energy charge are normal. In contrast, the turnover of several neurotransmitters is altered by mild hypoxia. For example, acetylcholine synthesis is reduced proportionally to the reduction in carbohydrate oxidation. This relationship holds in vitro and with several in vivo models of hypoxia. Pharmacologic and physiologic studies in man and experimental animals are consistent with acetylcholine having an important role in mediating the cerebral effects of mild hypoxia. These observations raise the possibility that treatments directed to cholinergic or other central neurotransmitter systems may benefit patients with cerebral syndromes secondary to chronic hypoxia.

  14. Cell cycle regulation and apoptosis mediated by p53 in response to hypoxia in hepatopancreas of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Hernandez, Dahlia M; Felix-Portillo, Monserrath; Peregrino-Uriarte, Alma B; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2017-09-27

    Although hypoxic aquatic environments cause negative effects on shrimp, these animals can withstand somewhat hypoxia, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this capacity are still poorly understood. In humans, mild hypoxia causes the induction of many proteins to allow cell survival. In contrast, apoptosis is induced during severe hypoxia leading to cell death. p53 is a key transcription factor that determines cells fate towards cell cycle arrest or induction of apoptosis in humans. The aim of this work was to study the role of p53 in cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in response to hypoxia in hepatopancreas of the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. p53 was silenced by RNAi and afterwards the shrimp were exposed to hypoxia. Cdk-2 was used as indicator of cell cycle progression while caspase-3 expression and caspase activity were analyzed as indicators of apoptosis. p53 levels in hepatopancreas were significantly higher at 48 h after hypoxic treatment. Increased expression levels of Cdk-2 were found in p53-silenced shrimp after 24 and 48 h in the normoxic treatments as well as 48 h after hypoxia, indicating a possible role of p53 in cell cycle regulation. In response to hypoxia, unsilenced shrimp showed an increase in caspase-3 expression levels, however an increase was also observed in caspase activity at 24 h of normoxic conditions in p53-silenced shrimps. Taken together these results indicate the involvement of p53 in regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis in the white shrimp in response to hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroacupuncture Pretreatment Attenuates Cerebral Ischemic Injury via Notch Pathway-Mediated Up-Regulation of Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Deng, Bin; Li, Yichong; Zhou, Lihua; Yang, Lei; Gou, Xingchun; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Guozhong; Xu, Hao; Xu, Lixian

    2015-11-01

    We have reported electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment induced the tolerance against focal cerebral ischemia through activation of canonical Notch pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully understood. Evidences suggest that up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) contributes to neuroprotection against ischemia which could interact with Notch signaling pathway in this process. Therefore, the current study is to test that up-regulation of HIF-1α associated with Notch pathway contributes to the neuroprotection of EA pretreatment. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with EA at the acupoint "Baihui (GV 20)" 30 min per day for successive 5 days before MCAO. HIF-1α levels were measured before and after reperfusion. Then, HIF-1α antagonist 2ME2 and γ-secretase inhibitor MW167 were used. Neurologic deficit scores, infarction volumes, neuronal apoptosis, and Bcl2/Bax were evaluated. HIF-1α and Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) were assessed. The results showed EA pretreatment enhanced the neuronal expression of HIF-1α, reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcome, inhibited neuronal apoptosis, up-regulated expression of Bcl-2, and down-regulated expression of Bax after reperfusion in the penumbra, while the beneficial effects were attenuated by 2ME2. Furthermore, intraventricular injection with MW167 efficiently suppressed both up-regulation of NICD and HIF-1α after reperfusion. However, administration with 2ME2 could only decrease the expression of HIF-1α in the penumbra. In conclusion, EA pretreatment exerts neuroprotection against ischemic injury through Notch pathway-mediated up-regulation of HIF-1α.

  16. Vitamin D prevents hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced blood-brain barrier disruption via vitamin D receptor-mediated NF-kB signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonmi Won

    Full Text Available Maintaining blood-brain barrier integrity and minimizing neuronal injury are critical components of any therapeutic intervention following ischemic stroke. However, a low level of vitamin D hormone is a risk factor for many vascular diseases including stroke. The neuroprotective effects of 1,25(OH2D3 (vitamin D after ischemic stroke have been studied, but it is not known whether it prevents ischemic injury to brain endothelial cells, a key component of the neurovascular unit. We analyzed the effect of 1,25(OH2D3 on brain endothelial cell barrier integrity and tight junction proteins after hypoxia/reoxygenation in a mouse brain endothelial cell culture model that closely mimics many of the features of the blood-brain barrier in vitro. Following hypoxic injury in bEnd.3 cells, 1,25(OH2D3 treatment prevented the decrease in barrier function as measured by transendothelial electrical resistance and permeability of FITC-dextran (40 kDa, the decrease in the expression of the tight junction proteins zonula occludin-1, claudin-5, and occludin, the activation of NF-kB, and the increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. These responses were blocked when the interaction of 1,25(OH 2D3 with the vitamin D receptor (VDR was inhibited by pyridoxal 5'-phosphate treatment. Our findings show a direct, VDR-mediated, protective effect of 1,25(OH 2D3 against ischemic injury-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction in cerebral endothelial cells.

  17. Expression of the CHOP-inducible carbonic anhydrase CAVI-b is required for BDNF-mediated protection from hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Tori A; Abel, Allyssa; Demme, Chris; Sherman, Teresa; Pan, Pei-wen; Halterman, Marc W; Parkkila, Seppo; Nehrke, Keith

    2014-01-16

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs) comprise a family of zinc-containing enzymes that catalyze the reversible hydration of carbon dioxide. CAs contribute to a myriad of physiological processes, including pH regulation, anion transport and water balance. To date, 16 known members of the mammalian alpha-CA family have been identified. Given that the catalytic family members share identical reaction chemistry, their physiologic roles are influenced greatly by their tissue and sub-cellular locations. CAVI is the lone secreted CA and exists in both saliva and the gastrointestinal mucosa. An alternative, stress-inducible isoform of CAVI (CAVI-b) has been shown to be expressed from a cryptic promoter that is activated by the CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein Homologous Protein (CHOP). The CAVI-b isoform is not secreted and is currently of unknown physiological function. Here we use neuronal models, including a model derived using Car6 and CHOP gene ablations, to delineate a role for CAVI-b in ischemic protection. Our results demonstrate that CAVI-b expression, which is increased through CHOP-signaling in response to unfolded protein stress, is also increased by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). While enforced expression of CAVI-b is not sufficient to protect against ischemia, CHOP regulation of CAVI-b is necessary for adaptive changes mediated by BDNF that reduce subsequent ischemic damage. These results suggest that CAVI-b comprises a necessary component of a larger adaptive signaling pathway downstream of CHOP.

  18. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha mediates protection of DL-3-n-butylphthalide in brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihong Yang; Ling Li; Ruxun Huang; Zhong Pei; Songjie Liao; Jinsheng Zeng

    2012-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can significantly alleviate oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of human umbilical vein endothelial cells at least partly associated with its enhancement on oxygen glucose deprivation -induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. In this study, we hypothesized that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury of newborn rat brain microvascular endothelial cells by means of upregulating hypoxia inducible factor-1α expression. MTT assay and Hoechst staining results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide protected brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot and immunofluorescent staining results further confirmed that the protective effect was related to upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α. Real-time RT-PCR reaction results showed that DL-3-n-butylphthalide reduced apoptosis by inhibiting downregulation of pro-apoptotic gene caspase-3 mRNA expression and upregulation of apoptosis-executive protease bcl-2 mRNA expression; however, DL-3-n-butylphthalide had no protective effects on brain microvascular endothelial cells after knockdown of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by small interfering RNA. These findings suggest that DL-3-n-butylphthalide can protect brain microvascular endothelial cells against oxygen glucose deprivation-induced injury by upregulating bcl-2 expression and downregulating caspase-3 expression though hypoxia inducible factor-1α pathway.

  19. Resistance to hypoxia-induced, BNIP3-mediated cell death contributes to an increase in a CD133-positive cell population in human glioblastomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Ulf Dietrich; Maciaczyk, Donata; Dai, Fangping; Claus, Rainer; Firat, Elke; Doostkam, Soroush; Bogiel, Tomasz; Carro, Maria Stella; Döbrössy, Mate; Herold-Mende, Christel; Niedermann, Gabriele; Prinz, Marco; Nikkhah, Guido; Maciaczyk, Jaroslaw

    2012-12-01

    In addition to intrinsic regulatory mechanisms, brain tumor stemlike cells (BTSCs), a small subpopulation of malignant glial tumor-derived cells, are influenced by environmental factors. Previous reports showed that lowering oxygen tension induced an increase of BTSCs expressing CD133 and other stem cell-related genes and more pronounced clonogenic capacity in vitro. We investigated the mechanisms responsible for hypoxia-dependent induction of CD133-positive BTSCs in glioblastomas. We confirmed that cultures exposed to lowered oxygen levels showed a severalfold increase of CD133-positive BTSCs. Both the increase of CD133-positive cells and deceleration of the growth kinetics were reversible after transfer to normoxic conditions. Exposure to hypoxia induced BNIP3 (BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa protein-interacting protein 3)-dependent apoptosis preferentially in CD133-negative cells. In contrast, CD133-positive cells proved to be more resistant to hypoxia-induced programmed cell death. Application of the demethylating agent 5'-azacitidine resulted in an increase of BNIP3 expression levels in CD133-positive cells. Thus, epigenetic modifications led to their better survival in lowered oxygen tension. Moreover, the, hypoxia-induced increase of CD133-positive cells was inhibited after 5'-azacitidine treatment. These results suggest the possible efficacy of a novel therapy for glioblastoma focused on eradication of BTSCs by modifications of epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

  20. A cardiac myocyte-restricted Lin28/let-7 regulatory axis promotes hypoxia-mediated apoptosis by inducing the AKT signaling suppressor PIK3IP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Shaurya; Wei, Jianqin; Bishopric, Nanette H

    2016-02-01

    The let-7 family of microRNAs (miRs) regulates critical cell functions, including survival signaling, differentiation, metabolic control and glucose utilization. These functions may be important during myocardial ischemia. MiR-let-7 expression is under tight temporal and spatial control through multiple redundant mechanisms that may be stage-, isoform- and tissue-specific. To determine the mechanisms and functional consequences of miR-let-7 regulation by hypoxia in the heart. MiR-let-7a, -7c and -7g were downregulated in the adult mouse heart early after coronary occlusion, and in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes subjected to hypoxia. Let-7 repression did not require glucose depletion, and occurred at a post-transcriptional level. Hypoxia also induced the RNA binding protein Lin28, a negative regulator of let-7. Hypoxia ineither induced Lin28 nor repressed miR-let-7 in cardiac fibroblasts. Both changes were abrogated by treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A. Restoration of let-7g to hypoxic myocytes and to ischemia-reperfused mouse hearts in vivo via lentiviral transduction potentiated the hypoxia-induced phosphorylation and activation of Akt, and prevented hypoxia-dependent caspase activation and death. Mechanistically, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase interacting protein 1 (Pik3ip1), a negative regulator of PI3K, was identified as a novel target of miR-let-7 by a crosslinking technique showing that miR-let-7g specifically targets Pik3ip1 to the cardiac myocyte Argonaute complex RISC. Finally, in non-failing and failing human myocardium, we found specific inverse relationships between Lin28 and miR-let-7g, and between miR-let-7g and PIK3IP1. A conserved hypoxia-responsive Lin28-miR-let-7-Pik3ip1 regulatory axis is specific to cardiac myocytes and promotes apoptosis during myocardial ischemic injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by cobalt chloride-simulated hypoxia is mediated by persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in a metastatic human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Kirschenbaum, A; Yao, S; Stearns, M E; Holland, J F; Claffey, K; Levine, A C

    1999-01-01

    Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression induced by hypoxia is crucial event leading to neovascularization. Cyclooxygenase-2, an inducible enzyme that catalyzes the formation of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid, has been demonstrated to be induced by hypoxia and play role in angiogenesis and metastasis. To investigate the potential effect of COX-2 on hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in prostate cancer. We examined the relationship between COX-2 expression and VEGF induction in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-simulated hypoxia in three human prostate cancer cell lines with differing biological phenotypes. Northern blotting and ELISA revealed that all three tested cell lines constitutively expressed VEGF mRNA, and secreted VEGF protein to different degrees (LNCaP > PC-3 > PC3ML). However, these cell lines differed in the ability to produce VEGF in the presence of CoCl2-simulated hypoxia. CoCl2 treatment resulted in 40% and 75% increases in VEGF mRNA, and 50% and 95% in protein secretion by LNCaP and PC-3 cell lines, respectively. In contrast, PC-3ML cell line, a PC-3 subline with highly invasive, metastatic phenotype, exhibits a dramatic upregulation of VEGF, 5.6-fold in mRNA and 6.3-fold in protein secretion after treatment with CoCl2. The upregulation of VEGF in PC-3ML cells is accompanied by a persistent induction of COX-2 mRNA (6.5-fold) and protein (5-fold). Whereas COX-2 expression is only transiently induced in PC-3 cells and not affected by CoCl2 in LNCaP cells. Moreover, the increases in VEGF mRNA and protein secretion induced by CoCl2 in PC-3ML cells were significantly suppressed following exposure to NS398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor. Finally, the effect of COX-2 inhibition on CoCl2-induced VEGF production was reversed by the treatment with exogenous PGE2. Our data demonstrate that VEGF induction by cobalt chloride-simulated hypoxia is maintained by a concomitant, persistent induction of COX-2 expression and

  2. Hyperglycemia, tumorigenesis, and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chun; Yang, Wei-Chung Vivian

    2016-12-01

    Hyperglycemia is the most prominent sign that characterizes diabetes. Hyperglycemia favors malignant cell growth by providing energy to cancer cells. Clinical studies also showed an increased risk of diabetes being associated with different types of cancers. In addition, poorly regulated glucose metabolism in diabetic patients is often found with increased levels of chronic inflammatory markers, e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and emerging evidence has highlighted activation of the immune response in the progression and development of cancer cells. Therefore, uncontrolled proinflammatory responses could conceivably create a chronic inflammatory state, promoting a tumor-favorable microenvironment and potentially triggering immune overactivation and cancer growth. To further understand how hyperglycemia contributes to immune overactivation, the tumor microenvironment and the development of chronic inflammation-associated tumors may provide insights into tumor biology and immunology. This paper provides a brief introduction to hyperglycemia-associated diseases, followed by a comprehensive overview of the current findings of regulatory molecular mechanisms of glycosylation on proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix under hyperglycemic conditions. Then, the authors discuss the role of hyperglycemia in tumorigenesis (particularly in prostate, liver, colorectal, and pancreatic cancers), as well as the contribution of hyperglycemia to chronic inflammation. The authors end with a brief discussion on the future perspectives of hyperglycemia/tumorigenesis and potential applications of alternative/effective therapeutic strategies for hyperglycemia-associated cancers.

  3. The effect of lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on the uptake of fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)f) in the human pancreatic cancer cell line, patu8988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guanglei; Bo, Jingli; Wan, Renming; Peng, Mingya; Luan, Yufen; Deng, Minbin; Xu, Longbao

    2015-05-01

    Hypoxia can stimulate (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake in cultured tumor cells. This study has investigated the effect of lentiviral vector-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) on the changes in HIF-1 and glucose transporter 1 (Glut-1) expression, the cell growth, and the uptake of (18)F-FDG in the human pancreatic cancer cell line, Patu8988. Lentiviral RNAi vector targeting the HIF-1α gene (LV-HIF-1αRNAi) was constructed and used to treat cells at various concentrations (25-200 nM). The expression changes of HIF-1α and Glut-1 in hypoxic Patu8988 cells after RNAi treatment were determined using real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR). The inhibition rate of cell proliferation 48 hours after the addition of 10 μL of different concentrations of LV-HIF-1αRNAi (25-200 nM) was assayed using the MTT method. Meanwhile, the cell uptake of (18)F-FDG was also assessed. After RNAi transfection, the relative expression levels of HIF-1α mRNA and Glut-1 under hypoxia were reduced and the relative expression levels of HIF-1α protein also decreased. Compared with the control group, the inhibition rates of cell proliferation under different viral dosages were 5.98%, 15.65%, 26.42%, and 40.81%, respectively, positively correlated with the viral doses (r=0.558, p<0.05). Under hypoxia, Glut-1 mRNA expression in Patu8988 cells treated with 200 nM of LV-HIF-1αRNAi for 24, 48, and 72 hours, respectively, was positively correlated with the inhibition rate of cell proliferation (r=0.618, p<0.05) as well as the inhibition rate of (18)F-FDG uptake (r=0.664, p<0.05), while the latter two displayed a positive correlation with each other too (r=0.582, p<0.05). Under hypoxia, RNAi targeting HIF-1α significantly inhibited the expression of Glut-1 mRNA in Patu8988 pancreatic cancer cells and their uptake of (18)F-FDG. These results suggest that LV-HIF-1αRNAi may form a new treatment for

  4. TLRs, Alcohol, HCV, and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keigo Machida

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic liver damage caused by viral infection, alcohol, or obesity can result in increased risk for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Ample epidemiological evidence suggests that there is a strong synergism between hepatitis C virus (HCV and alcoholic liver diseases (ALD. The Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling pathway is upregulated in chronic liver diseases. Alcoholism is associated with endotoxemia that stimulates expression of proinflammatory cytokine expression and inflammation in the liver and fat tissues. Recent studies of HCC have centered on cancer-initiating stem cell (CSC, including detection of CSC in cancer, identification of CSC markers, and isolation of CSC from human HCC cell lines. Synergism between alcohol and HCV may lead to liver tumorigenesis through TLR signaling.

  5. IKKα activation of NOTCH links tumorigenesis via FOXA2 suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mo; Lee, Dung-Fang; Chen, Chun-Te; Yen, Chia-Jui; Li, Long-Yuan; Lee, Hong-Jen; Chang, Chun-Ju; Chang, Wei-Chao; Hsu, Jung-Mao; Kuo, Hsu-Ping; Xia, Weiya; Wei, Yongkun; Chiu, Pei-Chun; Chou, Chao-Kai; Du, Yi; Dhar, Debanjan; Karin, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2012-01-27

    Proinflammatory cytokine TNFα plays critical roles in promoting malignant cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and tumor metastasis in many cancers. However, the mechanism of TNFα-mediated tumor development remains unclear. Here, we show that IKKα, an important downstream kinase of TNFα, interacts with and phosphorylates FOXA2 at S107/S111, thereby suppressing FOXA2 transactivation activity and leading to decreased NUMB expression, and further activates the downstream NOTCH pathway and promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, we found that levels of IKKα, pFOXA2 (S107/111), and activated NOTCH1 were significantly higher in hepatocellular carcinoma tumors than in normal liver tissues and that pFOXA2 (S107/111) expression was positively correlated with IKKα and activated NOTCH1 expression in tumor tissues. Therefore, dysregulation of NUMB-mediated suppression of NOTCH1 by TNFα/IKKα-associated FOXA2 inhibition likely contributes to inflammation-mediated cancer pathogenesis. Here, we report a TNFα/IKKα/FOXA2/NUMB/NOTCH1 pathway that is critical for inflammation-mediated tumorigenesis and may provide a target for clinical intervention in human cancer.

  6. Manipulation of the Gut Microbiota Reveals Role in Colon Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackular, Joseph P.; Baxter, Nielson T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT There is growing evidence that individuals with colonic adenomas and carcinomas harbor a distinct microbiota. Alterations to the gut microbiota may allow the outgrowth of bacterial populations that induce genomic mutations or exacerbate tumor-promoting inflammation. In addition, it is likely that the loss of key bacterial populations may result in the loss of protective functions that are normally provided by the microbiota. We explored the role of the gut microbiota in colon tumorigenesis by using an inflammation-based murine model. We observed that perturbing the microbiota with different combinations of antibiotics reduced the number of tumors at the end of the model. Using the random forest machine learning algorithm, we successfully modeled the number of tumors that developed over the course of the model on the basis of the initial composition of the microbiota. The timing of antibiotic treatment was an important determinant of tumor outcome, as colon tumorigenesis was arrested by the use of antibiotics during the early inflammation period of the murine model. Together, these results indicate that it is possible to predict colon tumorigenesis on the basis of the composition of the microbiota and that altering the gut microbiota can alter the course of tumorigenesis. IMPORTANCE Mounting evidence indicates that alterations to the gut microbiota, the complex community of bacteria that inhabits the gastrointestinal tract, are strongly associated with the development of colorectal cancer. We used antibiotic perturbations to a murine model of inflammation-driven colon cancer to generate eight starting communities that resulted in various severities of tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we were able to quantitatively predict the final number of tumors on the basis of the initial composition of the gut microbiota. These results further bolster the evidence that the gut microbiota is involved in mediating the development of colorectal cancer. As a final proof of

  7. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates radiation-induced invasiveness through the SDF-1α/CXCR4 pathway in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; He, Yan; Ji, Jianfeng; Yao, Yifan; Shen, Wenhao; Luo, Jialin; Zhu, Wei; Cao, Han; Geng, Yangyang; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping; Ding, Wei-Qun

    2015-05-10

    Radiotherapy is an important procedure for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, recent evidence has shown that irradiation can promote the invasion and metastasis of several types of cancer, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which radiation enhances the invasiveness of NSCLC cells. We found that after irradiation, hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) was increased and translocated into the nucleus, where it bound to the hypoxia response element (HRE) in the CXCR4 promoter and promoted the transcription of CXCR4. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) also plays a role in the radiation-induced expression of CXCR4. Our results revealed that 2 Gy X-ray irradiation promoted the metastasis and invasiveness of H1299, A549 and H460 cells, which were significantly enhanced by SDF-1α treatment. Blocking the SDF-1α/CXCR4 interaction could suppress the radiation-induced invasiveness of NSCLC cells. The PI3K/pAkt and MAPK/pERK1/2 pathways were found to be involved in radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression. In vivo, irradiation promoted the colonization of H1299 cells in the liver and lung, which was mediated by CXCR4. Altogether, our findings have elucidated the underlying mechanisms of the irradiation-enhanced invasiveness of NSCLC cells.

  8. Anaplastic thyroid cancer, tumorigenesis and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, J P

    2010-03-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is a fatal endocrine malignancy. Current therapy fails to significantly improve survival. Recent insights into thyroid tumorigenesis, post-malignant dedifferentiation and mode of metastatic activity offer new therapeutic strategies.

  9. The roles of PIKE in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi QI; Keqiang YE

    2013-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is the process by which normal cells evolve the capacity to evade and overcome the constraints usually placed upon their growth and survival.To ensure the integrity of organs and tissues,the balance of cell proliferation and cell death is tightly maintained.The proteins controlling this balance are either considered oncogenes,which promote tumorigenesis,or tumor suppressors,which prevent tumorigenesis.Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enhancer (PIKE) is a family of GTP-binding proteins that possess anti-apoptotic functions and play an important role in the central nervous system.Notably,accumulating evidence suggests that PIKE is a proto-oncogene involved in tumor progression.The PIKE gene (CENTG1) is amplified in a variety of human cancers,leading to the resistance against apoptosis and the enhancement of invasion.In this review,we will summarize the functions of PIKE proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss their potential implications in cancer therapy.

  10. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with aura is prevalent in high-altitude populations suggesting an association between migraine aura and hypoxia. We investigated whether experimental hypoxia triggers migraine and aura attacks in patients suffering from migraine with aura. We also investigated the metabolic and vascular...... response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...... in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...

  11. Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis: good and evil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krock, Bryan L; Skuli, Nicolas; Simon, M Celeste

    2011-12-01

    The vascular network delivers oxygen (O(2)) and nutrients to all cells within the body. It is therefore not surprising that O(2) availability serves as a primary regulator of this complex organ. Most transcriptional responses to low O(2) are mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), highly conserved transcription factors that control the expression of numerous angiogenic, metabolic, and cell cycle genes. Accordingly, the HIF pathway is currently viewed as a master regulator of angiogenesis. HIF modulation could provide therapeutic benefit for a wide array of pathologies, including cancer, ischemic heart disease, peripheral artery disease, wound healing, and neovascular eye diseases. Hypoxia promotes vessel growth by upregulating multiple pro-angiogenic pathways that mediate key aspects of endothelial, stromal, and vascular support cell biology. Interestingly, recent studies show that hypoxia influences additional aspects of angiogenesis, including vessel patterning, maturation, and function. Through extensive research, the integral role of hypoxia and HIF signaling in human disease is becoming increasingly clear. Consequently, a thorough understanding of how hypoxia regulates angiogenesis through an ever-expanding number of pathways in multiple cell types will be essential for the identification of new therapeutic targets and modalities.

  12. Cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 deletion enhances colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilsley, Jillian N M; Nakanishi, Masako; Flynn, Christopher; Belinsky, Glenn S; De Guise, Sylvain; Adib, John N; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Bonventre, Joseph V; Rosenberg, Daniel W

    2005-04-01

    Cellular pools of free arachidonic acid are tightly controlled through enzymatic release of the fatty acid and subsequent utilization by downstream enzymes including the cyclooxygenases. Arachidonic acid cleavage from membrane phospholipids is accomplished by the actions of phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)). Upon release, free arachidonic acid provides substrate for the synthesis of eicosanoids. However, under certain conditions, arachidonic acid may participate in ceramide-mediated apoptosis. Disruption of arachidonic acid homeostasis can shift the balance of cell turnover in favor of tumorigenesis, via overproduction of tumor-promoting eicosanoids or alternatively by limiting proapoptotic signals. In the following study, we evaluated the influence of genetic deletion of a key intracellular phospholipase, cytoplasmic PLA(2) (cPLA(2)), on azoxymethane-induced colon tumorigenesis. Heterozygous and null mice, upon treatment with the organotropic colon carcinogen, azoxymethane, developed a significant (P < 0.05) increase in colon tumor multiplicity (7.2-fold and 5.5-fold, respectively) relative to their wild-type littermates. This enhanced tumor sensitivity may be explained, in part, by the attenuated levels of apoptosis observed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end labeling staining within the colonic epithelium of heterozygous and null mice ( approximately 50% of wild type). The lower frequency of apoptotic cells corresponded with reduced ceramide levels (69% and 46% of wild-type littermates, respectively). Remarkably, increased tumorigenesis resulting from cPLA(2) deletion occurred despite a significant reduction in prostaglandin E(2) production, even in cyclooxygenase-2-overexpressing tumors. These data contribute new information that supports a fundamental role of cPLA(2) in the control of arachidonic acid homeostasis and cell turnover. Our findings indicate that the proapoptotic role of cPLA(2) in the colon may supercede its contribution to

  13. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  14. DNA Methylation in Thyroid Tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen, Josena K., E-mail: jstephe2@hfhs.org [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Chitale, Dhananjay [Department of Pathology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States); Narra, Vinod [Essex Surgical Associates, PC, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States); Chen, Kang Mei; Sawhney, Raja; Worsham, Maria J. [Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)

    2011-03-29

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine cancer with 1,690 deaths each year. There are four main types of which the papillary and follicular types together account for >90% followed by medullary cancers with 3% to 5% and anaplastic carcinomas making up <3%. Epigenetic events of DNA hypermethylation are emerging as promising molecular targets for cancer detection. Our immediate and long term goal is to identify DNA methylation markers for early detection of thyroid cancer. This pilot study comprised of 21 patients to include 11 papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 2 follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 5 normal thyroid cases, and 3 hyperthyroid cases. Aberrant promoter methylation was examined in 24 tumor suppressor genes using the methylation specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) assay and in the NIS gene using methylation-specific PCR (MSP). The frequently methylated genes were CASP8 (17/21), RASSF1 (16/21) and NIS (9/21). In the normal samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 5/5, 4/5 and 1/5 respectively. In the hyperthyroid samples, CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were methylated in 3/3, 2/3 and 1/3 respectively. In the thyroid cancers, CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS were methylated in 9/13, 10/13, and 7/13 respectively. CASP8, RASSF1 and NIS were also methylated in concurrently present normal thyroid tissue in 3/11, 4/11 and 3/11 matched thyroid cancer cases (matched for presence of both normal thyroid tissue and thyroid cancer), respectively. Our data suggests that aberrant methylation of CASP8, RASSF1, and NIS maybe an early change in thyroid tumorigenesis regardless of cell type.

  15. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases. CONCLUSIONS: These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  16. Tumor hypoxia induces nuclear paraspeckle formation through HIF-2α dependent transcriptional activation of NEAT1 leading to cancer cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhry, H; Albukhari, A; Morotti, M; Haider, S; Moralli, D; Smythies, J; Schödel, J; Green, C M; Camps, C; Buffa, F; Ratcliffe, P; Ragoussis, J; Harris, A L; Mole, D R

    2015-08-20

    Activation of cellular transcriptional responses, mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), is common in many types of cancer, and generally confers a poor prognosis. Known to induce many hundreds of protein-coding genes, HIF has also recently been shown to be a key regulator of the non-coding transcriptional response. Here, we show that NEAT1 long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is a direct transcriptional target of HIF in many breast cancer cell lines and in solid tumors. Unlike previously described lncRNAs, NEAT1 is regulated principally by HIF-2 rather than by HIF-1. NEAT1 is a nuclear lncRNA that is an essential structural component of paraspeckles and the hypoxic induction of NEAT1 induces paraspeckle formation in a manner that is dependent upon both NEAT1 and on HIF-2. Paraspeckles are multifunction nuclear structures that sequester transcriptionally active proteins as well as RNA transcripts that have been subjected to adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing. We show that the nuclear retention of one such transcript, F11R (also known as junctional adhesion molecule 1, JAM1), in hypoxia is dependent upon the hypoxic increase in NEAT1, thereby conferring a novel mechanism of HIF-dependent gene regulation. Induction of NEAT1 in hypoxia also leads to accelerated cellular proliferation, improved clonogenic survival and reduced apoptosis, all of which are hallmarks of increased tumorigenesis. Furthermore, in patients with breast cancer, high tumor NEAT1 expression correlates with poor survival. Taken together, these results indicate a new role for HIF transcriptional pathways in the regulation of nuclear structure and that this contributes to the pro-tumorigenic hypoxia-phenotype in breast cancer.

  17. Hypoxia and prostaglandin E receptor 4 signalling pathways synergise to promote endometrial adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumour growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob D Catalano

    Full Text Available The prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS pathway is a potent driver of tumour development in humans by enhancing the biosynthesis and signalling of prostaglandin (PG E(2. PTGS2 expression and PGE(2 biosynthesis is elevated in endometrial adenocarcinoma, however the mechanism whereby PTGS and PGE(2 regulate endometrial tumour growth is unknown. Here we investigated (a the expression profile of the PGE synthase enzymes (PTGES, PTGES-2, PTGES-3 and PGE receptors (PTGER1-4 in endometrial adenocarcinomas compared with normal endometrium and (b the role of PTGER4 in endometrial tumorigenesis in vivo. We found elevated expression of PTGES2 and PTGER4 and suppression of PTGER1 and PTGER3 in endometrial adenocarcinomas compared with normal endometrium. Using WT Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cells and Ishikawa cells stably transfected with the full length PTGER4 cDNA (PTGER4 cells xenografted in the dorsal flanks of nude mice, we show that PTGER4 rapidly and significantly enhances tumour growth rate. Coincident with enhanced PTGER4-mediated tumour growth we found elevated expression of PTGS2 in PTGER4 xenografts compared with WT xenografts. Furthermore we found that the augmented growth rate of the PTGER4 xenografts was not due to enhanced angiogenesis, but regulated by an increased proliferation index and hypoxia. In vitro, we found that PGE(2 and hypoxia independently induce expression of PTGER4 indicating two independent pathways regulating prostanoid receptor expression. Finally we have shown that PGE(2 and hypoxia synergise to promote cellular proliferation of endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

  18. Hypoxia and brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Luiten, P.

    1996-01-01

    Hypoxia threatens brain function during the entire life-span starting from early fetal age up to senescence. This review compares the short-term, long-term and life-spanning effects of fetal chronic hypoxia and neonatal anoxia on several behavioural paradigms including novelty-induced spontaneous an

  19. Creatine monohydrate supplementation for 10 weeks mediates neuroprotection and improves learning/memory following neonatal hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy in female albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allah Yar, Razia; Akbar, Atif; Iqbal, Furhan

    2015-01-21

    Currently there are no uniform standard treatments for newborn suffering from cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and to find new and effective strategies for treating the HI injury remains a key direction for future research. Present study was designed to demonstrate that optimal dose (1 or 3%) of creatine monohydrate (Cr) for the treatment of neonatal HI in female albino mice. On postnatal day 10, animals were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by 8% hypoxia for 25 minutes. Following weaning on postnatal day 20, mice were divided into three treatments on the basis of diet supplementation (Normal rodent diet, 1% and 3% creatine supplemented diet) for 10 week. A battery of neurological tests (Rota rod, open field and Morris water maze) was used to demonstrate effect of Cr supplementation on neurofunction and infarct size following HI. Open field test results indicated that Cr supplementation had significantly improved locomotory and exploratory behavior in subjects. It was observed that Cr treated mice showed better neuromuscular coordination (rota rod) and improved spatial memory (Morris Water Maze test). A significant affect of creatine supplementation in reducing infarct size was also observed. Post hoc analysis of post hoc multiple comparisons revealed that mice supplemented with 3% Cr for 10 weeks performed better during Morris water maze test while 1% Cr supplementation improved the exploratory behavior and gain in body weight than control group indicating that Cr supplementation has the potential to improve the neurofunction following neonatal brain damage. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Brain and Memory.

  20. Epigenetic induction of epithelial to mesenchymal transition by LCN2 mediates metastasis and tumorigenesis, which is abrogated by NF-κB inhibitor BRM270 in a xenograft model of lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongre, Raj Kumar; Sodhi, Simrinder Singh; Sharma, Neelesh; Ghosh, Mrinmoy; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Nameun; Park, Yang Ho; Shin, Young Gyu; Kim, Sung Jin; Jiao, Zhang Jiao; Huynh, Do Luong; Jeong, Dong Kee

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cancer stem-like cells (TICSCs) have recently become the object of intensive study. Human-Lipocalin-2 (hLCN2) acts as a biomarker for cancers. The aim of the present study was to explore new insights regarding the potential role of LCN2 in inducing epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) by transfecting LCN2 into CD133+-A549-TICSCs and its cross-talk with the NF-κB signaling pathway in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Furthermore, EMT was confirmed by transcriptomic analysis, immunoblotting and immunocyto/histochemical analyses. Tumorigenesis and metastasis were confirmed by molecular therapeutics tracer 2DG infrared optical probe in BALB/cSIc-nude mice. It was observed that the CD133+-expressing-LCN2-A549 TICSCs population increased in adenocarcinoma of the lung compared to the normal lung tissue. The expressions of genes involved in stemness, adhesion, motility and drug efflux was higher in these cells than in their non-LCN2 expressing counterparts. The present study revealed that elevated expression of LCN2 significantly induced metastasis via EMT. Overexpression of LCN2 significantly increased stemness and tumor metastasis by modulating NF-κB cellular signaling. BRM270, a novel inhibitor of NF-κB plays a significant role in the EMT reversal. BRM270, a naturaceutical induces cell shrinkage, karyorrhexis and programmed cell death (PCD) which were observed by Hoechst 33342 staining while flow cytometry analysis showed significant (P<0.05) decrease in cell population from G0-G1 phases. Also, 2DG guided in vivo model revealed that BRRM270 significantly (P<0.0003) reduced tumor metastasis and increased percent survival in real-time with complete resection. An elaborate study on the novel concept with respect to linking of naturaceutics as selective and potential anticancer agent that eliminates the elevated LCN2 induced EMT and tumor dissemination through cooperation with the NF-κB signaling as the baseline data for the planning of new

  1. Effects of the interannual variations in the flood pulse mediated by hypoxia tolerance: the case of the fish assemblages in the upper Paraná River floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Petry

    Full Text Available The effects of the duration of the floods on abiotic variables and attributes of species tolerant and intolerant to hypoxia (STH and SIH respectively were evaluated in rivers and lakes of the upper Paraná River. Fish were sampled once a year, in six sampling stations, during the high water period from 2000 to 2003. There were overall reductions in dissolved oxygen levels and increases in transparency of water in lakes in years of moderate floods. The duration of floods influenced species differentially based on their tolerance to hypoxia: in moderate floods, richness of STH increased and numerical abundance and biomass of SIH reduced significantly. Opposite relationships were detected between dissolved oxygen and the attributes of STH and SIH. Dissolved oxygen was the best predictor of variability of STH and SIH in years of moderate floods, whereas water transparency predicted significant amounts of STH in years of short floods. Being positively affected by dissolved oxygen reductions, STH seem to take advantages in persisting in seasonally harsh lentic habitats. The incorporation of abiotic data as well the differential tolerance of species to hypoxia would improve further investigations of the effects of interannual variations in the flood pulse on tropical fish assemblagesOs efeitos da duração da cheia sobre algumas variáveis abióticas e atributos das assembleias de peixes (espécies tolerantes e intolerantes à hipóxia, STH e SIH, respectivamente foram avaliados em rios e lagoas do alto rio Paraná. Os peixes foram amostrados uma vez ao ano, em seis localidades, durante o período de águas altas entre 2000 e 2003. Houve reduções generalizadas nos níveis de oxigênio dissolvido e aumentos na transparência da água em lagos em anos de cheias moderadas. A duração das cheias influenciou as espécies diferencialmente em função de sua tolerância à hipóxia: em anos de cheias moderadas, a riqueza das STH aumentou e a abund

  2. Quercetin induces protective autophagy in gastric cancer cells: involvement of Akt-mTOR- and hypoxia-induced factor 1α-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Liu, Rui; Li, Jingyi; Mao, Jiali; Lei, Yunlong; Wu, Jinhua; Zeng, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Hong; Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-09-01

    Quercetin, a dietary antioxidant present in fruits and vegetables, is a promising cancer chemopreventive agent that inhibits tumor promotion by inducing cell cycle arrest and promoting apoptotic cell death. In this study, we examined the biological activities of quercetin against gastric cancer. Our studies demonstrated that exposure of gastric cancer cells AGS and MKN28 to quercetin resulted in pronounced pro-apoptotic effect through activating the mitochondria pathway. Meanwhile, treatment with quercetin induced appearance of autophagic vacuoles, formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs), conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, recruitment of LC3-II to the autophagosomes as well as activation of autophagy genes, suggesting that quercetin initiates the autophagic progression in gastric cancer cells. Furthermore, either administration of autophagic inhibitor chloroquine or selective ablation of atg5 or beclin 1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) could augment quercetin-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that autophagy plays a protective role against quercetin-induced apoptosis. Moreover, functional studies revealed that quercetin activated autophagy by modulation of Akt-mTOR signaling and hypoxia-induced factor 1α (HIF-1α) signaling. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence for occurrence of quercetin-induced apoptosis and autophagy in vivo. Together, our studies provided new insights regarding the biological and anti-proliferative activities of quercetin against gastric cancer, and may contribute to rational utility and pharmacological study of quercetin in future anti-cancer research.

  3. Complexity, dynamic cellular network, and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, P

    1997-01-01

    A holistic approach to tumorigenesis is proposed. The main element of the model is the existence of dynamic cellular network. This network comprises a molecular and an energetistic structure of a cell connected through the multidirectional flow of information. The interactions within dynamic cellular network are complex, stochastic, nonlinear, and also involve quantum effects. From this non-reductionist perspective, neither tumorigenesis can be limited to the genetic aspect, nor the initial event must be of molecular nature, nor mutations and epigenetic factors are mutually exclusive, nor a link between cause and effect can be established. Due to complexity, an unstable stationary state of dynamic cellular network rather than a group of unrelated genes determines the phenotype of normal and transformed cells. This implies relativity of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A bifurcation point is defined as an unstable state of dynamic cellular network leading to the other phenotype-stationary state. In particular, the bifurcation point may be determined by a change of expression of a single gene. Then, the gene is called bifurcation point gene. The unstable stationary state facilitates the chaotic dynamics. This may result in a fractal dimension of both normal and tumor tissues. The co-existence of chaotic dynamics and complexity is the essence of cellular processes and shapes differentiation, morphogenesis, and tumorigenesis. In consequence, tumorigenesis is a complex, unpredictable process driven by the interplay between self-organisation and selection.

  4. Hypoxia Promotes Gastric Cancer Malignancy Partly through the HIF-1α Dependent Transcriptional Activation of the Long Non-coding RNA GAPLINC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhao, Xihe; Zou, Huawei; Bai, Rubing; Yang, Keyu; Tian, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activates the transcription of genes involved in cancer progression. Recently, HIF was reported to regulate the transcription of non-coding RNAs. Here, we show that the transcription of a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), Gastric Adenocarcinoma Associated, Positive CD44 Regulator, Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA (GAPLINC), is directly activated by HIF-1α in gastric cancer (GC). GAPLINC was overexpressed in GC tissues and promoted tumor migration and invasive behavior. GAPLINC overexpression was associated with poor prognosis in GC patients. Luciferase reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that HIF-1α binds to the promoter region of GAPLINC and activates its transcription. GAPLINC knockdown inhibited hypoxia-induced tumor proliferation in vivo. Taken together, our results identified a novel role for HIF transcriptional pathways in GC tumorigenesis mediated by the regulation of the lncRNA GAPLINC, and suggest GAPLINC as a novel therapeutic target for reversing chemoradioresistance and prolonging survival. PMID:27729869

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  6. The gut microbiome modulates colon tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zackular, Joseph P; Baxter, Nielson T; Iverson, Kathryn D; Sadler, William D; Petrosino, Joseph F; Chen, Grace Y; Schloss, Patrick D

    2013-11-05

    Recent studies have shown that individuals with colorectal cancer have an altered gut microbiome compared to healthy controls. It remains unclear whether these differences are a response to tumorigenesis or actively drive tumorigenesis. To determine the role of the gut microbiome in the development of colorectal cancer, we characterized the gut microbiome in a murine model of inflammation-associated colorectal cancer that mirrors what is seen in humans. We followed the development of an abnormal microbial community structure associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis in the colon. Tumor-bearing mice showed enrichment in operational taxonomic units (OTUs) affiliated with members of the Bacteroides, Odoribacter, and Akkermansia genera and decreases in OTUs affiliated with members of the Prevotellaceae and Porphyromonadaceae families. Conventionalization of germfree mice with microbiota from tumor-bearing mice significantly increased tumorigenesis in the colon compared to that for animals colonized with a healthy gut microbiome from untreated mice. Furthermore, at the end of the model, germfree mice colonized with microbiota from tumor-bearing mice harbored a higher relative abundance of populations associated with tumor formation in conventional animals. Manipulation of the gut microbiome with antibiotics resulted in a dramatic decrease in both the number and size of tumors. Our results demonstrate that changes in the gut microbiome associated with inflammation and tumorigenesis directly contribute to tumorigenesis and suggest that interventions affecting the composition of the microbiome may be a strategy to prevent the development of colon cancer. The trillions of bacteria that live in the gut, known collectively as the gut microbiome, are important for normal functioning of the intestine. There is now growing evidence that disruptive changes in the gut microbiome are strongly associated with the development colorectal cancer. However, how the gut microbiome

  7. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Receptor Signaling is Necessary for Epidermal Growth Factor Mediated Proliferation of SVZ Neural Precursors Following Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhivyaa eAlagappan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed the importance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF and epidermal growth factor (EGF receptor co-signaling for rat neural precursor (NP cell proliferation and self-renewal in the context of a developmental brain injury that is associated with cerebral palsy. Consistent with previous studies, we found that there is an increase in the in vitro growth of subventricular zone (SVZ NPs isolated acutely after cerebral hypoxia-ischemia; however, when cultured in medium that is insufficient to stimulate the IGF type 1 receptor, neurosphere formation and the proliferative capacity of those NPs was severely curtailed. This reduced growth capacity could not be attributed simply to failure to survive. The growth and self-renewal of the NPs could be restored by addition of both IGF-I and IGF-II. Since the size of the neurosphere is predominantly due to cell proliferation we hypothesized that the IGFs were regulating progression through the cell cycle. Analyses of cell cycle progression revealed that IGF-1R activation together with EGFR co-signaling decreased the percentage of cells in G1 and enhanced cell progression into S and G2. This was accompanied by increases in expression of cyclin D1, phosphorylated histone 3 and phosphorylated Rb. Based on these data we conclude that coordinate signaling between the EGF receptor and the IGF type 1 receptor is necessary for the normal proliferation of NPs as well as for their reactive expansion after injury. These data indicate that manipulations that maintain or amplify IGF signaling in the brain during recovery from developmental brain injuries will enhance the production of new brain cells to improve neurological function in children who are at risk for developing cerebral palsy.

  8. Hypoxia-regulated microRNAs in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guomin SHEN; Xiaobo LI; Yong-feng JIA; Gary A PIAZZA; Yaguang XI

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the tumor microenvironment by allowing the development and maintenance of cancer cells,but the regulatory mechanisms by which tumor cells adapt to hypoxic conditions are not yet well understood.MicroRNAs are recognized as a new class of master regulators that control gene expression and are responsible for many normal and pathological cellular processes.Studies have shown that hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) regulates a panel of microRNAs,whereas some of microRNAs target HIF1.The interaction between microRNAs and HIF1 can account for many vital events relevant to tumorigenesis,such as angiogenesis,metabolism,apoptosis,cell cycle regulation,proliferation,metastasis,and resistance to anticancer therapy.This review will summarize recent findings on the roles of hypoxia and microRNAs in human cancer and illustrate the machinery by which microRNAs interact with hypoxia in tumor cells,It is expected to update our knowledge about the regulatory roles of microRNAs in regulating tumor microenvironments and thus benefit the development of new anticancer drugs.

  9. Inhibition of lung tumorigenesis by tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chung S; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-yu; Lu, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Tea and tea constituents have been shown by different investigators to inhibit lung tumorigenesis in different animal model systems. This includes lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice induced by 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), N-nitrosodiethylamine, benzo[a]pyrene, N-nitrosomethylurea, or cisplatin. Inhibition of lung tumorigenesis has also been demonstrated in C3H mice treated with N-nitrosodiethylamine. In most of these experiments, reduction in tumor number and tumor size has been observed in the tea-treated group, and in some experiments, decreased tumor incidence has also been observed. The green tea constituent, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), and the black tea constituent, theaflavins, have also been shown to be effective. Black tea preparations have been shown to reduce the incidence and number of spontaneously generated lung adenocarcinomas and rhabdomyosarcoma in A/J mice, as well as inhibit the progression of lung adenoma to adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms for the inhibitory action have not been well elucidated. It may be related to the antiproliferative, proapoptotic, and antiangiogenic activities of tea constituents that have been demonstrated in some experiments. These activities may be a result of the inhibition of key protein kinases involved in signal transduction and cell cycle regulation. Tea catechins, such as EGCG, have been suggested to be the effective components. However, a study suggests that caffeine is the key effective constituent for the inhibitory activity of lung tumorigenesis in Fisher 344 rats by black tea. In many of the experiments, tea consumption resulted in the reduction of body fat and body weight; these factors may also contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis.

  10. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  11. 17β-Estradiol and/or Estrogen Receptor β Attenuate the Autophagic and Apoptotic Effects Induced by Prolonged Hypoxia Through HIF-1α-Mediated BNIP3 and IGFBP-3 Signaling Blockage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Jine-Yuan Hsieh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The risk of heart disease is higher in males than in females. However, this advantage of females declines with increasing age, presumably a consequence of decreased estrogen secretion and malfunctioning of the estrogen receptor. We previously demonstrated that 17β-estradiol (E2 prevents cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, autophagy and apoptosis via estrogen receptor α (ERα, but the effects of ERβ on myocardial injury remained elusive. The present paper thus, investigated the cardioprotective effects of estrogen (E2 and ERβ against hypoxia-induced cell death. Methods: Transient transfection of Tet-On ERβ gene construct was used to overexpress ERβ in hypoxia-treated H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells. Results: Our data revealed that IGF1R, Akt phosphorylation and Bcl-2 expression are enhanced by ERβ in H9c2 cells. Moreover, ERβ overexpression reduced accumulation of hypoxia-related proteins, autophagy-related proteins and mitochondria-apoptotic proteins and enhanced the protein levels of Bcl-2, pAkt and Bad under hypoxic condition. In neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs, we observed that hypoxia induced cell apoptosis as measured by TUNEL staining, and E2 and/or ERβ could totally abolish hypoxia-induced apoptosis. The suppressive effects of E2 and/or ERβ in hypoxia-treated NRVMs were totally reversed by ER antagonist, ICI. Taken together, E2 and/or ERβ exert the protective effect through repressed hypoxia-inducible HIF-1α, BNIP3 and IGFBP-3 levels to restrain the hypoxia-induced autophagy and apoptosis effects in H9c2 cardiomyoblast cells. Conclusion: The results suggest that females probably could tolerate better prolonged hypoxia condition than males, and E2/ERβ treatment could be a potential therapy to prevent hypoxia-induced heart damage.”

  12. Wnt signaling and colon tumorigenesis - A view from the periphery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Antony W., E-mail: burgess@ludwig.edu.au [Parkville Branch, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne, 3050 (Australia); Faux, Maree C. [Parkville Branch, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Melbourne, 3050 (Australia); Layton, Meredith J. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Melbourne, 3800 (Australia); Ramsay, Robert G. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, 3002 (Australia); Pathology Department, the University of Melbourne, Parkville, 3050 (Australia)

    2011-11-15

    In this brief overview we discuss the association between Wnt signaling and colon cell biology and tumorigenesis. Our current understanding of the role of Apc in the {beta}-catenin destruction complex is compared with potential roles for Apc in cell adhesion and migration. The requirement for phosphorylation in the proteasomal-mediated degradation of {beta}-catenin is contrasted with roles for phospho-{beta}-catenin in the activation of transcription, cell adhesion and migration. The synergy between Myb and {beta}-catenin regulation of transcription in crypt stem cells during Wnt signaling is discussed. Finally, potential effects of growth factor regulatory systems, Apc or truncated-Apc on crypt morphogenesis, stem cell localization and crypt fission are considered.

  13. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decre...

  14. The local corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 signalling pathway partly mediates hypoxia-induced increases in lipolysis via the cAMP-protein kinase A signalling pathway in white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanlei; Qu, Zhuan; Chen, Nan; Gong, Hui; Song, Mintao; Chen, Xuequn; Du, Jizeng; Xu, Chengli

    2014-07-05

    Our objective was to investigate the mechanisms by which the endogenous CRHR2 in white adipose tissue (WAT) regulates metabolic activities associated with lipogenesis and lipolysis under continuous exposure to hypoxia. We found that hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 5000 m significantly reduced the body weight, food intake, and WAT mass of rats. Hypoxia also accelerated lipolysis and suppressed lipogenesis in WAT. Pretreatment with astressin 2B, a selective CRHR2 antagonist, partly but significantly attenuated the hypoxia-induced reductions in body weight and WAT mass by blocking the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA)-hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL)/perilipin signalling pathway. Astressin 2B treatment failed to attenuate hypoxia induced lipogenic inhibition. In conclusion, activation of endogenous WAT Ucn2/3 autocrine/paracrine pathway was involved in hypoxia induced lipolysis via CRHR2 - cAMP-PKA signalling pathway. This study provides the novel understanding of local CRHR2 signaling pathway playing important role in WAT loss and lipid metabolism under hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Menin represses tumorigenesis via repressing cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Ting; Hua, Xianxin

    2011-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) results from mutations in the tumor suppressor gene, MEN1, which encodes nuclear protein menin. Menin is important for suppressing tumorigenesis in various endocrine and certain non-endocrine tissues. Although menin suppresses MEN1 through a variety of mechanisms including regulating apoptosis and DNA repair, the role of menin in regulating cell proliferation is one of the best-studied functions. Here, we focus on reviewing various mechanisms underly...

  16. Inactivating CUX1 mutations promote tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for cancer genetics is to determine which low frequency somatic mutations are drivers of tumorigenesis. Here we interrogate the genomes of 7,651 diverse human cancers to identify novel drivers and find inactivating mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor CUX1 (cut-like homeobox 1) in ~1-5% of tumors. Meta-analysis of CUX1 mutational status in 2,519 cases of myeloid malignancies reveals disruptive mutations associated with poor survival, highlighting the clinical si...

  17. Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    stem cells ( BMDC ), which then acts in a paracrine fashion on the cancer cells to enhance their invasion [7]. Interestingly the group of Karnoub showed...AD_________________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-08-1-0523 TITLE: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in...DATES COVERED 1 Aug 2008 – 31 Jul 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis 5b. GRANT

  18. RNA interference targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α via a novel multifunctional surfactant attenuates glioma growth in an intracranial mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, David L; Aguirre, Maria T; Ravichandran, Sandhya; Leishman, Lisa L; Berrondo, Claudia; Gamboa, Joseph T; Wang, Libo; King, Rose; Wang, Xuli; Tan, Mingqian; Malamas, Anthony; Lu, Zheng-Rong; Jensen, Randy L

    2015-02-01

    High-grade gliomas are the most common form of adult brain cancer, and patients have a dismal survival rate despite aggressive therapeutic measures. Intratumoral hypoxia is thought to be a main contributor to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of these tumors. Because hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is the major mediator of hypoxia-regulated cellular control, inhibition of this transcription factor may reduce glioblastoma growth. Using an orthotopic mouse model with U87-LucNeo cells, the authors used RNA interference to knock down HIF-1α in vivo. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) was packaged using a novel multifunctional surfactant, 1-(aminoethyl) iminobis[N-(oleicylcysteinylhistinyl-1-aminoethyl)propionamide] (EHCO), a nucleic acid carrier that facilitates cellular uptake and intracellular release of siRNA. Stereotactic injection was used to deliver siRNA locally through a guide-screw system, and delivery/uptake was verified by imaging of fluorescently labeled siRNA. Osmotic pumps were used for extended siRNA delivery to model a commonly used human intracranial drug-delivery technique, convection-enhanced delivery. Mice receiving daily siRNA injections targeting HIF-1α had a 79% lower tumor volume after 50 days of treatment than the controls. Levels of the HIF-1 transcriptional targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1), c-MET, and carbonic anhydrase-IX (CA-IX) and markers for cell growth (MIB-1 and microvascular density) were also significantly lower. Altering the carrier EHCO by adding polyethylene glycol significantly increased the efficacy of drug delivery and subsequent survival. Treating glioblastoma with siRNA targeting HIF-1α in vivo can significantly reduce tumor growth and increase survival in an intracranial mouse model, a finding that has direct clinical implications.

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factors - regulation, role and comparative aspects in tumourigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, A E; Kristensen, A T; Law, I;

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) play a key role in the cellular response experienced in hypoxic tumours, mediating adaptive responses that allow hypoxic cells to survive in the hostile environment. Identification and understanding of tumour hypoxia and the influence on cellular processes carries...

  1. Reactivating HIF prolyl hydroxylases under hypoxia results in metabolic catastrophe and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, D A; Frezza, C; MacKenzie, E D; Nguyen, Q D; Zheng, L; Selak, M A; Roberts, D L; Dive, C; Watson, D G; Aboagye, E O; Gottlieb, E

    2009-11-12

    Cells exposed to low-oxygen conditions (hypoxia) alter their metabolism to survive. This response, although vital during development and high-altitude survival, is now known to be a major factor in the selection of cells with a transformed metabolic phenotype during tumorigenesis. It is thought that hypoxia-selected cells have increased invasive capacity and resistance to both chemo- and radiotherapies, and therefore represent an attractive target for antitumor therapy. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) are responsible for the majority of gene expression changes under hypoxia, and are themselves controlled by the oxygen-sensing HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). It was previously shown that mutations in succinate dehydrogenase lead to the inactivation PHDs under normoxic conditions, which can be overcome by treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate derivatives. Given that solid tumors contain large regions of hypoxia, the reactivation of PHDs in these conditions could induce metabolic catastrophe and therefore prove an effective antitumor therapy. In this report we demonstrate that derivatized alpha-ketoglutarate can be used as a strategy for maintaining PHD activity under hypoxia. By increasing intracellular alpha-ketoglutarate and activating PHDs we trigger PHD-dependent reversal of HIF1 activation, and PHD-dependent hypoxic cell death. We also show that derivatized alpha-ketoglutarate can permeate multiple layers of cells, reducing HIF1alpha levels and its target genes in vivo.

  2. Comparative and Experimental Studies on the Genes Altered by Chronic Hypoxia in Human Brain Microendothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mata-Greenwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A is a master regulator of acute hypoxia; however, with chronic hypoxia, HIF1A levels return to the normoxic levels. Importantly, the genes that are involved in the cell survival and viability under chronic hypoxia are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia leads to the upregulation of a core group of genes with associated changes in the promoter DNA methylation that mediates the cell survival under hypoxia.Results : We examined the effect of chronic hypoxia (3 days; 0.5% oxygen on human brain micro endothelial cells (HBMEC viability and apoptosis. Hypoxia caused a significant reduction in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Next, we examined chronic hypoxia associated changes in transcriptome and genome-wide promoter methylation. The data obtained was compared with 16 other microarray studies on chronic hypoxia. Nine genes were altered in response to chronic hypoxia in all 17 studies. Interestingly, HIF1A was not altered with chronic hypoxia in any of the studies. Furthermore, we compared our data to three other studies that identified HIF-responsive genes by various approaches. Only two genes were found to be HIF dependent. We silenced each of these 9 genes using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Downregulation of EGLN3 significantly increased the cell death under chronic hypoxia, whereas downregulation of ERO1L, ENO2, adrenomedullin, and spag4 reduced the cell death under hypoxia.Conclusions : We provide a core group of genes that regulates cellular acclimatization under chronic hypoxic stress, and most of them are HIF independent.

  3. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  4. Identifying novel hypoxia-associated markers of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Lynda M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with poor long-term survival due to late diagnosis and development of chemoresistance. Tumour hypoxia is associated with many features of tumour aggressiveness including increased cellular proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, increased invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance, mostly mediated through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. While HIF-1α has been associated with platinum resistance in a variety of cancers, including ovarian, relatively little is known about the importance of the duration of hypoxia. Similarly, the gene pathways activated in ovarian cancer which cause chemoresistance as a result of hypoxia are poorly understood. This study aimed to firstly investigate the effect of hypoxia duration on resistance to cisplatin in an ovarian cancer chemoresistance cell line model and to identify genes whose expression was associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

  5. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  6. Innate lymphoid cells involve in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; van Velkinburgh, Jennifer C; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) promptly initiate cytokine responses to pathogen exposure in the mucosa and mucosal-associated lymphoid tissues. ILCs were recently categorized as being of the lymphoid lineage and have been classified into three groups. ILCs play important roles in immunity against pathogens, and an anti-tumor immune-related function was recently demonstrated. In this review we discuss whether and how ILCs involve in the tumorigenesis, providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying the particular functions of ILCs as well as the potential targets for tumor intervention.

  7. Miz1 is a critical repressor of cdkn1a during skin tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hönnemann

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz1 forms repressive DNA-binding complexes with the Myc, Gfi-1 and Bcl-6 oncoproteins. Known target genes of these complexes encode the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs cdkn2b (p15(Ink4, cdkn1a (p21(Cip1, and cdkn1c (p57(Kip2. Whether Miz1-mediated repression is important for control of cell proliferation in vivo and for tumor formation is unknown. Here we show that deletion of the Miz1 POZ domain, which is critical for Miz1 function, restrains the development of skin tumors in a model of chemically-induced, Ras-dependent tumorigenesis. While the stem cell compartment appears unaffected, interfollicular keratinocytes lacking functional Miz1 exhibit a reduced proliferation and an accelerated differentiation of the epidermis in response to the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA. Tumorigenesis, proliferation and normal differentiation are restored in animals lacking cdkn1a, but not in those lacking cdkn2b. Our data demonstrate that Miz1-mediated attenuation of cell cycle arrest pathways via repression of cdkn1a has a critical role during tumorigenesis in the skin.

  8. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor mediated tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The ETS family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24066765

  9. Molecular mechanisms of ETS transcription factor-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Adwitiya; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    The E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family of transcription factors is critical for development, differentiation, proliferation and also has a role in apoptosis and tissue remodeling. Changes in expression of ETS proteins therefore have a significant impact on normal physiology of the cell. Transcriptional consequences of ETS protein deregulation by overexpression, gene fusion, and modulation by RAS/MAPK signaling are linked to alterations in normal cell functions, and lead to unlimited increased proliferation, sustained angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Existing data show that ETS proteins control pathways in epithelial cells as well as stromal compartments, and the crosstalk between the two is essential for normal development and cancer. In this review, we have focused on ETS factors with a known contribution in cancer development. Instead of focusing on a prototype, we address cancer associated ETS proteins and have highlighted the diverse mechanisms by which they affect carcinogenesis. Finally, we discuss strategies for ETS factor targeting as a potential means for cancer therapeutics.

  10. FoxO3A promotes metabolic adaptation to hypoxia by antagonizing Myc function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Steen; Binderup, Tina; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of metazoan organisms to hypoxia engages a metabolic switch orchestrated by the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 mediates induction of glycolysis and active repression of mitochondrial respiration that reduces oxygen consumption and inhibits the production of potentially harmful...... tumour tissue in vivo and that FoxO3A short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing xenograft tumours are decreased in size and metabolically changed. Our findings define a novel mechanism by which FoxO3A promotes metabolic adaptation and stress resistance in hypoxia.......Exposure of metazoan organisms to hypoxia engages a metabolic switch orchestrated by the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 mediates induction of glycolysis and active repression of mitochondrial respiration that reduces oxygen consumption and inhibits the production of potentially harmful...

  11. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  12. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  13. Carotid body oxygen sensing and adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; Macías, David; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Pardal, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the principal arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Our understanding of CB function and its role in disease mechanisms has progressed considerably in the last decades, particularly in recent years. The sensory elements of the CB are the neuron-like glomus cells, which contain numerous transmitters and form synapses with afferent sensory fibers. The activation of glomus cells under hypoxia mainly depends on the modulation of O2-sensitive K(+) channels which leads to cell depolarization and the opening of Ca(2+) channels. This model of sensory transduction operates in all mammalian species studied thus far, including man. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channel function by changes in the O2 level are as yet unknown. The CB plays a fundamental role in acclimatization to sustained hypoxia. Mice with CB atrophy or patients who have undergone CB resection due to surgical treatments show a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB growth under hypoxia is supported by the existence of a resident population of neural crest-derived stem cells of glia-like phenotype. These stem cells are not highly affected by exposure to low O2 tension; however, there are abundant synapse-like contacts between the glomus cells and stem cells (chemoproliferative synapses), which may be needed to trigger progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation under hypoxia. CB hypo- or hyper-activation may also contribute to the pathogenesis of several prevalent human diseases.

  14. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors.

  15. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-07

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease.

  16. Upregulated copper transporters in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M Zimnicka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX, a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2 also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness.

  17. Glycogen synthesis is induced in hypoxia by the hypoxia-inducible factor and promotes cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffrey ePelletier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1, were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these hypoxia-preconditioned cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO2 acts as an alarm that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  18. NACK is an integral component of the Notch transcriptional activation complex and is critical for development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kelly L; Alves-Guerra, Marie-Clotilde; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Han, Xiaoqing; Ranganathan, Prathibha; Zhu, Xiaoxia; DaSilva, Thiago; Liu, Wei; Ratti, Francesca; Demarest, Renee M; Tzimas, Cristos; Rice, Meghan; Vasquez-Del Carpio, Rodrigo; Dahmane, Nadia; Robbins, David J; Capobianco, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    The Notch signaling pathway governs many distinct cellular processes by regulating transcriptional programs. The transcriptional response initiated by Notch is highly cell context dependent, indicating that multiple factors influence Notch target gene selection and activity. However, the mechanism by which Notch drives target gene transcription is not well understood. Herein, we identify and characterize a novel Notch-interacting protein, Notch activation complex kinase (NACK), which acts as a Notch transcriptional coactivator. We show that NACK associates with the Notch transcriptional activation complex on DNA, mediates Notch transcriptional activity, and is required for Notch-mediated tumorigenesis. We demonstrate that Notch1 and NACK are coexpressed during mouse development and that homozygous loss of NACK is embryonic lethal. Finally, we show that NACK is also a Notch target gene, establishing a feed-forward loop. Thus, our data indicate that NACK is a key component of the Notch transcriptional complex and is an essential regulator of Notch-mediated tumorigenesis and development.

  19. Roles of sphingosine 1-phosphate on tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsinyu; Lee

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid with a variety of biological activities.It is generated from the conversion of ceramide to sphingosine by ceramidase and the subsequent conversion of sphingosine to S1P,which is catalyzed by sphingosine kinases.Through increasing its intracellular levels by sphingolipid metabolism and binding to its cell surface receptors,S1P regulates several physiological and pathological processes,including cell proliferation,migration,angiogenesis and autophagy.These processes are responsible for tumor growth,metastasis and invasion and promote tumor survival.Since ceramide and S1P have distinct functions in regulating in cell fate decision,the balance between the ceramide/sphingosine/S1P rheostat becomes a potent therapeutic target for cancer cells.Herein,we summarize our current understanding of S1P signaling on tumorigenesis and its potential as a target for cancer therapy.

  20. The role of menin in parathyroid tumorigenesis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davenport, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism is a common disorder that involves the pathological enlargement of one or more parathyroid glands resulting in excessive production of parathyroid hormone (PTH). The exact pathogenesis of this disease remains to be fully understood. In recent years interest has focussed on the interaction between menin protein and the transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta\\/Smad signalling pathway. In vitro experimentation has demonstrated that the presence of menin is required for TGF-beta to effectively inhibit parathyroid cell proliferation and PTH production. This observation correlates with the almost universal occurrence of parathyroid tumors accompanying the inactivation of menin in multiple endocrine neoplasia Type 1 (MEN1) syndrome and the high rate of somatic menin gene mutations seen in sporadic parathyroid adenomas. This chapter aims to review the role of menin in primary hyperparathyroidism and parathyroid hormone-regulation, including the influences of MEN1 gene mutations on parathyroid cell proliferation, differentiation and tumorigenesis.

  1. Trichostatin A enhances estrogen receptor-alpha repression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells under hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyunggyun; Park, Joonwoo; Shim, Myeongguk; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2016-02-12

    Estrogen receptor (ER) is a crucial determinant of resistance to endocrine therapy, which may change during the progression of breast cancer. We previously showed that hypoxia induces ESR1 gene repression and ERα protein degradation via proteasome-mediated pathway in breast cancer cells. HDAC plays important roles in the regulation of histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification. HDAC inhibitors can induce epigenetic changes and have therapeutic potential for targeting various cancers. Trichostatin A exerts potent antitumor activities against breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this report, we show that TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level and downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxic conditions through a proteasome-mediated pathway. TSA-induced estrogen response element-driven reporter activity in the absence of estrogen was synergistically enhanced under hypoxia; however, TSA inhibited cell proliferation under both normoxia and hypoxia. Our data show that the hypoxia-induced repression of ESR1 and degradation of ERα are enhanced by concomitant treatment with TSA. These findings expand our understanding of hormone responsiveness in the tumor microenvironment; however, additional in-depth studies are required to elucidate the detailed mechanisms of TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia. - Highlights: • TSA augments ESR1 gene repression at the transcriptional level under hypoxia. • TSA downregulates ERα protein expression under hypoxia. • TSA-induced ERα regulation under hypoxia is essential for understanding the behavior and progression of breast cancer.

  2. Visceral white fat remodelling contributes to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Laureline; Thomas, Amandine; Rieusset, Jennifer; Casteilla, Louis; Levy, Patrick; Arnaud, Claire; Dematteis, Maurice

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea is a highly prevalent disease characterised by repetitive upper airway collapse during sleep leading to intermittent hypoxia. Cardiometabolic complications of sleep apnoea have been mostly attributed to intermittent hypoxia. These consequences could be mediated through intermittent hypoxia-related alterations of the visceral white fat, as it is recognised for playing an important role in inflammation, atherogenesis and insulin resistance. Epididymal adipose tissue alterations were investigated in 20-week-old nonobese male apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction 5-21%, 60-s cycle, 8 h · day(-1)) or air for 6 weeks. These adipose tissue alterations, as well as metabolic alterations and aortic atherosclerosis, were then assessed in lipectomised or sham-operated mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia or air for 6 weeks. Intermittent hypoxia induced morphological (shrunken adipocytes), functional (increased uncoupling protein-1 expression) and inflammatory (increased macrophage recruitment and secretion of interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α) remodelling of epididymal adipose tissue. Hypoxic mice presented more severe dyslipidaemia and atherosclerosis lesions and developed insulin resistance. Epididymal lipectomy attenuated both intermittent hypoxia-induced dyslipidaemia and atherogenesis, but did not improve insulin sensitivity. Our results confirmed that the dyslipidaemic and proatherogenic effects of intermittent hypoxia are partly mediated through morphological, functional and inflammatory remodelling of visceral white fat, regardless of obesity.

  3. Hypoxia-induced modulation of apoptosis and BCL-2 family proteins in different cancer cell types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Sermeus

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in the resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Moreover, according to the cell lines, hypoxia differently influences cell death. The study of the effects of hypoxia on the apoptosis induced by 5 chemotherapeutic drugs in 7 cancer cell types showed that hypoxia generally inhibited the drug-induced apoptosis. In most cases, the effect of hypoxia was the same for all the drugs in one cell type. The expression profile of 93 genes involved in apoptosis as well as the protein level of BCL-2 family proteins were then investigated. In HepG2 cells that are strongly protected against cell death by hypoxia, hypoxia decreased the abundance of nearly all the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins while none of them are decreased in A549 cells that are not protected against cell death by hypoxia. In HepG2 cells, hypoxia decreased NOXA and BAD abundance and modified the electrophoretic mobility of BIM(EL. BIM and NOXA are important mediators of etoposide-induced cell death in HepG2 cells and the hypoxia-induced modification of these proteins abundance or post-translational modifications partly account for chemoresistance. Finally, the modulation of the abundance and/or of the post-translational modifications of most proteins of the BCL-2 family by hypoxia involves p53-dependent and -independent pathways and is cell type-dependent. A better understanding of these cell-to-cell variations is crucial in order to overcome hypoxia-induced resistance and to ameliorate cancer therapy.

  4. HIF-1α介导了间歇低氧对人肺腺癌A549细胞体外生物学行为的影响∗%HIF-1αmediates effect of intermittent hypoxia on biological behavior of A549 cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨士芳; 李晓明; 安弘; 高兴林

    2016-01-01

    目的::探讨缺氧诱导因子1α( HIF-1α)是否介导间歇低氧对人肺腺癌A549细胞体外活力、凋亡以及侵袭的影响。方法:采用体外转染方法将特异性针对 HIF-1α的siRNA导入A549细胞,在间歇低氧条件下培养后通过real-time PCR和Western blot法检测 HIF-1α及其下游Bcl-2、Bax、P53、P21、VEGF的mRNA和蛋白表达;通过MTT法和流式细胞术分别检测A549细胞的活力、凋亡及细胞周期;通过Transwell小室检测A549细胞的侵袭能力。结果:未转染HIF-1α-siRNA的A549细胞[间歇低氧空白对照组( IHC组)、间歇低氧空载体对照组( IHE组)及间歇低氧阴性对照组( IHN组)]经间歇低氧干预后的HIF-1α、Bcl-2及VEGF表达均明显高于常氧对照组( RA组),Bax及P21表达均明显低于RA组(P<0.05),而转染HIF-1α-siRNA的A549细胞[间歇低氧siRNA组(IHS组)]较IHC组、IHE组及IHN组经间歇低氧干预后的HIF-1α、BCL-2及VEGF表达均明显下调,Bax及P21表达较均明显上调(P<0.05);所有间歇低氧组A549细胞的P53表达均较RA组升高(P<0.05),但各间歇低氧组之间无显著性差异。 IHC组、IHE组及IHN组A549细胞经间歇低氧干预后较RA组的细胞活力增强,凋亡率下降,侵袭力增强(P<0.05),而IHS组A549细胞经间歇低氧干预后细胞周期被阻滞于G1期,较未转染组的细胞活力下降,凋亡增加,侵袭能力下降(P<0.05)。结论:间歇低氧可通过HIF-1α途径调控其下游基因表达进而促进A549细胞的活力和转移;通过RNA干扰技术造成HIF-1α基因沉默可以抑制间歇低氧引起的A549细胞生长和转移。%[ ABSTRACT] AIM:To investigate whether hypoxia-inducible factor 1α( HIF-1α) mediates the effect of intermit-tent hypoxia on A549 cell viability, apoptosis and invasive ability in vitro. METHODS: A549 cells were transfected with HIF-1α-siRNA and cultured under intermittent hypoxia. The expression of HIF-1αand its downstream genes, such as

  5. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  6. Intricacies of hedgehog signaling pathways: A perspective in tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kar, Swayamsiddha; Deb, Moonmoon; Sengupta, Dipta; Shilpi, Arunima; Bhutia, Sujit Kumar [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India); Patra, Samir Kumar, E-mail: samirp@nitrkl.ac.in [Epigenetics and Cancer Research Laboratory, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Group, Department of Life Science, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, Odisha 769008 (India)

    2012-10-01

    The hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is a crucial negotiator of developmental proceedings in the embryo governing a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue patterning. The overall activity of the pathway is significantly curtailed after embryogenesis as well as in adults, yet it retains many of its functional capacities. However, aberration in HH signaling mediates the initiation, proliferation and continued sustenance of malignancy in different tissues to varying degrees through different mechanisms. In this review, we provide an overview of the role of constitutively active aberrant HH signaling pathway in different types of human cancer and the underlying molecular and genetic mechanisms that drive tumorigenesis in that particular tissue. An insight into the various modes of anomalous HH signaling in different organs will provide a comprehensive knowledge of the pathway in these tissues and open a window for individually tailored, tissue-specific therapeutic interventions. The synergistic cross talking of HH pathway with many other regulatory molecules and developmentally inclined signaling pathways may offer many avenues for pharmacological advances. Understanding the molecular basis of abnormal HH signaling in cancer will provide an opportunity to inhibit the deregulated pathway in many aggressive and therapeutically challenging cancers where promising options are not available.

  7. Acidosis, hypoxia and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2010-11-01

    Bone homeostasis is profoundly affected by local pH and oxygen tension. It has long been recognised that the skeleton contains a large reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to neutralise metabolic H(+) if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. Bone cells are extremely sensitive to the direct effects of pH: acidosis inhibits mineral deposition by osteoblasts but it activates osteoclasts to resorb bone and other mineralised tissues. These reciprocal responses act to maximise the availability of OH(-) ions from hydroxyapatite in solution, where they can buffer excess H(+). The mechanisms by which bone cells sense small pH changes are likely to be complex, involving ion channels and receptors in the cell membrane, as well as direct intracellular effects. The importance of oxygen tension in the skeleton has also long been known. Recent work shows that hypoxia blocks the growth and differentiation of osteoblasts (and thus bone formation), whilst strongly stimulating osteoclast formation (and thus bone resorption). Surprisingly, the resorptive function of osteoclasts is unimpaired in hypoxia. In vivo, tissue hypoxia is usually accompanied by acidosis due to reduced vascular perfusion and increased glycolytic metabolism. Thus, disruption of the blood supply can engender a multiple negative impact on bone via the direct actions of reduced pO(2) and pH on bone cells. These observations may contribute to our understanding of the bone disturbances that occur in numerous settings, including ageing, inflammation, fractures, tumours, anaemias, kidney disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and smoking.

  8. MicroRNA-31 initiates lung tumorigenesis and promotes mutant KRAS-driven lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Mick D; Boyd, Kelli L; Moyo, Tamara; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Duszynski, Robert; Arrate, Maria Pia; Chen, Xi; Zhao, Zhongming; Blackwell, Timothy S; Andl, Thomas; Eischen, Christine M

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA (miR) are important regulators of gene expression, and aberrant miR expression has been linked to oncogenesis; however, little is understood about their contribution to lung tumorigenesis. Here, we determined that miR-31 is overexpressed in human lung adenocarcinoma and this overexpression independently correlates with decreased patient survival. We developed a transgenic mouse model that allows for lung-specific expression of miR-31 to test the oncogenic potential of miR-31 in the lung. Using this model, we observed that miR-31 induction results in lung hyperplasia, followed by adenoma formation and later adenocarcinoma development. Moreover, induced expression of miR-31 in mice cooperated with mutant KRAS to accelerate lung tumorigenesis. We determined that miR-31 regulates lung epithelial cell growth and identified 6 negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling as direct targets of miR-31. Our study distinguishes miR-31 as a driver of lung tumorigenesis that promotes mutant KRAS-mediated oncogenesis and reveals that miR-31 directly targets and reduces expression of negative regulators of RAS/MAPK signaling.

  9. Hypoxia inhibits hypertrophic differentiation and endochondral ossification in explanted tibiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C H Leijten

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously described or whether alleviation of hypoxia and consequent changes in oxygen tension mediated signaling events also plays an active role in regulating the hypertrophic differentiation process itself. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fetal mouse tibiae (E17.5 explants were cultured up to 21 days under normoxic or hypoxic conditions (21% and 2.5% oxygen respectively. Tibiae were analyzed on growth kinetics, histology, gene expression and protein secretion. RESULTS: The oxygen level had a strong influence on the development of explanted fetal tibiae. Compared to hypoxia, normoxia increased the length of the tibiae, length of the hypertrophic zone, calcification of the cartilage and mRNA levels of hypertrophic differentiation-related genes e.g. MMP9, MMP13, RUNX2, COL10A1 and ALPL. Compared to normoxia, hypoxia increased the size of the cartilaginous epiphysis, length of the resting zone, calcification of the bone and mRNA levels of hyaline cartilage-related genes e.g. ACAN, COL2A1 and SOX9. Additionally, hypoxia enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of the secreted articular cartilage markers GREM1, FRZB and DKK1, which are able to inhibit hypertrophic differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data suggests that oxygen levels play an active role in the regulation of hypertrophic differentiation of hyaline chondrocytes. Normoxia stimulates hypertrophic differentiation evidenced by the expression of hypertrophic differentiation related genes. In contrast, hypoxia suppresses hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes, which might be at least partially explained by the induction of GREM1, FRZB and DKK1 expression.

  10. Amiloride slows down calpain-mediated ABCA1 degradation through in-hibition of hypoxia-induced NHE1 expression%Amiloride 通过抑制缺氧诱导的 NHE1表达而延缓 calpain 介导的 ABCA1降解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫显刚; 张莉; 张洛超; 王龙; 向凝; 杨涓; 宋翔

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To examine the effects of hypoxia on sodium-hydrogen exchange 1 (NHE1) expression, in-tracellular Ca2+concentration ( [ Ca2+] i ) and calpain activity, and to explore the effect of amiloride on adenosine triphos-phate-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) degradation and its calpain-related mechanism.METHODS:RAW264.7 cells were exposed to hypoxia for 0 h, 12 h, 24 h and 48 h.The cell viability was measured by MTT assay and the expres-sion of NHE1 at mRNA and protein levels was detected by real-time PCR and Western blot.[ Ca2+] i was analyzed by flow cytometry.Calpain activity was assessed by the method of Suc-LLVY-aminoluciferin.Furthermore, the protein levels of ABCA1 in the RAW264.7 cells exposed to hypoxia for 24 h were determined after 6 h or 12 h treatment with NHE1 inhibi-tor amiloride in the presence of cycloheximide.ABCA1 protein levels and calpain activity were detected after 12 h incuba-tion with calpain inhibitor ALLN or intracellular calcium-chelating agent BAPTA.RESULTS: Hypoxia inhibited the cell viability in a time-dependent manner.Hypoxia up-regulated the mRNA and protein expression of NHE1, and increased [ Ca2+] i and calpain activity.Hypoxia increased the degradation of ABCA1 and amiloride slowed down the ABCA1 degra-dation.ALLN or BAPTA increased ABCA1 protein level and decreased calpain activity.CONCLUSION:NHE1 inhibitor amiloride attenuates the calpain-mediated degradation of ABCA1, indicating that hypoxia-induced NHE1 might, at least in part, participate in the ABCA1 degradation.%目的:研究缺氧对钠氢交换体1(NHE1)表达、细胞内钙离子浓度([Ca2+]i)和钙蛋白酶(calpain)活性的影响,探讨NHE1抑制剂阿米洛利( amiloride )对 ABCA1降解的影响以及与calpain 相关的机制。方法:RAW264.7细胞缺氧0、12、24和48 h。 MTT法检测细胞活力,real-time PCR及Western blot检测NHE1的表达。流式细胞术检测[ Ca2+] i ,荧光素法检测细胞

  11. CNS hypoxia is more pronounced in murine cerebral than noncerebral malaria and is reversed by erythropoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Combes, Valery; Hunt, Nicholas Henry;

    2011-01-01

    -ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) gene knockout mice. The effect of erythropoietin, an oxygen-sensitive cytokine that mediates protection against CM, on cerebral hypoxia was studied in C57BL/6 mice. Numerous hypoxic foci of neurons and glial cells were observed in mice with CM. Substantially fewer and smaller foci were...... observed in mice without CM, and hypoxia seemed to be confined to neuronal cell somas. PARP-1-deficient mice were not protected against CM, which argues against a role for cytopathic hypoxia. Erythropoietin therapy reversed the development of CM and substantially reduced the degree of neural hypoxia......Cerebral malaria (CM) is associated with high mortality and risk of sequelae, and development of adjunct therapies is hampered by limited knowledge of its pathogenesis. To assess the role of cerebral hypoxia, we used two experimental models of CM, Plasmodium berghei ANKA in CBA and C57BL/6 mice...

  12. HMGA2 induces pituitary tumorigenesis by enhancing E2F1 activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedele, Monica; Visone, Rosa; De Martino, Ivana

    2006-01-01

    HMGA2 gene amplification and overexpression in human prolactinomas and the development of pituitary adenomas in HMGA2 transgenic mice showed that HMGA2 plays a crucial role in pituitary tumorigenesis. We have explored the pRB/E2F1 pathway to investigate the mechanism by which HMGA2 acts. Here we......2 mice. Thus, HMGA2-mediated E2F1 activation is a crucial event in the onset of these tumors in transgenic mice and probably also in human prolactinomas....

  13. In Drosophila, RhoGEF2 cooperates with activated Ras in tumorigenesis through a pathway involving Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II and JNK signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peytee Khoo

    2013-05-01

    The Ras oncogene contributes to ∼30% of human cancers, but alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. In a Drosophila screen for oncogenes that cooperate with an activated allele of Ras (RasACT to promote tissue overgrowth and invasion, we identified the GTP exchange factor RhoGEF2, an activator of Rho-family signalling. Here, we show that RhoGEF2 also cooperates with an activated allele of a downstream effector of Ras, Raf (RafGOF. We dissect the downstream pathways through which RhoGEF2 cooperates with RasACT (and RafGOF, and show that RhoGEF2 requires Rho1, but not Rac, for tumorigenesis. Furthermore, of the Rho1 effectors, we show that RhoGEF2 + Ras (Raf-mediated tumorigenesis requires the Rho kinase (Rok–Myosin-II pathway, but not Diaphanous, Lim kinase or protein kinase N. The Rho1–Rok–Myosin-II pathway leads to the activation of Jun kinase (JNK, in cooperation with RasACT. Moreover, we show that activation of Rok or Myosin II, using constitutively active transgenes, is sufficient for cooperative tumorigenesis with RasACT, and together with RasACT leads to strong activation of JNK. Our results show that Rok–Myosin-II activity is necessary and sufficient for Ras-mediated tumorigenesis. Our observation that activation of Myosin II, which regulates Filamentous actin (F-actin contractility without affecting F-actin levels, cooperates with RasACT to promote JNK activation and tumorigenesis, suggests that increased cell contractility is a key factor in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we show that signalling via the Tumour necrosis factor (TNF; also known as Egr-ligand–JNK pathway is most likely the predominant pathway that activates JNK upon Rok activation. Overall, our analysis highlights the need for further analysis of the Rok–Myosin-II pathway in cooperation with Ras in human cancers.

  14. Tracheal remodelling in response to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lazaro; Gorr, Thomas A.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The insect tracheal system is a continuous tubular network that ramifies into progressively thinner branches to provide air directly to every organ and tissue throughout the body. During embryogenesis the basic architecture of the tracheal system develops in a stereotypical and genetically controlled manner. Later, in larval stages, the tracheal system becomes plastic, and adapts to particular oxygen needs of the different tissues of the body. Oxygen sensing is mediated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases that regulate protein stability of the alpha subunit of oxygen-responsive transcription factors from the HIF family. Tracheal cells are exquisitely sensitive to oxygen levels, modulating the expression of hypoxia-inducible proteins that mediate sprouting of tracheal branches in direction to oxygen-deprived tissues. PMID:19482033

  15. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  16. Calcium sensing receptor suppresses human pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bo; Chow, Jimmy Y C; Dong, Tobias Xiao; Yang, Shi-Ming; Lu, De-Sheng; Carethers, John M; Dong, Hui

    2016-07-10

    The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) is functionally expressed in normal human pancreases, but its pathological role in pancreatic tumorigenesis is currently unknown. We sought to investigate the role of CaSR in pancreatic cancer (PC) and the underlying molecular mechanisms. We revealed that the expression of CaSR was consistently downregulated in the primary cancer tissues from PC patients, which was correlated with tumor size, differentiation and poor survival of the patients. CaSR activation markedly suppressed pancreatic tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo likely through the Ca(2+) entry mode of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger 1 (NCX1) to induce Ca(2+) entry into PC cells. Moreover, NCX1-mediated Ca(2+) entry resulted in Ca(2+)-dependent inhibition of β-catenin signaling in PC cells, eventually leading to the inhibition of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Collectively, we demonstrate for the first time that CaSR exerts a suppressive function in pancreatic tumorigenesis through a novel NCX1/Ca(2+)/β-catenin signaling pathway. Targeting this specific signaling pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for PC.

  17. Hypoxia inducible factors regulate the transcription of the sprouty2 gene and expression of the sprouty2 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Paul; Patel, Tarun B.

    2017-01-01

    Receptor Tyrosine Kinase (RTK) signaling plays a major role in tumorigenesis and normal development. Sprouty2 (Spry2) attenuates RTK signaling and inhibits processes such as angiogenesis, cell proliferation, migration and survival, which are all upregulated in tumors. Indeed in cancers of the liver, lung, prostate and breast, Spry2 protein levels are markedly decreased correlating with poor patient prognosis and shorter survival. Thus, it is important to understand how expression of Spry2 is regulated. While prior studies have focused on the post-translation regulation of Spry2, very few studies have focused on the transcriptional regulation of SPRY2 gene. Here, we demonstrate that in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, the transcription of SPRY2 is inhibited by the transcription regulating hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). HIFs are composed of an oxygen regulated alpha subunit (HIF1α or HIF2α) and a beta subunit (HIF1β). Intriguingly, silencing of HIF1α and HIF2α elevates SPRY2 mRNA and protein levels suggesting HIFs reduce the transcription of the SPRY2 promoter. In silico analysis identified ten hypoxia response elements (HREs) in the proximal promoter and first intron of SPRY2. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we show that HIF1α/2α bind near the putative HREs in the proximal promoter and intron of SPRY2. Our studies demonstrated that not only is the SPRY2 promoter methylated, but silencing HIF1α/2α reduced the methylation. ChIP assays also showed DNA methyltransferase1 (DNMT1) binding to the proximal promoter and first intron of SPRY2 and silencing HIF1α/2α decreased this association. Additionally, silencing of DNMT1 mimicked the HIF1α/2α silencing-mediated increase in SPRY2 mRNA and protein. While simultaneous silencing of HIF1α/2α and DNMT1 increased SPRY2 mRNA a little more, the increase was not additive suggesting a common mechanism by which DNMT1 and HIF1α/2α regulate SPRY2 transcription. Together these data suggest that the

  18. The mechanism of long non-coding RNA MEG3 for neurons apoptosis caused by hypoxia: mediated by miR-181b-12/15-LOX signaling pathway

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    Xiaomin Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: lncRNAs are recently thought to play a significant role in cellular homeostasis during pathological process of diseases by competing inhibiting miRNA function. The aim of present study was to assess the function of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA MEG3 and its functional interaction with microRNA-181b in cerebral ischemic infarct of mice and hypoxia-induced neurons apoptosis. Methods: To address this question, we performed the experiments with in vivo middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO mice model and in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD-cultured neuronal HT22 cell line. Relative expression of MEG3, miR-181b and 12/15-LOX (lipoxygenase mRNA was determined using quantitative RT-PCR. Western blot was used to evaluate 12/15-LOX protein expression. TUNEL assay was performed to assess cell apoptosis.Results: In both MCAO mice and OGD-cultured HT22 cell, ischemia or hypoxia treatment results in a time-dependent increase in MEG3 and 12/15-LOX expression and decrease in miR-181b expression. Knockdown of MEG3 contributes to attenuation of hypoxia-induced apoptosis of HT22 cell. Also, expression level of MEG3 negatively correlated with miR-181b expression and positively correlated with 12/15-LOX expression. In contrary to MEG3, miR-181b overexpression attenuated hypoxia-induced HT22 cell apoptosis, as well as suppressed hypoxia-induced increase in 12/15-LOX expression. By luciferase reporter assay, we concluded that miR-181b directly binds to 12/15-LOX 3’-UTR, thereby negatively regulates 12/15-LOX expression. Conclusion: Our data suggested that long non-coding RNA MEG3 functions as a competing endogenous RNA for miR-181b to regulate 12/15-LOX expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced ischemic infarct of brain nerve cells.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α induces multidrug resistance protein in colon cancer

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    Lv Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yingqian Lv, Shan Zhao, Jinzhu Han, Likang Zheng, Zixin Yang, Li Zhao Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital, Hebei Medical University, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Multidrug resistance is the major cause of chemotherapy failure in many solid tumors, including colon cancer. Hypoxic environment is a feature for all solid tumors and is important for the development of tumor resistance to chemotherapy. Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α is the key transcription factor that mediates cellular response to hypoxia. HIF-1α has been shown to play an important role in tumor resistance; however, the mechanism is still not fully understood. Here, we found that HIF-1α and the drug resistance-associated gene multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1 were induced by treatment of colon cancer cells with the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride. Inhibition of HIF-1α by RNA interference and dominant-negative protein can significantly reduce the induction of MRP1 by hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis showed that a hypoxia response element is located at -378 to -373 bp upstream of the transcription start site of MRP1 gene. Luciferase reporter assay combined with mutation analysis confirmed that this element is essential for hypoxia-mediated activation of MRP gene. Furthermore, RNA interference revealed that HIF-1α is necessary for this hypoxia-driven activation of MRP1 promoter. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that HIF-1α could directly bind to this HRE site in vivo. Together, these data suggest that MRP1 is a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, which provides a potential novel mechanism for HIF-1α-mediated drug resistance in colon cancer and maybe other solid tumors as well. Keywords: hypoxia, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, multidrug resistance associated protein, transcriptional regulation, chemotherapy tolerance

  20. Sodium hydrosulfide prevents hypoxia-induced behavioral impairment in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zhan, Jingmin; Wang, Xueer; Gu, Jianhua; Xie, Kai; Zhang, Qingrui; Liu, Dexiang

    2013-11-13

    Hypoxic encephalopathy is a common cause of neonatal seizures and long-term neurological abnormalities. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may have multiple functions in brain. The aim of this study is to investigate whether sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H2S donor, provides protection against neonatal hypoxia-induced neurobehavioral deficits. Neonatal mice were subjected to hypoxia (5% oxygen for 120min) at postnatal day 1 and received NaHS (5.6mg/kg) once daily for 3d. Neurobehavioral toxicity was examined at 3-30d after hypoxia. Treatment with NaHS significantly attenuated the delayed development of sensory and motor reflexes induced by hypoxia up to two weeks after the insult. Moreover, NaHS improved the learning and memory performance of hypoxic animals as indicated in Morris water maze test at 30d after hypoxia. In mice exposed to hypoxia, treatment with NaHS enhanced expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the protective effects of NaHS were associated with its ability to repress the hypoxia-induced nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and nitric oxide production in the hippocampus of mice brain. Taken together, these results suggest that the long-lasting beneficial effects of NaHS on hypoxia-induced neurobehavioral deficits are mediated, at least in part, by inducing BDNF expression and suppressing NOS activity in the brain of mice.

  1. Contrasting effects of ascorbate and iron on the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Nick P; Croft, Quentin P; Curtis, M Kate; Turner, Brandon E; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A; Smith, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia causes an increase in pulmonary artery pressure. Gene expression controlled by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors plays an important role in the underlying pulmonary vascular responses. The hydroxylase enzymes that regulate HIF are highly sensitive to varying iron availability, and iron status modifies the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia, possibly through its effects on HIF. Ascorbate (vitamin C) affects HIF hydroxylation in a similar manner to iron and may therefore have similar pulmonary effects. This study investigated the possible contribution of ascorbate availability to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans. Seven healthy volunteers undertook a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover protocol which studied the effects of high-dose intravenous ascorbic acid (total 6 g) on the pulmonary vascular response to 5 h of sustained hypoxia. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) was assessed during hypoxia by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with corresponding data from a similar study investigating the effect of intravenous iron, in which SPAP was measured in seven healthy volunteers during 8 h of sustained hypoxia. Consistent with other studies, iron supplementation profoundly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (P ascorbate did not affect the increase in pulmonary artery pressure induced by several hours of hypoxia (P = 0.61). We conclude that ascorbate does not interact with hypoxia and the pulmonary circulation in the same manner as iron. Whether the effects of iron are HIF-mediated remains unknown, and the extent to which ascorbate contributes to HIF hydroxylation in vivo is also unclear.

  2. Chronic hypoxia during gestation enhances uterine arterial myogenic tone via heightened oxidative stress.

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    Daliao Xiao

    Full Text Available Chronic hypoxia during gestation has profound adverse effects on the adaptation of uteroplacental circulation in pregnancy. Yet, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in uterine arteries plays a critical role in the maladaptation of uterine circulation associated with chronic hypoxia. Uterine arteries were isolated from nonpregnant and near-term pregnant sheep maintained at sea level (~300 m or exposed to high-altitude (3801 m hypoxia for 110 days. Hypoxia significantly increased ROS production in uterine arteries of pregnant, but not nonpregnant, sheep. This was associated with a significant increase in NADPH oxidase (Nox 2, but not Nox1 or Nox4, protein abundance and total Nox activity in uterine arteries of pregnant animals. Chronic hypoxia significantly increased pressure-dependent uterine arterial myogenic tone in pregnant sheep, which was abrogated by a Nox inhibitor apocynin. Additionally, the hypoxia-induced increase in myogenic reactivity of uterine arteries to phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate in pregnant sheep was blocked by apocynin and tempol. In consistence with the myogenic responses, the hypoxia-mediated down-regulation of BKCa channel activity in uterine arteries of pregnant animals was reversed by apocynin. The findings suggest that heightened oxidative stress in uterine arteries plays a key role in suppressing the BKCa channel activity, resulting in increased myogenic reactivity and maladaptation of uteroplacental circulation caused by chronic hypoxia during gestation.

  3. Snail/beta-catenin signaling protects breast cancer cells from hypoxia attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherbakov, Alexander M., E-mail: alex.scherbakov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, Institute of Clinical Oncology, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Stefanova, Lidia B.; Sorokin, Danila V.; Semina, Svetlana E. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation); Berstein, Lev M. [Laboratory of Oncoendocrinology, N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St. Petersburg 197758 (Russian Federation); Krasil’nikov, Mikhail A. [Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology, Institute of Carcinogenesis, N.N. Blokhin Cancer Research Centre, Kashirskoye sh. 24, Moscow 115478 (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-10

    The tolerance of cancer cells to hypoxia depends on the combination of different factors – from increase of glycolysis (Warburg Effect) to activation of intracellular growth/apoptotic pathways. Less is known about the influence of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and EMT-associated pathways on the cell sensitivity to hypoxia. The aim of this study was to explore the role of Snail signaling, one of the key EMT pathways, in the mediating of hypoxia response and regulation of cell sensitivity to hypoxia, using as a model in vitro cultured breast cancer cells. Earlier we have shown that estrogen-independent HBL-100 breast cancer cells differ from estrogen-dependent MCF-7 cells with increased expression of Snail1, and demonstrated Snail1 involvement into formation of hormone-resistant phenotype. Because Snail1 belongs to hypoxia-activated proteins, here we studied the influence of Snail1 signaling on the cell tolerance to hypoxia. We found that Snail1-enriched HBL-100 cells were less sensitive to hypoxia-induced growth suppression if compared with MCF-7 line (31% MCF-7 vs. 71% HBL-100 cell viability after 1% O{sub 2} atmosphere for 3 days). Snail1 knock-down enhanced the hypoxia-induced inhibition of cell proliferation giving the direct evidence of Snail1 involvement into cell protection from hypoxia attack. The protective effect of Snail1 was shown to be mediated, at least in a part, via beta-catenin which positively regulated expression of HIF-1-dependent genes. Finally, we found that cell tolerance to hypoxia was accompanied with the failure in the phosphorylation of AMPK – the key energy sensor, and demonstrated an inverse relationship between AMPK and Snail/beta-catenin signaling. Totally, our data show that Snail1 and beta-catenin, besides association with loss of hormone dependence, protect cancer cells from hypoxia and may serve as an important target in the treatment of breast cancer. Moreover, we suggest that the level of these proteins as well

  4. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winning, Sandra; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia) which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate) immunity.

  5. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Winning

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate immunity.

  6. Hypoxia, Monitoring, and Mitigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    al., (2012). Short-term exposure to hypoxia for work and leisure activities in health and disease: which level of hypoxia is safe? Sleep Breath, 16...Altitude Illness. Emergency Medical Clinics of North America. (2):329-55, viii. Travel to a high altitude requires that the human body acclimatize to...preventable. Practitioners working in or advising those traveling to a high altitude must be familiar with the early recognition of symptoms, prompt

  7. Cited1 deficiency suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis.

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    Valérie Méniel

    Full Text Available Conditional deletion of Apc in the murine intestine alters crypt-villus architecture and function. This process is accompanied by multiple changes in gene expression, including upregulation of Cited1, whose role in colorectal carcinogenesis is unknown. Here we explore the relevance of Cited1 to intestinal tumorigenesis. We crossed Cited1 null mice with Apc(Min/+ and AhCre(+Apc(fl/fl mice and determined the impact of Cited1 deficiency on tumour growth/initiation including tumour multiplicity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and the transcriptome. We show that Cited1 is up-regulated in both human and murine tumours, and that constitutive deficiency of Cited1 increases survival in Apc(Min/+ mice from 230.5 to 515 days. However, paradoxically, Cited1 deficiency accentuated nearly all aspects of the immediate phenotype 4 days after conditional deletion of Apc, including an increase in cell death and enhanced perturbation of differentiation, including of the stem cell compartment. Transcriptome analysis revealed multiple pathway changes, including p53, PI3K and Wnt. The activation of Wnt through Cited1 deficiency correlated with increased transcription of β-catenin and increased levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin. Hence, immediately following deletion of Apc, Cited1 normally restrains the Wnt pathway at the level of β-catenin. Thus deficiency of Cited1 leads to hyper-activation of Wnt signaling and an exaggerated Wnt phenotype including elevated cell death. Cited1 deficiency decreases intestinal tumourigenesis in Apc(Min/+ mice and impacts upon a number of oncogenic signaling pathways, including Wnt. This restraint imposed by Cited1 is consistent with a requirement for Cited1 to constrain Wnt activity to a level commensurate with optimal adenoma formation and maintenance, and provides one mechanism for tumour repression in the absence of Cited1.

  8. ATF-1 is a hypoxia-responsive transcriptional activator of skeletal muscle mitochondrial-uncoupling protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhongping; Sack, Michael N

    2008-08-22

    Hypoxia induces oxidative damage in skeletal muscle. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is the skeletal muscle enriched uncoupling protein and has previously been shown to confer resistance against oxidative stress. We show that hypoxia robustly up-regulates skeletal muscle UCP3 and that the absence of UCP3 in primary skeletal myocytes exacerbates hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species generation. In this context, we reasoned that the investigation of the regulation of UCP3 may identify novel hypoxia-responsive regulatory pathways that modulate intrinsic anti-oxidant defenses. By screening a transcription factor array of 704 full-length cDNAs in murine C2C12 myoblasts following cotransfection of a murine UCP3 promoter-luciferase construct and myoD we identified numerous candidate regulatory factors that up-regulate UCP3. Active transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) was identified, and as this transcription factor is a known component of a multiprotein hypoxia-induced regulatory complex, we explored its role in hypoxia-mediated UCP3 up-regulation. Site-directed mutagenesis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identify a 10-bp region required for ATF-1 induction of UCP3 promoter activity. Hypoxia promotes the phosphorylation of ATF-1, and the knockdown of ATF-1 by shRNA prevents hypoxia-mediated up-regulation of UCP3. Pharmacologic inhibition of p38 MAP kinase prevents both hypoxia-mediated ATF-1 phosphorylation and UCP3 up-regulation. PKA signaling does not modulate hypoxia-induced UCP3 up-regulation and neither does HIF-1alpha activation by cobalt chloride. In conclusion, ATF-1, via p38 MAP kinase activation, functions as a novel regulatory pathway driving UCP3 expression. These data reinforce the role of ATF-1 as a hypoxia-responsive trans-activator and identifies a novel regulatory program that may modulate cellular responses to oxygen-deficit.

  9. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Manassantin Analogues for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Do-Yeon; Lee, Hye Eun; Weitzel, Douglas H.; PARK, KYUNGHYE; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Chen-Ting; Stephenson, Tesia N.; Park, Hyeri; Fitzgerald, Michael C.; Chi, Jen-Tsan; Mook, Robert A.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Lee, You Mie; Hong, Jiyong

    2015-01-01

    To cope with hypoxia, tumor cells have developed a number of adaptive mechanisms mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) to promote angiogenesis and cell survival. Due to significant roles of HIF-1 in the initiation, progression, metastasis, and resistance to treatment of most solid tumors, a considerable amount of effort has been made to identify HIF-1 inhibitors for treatment of cancer. Isolated from Saururus cernuus, manassantins A (1) and B (2) are potent inhibitors of HIF-1 activi...

  10. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors in leukaemias

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    Margaux eDeynoux

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukaemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukaemic stem cells (LSCs within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew and therefore re-establish the full tumour. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukaemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal haematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells and vascular cells. A hallmark of the haematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of HSCs. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor family. In solid tumours, it has been well-established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukaemia is not considered a solid tumour, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukaemic cell proliferation, differentiation and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukaemic development and therapeutic resistance, and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukaemias.

  11. Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia attenuates hypoxia-induced depressor response.

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    Fang Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia (HIH produces many favorable effects in the cardiovascular system such as anti-hypertensive effect. In this study, we showed that HIH significantly attenuated a depressor response induced by acute hypoxia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley rats received HIH in a hypobaric chamber simulating an altitude of 5000 m. The artery blood pressure (ABP, heart rate (HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded in anesthetized control rats and rats received HIH. The baseline ABP, HR and RSNA were not different between HIH and control rats. Acute hypoxia-induced decrease in ABP was significantly attenuated in HIH rat compared with control rats. However, acute hypoxia-induced increases in HR and RSNA were greater in HIH rat than in control rats. After removal of bilateral ascending depressor nerves, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses were comparable in control and HIH rats. Furthermore, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses did not differ between control and HIH groups after blocking ATP-dependent K(+ channels by glibenclamide. The baroreflex function evaluated by intravenous injection of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was markedly augmented in HIH rats compared with control rats. The pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses evoked by intravenous injection of cyanide potassium were also significantly greater in HIH rats than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that HIH suppresses acute hypoxia-induced depressor response through enhancement of baroreflex and chemoreflex function, which involves activation of ATP-dependent K(+ channels. This study provides new information and underlying mechanism on the beneficiary effect of HIH on maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis.

  12. Nisin, an apoptogenic bacteriocin and food preservative, attenuates HNSCC tumorigenesis via CHAC1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Nam E; Ritchie, Kathryn; Kamarajan, Pachiyappan; Miao, Di; Kapila, Yvonne L

    2012-12-01

    Nisin, a bacteriocin and commonly used food preservative, may serve as a novel potential therapeutic for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), as it induces preferential apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and reduces cell proliferation in HNSCC cells, compared with primary keratinocytes. Nisin also reduces HNSCC tumorigenesis in vivo. Mechanistically, nisin exerts these effects on HNSCC, in part, through CHAC1, a proapoptotic cation transport regulator, and through a concomitant CHAC1-independent influx of extracellular calcium. In addition, although CHAC1 is known as an apoptotic mediator, its effects on cancer cell apoptosis have not been examined. Our studies are the first to report CHAC1's new role in promoting cancer cell apoptosis under nisin treatment. These data support the concept that nisin decreases HNSCC tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo by inducing increased cell apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation; effects that are mediated by activation of CHAC1, increased calcium influxes, and induction of cell cycle arrest. These findings support the use of nisin as a potentially novel therapeutic for HNSCC, and as nisin is safe for human consumption and currently used in food preservation, its translation into a clinical setting may be facilitated.

  13. Autophagy-preferential degradation of MIR224 participates in hepatocellular carcinoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheng-Hui; Wu, Shan-Ying; Zuchini, Roberto; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Su, Ih-Jen; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Lin, Yen-Ju; Wu, Cheng-Tao; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Autophagy and microRNA (miRNA) are important regulators during cancer cell tumorigenesis. Impaired autophagy and high expression of the oncogenic microRNA MIR224 are prevalent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); however, the relationship between the 2 phenomena remains elusive. In this study, we are the first to reveal that autophagy selectively regulates MIR224 expression through an autophagosome-mediated degradation system. Based on this finding, we further demonstrated that in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC, aberrant autophagy (low autophagic activity) results in accumulation of MIR224 and decreased expression of the target gene Smad4, which leads to increased cell migration and tumor formation. Preferential recruitment of MIR224 into the autophagosome was clearly demonstrated by a) miRNA in situ hybridization under confocal microscopy, and b) immunogold labeling of MIR224 under electron microscopy compared with a ubiquitously expressed microRNA MIRlet7e/let-7. Furthermore, we found that off-label use of amiodarone, an antiarrhythmic agent, effectively suppressed HCC tumorigenesis through autophagy-mediated MIR224 degradation both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, we identified amiodarone as a new autophagy inducer, which may provide an alternative approach in HCC therapy through a novel tumor suppression mechanism.

  14. News about VDAC1 in hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie M. Mazure

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites and ATP. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulates the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC, which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis and other processes. Second we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1.

  15. News about VDAC1 in Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, N M

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites, and adenosine triphosphate. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulate the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia, some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC), which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis, and other processes. Second, we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1.

  16. Chronic hypoxia promotes pulmonary artery endothelial cell proliferation through H2O2-induced 5-lipoxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi M Porter

    Full Text Available Pulmonary Hypertension (PH is a progressive disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and proliferation. Hypoxia induces PH by increasing vascular remodeling. A potential mediator in hypoxia-induced PH development is arachidonate 5-Lipoxygenase (ALOX5. While ALOX5 metabolites have been shown to promote pulmonary vasoconstriction and endothelial cell proliferation, the contribution of ALOX5 to hypoxia-induced proliferation remains unknown. We hypothesize that hypoxia exposure stimulates HPAEC proliferation by increasing ALOX5 expression and activity. To test this, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC were cultured under normoxic (21% O2 or hypoxic (1% O2 conditions for 24-, 48-, or 72 hours. In a subset of cells, the ALOX5 inhibitor, zileuton, or the 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor, MK-886, was administered during hypoxia exposure. ALOX5 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blot and HPAEC proliferation was assessed. Our results demonstrate that 24 and 48 hours of hypoxia exposure have no effect on HPAEC proliferation or ALOX5 expression. Seventy two hours of hypoxia significantly increases HPAEC ALOX5 expression, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 release, and HPAEC proliferation. We also demonstrate that targeted ALOX5 gene silencing or inhibition of the ALOX5 pathway by pharmacological blockade attenuates hypoxia-induced HPAEC proliferation. Furthermore, our findings indicate that hypoxia-induced increases in cell proliferation and ALOX5 expression are dependent on H2O2 production, as administration of the antioxidant PEG-catalase blocks these effects and addition of H2O2 to HPAEC promotes proliferation. Overall, these studies indicate that hypoxia exposure induces HPAEC proliferation by activating the ALOX5 pathway via the generation of H2O2.

  17. Hypoxia-ischemia and retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanjit Kaur

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Charanjit Kaur1, Wallace S Foulds2, Eng-Ang Ling11Department of Anatomy, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, SingaporeAbstract: Retinal hypoxia is the potentially blinding mechanism underlying a number of sight-threatening disorders including central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic central retinal vein thrombosis, complications of diabetic eye disease and some types of glaucoma. Hypoxia is implicated in loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurring in such conditions. RGC death occurs by apoptosis or necrosis. Hypoxia-ischemia induces the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Increased production of VEGF results in disruption of the blood retinal barrier leading to retinal edema. Enhanced expression of NOS results in increased production of nitric oxide which may be toxic to the cells resulting in their death. Excess glutamate release in hypoxic-ischemic conditions causes excitotoxic damage to the RGCs through activation of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Activation of glutamate receptors is thought to initiate damage in the retina by a cascade of biochemical effects such as neuronal NOS activation and increase in intracellular Ca2+ which has been described as a major contributing factor to RGC loss. Excess production of proinflammatory cytokines also mediates cell damage. Besides the above, free-radicals generated in hypoxic-ischemic conditions result in RGC loss because of an imbalance between antioxidant- and oxidant-generating systems. Although many advances have been made in understanding the mediators and mechanisms of injury, strategies to improve the damage are lacking. Measures to prevent neuronal injury have to be developed.Keywords: retinal hypoxia, retinal ganglion cells, glutamate receptors, neuronal injury, retina

  18. Ras-Directed N-Glycoproteins Are Novel Early Biomarkers for Tumorigenesis and Malignant Transformation and Therapeutic Targets of Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    phosphorylates Ser192 in MGAT5B in MPNST cells. Moreover, wild type MGAT5B protein locates in the Golgi apparatus whereas mutated MGAT5BS192A protein...to the Golgi apparatus to attenuate MGAT5B-mediated glycosylation and phosphorylation of kinase receptors. Targeting MGAT5-mediated glycosylation of...tumorigenesis in Nf1+/-;p53+/- mice (bottom). Because proteins travelling to the Golgi apparatus for the consequent steps of glycosylation must be

  19. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  20. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  1. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean. The negative impacts of hypoxia include...

  2. Multiple across-strain and within-strain QTLs suggest highly complex genetic architecture for hypoxia tolerance in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaozhu; Liu, Shikai; Jiang, Chen; Geng, Xin; Zhou, Tao; Li, Ning; Bao, Lisui; Li, Yun; Yao, Jun; Yang, Yujia; Zhong, Xiaoxiao; Jin, Yulin; Dunham, Rex; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2017-02-01

    The ability to survive hypoxic conditions is important for various organisms, especially for aquatic animals. Teleost fish, representing more than 50 % of vertebrate species, are extremely efficient in utilizing low levels of dissolved oxygen in water. However, huge variations exist among various taxa of fish in their ability to tolerate hypoxia. In aquaculture, hypoxia tolerance is among the most important traits because hypoxia can cause major economic losses. Genetic enhancement for hypoxia tolerance in catfish is of great interest, but little was done with analysis of the genetic architecture of hypoxia tolerance. The objective of this study was to conduct a genome-wide association study to identify QTLs for hypoxia tolerance using the catfish 250K SNP array with channel catfish families from six strains. Multiple significant and suggestive QTLs were identified across and within strains. One significant QTL and four suggestive QTLs were identified across strains. Six significant QTLs and many suggestive QTLs were identified within strains. There were rare overlaps among the QTLs identified within the six strains, suggesting a complex genetic architecture of hypoxia tolerance. Overall, within-strain QTLs explained larger proportion of phenotypic variation than across-strain QTLs. Many of genes within these identified QTLs have known functions for regulation of oxygen metabolism and involvement in hypoxia responses. Pathway analysis indicated that most of these genes were involved in MAPK or PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways that were known to be important for hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis and survival.

  3. Mitochondrial DNA plasticity is an essential inducer of tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W T Y; Cain, J E; Cuddihy, A; Johnson, J; Dickinson, A; Yeung, K-Y; Kumar, B; Johns, T G; Watkins, D N; Spencer, A; St John, J C

    2016-01-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA has been implicated in diseases such as cancer, its role remains to be defined. Using three models of tumorigenesis, namely glioblastoma multiforme, multiple myeloma and osteosarcoma, we show that mitochondrial DNA plays defining roles at early and late tumour progression. Specifically, tumour cells partially or completely depleted of mitochondrial DNA either restored their mitochondrial DNA content or actively recruited mitochondrial DNA, which affected the rate of tumorigenesis. Nevertheless, non-depleted tumour cells modulated mitochondrial DNA copy number at early and late progression in a mitochondrial DNA genotype-specific manner. In glioblastoma multiforme and osteosarcoma, this was coupled with loss and gain of mitochondrial DNA variants. Changes in mitochondrial DNA genotype affected tumour morphology and gene expression patterns at early and late progression. Importantly, this identified a subset of genes that are essential to early progression. Consequently, mitochondrial DNA and commonly expressed early tumour-specific genes provide novel targets against tumorigenesis.

  4. Controversies about the genetic model of colorectal tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, P

    1995-01-01

    According to the genetic model, intestinal tumorigenesis is a result of the ordered in time inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the activation of oncogenes. A tacit assumption is that both genes involved in the regulation of proliferation and growth factor-inducible genes, although inactivated, would not be changed during that process. The model requires that cancer cell population is homogenous, exists in a deterministic environment, and develops in a teleological manner. Meanwhile, tumorigenesis is rather a combination of both deterministic and stochastic molecular phenomena. Therefore, a novel notion of bifurcating point genes is defined as a generalization of the idea of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. Alternative stochastic mechanisms of tumorigenesis are discussed such as a decreased expression of intestinal-specific genes in cancer cells, most likely reflecting adaptation to survival within a heterogeneous, and non-equilibrated cellular population.

  5. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and the ERK Pathway Drive Chemerin Expression in Response to Hypoxia in Cultured Human Coronary Artery Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Su-Kiat; Shyu, Kou-Gi; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Lo, Huey-Ming; Wang, Bao-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Chemerin, a novel adipokine, plays a role in the inflammation status of vascular endothelial cells. Hypoxia causes endothelial-cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis. This study was aimed at evaluating the protein and mRNA expression of chemerin after exposure of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) to hypoxia. Methods and Results Cultured HCAECs underwent hypoxia for different time points. Chemerin protein levels increased after 4 h of hypoxia at 2.5% O2, with a peak of expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) at 1 h. Both hypoxia and exogenously added TNF-alpha during normoxia stimulated chemerin expression, whereas an ERK inhibitor (PD98059), ERK small interfering RNA (siRNA), or an anti-TNF-alpha antibody attenuated the chemerin upregulation induced by hypoxia. A gel shift assay indicated that hypoxia induced an increase in DNA-protein binding between the chemerin promoter and transcription factor SP1. A luciferase assay confirmed an increase in transcriptional activity of SP1 on the chemerin promoter during hypoxia. Hypoxia significantly increased the tube formation and migration of HCAECs, whereas PD98059, the anti-TNF-alpha antibody, and chemerin siRNA each attenuated these effects. Conclusion Hypoxia activates chemerin expression in cultured HCAECs. Hypoxia-induced chemerin expression is mediated by TNF-alpha and at least in part by the ERK pathway. Chemerin increases early processes of angiogenesis by HCAECs after hypoxic treatment. PMID:27792771

  6. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen Sensing under Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the discovery of endogenous H2S production, many in depth studies show this gasotransmitter with a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Three enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST, are involved in enzymatic production of H2S. Emerging evidence has elucidated an important protective role of H2S in hypoxic conditions in many mammalian systems. However, the mechanisms by which H2S senses and responses to hypoxia are largely elusive. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs function as key regulators of oxygen sensing, activating target genes expression under hypoxia. Recent studies have shown that exogenous H2S regulates HIF action in different patterns. The activation of carotid bodies is a sensitive and prompt response to hypoxia, rapidly enhancing general O2 supply. H2S has been identified as an excitatory mediator of hypoxic sensing in the carotid bodies. This paper presents a brief review of the roles of these two pathways which contribute to hypoxic sensing of H2S.

  7. Hypoxia enhances the antiglioma cytotoxicity of B10, a glycosylated derivative of betulinic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Fischer

    Full Text Available B10 is a glycosylated derivative of betulinic acid with promising activity against glioma cells. Lysosomal cell death pathways appear to be essential for its cytotoxicity. We investigated the influence of hypoxia, nutrient deprivation and current standard therapies on B10 cytotoxicity. The human glioma cell lines LN-308 and LNT-229 were exposed to B10 alone or together with irradiation, temozolomide, nutrient deprivation or hypoxia. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by crystal violet staining, clonogenicity assays, propidium iodide uptake and LDH release assays. Cell death was examined using an inhibitor of lysosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, a cathepsin inhibitor (CA074-Me and a short-hairpin RNA targeting cathepsin B. Hypoxia substantially enhanced B10-induced cell death. This effect was sensitive to bafilomycin A1 and thus dependent on hypoxia-induced lysosomal acidification. Cathepsin B appeared to mediate cell death because either the inhibitor CA074-Me or cathepsin B gene silencing rescued glioma cells from B10 toxicity under hypoxia. B10 is a novel antitumor agent with substantially enhanced cytotoxicity under hypoxia conferred by increased lysosomal cell death pathway activation. Given the importance of hypoxia for therapy resistance, malignant progression, and as a result of antiangiogenic therapies, B10 might be a promising strategy for hypoxic tumors like malignant glioma.

  8. Hypobaric-hypoxia-induced pulmonary damage in rats ameliorated by antioxidant erdosteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ozge; Balbay, Oner; Comunoğlu, Nil Ustündağ; Yavuz, Ozlem; Nihat Annakkaya, Ali; Güler, Selver; Silan, Coşkun; Erbaş, Mete; Arbak, Peri

    2006-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury to lung and pulmonary vasculature is an important mechanism in hypoxia-induced lung damage. In this study, we aimed to investigate the potential protective effects of erdosteine as an antioxidant agent on hypobaric hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Adult male rats were assigned randomly to three groups. The first group of rats was exposed to hypobaric-hypoxia and the second group was treated with erdosteine (20mg/kg, daily) for 2 weeks, during which time they were in a hypoxic chamber. These groups were compared with normoxic controls. All rats were sacrificed after 2 weeks. The hypoxia-induced increase in right ventricle to left ventricle plus septum weight ratio (from 0.20+/-0.01 to 0.26+/-0.01) was reduced significantly in the erdosteine-treated group (0.23+/-0.01). Malondialdehyde levels were elevated (from 0.33+/-0.11 to 0.59+/-0.02) and total antioxidant status was not changed significantly (from 1.77+/-0.42 to 2.61+/-0.23) by hypoxia. In contrast to the hypoxia-exposed group, malondialdehyde levels were significantly decreased in the erdosteine-treated group (0.37+/-0.02). Total antioxidant status (4.03+/-0.22) was significantly higher in erdosteine-treated rats when compared to non-treated rats. Histopathological examination demonstrated that erdosteine prevented inflammation and protected lung parenchyma and pulmonary endothelium of hypoxia-exposed rats.

  9. CD147 promotes melanoma progression through hypoxia-induced MMP2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, W; Su, J; Wu, L; Yang, D; Long, T; Li, D; Kuang, Y; Li, J; Qi, M; Zhang, J; Chen, X

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia enhances MMP2 expression and the invasion and metastatic potential of melanoma cells. CD147 has been shown to induce MMP2 in multiple cancers. To investigate the role of CD147 in hypoxiainduced MMP2 activation, we performed immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining in 206 normal and melanoma tissue samples, and analyzed the correlation between HIF1α and CD147. ChIP (chromosome Immunoprecipitation) in melanoma cell lines supports that HIF1α directly binds to CD147 promoter. Moreover, we made a series of deletion mutants of CD147 promoter, and identified a conserved HIF1α binding site. Point mutation in this site significantly decreased CD147 response to hypoxia. Importantly, knocking down CD147 attenuates MMP2 response to hypoxia in melanoma cell lines. MMP2 could not be efficiently activated by hypoxia in CD147 depletion cells. ELISA data showed that MMP2 secretion was reduced in CD147 depletion cells than control under hypoxia condition. To verify the data from cell culture model, we performed in vivo mouse xenograft experiment. IHC staining showed reduced MMP2 level in CD147 depleted xenografts compared to the control group, with the HIF1α level being comparable. Our study demonstrates a novel pathway mediated by CD147 to promote the MMP2 activation induced by hypoxia, and helps to understand the interplay between hypoxia and melanoma progression.

  10. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierckx, Rudi Andre; de Wiele, Christophe Van

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceutic

  11. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  12. miR-100 induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition but suppresses tumorigenesis, migration and invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahu Chen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Whether epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is always linked to increased tumorigenicity is controversial. Through microRNA (miRNA expression profiling of mammary epithelial cells overexpressing Twist, Snail or ZEB1, we identified miR-100 as a novel EMT inducer. Surprisingly, miR-100 inhibits the tumorigenicity, motility and invasiveness of mammary tumor cells, and is commonly downregulated in human breast cancer due to hypermethylation of its host gene MIR100HG. The EMT-inducing and tumor-suppressing effects of miR-100 are mediated by distinct targets. While miR-100 downregulates E-cadherin by targeting SMARCA5, a regulator of CDH1 promoter methylation, this miRNA suppresses tumorigenesis, cell movement and invasion in vitro and in vivo through direct targeting of HOXA1, a gene that is both oncogenic and pro-invasive, leading to repression of multiple HOXA1 downstream targets involved in oncogenesis and invasiveness. These findings provide a proof-of-principle that EMT and tumorigenicity are not always associated and that certain EMT inducers can inhibit tumorigenesis, migration and invasion.

  13. A diterpenoid derivative 15-oxospiramilactone inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling and colon cancer cell tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang; Haiyang Liu; Sheng Wang; Xiaojiang Hao; Lin Li

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is a highly conserved pathway in organism evolution and regulates many biological processes. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is closely related to tumorigenesis.In order to identify potent small molecules to treat the over-activated Wnt signaling-mediated cancer, such as colon cancer, we established a mammalian cell line-based reporter gene screening system. The screen revealed a diterpenoid derivative, 15-oxospiramilactone(NC043)that inhibits Wnt3a or LiCl-stimulated Top-flash reporter activity in HEK293T cells and growth of colon cancer cells, SW480 and Caco-2. Treatment of SW480 cells with NC043 led to decreases in the mRNA and/or protein expression of Wnt target genes Axin2, Cyclin Dl and Survivin, as well as decreases in the protein levels of Cdc25c and Cdc2.NC043 did not affect the cytosol-nuclear distribution and protein level of soluble β-catenin, but decreased β-catenin/TCF4 association in SW480 cells. Moreover, NC043 inhibited anchorage-independent growth and xenograft tumorigenesis of SW480 cells. Collectively these results demonstrate that NC043 is a novel small molecule that inhibits canonical Wnt signaling downstream of P-catenin stability and may be a potential compound for treating colorectal cancer.

  14. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; Min, Kyueng-Whan; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-07-10

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in the mammary glands of MMTV-Id1 transgenic mice. Furthermore, MMTV-Id1 mice develop ductal hyperplasia and mammary tumors with highly expressed basal markers. Id1 also increases breast cancer stem cell (CSC) population and activity in human breast cancer lines. Moreover, the effects of Id1 on normal and malignant stem cell activities are mediated by the Wnt/c-Myc pathway. Collectively, these findings provide in vivo genetic evidence of Id1 functions as an oncogene in breast cancer and indicate that Id1 regulates mammary basal stem cells by activating the Wnt/c-Myc pathway, thereby contributing to breast tumor development.

  15. A Requirement for SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 Phosphorylation in Bcr-Abl-Induced Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxue Qiu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 (SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 are inhibitors of the Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK/signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT pathway and function in a negative feedback loop during cytokine signaling. Abl transformation is associated with constitutive activation of JAK/STAT-dependent signaling. However, the mechanism by which Abl oncoproteins bypass SOCS inhibitory regulation remains poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that coexpression of Bcr-Abl with SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 results in tyrosine phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins. Interestingly, SOCS-1 is highly tyrosine phosphorylated in one of five primary chronic myelogenous leukemia samples. Bcr-Abl-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 occurs mainly on Tyr 155 and Tyr 204 residues of SOCS-1 and on Tyr 221 residue of SOCS-3. We observed that phosphorylation of these SOCS proteins was associated with their binding to Bcr-Abl. Bcr-Abl-dependent phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 diminished their inhibitory effects on the activation of JAK and STAT5 and thereby enhanced JAK/STAT5 signaling. Strikingly, disrupting the tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 impaired the expression of Bcl-XL protein and sensitized K562 leukemic cells to undergo apoptosis. Moreover, selective mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites of SOCS-1 or SOCS-3 significantly blocked Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenesis in nude mice and inhibited Bcr-Abl-mediated murine bone marrow transformation. Together, these results reveal a mechanism of how Bcr-Abl may overcome SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 inhibition to constitutively activate the JAK/STAT-dependent signaling, and suggest that Bcr-Abl may critically requires tyrosine phosphorylation of SOCS-1 and SOCS-3 to mediate tumorigenesis when these SOCS proteins are present in cells.

  16. Differential sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Theije, C C; Langen, R C J; Lamers, W H; Gosker, H R; Schols, A M W J; Köhler, S E

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia as a consequence of acute and chronic respiratory disease has been associated with muscle atrophy. This study investigated the sensitivity of oxidative and glycolytic muscles to hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy. Male mice were exposed to 8% normobaric oxygen for up to 21 days. Oxidative soleus and glycolytic extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were isolated, weighed, and assayed for expression profiles of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) signaling. Fiber-type composition and the capillary network were investigated. Hypoxia-induced muscle atrophy was more prominent in the EDL than the soleus muscle. Although increased expression of HIF1α target genes showed that both muscle types sensed hypoxia, their adaptive responses differed. Atrophy consistently involved a hypoxia-specific effect (i.e., not attributable to a hypoxia-mediated reduction of food intake) in the EDL only. Hypoxia-specific activation of the UPS and ALP and increased expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and its target genes were also mainly observed in the EDL. In the soleus, stimulation of gene expression of those pathways could be mimicked to a large extent by food restriction alone. Hypoxia increased the number of capillary contacts per fiber cross-sectional area in both muscles. In the EDL, this was due to type II fiber atrophy, whereas in the soleus the absolute number of capillary contacts increased. These responses represent two distinct modes to improve oxygen supply to muscle fibers, but may aggravate muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients who have a predominance of type II fibers.

  17. A critical reassessment of the role of mitochondria in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Salas

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is being analyzed by an increasing number of laboratories in order to investigate its potential role as an active marker of tumorigenesis in various types of cancer. Here we question the conclusions drawn in most of these investigations, especially those published in high-rank cancer research journals, under the evidence that a significant number of these medical mtDNA studies are based on obviously flawed sequencing results. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In our analyses, we take a phylogenetic approach and employ thorough database searches, which together have proven successful for detecting erroneous sequences in the fields of human population genetics and forensics. Apart from conceptual problems concerning the interpretation of mtDNA variation in tumorigenesis, in most cases, blocks of seemingly somatic mutations clearly point to contamination or sample mix-up and, therefore, have nothing to do with tumorigenesis. CONCLUSION: The role of mitochondria in tumorigenesis remains unclarified. Our findings of laboratory errors in many contributions would represent only the tip of the iceberg since most published studies do not provide the raw sequence data for inspection, thus hindering a posteriori evaluation of the results. There is no precedent for such a concatenation of errors and misconceptions affecting a whole subfield of medical research.

  18. Disulfiram deregulates HIF-α subunits and blunts tumor adaptation to hypoxia in hepatoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-joon; Kim, Min-sung; Cho, Kumsun; Yun, Jang-hyuk; Choi, Yong-joon; Cho, Chung-hyun

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Disulfiram is an aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor that was used to treat alcoholism and showed anticancer activity, but its anticancer mechanism remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of disulfiram on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-driven tumor adaptation to hypoxia in vitro. Methods: Hep3B, Huh7 and HepG2 hepatoma cells were incubated under normoxic (20% O2) or hypoxic (1% O2) conditions for 16 h. The expression and activity of HIF-1α and HIF-2α proteins were evaluated using immunoblotting and luciferase reporter assay, respectively. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to analyze HIF-mediated gene expression. Endothelial tubule formation assay was used to evaluate the anti-angiogenic effect. Results: Hypoxia caused marked expression of HIF-1α and HIF-1α in the 3 hepatoma cell lines, dramatically increased HIF activity and induced the expression of HIF downstream genes (EPO, CA9, VEGF-A and PDK1) in Hep3B cells. HIF-2α expression was positively correlated with the induction of hypoxic genes (CA9, VEGF-A and PDK1). Moreover, hypoxia markedly increased VEGF production and angiogenic potential of Hep3B cells. Disulfiram (0.3 to 2 μmol/L) inhibited hypoxia-induced gene expression and HIF activity in a dose-dependent manner. Disulfiram more effectively suppressed the viability of Hep3B cells under hypoxia, but it did not affect the cell cycle. Overexpression of HIF-2α in Hep3B cells reversed the inhibitory effects of disulfiram on hypoxia-induced gene expression and cell survival under hypoxia. Conclusion: Disulfiram deregulates the HIF-mediated hypoxic signaling pathway in hepatoma cells, which may contribute to its anticancer effect. Thus, disulfiram could be used to treat solid tumors that grow in a HIF-dependent manner. PMID:23852087

  19. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...

  20. Loss of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 expression delays mammary tumorigenesis and reduces localized inflammation in the C3(1)/SV40Tag triple negative breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Taryn L; Velázquez, Kandy T; Enos, Reilly T; Bader, Jackie E; Carson, Meredith S; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Murphy, E Angela

    2017-02-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) has been implicated as a major modulator in the progression of mammary tumorigenesis, largely due to its ability to recruit macrophages to the tumor microenvironment. Macrophages are key mediators in the connection between inflammation and cancer progression and have been shown to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Thus, MCP-1 may be a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory and difficult-to-treat cancers such as triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We examined the effect of MCP-1 depletion on mammary tumorigenesis in a model of TNBC. Tumor measurements were conducted weekly (until 22 weeks of age) and at sacrifice (23 weeks of age) in female C3(1)/SV40Tag and C3(1)/SV40Tag MCP-1 deficient mice to determine tumor numbers and tumorvolumes. Histopathological scoring was performed at 12 weeks of age and 23 weeks of age. Gene expression of macrophage markers and inflammatory mediators were measured in the mammary gland and tumor microenvironment at sacrifice. As expected, MCP-1 depletion resulted in decreased tumorigenesis, indicated by reduced primary tumor volume and multiplicity, and a delay in tumor progression represented by histopathological scoring (12 weeks of age). Deficiency in MCP-1 significantly downregulated expression of macrophage markers in the mammary gland (Mertk and CD64) and the tumor microenvironment (CD64), and also reduced expression of inflammatory cytokines in the mammary gland (TNFα and IL-1β) and the tumor microenvironment (IL-6). These data support the hypothesis that MCP-1 expression contributes to increased tumorigenesis in a model of TNBC via recruitment of macrophages and subsequent increase in inflammatory mediators.

  1. Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hoon; Raybuck, Ariel L; Stengel, Kristy; Wei, Mei; Beck, Thomas C; Volanakis, Emmanuel; Thomas, James W; Hiebert, Scott; Haase, Volker H; Boothby, Mark R

    2016-09-08

    Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.

  2. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha regulates the role of vascular endothelial growth factor on pulmonary arteries of rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李启芳; 戴爱国

    2004-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is one of the pivotal mediators in the response of lungs to decreased oxygen availability, and increasingly has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a downstream target gene of HIF-1α, plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and hypoxic pulmonary artery remodelling. In this study, we investigated the dynamic expression of HIF-1α and VEGF in pulmonary artery of rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Methods Forty male Wistar rats were exposed to hypoxia for 0, 3, 7, 14 or 21 days. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), vessel morphometry and right ventricle hypertrophy index (RVHI) were estimated. Lungs were inflated and fixed for in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry. Results mPAP values were significantly higher than the control values after 7days of hypoxia [(18.4±0.4) mmHg, P<0.05]. RVHI developed significantly after 14 days of hypoxia. Expression of HIF-1α protein increased in pulmonary arterial tunica intima of all hypoxic rats. In pulmonary arterial tunica media, HIF-1α protein was markedly increased by day 3 (0.20±0.02, P<0.05), reached the peak by day 7, then declined after day 14 of hypoxia. HIF-1α mRNA increased significantly after day 14 of hypoxia (0.20±0.02, P<0.05). VEGF protein began to increase markedly after day 7 of hypoxia, reaching its peak around day 14 of hypoxia (0.15±0.02, P<0.05). VEGF mRNA began to increase after day 7 of hypoxia, then remained more or less stable from day 7 onwards. VEGF mRNA is located mainly in tunica intima and tunica media, whereas VEGF protein is located predominantly in tunica intima. Linear analysis showed that HIF-1α mRNA, VEGF and mPAP were correlated with hypoxic pulmonary artery remodelling. HIF-1α mRNA was positively correlated with VEGF mRNA and protein (P<0.01). Conclusion HIF-1α and VEGF are both involved in the

  3. The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic forces are known to have various effects on the alveolar process, such as cell deformation, inflammation, and circulatory disturbances. Each of these conditions affecting cell differentiation, cell repair, and cell migration, is driven by numerous molecular and inflammatory mediators. As a result, bone remodeling is induced, facilitating orthodontic tooth movement. However, orthodontic forces not only have cellular effects but also induce vascular changes. Orthodontic forces are known to occlude periodontal ligament vessels on the pressure side of the dental root, decreasing the blood perfusion of the tissue. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, which is known to either affect cell proliferation or induce apoptosis, depending on the oxygen gradient. Because upregulated tissue proliferation rates are often accompanied by angiogenesis, hypoxia may be assumed to fundamentally contribute to bone remodeling processes during orthodontic treatment.

  4. THE ROLES OF bcl-2 GENE FAMILY IN THE PULMONARY ARTERY REMODELING OF HYPOXIA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨成; 王胜发; 梁桃; 王巨; 王凯; 王柏春

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the roles of apoptosis in the pulmonary artery remodeling of pulmonary hypertension secondary to hypoxia and illustrate the relative genes expression.Methods. Thirty rats were divided into hypoxia group(10%O2, 8h/d) and normal control group. On the 15th day of hypoxia, pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy index were measured and pulmonary artery vessels were studied by light microscope. Then terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling(TUNEL)technique was used to detect nucleosomal DNA fragmentation of apoptotic cells.In situ hybridization and RT-PCR were used to detect the expression level of bcl-2 and bax.``Results. The pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy index of hypoxia group were increased significantly, the pulmonary artery wall of hypoxic group become incrassate than control group. Apoptotic cells can be found in lung with hypoxia or without hypoxia. Compared with control group, apoptotic index of hypoxic group decreased significantly. Through the methods of in situ hybridization and RT-PCR, we found the expression of bcl-2 increased whereas bax decreased significantly in the hypoxic group.``Conclusion. The alternation in bcl-2 and bax expression induced by hypoxia play an important role in the pulmonary artery remodeling which is the main pathologic change of pulmonary hypertension secondary to hypoxia.

  5. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development.

  6. Salidroside exerts protective effects against chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension via AMPKα1-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mayun; Cai, Hui; Yu, Chang; Wu, Peiliang; Fu, Yangyang; Xu, Xiaomei; Fan, Rong; Xu, Cunlai; Chen, Yanfan; Wang, Liangxing; Huang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Salidroside, an active ingredient isolated from Rhodiola rosea, has shown to exert protective effects against chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, the underlying mechanisms were not well known. Based on our recent reports, we predicted the involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mediated effects in salidroside regulation of PAH. Firstly, to prove the hypothesis, rats were exposed to chronic hypoxia and treated with increasing concentrations of salidroside or a selective AMPK activator-5'-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) for 4 weeks. After salidroside or AICAR treatment, the chronic hypoxia-induced right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary artery remodeling were attenuated. Then the effects of salidroside or AICAR on hypoxia-induced excess cellular proliferation and apoptosis resistance of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), which contributed to pulmonary arterial remodeling, were investigated. Our results suggested salidroside, as well as AICAR, reversed hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation and apoptosis resistance while AMPK inhibitor Compound C enhanced the effects of hypoxia. To reveal the potential cellular mechanisms, activation of AMPKα1 and expression of the genes related to proliferation and apoptosis were analyzed in PASMCs after salidroside treatment under hypoxia conditions. The results demonstrated salidroside as well as AICAR might inhibit chronic hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation via AMPKα1-P53-P27/P21 pathway and reverse apoptosis resistance via AMPKα1-P53-Bax/Bcl-2-caspase 9-caspase 3 pathway.

  7. Emerging evidence of the physiological role of hypoxia in mammary development and lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Shao; Feng-Qi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a physiological or pathological condition of a deficiency of oxygen supply in the body as a whole or within a tissue. During hypoxia, tissues undergo a series of physiological responses to defend themselves against a low oxygen supply, including increased angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glucose uptake. The effects of hypoxia are mainly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), which is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting ofαandβsubunits. HIF-1βis constantly expressed, whereas HIF-1αis degraded under normal oxygen conditions. Hypoxia stabilizes HIF-1αand the HIF complex, and HIF then translocates into the nucleus to initiate the expression of target genes. Hypoxia has been extensively studied for its role in promoting tumor progression, and emerging evidence also indicates that hypoxia may play important roles in physiological processes, including mammary development and lactation. The mammary gland exhibits an increasing metabolic rate from pregnancy to lactation to support mammary growth, lactogenesis, and lactation. This process requires increasing amounts of oxygen consumption and results in localized chronic hypoxia as confirmed by the binding of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole HCl in mouse mammary gland. We hypothesized that this hypoxic condition promotes mammary development and lactation, a hypothesis that is supported by the following several lines of evidence:i) Mice with an HIF-1αdeletion selective for the mammary gland have impaired mammary differentiation and lipid secretion, resulting in lactation failure and striking changes in milk compositions;ii) We recently observed that hypoxia significantly induces HIF-1α-dependent glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells, which may be responsible for the dramatic increases in glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in the mammary gland during the transition period from late pregnancy to early lactation;and ii ) Hypoxia and HIF-1αincrease the

  8. Tumor suppression by miR-26 overrides potential oncogenic activity in intestinal tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitels, Lauren R.; Acharya, Asha; Shi, Guanglu; Chivukula, Divya; Chivukula, Raghu R.; Anandam, Joselin L.; Abdelnaby, Abier A.; Balch, Glen C.; Mansour, John C.; Yopp, Adam C.; Richardson, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Down-regulation of miR-26 family members has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple malignancies. In some settings, including glioma, however, miR-26-mediated repression of PTEN promotes tumorigenesis. To investigate the contexts in which the tumor suppressor versus oncogenic activity of miR-26 predominates in vivo, we generated miR-26a transgenic mice. Despite measureable repression of Pten, elevated miR-26a levels were not associated with malignancy in transgenic animals. We documented reduced miR-26 expression in human colorectal cancer and, accordingly, showed that miR-26a expression potently suppressed intestinal adenoma formation in Apcmin/+ mice, a model known to be sensitive to Pten dosage. These studies reveal a tumor suppressor role for miR-26 in intestinal cancer that overrides putative oncogenic activity, highlighting the therapeutic potential of miR-26 delivery to this tumor type. PMID:25395662

  9. Correlation of the nuclear accumulation of CTNNB1 and colonic tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU Zhe-fu; Maruyama Keiji; HAN De-min; Nakamura Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    @@ CTNNB1 (or beta-catenin) is regarded as a central effecter in molecules of the wingless/Wnt signalling pathway. It is a key component of the cadherin mediated cell to cell adhesion system and forms a complex with the protein product of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and conductin.1 One mutation of APC is also responsible for activation of wingless/Wnt signalling pathway and accumulation of free beta-catenin in the cell. Beta-catenin upregulates oncogenes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc.2 Beta-catenin expression in cytoplasm and nuclei was reported to increase in many cases of intestinal tumorigenesis.3,4 In addition, the hyperexpression of integrin linked kinase (ILK) in colonic polyposis has been demonstrated.5

  10. Prepubertal exposure to cow's milk reduces susceptibility to carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tina Skau; Khan, Galam; Davis, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cow's milk contains high levels of estrogens, progesterone and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), all of which are associated with breast cancer. We investigated whether prepubertal milk exposure affects mammary gland development and carcinogenesis in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were given either...... whole milk or tap water to drink from postnatal day (PND) 14 to PND 35, and thereafter normal tap water. Mammary tumorigenesis was induced by administering 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene on PND 50. Milk exposure increased circulating E2 levels on PND 25 by 10-fold (p vaginal...... or apoptosis were seen. IGF-1 mRNA levels were reduced on PND 50 in the mammary glands of rats exposed to milk at puberty. Our results suggest that drinking milk before puberty reduces later risk of developing mammary cancer in rats. This might be mediated by a reduction in the number of TEBs and lower...

  11. Stress-induced inhibition of nonsense-mediated RNA decay regulates intracellular cystine transport and intracellular glutathione through regulation of the cystine/glutamate exchanger SLC7A11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, L; Gardner, L B

    2015-08-06

    SLC7A11 encodes a subunit of the xCT cystine/glutamate amino-acid transport system and has a critical role in the generation of glutathione and the protection of cells from oxidative stress. Expression of SLC7A11 promotes tumorigenesis and chemotherapy resistance, but while SLC7A11 has been previously noted to be upregulated in hypoxic cells, its regulation has not been fully delineated. We have recently shown that nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) is inhibited by cellular stresses generated by the tumor microenvironment, including hypoxia, and augments tumorigenesis. Here we demonstrate that the inhibition of NMD by various cellular stresses leads to the stabilization and upregulation of SLC7A11 mRNA and protein. The inhibition of NMD and upregulation of SLC7A11 augments intracellular cystine transport and increases intracellular levels of cysteine and glutathione. Accordingly, the inhibition of NMD protects cells against oxidative stress via SLC7A11 upregulation. Together our studies identify a mechanism for the dynamic regulation of SLC7A11, through the stress-inhibited regulation of NMD, and add to the growing evidence that the inhibition of NMD is an adaptive response.

  12. Thioredoxin interacting protein inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Michael R; Rogers, Lynette K; Liu, Yusen; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2010-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is required for proper lung development and is transcriptionally regulated in alveolar epithelial cells by hypoxia inducible factor (HIF). Previous findings in a newborn mouse model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) suggest that thioredoxin interacting protein (Txnip) is a novel regulator of VEGF expression. The present studies were designed to test the hypothesis that Txnip negatively regulates VEGF through effects on HIF-mediated gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we first examined the levels of VEGF and Txnip protein in the lungs of 1 day-old newborn and E19 embryos and detected a significant inverse correlation. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this relationship, we studied the effects of Txnip overexpression on HIF-mediated transcription using murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells. Overexpression of Txnip inhibited HIF-mediated reporter activity in both hypoxia and room air. Suppression of HIF activity by Txnip appeared to be independent of the ability of Txnip to bind to thioredoxin. Thus, our studies support a model in which Txnip is a potentially critical regulator of HIF-mediated gene transcription in the murine lung. Alterations in Txnip expression could alter lung VEGF expression in prematurely born human infants and contribute to the development of BPD. PMID:20692333

  13. Loss of RASSF1A synergizes with deregulated RUNX2 signaling in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weyden, Louise; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Poulogiannis, George; Rust, Alistair G; Rashid, Mamunur; Adams, David J; Arends, Mark J; O'Neill, Eric

    2012-08-01

    The tumor suppressor gene RASSF1A is inactivated through point mutation or promoter hypermethylation in many human cancers. In this study, we conducted a Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis screen in Rassf1a-null mice to identify candidate genes that collaborate with loss of Rassf1a in tumorigenesis. We identified 10 genes, including the transcription factor Runx2, a transcriptional partner of Yes-associated protein (YAP1) that displays tumor suppressive activity through competing with the oncogenic TEA domain family of transcription factors (TEAD) for YAP1 association. While loss of RASSF1A promoted the formation of oncogenic YAP1-TEAD complexes, the combined loss of both RASSF1A and RUNX2 further increased YAP1-TEAD levels, showing that loss of RASSF1A, together with RUNX2, is consistent with the multistep model of tumorigenesis. Clinically, RUNX2 expression was frequently downregulated in various cancers, and reduced RUNX2 expression was associated with poor survival in patients with diffuse large B-cell or atypical Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphomas. Interestingly, decreased expression levels of RASSF1 and RUNX2 were observed in both precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and colorectal cancer, further supporting the hypothesis that dual regulation of YAP1-TEAD promotes oncogenic activity. Together, our findings provide evidence that loss of RASSF1A expression switches YAP1 from a tumor suppressor to an oncogene through regulating its association with transcription factors, thereby suggesting a novel mechanism for RASSF1A-mediated tumor suppression. ©2012 AACR.

  14. Relative Expression of HIF-1α mRNA in Rat Heart, Brain and Blood During Induced Systemic Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Syarifah Dewi; Reni Paramita; Septelia Inawati Wanandi

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole or region of the body (tissue or cell) deprived of adequate oxygen supply. The transcriptional regulator hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is an essential mediator of O2 homeostasis. Unlike the β sub unit (HIF-1β), the activity of HIF-1α is controlled in an oxygen-dependent manner. It has been reported that the stability and expression of HIF-1α during hypoxia is remarkably higher than those under normoxic conditions.The aim of...

  15. Adipose tissue hypoxia in obesity and its impact on adipocytokine dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosogai, Naomi; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Oshima, Kazuya; Miyata, Yugo; Tanaka, Sachiyo; Segawa, Katsumori; Furukawa, Shigetada; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Komuro, Ryutaro; Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2007-04-01

    Obesity is linked to a variety of metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Dysregulated production of fat-derived secretory factors, adipocytokines, is partly responsible for obesity-linked metabolic disorders. However, the mechanistic role of obesity per se to adipocytokine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that adipose tissue of obese mice is hypoxic and that local adipose tissue hypoxia dysregulates the production of adipocytokines. Tissue hypoxia was confirmed by an exogenous marker, pimonidazole, and by an elevated concentration of lactate, an endogenous marker. Moreover, local tissue hypoperfusion (measured by colored microspheres) was confirmed in adipose tissue of obese mice. Adiponectin mRNA expression was decreased, and mRNA of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated protein, was significantly increased in adipose tissue of obese mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, hypoxia dysregulated the expression of adipocytokines, such as adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, and increased the mRNAs of ER stress marker genes, CHOP and GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein, 78 kD). Expression of CHOP attenuated adiponectin promoter activity, and RNA interference of CHOP partly reversed hypoxia-induced suppression of adiponectin mRNA expression in adipocytes. Hypoxia also increased instability of adiponectin mRNA. Our results suggest that hypoperfusion and hypoxia in adipose tissues underlie the dysregulated production of adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome in obesity.

  16. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2, physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%, and normoxia (∼20% are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia or excess oxygen (hyperoxia could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction. Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s (HIFs are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  17. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Hemant; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1-1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1-13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g., inflammation, solid tumor formation, lung disease, or myocardial infarction). Hypoxia plays a key role in the pathophysiology of heart disease, cancers, stroke, and other causes of mortality. Hypoxia inducible factor(s) (HIFs) are key oxygen sensors that mediate the ability of the cell to cope with decreased oxygen tension. These transcription factors regulate cellular adaptation to hypoxia and protect cells by responding acutely and inducing production of endogenous metabolites and proteins to promptly regulate metabolic pathways. Here, we review the role of the HIF pathway as a metabolic adaptation pathway and how this pathway plays a role in cell survival. We emphasize the roles of the HIF pathway in physiological adaptation, cell death, pH regulation, and adaptation during exercise.

  18. Protective effects of astragalus extract against intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiang; GAO Wen-yuan; ZHANG Yun; CHEN Bao-yun; CHEN Zhe; ZHANG Wei-san; MAN Shu-li

    2013-01-01

    Background Intermittent hypoxia is the main pathophysiological cause of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.Astragalus shows improvement of spatial learning and memory abilities under intermittent hypoxia.Our study aimed to investigate the protective effect of astragalus against intermittent hypoxia induced-hippocampal neurons impairment in rats and lay the theoretical foundation for the sleep apnea improvement in cognitive function by astragalus.Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups:blank control group,normoxia group,intermittent hypoxia group and astragalus treated intermittent hypoxia group.After 6-week treatment,apoptosis of neurons was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay.Furthermore,the expression of HIF-1a was detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) at the mRNA level as well as by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blotting at the protein level.Results HPLC analysis indicated that astragaloside Ⅳ,astragaloside Ⅱ and astragaloside Ⅰ were the main compounds in astragals extract.Astragalus extract reduced the apoptosis of hippocampal neurons (P <0.05) and decreased the expression of HIF-1a at both the mRNA and protein levels in hippocampus compared with non-treated groups (P <0.05).Conclusion Astragalus protects against intermittent hypoxia-induced hippocampal neurons impairment in rats.

  19. Autophagy mitigates metabolic stress and genome damage in mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantza-Wadsworth, Vassiliki; Patel, Shyam; Kravchuk, Olga; Chen, Guanghua; Mathew, Robin; Jin, Shengkan; White, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involving self-digestion of cellular organelles during starvation as a means of cell survival; however, if it proceeds to completion, autophagy can lead to cell death. Autophagy is also a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor mechanism for mammary tumorigenesis, as the essential autophagy regulator beclin1 is monoallelically deleted in breast carcinomas. However, the mechanism by which autophagy suppresses breast cancer remains elusive. Here we show that allelic loss of beclin1 and defective autophagy sensitized mammary epithelial cells to metabolic stress and accelerated lumen formation in mammary acini. Autophagy defects also activated the DNA damage response in vitro and in mammary tumors in vivo, promoted gene amplification, and synergized with defective apoptosis to promote mammary tumorigenesis. Therefore, we propose that autophagy limits metabolic stress to protect the genome, and that defective autophagy increases DNA damage and genomic instability that ultimately facilitate breast cancer progression. PMID:17606641

  20. CUEDC2: an emerging key player in inflammation and tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghong Man; Xuemin Zhang

    2011-01-01

    CUE domain-containing 2 (CUEDC2) is a protein involved in the regulation of the cell cycle,inflammation,and tumorigenesis and is highly expressed in many types of tumors.CUEDC2 is phosphorylated by Cdk1 during mitosis and promotes the release of anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome (APC/C) from checkpoint inhibition.CUEDC2 is also known to interact with IkB kinase α (IKKα) and IKKβ and has an inhibitory role in the activation of transcription factor nuclear factor-κB.Moreover,CUEDC2 plays an important role in downregulating the expression of hormone receptors estrogen receptorα and progesterone receptor,thereby impairing the responsiveness of breast cancer to endocrine therapies.In this review,current knowledge on the multi-functions of CUEDC2 in normal processes and tumorigenesis are discussed and summarized.

  1. Non-metabolic functions of glycolytic enzymes in tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X; Li, S

    2017-05-11

    Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism to meet the requirement for survival and rapid growth. One hallmark of cancer metabolism is elevated aerobic glycolysis and reduced oxidative phosphorylation. Emerging evidence showed that most glycolytic enzymes are deregulated in cancer cells and play important roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies revealed that all essential glycolytic enzymes can be translocated into nucleus where they participate in tumor progression independent of their canonical metabolic roles. These noncanonical functions include anti-apoptosis, regulation of epigenetic modifications, modulation of transcription factors and co-factors, extracellular cytokine, protein kinase activity and mTORC1 signaling pathway, suggesting that these multifaceted glycolytic enzymes not only function in canonical metabolism but also directly link metabolism to epigenetic and transcription programs implicated in tumorigenesis. These findings underscore our understanding about how tumor cells adapt to nutrient and fuel availability in the environment and most importantly, provide insights into development of cancer therapy.

  2. The role of antimicrobial peptides in skin tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Marcinkiewicz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, known as “natural antibiotics”, are the first line of defense in humans as effector molecules of the innate immune system of the skin. They present activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, fungi, parasites and enveloped viruses. An increasing number of studies report altered expression of AMPs in human cancers. Antimicrobial peptides such as human β defensins, human cathelicidin, ribonuclease 7 and psoriasin, a member of S100 proteins, are suggested to play a role in tumor progression and tumor suppression in pre-malignant skin lesions and malignancies. Noticeable changes in AMPs expression in skin tumorigenesis suggest a correlation between peptides and cutaneous cancers, though it is still a matter of discussion. In this article we review recent studies on the relationship between antimicrobial peptides and skin tumorigenesis.

  3. Hypoxia Impairs Vasodilation in the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert F Voelkel; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Reeves, John T.

    1981-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction; we investigated whether hypoxia could also impair pulmonary vasodilation. We found in the isolated perfused rat lung a delay in vasodilation following agonist-induced vasoconstriction. The delay was not due to erythrocyte or plasma factors, or to alterations in base-line lung perfusion pressure. Pretreating lungs with arachidonic acid abolished hypoxic vasoconstriction, but did not influence the hypoxia-induced impairment of vasodilation aft...

  4. Role of chronic hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cells are endowed with a defensive mechanism against hypoxia,namely hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE).Under hypoxic conditions,activation of HIF leads to expression of a variety of adaptive genes with HRE in a coordinated manner.

  5. Increased cerebral output of free radicals during hypoxia: implications for acute mountain sickness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether hypoxia causes free radical-mediated disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and impaired cerebral oxidative metabolism and whether this has any bearing on neurological symptoms ascribed to acute mountain sickness (AMS). Ten men provided internal jugular vein...

  6. Modest hypoxia significantly reduces triglyceride content and lipid droplet size in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi, E-mail: thashimo@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Yokokawa, Takumi; Endo, Yuriko [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Iwanaka, Nobumasa [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Higashida, Kazuhiko [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Faculty of Sport Science, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa, Saitama 359-1192 (Japan); Taguchi, Sadayoshi [Faculty of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1 Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Long-term hypoxia decreased the size of LDs and lipid storage in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Long-term hypoxia increased basal lipolysis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased lipid-associated proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia decreased basal glucose uptake and lipogenic proteins in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. •Hypoxia-mediated lipogenesis may be an attractive therapeutic target against obesity. -- Abstract: Background: A previous study has demonstrated that endurance training under hypoxia results in a greater reduction in body fat mass compared to exercise under normoxia. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie this hypoxia-mediated reduction in fat mass remain uncertain. Here, we examine the effects of modest hypoxia on adipocyte function. Methods: Differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes were incubated at 5% O{sub 2} for 1 week (long-term hypoxia, HL) or one day (short-term hypoxia, HS) and compared with a normoxia control (NC). Results: HL, but not HS, resulted in a significant reduction in lipid droplet size and triglyceride content (by 50%) compared to NC (p < 0.01). As estimated by glycerol release, isoproterenol-induced lipolysis was significantly lowered by hypoxia, whereas the release of free fatty acids under the basal condition was prominently enhanced with HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Lipolysis-associated proteins, such as perilipin 1 and hormone-sensitive lipase, were unchanged, whereas adipose triglyceride lipase and its activator protein CGI-58 were decreased with HL in comparison to NC. Interestingly, such lipogenic proteins as fatty acid synthase, lipin-1, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma were decreased. Furthermore, the uptake of glucose, the major precursor of 3-glycerol phosphate for triglyceride synthesis, was significantly reduced in HL compared to NC or HS (p < 0.01). Conclusion: We conclude that hypoxia has a direct impact on reducing the triglyceride content and lipid droplet size via

  7. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappala, Giovanna, E-mail: zappalag@mail.nih.gov [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rechler, Matthew M. [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Clinical Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  8. Interlinking of hypoxia and estrogen in thyroid cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoria, S; Hanly, E; Nicolini, A; George, A L; Geliebter, J; Shin, E J; Suriano, R; Carpi, A; Tiwari, R K

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen aids in neo-vascularization of various tumors during hypoxic conditions, however the role of estrogen within the hypoxic environment of thyroid cancer is not known. In a series of experimentations, using human thyroid cancer cells, we observed that estrogen and hypoxia modulate the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling which is abrogated by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant and the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole). Furthermore, we found that the conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells lead to enhanced migration and tubulogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which is abrogated by HIF-1 inhibitor. These findings, in addition to our previous and other scientific literature data, lead us to conclude that estrogen and hypoxia are interlinked in thyroid cancer and can equally modulate epithelial-endothelial cell interactions by mediating key cellular, metabolic and molecular processes of thyroid cancer progression. We believe that the hormonal component and cellular adaptation to oxygen tension of cancer cells are functionally equivalent with a cellular transition that can be exploited clinically for a combinational approach for thyroid cancer treatment involving antiestrogens as well as anti-hypoxic agents.

  9. Intermittent hypoxia attenuates ischemia/reperfusion induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes via regulating Bcl-2/Bax expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia has been shown to provide myocardial protection against ishemia/reperfusion-induced injury.Cardiac myocyte loss through apoptosis has been reported in ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our aim was to investigate whether intermittent hypoxia could attenuate ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis in cardiac myocytes and its potential mechanisms. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hypoxia simulated 5000 m in a hypobaric chamber for 6 h/day, lasting 42 days. Normoxia group rats were kept under normoxic conditions. Isolated perfused hearts from both groups were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion.Incidence of apoptosis in cardiac myocytes was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and DNA agarose gel electrophoresis. Expressions of apoptosis related proteins,Bax and Bcl-2, in cytosolic and membrane fraction were detected by Western Blotting. After ischemia/reperfusion,enhanced recovery of cardiac function was observed in intermittent hypoxia hearts compared with normoxia group.Ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis, as evidenced by TUNEL-positive nuclei and DNA fragmentation, was significantly reduced in intermittent hypoxia group compared with normoxia group. After ischemia/reperfusion,expression of Bax in both cytosolic and membrane fractions was decreased in intermittent hypoxia hearts compared with normoxia group. Although ischemia/reperfusion did not induce changes in the level of Bcl-2 expression in cytosolic fraction between intermittent hypoxia and normoxia groups, the expression of Bcl-2 in membrane fraction was upregulated in intermittent hypoxia group compared with normoxia group. These results indicated that the cardioprotection of intermittent hypoxia against ischemia/reperfusion injury appears to be in part due to reduce myocardial apoptosis. Intermittent hypoxia attenuated ischemia/reperfusion-induced apoptosis via increasing the ratio of Bcl

  10. Exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate boosts acclimatization in rats exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia: assessment of haematological and metabolic effects.

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    Sonam Chawla

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The physiological challenges posed by hypobaric hypoxia warrant exploration of pharmacological entities to improve acclimatization to hypoxia. The present study investigates the preclinical efficacy of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P to improve acclimatization to simulated hypobaric hypoxia. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Efficacy of intravenously administered S1P in improving haematological and metabolic acclimatization was evaluated in rats exposed to simulated acute hypobaric hypoxia (7620 m for 6 hours following S1P pre-treatment for three days. MAJOR FINDINGS: Altitude exposure of the control rats caused systemic hypoxia, hypocapnia (plausible sign of hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis due to suboptimal renal compensation indicated by an overt alkaline pH of the mixed venous blood. This was associated with pronounced energy deficit in the hepatic tissue along with systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. S1P pre-treatment improved blood oxygen-carrying-capacity by increasing haemoglobin, haematocrit, and RBC count, probably as an outcome of hypoxia inducible factor-1α mediated erythropoiesis and renal S1P receptor 1 mediated haemoconcentation. The improved partial pressure of oxygen in the blood could further restore aerobic respiration and increase ATP content in the hepatic tissue of S1P treated animals. S1P could also protect the animals from hypoxia mediated oxidative stress and inflammation. CONCLUSION: The study findings highlight S1P's merits as a preconditioning agent for improving acclimatization to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure. The results may have long term clinical application for improving physiological acclimatization of subjects venturing into high altitude for occupational or recreational purposes.

  11. Exogenous Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Boosts Acclimatization in Rats Exposed to Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia: Assessment of Haematological and Metabolic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Sonam; Rahar, Babita; Singh, Mrinalini; Bansal, Anju; Saraswat, Deepika; Saxena, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    Background The physiological challenges posed by hypobaric hypoxia warrant exploration of pharmacological entities to improve acclimatization to hypoxia. The present study investigates the preclinical efficacy of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) to improve acclimatization to simulated hypobaric hypoxia. Experimental Approach Efficacy of intravenously administered S1P in improving haematological and metabolic acclimatization was evaluated in rats exposed to simulated acute hypobaric hypoxia (7620m for 6 hours) following S1P pre-treatment for three days. Major Findings Altitude exposure of the control rats caused systemic hypoxia, hypocapnia (plausible sign of hyperventilation) and respiratory alkalosis due to suboptimal renal compensation indicated by an overt alkaline pH of the mixed venous blood. This was associated with pronounced energy deficit in the hepatic tissue along with systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. S1P pre-treatment improved blood oxygen-carrying-capacity by increasing haemoglobin, haematocrit, and RBC count, probably as an outcome of hypoxia inducible factor-1α mediated erythropoiesis and renal S1P receptor 1 mediated haemoconcentation. The improved partial pressure of oxygen in the blood could further restore aerobic respiration and increase ATP content in the hepatic tissue of S1P treated animals. S1P could also protect the animals from hypoxia mediated oxidative stress and inflammation. Conclusion The study findings highlight S1P’s merits as a preconditioning agent for improving acclimatization to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure. The results may have long term clinical application for improving physiological acclimatization of subjects venturing into high altitude for occupational or recreational purposes. PMID:24887065

  12. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor as an Angiogenic Master Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) regulate the transcription of genes that mediate the response to hypoxia. HIFs are constantly expressed and degraded under normoxia, but stabilized under hypoxia. HIFs have been widely studied in physiological and pathological conditions and have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In clinical settings, the HIF pathway has been studied for its role in inhibiting carcinogenesis. HIFs might also play a protective role in the pathology of ischemic diseases. Clinical trials of therapeutic angiogenesis after the administration of a single growth factor have yielded unsatisfactory or controversial results, possibly because the coordinated activity of different HIF-induced factors is necessary to induce mature vessel formation. Thus, manipulation of HIF activity to simultaneously induce a spectrum of angiogenic factors offers a superior strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis. Because HIF-2α plays an essential role in vascular remodeling, manipulation of HIF-2α is a promising approach to the treatment of ischemic diseases caused by arterial obstruction, where insufficient development of collateral vessels impedes effective therapy. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit e (eIF3e)/INT6 interacts specifically with HIF-2α and induces the proteasome inhibitor-sensitive degradation of HIF-2α, independent of hypoxia and von Hippel-Lindau protein. Treatment with eIF3e/INT6 siRNA stabilizes HIF-2α activity even under normoxic conditions and induces the expression of several angiogenic factors, at levels sufficient to produce functional arteries and veins in vivo. We have demonstrated that administration of eIF3e/INT6 siRNA to ischemic limbs or cold-injured brains reduces ischemic damage in animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between HIFs and vascular diseases. We also discuss novel oxygen-independent regulatory proteins that bind HIF-α and the implications

  13. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Enhances Tumor Hypoxia: An Insight into the Relationship of Hypoxia and Angiogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Kostourou

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygenation status of tumors derived from wild-type C6 glioma cells and clone D27 cells overexpressing dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH was assessed in vivo using a variety of direct and indirect assays of hypoxia. Clone D27 tumors exhibit a more aggressive and better-vascularized phenotype compared to wild-type C6 gliomas. Immunohistochemical analyses using the 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker pimonidazole, fiber optic OxyLite measurements of tumor pO2, and localized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of tumor bioenergetic status and pH clearly demonstrated that the D27 tumors were more hypoxic compared to C6 wild type. In the tumor extracts, only glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the D27 tumors. Elevated Glut-1 expression, a reliable functional marker for hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated metabolic adaptation, was observed in the D27 tumors. Together, the data show that overexpression of DDAH results in C6 gliomas that are more hypoxic compared to wild-type tumors, and point strongly to an inverse relationship of tumor oxygenation and angiogenesis in vivo-a concept now being supported by the enhanced understanding of oxygen sensing at the molecular level.

  14. CD147 subunit of lactate/H+ symporters MCT1 and hypoxia-inducible MCT4 is critical for energetics and growth of glycolytic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Renaud; Chiche, Johanna; Marchiq, Ibtissam; Naiken, Tanesha; Ilc, Karine; Murray, Clare M.; Critchlow, Susan E.; Roux, Danièle; Simon, Marie-Pierre; Pouysségur, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Malignant tumors exhibit increased dependence on glycolysis, resulting in abundant export of lactic acid, a hypothesized key step in tumorigenesis. Lactic acid is mainly transported by two H+/lactate symporters, MCT1/MCT4, that require the ancillary protein CD147/Basigin for their functionality. First, we showed that blocking MCT1/2 in Ras-transformed fibroblasts with AR-C155858 suppressed lactate export, glycolysis, and tumor growth, whereas ectopic expression of MCT4 in these cells conferred resistance to MCT1/2 inhibition and reestablished tumorigenicty. A mutant-derivative, deficient in respiration (res−) and exclusively relying on glycolysis for energy, displayed low tumorigenicity. These res− cells could develop resistance to MCT1/2 inhibition and became highly tumorigenic by reactivating their endogenous mct4 gene, highlighting that MCT4, the hypoxia-inducible and tumor-associated lactate/H+ symporter, drives tumorigenicity. Second, in the human colon adenocarcinoma cell line (LS174T), we showed that combined silencing of MCT1/MCT4 via inducible shRNA, or silencing of CD147/Basigin alone, significantly reduced glycolytic flux and tumor growth. However, both silencing approaches, which reduced tumor growth, displayed a low level of CD147/Basigin, a multifunctional protumoral protein. To gain insight into CD147/Basigin function, we designed experiments, via zinc finger nuclease-mediated mct4 and basigin knockouts, to uncouple MCTs from Basigin expression. Inhibition of MCT1 in MCT4-null, Basiginhigh cells suppressed tumor growth. Conversely, in Basigin-null cells, in which MCT activity had been maintained, tumorigenicity was not affected. Collectively, these findings highlight that the major protumoral action of CD147/Basigin is to control the energetics of glycolytic tumors via MCT1/MCT4 activity and that blocking lactic acid export provides an efficient anticancer strategy. PMID:21930917

  15. The role of formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapkov, Igor; Öqvist, Carl Otto; Figenschau, Yngve; Kogner, Per; Johnsen, John Inge; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2016-07-18

    Formyl peptide receptor 1 (FPR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor mainly expressed by the cells of myeloid origin, where it mediates the innate immune response to bacterial formylated peptides. High expression of FPR1 has been detected in various cancers but the function of FPR1 in tumorigenesis is poorly understood. Expression of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cell lines and primary tumors was studied using RT-PCR, western blotting, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Calcium mobilization assays and western blots with phospho-specific antibodies were used to assess the functional activity of FPR1 in neuroblastoma. The tumorigenic capacity of FPR1 was assessed by xenografting of neuroblastoma cells expressing inducible FPR1 shRNA, FPR1 cDNA or control shRNA in nude mice. FPR1 is expressed in neuroblastoma primary tumors and cell lines. High expression of FPR1 corresponds with high-risk disease and poor patient survival. Stimulation of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cells using fMLP, a selective FPR1 agonist, induced intracellular calcium mobilization and activation of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt and P38-MAPK signal transduction pathways that were inhibited by using Cyclosporin H, a selective receptor antagonist for FPR1. shRNA knock-down of FPR1 in neuroblastoma cells conferred a delayed xenograft tumor development in nude mice, whereas an ectopic overexpression of FPR1 promoted augmented tumorigenesis in nude mice. Our data demonstrate that FPR1 is involved in neuroblastoma development and could represent a therapy option for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  16. The oxygen sensor PHD3 limits glycolysis under hypoxia via direct binding to pyruvate kinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Chen; Oliver Rinner; Dominika Czernik; Katarzyna J Nytko; Dan Zheng; Daniel P Stiehl; Nicola Zamboni; Matthias Gstaiger; Christian Frei

    2011-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Oxygen levels are critical for cellular physiology.Under low oxygen (hypoxia),cells increase glycolysis while limiting mitochondrial oxidative metabolism.Such adaptation is largely mediated by the transcription factors HIF,which accumulate under hypoxia [1,2].Prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHD) function as cellular oxygen sensors and target HIF for subsequent degradation under normoxia [2].The PHD/HIF pathway is conserved in Drosophila,where a single prolyl hydroxylase,Fatiga,has been characterized.We have previously reported that Fatiga regulates cellular growth rates in a HIF-independent manner,yet mechanisms remained elusive [3].

  17. Upregulation of Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory Protein by Hypoxia Stimulates Aldosterone Synthesis in Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells to Promote Pulmonary Vascular Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A.; Oldham, William M.; Chan, Stephen Y.; Vargas, Sara O.; Arons, Elena; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular mechanism(s) regulating hypoxia-induced vascular fibrosis are unresolved. Hyperaldosteronism correlates positively with vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), suggesting that aldosterone may contribute to the pulmonary vasculopathy of hypoxia. The hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors c-Fos/c-Jun regulate steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which facilitates the rate-limiting step of aldosterone steroidogenesis. We hypothesized that c-Fos/c-Jun upregulation by hypoxia activates StAR-dependent aldosterone synthesis in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to promote vascular fibrosis in PAH. Methods and Results Patients with PAH, rats with Sugen/hypoxia-PAH, and mice exposed to chronic hypoxia expressed increased StAR in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, providing a basis for investigating hypoxia-StAR signaling in HPAECs. Hypoxia (2.0% FiO2) increased aldosterone levels selectively in HPAECs, which was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Increased aldosterone by hypoxia resulted from enhanced c-Fos/c-Jun binding to the proximal activator protein (AP-1) site of the StAR promoter in HPAECs, which increased StAR expression and activity. In HPAECs transfected with StAR-siRNA or treated with the AP-1 inhibitor, SR-11302, hypoxia failed to increase aldosterone, confirming that aldosterone biosynthesis required StAR activation by c-Fos/c-Jun. The functional consequences of aldosterone were confirmed by pharmacological inhibition of the mineralocorticoid receptor with spironolactone or eplerenone, which attenuated hypoxia-induced upregulation of the fibrogenic protein connective tissue growth factor and collagen III in vitro, and decreased pulmonary vascular fibrosis to improve pulmonary hypertension in Conclusions Our findings identify autonomous aldosterone synthesis in HPAECs due to hypoxia-mediated upregulation of StAR as a novel molecular mechanism that promotes pulmonary vascular

  18. The role of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in bypassing oncogene-induced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehtap Kilic Eren

    Full Text Available Oncogene induced senescence (OIS is a sustained anti-proliferative response acutely induced in primary cells via activation of mitogenic oncogenes such as Ras/BRAF. This mechanism acts as an initial barrier preventing normal cells transformation into malignant cell. Besides oncogenic activation and DNA damage response (DDR, senescence is modulated by a plethora of other factors, and one of the most important one is oxygen tension of the tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of hypoxia on RasV12-induced senescence in human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs. We showed here that hypoxia prevents execution of oncogene induced senescence (OIS, through a strong down-regulation of senescence hallmarks, such as SA- β-galactosidase, H3K9me3, HP1γ, p53, p21CIP1 and p16INK4a in association with induction of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α. In addition, hypoxia also decreased marks of H-RasV12-induced DDR in both cell lines through down-regulation of ATM/ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 phosphorylation as well as decreased γ-H2AX positivity. Utilizing shRNA system targeting HIF-1α we show that HIF-1α is directly involved in down regulation of p53 and its target p21CIP1 but not p16INK4a. In line with this finding we found that knock down of HIF-1α leads to a strong induction of apoptotic response, but not restoration of senescence in Ras expressing HDFs in hypoxia. This indicates that HIF-1α is an important player in early steps of tumorigenesis, leading to suppression of senescence through its negative regulation of p53 and p21CIP1. In our work we describe a mechanism through which hypoxia and specifically HIF-1α preclude cells from maintaining senescence-driven anti proliferative response. These findings indicate the possible mechanism through which hypoxic environment helps premalignant cells to evade impingement of cellular failsafe pathways.

  19. Ets-1 as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, N; Xu, C; Zhu, Y-X; Cao, Y; Liu, D-C; Han, X

    2015-02-19

    Hypoxia complicates islet isolation for transplantation and may contribute to pancreatic β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic β-cells are susceptible to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. Severe hypoxic conditions during the immediate post-transplantation period are a main non-immune factor leading to β-cell death and islet graft failure. In this study, we identified the transcription factor Ets-1 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1) as an early response gene against hypoxia-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells. Hypoxia regulates Ets-1 at multiple levels according to the degree of β-cell oxygen deprivation. Moderate hypoxia promotes Ets-1 gene transcription, whereas severe hypoxia promotes its transactivation activity, as well as its ubiquitin-proteasome mediated degradation. This degradation causes a relative insufficiency of Ets-1 activity, and limits the transactivation effect of Ets-1 on downstream hypoxic-inducible genes and its anti-apoptotic function. Overexpression of ectopic Ets-1 in MIN6 and INS-1 cells protects them from severe hypoxia-induced apoptosis in a mitochondria-dependent manner, confirming that a sufficient amount of Ets-1 activity is critical for protection of pancreatic β-cells against hypoxic injury. Targeting Ets-1 expression may be a useful strategy for islet graft protection during the immediate post-transplantation period.

  20. Time-dependent stabilization of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by different intracellular sources of reactive oxygen species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Calvani

    Full Text Available Intratumoral hypoxia is a major obstacle in the development of effective cancer chemotherapy, decreasing the efficacy of anti-neoplastic drugs in several solid tumours. The hypoxic environment, through its master regulator hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1, is able to maintain an anti-apoptotic potential through activation of critical genes associated with drug resistance. Besides affecting metabolism and motility of tumour cells, hypoxia also paradoxically increases production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which contribute to stabilize HIF-1 through a redox-mediated inhibition of its proteolysis. Here we reported that 1% O(2 hypoxia increases the resistance of human metastatic melanoma cells to conventional chemotherapy with etoposide, and that the increase in chemoresistance strongly depends on ROS delivery due to hypoxia. We reported a biphasic redox-dependent role of HIF-1, involving mitochondrial complex III and NADPH oxidase as oxidants sources, synergising in enhancing survival to chemotherapy. The feed-forward loop engaged by hypoxia involves first an HIF-1-dependent vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A autocrine production and, in the later phase, activation of NADPH oxidase from VEGF/VEGFR2 interaction, finally leading to a further redox-dependent long lasting stabilization of HIF-1. We therefore identified a redox-dependent circuitry linking hypoxia-driven ROS to VEGF-A secretion and to enhanced melanoma cell survival to etoposide chemotherapy.

  1. Hypoxia induces heart regeneration in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yuji; Canseco, Diana C; Thet, SuWannee; Abdisalaam, Salim; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Santos, Celio X; Shah, Ajay M; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E; Kinter, Michael T; Szweda, Luke I; Xing, Chao; Hu, Zeping; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Schiattarella, Gabriele; Hill, Joseph A; Oz, Orhan; Lu, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kimura, Wataru; Sadek, Hesham A

    2017-01-12

    The adult mammalian heart is incapable of regeneration following cardiomyocyte loss, which underpins the lasting and severe effects of cardiomyopathy. Recently, it has become clear that the mammalian heart is not a post-mitotic organ. For example, the neonatal heart is capable of regenerating lost myocardium, and the adult heart is capable of modest self-renewal. In both of these scenarios, cardiomyocyte renewal occurs via the proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, and is regulated by aerobic-respiration-mediated oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we reasoned that inhibiting aerobic respiration by inducing systemic hypoxaemia would alleviate oxidative DNA damage, thereby inducing cardiomyocyte proliferation in adult mammals. Here we report that, in mice, gradual exposure to severe systemic hypoxaemia, in which inspired oxygen is gradually decreased by 1% and maintained at 7% for 2 weeks, results in inhibition of oxidative metabolism, decreased reactive oxygen species production and oxidative DNA damage, and reactivation of cardiomyocyte mitosis. Notably, we find that exposure to hypoxaemia 1 week after induction of myocardial infarction induces a robust regenerative response with decreased myocardial fibrosis and improvement of left ventricular systolic function. Genetic fate-mapping analysis confirms that the newly formed myocardium is derived from pre-existing cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate that the endogenous regenerative properties of the adult mammalian heart can be reactivated by exposure to gradual systemic hypoxaemia, and highlight the potential therapeutic role of hypoxia in regenerative medicine.

  2. Advances of Hypoxia and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing LI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the malignant tumors with fastest growing rates in incidence and mortality in our country, also with largest threat to human health and life. However, the exact mechanisms underlying lung cancer development remain unclear. The microenvironment of tumor hypoxia was discovered in 1955, but hypoxia in lung cancer tissues had not been successfully detected till 2006. Further studies show that hypoxia not only functions through the resistance to radiotherapy, but also regulates lung cancer development, invasion, metastasis, chemotherapy resistance and prognosis through an important oncogene HIF (hypoxia inducible factor, with its regulators PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain and pVHL (product of von Hippel-Lindau gene. Therefore, hypoxia, HIF, PHD and pVHL should be considered as potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer pathogenesis and progression.

  3. BAG-1 haplo-insufficiency impairs lung tumorigenesis

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    Camarero Guadalupe

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAG-1 is a multifunctional co-chaperone of heat shock proteins (Hsc70/Hsp70 that is expressed in most cells. It interacts with Bcl-2 and Raf indicating that it might connect protein folding with other signaling pathways. Evidence that BAG-1 expression is frequently altered in human cancers, in particular in breast cancer, relative to normal cells has been put forward but the notion that overexpression of BAG-1 contributes to poor prognosis in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Methods We have evaluated the effect of BAG-1 heterozygosity in mice in a model of non-small-cell lung tumorigenesis with histological and molecular methods. We have generated mice heterozygous for BAG-1, carrying a BAG-1 null allele, that in addition express oncogenic, constitutively active C-Raf kinase (SP-C C-Raf BxB in type II pneumocytes. SP-C C-Raf BxB mice develop multifocal adenomas early in adulthood. Results We show that BAG-1 heterozygosity in mice impairs C-Raf oncogene-induced lung adenoma growth. Lung tumor initiation was reduced by half in BAG-1 heterozygous SP-C C-Raf BxB mice compared to their littermates. Tumor area was reduced by 75% in 4 month lungs of BAG-1 haploinsufficient mice compared to mice with two BAG-1 copies. Whereas BAG-1 heterozygosity did not affect the rate of cell proliferation or signaling through the mitogenic cascade in adenoma cells, it increased the rate of apoptosis. Conclusion Reduced BAG-1 expression specifically targets tumor cells to apoptosis and impairs tumorigenesis. Our data implicate BAG-1 as a key player in oncogenic transformation by Raf and identify it as a potential molecular target for cancer treatment.

  4. The Role of MUC1 Cytoplasmic Domain in Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    5 AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-1-0476 TITLE: The Role of MUCI Cytoplasmic Domain in Tumorigenesis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Assah Al-Masri CONTRACTING ...The overall aim of the research is to develop a better understanding of the role of MUCI in breast cancer. Loss of Mucl (mouse homologue of MUC1...significant delay in tumor progression that is observed in the absence of Mucl . We suggest that the interaction of Mucl with c-Src, a key player in PyV MT

  5. Drosophila as a model for context-dependent tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipping, Marla; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila can exhibit classic hallmarks of cancer, such as evasion of apoptosis, sustained proliferation, metastasis, prolonged survival, genome instability, and metabolic reprogramming, when cancer-related genes are perturbed. In the last two decades, studies in flies have identified several tumor suppressor and oncogenes. However, the greatest strength of the fly lies in its ability to model cancer hallmarks in a variety of tissue types, which enables the study of context-dependent tumorigenesis. We review the organs and tissues that have been used to model tumor formation, and propose new strategies to maximize the potential of Drosophila in cancer research.

  6. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  7. Developmental programming of O(2) sensing by neonatal intermittent hypoxia via epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in infants born preterm. Carotid body chemo-reflex and catecholamine secretion from adrenal medullary chromaffin cells (AMC) are important for maintenance of cardio-respiratory homeostasis during hypoxia. This article highlights studies on the effects of IH on O(2) sensing by the carotid body and AMC in neonatal rodents. Neonatal IH augments hypoxia-evoked carotid body sensory excitation and catecholamine secretion from AMC which are mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent recruitment of endothelin-1 and Ca(2+) signaling, respectively. The effects of neonatal IH persist into adulthood. Evidence is emerging that neonatal IH initiates epigenetic mechanisms involving DNA hypermethylation contributing to long-lasting increase in ROS levels. Since adult human subjects born preterm exhibit higher incidence of sleep-disordered breathing and hypertension, DNA hypomethylating agents might offer a novel therapeutic intervention to decrease long-term cardio-respiratory morbidity caused by neonatal IH.

  8. The circadian mutation PER2(S662G) is linked to cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis.

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    Gu, X; Xing, L; Shi, G; Liu, Z; Wang, X; Qu, Z; Wu, X; Dong, Z; Gao, X; Liu, G; Yang, L; Xu, Y

    2012-03-01

    Circadian oscillation and cell cycle progression are the two most essential rhythmic events present in almost all organisms. Circadian rhythms keep track of time and provide temporal regulation with a period of about 24 h. The cell cycle is optimized for growth and division, but not for time keeping. Circadian gated cell divisions are observed in nearly all organisms. However, the implications of this coupling to the physiology of mammals are unknown. A mutation (S662G) in the clock protein PERIOD2 (PER2) is responsible for familial advanced sleep phase syndrome in which sleep onset occurs in the early evening and wakefulness occurs in the early morning. Here, we provide evidence that the PER2(S662) mutation leads to enhanced resistance to X-ray-induced apoptosis and increased E1A- and RAS-mediated oncogenic transformation. Accordingly, the PER2(S662) mutation affects tumorigenesis in cancer-sensitized p53(R172H/+) mice. Finally, analyzing the clock-controlled cell cycle genes p21, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and p27, we found that the relative phases between p21 and Cyclin D expression profiles have been changed significantly in these Per2 allele mutant mouse embryonic fibroblasts. This key role of the Per2-mediated phase alteration of p21 provides what we believe to be a novel mechanism in understanding cell cycle progression, its plasticity and its resistance to interference.

  9. Impact of interleukin-6 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and lung inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izziki Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of various forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH. Recent studies in patients with idiopathic PH or PH associated with underlying diseases suggest a role for interleukin-6 (IL-6. Methods To determine whether endogenous IL-6 contributes to mediate hypoxic PH and lung inflammation, we studied IL-6-deficient (IL-6-/- and wild-type (IL-6+/+ mice exposed to hypoxia for 2 weeks. Results Right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and the number and media thickness of muscular pulmonary vessels were decreased in IL-6-/- mice compared to wild-type controls after 2 weeks' hypoxia, although the pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar in IL-6+/+ and IL-6-/- mice. Hypoxia exposure of IL-6+/+ mice led to marked increases in IL-6 mRNA and protein levels within the first week, with positive IL-6 immunostaining in the pulmonary vessel walls. Lung IL-6 receptor and gp 130 (the IL-6 signal transducer mRNA levels increased after 1 and 2 weeks' hypoxia. In vitro studies of cultured human pulmonary-artery smooth-muscle-cells (PA-SMCs and microvascular endothelial cells revealed prominent synthesis of IL-6 by PA-SMCs, with further stimulation by hypoxia. IL-6 also markedly stimulated PA-SMC migration without affecting proliferation. Hypoxic IL-6-/- mice showed less inflammatory cell recruitment in the lungs, compared to hypoxic wild-type mice, as assessed by lung protein levels and immunostaining for the specific macrophage marker F4/80, with no difference in lung expression of adhesion molecules or cytokines. Conclusion These data suggest that IL-6 may be actively involved in hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice.

  10. Parabiotic model for differentiating local and systemic effects of continuous and intermittent hypoxia.

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    Torres, Marta; Rojas, Mauricio; Campillo, Noelia; Cardenes, Nayra; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia can be damaging either because cells are directly sensitive to low oxygen pressure in their local microenvironment and/or because they are exposed to circulating factors systemically secreted in response to hypoxia. The conventional hypoxia model, breathing hypoxic air, does not allow one to distinguish between these local and systemic effects. Here we propose and validate a model for differentially applying local and systemic hypoxic challenges in an animal. We used parabiosis, two mice sharing circulation by surgical union through the skin, and tested the hypothesis that when one of the parabionts breathes room air and the other one is subjected to hypoxic air, both mice share systemic circulation but remain normoxic and hypoxic, respectively. We tested two common hypoxic paradigms in 10 parabiotic pairs: continuous hypoxia (10% O2) mimicking chronic lung diseases, and intermittent hypoxia (40 s, 21% O2; 20 s, 5% O2) simulating sleep apnea. Arterial oxygen saturation and oxygen partial pressure at muscle tissue were measured in both parabionts. Effective cross-circulation was assessed by intraperitoneally injecting a dye in one of the parabionts and measuring blood dye concentration in both animals after 2 h. The results confirmed the hypothesis that tissues of the parabiont under room air were perfused with normally oxygenated blood and, at the same time, were exposed to all of the systemic mediators secreted by the other parabiont actually subjected to hypoxia. In conclusion, combination of parabiosis and hypoxic/normoxic air breathing is a novel approach to investigate the effects of local and systemic hypoxia in respiratory diseases.

  11. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies, presumed airway hypoxia sensors, in hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase-deficient mice.

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    Pan, Jie; Bishop, Tammie; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), presumed polymodal airway sensors, consist of innervated clusters of amine (serotonin) and peptide-producing cells. While NEB responses to acute hypoxia are mediated by a membrane-bound O2 sensor complex, responses to sustained and/or chronic hypoxia involve a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)-hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent mechanism. We have previously reported hyperplasia of NEBs in the lungs of Phd1-/- mice associated with enhanced serotonin secretion. Here we use a novel multilabel immunofluorescence method to assess NEB distribution, frequency, and size, together with the number and size of NEB cell nuclei, and to colocalize multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear epitopes in the lungs of Phd1-/-, Phd2+/-, and Phd3-/- mice and compare them with wild-type controls. To define the mechanisms of NEB cell hyperplasia, we used antibodies against Mash1 and Prox1 (neurogenic genes involved in NEB cell differentiation/maturation), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Morphometric analysis of (% total lung area) immunostaining for synaptophysin (% synaptophysin), a cytoplasmic marker of NEB cells, was significantly increased in Phd1-/- and Phd3-/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, NEB size and the number and size of NEB nuclei were also significantly increased, indicating that deficiency of Phds is associated with striking hyperplasia and hypertrophy of NEBs. In Phd2+/- mice, while mean % synaptophysin was comparable to wild-type controls, the NEB size was moderately increased, suggesting an effect even in heterozygotes. NEBs in all Phd-deficient mice showed increased expression of Mash1, Prox1, Ki67, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, in keeping with enhanced differentiation from precursor cells and a minor component of cell proliferation. Since the loss of PHD activity mimics chronic hypoxia, our data provide critical information on the potential role of PHDs in the pathobiology and

  12. Effect of superoxide anion scavenger on rat hearts with chronic intermittent hypoxia.

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    Pai, Peiying; Lai, Ching Jung; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Liou, Yi-Fan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2016-04-15

    Only very limited information regarding the protective effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiac apoptosis is available. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of the superoxide anion scavenger on cardiac apoptotic and prosurvival pathways in rats with sleep apnea. Forty-two Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, rats with normoxic exposure (Control, 21% O2, 1 mo), rats with chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia, 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo), and rats with pretreatment of the superoxide anion scavenger and chronic intermittent hypoxia exposure (Hypoxia-O2 (-)-Scavenger, MnTMPyP pentachloride, 1 mg/kg ip per day; 3-7% O2vs. 21% O2per 40 s cycle, 8 h per day, 1 mo) at 5-6 mo of age. After 1 mo, the protein levels and apoptotic cells of excised hearts from three groups were measured by Western blotting and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced myocardial architecture abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy, and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger decreased hypoxia-induced Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, Fas-associated death domain (FADD), activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptotic pathway) as well as Bad, activated caspase-9 and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway), endonuclease G (EndoG), apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and TUNEL-positive apoptosis. The superoxide anion scavenger increased IGF-1, IGF-1R, p-PI3k, p-Akt, p-Bad, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL (survival pathway). Our findings imply that the superoxide anion scavenger might prevent cardiac Fas-mediated and mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis and enhance the IGF-1-related survival pathway in chronic intermittent hypoxia. The superoxide anion scavenger may prevent chronic sleep apnea-enhanced cardiac apoptotic pathways and enhances

  13. Tumor microenvironment conditions alter Akt and Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 expression in endothelial cells more than hypoxia alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anna-Kathrine; Mendes Lopes de Melo, Joana; Mørup, Nina

    2017-01-01

    Background Chronic angiogenesis is a hallmark of most tumors and takes place in a hostile tumor microenvironment (TME) characterized by hypoxia, low nutrient and glucose levels, elevated lactate and low pH. Despite this, most studies addressing angiogenic signaling use hypoxia as a proxy for tumor......% hypoxia, low serum, glucose, pH, high lactate) or 1% hypoxia for 24 or 48 h, with or without NHE1 inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown. mRNA and protein levels of NHE1, Akt1–3, and downstream effectors were assessed by qPCR and Western blotting, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release by ELISA...... cells, Akt1 most abundantly. Akt1 protein expression was reduced by TME yet unaffected by hypoxia, while Akt phosphorylation was increased by TME. The Akt loss was partly reversed by MCF-7 human breast cancer cell conditioned medium, suggesting that in vivo, the cancer cell secretome may compensate...

  14. Combination effects of sorafenib with PI3K inhibitors under hypoxia in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia DR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dimple R Bhatia, Padma Thiagarajan School of Biosciences and Technology, Vellore Institute of Technology University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Aim: This study reports the influence of hypoxia on response of colorectal cancer cells to anticancer effects of sorafenib in combination with PI3K inhibitors GDC-0941 and BEZ-235.Materials and methods: All hypoxic exposures were carried out at 1% O2/5% CO2. Antiproliferation activity was evaluated by 48 hours propidium iodide and 14 days clonogenic assay. Protein levels were evaluated by fluorescence ELISA. Metabolites lactate and glucose were evaluated biochemically.Results: In the 48-hour proliferation assay, sorafenib acted synergistically with GDC-0941 but not with BEZ-235. In long-term colony-forming assays, both GDC-0941 and BEZ-235 were shown to potentiate the antiproliferative activity of sorafenib. At the molecular level, the synergism is mediated through inhibition of pAKT, pS6, p4EBP1, pERK, cyclin D1, and Bcl-2. No change in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α levels was observed in cells treated with the combination of compounds under hypoxia. A significant reduction in glucose uptake and lactate release was observed in cells treated with the combination of compounds under normoxia and hypoxia.Conclusion: Combinations of sorafenib with PI3K inhibitors BEZ-235 and GDC-0941 are efficacious under hypoxia. Thus, these anticancer combinations have a potential to overcome the hypoxia-mediated resistance mechanisms to antiproliferative agents in cancer therapy. Keywords: GDC-0941, BEZ-235, anticancer, antiproliferation

  15. The key role of nitric oxide in hypoxia: hypoxic vasodilation and energy supply-demand matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2013-11-10

    A mismatch between energy supply and demand induces tissue hypoxia with the potential to cause cell death and organ failure. Whenever arterial oxygen concentration is reduced, increases in blood flow--hypoxic vasodilation--occur in an attempt to restore oxygen supply. Nitric oxide (NO) is a major signaling and effector molecule mediating the body's response to hypoxia, given its unique characteristics of vasodilation (improving blood flow and oxygen supply) and modulation of energetic metabolism (reducing oxygen consumption and promoting utilization of alternative pathways). This review covers the role of oxygen in metabolism and responses to hypoxia, the hemodynamic and metabolic effects of NO, and mechanisms underlying the involvement of NO in hypoxic vasodilation. Recent insights into NO metabolism will be discussed, including the role for dietary intake of nitrate, endogenous nitrite (NO₂⁻) reductases, and release of NO from storage pools. The processes through which NO levels are elevated during hypoxia are presented, namely, (i) increased synthesis from NO synthases, increased reduction of NO₂⁻ to NO by heme- or pterin-based enzymes and increased release from NO stores, and (ii) reduced deactivation by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase. Several reviews covered modulation of energetic metabolism by NO, while here we highlight the crucial role NO plays in achieving cardiocirculatory homeostasis during acute hypoxia through both vasodilation and metabolic suppression. We identify a key position for NO in the body's adaptation to an acute energy supply-demand mismatch.

  16. Oxygen sensing by the carotid body: mechanisms and role in adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; González-Rodríguez, Patricia; Gao, Lin; Fernández-Agüera, M Carmen; Pardal, Ricardo; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia

    2016-04-15

    Oxygen (O2) is fundamental for cell and whole-body homeostasis. Our understanding of the adaptive processes that take place in response to a lack of O2(hypoxia) has progressed significantly in recent years. The carotid body (CB) is the main arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the acute cardiorespiratory reflexes (hyperventilation and sympathetic activation) triggered by hypoxia. The CB is composed of clusters of cells (glomeruli) in close contact with blood vessels and nerve fibers. Glomus cells, the O2-sensitive elements in the CB, are neuron-like cells that contain O2-sensitive K(+)channels, which are inhibited by hypoxia. This leads to cell depolarization, Ca(2+)entry, and the release of transmitters to activate sensory fibers terminating at the respiratory center. The mechanism whereby O2modulates K(+)channels has remained elusive, although several appealing hypotheses have been postulated. Recent data suggest that mitochondria complex I signaling to membrane K(+)channels plays a fundamental role in acute O2sensing. CB activation during exposure to low Po2is also necessary for acclimatization to chronic hypoxia. CB growth during sustained hypoxia depends on the activation of a resident population of stem cells, which are also activated by transmitters released from the O2-sensitive glomus cells. These advances should foster further studies on the role of CB dysfunction in the pathogenesis of highly prevalent human diseases.

  17. Apelin Protects Primary Rat Retinal Pericytes from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Apoptosis

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    Li Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericytes are a population of cells that participate in normal vessel architecture and regulate permeability. Apelin, as the endogenous ligand of G protein-coupled receptor APJ, participates in a number of physiological and pathological processes. To date, the effect of apelin on pericyte is not clear. Our study aimed to investigate the potential protection mechanisms of apelin, with regard to primary rat retinal pericytes under hypoxia. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that pericytes colocalized with APJ in the fibrovascular membranes dissected from proliferative diabetic retinopathy patients. In the in vitro studies, we first demonstrated that the expression of apelin/APJ was upregulated in pericytes under hypoxia, and apelin increased pericytes proliferation and migration. Moreover, knockdown of apelin in pericyte was achieved via lentivirus-mediated RNA interference. After the inhibition of apelin, pericytes proliferation was inhibited significantly in hypoxia culture condition. Furthermore, exogenous recombinant apelin effectively prevented hypoxia-induced apoptosis through downregulating active-caspase 3 expression and increasing the ratio of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2/Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax in pericytes. These results suggest that apelin suppressed hypoxia-induced pericytes injury, which indicated that apelin could be a potential therapeutic target for retinal angiogenic diseases.

  18. The effect of intermittent hypobaric-hypoxia treatments on renal glutathione peroxidase activity of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, I. A.; Jusman, S. W. A.

    2017-08-01

    Many people living at high altitudes experiencing a condition called intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH). Some people even create IHH condition as an exercise for pilots, athletes, and mountaineers. In this experiment, we aimed to determine whether the protective effect of IHH is mediated through glutathione peroxidase (GPX) enzyme. The experiment’s sample is two-month-old healthy Sprague-Dawley rat kidneys weighing 200-250 g. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia treatment is done using a Hypobaric Chamber type I that can mimic air pressure at certain altitudes: 35,000 (one minute), 30,000 (three minutes), 25,000 (five minutes), and 18,000 (30 minutes) feet. The rats were divided into five treatment groups, including a control group, hypobaric-hypoxia group, and intermittent hypobaric-hypoxia 1x, 2x, and 3x groups with each group consisting of three rats. The specific activity of GPX was measured using RANDOX and RANSEL methods. The statistical analysis of one way-ANOVA did not show significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05), although specific activities of the renal GPX of rats exposed to hypobaric-hypoxia were higher than the control group. This may be caused by the other antioxidants’ activities. In conclusion, the IHH treatment did not affect GPX activity in the rat kidneys.

  19. Hypoxia-inducible genes encoding small EF-hand proteins in rice and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Chie; Minami, Ikuko; Oda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    Rice has evolved metabolic and morphological adaptations to low-oxygen stress to grow in submerged paddy fields. To characterize the molecular components that mediate the response to hypoxia in rice, we identified low-oxygen stress early response genes by microarray analysis. Among the highly responsive genes, five genes, OsHREF1 to OsHREF5, shared strong homology. They encoded small proteins harboring two EF-hands, typical Ca(2+)-binding motifs. Homologous genes were found in many land plants, including SlHREF in tomato, which is also strongly induced by hypoxia. SlHREF induction was detected in both roots and shoots of tomato plants under hypoxia. With the exception of OsHREF5, OsHREF expression was unaffected by drought, salinity, cold, or osmotic stress. Fluorescent signals of green fluorescent protein-fused OsHREFs were detected in the cytosol and nucleus. Ruthenium red, an inhibitor of intracellular Ca(2+) release, repressed induction of OsHREF1-4 under hypoxia. The HREFs may be related to the Ca(2+) response to hypoxia.

  20. Truncated forms of BNIP3 act as dominant negatives inhibiting hypoxia-induced cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Nicolle; Burton, Teralee R; Henson, Elizabeth S; Ong-Justiniano, Coleen; Brown, Michelle; Gibson, Spencer B

    2011-01-01

    BNIP3 (Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B Ninteen Kilodalton Interacting Protein) is a pro-cell death member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins. Its expression is induced by the transcription factor Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1) under conditions of low oxygen (hypoxia) and is found over expressed in hypoxic regions of many tumors. When over expressed, BNIP3 induces cell death through induction of mitochondrial dysfunction that is dependant on the presence of BNIP3’s TM domain. Herein, we have determined that the SkOv3 ovarian cancer cell line expresses a truncated BNIP3 protein, which results in the elimination of the transmembrane domain. Truncation that eliminates all four domains of BNIP3 protein also inhibits hypoxia-induced cell death in SkOv3, HEK293, U251 and MCF-7 cells. Three different mutations in a BNIP3 expression vector that lead to a truncated BNIP3 protein, lacking TM domain only, or lacking CD, BH3, and TM domains resulted in inhibition of hypoxia-induced cell death when transfected into HEK293 cells. We found that truncated BNIP3 failed to associate with the mitochondria and the truncated BNIP3 lacking all four domains can bind to wild type BNIP3. Taken together, truncation of BNIP3 could be a novel mechanism for cancer cells to avoid hypoxia-induced cell death mediated by BNIP3 over expression. PMID:21138765

  1. New and emerging factors in tumorigenesis: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suwon

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the genes and cellular processes that have emerged recently as new key factors in tumorigenesis. We review these in the context of three broad categories. First, genome-scale sequencing studies have revealed a set of frequently mutated genes in cancer. Genes that are mutated in >5% of all cancers across tissue types are discussed, with a highlighted focus on the two most frequently mutated genes, TP53 and PIK3CA. Second, the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy are reviewed. These include acquired resistance under targeted therapy selection owing to mutations and amplification of genes in the same or parallel signaling pathways. Importantly, sequencing of primary tumors has revealed that therapy-resistant clones already exist prior to targeted therapy, demonstrating that tumor heterogeneity in primary tumors confers a mechanism for inherent therapy resistance. Third, "metastasis-specific genes", or rather lack thereof, are discussed. While many genes have been shown to be capable of promoting metastasis in experimental systems, no common genetic alterations have been identified specific to metastatic lesions. Rather, the same gene mutations frequently found in primary tumors are also found prevalent in metastases, suggesting that the genes that drive tumorigenesis may also drive metastasis. In this light, an emerging view of metastatic progression is discussed. Collectively, these recent advances in cancer research have refined our knowledge on cancer etiology and progression but also present challenges that will require innovative new approaches to treat and manage cancer.

  2. Patched2 modulates tumorigenesis in patched1 heterozygous mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngsoo; Miller, Heather L; Russell, Helen R; Boyd, Kelli; Curran, Tom; McKinnon, Peter J

    2006-07-15

    The sonic hedgehog (SHH) receptor Patched 1 (Ptch1) is critical for embryonic development, and its loss is linked to tumorigenesis. Germ line inactivation of one copy of Ptch1 predisposes to basal cell carcinoma and medulloblastoma in mouse and man. In many cases, medulloblastoma arising from perturbations of Ptch1 function leads to a concomitant up-regulation of a highly similar gene, Patched2 (Ptch2). As increased expression of Ptch2 is associated with medulloblastoma and other tumors, we investigated the role of Ptch2 in tumor suppression by generating Ptch2-deficient mice. In striking contrast to Ptch1-/- mice, Ptch2-/- animals were born alive and showed no obvious defects and were not cancer prone. However, loss of Ptch2 markedly affected tumor formation in combination with Ptch1 haploinsufficiency. Ptch1+/-Ptch2-/- and Ptch1+/-Ptch2+/- animals showed a higher incidence of tumors and a broader spectrum of tumor types compared with Ptch1+/- animals. Therefore, Ptch2 modulates tumorigenesis associated with Ptch1 haploinsufficiency.

  3. Aerosol administration of phospho-sulindac inhibits lung tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ka Wing; Wong, Chi C; Alston, Ninche; Mackenzie, Gerardo G; Huang, Liqun; Ouyang, Nengtai; Xie, Gang; Wiedmann, Timothy; Rigas, Basil

    2013-08-01

    Phospho-sulindac is a sulindac derivative with promising anticancer activity in lung cancer, but its limited metabolic stability presents a major challenge for systemic therapy. We reasoned that inhalation delivery of phospho-sulindac might overcome first-pass metabolism and produce high levels of intact drug in lung tumors. Here, we developed a system for aerosolization of phospho-sulindac and evaluated the antitumor efficacy of inhaled phospho-sulindac in an orthotopic model of human non-small cell lung cancer (A549 cells). We found that administration by inhalation delivered high levels of phospho-sulindac to the lungs and minimized its hydrolysis to less active metabolites. Consequently, inhaled phospho-sulindac (6.5 mg/kg) was highly effective in inhibiting lung tumorigenesis (75%; P sulindac suppressed lung tumorigenesis by (i) inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) activation, leading to profound inhibition of Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR survival cascades; (ii) inducing oxidative stress, which provokes the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondria-dependent cell death; and (iii) inducing autophagic cell death. Our data establish that inhalation delivery of phospho-sulindac is an efficacious approach to the control of lung cancer, which merits further evaluation.

  4. The TEAD Family and Its Oncogenic Role in Promoting Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The TEAD family of transcription factors is necessary for developmental processes. The family members contain a TEA domain for the binding with DNA elements and a transactivation domain for the interaction with transcription coactivators. TEAD proteins are required for the participation of coactivators to transmit the signal of pathways for the downstream signaling processes. TEADs also play an important role in tumor initiation and facilitate cancer progression via activating a series of progression-inducing genes, such as CTGF, Cyr61, Myc and Gli2. Recent studies have highlighted that TEADs, together with their coactivators, promote or even act as the crucial parts in the development of various malignancies, such as liver, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. Furthermore, TEADs are proposed to be useful prognostic biomarkers due to the ideal correlation between high expression and clinicopathological parameters in gastric, breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this review, we summarize the functional role of TEAD proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss the key role of TEAD transcription factors in the linking of signal cascade transductions. Improved knowledge of the TEAD proteins will be helpful for deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and identifying ideal predictive or prognostic biomarkers, even providing clinical translation for anticancer therapy in human cancers.

  5. The TEAD Family and Its Oncogenic Role in Promoting Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuhang; Huang, Tingting; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Kang, Wei; To, Ka Fai

    2016-01-21

    The TEAD family of transcription factors is necessary for developmental processes. The family members contain a TEA domain for the binding with DNA elements and a transactivation domain for the interaction with transcription coactivators. TEAD proteins are required for the participation of coactivators to transmit the signal of pathways for the downstream signaling processes. TEADs also play an important role in tumor initiation and facilitate cancer progression via activating a series of progression-inducing genes, such as CTGF, Cyr61, Myc and Gli2. Recent studies have highlighted that TEADs, together with their coactivators, promote or even act as the crucial parts in the development of various malignancies, such as liver, ovarian, breast and prostate cancers. Furthermore, TEADs are proposed to be useful prognostic biomarkers due to the ideal correlation between high expression and clinicopathological parameters in gastric, breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. In this review, we summarize the functional role of TEAD proteins in tumorigenesis and discuss the key role of TEAD transcription factors in the linking of signal cascade transductions. Improved knowledge of the TEAD proteins will be helpful for deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of tumorigenesis and identifying ideal predictive or prognostic biomarkers, even providing clinical translation for anticancer therapy in human cancers.

  6. Hypoxia induces apelin expression in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, K; Muendlein, A; Stark, N; Saely, C H; Wabitsch, M; Fraunberger, P; Drexel, H

    2011-06-01

    Adipokines play a central role in the development of diseases associated with insulin resistance and obesity. Hypoxia in adipose tissue leads to a dysregulation of the expression of adipokines. The effect of hypoxia on the more recently identified adipokine apelin in human adipocytes is unclear. Therefore, we aimed at investigating the role of hypoxia on the expression of the adipokine apelin. Differentiated human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes were cultured under hypoxic conditions for varying time periods. A modular incubator chamber was used to create a hypoxic tissue culture environment (defined as 1% O(2), 94% N, and 5% CO(2)). In addition, hypoxic conditions were mimicked by using CoCl(2). The effect of hypoxia on the expression of the investigated adipokines was measured by real-time PCR and the secretion of apelin was quantified by ELISA. Induction of hypoxia significantly induced mRNA expression of leptin and apelin in differentiated SGBS adipocytes compared with the normoxic control condition. Expression of adiponectin was significantly decreased by hypoxia. In addition, the amount of secreted apelin protein in response to hypoxia was elevated compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that the observed hypoxia-induced induction of apelin mRNA expression is in the first phase dependent on HIF-1α. In our study, we could demonstrate for the first time that apelin expression and secretion by human adipocytes are strongly induced under hypoxic conditions and that the early response on hypoxia with apelin induction is dependent on HIF-1α. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  8. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrink, Sabine U; Severson, Paul L; Kulak, Mikhail V; Futscher, Bernard W; Domann, Frederick E

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O2 prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity.

  9. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  10. Isoliquiritigenin, a flavonoid from licorice, blocks M2 macrophage polarization in colitis-associated tumorigenesis through downregulating PGE{sub 2} and IL-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haixia [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Zhang, Xinhua [Department of Liver, Biliary And Pancreatic Tumors, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan 430079 (China); Chen, Xuewei; Li, Ying; Ke, Zunqiong [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Tang, Tian [Department of Oncology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Chai, Hongyan [Center for Gene Diagnosis, Zhongnan Hospital, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Guo, Austin M. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Chen, Honglei, E-mail: hl-chen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology and Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Yang, Jing, E-mail: yangjingliu2013@163.com [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-09-15

    M2 macrophage polarization is implicated in colorectal cancer development. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL), a flavonoid from licorice, has been reported to prevent azoxymethane (AOM) induced colon carcinogenesis in animal models. Here, in a mouse model of colitis-associated tumorigenesis induced by AOM/dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), we investigated the chemopreventive effects of ISL and its mechanisms of action. Mice were treated with AOM/DSS and randomized to receive either vehicle or ISL (3, 15 and 75 mg/kg). Tumor load, histology, immunohistochemistry, and gene and protein expressions were determined. Intragastric administration of ISL for 12 weeks significantly decreased colon cancer incidence, multiplicity and tumor size by 60%, 55.4% and 42.6%, respectively. Moreover, ISL inhibited M2 macrophage polarization. Such changes were accompanied by downregulation of PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling. Importantly, depletion of macrophages by clodronate (Clod) or zoledronic acid (ZA) reversed the effects of ISL. In parallel, in vitro studies also demonstrated that ISL limited the M2 polarization of RAW264.7 cells and mouse peritoneal macrophages with concomitant inactivation of PGE{sub 2}/PPARδ and IL-6/STAT3 signaling. Conversely, exogenous addition of PGE{sub 2} or IL-6, or overexpression of constitutively active STAT3 reversed ISL-mediated inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization. In summary, dietary flavonoid ISL effectively inhibits colitis-associated tumorigenesis through hampering M2 macrophage polarization mediated by the interplay between PGE{sub 2} and IL-6. Thus, inhibition of M2 macrophage polarization is likely to represent a promising strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. - Highlights: • Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) prevents colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL inhibits M2 macrophage polarization in vivo and in vitro. • ISL inhibits PGE{sub 2} and IL-6 signaling in colitis-associated tumorigenesis. • ISL may be an attractive candidate agent for

  11. ERK/MAPK activation involves hypoxia-induced MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression and contributes to apoptosis resistance in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lili; Zhang, Hongbo; Sun, Li; Gao, Yuqi; Jin, Haifeng; Liang, Shuhui; Wang, Yanxia; Dong, Mingqing; Shi, Yongquan; Li, Zhichao; Fan, Daiming

    2010-08-15

    We previously demonstrated that hypoxia increased the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1)-dependent MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression, which enhanced adhesion of gastric cancer cells to laminin, inhibited drug-induced apoptosis and caused cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR). Here, we investigated the role of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 in the signaling mechanisms underlying these events. We found that hypoxia activated ERK activity in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK), which preferentially activated ERK, mimics, in a nonadditive way, hypoxia-induced activity of MGr1-Ag/37LRP promoter and expression of MGr1-Ag/37LRP. Furthermore, U0126, the MEK inhibitor, inhibited hypoxia- and MEK-induced MGr1-Ag/37LRP promoter activity in a dose-dependent manner. MEK inhibition also reversed hypoxia- and MEK-induced HIF-1 protein and its activity in a dose-dependent manner. We also investigated reactive oxygen species signaling this response. Exogenous addition of H(2)O(2) was sufficient to activate ERK in a dose-dependent profile. Reactive oxygen species scavengers of H(2)O(2) significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced ERK or HIF-1 activation and sequential expression of MGr1-Ag/37LRP. We also investigated the signaling in hypoxia-induced cell adhesion and apoptosis induced by vincristine. Hypoxia significantly enhanced adhesion of SGC7901 cells to laminin in a time-dependent manner, which might be inhibited by the MEK inhibitor U0126 and MGr1-Ag/37LRP siRNA. Consistent with results of adhesion assay, hypoxia-resistant apoptosis might be reversed by U0126 in a dose-dependent manner. Our results suggest that hypoxia-elicited MGr1-Ag/37LRP expression activated by HIF-1 depends on ERK activation. These events are dependent of reactive oxygen intermediates.

  12. Trim25 Is an RNA-Specific Activator of Lin28a/TuT4-Mediated Uridylation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choudhury, Nila Roy; Nowak, Jakub S; Zuo, Juan; Rappsilber, Juri; Spoel, Steven H; Michlewski, Gracjan

    2014-01-01

    .... Lin28a is a conserved RNA binding protein involved in pluripotency and tumorigenesis that was previously shown to trigger TuT4-mediated pre-let-7 uridylation, inhibiting its processing and targeting it for degradation...

  13. Hypoxia induces discoidin domain receptor-2 expression via the p38 pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells to increase their migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Chung; Wang, Bao-Wei; Wang, Danny Ling; Shyu, Kou-Gi

    2008-10-03

    Discoidin domain receptor-2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that binds to the extracellular matrix. We investigated the role of hypoxia in DDR2 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the underlying mechanism. Subjecting VSMCs to hypoxia (2.5% O(2)) induced DDR2 expression; treatments with a specific inhibitor (SB203580) of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or p38-specific small interference RNA (siRNA) abolished this hypoxia-induced DDR2 expression. Gel shifting assays showed that hypoxia increased the Myc-Max-DNA binding activity in the promoter region of DDR2; inhibition of p38 MAPK activation by SB203580 and p38-specific siRNA blocked hypoxia-induced DDR2 promoter activity. Hypoxia also induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in VSMCs and increased their migration. These VSMC responses to hypoxia were inhibited by DDR2- and p38-specific siRNAs. Our results suggested that hypoxia induces DDR2 expression in VSMCs at the transcriptional level, which is mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway and contributes to VSMC migration.

  14. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation.

  15. Hypoxia-triggered m-calpain activation evokes endoplasmic reticulum stress and neuropathogenesis in a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Xie, Jing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Bao-Lu; An, Li; Wang, Zhan-You

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is activated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. ER stress-triggered unfolded protein response (UPR) leads to tau phosphorylation and neuronal death. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced m-calpain activation is involved in ER stress-mediated AD pathogenesis. We employed a hypoxic exposure in APP/PS1 transgenic mice and SH-SY5Y cells overexpressing human Swedish mutation APP (APPswe). We observed that hypoxia impaired spatial learning and memory in the APP/PS1 mouse. In the transgenic mouse brain, hypoxia increased the UPR, upregulated apoptotic signaling, enhanced the activation of calpain and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β), and increased tau hyperphosphorylation and β-amyloid deposition. In APPswe cells, m-calpain silencing reduced hypoxia-induced cellular dysfunction and resulted in suppression of GSK3β activation, ER stress and tau hyperphosphorylation reduction as well as caspase pathway suppression. These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced abnormal calpain activation may increase ER stress-induced apoptosis in AD pathogenesis. In contrast, a reduction in the expression of the m-calpain isoform reduces ER stress-linked apoptosis that is triggered by hypoxia. These findings suggest that hypoxia-triggered m-calpain activation is involved in ER stress-mediated AD pathogenesis. m-calpain is a potential target for AD therapeutics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Hypoxia pretreatment and EPO-modification enhance the protective effects of MSC on neuron-like PC12 cells in a similar way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinli; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-08

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) based cell transplantation therapy is proved to be an attractive strategy with great potential for improvement of hypoxia induced neural damage. In the present study, MSCs were co-culture with PC12 to investigate its protective effects against hypoxia pretreatment, and the Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay, MTT and Anexin V staining were performed to analysis the cellular damage or apoptotic. RT-PCR and Western blotting were further used to investigate the underlying mechanism. The results indicate that hypoxia treatment results in the decrease of PC12 cell viability, yet co-culture with MSC could protect the PC12 from hypoxia induced damage. Hypoxia pre-activated or EPO transduced MSC with up-regulated erythropoietin (EPO) expression could further enhance MSC's protective effect against hypoxia induced cell damage, which was associated with high level of anti-apoptotic p-Akt and ration Bcl-2/Bax, and decreased Caspase 3 in PC12. Taken together, these data suggests high levels of MSC-mediated cyto-protection is closely tied to high gene expression levels of EPO. The up-regulation of EPO for enhanced MSC-mediated cyto-protection may has great potential for the MSC cellular therapy of neural or neuronal injuries induced by hypoxia.

  17. Polycomb Repressor Complex 1 Member, BMI1 Contributes to Urothelial Tumorigenesis through p16-Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia E. De Faveri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial carcinoma (UC causes significant morbidity and remains the most expensive cancer to treat because of the need for repeated resections and lifelong monitoring for patients with non–muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. Novel therapeutics and stratification approaches are needed to improve the outlook for both NMIBC and muscle-invasive bladder cancer. We investigated the expression and effects of B Lymphoma Mo-MLV Insertion Region 1 (BMI1 in UC. BMI1 was found to be overexpressed in most UC cell lines and primary tumors by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. In contrast to some previous reports, no association with tumor stage or grade was observed in two independent tumor panels. Furthermore, upregulation of BMI1 was detected in premalignant bladder lesions, suggesting a role early in tumorigenesis. BMI1 is not located within a common region of genomic amplification in UC. The CDKN2A locus (which encodes the p16 tumor suppressor gene is a transcriptional target of BMI1 in some cellular contexts. In UC cell lines and primary tissues, no correlation between BMI1 and p16 expression was observed. Retroviral-mediated overexpression of BMI1 immortalized normal human urothelial cells (NHUC in vitro and was associated with induction of telomerase activity, bypass of senescence, and repression of differentiation. The effects of BMI1 on gene expression were identified by expression microarray analysis of NHUC-BMI1. Metacore analysis of the gene expression profile implicated downstream effects of BMI1 on α4/β1 integrin-mediated adhesion, cytoskeleton remodeling, and CREB1-mediated transcription.

  18. 2004 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  19. 2002 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. 2003 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  1. 2006 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  2. 2007 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. 2005 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  4. 2001 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  5. Measuring and monitoring eutrophication and hypoxia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Heidemeier, J.

    Coastal hypoxia is a complex problem and, although research has made great strides in understanding its causes and remedies, more knowledge is needed to fill critical gaps that impede action. To establish long-term trends and identify changes...

  6. Triptolide protects astrocytes from hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minfang Guo; Hongcui Fan; Jiezhong Yu; Ning Ji; Yongsheng Sun; Liyun Liang; Baoguo Xiao; Cungen Ma

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes in an in vitro murine astrocyte model of oxygen and glucose deprivation/hypoxia and reoxygenation were treated with different concentrations of triptolide (250, 500, 1 000 ng/mL) in a broader attempt to elucidate the protection and mechanism underlying triptolide treatment on astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. The results showed that the matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 expressions were significantly decreased after triptolide treatment in the astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury, while interleukin-10 expression was upregulated. In addition, the vitality of the injured astrocytes was enhanced, the triptolide's effect was apparent at 500 ng/mL. These experimental findings indicate that triptolide treatment could protect astrocytes against hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury through the inhibition of inflammatory response and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

  7. Acetylation-dependent regulation of essential iPS-inducing factors: a regulatory crossroad for pluripotency and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiangpeng; Liu, Pengda; Lau, Alan W; Liu, Yueyong; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki

    2014-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated from somatic cells by coexpression of four transcription factors: Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, and c-Myc. However, the low efficiency in generating iPS cells and the tendency of tumorigenesis hinder the therapeutic applications for iPS cells in treatment of human diseases. To this end, it remains largely unknown how the iPS process is subjected to regulation by upstream signaling pathway(s). Here, we report that Akt regulates the iPS process by modulating posttranslational modifications of these iPS factors in both direct and indirect manners. Specifically, Akt directly phosphorylates Oct4 to modulate the Oct4/Sox2 heterodimer formation. Furthermore, Akt either facilitates the p300-mediated acetylation of Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, or stabilizes Klf4 by inactivating GSK3, thus indirectly modulating stemness. As tumorigenesis shares possible common features and mechanisms with iPS, our study suggests that Akt inhibition might serve as a cancer therapeutic approach to target cancer stem cells.

  8. Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis %Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xu; Jun-Yuan Ji

    2011-01-01

    Appropriately controlled gene expression is fundamental for normal growth and survival of all living organisms.In eukaryotes,the transcription of protein-coding mRNAs is dependent on RNA polymerase Ⅱ (Pol Ⅱ).The multi-subunit transcription cofactor Mediator complex is proposed to regulate most,if not all,of the Pol Ⅱ-dependent transcription.Here we focus our discussion on two subunits of the Mediator complex,cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and its regulatory partner Cyclin C (CycC),because they are either mutated or amplified in a variety of human cancers.CDK8 functions as an oncoprotein in melanoma and colorectal cancers,thus there are considerable interests in developing drugs specifically targeting the CDK8 kinase activity.However,to evaluate the feasibility of targeting CDK8 for cancer therapy and to understand how their dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis,it is essential to elucidate the in vivo function and regulation of CDK8-CycC,which are still poorly understood in multi-cellular organisms.We summarize the evidence linking their dysregulation to various cancers and present our bioinformatics and computational analyses on the structure and evolution of CDK8.We also discuss the implications of these observations in tumorigenesis.Because most of the Mediator subunits,including CDK8 and CycC,are highly conserved during eukaryotic evolution,we expect that investigations using model organisms such as Drosophila will provide important insights into the function and regulation of CDK8 and CycC in different cellular and developmental contexts.

  9. Hypoxia independent drivers of melanoma angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eMeierjohann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is a process which is traditionally regarded as the tumor`s response to low nutrient supply occurring under hypoxic conditions. However, hypoxia is not a prerequisite for angiogenesis. The fact that even single tumor cells or small tumor cell aggregates are capable of attracting blood vessels reveals the early metastatic capability of tumor cells. This review sheds light on the hypoxia independent mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis in melanoma.

  10. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons.

  11. Telomere Replication Stress Induced by POT1 Inactivation Accelerates Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzaru, Alexandra M; Hom, Robert A; Beal, Angela; Phillips, Aaron F; Ni, Eric; Cardozo, Timothy; Nair, Nidhi; Choi, Jaehyuk; Wuttke, Deborah S; Sfeir, Agnel; Denchi, Eros Lazzerini

    2016-06-01

    Genome sequencing studies have revealed a number of cancer-associated mutations in the telomere-binding factor POT1. Here, we show that when combined with p53 deficiency, depletion of murine POT1a in common lymphoid progenitor cells fosters genetic instability, accelerates the onset, and increases the severity of T cell lymphomas. In parallel, we examined human and mouse cells carrying POT1 mutations found in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) patients. Inhibition of POT1 activates ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling and induces telomere fragility, replication fork stalling, and telomere elongation. Our data suggest that these phenotypes are linked to impaired CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1) function at telomeres. Lastly, we show that proliferation of cancer cells lacking POT1 is enabled by the attenuation of the ATR kinase pathway. These results uncover a role for defective telomere replication during tumorigenesis.

  12. Telomere Replication Stress Induced by POT1 Inactivation Accelerates Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Pinzaru

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing studies have revealed a number of cancer-associated mutations in the telomere-binding factor POT1. Here, we show that when combined with p53 deficiency, depletion of murine POT1a in common lymphoid progenitor cells fosters genetic instability, accelerates the onset, and increases the severity of T cell lymphomas. In parallel, we examined human and mouse cells carrying POT1 mutations found in cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL patients. Inhibition of POT1 activates ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling and induces telomere fragility, replication fork stalling, and telomere elongation. Our data suggest that these phenotypes are linked to impaired CST (CTC1-STN1-TEN1 function at telomeres. Lastly, we show that proliferation of cancer cells lacking POT1 is enabled by the attenuation of the ATR kinase pathway. These results uncover a role for defective telomere replication during tumorigenesis.

  13. ATM promotes apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenesis in response to Myc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusapati, Raju V.; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Hong, Sungki; Powers, John T.; Yan, Mingshan; Kiguchi, Kaoru; McArthur, Mark J.; Wong, Paul K.; Johnson, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene contributes to the development of a significant number of human cancers. In response to deregulated Myc activity, the p53 tumor suppressor is activated to promote apoptosis and inhibit tumor formation. Here we demonstrate that p53 induction in response to Myc overexpression requires the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a major regulator of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. In a transgenic mouse model overexpressing Myc in squamous epithelial tissues, inactivation of Atm suppresses apoptosis and accelerates tumorigenesis. Deregulated Myc expression induces DNA damage in primary transgenic keratinocytes and the formation of H2AX and phospho-SMC1 foci in transgenic tissue. These findings suggest that Myc overexpression causes DNA damage in vivo and that the ATM-dependent response to this damage is critical for p53 activation, apoptosis, and the suppression of tumor development. p53 | DNA damage

  14. Role of Dicer on tumorigenesis in glioma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anling Zhang; Lei Han; Guangxiu Wang; Zhifan Jia; Peiyu Pu; Chunsheng Kang

    2010-01-01

    Micro RNAs(miRNAs)are non-coding,single-stranded RNAs that regulate target gene expression by repressing translation or promoting RNA cleavage.Recent studies show that miRNA expression is globally decreased in some human tumors.Dicer is an essential component of the miRNA processing machinery.To determine whether global reduction of miRNA effects tumorigenesis,small interfering RNA were designed to target Dicer to restrain whole miRNA expression in the glioblastoma cell line-TJ905.With effective knock-down of Dicer,tumor cells were invasive and proliferative,and globally impaired miRNA processing enhanced proliferation and invasiveness of glioma cells in vitro.Suppression of Dicer expression resulted in a more aggressive glioma phenotype,which suggests that global reduction of miRNA expression could have an oncogenic role in glioblastoma cells.

  15. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J. P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Dos Santos Coelho, P.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N. M.; Forbes, S.; Stimson, R. H.; Hameed, A. G.; Arnold, N.; Preston, J.A.; Lawrie, A.; Finisguerra, V.; Mazzone, M.; Sadiku, P.; Goveia, J.; Taverna, F.; Carmeliet, P.; Foster, S.J.; Chilvers, E.R.; Cowburn, A.S.; Dockrell, D.H.; Johnson, R.S.; Meehan, R. R.; Whyte, M.K.B.; Walmsley, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28386604

  16. The HIF-1α/CXCR4 pathway supports hypoxia-induced metastasis of human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guofeng; Zhang, Yinglong; Lu, Yao; Liu, Lijuan; Shi, Doufei; Wen, Yanhua; Yang, Lianjia; Ma, Qiong; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Xiaodong; Qiu, Xiuchun; Zhou, Yong

    2015-02-01

    HIF-1α mediates hypoxia-induced expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and contributes to metastasis in many different cancers. We have previously shown that hypoxia promotes migration of human osteosarcoma cells by activating the HIF-1α/CXCR4 pathway. Here, immunohistochemical analysis showed that unlike control osteochondroma samples, osteosarcoma specimens were characterized by elevated expression levels of HIF-1α and CXCR4. Moreover, we found that hypoxia-induced invasiveness was more pronounced in high metastatic potential F5M2 osteosarcoma cells than in low metastatic potential F4 cells, and that this induction was sensitive to treatment with the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 and the HIF-1α inhibitor KC7F2. Interestingly, hypoxia-induced CXCR4 expression persisted after cultured osteosarcoma cells were returned to normoxic conditions. These observations were confirmed by experiments in a mouse model of osteosarcoma lung metastasis showing that hypoxia stimulation of pulmonary metastasis was greater in F5M2 than in F4 cells, and was sensitive to treatment with AMD3100. Our study provides further evidence of the contributions of hypoxia and the HIF-1α/CXCR4 pathway to the progression of osteosarcoma, and suggests that this axis might be efficiently leveraged in the development of novel osteosarcoma therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoxia induces upregulation of the deoxyribonuclease I gene in the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kominato, Yoshihiko; Iida, Reiko; Nakajima, Tamiko; Tajima, Yutaka; Takagi, Rie; Makita, Chikako; Kishi, Koichiro; Ueki, Misuzu; Kawai, Yasuyuki; Yasuda, Toshihiro

    2007-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that ischemia caused by acute myocardial infarction induces an abrupt increase of serum deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) activity. In this study, we examined whether hypoxia can affect the levels of DNase I activity and/or its transcripts in vitro. We first exposed the human pancreatic cancer cell line QGP-1, which is the first documented DNase-I-producing cell line, to hypoxia (2% O2), and found that this induced a significant increase in both the activity and transcripts of DNase I. This response was mediated by increased transcription only from exon 1a of the two alternative transcription-initiating exons utilized simultaneously in the human DNase I gene (DNASE1); exposure of QGP-1 cells to hypoxia for 24 h resulted in a 15-fold increase of DNASE1 transcripts starting from exon 1a compared with the expression level under normoxic conditions. Promoter, electrophoretic mobility shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays with QGP-1 cells exposed to hypoxia or normoxia showed that the region just upstream from exon 1a was involved in this response in a hypoxia-induced factor-1-independent, but at least in a Sp1 transcription factor-dependent manner possibly through enhanced binding of Sp1 protein to the promoter. These results indicate that DNASE1 expression is upregulated by hypoxia in the cells.

  18. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A A R; Dickinson, R S; Murphy, F; Thomson, J P; Marriott, H M; Tavares, A; Willson, J; Williams, L; Lewis, A; Mirchandani, A; Dos Santos Coelho, P; Doherty, C; Ryan, E; Watts, E; Morton, N M; Forbes, S; Stimson, R H; Hameed, A G; Arnold, N; Preston, J A; Lawrie, A; Finisguerra, V; Mazzone, M; Sadiku, P; Goveia, J; Taverna, F; Carmeliet, P; Foster, S J; Chilvers, E R; Cowburn, A S; Dockrell, D H; Johnson, R S; Meehan, R R; Whyte, M K B; Walmsley, S R

    2017-02-10

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality.

  19. Resveratrol has inhibitory effects on the hypoxia-induced inflammation and angiogenesis in human adipose tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullberg, Karina B; Olholm, Jens; Paulsen, Søren K; Foldager, Casper B; Lind, Martin; Richelsen, Bjørn; Pedersen, Steen B

    2013-05-13

    Hypoxia modulates the production of proteins involved in e.g. inflammation, angiogenesis and glucose utilization and hypoxia may therefore be an important factor underlying adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenolic compound and has been shown to have powerful anti-inflammatory effects and beneficial effects on several obesity-related complications. Thus, in the present study we investigated whether RSV has effects on hypoxic markers (GLUT-1, VEGF), hypoxia-induced key markers of inflammation (IL8, IL6), and leptin in human adipose tissue in vitro. Hypoxia was induced by incubating human adipose tissue fragments with 1% O2 for 24h as compared to 21% O2 The gene expressions were investigated by RT-PCR and protein release by Elisa. Hypoxia increases the expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) (19-fold, pleptin (9-fold). The protein levels of VEGF released to the medium was increased (8-fold, padipose tissue in the expression and release of inflammation and angiogenesis-related adipokines. In addition the inhibition of hypoxia-mediated inflammation and angiogenesis might represent a novel mechanism of RSV in preventing obesity-related pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular mechanisms underlying synergistic adhesion of sickle red blood cells by hypoxia and low nitric oxide bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutsaeva, Diana R; Montero-Huerta, Pedro; Parkerson, James B; Yerigenahally, Shobha D; Ikuta, Tohru; Head, C Alvin

    2014-03-20

    The molecular mechanisms by which nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability modulates the clinical expression of sickle cell disease (SCD) remain elusive. We investigated the effect of hypoxia and NO bioavailability on sickle red blood cell (sRBC) adhesion using mice deficient for endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) because their NO metabolite levels are similar to those of SCD mice but without hypoxemia. Whereas sRBC adhesion to endothelial cells in eNOS-deficient mice was synergistically upregulated at the onset of hypoxia, leukocyte adhesion was unaffected. Restoring NO metabolite levels to physiological levels markedly reduced sRBC adhesion to levels seen under normoxia. These results indicate that sRBC adherence to endothelial cells increases in response to hypoxia prior to leukocyte adherence, and that low NO bioavailability synergistically upregulates sRBC adhesion under hypoxia. Although multiple adhesion molecules mediate sRBC adhesion, we found a central role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Hypoxia and low NO bioavailability upregulated P-selectin expression in endothelial cells in an additive manner through p38 kinase pathways. These results demonstrate novel cellular and signaling mechanisms that regulate sRBC adhesion under hypoxia and low NO bioavailability. Importantly, these findings point us toward new molecular targets to inhibit cell adhesion in SCD.

  1. Expression and methylation pattern of p16 in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Safiye; Celebiler, Aydan Cavusoglu; Zadeoğlulari, Zeynep; Diniz, Gulden; Kargi, Aydanur; Olgun, Nur

    2010-03-01

    Understanding migration, population and differentiation of primordial neural crest cells will help in evolving biology of neuroblastoma. P16 is a tumour suppressor gene contributing in cell cycle arrest as cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor. Methylation is an important mechanism for silencing tumor suppressor genes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of p16 and its methylation pattern in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis. This study included 23 cases (11 male; 12 female) and 31 samples from archival paraffin embedded tissues. P16 was studied in 5 samples of normal adrenal medullar tissue, 5 samples of adrenal tissue including blastic rests, 5 samples of neuroblastoma in situ tissue and in 8 samples of neuroblastoma tissues primary and after chemotherapy in each group. The adrenal gland tissues were obtained from paediatric autopsy cases. Expression of p16 was searched by immunohistochemistry. Methylation specific PCR was used to detect the methylation rate of p16. The age range of autopsy cases was between 20 weeks of foetal age and 36 months of infant age. The mean age of neuroblastoma cases was 45 months. P16 expression was positive in normal adrenal tissues, in one of 5 samples of adrenal blastic rest tissue and in all of samples of after chemotherapy; while no expression was observed in neuroblastoma and neuroblastoma in situ tissues. P16 methylation was observed in samples of neuroblastoma in situ and primary neuroblastoma tissues. Our results suggest that p16 and its methylation seems to play role in neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and in the migration, population and differentiation of primordial neural crest cells. Inhibitors of DNA methylation may provide a useful tool for restoring p16 activity in neuroblastoma treatment.

  2. Aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate inhibits lung tumorigenesis without causing liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; North, Paula E; Yang, Shoua; Lubet, Ronald A; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2012-05-01

    3-Bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent and a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism, has been proposed as a specific anticancer agent. However, the chemopreventive effect of 3-bromopyruvate in lung tumorigenesis has not been tested. In this study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of 3-bromopyruvate in a mouse lung tumor model. Benzo(a)pyrene was used to induce lung tumors, and 3-bromopyruvate was administered by oral gavage to female A/J mice. We found that 3-bromopyruvate significantly decreased tumor multiplicity and tumor load by 58% and 83%, respectively, at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight by gavage. Due to the known liver toxicity of 3-bromopyruvate in animal models given large doses of 3-bromopyruvate, confirmed in this study, we decided to test the chemopreventive activity of aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate in the same lung tumor model. As expected, aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate similarly significantly decreased tumor multiplicity and tumor load by 49% and 80%, respectively, at a dose of 10 mg/mL by inhalation. Interestingly, the efficacy of aerosolized 3-bromopyruvate did not accompany any liver toxicity indicating that it is a safer route of administering this compound. Treatment with 3-bromopyruvate increased immunohistochemical staining for cleaved caspase-3, suggesting that the lung tumor inhibitory effects of 3-bromopyruvate were through induction of apoptosis. 3-Bromopyruvate also dissociated hexokinase II from mitochondria, reduced hexokinase activity, and blocked energy metabolism in cancer cells, finally triggered cancer cell death and induced apoptosis through caspase-3, and PARP in human lung cancer cell line. The ability of 3-bromopyruvate to inhibit mouse lung tumorigenesis, in part through induction of apoptosis, merits further investigation of this compound as a chemopreventive agent for human lung cancer.

  3. New and emerging factors in tumorigenesis: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Suwon Kim1,2 1Department of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix, 2Cancer and Cell Biology Division, Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, AZ, USA Abstract: This article provides an overview of the genes and cellular processes that have emerged recently as new key factors in tumorigenesis. We review these in the context of three broad categories. First, genome-scale sequencing studies have revealed a set of frequently mutated genes in cancer. Genes that are mutated in >5% of all cancers across tissue types are discussed, with a highlighted focus on the two most frequently mutated genes, TP53 and PIK3CA. Second, the mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapy are reviewed. These include acquired resistance under targeted therapy selection owing to mutations and amplification of genes in the same or parallel signaling pathways. Importantly, sequencing of primary tumors has revealed that therapy-resistant clones already exist prior to targeted therapy, demonstrating that tumor heterogeneity in primary tumors confers a mechanism for inherent therapy resistance. Third, “metastasis-specific genes”, or rather lack thereof, are discussed. While many genes have been shown to be capable of promoting metastasis in experimental systems, no common genetic alterations have been identified specific to metastatic lesions. Rather, the same gene mutations frequently found in primary tumors are also found prevalent in metastases, suggesting that the genes that drive tumorigenesis may also drive metastasis. In this light, an emerging view of metastatic progression is discussed. Collectively, these recent advances in cancer research have refined our knowledge on cancer etiology and progression but also present challenges that will require innovative new approaches to treat and manage cancer. Keywords: cancer, genomics, gene mutations, targeted therapy resistance, tumor heterogeneity, metastasis

  4. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus promotes tumorigenesis by modulating the Hippo pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G; Yu, F-X; Kim, Y C; Meng, Z; Naipauer, J; Looney, D J; Liu, X; Gutkind, J S; Mesri, E A; Guan, K-L

    2015-07-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus and the culprit behind the human disease Kaposi sarcoma (KS), an AIDS-defining malignancy. KSHV encodes a viral G-protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) critical for the initiation and progression of KS. In this study, we identified that YAP/TAZ, two homologous oncoproteins inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, are activated in KSHV-infected cells in vitro, KS-like mouse tumors and clinical human KS specimens. The KSHV-encoded vGPCR acts through Gq/11 and G12/13 to inhibit the Hippo pathway kinases Lats1/2, promoting the activation of YAP/TAZ. Furthermore, depletion of YAP/TAZ blocks vGPCR-induced cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a xenograft mouse model. The vGPCR-transformed cells are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of YAP. Our study establishes a pivotal role of the Hippo pathway in mediating the oncogenic activity of KSHV and development of KS, and also suggests a potential of using YAP inhibitors for KS intervention.

  5. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis and viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YASUO eARIUMI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-ß-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction of anti-viral mediators, interferon regulatory factor (IRF 3 and type I interferon (IFN. However, DDX3 seems to be an important target for several viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1, hepatitis C virus (HCV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and poxvirus. DDX3 interacts with HIV-1 Rev or HCV Core protein and modulates its function. At least, DDX3 is required for both HIV-1 and HCV replication. Therefore, DDX3 could be a novel therapeutic target for the development of drug against HIV-1 and HCV.

  6. Multiple functions of DDX3 RNA helicase in gene regulation, tumorigenesis, and viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    The DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX3 is a multifunctional protein involved in all aspects of RNA metabolism, including transcription, splicing, mRNA nuclear export, translation, RNA decay and ribosome biogenesis. In addition, DDX3 is also implicated in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, Wnt-β-catenin signaling, tumorigenesis, and viral infection. Notably, recent studies suggest that DDX3 is a component of anti-viral innate immune signaling pathways. Indeed, DDX3 contributes to enhance the induction of anti-viral mediators, interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 and type I IFN. However, DDX3 seems to be an important target for several viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and poxvirus. DDX3 interacts with HIV-1 Rev or HCV Core protein and modulates its function. At least, DDX3 is required for both HIV-1 and HCV replication. Therefore, DDX3 could be a novel therapeutic target for the development of drug against HIV-1 and HCV.

  7. β-catenin functions pleiotropically in differentiation and tumorigenesis in mouse embryo-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Okumura

    Full Text Available The canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the maintenance of the balance between proliferation and differentiation throughout embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis. β-Catenin, encoded by the Ctnnb1 gene, mediates an intracellular signaling cascade activated by Wnt. It also plays an important role in the maintenance of various types of stem cells including adult stem cells and cancer stem cells. However, it is unclear if β-catenin is required for the derivation of mouse embryo-derived stem cells. Here, we established β-catenin-deficient (β-cat(Δ/Δ mouse embryo-derived stem cells and showed that β-catenin is not essential for acquiring self-renewal potential in the derivation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, teratomas formed from embryo-derived β-cat(Δ/Δ ESCs were immature germ cell tumors without multilineage differentiated cell types. Re-expression of functional β-catenin eliminated their neoplastic, transformed phenotype and restored pluripotency, thereby rescuing the mutant ESCs. Our findings demonstrate that β-catenin has pleiotropic effects in ESCs; it is required for the differentiation of ESCs and prevents them from acquiring tumorigenic character. These results highlight β-catenin as the gatekeeper in differentiation and tumorigenesis in ESCs.

  8. HSPB1 Inhibits the Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition to Suppress Pulmonary Fibrosis and Lung Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Nam, Jae-Kyung; Kim, Bu-Yeo; Jang, Junho; Jin, Young-Bae; Lee, Hae-June; Park, Seungwoo; Ji, Young Hoon; Cho, Jaeho; Lee, Yoon-Jin

    2016-03-01

    The endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) contributes to cancer, fibrosis, and other pathologic processes. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Endothelial HSP1 (HSPB1) protects against cellular stress and has been implicated in cancer progression and pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the role of HSPB1 in mediating the EndMT during the development of pulmonary fibrosis and lung cancer. HSPB1 silencing in human pulmonary endothelial cells accelerated emergence of the fibrotic phenotype after treatment with TGFβ or other cytokines linked to pulmonary fibrosis, suggesting that HSPB1 maintains endothelial cell identity. In mice, endothelial-specific overexpression of HSPB1 was sufficient to inhibit pulmonary fibrosis by blocking the EndMT. Conversely, HSPB1 depletion in a mouse model of lung tumorigenesis induced the EndMT. In clinical specimens of non-small cell lung cancer, HSPB1 expression was absent from tumor endothelial cells undergoing the EndMT. Our results showed that HSPB1 regulated the EndMT in lung fibrosis and cancer, suggesting that HSPB1-targeted therapeutic strategies may be applicable for treating an array of fibrotic diseases.

  9. Gpr177 deficiency impairs mammary development and prohibits Wnt-induced tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Eri Ohfuchi; Yu, H-M Ivy; Jiang, Ming; Fu, Jiang; Hsu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of the Wnt pathway, essential for various developmental processes, is tightly linked to human breast cancers. By hijacking this evolutionary conserved signaling pathway, cancer cells acquire sustaining proliferation ability, leading to modification of physiologic properties necessary for tumor initiation and progression. An enormous wealth of knowledge on the importance of Wnt signaling in breast development and cancer has been obtained, but the cell types responsible for production of this proliferative signal operating within normal and malignant tissues remains poorly understood. Here we report that Wnt production mediated by Gpr177 is essential for mammary morphogenesis. The loss of Gpr177 interferes with mammary stem cells, leading to deficiencies in cell proliferation and differentiation. Genetic analysis further demonstrates an indispensable role of Gpr177 in Wnt-induced tumorigenesis. The Gpr177-deficiency mice are resistant to malignant transformation. This study not only demonstrates the necessity of Wnt in mammary organogenesis but also provides a proof-of-principle for targeting of Gpr177 as a potential new treatment for human diseases with aberrant Wnt stimulation.

  10. Gpr177 deficiency impairs mammary development and prohibits Wnt-induced tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Ohfuchi Maruyama

    Full Text Available Aberrant regulation of the Wnt pathway, essential for various developmental processes, is tightly linked to human breast cancers. By hijacking this evolutionary conserved signaling pathway, cancer cells acquire sustaining proliferation ability, leading to modification of physiologic properties necessary for tumor initiation and progression. An enormous wealth of knowledge on the importance of Wnt signaling in breast development and cancer has been obtained, but the cell types responsible for production of this proliferative signal operating within normal and malignant tissues remains poorly understood. Here we report that Wnt production mediated by Gpr177 is essential for mammary morphogenesis. The loss of Gpr177 interferes with mammary stem cells, leading to deficiencies in cell proliferation and differentiation. Genetic analysis further demonstrates an indispensable role of Gpr177 in Wnt-induced tumorigenesis. The Gpr177-deficiency mice are resistant to malignant transformation. This study not only demonstrates the necessity of Wnt in mammary organogenesis but also provides a proof-of-principle for targeting of Gpr177 as a potential new treatment for human diseases with aberrant Wnt stimulation.

  11. GATA4 is a critical regulator of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical tumorigenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krachulec, Justyna; Vetter, Melanie; Schrade, Anja; Löbs, Ann-Kathrin; Bielinska, Malgorzata; Cochran, Rebecca; Kyrönlahti, Antti; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Parviainen, Helka; Jay, Patrick Y; Heikinheimo, Markku; Wilson, David B

    2012-06-01

    In response to gonadectomy certain inbred mouse strains develop sex steroidogenic adrenocortical neoplasms. One of the hallmarks of neoplastic transformation is expression of GATA4, a transcription factor normally present in gonadal but not adrenal steroidogenic cells of the adult mouse. To show that GATA4 directly modulates adrenocortical tumorigenesis and is not merely a marker of gonadal-like differentiation in the neoplasms, we studied mice with germline or conditional loss-of-function mutations in the Gata4 gene. Germline Gata4 haploinsufficiency was associated with attenuated tumor growth and reduced expression of sex steroidogenic genes in the adrenal glands of ovariectomized B6D2F1 and B6AF1 mice. At 12 months after ovariectomy, wild-type B6D2F1 mice had biochemical and histological evidence of adrenocortical estrogen production, whereas Gata4(+/-) B6D2F1 mice did not. Germline Gata4 haploinsufficiency exacerbated the secondary phenotype of postovariectomy obesity in B6D2F1 mice, presumably by limiting ectopic estrogen production in the adrenal glands. Amhr2-cre-mediated deletion of floxed Gata4 (Gata4(F)) in nascent adrenocortical neoplasms of ovariectomized B6.129 mice reduced tumor growth and the expression of gonadal-like markers in a Gata4(F) dose-dependent manner. We conclude that GATA4 is a key modifier of gonadectomy-induced adrenocortical neoplasia, postovariectomy obesity, and sex steroidogenic cell differentiation.

  12. Cbx8 Acts Non-canonically with Wdr5 to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chi-Yeh; Sun, Zhen; Mullokandov, Gavriel; Bosch, Almudena; Qadeer, Zulekha A; Cihan, Esma; Rapp, Zachary; Parsons, Ramon; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A; Farias, Eduardo F; Brown, Brian D; Gaspar-Maia, Alexandre; Bernstein, Emily

    2016-07-12

    Chromatin-mediated processes influence the development and progression of breast cancer. Using murine mammary carcinoma-derived tumorspheres as a functional readout for an aggressive breast cancer phenotype, we performed a loss-of-function screen targeting 60 epigenetic regulators. We identified the Polycomb protein Cbx8 as a key regulator of mammary carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, Cbx8 is overexpressed in human breast cancer and correlates with poor survival. Our genomic analyses revealed that Cbx8 positively regulates Notch signaling by maintaining H3K4me3 levels on Notch-network gene promoters. Ectopic expression of Notch1 partially rescues tumorsphere formation in Cbx8-depleted cells. We find that Cbx8 associates with non-PRC1 complexes containing the H3K4 methyltransferase complex component WDR5, which together regulate Notch gene expression. Thus, our study implicates a key non-canonical role for Cbx8 in promoting breast tumorigenesis.

  13. Cbx8 Acts Non-canonically with Wdr5 to Promote Mammary Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Yeh Chung

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin-mediated processes influence the development and progression of breast cancer. Using murine mammary carcinoma-derived tumorspheres as a functional readout for an aggressive breast cancer phenotype, we performed a loss-of-function screen targeting 60 epigenetic regulators. We identified the Polycomb protein Cbx8 as a key regulator of mammary carcinoma both in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, Cbx8 is overexpressed in human breast cancer and correlates with poor survival. Our genomic analyses revealed that Cbx8 positively regulates Notch signaling by maintaining H3K4me3 levels on Notch-network gene promoters. Ectopic expression of Notch1 partially rescues tumorsphere formation in Cbx8-depleted cells. We find that Cbx8 associates with non-PRC1 complexes containing the H3K4 methyltransferase complex component WDR5, which together regulate Notch gene expression. Thus, our study implicates a key non-canonical role for Cbx8 in promoting breast tumorigenesis.

  14. Diallyl sulfide protects against N-nitrosodiethylamine-induced liver tumorigenesis: Role of aldose reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Safinaz S Ibrahim; Noha N Nassar

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of diallyl sulfide (DAS) against N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced liver carcinogenesis. METHODS: Male Wistar rats received either NDEA or NDEA together with DAS as protection. Liver energy metabolism was assessed in terms of lactate, pyruvate, lactate/pyruvate, ATP levels, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activities. In addition, membrane disintegration of the liver cells was evaluated by measuring lipid-peroxidation products, measured as malondialdehyde (MDA); nitric oxide (NO) levels; glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Uver DNA level, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and cytochrome c oxidase activities were used as DNA fragmentation indices. Aldose reductase (AR) activity was measured as an index for cancer cells resistant to chemotherapy and histopathological examination was performed on liver sections from different groups. RESULTS: NDEA significantly disturbed liver functions and most of the aforementioned indices. Treatment with DAS significantly restored liver functions and hepatocellular integrity; improved parameters of energy metabolism and suppressed free-radical generation. CONCLUSION: We provide evidence that DAS exerts a protective role on liver functions and tissue integrity in face of enhanced tumorigenesis caused by NDEA, as well as improving cancer-cell sensitivity to chemotherapy. This is mediated through combating oxidative stress of free radicals, improving the energy metabolic state of the cell, and enhancing the activity of G6Pase, GST and AR enzymes.

  15. The essential roles of CCR7 in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by hypoxia in epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaomei; Han, Lin; Guo, Jingyan; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Jianfang; Yang, Xiangshan

    2014-12-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 and its ligands CCL19/21 mediate the tumor mobility, invasion, and metastasis (Wu et al. Curr Pharm Des. 15:742-57, 2009). Hypoxia induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to facilitate the tumor biology. Here, we addressed the roles of CCR7 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and hypoxia-induced serous papillary cystic adenocarcinoma (SKOV-3) EMT. The expression level of CCR7 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 30 specimens of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Western blot was used to investigate the expression of hypoxia-induced CCR7, HIF-1α, and EMT markers (N-cadherin, Snail, MMP-9). In addition, wound healing and Transwell assay were introduced to observe the capacity of migration and invasiveness. Our data showed CCR7 expression was observed in 22 cases of tissues and closely associated with lymph node metastasis and FIGO stage (III + IV). At 6, 12, 24, and 36 h following hypoxia, CCR7 and HIF-1α proteins were both obviously upregulated in a time-dependent method, compared with normal oxygen. In vitro, SKOV-3 expressed N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-9 once either CCL21 stimulation or hypoxia induction, while hypoxia accompanied with CCL21 induction exhibited strongest upregulation of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-9 proteins. Besides, wound healing and Transwell assay further identified that hypoxia with CCL21 stimulation can remarkably promote cell migration and invasiveness. Taken together, CCR7 can constitutively express in epithelial ovarian carcinomas and be induced rapidly in response to hypoxia, which indeed participates in EMT development and prompts the cell migration and invasion. Thus, this study suggested that the epithelial ovarian cancer invasion and metastasis can be inhibited by antagonizing CCR7.

  16. Hypoxia Suppresses Spontaneous Mineralization and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells via IGFBP3 Up-Regulation

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    Ji Hye Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia has diverse stimulatory effects on human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs. In the present study, we investigated whether hypoxic culture conditions (2% O2 suppress spontaneous mineralization and osteogenic differentiation of ASCs. We also investigated signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved in this process. We found that hypoxia suppressed spontaneous mineralization and osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, and up-regulated mRNA and protein expression of Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs in ASCs. Although treatment with recombinant IGFBPs did not affect osteogenic differentiation of ASCs, siRNA-mediated inhibition of IGFBP3 attenuated hypoxia-suppressed osteogenic differentiation of ASCs. In contrast, overexpression of IGFBP3 via lentiviral vectors inhibited ASC osteogenic differentiation. These results indicate that hypoxia suppresses spontaneous mineralization and osteogenic differentiation of ASCs via intracellular IGFBP3 up-regulation. We determined that reactive oxygen species (ROS generation followed by activation of the MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways play pivotal roles in IGFBP3 expression under hypoxia. For example, ROS scavengers and inhibitors for MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways attenuated the hypoxia-induced IGFBP3 expression. Inhibition of Elk1 and NF-κB through siRNA transfection also led to down-regulation of IGFBP3 mRNA expression. We next addressed the proliferative potential of ASCs with overexpressed IGFBP3, but IGFBP3 overexpression reduced the proliferation of ASCs. In addition, hypoxia reduced the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived clonal mesenchymal stem cells. Collectively, our results indicate that hypoxia suppresses the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via IGFBP3 up-regulation.

  17. Hypoxia diminishes the detoxification of the environmental mutagen benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schults, Marten A; Sanen, Kathleen; Godschalk, Roger W; Theys, Jan; van Schooten, Frederik J; Chiu, Roland K

    2014-11-01

    Hypoxia promotes genetic instability and is therefore an important factor in carcinogenesis. We have previously shown that activation of the hypoxia responsive transcription factor HIFα can enhance the mutagenic phenotype induced by the environmental mutagen benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). To further elucidate the mechanism behind the ability of hypoxia to increase mutagenicity of carcinogens, we examined the activation and detoxification of BaP under hypoxic conditions. To this end, the human lung carcinoma cell line A549 was treated with BaP under 20%, 5% or 0.2% oxygen for 18h and alterations in BaP metabolism were assayed. First, BaP-induced expression of key metabolic enzymes was analysed; expression levels of the activating CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were increased, while the detoxifying enzymes UGT1A6 and UGT2B7 were significantly reduced by hypoxia. To evaluate whether these changes had an effect on metabolism, levels of BaP and several of its metabolites were determined. Cells under hypoxia have a reduced capacity to metabolise BaP leaving more of the parent molecule intact. Additionally, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, the pre-cursor metabolite of the reactive metabolite BaP-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxide (BPDE), was formed in higher concentrations. Finally, under hypoxia, DNA adducts accumulated over a period of 168 h, whereas adducts were efficiently removed in 20% oxygen conditions. The delayed detoxification kinetics resulted in a 1.5-fold increase in DNA adducts. These data indicate that the metabolism under hypoxic conditions has shifted towards increased activation of BaP instead of detoxification and support the idea that modulation of carcinogen metabolism is an important additional mechanism for the observed HIF1 mediated genetic instability.

  18. Expression profiling reveals novel hypoxic biomarkers in peripheral blood of adult mice exposed to chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Mosqueira

    Full Text Available Hypoxia induces a myriad of changes including an increase in hematocrit due to erythropoietin (EPO mediated erythropoiesis. While hypoxia is of importance physiologically and clinically, lacunae exist in our knowledge of the systemic and temporal changes in gene expression occurring in blood during the exposure and recovery from hypoxia. To identify these changes expression profiling was conducted on blood obtained from cohorts of C57Bl-10 wild type mice that were maintained at normoxia (NX, exposed for two weeks to normobaric chronic hypoxia (CH or two weeks of CH followed by two weeks of normoxic recovery (REC. Using stringent bioinformatic cut-offs (0% FDR, 2 fold change cut-off, 230 genes were identified and separated into four distinct temporal categories. Class I contained 1 transcript up-regulated in both CH and REC; Class II contained 202 transcripts up-regulated in CH but down-regulated after REC; Class III contained 9 transcripts down-regulated both in CH and REC; Class IV contained 18 transcripts down-regulated after CH exposure but up-regulated after REC. Profiling was independently validated and extended by analyzing expression levels of selected genes as novel biomarkers from our profile (e.g. spectrin alpha-1, ubiquitin domain family-1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase-1 by performing qPCR at 7 different time points during CH and REC. Our identification and characterization of these genes define transcriptome level changes occurring during chronic hypoxia and normoxic recovery as well as novel blood biomarkers that may be useful in monitoring a variety of physiological and pathological conditions associated with hypoxia.

  19. The effect of hypoxia on facial shape variation and disease phenotypes in chicken embryos

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    Francis Smith

    2013-07-01

    Craniofacial anomalies can arise from both genetic and environmental factors, including prenatal hypoxia. Recent clinical evidence correlates hypoxia to craniofacial malformations. However, the mechanisms by which hypoxia mediates these defects are not yet understood. We examined the cellular mechanisms underlying malformations induced by hypoxia using a chicken (Gallus gallus embryo model. Eggs were incubated in either hypoxic (7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17 or 19% O2 or normoxic (21% O2 conditions. Embryos were photographed for morphological analysis at days 3–6. For analysis of skeletal development, 13-day embryos were cleared and stained with alcian blue and alizarin red for cartilage and bone, respectively. Quantitative analysis of facial shape variation was performed on images of embryos via geometric morphometrics. Early-stage embryos (day 2 were analyzed for apoptosis via whole-mount and section TUNEL staining and immunostaining for cleaved caspase-3, whereas later-stage embryos (days 4–6 were sectioned in paraffin for analysis of cell proliferation (BrdU, apoptosis (TUNEL and metabolic stress (phospho-AMPK. Results demonstrate that survival is reduced in a dose-dependent manner. Hypoxic embryos displayed a spectrum of craniofacial anomalies, from mild asymmetry and eye defects to more severe frontonasal and cephalic anomalies. Skull bone development was delayed in hypoxic embryos, with some skeletal defects observed. Morphometric analysis showed facial shape variation relative to centroid size and age in hypoxic groups. Hypoxia disrupted cell proliferation and, in early-stage embryos, caused apoptosis of neural crest progenitor cells. Hypoxic embryos also displayed an increased metabolic stress response. These results indicate that hypoxia during early embryonic craniofacial development might induce cellular oxidative stress, leading to apoptosis of the neural crest progenitor cells that are crucial to normal craniofacial morphogenesis.

  20. An insert-based enzymatic cell culture system to rapidly and reversibly induce hypoxia: investigations of hypoxia-induced cell damage, protein expression and phosphorylation in neuronal IMR-32 cells

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    Ying Huang

    2013-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue hypoxia are of high clinical relevance because they are associated with various pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms causing cell damage are still not fully understood, which is at least partially due to the lack of cell culture systems for the induction of rapid and transient hypoxic conditions. The aim of the study was to establish a model that is suitable for the investigation of cellular and molecular effects associated with transient and long-term hypoxia and to gain insights into hypoxia-mediated mechanisms employing a neuronal culture system. A semipermeable membrane insert system in combination with the hypoxia-inducing enzymes glucose oxidase and catalase was employed to rapidly and reversibly generate hypoxic conditions in the culture medium. Hydrogen peroxide assays, glucose measurements and western blotting were performed to validate the system and to evaluate the effects of the generated hypoxia on neuronal IMR-32 cells. Using the insert-based two-enzyme model, hypoxic conditions were rapidly induced in the culture medium. Glucose concentrations gradually decreased, whereas levels of hydrogen peroxide were not altered. Moreover, a rapid and reversible (onoff generation of hypoxia could be performed by the addition and subsequent removal of the enzyme-containing inserts. Employing neuronal IMR-32 cells, we showed that 3 hours of hypoxia led to morphological signs of cellular damage and significantly increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (a biochemical marker of cell damage. Hypoxic conditions also increased the amounts of cellular procaspase-3 and catalase as well as phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinase Akt, but not Erk1/2 or STAT5. In summary, we present a novel framework for investigating hypoxia-mediated mechanisms at the cellular level. We claim that the model, the first of its kind, enables researchers to rapidly and

  1. The G protein-coupled receptor 30 is up-regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) in breast cancer cells and cardiomyocytes.

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    Recchia, Anna Grazia; De Francesco, Ernestina Marianna; Vivacqua, Adele; Sisci, Diego; Panno, Maria Luisa; Andò, Sebastiano; Maggiolini, Marcello

    2011-03-25

    GPR30, also known as GPER, has been suggested to mediate rapid effects induced by estrogens in diverse normal and cancer tissues. Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors involved in apoptosis, cell survival, and proliferation. The response to low oxygen environment is mainly mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor named HIF-1α, which activates signaling pathways leading to adaptive mechanisms in tumor cells. Here, we demonstrate that the hypoxia induces HIF-1α expression, which in turn mediates the up-regulation of GPER and its downstream target CTGF in estrogen receptor-negative SkBr3 breast cancer cells and in HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Moreover, we show that HIF-1α-responsive elements located within the promoter region of GPER are involved in hypoxia-dependent transcription of GPER, which requires the ROS-induced activation of EGFR/ERK signaling in both SkBr3 and HL-1 and cells. Interestingly, the apoptotic response to hypoxia was prevented by estrogens through GPER in SkBr3 cells. Taken together, our data suggest that the hypoxia-induced expression of GPER may be included among the mechanisms involved in the anti-apoptotic effects elicited by estrogens, particularly in a low oxygen microenvironment.

  2. The tumor microenvironment: An irreplaceable element of tumor budding and epithelial-mesenchymal transition-mediated cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xu, Fangying; Li, Si; Zhong, Anjing; Meng, Xianwen; Lai, Maode

    2016-07-03

    Tumor budding occurs at the invasive front of cancer; the tumor cells involved have metastatic and stemness features, indicating a poor prognosis. Tumor budding is partly responsible for cancer metastasis, and its initiation is based on the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. The EMT process involves the conversion of epithelial cells into migratory and invasive cells, and is a profound event in tumorigenesis. The EMT, associated with the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) and resistance to therapy, results from a combination of gene mutation, epigenetic regulation, and microenvironmental control. Tumor budding can be taken to represent the EMT in vivo. The EMT process is under the influence of the tumor microenvironment as well as tumor cells themselves. Here, we demonstrate that the tumor microenvironment dominates EMT development and impacts cancer metastasis, as well as promotes CSC formation and mediates drug resistance. In this review, we mainly discuss components of the microenvironment, such as the extracellular matrix (ECM), inflammatory cytokines, metabolic products, and hypoxia, that are involved in and impact on the acquisition of tumor-cell motility and dissemination, the EMT, metastatic tumor-cell formation, tumor budding and CSCs, and cancer metastasis, including subsequent chemo-resistance. From our point of view, the tumor microenvironment now constitutes a promising target for cancer therapy.

  3. Somatic pairing of chromosome 19 in renal oncocytoma is associated with deregulated EGLN2-mediated [corrected] oxygen-sensing response.

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    Julie M Koeman

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities, such as structural and numerical abnormalities, are a common occurrence in cancer. The close association of homologous chromosomes during interphase, a phenomenon termed somatic chromosome pairing, has been observed in cancerous cells, but the functional consequences of somatic pairing have not been established. Gene expression profiling studies revealed that somatic pairing of chromosome 19 is a recurrent chromosomal abnormality in renal oncocytoma, a neoplasia of the adult kidney. Somatic pairing was associated with significant disruption of gene expression within the paired regions and resulted in the deregulation of the prolyl-hydroxylase EGLN2 [corrected] a key protein that regulates the oxygen-dependent degradation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. Overexpression of EGLN2 [corrected] in renal oncocytoma increased ubiquitin-mediated destruction of HIF and concomitantly suppressed the expression of several HIF-target genes, including the pro-death BNIP3L gene. The transcriptional changes that are associated with somatic pairing of chromosome 19 mimic the transcriptional changes that occur following DNA amplification. Therefore, in addition to numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities, alterations in chromosomal spatial dynamics should be considered as genomic events that are associated with tumorigenesis. The identification of EGLN2 as a significantly deregulated gene that maps within the paired chromosome region directly implicates defects in the oxygen-sensing network to the biology of renal oncocytoma.

  4. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α promotes survival of mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia

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    Lv, Bingke; Li, Feng; Fang, Jie; Xu, Limin; Sun, Chengmei; Han, Jianbang; Hua, Tian; Zhang, Zhongfei; Feng, Zhiming; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal materials for cell therapy. Research has indicated that hypoxia benefits MSC survival, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. This study aims to uncover potential mechanisms involving hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) to explain the promoted MSC survival under hypoxia. MSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured under normoxia or hypoxia condition. The overexpression vector or small interfering RNA of Hif1a gene was transfected to MSCs, after which cell viability, apoptosis and expression of HIF1A were analyzed by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Factors in p53 pathway were detected to reveal the related mechanisms. Results showed that hypoxia elevated MSCs viability and up-regulated HIF1A (P cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression had the opposite pattern (P cell therapy.

  5. Does hypoxia play a role in the development of sarcopenia in humans? Mechanistic insights from the Caudwell Xtreme Everest Expedition

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    Liesl Wandrag

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The putative role of GLP-1 and nitrite as mediators of the effects of hypoxia on FFM is an intriguing finding. If confirmed, nutritional and pharmacological interventions targeting these pathways may offer new avenues for prevention and treatment of sarcopenia.

  6. Quercetin induces autophagy via FOXO1-dependent pathways and autophagy suppression enhances quercetin-induced apoptosis in PASMCs in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanzhou; Cao, Xiaopei; Guo, Pujian; Li, Xiaochen; Shang, Huihui; Liu, Jin; Xie, Min; Xu, Yongjian; Liu, Xiansheng

    2017-02-01

    Quercetin, an important dietary flavonoid has been demonstrated to potentially reverse or even prevent pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) progression. However, the effects of quercetin on apoptosis and autophagy in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have not yet been clearly elucidated. The current study found that quercetin significantly induce the apoptotic and autophagic capacities of PASMCs in vitro and in vivo in hypoxia. In addition, we found that quercetin increases FOXO1 (a major mediator in autophagy regulation) expression and transcriptional activity. Moreover, FOXO1 knockdown by siRNAs inhibited the phosphorylation of mTOR and 4E-BPI, which is downstream of P70-S6K, and markedly blocked quercetin-induced autophagy. We also observed that FOXO1-mediated autophagy was achieved via SESN3 not Rictor upregulation and after mTOR suppression. Furthermore, Treatment with autophagy-specific inhibitors could markedly enhance quercetin-induced apoptosis in PASMCs under hypoxia. Finally, quercetin in combination with autophagy inhibition treatment could enhance the therapeutic effects of quercetin in hypoxia-associated PAH in vivo. Taken together, quercetin could enhance hypoxia-induced autophagy through the FOXO1-SENS3-mTOR pathway in PASMCs. Combining quercetin and autophagy inhibitors may be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating hypoxia-associated PAH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Sulforaphane inhibits hypoxia-induced HIF-1α and VEGF expression and migration of human colon cancer cells.

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    Kim, Dong Hwan; Sung, Bokyung; Kang, Yong Jung; Hwang, Seong Yeon; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Im, Eunok; Kim, Nam Deuk

    2015-12-01

    The effects of sulforaphane (a natural product commonly found in broccoli) was investigated on hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression in HCT116 human colon cancer cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells. We found that hypoxia-induced HIF-1α protein expression in HCT116 and AGS cells, while treatment with sulforaphane markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited HIF-1α expression in both cell lines. Treatment with sulforaphane inhibited hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in HCT116 cells. Treatment with sulforaphane modulated the effect of hypoxia on HIF-1α stability. However, degradation of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through the 26S proteasome pathway. We also found that the inhibition of HIF-1α by sulforaphane was not mediated through AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation under hypoxic conditions. Finally, hypoxia-induced HCT116 cell migration was inhibited by sulforaphane. These data suggest that sulforaphane may inhibit human colon cancer progression and cancer cell angiogenesis by inhibiting HIF-1α and VEGF expression. Taken together, these results indicate that sulforaphane is a new and potent chemopreventive drug candidate for treating patients with human colon cancer.

  8. The functional and structural characterization of a novel oncogene GIG47 involved in the breast tumorigenesis

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    Han Kyou-Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A candidate oncogene GIG47, previously known as a neudesin with a neurotrophic activity, was identified by applying the differential expression analysis method. Methods As a first step to understand the molecular role of GIG47, we analyzed the expression profile of GIG47 in multiple human cancers including the breast cancer and characterized its function related to human carcinogenesis. Based on this oncogenic role of GIG47, we then embarked on determining the high-resolution structure of GIG47. We have applied multidimensional heteronuclear NMR methods to GIG47. Results GIG47 was over-expressed in primary breast tumors as well as other human tumors including carcinomas of the uterine cervix, malignant lymphoma, colon, lung, skin, and leukemia. To establish its role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer in humans, we generated stable transfectants of MCF7 cells. The ectopic expression of GIG47 in MCF7 cells promoted the invasiveness in the presence of 50% serum. In addition, it also resulted in the increased tumorigenicity in in vivo tumor formation assay. The tumorigenesis mechanism involving GIG47 might be mediated by the activation of MAPK and PI3K pathways. These results indicate that GIG47 plays a role in the breast tumorigenesis, thus representing a novel target for the treatment of breast cancer. To facilitate the development of GIG47-targeted therapeutics, we determined the structural configuration of GIG47. The high-resolution structure of GIG47 was obtained by combination of NMR and homology modeling. The overall structure of GIG47 has four α-helices and 6 β-strands, arranged in a β1-α1-β2-β3-α2-β4-α3-α4-β5-β6 topology. There is a potential heme/steroid binding pocket formed between two helices α2 and α3. Conclusion The determined three-dimensional structure of GIG47 may facilitate the development of potential anti-cancer agents.

  9. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 regulates hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α protein levels in endothelial cells under hypoxia.

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    Stefan K Alig

    Full Text Available The tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 negatively influences endothelial function, such as VEGF signaling and reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, and has been shown to influence angiogenesis during tissue ischemia. In ischemic tissues, hypoxia induced angiogenesis is crucial for restoring oxygen supply. However, the exact mechanism how SHP-1 affects endothelial function during ischemia or hypoxia remains unclear. We performed in vitro endothelial cell culture experiments to characterize the role of SHP-1 during hypoxia.SHP-1 knock-down by specific antisense oligodesoxynucleotides (AS-Odn increased cell growth as well as VEGF synthesis and secretion during 24 hours of hypoxia compared to control AS-Odn. This was prevented by HIF-1α inhibition (echinomycin and apigenin. SHP-1 knock-down as well as overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-1 (SHP-1 CS further enhanced HIF-1α protein levels, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active SHP-1 (SHP-1 E74A resulted in decreased HIF-1α levels during hypoxia, compared to wildtype SHP-1. Proteasome inhibition (MG132 returned HIF-1α levels to control or wildtype levels respectively in these cells. SHP-1 silencing did not alter HIF-1α mRNA levels. Finally, under hypoxic conditions SHP-1 knock-down enhanced intracellular endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS formation, as measured by oxidation of H2-DCF and DHE fluorescence.SHP-1 decreases half-life of HIF-1α under hypoxic conditions resulting in decreased cell growth due to diminished VEGF synthesis and secretion. The regulatory effect of SHP-1 on HIF-1α stability may be mediated by inhibition of endothelial ROS formation stabilizing HIF-1α protein. These findings highlight the importance of SHP-1 in hypoxic signaling and its potential as therapeutic target in ischemic diseases.

  10. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorrink, Sabine U. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Severson, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kulak, Mikhail V. [Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Futscher, Bernard W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Domann, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  11. Hypoxia-on-a-chip

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    Busek Mathias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work a microfluidic cell cultivation device for perfused hypoxia assays as well as a suitable controlling unit are presented. The device features active components like pumps for fluid actuation and valves for fluid direction as well as an oxygenator element to ensure a sufficient oxygen transfer. It consists of several individually structured layers which can be tailored specifically to the intended purpose. Because of its clearness, its mechanical strength and chemical resistance as well as its well-known biocompatibility polycarbonate was chosen to form the fluidic layers by thermal diffusion bonding. Several oxygen sensing spots are integrated into the device and monitored with fluorescence lifetime detection. Furthermore an oxygen regulator module is implemented into the controlling unit which is able to mix different process gases to achieve a controlled oxygenation. First experiments show that oxygenation/deoxygenation of the system is completed within several minutes when pure nitrogen or air is applied to the oxygenator. Lastly the oxygen input by the pneumatically driven micro pump was quantified by measuring the oxygen content before and after the oxygenator.

  12. Enhancement of hypoxia-induced gene expression in fish liver by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP).

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    Yu, Richard Man Kit; Ng, Patrick Kwok Shing; Tan, Tianfeng; Chu, Daniel Ling Ho; Wu, Rudolf Shiu Sun; Kong, Richard Yuen Chong

    2008-11-21

    Fish in polluted coastal habitats commonly suffer simultaneous exposure to both hypoxia and xenobiotics. Although the adaptive molecular responses to each stress have been described, little is known about the interaction between the signaling pathways mediating these responses. Previous studies in mammalian hepatoma cell lines have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)- and/or aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activated gene expression is suppressed following co-exposure to hypoxia and the hallmark AhR ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). However, whether similar crosstalk exists in the non-tumor liver tissues of fish and whether other non-TCDD ligands also play the same inhibitory role in this crosstalk remain unknown. Here, the in vivo hepatic mRNA expression profiles of multiple hypoxia- and AhR-responsive genes (later gene expression=mRNA expression of the gene) were examined in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) upon single and combined exposures to hypoxia and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). Combined exposure enhanced hypoxia-induced gene expression but did not significantly alter BaP-induced gene expression. Protein carbonyl content was markedly elevated in fish subjected to combined exposure, indicating accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Application of diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) to hypoxia-treated grouper liver explants similarly exaggerated hypoxia-induced gene expression as in the combined stress tissues in vivo. These observations suggest that ROS derived from the combined hypoxia and BaP stress have a role in enhancing hypoxia-induced gene expression.

  13. Hypoxia-Induced Collagen Synthesis of Human Lung Fibroblasts by Activating the Angiotensin System

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    Shan-Shan Liu; Hao-Yan Wang; Jun-Ming Tang; Xiu-Mei Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The exact molecular mechanism that mediates hypoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis needs to be further clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the effect and underlying mechanism of angiotensin II (Ang II) on collagen synthesis in hypoxic human lung fibroblast (HLF) cells. The HLF-1 cell line was used for in vitro studies. Angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) expression levels in human ...

  14. Effects of acute hypoxia on human adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity and lipolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahat, Bimit; Chassé, Étienne; Mauger, Jean-François; Imbeault, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue regulates postprandial lipid metabolism by storing dietary fat through lipoprotein lipase-mediated hydrolysis of exogenous triglycerides, and by inhibiting delivery of endogenous non-esterified fatty acid to nonadipose tissues. Animal studies show that acute hypoxia, a model of obstructive sleep apnea, reduces adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity and increases non-esterified fatty acid release, adversely affecting postprandial lipemia. These observations remain...

  15. TMEM45A is essential for hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in breast and liver cancer cells

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    Flamant Lionel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors associated with reduced response to radio- and chemotherapy, therefore increasing the probability of tumor recurrence. The aim of this study was to identify new mechanisms responsible for hypoxia-induced resistance in breast cancer cells. Methods MDA-MB-231 and HepG2 cells were incubated in the presence of taxol or etoposide respectively under normoxia and hypoxia and apoptosis was analysed. A whole transcriptome analysis was performed in order to identify genes whose expression profile was correlated with apoptosis. The effect of gene invalidation using siRNA was studied on drug-induced apoptosis. Results MDA-MB-231 cells incubated in the presence of taxol were protected from apoptosis and cell death by hypoxia. We demonstrated that TMEM45A expression was associated with taxol resistance. TMEM45A expression was increased both in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and in HepG2 human hepatoma cells in conditions where protection of cells against apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents was observed, i.e. under hypoxia in the presence of taxol or etoposide. Moreover, this resistance was suppressed by siRNA-mediated silencing of TMEM45A. Kaplan Meier curve showed an association between high TMEM45A expression and poor prognostic in breast cancer patients. Finally, TMEM45 is highly expressed in normal differentiated keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this protein is involved in epithelial functions. Conclusion Altogether, our results unravel a new mechanism for taxol and etoposide resistance mediated by TMEM45A. High levels of TMEM45A expression in tumors may be indicative of potential resistance to cancer therapy, making TMEM45A an interesting biomarker for resistance.

  16. Hypoxia and the anticoagulants dalteparin and acetylsalicylic acid affect human placental amino acid transport.

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    Marc-Jens Kleppa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anticoagulants, e.g. low-molecular weight heparins (LMWHs and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA are prescribed to women at risk for pregnancy complications that are associated with impaired placentation and placental hypoxia. Beyond their role as anticoagulants these compounds exhibit direct effects on trophoblast but their impact on placental function is unknown. The amino acid transport systems A and L, which preferably transfer essential amino acids, are well-described models to study placental nutrient transport. We aimed to examine the effect of hypoxia, LMWHs and ASA on the activity of the placental amino acid transport systems A and L and associated signalling mechanisms. METHODS: The uptake of C14-MeAIB (system A or H3-leucin (system L was investigated after incubation of primary villous fragments isolated from term placentas. Villous tissue was incubated at 2% O2 (hypoxia, 8% O2 and standard culture conditions (21% O2 or at 2% O2 and 21% O2 with dalteparin or ASA. Activation of the JAK/STAT or mTOR signalling pathways was determined by Western analysis of total and phosphorylated STAT3 or Raptor. RESULTS: Hypoxia decreased system A mediated MeAIB uptake and increased system L mediated leucine uptake compared to standard culture conditions (21% O2. This was accompanied by an impairment of STAT3 and a stimulation of Raptor signalling. System L activity increased at 8% O2. Dalteparin treatment reduced system A and system L activity under normoxic conditions and ASA (1 mM decreased system A and L transporter activity under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Our data underline the dependency of placental function on oxygen supply. LMWHs and ASA are not able to reverse the effects of hypoxia on placental amino acid transport. These findings and the uncovering of the signalling mechanisms in more detail will help to understand the impact of LMWHs and ASA on placental function and fetal growth.

  17. Lycopene attenuated hepatic tumorigenesis via differential mechanisms depending on carotenoid cleavage enzyme in mice.

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    Ip, Blanche C; Liu, Chun; Ausman, Lynne M; von Lintig, Johannes; Wang, Xiang-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Obesity is associated with increased liver cancer risks and mortality. We recently showed that apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, a lycopene metabolite generated by beta-carotene-9',10'-oxygenase (BCO2), inhibited carcinogen-initiated, high-fat diet (HFD)-promoted liver inflammation, and hepatic tumorigenesis development. The present investigation examined the outstanding question of whether lycopene could suppress HFD-promoted hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression, and if BCO2 expression is important using BCO2-knockout (BCO2-KO) and wild-type male mice. Results showed that lycopene supplementation (100 mg/kg diet) for 24 weeks resulted in comparable accumulation of hepatic lycopene (19.4 vs. 18.2 nmol/g) and had similar effects on suppressing HFD-promoted HCC incidence (19% vs. 20%) and multiplicity (58% vs. 62%) in wild-type and BCO2-KO mice, respectively. Intriguingly, lycopene chemopreventive effects in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic proinflammatory signaling (phosphorylation of NK-κB p65 and STAT3; IL6 protein) and inflammatory foci. In contrast, the protective effects of lycopene in BCO2-KO but not in wild-type mice were associated with reduced hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response (ER(UPR)), through decreasing ER(UPR)-mediated protein kinase RNA-activated like kinase-eukaryotic initiation factor 2α activation, and inositol requiring 1α-X-box-binding protein 1 signaling. Lycopene supplementation in BCO2-KO mice suppressed oncogenic signals, including Met mRNA, β-catenin protein, and mTOR complex 1 activation, which was associated with increased hepatic microRNA (miR)-199a/b and miR214 levels. These results provided novel experimental evidence that dietary lycopene can prevent HFD-promoted HCC incidence and multiplicity in mice, and may elicit different mechanisms depending on BCO2 expression. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. The Cell Surface Estrogen Receptor, G Protein- Coupled Receptor 30 (GPR30, is Markedly Down Regulated During Breast Tumorigenesis

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    Indira Poola

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: GPR30 is a cell surface estrogen receptor that has been shown to mediate a number of non-genomic rapid effects of estrogen and appear to balance the signaling of estrogen and growth factors. In addition, progestins appear to use GPR30 for their actions. Therefore, GPR30 could play a critical role in hormonal regulation of breast epithelial cell integrity. Deregulation of the events mediated by GPR30 could contribute to tumorigenesis.Methods: To understand the role of GPR30 in the deregulation of estrogen signaling processes during breast carcinogenesis, we have undertaken this study to investigate its expression at mRNA levels in tumor tissues and their matched normal tissues. We compared its expression at mRNA levels by RT quantitative real-time PCR relative to GAPDH in ERα”—positive (n = 54 and ERα”—negative (n = 45 breast cancer tissues to their matched normal tissues.Results: We report here, for the first time, that GPR30 mRNA levels were significantly down-regulated in cancer tissues in comparison with their matched normal tissues (p 0.0001 by two sided paired t-test. The GPR30 expression levels were significantly lower in tumor tissues from patients (n = 29 who had lymph node metastasis in comparison with tumors from patients (n = 53 who were negative for lymph node metastasis (two sample t-test, p 0.02, but no association was found with ERα, PR and other tumor characteristics.Conclusions: Down-regulation of GPR30 could contribute to breast tumorigenesis and lymph node metastasis.

  19. Cognition and chronic hypoxia in pulmonary diseases

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    Renata Areza-Fegyveres

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung disease with chronic hypoxia has been associated with cognitive impairment of the subcortical type. Objectives: To review the cognitive effects of chronic hypoxia in patients with lung disease and its pathophysiology in brain metabolism. Methods: A literature search of Pubmed data was performed. The words and expressions from the text subitems including "pathophysiology of brain hypoxia", "neuropsychology and hypoxia", "white matter injury and chronic hypoxia", for instance, were key words in a search of reports spanning from 1957 to 2009. Original articles were included. Results: According to national and international literature, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sleep obstructive apnea syndrome perform worse on tests of attention, executive functions and mental speed. The severity of pulmonary disease correlates with degree of cognitive impairment. These findings support the diagnosis of subcortical type encephalopathy. Conclusion: Cognitive effects of clinical diseases are given limited importance in congresses and symposia about cognitive impairment and its etiology. Professionals that deal with patients presenting cognitive loss should be aware of the etiologies outlined above as a major cause or potential contributory factors, and of their implications for treatment adherence and quality of life.

  20. Preparation and Preservation of Hypoxia UW Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Chidang; WANG Chunyou; LIU Tan; CHENG Rui; YANG Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the method to prepare hypoxia UW solution and the stability and preservation of hypoxia UW solution, UW solution was purged by argon or air for 15 min or 60 at a flow rate of 0.8 or 2 L/min, and the oxygen partial pressure of UW solution was detected. The hy-poxia UW solution was exposed to the air or sealed up to preserve by using different methods, and the changes of oxygen partial pressure was tested. The results showed that oxygen partial pressure of 50 mL UW solution, purged by argon for 15 min at a flow rate of 2 L/min, was declined from 242±6 mmHg to 83±10 mmHg. After exposure to the air, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was gradually increased to 160±7 mmHg at 48 h. After sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bad filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was stable, about 88±13 mmHg at 72 h. It was concluded that oxygen of UW solution could be purged by argon efficiently. Sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bag filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of UW so- lution could be stabilized.

  1. Investigating hypoxia in aquatic environments: diverse approaches to addressing a complex phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Friedrich

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we synthesize the new knowledge on oxygen and oxygen-related phenomena in aquatic systems, resulting from the EU-FP7 project HYPOX ("In situ monitoring of oxygen depletion in hypoxic ecosystems of coastal and open seas, and land-locked water bodies", www.hypox.net. In view of the anticipated oxygen loss in aquatic systems due to eutrophication and climate change, HYPOX was set up to improve capacities to monitor hypoxia as well as to understand its causes and consequences. Temporal dynamics and spatial patterns of hypoxia were analysed in field studies in various aquatic environments, including the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, Scottish and Scandinavian fjords, Ionian Sea lagoons and embayments, and in Swiss lakes. Examples of episodic and rapid (hours occurrences of hypoxia as well as seasonal changes in bottom-water oxygenation in stratified systems are discussed. Geologically-driven hypoxia caused by gas seepage is demonstrated. Using novel technologies, temporal and spatial patterns of water-column oxygenation, from basin-scale seasonal patterns to meter-scale submicromolar oxygen distributions were resolved. Existing multi-decadal monitoring data were used to demonstrate the imprint of climate change and eutrophication on long-term oxygen distributions. Organic and inorganic proxies were used to extend investigations on past oxygen conditions to centennial and even longer timescales not resolved by monitoring. The effects of hypoxia on faunal communities and biogeochemical processes were also addressed in the project. An investigation of benthic fauna is presented as an example of hypoxia-devastated benthic communities that slowly recover upon a reduction in eutrophication in a system where natural and anthropogenic hypoxia overlap. Biogeochemical investigations reveal that oxygen intrusions have a strong effect on microbially-mediated redox cycling of elements. Observations and modeling studies of the sediments demonstrate the

  2. Hypoxia Inhibits Hypertrophic Differentiation and Endochondral Ossification in Explanted Tibiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Landman, Ellie; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously

  3. Hypoxia-regulated target genes implicated in tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia is an important microenvironmental factor that induces cancer metastasis. Hypoxia/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α regulates many important steps of the metastatic processes, especially epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT that is one of the crucial mechanisms to cause early stage of tumor metastasis. To have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia-regulated metastasis, various hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes are categorized into different classes including transcription factors, histone modifiers, enzymes, receptors, kinases, small GTPases, transporters, adhesion molecules, surface molecules, membrane proteins, and microRNAs. Different roles of these target genes are described with regards to their relationship to hypoxia-induced metastasis. We hope that this review will provide a framework for further exploration of hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes and a comprehensive view of the metastatic picture induced by hypoxia.

  4. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Polly Y. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cucinotta, Francis A. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Bjornstad, Kathleen A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Bakke, James [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Rosen, Chris J. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Biosciences Div.; Du, Nicholas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Fairchild, David G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Cacao, Eliedonna [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Dept. of Health Physics and Diagnostic Sciences; Blakely, Eleanor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2016-04-19

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ~70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ~100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  5. Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Low-Dose and LET Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Polly Y; Cucinotta, Francis A; Bjornstad, Kathleen A; Bakke, James; Rosen, Chris J; Du, Nicholas; Fairchild, David G; Cacao, Eliedonna; Blakely, Eleanor A

    2016-05-01

    Increased cancer risk remains a primary concern for travel into deep space and may preclude manned missions to Mars due to large uncertainties that currently exist in estimating cancer risk from the spectrum of radiations found in space with the very limited available human epidemiological radiation-induced cancer data. Existing data on human risk of cancer from X-ray and gamma-ray exposure must be scaled to the many types and fluences of radiations found in space using radiation quality factors and dose-rate modification factors, and assuming linearity of response since the shapes of the dose responses at low doses below 100 mSv are unknown. The goal of this work was to reduce uncertainties in the relative biological effect (RBE) and linear energy transfer (LET) relationship for space-relevant doses of charged-particle radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The historical data from the studies of Fry et al. and Alpen et al. for Harderian gland (HG) tumors in the female CB6F1 strain of mouse represent the most complete set of experimental observations, including dose dependence, available on a specific radiation-induced tumor in an experimental animal using heavy ion beams that are found in the cosmic radiation spectrum. However, these data lack complete information on low-dose responses below 0.1 Gy, and for chronic low-dose-rate exposures, and there are gaps in the LET region between 25 and 190 keV/μm. In this study, we used the historical HG tumorigenesis data as reference, and obtained HG tumor data for 260 MeV/u silicon (LET ∼70 keV/μm) and 1,000 MeV/u titanium (LET ∼100 keV/μm) to fill existing gaps of data in this LET range to improve our understanding of the dose-response curve at low doses, to test for deviations from linearity and to provide RBE estimates. Animals were also exposed to five daily fractions of 0.026 or 0.052 Gy of 1,000 MeV/u titanium ions to simulate chronic exposure, and HG tumorigenesis from this fractionated study were compared to the

  6. Hypoxia-Induced Collagen Synthesis of Human Lung Fibroblasts by Activating the Angiotensin System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Shan Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The exact molecular mechanism that mediates hypoxia-induced pulmonary fibrosis needs to be further clarified. The aim of this study was to explore the effect and underlying mechanism of angiotensin II (Ang II on collagen synthesis in hypoxic human lung fibroblast (HLF cells. The HLF-1 cell line was used for in vitro studies. Angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE, angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R and angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R expression levels in human lung fibroblasts were analysed using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR after hypoxic treatment. Additionally, the collagen type I (Col-I, AT1R and nuclear factor κappaB (NF-κB protein expression levels were detected using Western blot analysis, and NF-κB nuclear translocation was measured using immunofluorescence localization analysis. Ang II levels in HLF-1 cells were measured with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. We found that hypoxia increased Col-I mRNA and protein expression in HLF-1 cells, and this effect could be inhibited by an AT1R or AT2R inhibitor. The levels of NF-κB, RAS components and Ang II production in HLF-1 cells were significantly increased after the hypoxia exposure. Hypoxia or Ang II increased NF-κB-p50 protein expression in HLF-1 cells, and the special effect could be inhibited by telmisartan (TST, an AT1R inhibitor, and partially inhibited by PD123319, an AT2R inhibitor. Importantly, hypoxia-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation could be nearly completely inhibited by an AT1R or AT2R inhibitor. Furthermore pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB blocker, abolished the expression of hypoxia-induced AT1R and Col-I in HLF-1 cells. Our results indicate that Ang II-mediated NF-κB signalling via ATR is involved in hypoxia-induced collagen synthesis in human lung fibroblasts.

  7. Invited review: decoding the microRNA response to hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Roger

    2011-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) were discovered nearly two decades ago by researchers who sought to understand how basic developmental mechanisms work in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Since the identification of conserved miRNA families in higher eukaryotes, there has been an explosion of interest...... into how these tiny RNA molecules function. miRNAs are 20-24 nucleotide non-coding RNA molecules that predominantly regulate transcripts of target genes through translational inhibition. Much recent interest has focused on the influence of miRNAs on homeostatic regulation, and in particular, hypoxic...... responses. The ability to sense and respond to hypoxia is of fundamental importance to aerobic organisms and dysregulated oxygen homeostasis is a hallmark in the pathophysiology of cancer, neurological dysfunction, myocardial infarction, and lung disease. miRNAs are ideal mediators of hypoxic stress...

  8. Rat reaction to hypokinesia after prior adaptation to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashova, Z. I.; Tarakanova, O. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prior hypoxia adaptation on body tolerance to hypokinesia was investigated. Rats trained to a 50 day period of hypokinesia and hypoxia with a preliminary month of adaptation to hypoxia showed less weight loss, higher indices for red blood content, heightened reactivity of the overall organism and the central nervous system to acute hypoxia, and decreased modification of the skeletal muscles compared to rats subjected to hypokinesia alone.

  9. Hypoxia and loss of PHD2 inactivate stromal fibroblasts to decrease tumour stiffness and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Chris D; Pedersen, Jesper T; Venning, Freja A; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Moeendarbary, Emad; Charras, Guillaume; Cox, Thomas R; Sahai, Erik; Erler, Janine T

    2015-10-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) interact with tumour cells and promote growth and metastasis. Here, we show that CAF activation is reversible: chronic hypoxia deactivates CAFs, resulting in the loss of contractile force, reduced remodelling of the surrounding extracellular matrix and, ultimately, impaired CAF-mediated cancer cell invasion. Hypoxia inhibits prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2), leading to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α stabilisation, reduced expression of αSMA and periostin, and reduced myosin II activity. Loss of PHD2 in CAFs phenocopies the effects of hypoxia, which can be prevented by simultaneous depletion of HIF-1α. Treatment with the PHD inhibitor DMOG in an orthotopic breast cancer model significantly decreases spontaneous metastases to the lungs and liver, associated with decreased tumour stiffness and fibroblast activation. PHD2 depletion in CAFs co-injected with tumour cells similarly prevents CAF-induced metastasis to lungs and liver. Our data argue that reversion of CAFs towards a less active state is possible and could have important clinical implications.

  10. Hypoxia facilitates neurogenic dural plasma protein extravasation in mice: a novel animal model for migraine pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunfeld, Anika; Segelcke, Daniel; Bäcker, Ingo; Mecheri, Badreddine; Hemmer, Kathrin; Dlugosch, Elisabeth; Andriske, Michael; Paris, Frank; Zhu, Xinran; Lübbert, Hermann

    2015-12-08

    Migraine animal models generally mimic the onset of attacks and acute treatment processes. A guinea pig model used the application of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP) to trigger immediate dural plasma protein extravasation (PPE) mediated by 5-HT2B receptors. This model has predictive value for antimigraine drugs but cannot explain the delayed onset of efficacy of 5-HT2B receptor antagonists when clinically used for migraine prophylaxis. We found that mCPP failed to induce dural PPE in mice. Considering the role 5-HT2B receptors play in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vessel muscularization, we were encouraged to keep mice under hypoxic conditions and tested whether this treatment will render them susceptible to mCPP-induced dural PPE. Following four-week of hypoxia, PPE, associated with increased transendothelial transport, was induced by mCPP. The effect was blocked by sumatriptan. Chronic application of 5-HT2B receptor or nitric oxide synthase blockers during hypoxia prevented the development of susceptibility. Here we present a migraine model that distinguishes between a migraine-like state (hypoxic mice) and normal, normoxic mice and mimics processes that are related to chronic activation of 5-HT2B receptors under hypoxia. It seems striking, that chronic endogenous activation of 5-HT2B receptors is crucial for the sensitization since 5-HT2B receptor antagonists have strong, albeit delayed migraine prophylactic efficacy.

  11. p53 and telomerase control rat myocardial tissue response to hypoxia and ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cataldi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence implies loss of proliferative and tissue regenerative capability. Also hypoxia, producing Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS, can damage cellular components through the oxidation of DNA, proteins and lipids, thus influencing the shortening of telomeres. Since ribonucleoprotein Telomerase (TERT, catalyzing the replication of the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, promotes cardiac muscle cell proliferation, hypertrophy and survival, here we investigated its role in the events regulating apoptosis occurrence and life span in hearts deriving from young and old rats exposed to hypoxia. TUNEL (terminal-deoxinucleotidyl -transferase- mediated dUTP nick end-labeling analysis reveals an increased apoptotic cell number in both samples after hypoxia exposure, mainly in the young with respect to the old. TERT expression lowers either in the hypoxic young, either in the old in both experimental conditions, with respect to the normoxic young. These events are paralleled by p53 and HIF-1 ? expression dramatic increase and by p53/ HIF-1 ? co-immunoprecipitation in the hypoxic young, evidencing the young subject as the most stressed by such challenge. These effects could be explained by induction of damage to genomic DNA by ROS that accelerates cell senescence through p53 activation. Moreover, by preventing TERT enzyme down-regulation, cell cycle exit and apoptosis occurrence could be delayed and new possibilities for intervention against cell ageing and hypoxia could be opened.

  12. Response of tumour cells to hypoxia: role of p53 and NFkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royds, J A; Dower, S K; Qwarnstrom, E E; Lewis, C E

    1998-04-01

    Hypoxia is present in several areas of malignant tumours and is thought to result from an inadequate rate of tumour angiogenesis, vascular collapse, or both. The presence and extent of these hypoxic tumour microenvironments have recently been shown to influence tumour progression by regulating both tumour cell survival and the expression of key angiogenic molecules. Recent studies have suggested that mutations in the tumour suppressor gene, p53, may play an important role in regulating the adaptive response of tumour cells to hypoxia by enhancing their survival and release of proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor. It has even been suggested that hypoxia may select for the survival of the more malignant clones harbouring such genetic defects as mutations in p53. Recently, the transcription factor, NFkB, has also been implicated as a novel mediator of the effects of hypoxia and reoxygenation in tumour cells. This article reviews some of the molecular mechanisms subserving the responses of tumour cells to hypoxic stress, particularly the role and relation of NFkB and p53 in regulating this phenomenon.

  13. Stanniocalcin-2 is a HIF-1 target gene that promotes cell proliferation in hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Alice Y.S. [Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wong, Chris K.C., E-mail: ckcwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2010-02-01

    Stanniocalcin-2 (STC2), the paralog of STC1, has been suggested as a novel target of oxidative stress response to protect cells from apoptosis. The expression of STC2 has been reported to be highly correlated with human cancer development. In this study, we reported that STC2 is a HIF-1 target gene and is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation. STC2 was shown to be up-regulated in different breast and ovarian cancer cells, following exposure to hypoxia. Using ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), the underlying mechanism of HIF-1 mediated STC2 gene transactivation was characterized. Hypoxia-induced STC2 expression was found to be HIF-1{alpha} dependent and required the recruitment of p300 and HDAC7. Using STC2 promoter deletion constructs and site-directed mutagenesis, two authentic consensus HIF-1 binding sites were identified. Under hypoxic condition, the silencing of STC2 reduced while the overexpression of STC2 increased the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma and cyclin D in both SKOV3 and MCF7 cells. The change in cell cycle proteins correlated with the data of the serial cell counts. The results indicated that cell proliferation was reduced in STC2-silenced cells but was increased in STC2-overexpressing hypoxic cells. Solid tumor progression is usually associated with hypoxia. The identification and functional analysis of STC2 up-regulation by hypoxia, a feature of the tumor microenvironment, sheds light on a possible role for STC2 in tumors.

  14. Autophagy contributes to regulation of the hypoxia response during submergence in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Liao, Bin; Qi, Hua; Xie, Li-Juan; Huang, Li; Tan, Wei-Juan; Zhai, Ning; Yuan, Li-Bing; Zhou, Ying; Yu, Lu-Jun; Chen, Qin-Fang; Shu, Wensheng; Xiao, Shi

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy involves massive degradation of intracellular components and functions as a conserved system that helps cells to adapt to adverse conditions. In mammals, hypoxia rapidly stimulates autophagy as a cell survival response. Here, we examine the function of autophagy in the regulation of the plant response to submergence, an abiotic stress that leads to hypoxia and anaerobic respiration in plant cells. In Arabidopsis thaliana, submergence induces the transcription of autophagy-related (ATG) genes and the formation of autophagosomes. Consistent with this, the autophagy-defective (atg) mutants are hypersensitive to submergence stress and treatment with ethanol, the end product of anaerobic respiration. Upon submergence, the atg mutants have increased levels of transcripts of anaerobic respiration genes (alcohol dehydrogenase 1, ADH1 and pyruvate decarboxylase 1, PDC1), but reduced levels of transcripts of other hypoxia- and ethylene-responsive genes. Both submergence and ethanol treatments induce the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the rosettes of atg mutants more than in the wild type. Moreover, the production of ROS by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases is necessary for plant tolerance to submergence and ethanol, submergence-induced expression of ADH1 and PDC1, and activation of autophagy. The submergence- and ethanol-sensitive phenotypes in the atg mutants depend on a complete salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway. Together, our findings demonstrate that submergence-induced autophagy functions in the hypoxia response in Arabidopsis by modulating SA-mediated cellular homeostasis.

  15. Hypoxia and Human Genome Stability: Downregulation of BRCA2 Expression in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Fanale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, it has been reported that hypoxia causes increased mutagenesis and alteration in DNA repair mechanisms. In 2005, an interesting study showed that hypoxia-induced decreases in BRCA1 expression and the consequent suppression of homologous recombination may lead to genetic instability. However, nothing is yet known about the involvement of BRCA2 in hypoxic conditions in breast cancer. Initially, a cell proliferation assay allowed us to hypothesize that hypoxia could negatively regulate the breast cancer cell growth in short term in vitro studies. Subsequently, we analyzed gene expression in breast cancer cell lines exposed to hypoxic condition by microarray analysis. Interestingly, genes involved in DNA damage repair pathways such as mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair were downregulated. In particular, we focused on the BRCA2 downregulation which was confirmed at mRNA and protein level. In addition, breast cancer cells were treated with dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG, a cell-permeable inhibitor of both proline and asparaginyl hydroxylases able to induce HIF-1α stabilization in normoxia, providing results comparable to those previously described. These findings may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying genetic instability mediated by hypoxia and BRCA involvement in sporadic breast cancers.

  16. Hypoxia induces a hedgehog response mediated by HIF-1 alpha

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Maarten F.; Groot, Angelique P.; Oduro, Jeremiah P.; Franken, Rutger J.; Schoenmakers, Saskia H. H. F.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Recently, it has become clear that the developmental hedgehog pathway is activated in ischaemic adult tissue where it aids in salvaging damaged tissue. The exact driving force for the initial hedgehog response is unclear and as most physiological and cellular processes are disturbed in ischaemic tis

  17. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  18. Protective effect of salidroside on cardiac apoptosis in mice with chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mei-Chih; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lai, Mei-Hsin; Lin, Yueh-Min; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Liu, Yi-fan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study is to determine if salidroside has protective effects on hypoxia-induced cardiac widely dispersed apoptosis in mice with severe sleep apnea model. Sixty-four C57BL/6J mice 5-6 months of age were divided into four groups, i.e. Control group (21% O2, 24h per day, 8 weeks, n=16); Hypoxia group (Hypoxia: 7% O2 60s, 20% O2 alternating 60s, 8h per day, 8 weeks, n=16); and Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S 30 groups (Hypoxia for 1st 4 weeks, hypoxia pretreated 10mg/kg and 30 mg/kg salidroside by oral gavage per day for 2nd 4 weeks, n=16 and 16). The excised hearts from four groups were measured by the heart weight index, H&E staining, TUNEL-positive assays and Western blotting. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in mice heart were less in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 than those in the Hypoxia group. Compared with Hypoxia, the protein levels of Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, Fas-Associated Death Domain (FADD), activated caspase 8, and activated caspase 3 (Fas pathways) were decreased in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30. In the mitochondria pathway, the protein levels of BcLx, Bcl2, and Bid (anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family) in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 were more than those in Hypoxia. The protein levels of Bax, t-Bid, activated caspase 9, and activated caspase 3 were less in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 than those in hypoxia. Our findings suggest that salidroside has protective effects on chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways in mice hearts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypoxia-sensitive epigenetic regulation of an antisense-oriented lncRNA controls WT1 expression in myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory McCarty

    Full Text Available WT1 is a transcription factor expressed in hematopoietic stem cells and in most cases of myeloid leukemia. We investigated the roles of hypoxia and epigenetics in the regulation of WT1 expression in myeloid leukemia cells. WT1 expression correlates with hypomethylation of the CpG island in Intron 1, and pharmacologic demethylation of this CpG island induces WT1 mRNA expression. Hypoxia causes decreases in DNMT expression and activity and increased expression and activity of TET2 and TET3, resulting in demethylation of this CpG island and expression of WT1 mRNA. Demethylation of the CpG island, either from pharmacologic treatment or induction of hypoxia, results in transcription of an antisense-oriented lncRNA, and inhibiting lncRNA expression with shRNA blocks WT1 mRNA expression. These results reveal a novel model of hypoxia-mediated epigenetic gene regulation. In addition, this is the first report that TET2 and TET3, increasingly recognized as important epigenetic regulators of gene expression in stem cells and in cancer cells, can be regulated by hypoxia, providing a solid mechanistic link between hypoxia and epigenetic regulation of gene expression with important implications for the role of hypoxia in stem cell function.

  20. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  1. Luminal Iron Levels Govern Intestinal Tumorigenesis after Apc Loss In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorina Radulescu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is clear from epidemiological studies that excess iron is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer; however, questions regarding the mechanism of how iron increases cancer risk, the source of the excess iron (circulating or luminal, and whether iron reduction represents a potential therapeutic option remain unanswered. In this study, we show that after Apc deletion, the cellular iron acquisition proteins TfR1 and DMT1 are rapidly induced. Conversely, restoration of APC reduces cellular iron due to repression of these proteins. To test the functional importance of these findings, we performed in vivo investigations of the impact of iron levels on intestinal tumorigenesis. Strikingly, depletion of luminal (but not systemic iron strongly suppressed murine intestinal tumorigenesis, whereas increased luminal iron strongly promoted tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data definitively delineate iron as a potent modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis and have important implications for dietary iron supplementation in patients at high risk of colorectal cancer.

  2. Stem-Like Cells in Bone Sarcomas: Implications for Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Parker Gibbs

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Bone sarcomas are a clinically and molecularly heterogeneous group of malignancies characterized by varying degrees of mesenchymal differentiation. Despite advances in medical and surgical management, survival rates for high-grade tumors have remained static at 50% to 70%. Tumor stem cells have been recently implicated in the pathogenesis of other heterogeneous, highly malignant tumors. We demonstrate here the existence of a small subpopulation of self-renewing bone sarcoma cells that are capable of forming suspended spherical, clonal colonies, also called “sarcospheres,” in anchorage-independent, serum-starved conditions. These bone sarcoma cells as well as tissue specimens express activated STAT3 and the marker genes of pluripotent embryonic stem (ES cells, Oct 3/4 and Nanog. Expression levels of Oct 3/4 and Nanog are greater in sarcospheres than in adherent cultures. A subset of bone sarcoma cells displays several surface markers of mesenchymal stem cells (Stro-1, CD105, and CD44 as well as attributes of mesodermal, ectodermal, and endodermal differentiation. Although previously documented in brain and breast tumors, our results support the extension of the cancer stem cell hypothesis to include tumors of mesenchymal lineage. Furthermore, they suggest the participation of ES cell homeobox proteins in non-germ cell tumorigenesis.

  3. MicroRNA-429 Modulates Hepatocellular Carcinoma Prognosis and Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ying Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNA-429 (miR-429 may modify the development and progression of cancers; however, the role of this microRNA in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC has not been well elaborated. Here, we tested miR-429 expression in 138 pathology-diagnosed HCC cases and SMMC-7721 cells. We found that miR-429 was upregulated in HCC tumor tissues and that the high expression of miR-429 was significantly correlated with larger tumor size (odd ratio (OR, 2.70; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.28–5.56 and higher aflatoxin B1-DNA adducts (OR = 3.13, 95% CI = 1.47–6.67. Furthermore, this microRNA overexpression modified the recurrence-free survival and overall survival of HCC patients. Functionally, miR-429 overexpression progressed tumor cells proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis. These results indicate for the first time that miR-429 may modify HCC prognosis and tumorigenesis and may be a potential tumor therapeutic target.

  4. Luteinizing hormone promotes gonadal tumorigenesis in inhibin-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraja, Ankur K.; Agno, Julio E.; Kumar, T. Rajendra; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The inhibins are secreted α:β heterodimers of the TGF-β superfamily that are mainly synthesized in Sertoli cells and granulosa cells, and are critical regulators of testicular and ovarian development and function. Mice homozygous for a targeted deletion of the inhibin α subunit gene (Inha-/-) develop sex cord-stromal tumors in a gonadotropin-dependent manner. Here, we determine the contribution of LH to gonadal tumorigenesis by generating mice deficient in both inhibins and LH. Inha-/-Lhb-/- mice have increased survival and delayed tumor progression, and these observations correlate with lower serum FSH and estradiol levels compared to Inha-/- controls. Double mutant testicular tumors demonstrate decreased expression of cyclin D2, while double mutant ovarian tumors have elevated expression of p15INK4b and trend toward higher levels of p27Kip1. We conclude that LH is not required for tumor formation in the absence of inhibins but promotes tumor progression, likely through alterations in serum hormone levels and cell cycle regulators. PMID:18657590

  5. Molecular genetics of cancer and tumorigenesis: Drosophila models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu-Min Deng

    2011-01-01

    Why do some cells not respond to normal control of cell division and become tumorous? Which signals trigger some tumor cells to migrate and colonize other tissues? What genetic factors are responsible for tumorigenesis and cancer development? What environmental factors play a role in cancer formation and progression? In how many ways can our bodies prevent and restrict the growth of cancerous cells?How can we identify and deliver effective drugs to fight cancer? In the fight against cancer,which kills more people than any other disease,these and other questions have long interested researchers from a diverse range of fields.To answer these questions and to fight cancer more effectively,we must increase our understanding of basic cancer biology.Model organisms,including the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster,have played instrumental roles in our understanding of this devastating disease and the search for effective cures.Drosophila and its highly effective,easy-touse,and ever-expanding genetic tools have contributed toand enriched our knowledge of cancer and tumor formation tremendously.

  6. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2016-01-14

    Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first) is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL) in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16); however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8), suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  7. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaming Su

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60 family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs. As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16; however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8, suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways.

  8. Dynamics of notch expression during murine prostate development and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou, J; Ross, S; Koeppen, H; de Sauvage, F J; Gao, W Q

    2001-10-01

    Notch signaling has been widely demonstrated to be responsible for cell fate determination during normal development and implicated in human T-cell leukemia and mouse mammary carcinomas. Here we show that Notch signaling may be involved in prostatic development and cancer cell growth. In situ hybridization and reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that Notch1 was expressed in prostate epithelial cells during normal development and in prostate cancer cells. Characterization of Notch1-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice, in which the expression of reporter green fluorescent protein is under the control of the Notch1 promoter, indicated that Notch1-expressing cells were associated with the basal epithelial cell population in the prostate. Examination of the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate showed that expression of Notch1 was elevated in malignant prostatic epithelial cells of primary and metastatic tumors. Expression of Notch ligands, however, was low or undetectable in cultured prostate cancer cells or in malignant prostatic epithelial cells in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate. Furthermore, overexpression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 inhibited the proliferation of various prostate cancer cells, including DU145, LNCaP, and PC3 cells. Taken together, our data indicate for the first time that Notch signaling may play a role in murine prostatic development and tumorigenesis.

  9. Survival and tumorigenesis in O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase-deficient mice following cyclophosphamide exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Nagasubramanian, Ramamoorthy; Hansen, Ryan J.; Delaney, Shannon M.; Cherian, Mathew M.; Samson, Leona D.; Kogan, Scott C.; Dolan, M Eileen

    2008-01-01

    O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) deficiency is associated with an increased susceptibility to alkylating agent toxicity. To understand the contribution of MGMT in protecting against cyclophosphamide (CP)-induced toxicity, mutagenesis and tumorigenesis, we compared the biological effects of this agent in transgenic Mgmt knockout and wild-type mice. In addition, neurofibromin (Nf1)+/− background was used to increase the likelihood of CP-induced tumorigenesis. Cohorts of Mgmt-profic...

  10. Overexpression of Id1 in transgenic mice promotes mammary basal stem cell activity and breast tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Shin, Dong-Hui; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Jeong-Yeon; Won, Hee-Young; Jang, Ki-Seok; MIN, KYUENG-WHAN; Jang, Si-Hyong; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Oh, Seung Hyun; Kong, Gu

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor of differentiation/DNA binding (Id)1 is a crucial regulator of mammary development and breast cancer progression. However, its effect on stemness and tumorigenesis in mammary epithelial cells remains undefined. Herein, we demonstrate that Id1 induces mammary tumorigenesis by increasing normal and malignant mammary stem cell (MaSC) activities in transgenic mice. MaSC-enriched basal cell expansion and increased self-renewal and in vivo regenerative capacity of MaSCs are observed in th...

  11. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B.; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  12. Lessons learned using different mouse models during space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xiangming; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xiang; Farris, Alton B; Wang, Ya

    2016-06-01

    Unlike terrestrial ionizing radiation, space radiation, especially galactic cosmic rays (GCR), contains high energy charged (HZE) particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). Due to a lack of epidemiologic data for high-LET radiation exposure, it is highly uncertain how high the carcinogenesis risk is for astronauts following exposure to space radiation during space missions. Therefore, using mouse models is necessary to evaluate the risk of space radiation-induced tumorigenesis; however, which mouse model is better for these studies remains uncertain. Since lung tumorigenesis is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women, and low-LET radiation exposure increases human lung carcinogenesis, evaluating space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis is critical to enable safe Mars missions. Here, by comparing lung tumorigenesis obtained from different mouse strains, as well as miR-21 in lung tissue/tumors and serum, we believe that wild type mice with a low spontaneous tumorigenesis background are ideal for evaluating the risk of space radiation-induced lung tumorigenesis, and circulating miR-21 from such mice model might be used as a biomarker for predicting the risk.

  13. 4-Guanidino-n-butyl syringate (Leonurine, SCM 198) protects H9c2 rat ventricular cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin-hua; Chen, Pei-fang; Pan, Li-long; Silva, Ranil De; Zhu, Yi-zhun

    2009-11-01

    In the present study, we examined the ability of a chemically synthesized compound based on the structure of leonurine, a phytochemical component of Herba leonuri, to protect H9c2 rat ventricular cells from apoptosis induced by hypoxia and serum deprivation, as a model of ischemia. The results revealed a concentration-dependent increase in cell viability associated with leonurine treatment, accompanied by a consistent decline in lactate dehydrogenase leakage into the culture medium. The fraction of annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate-positive cells was increased by hypoxia but reduced by leonurine. These changes were associated with increased expression of the antiapoptotic gene, Bcl-2, and reduced expression of the proapoptotic gene, Bax. Leonurine also reduced the cytosolic Ca overload induced by hypoxia. These results suggest that leonurine elicits potent cardioprotective effects in H9c2 cells, and these effects may be mediated by inhibition of intracellular Ca overload and apoptosis during hypoxia.

  14. Relative Expression of HIF-1α mRNA in Rat Heart, Brain and Blood During Induced Systemic Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syarifah Dewi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole or region of the body (tissue or cell deprived of adequate oxygen supply. The transcriptional regulator hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is an essential mediator of O2 homeostasis. Unlike the β sub unit (HIF-1β, the activity of HIF-1α is controlled in an oxygen-dependent manner. It has been reported that the stability and expression of HIF-1α during hypoxia is remarkably higher than those under normoxic conditions.The aim of this study was to analyze the adaptive tissue responses during induced systemic hypoxia by comparation of relative expression of mRNA HIF-1α in rat heart, brain and blood. Twenty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to systemic hypoxia by placing them in the hypoxic chamber supplied by 8-10% of O2 for 0, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. The relative expression level of HIF-1α mRNA in brain, heart and leucocyte cells were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR assay (Real Time PCR based on Pfaff's formula. This study demonstrates that the increased of relative expression of HIF-1α mRNA during induced systemic hypoxia reached its maximum level at day 7 (in heart or at day 14 (in brain, whereas in leucocyte cells the stimulation of HIF-1α expression was intensively maintained up to 21 days although the expression has reached the remarkably high level. We could conclude that HIF-1α as an oxygen sensing during systemic hypoxia has different capacity and sensitivity in brain, heart and blood tissues, due to the importance of oxygen homeostasis in each tissue.

  15. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...... by hyperventilation of room air, elicited a normoxic increase in the haemoglobin oxygen affinity without changing serum-EPO. Among the measured blood gas and acid-base parameters, only the partial pressures of oxygen in arterial blood during hypocapnic hypoxia were related to the peak values of serum-EPO (r = -0...

  16. Nuclear factor-κB2/p100 promotes endometrial carcinoma cell survival under hypoxia in a HIF-1α independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeramian, Andree; Santacana, Maria; Sorolla, Anabel; Llobet, David; Encinas, Mario; Velasco, Ana; Bahi, Nuria; Eritja, Nuria; Domingo, Mónica; Oliva, Esther; Dolcet, Xavier; Matias-Guiu, Xavier

    2011-06-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC) is a common female cancer, treated mainly by surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. Relapse following treatment is associated with increased risk of metastases. Hypoxia, a common microenvironment in solid tumors, correlates with malignant progression, rendering tumors resistant to ionizing therapy. Hence, we assessed here the immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and members of the NF-κB family in 82 primary EC and 10 post-radiation recurrences of EC. Post-radiation recurrences were highly hypoxic, with a higher expression of HIF-1α and also RelA (p65) and p52 when compared with primary EC. We next investigated the effects of hypoxia on EC cell lines. We found that EC cell lines are highly resistant to hypoxia-induced apoptosis. We thus focused on the molecular mechanisms involved in conferring hypoxic cell death resistance. We show that in addition to the classical NF-κB, hypoxia activates the alternative NF-κB pathway. To characterize the upstream kinases involved in the activation of these pathways, we used lentiviral-mediated knockdown and mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking IKKα and IKKβ kinases. Both IKKα and IKKβ kinases are required for RelA (p65) and p100 accumulation, whereas p52 processing under hypoxia is IKKα dependent. Furthermore, Ishikawa endometrial cell line harboring either RelA (p65) or p52 short-hairpin RNA was sensitive to hypoxia-induced cell death, indicating that, in addition to the known prosurvival role of RelA (p65) under hypoxia, alternative NF-κB pathway also enhances hypoxic survival of EC cells. Interestingly, although HIF-1α controlled classical NF-κB activation pathway and survival under hypoxia through RelA (p65) nuclear accumulation, the alternative pathway was HIF-1α independent. These findings have important clinical implications for the improvement of EC prognosis before radiotherapy.

  17. Prolonged sulforaphane treatment does not enhance tumorigenesis in oncogenic K-ras and xenograft mouse models of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponvijay Kombairaju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sulforaphane (SFN, an activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2, is a promising chemopreventive agent which is undergoing clinical trial for several diseases. Studies have indicated that there is gain of Nrf2 function in lung cancer and other solid tumors because of mutations in the inhibitor Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1. More recently, several oncogenes have been shown to activate Nrf2 signaling as the main prosurvival pathway mediating ROS detoxification, senescence evasion, and neoplastic transformation. Thus, it is important to determine if there is any risk of enhanced lung tumorigenesis associated with prolonged administration of SFN using mouse models of cancer. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on oncogenic K-ras (K-ras LSL-G12D -driven lung tumorigenesis. One week post mutant-K-ras expression, mice were treated with SFN (0.5 mg, 5 d/wk for 3 months by means of a nebulizer. Fourteen weeks after mutant K-ras expression (K-ras LSL-G12D , mice were sacrificed, and lung sections were screened for neoplastic foci. Expression of Nrf2-dependent genes was measured using real time RT-PCR. We also determined the effect of prolonged SFN treatment on the growth of preclinical xenograft models using human A549 (with mutant K-ras and Keap1 allele and H1975 [with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR allele] nonsmall cell lung cancer cells. Results: Systemic SFN administration did not promote the growth of K-ras LSL-G12D -induced lung tumors and had no significant effect on the growth of A549 and H1975 established tumor xenografts in nude mice. Interestingly, localized delivery of SFN significantly attenuated the growth of A549 tumors in nude mice, suggesting an Nrf2-independent antitumorigenic activity of SFN. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that prolonged SFN treatment does not promote lung tumorigenesis in various mouse models of lung cancer.

  18. Hypoxia upregulates Bcl-2 expression and suppresses interferon-gamma induced antiangiogenic activity in human tumor derived endothelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wang, Jiang Huai

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia in solid tumors potentially stimulates angiogenesis by promoting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and upregulating VEGF receptor expression. However, it is unknown whether hypoxia can modulate the effect of anti-angiogenic treatment on tumor-derived endothelium. METHODS: Human tumor-derived endothelial cells (HTDEC) were freshly isolated from surgically removed human colorectal tumors by collagenase\\/DNase digestion and Percol gradient sedimentation. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring BrdU incorporation, and capillary tube formation was measured using Matrigel. Cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry and ELISA, and Bcl-2 expression was detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Under aerobic culture conditions (5% CO2 plus 21% O2) HTDEC expressed less Bcl-2 and were more susceptible to IFN-gamma-induced apoptosis with significant reductions in both cell proliferation and capillary tube formation, when compared with normal human macrovascular and microvascular EC. Following exposure of HTDEC to hypoxia (5% CO2 plus 2% O2), IFN-gamma-induced cell apoptosis, and antiangiogenic activity (i.e. an inhibition in cell proliferation and capillary tube formation) in HTDEC were markedly attenuated. This finding correlated with hypoxia-induced upregulation of Bcl-2 expression in HTDEC. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that hypoxia can protect HTDEC against IFN-gamma-mediated cell death and antiangiogenic activity, and suggest that improvement of tumor oxygenation may potentiate the efficacy of anti-cancer therapies specifically targeting the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis.

  19. Activation of the central histaminergic system is involved in hypoxia-induced stroke tolerance in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yan-ying; Hu, Wei-wei; Dai, Hai-bin; Zhang, Jian-xiang; Zhang, Lu-yi; He, Ping; Shen, Yao; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Wei, Er-qing; Chen, Zhong

    2011-01-01

    We hypothesized that activation of the central histaminergic system is required for neuroprotection induced by hypoxic preconditioning. Wild-type (WT) and histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC-KO) mice were preconditioned by 3 hours of hypoxia (8% O(2)) and, 48 hours later, subjected to 30 minutes of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion, followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Hypoxic preconditioning improved neurologic function and decreased infarct volume in WT or HDC-KO mice treated with histamine, but not in HDC-KO or WT mice treated with α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH, an inhibitor of HDC). Laser-Doppler flowmetry analysis showed that hypoxic preconditioning ameliorated cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the periphery of the MCA territory during ischemia in WT mice but not in HDC-KO mice. Histamine decreased in the cortex of WT mice after 2, 3, and 4 hours of hypoxia, and HDC activity increased after 3 hours of hypoxia. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and protein expressions showed a greater increase after hypoxia than those in HDC-KO or α-FMH-treated WT mice. In addition, the VEGF receptor-2 antagonist SU1498 prevented the protective effect of hypoxic preconditioning in infarct volume and reversed increased peripheral CBF in WT mice. Therefore, endogenous histamine is an essential mediator of hypoxic preconditioning. It may function by enhancing hypoxia-induced VEGF expression.

  20. Myeloid cell-derived hypoxia-inducible factor attenuates inflammation in unilateral ureteral obstruction-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hanako; Gilbert, Victoria; Liu, Qingdu; Kapitsinou, Pinelopi P; Unger, Travis L; Rha, Jennifer; Rivella, Stefano; Schlöndorff, Detlef; Haase, Volker H

    2012-05-15

    Renal fibrosis and inflammation are associated with hypoxia, and tissue pO(2) plays a central role in modulating the progression of chronic kidney disease. Key mediators of cellular adaptation to hypoxia are hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 and -2. In the kidney, they are expressed in a cell type-specific manner; to what degree activation of each homolog modulates renal fibrogenesis and inflammation has not been established. To address this issue, we used Cre-loxP recombination to activate or to delete both Hif-1 and Hif-2 either globally or cell type specifically in myeloid cells. Global activation of Hif suppressed inflammation and fibrogenesis in mice subjected to unilateral ureteral obstruction, whereas activation of Hif in myeloid cells suppressed inflammation only. Suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration was associated with downregulation of CC chemokine receptors in renal macrophages. Conversely, global deletion or myeloid-specific inactivation of Hif promoted inflammation. Furthermore, prolonged hypoxia suppressed the expression of multiple inflammatory molecules in noninjured kidneys. Collectively, we provide experimental evidence that hypoxia and/or myeloid cell-specific HIF activation attenuates renal inflammation associated with chronic kidney injury.

  1. The retinoblastoma protein regulates hypoxia-inducible genetic programs, tumor cell invasiveness and neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Mark P.; Takhar, Mandeep K.; Nason, Rebecca; Santacruz, Stephanie; Tam, Kevin J.; Massah, Shabnam; Haegert, Anne; Bell, Robert H.; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Collins, Colin C.; Lee, Frank J.S.; Prefontaine, Gratien G.; Cox, Michael E.; Beischlag, Timothy V.

    2016-01-01

    Loss of tumor suppressor proteins, such as the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), results in tumor progression and metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by low oxygen availability within the tumor that is detected by hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The HIF1 complex, HIF1α and dimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), is the master regulator of the hypoxic response. Previously, we demonstrated that Rb represses the transcriptional response to hypoxia by virtue of its association with HIF1. In this report, we further characterized the role Rb plays in mediating hypoxia-regulated genetic programs by stably ablating Rb expression with retrovirally-introduced short hairpin RNA in LNCaP and 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. DNA microarray analysis revealed that loss of Rb in conjunction with hypoxia leads to aberrant expression of hypoxia-regulated genetic programs that increase cell invasion and promote neuroendocrine differentiation. For the first time, we have established a direct link between hypoxic tumor environments, Rb inactivation and progression to late stage metastatic neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for progression of benign prostate tumors to metastasized and lethal forms will aid in the development of more effective prostate cancer therapies. PMID:27015368

  2. Hypoxia suppresses Kv 2.1 channel expression through endogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in rat pulmonary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Qiu, Zhaoping; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Shuo; Zhu, Daling

    2010-09-01

    We have previously reported that hypoxia activates lung 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which catalyzes arachidonic acid to produce 15-HETE, leading to constriction of neonatal rabbit pulmonary arteries. Hypoxia suppresses Kv2.1 channel expression. Although the Kv channel inhibition by hypoxia is likely to be mediated through 15-HETE, direct evidence is still lacking. To explore whether 15-LOX/15-HETE pathway contributes to the hypoxia-induced down-regulation of Kv2.1 channel, we performed studies using 15-LOX blockers, semi-quantitative PCR and western blot analysis. We found that Kv2.1 channel expression at the mRNA and protein levels was greatly up-regulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and pulmonary artery (PA) after blockade of endogenous 15-HETE under hypoxic condition. 15-HETE further decreased Kv2.1 channel expression in comparison with 12-HETE and 5-HETE in cultured PASMCs and PA under normoxic conditions. These data indicate that hypoxia suppresses Kv2.1 channel expression through endogenous 15-HETE in PA.

  3. Nutrient-Deprived Retinal Progenitors Proliferate in Response to Hypoxia: Interaction of the HIF-1 and mTOR Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Khaliullina

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available At a cellular level, nutrients are sensed by the mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR. The response of cells to hypoxia is regulated via action of the oxygen sensor Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1. During development, injury and disease, tissues might face conditions of both low nutrient supply and low oxygen, yet it is not clear how cells adapt to both nutrient restriction and hypoxia, or how mTOR and HIF-1 interact in such conditions. Here we explore this question in vivo with respect to cell proliferation using the ciliary marginal zone (CMZ of Xenopus. We found that both nutrient-deprivation and hypoxia cause retinal progenitors to decrease their proliferation, yet when nutrient-deprived progenitors are exposed to hypoxia there is an unexpected rise in cell proliferation. This increase, mediated by HIF-1 signalling, is dependent on glutaminolysis and reactivation of the mTOR pathway. We discuss how these findings in non-transformed tissue may also shed light on the ability of cancer cells in poorly vascularised solid tumours to proliferate.

  4. The retinoblastoma protein regulates hypoxia-inducible genetic programs, tumor cell invasiveness and neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Mark P; Takhar, Mandeep K; Nason, Rebecca; Santacruz, Stephanie; Tam, Kevin J; Massah, Shabnam; Haegert, Anne; Bell, Robert H; Altamirano-Dimas, Manuel; Collins, Colin C; Lee, Frank J S; Prefontaine, Gratien G; Cox, Michael E; Beischlag, Timothy V

    2016-04-26

    Loss of tumor suppressor proteins, such as the retinoblastoma protein (Rb), results in tumor progression and metastasis. Metastasis is facilitated by low oxygen availability within the tumor that is detected by hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). The HIF1 complex, HIF1α and dimerization partner the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), is the master regulator of the hypoxic response. Previously, we demonstrated that Rb represses the transcriptional response to hypoxia by virtue of its association with HIF1. In this report, we further characterized the role Rb plays in mediating hypoxia-regulated genetic programs by stably ablating Rb expression with retrovirally-introduced short hairpin RNA in LNCaP and 22Rv1 human prostate cancer cells. DNA microarray analysis revealed that loss of Rb in conjunction with hypoxia leads to aberrant expression of hypoxia-regulated genetic programs that increase cell invasion and promote neuroendocrine differentiation. For the first time, we have established a direct link between hypoxic tumor environments, Rb inactivation and progression to late stage metastatic neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for progression of benign prostate tumors to metastasized and lethal forms will aid in the development of more effective prostate cancer therapies.

  5. The induction of tuftelin expression in PC12 cell line during hypoxia and NGF-induced differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Yoav; Silverstein, Nechama; Blumenfeld, Anat; Shilo, Dekel; Haze, Amir; Rosenfeld, Eli; Shay, Boaz; Tabakman, Rinat; Lecht, Shimon; Lazarovici, Philip; Deutsch, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The tuftelin protein isoforms undergo post-translation modifications, and are ubiquitously expressed in various tissues in embryos, adults, and tumors. Developmental and pathological studies suggested an apparent correlation between oxygen deprivation and tuftelin expression. The aim of the study was therefore to investigate the effect of a pathological insult (hypoxia) and a physiological growth factor (NGF), which antagonistically regulate HIF1 expression, on tuftelin expression using the neuronal PC12 cell model. In the present study, we first demonstrated the expression of tuftelin in PC12 cells, providing an experimental system to investigate the pathophysiological role of tuftelin. Furthermore, we demonstrated the induction of tuftelin during hypoxia by oxygen deprivation and during chemical hypoxia by cobalt chloride. Down-regulation of HIF1α mRNA blocked hypoxia-induced HIF1α expression, and reduced by 89% hypoxia-induced tuftelin expression. In mice, intraperitoneal injection of cobalt chloride significantly induced tuftelin mRNA and protein expression in the brain. During NGF-mediated PC12 differentiation, tuftelin expression was significantly induced in correlation with neurite outgrowth. This induction was partially blocked by K252a, a selective antagonist of the NGF receptor TrkA, indicating the involvement of the TrkA-signaling pathways in tuftelin induction by NGF. Revealing the physiological role of tuftelin will clarify mechanisms related to the "hypoxic genome," and NGF-induced neurotrophic and angiogenic effects.

  6. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  7. Hypoxia, HIF-1 Regulation and Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen insufficiency (hypoxia) is a common feature of human cancer and associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are more resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy contributing to their unfavorable prognosis. The oxygen sensing pathway is cont

  8. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  9. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, Maria; Bloomer, William D.; Bloomer, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula ##STR1## wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO.sub.2 is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers.

  10. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula STR1 wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO[sub 2] is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole are developed. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers. 9 figs.

  11. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...

  12. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...

  13. Notch signaling modulates hypoxia-induced neuroendocrine differentiation of human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Rosati, Fabiana; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Sturli, Niccolò; Kacer, Doreen; Pennella, Antonio; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; Barucci, Riccardo; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Prudovsky, Igor; Landriscina, Matteo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Prostate carcinoma is among the most common causes of cancer-related death in men, representing 15% of all male malignancies in developed countries. Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) has been associated with tumor progression, poor prognosis, and with the androgen-independent status. Currently, no successful therapy exists for advanced, castration-resistant disease. Because hypoxia has been linked to prostate cancer progression and unfavorable outcome, we sought to determine whether hypoxia would impact the degree of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Exposure of LNCaP cells to low oxygen tension induced a neuroendocrine phenotype, associated with an increased expression of the transcription factor neurogenin3 and neuroendocrine markers, such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, and β3-tubulin. Moreover, hypoxia triggered a significant decrease of Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA and protein expression, with subsequent downregulation of Notch-mediated signaling, as shown by reduced levels of the Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hey1. NED was promoted by attenuation of Hes1 transcription, as cells expressing a dominant-negative form of Hes1 displayed increased levels of neuroendocrine markers under normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia downregulated Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA transcription and receptor activation also in the androgen-independent cell lines, PC-3 and Du145, it did not change the extent of NED in these cultures, suggesting that androgen sensitivity may be required for transdifferentiation to occur. Hypoxia induces NED of LNCaP cells in vitro, which seems to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signaling with subsequent downregulation of Hes1 transcription. ©2011 AACR.

  14. Nitric oxide-driven hypoxia initiates synovial angiogenesis, hyperplasia and inflammatory lesions in mice.

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    Fei Bao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO. Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2, reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA, an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Like collagen

  15. NOTCH SIGNALLING MODULATES HYPOXIA-INDUCED NEUROENDOCRINE DIFFERENTIATION OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Rosati, Fabiana; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Sturli, Niccolò; Kacer, Doreen; Pennella, Antonio; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; Barucci, Riccardo; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Prudovsky, Igor; Landriscina, Matteo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is among the most common causes of cancer-related death in men, representing 15% of all male malignancies in developed countries. Neuroendocrine differentiation has been associated with tumor progression, poor prognosis and with the androgen-independent status. Currently, no successful therapy exists for advanced, castration-resistant disease. Because hypoxia has been linked to prostate cancer progression and unfavourable outcome, we sought to determine whether hypoxia would impact the degree of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, in vitro. Results exposure of LNCaP cells to low oxygen tension induced a neuroendocrine phenotype, associated with an increased expression of the transcription factor neurogenin3 and neuroendocrine markers, such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A and β3-tubulin. Moreover, hypoxia triggered a significant decrease of Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA and protein expression, with subsequent down regulation of Notch-mediated signalling, as demonstrated by reduced levels of the Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hey1. Neuroendocrine differentiation was promoted by attenuation of Hes1 transcription, as cells expressing a dominant negative form of Hes1 displayed increased levels of neuroendocrine markers under normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia down regulated Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA transcription and receptor activation also in the androgen independent cell lines, PC3 and Du145, it did not change the extent of NE differentiation in these cultures, suggesting that androgen sensitivity may be required for transdifferentiation to occur. Conclusions hypoxia induces neuroendocrine differentiation of LNCaP cells in vitro, which appears to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signalling with subsequent down-regulation of Hes1 transcription. PMID:22172337

  16. Conserved mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the Drosophila adult midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Martorell