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Sample records for hypoxia marker sr4554

  1. Hypoxia in human colorectal adenocarcinoma: comparison between extrinsic and potential intrinsic hypoxia markers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goethals, L.; Debucquoy, A.; Perneel, C.; Geboes, K.; Ectors, N.; Schutter, H. De; Penninckx, F.; McBride, W.H.; Begg, A.C.; Haustermans, K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To detect and quantify hypoxia in colorectal adenocarcinomas by use of pimonidazole and iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) as extrinsic markers and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), microvessel density (MVD), epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as intri

  2. A preclinical model for noninvasive imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression; comparison with an exogenous marker of tumor hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Bixiu; Burgman, Paul; Zanzonico, Pat; O' Donoghue, Joseph; Li, Gloria C.; Ling, C. Clifton [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York (United States); Cai Shangde; Finn, Ron [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Serganova, Inna [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States); Blasberg, Ronald; Gelovani, Juri [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Neurology, New York (United States)

    2004-11-01

    Hypoxia is associated with tumor aggressiveness and is an important cause of resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. Assays of tumor hypoxia could provide selection tools for hypoxia-modifying treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop and characterize a rodent tumor model with a reporter gene construct that would be transactivated by the hypoxia-inducible molecular switch, i.e., the upregulation of HIF-1. The reporter gene construct is the herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) fused with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under the regulation of an artificial hypoxia-responsive enhancer/promoter. In this model, tumor hypoxia would up-regulate HIF-1, and through the hypoxia-responsive promoter transactivate the HSV1-tkeGFPfusion gene. The expression of this reporter gene can be assessed with the {sup 124}I-labeled reporter substrate 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 124}I-FIAU), which is phosphorylated by the HSV1-tk enzyme and trapped in the hypoxic cells. Animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and phosphor plate imaging (PPI) were used in this study to visualize the trapped {sup 124}I-FIAU, providing a distribution of the hypoxia-induced molecular events. The distribution of {sup 124}I-FIAU was also compared with that of an exogenous hypoxic cell marker, {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO). Our results showed that {sup 124}I-FIAU microPET imaging of the hypoxia-induced reporter gene expression is feasible, and that the intratumoral distributions of {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO are similar. In tumor sections, detailed radioactivity distributions were obtained with PPI which also showed similarity between {sup 124}I-FIAU and {sup 18}F-FMISO. This reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect hypoxia-induced transcriptional activation by noninvasive imaging and might provide a valuable tool in studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future

  3. Markers of physiological stress during exercise under conditions of normoxia, normobaric hypoxia, hypobaric hypoxia, and genuine high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, David Richard; O'Hara, John Paul; Boos, Christopher John; Hodkinson, Peter David; Tsakirides, Costas; Hill, Neil Edward; Jose, Darren; Hawkins, Amanda; Phillipson, Kelly; Hazlerigg, Antonia; Arjomandkhah, Nicola; Gallagher, Liam; Holdsworth, David; Cooke, Mark; Green, Nicholas Donald Charles; Mellor, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether there is a differential response at rest and following exercise to conditions of genuine high altitude (GHA), normobaric hypoxia (NH), hypobaric hypoxia (HH), and normobaric normoxia (NN). Markers of sympathoadrenal and adrenocortical function [plasma normetanephrine (PNORMET), metanephrine (PMET), cortisol], myocardial injury [highly sensitive cardiac troponin T (hscTnT)], and function [N-terminal brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)] were evaluated at rest and with exercise under NN, at 3375 m in the Alps (GHA) and at equivalent simulated altitude under NH and HH. Participants cycled for 2 h [15-min warm-up, 105 min at 55% Wmax (maximal workload)] with venous blood samples taken prior (T0), immediately following (T120) and 2-h post-exercise (T240). Exercise in the three hypoxic environments produced a similar pattern of response with the only difference between environments being in relation to PNORMET. Exercise in NN only induced a rise in PNORMET and PMET. Biochemical markers that reflect sympathoadrenal, adrenocortical, and myocardial responses to physiological stress demonstrate significant differences in the response to exercise under conditions of normoxia versus hypoxia, while NH and HH appear to induce broadly similar responses to GHA and may, therefore, be reasonable surrogates.

  4. Validating the use of CAIX and GLUT1 as endogenous markers for hypoxia in solid tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Hao, Jing; Overgaard, Jens;

    H, but the influence of low pH on the expression of CA9 and GLUT1 has not been shown. The aim of this study was to investigate these aspects. Method:  Exponentially growing human uterine cervix squamous cell carcinoma (SiHa) cells, cultured in 5cm petri-dishes with MEM+10% FCS, were used for all experiments. Hypoxia...... response in the same cell line, and the induction was highly pH dependent, with minimal induction occurring at low pH. These findings raise concerns about the application CAIX and GLUT1 as endogenous markers of hypoxia in vivo. Supported by a grant from the Danish Cancer Society...

  5. Effects of hypoxia on expression of a panel of stem cell and chemoresistance markers in glioblastoma-derived spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Jesper; Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte;

    2011-01-01

    ). Spheroids were formed in 21% and 1% O(2) in serum-free medium. The immunohistochemical panel included hypoxia (HIF-1α, HIF-2α), proliferation (Ki-67), and stem cell markers (CD133, podoplanin, Bmi-1, nestin, Sox-2) as well as markers related to chemoresistance (MGMT, TIMP-1, Lamp-1, MRP1, MDR-1...

  6. An immunohistochemical study of the expression of the hypoxia markers Glut-1 and Ca-IX in canine sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbondati, E; Del-Pozo, J; Hoather, T M; Constantino-Casas, F; Dobson, J M

    2013-11-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been associated with increased malignancy, likelihood of metastasis, and increased resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy in human medicine. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key transcription factor that is induced by tumor hypoxia and regulates the pathways involved in cellular response and adaptation to the hostile tumor microenvironment. HIF-1 induces transcription of different proteins, including Ca-IX and Glut-1, which are considered endogenous markers of chronic hypoxia in solid tumors in humans. In this study, sections from 40 canine sarcomas (20 histiocytic sarcomas and 20 low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas) were immunostained for these markers. Expression of Glut-1 was scored based on percentage of positive staining cells (0 = 50%) and intensity of cellular staining (1 = weak; 2 = strong); Ca-IX was scored based on percentage of positive cells (0 = 30%). Intratumoral microvessel density was measured using CD31 to assess intratumoral neoangiogenesis. Histiocytic sarcomas showed statistically significant higher Glut-1 immunoreactivity and angiogenesis than did low-grade soft-tissue sarcomas. Intratumoral microvessel density in histiocytic sarcomas was positively associated with Glut-1 immunoreactivity score. These findings suggest a potential role of hypoxia in the biology of these tumors and may provide a base for investigation of the potential prognostic use of these markers in naturally occurring canine tumors.

  7. Hypoxia induced expression of endogenous markers in vitro is highly influenced by pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genes such as carbonic anhydrase IX (Ca9), glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), osteopontin (OPN) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) have been suggested as hypoxic markers, but inconsistent results suggest that factors other than oxygen influence their expression......Ha and FaDu(DD) cells Ca9 and LOX reached the highest level of expression at 1% oxygen. In FaDu(DD) cells, a pH of 6.5 had a medium suppression effect on the hypoxia induced expression of Ca9. pH 6.3 resulted in severe suppression of expression for Ca9 and LOX in both SiHa and FaDu(DD). Glut1 and LDH-A had...

  8. Hypoxia induced expression of endogenous markers in vitro is highly influenced by pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Alsner, Jan; Overgaard, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genes such as carbonic anhydrase IX (Ca9), glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), lactate dehydrogenase A (LDH-A), osteopontin (OPN) and lysyl oxidase (LOX) have been suggested as hypoxic markers, but inconsistent results suggest that factors other than oxygen influence their expression......Ha and FaDu(DD) cells Ca9 and LOX reached the highest level of expression at 1% oxygen. In FaDu(DD) cells, a pH of 6.5 had a medium suppression effect on the hypoxia induced expression of Ca9. pH 6.3 resulted in severe suppression of expression for Ca9 and LOX in both SiHa and FaDu(DD). Glut1 and LDH-A had...

  9. {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics identification of markers of hypoxia-induced metabolic shifts in a breast cancer model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weljie, Aalim M., E-mail: aweljie@ucalgary.ca [University of Calgary, Department of Biological Sciences (Canada); Bondareva, Alla [Department of Comparative Biology and Experimental Medicine (Canada); Zang, Ping [University of Calgary, Department of Chemistry (Canada); Jirik, Frank R. [McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O{sub 2}) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.

  10. Identifying novel hypoxia-associated markers of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McEvoy, Lynda M

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with poor long-term survival due to late diagnosis and development of chemoresistance. Tumour hypoxia is associated with many features of tumour aggressiveness including increased cellular proliferation, inhibition of apoptosis, increased invasion and metastasis, and chemoresistance, mostly mediated through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. While HIF-1α has been associated with platinum resistance in a variety of cancers, including ovarian, relatively little is known about the importance of the duration of hypoxia. Similarly, the gene pathways activated in ovarian cancer which cause chemoresistance as a result of hypoxia are poorly understood. This study aimed to firstly investigate the effect of hypoxia duration on resistance to cisplatin in an ovarian cancer chemoresistance cell line model and to identify genes whose expression was associated with hypoxia-induced chemoresistance.

  11. Synthesis, radiolabeling and biological evaluation of propylene amine oxime complexes containing nitrotriazoles as hypoxia markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huafan; Mei, Lei; Chu, Taiwei

    2012-06-04

    Two propylene amine oxime (PnAO) complexes, 1, containing a 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazole and 2, containing two 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazoles, were synthesized and radiolabeled with (99m)Tc in high labeling yields. Cellular uptakes of (99m)Tc-1 and (99m)Tc-2 were tested using a S180 cells line. Under anoxic conditions, the cellular uptakes of (99m)Tc-1 and (99m)Tc-2 were 33.7 ± 0.2% and 35.0 ± 0.7% at 4 h, whereas the normoxic uptakes of the two complexes were 6.0 ± 1.6% and 4.6 ± 0.9%, respectively. Both (99m)Tc-1 and (99m)Tc-2 displayed significant anoxic/normoxic differentials. The cellular uptakes were highly dependent on oxygen and temperature. Biodistribution studies revealed that both (99m)Tc-1 and (99m)Tc-2 showed a selective localization in tumor and slow clearance from it. At 4 h, the tumor-to-muscle ratios (T/M) were 3.79 for (99m)Tc-1 and 4.58 for (99m)Tc-2. These results suggested that (99m)Tc-labeled PnAO complexes (99m)Tc-1 and (99m)Tc-2 might serve as novel hypoxia markers. By introducing a second nitrotriazole redox center, the hypoxic accumulation of the marker was slightly enhanced.

  12. Carbonic anhydrase IX is a marker of hypoxia and correlates with higher Gleason scores and ISUP grading in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Di Serio, Claudia; Danza, Giovanna; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Ginori, Alessandro; Prudovsky, Igor; Marchionni, Niccolò; Del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Tarantini, Francesca

    2016-05-25

    Carbonic anhydrase IX is a member of α-carbonic anhydrases that is preferentially expressed in solid tumors. It enables bicarbonate transport across the plasma membrane, neutralizing intracellular pH and conferring to cancer cells a survival advantage in hypoxic/acidic microenvironments. Overexpression of carbonic anhydrase IX in cancer tissues is regulated by hypoxia inducible factor 1α - mediated transcription and the enzyme is considered a marker of tumor hypoxia and poor outcome. The role of carbonic anhydrase IX in prostate cancer has not been fully clarified and controversy has arisen on whether this enzyme is overexpressed in hypoxic prostate cancer tissues. We analyzed the expression of carbonic anhydrase IX and hypoxia inducible factor 1α in two prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and PC-3, and in 110 cancer biopsies, by western blotting and immunocyto/histochemistry. In LNCaP and PC-3 cells, carbonic anhydrase IX was mostly cytoplasmic/nuclear, with very limited membrane localization. Nuclear staining became stronger under hypoxia. When we analyzed carbonic anhydrase IX expression in human prostate cancer biopsies, we found that protein staining positively correlated with hypoxia inducible factor 1α and with Gleason pattern and score, as well as with the novel grading system proposed by the International Society of Urological Pathology for prostate cancer. Once more, carbonic anhydrase IX was mainly cytoplasmic in low grade carcinomas, whereas in high grade tumors was strongly expressed in the nucleus of the neoplastic cell. An association between carbonic anhydrase IX expression level and the main clinic-pathological features involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness was identified. There was a statistically significant association between carbonic anhydrase IX and hypoxia inducible factor 1α in prostate cancer tissues, that identifies the enzyme as a reliable marker of tumor hypoxia. In addition, carbonic anhydrase IX expression positively

  13. Effects of hypoxia on expression of a panel of stem cell and chemosensitivity markers in glioblastoma cell line-derived spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Jesper; Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte;

    immunohistochemical panel included hypoxia (HIF-1α, HIF-2α), proliferation (Ki-67) and stem cell (CD133, nestin, podoplanin, Bmi-1, Sox-2) markers as well as markers related to chemosensitivity (MGMT, MDR-1, TIMP-1, Lamp-1). Since spheroids derived in hypoxia were smaller than in normoxia, a set of experiments...... for podoplanin, nestin and TIMP-1 as well as for Ki-67. Hif-2α, Sox-2, MGMT and MDR-1 were not detectable in normoxic and hypoxic U87 spheroids. In conclusion, the expression of tumor stem cell and chemosensitivity markers seems to depend on the oxygen tension suggesting that future development of therapeutic...

  14. Proteomic identification of novel differentiation plasma protein markers in hypobaric hypoxia-induced rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Ahmad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric hypoxia causes complex changes in the expression of genes, including stress related genes and corresponding proteins that are necessary to maintain homeostasis. Whereas most prior studies focused on single proteins, newer methods allowing the simultaneous study of many proteins could lead to a better understanding of complex and dynamic changes that occur during the hypobaric hypoxia. METHODS: In this study we investigated the temporal plasma protein alterations of rat induced by hypobaric hypoxia at a simulated altitude of 7620 m (25,000 ft, 282 mm Hg in a hypobaric chamber. Total plasma proteins collected at different time points (0, 6, 12 and 24 h, separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and identified using matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF. Biological processes that were enriched in the plasma proteins during hypobaric hypoxia were identified using Gene Ontology (GO analysis. According to their properties and obvious alterations during hypobaric hypoxia, changes of plasma concentrations of Ttr, Prdx-2, Gpx -3, Apo A-I, Hp, Apo-E, Fetub and Nme were selected to be validated by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Bioinformatics analysis of 25 differentially expressed proteins showed that 23 had corresponding candidates in the database. The expression patterns of the eight selected proteins observed by Western blot were in agreement with 2-DE results, thus confirming the reliability of the proteomic analysis. Most of the proteins identified are related to cellular defense mechanisms involving anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. Their presence reflects the consequence of serial cascades initiated by hypobaric hypoxia. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides information about the plasma proteome changes induced in response to hypobaric hypoxia and thus identification of the candidate proteins which can act as novel biomarkers.

  15. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan CSPG4 as a novel hypoxia-sensitive marker in pancreatic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleg, Shereen; Titov, Alexandr; Heller, Anette; Giese, Thomas; Tjaden, Christine; Ahmad, Sufian S; Gaida, Matthias M; Bauer, Andrea S; Werner, Jens; Giese, Nathalia A

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20), premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55), and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86). Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139), western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissue(high)/sera(low)-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct

  16. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan CSPG4 as a novel hypoxia-sensitive marker in pancreatic tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen Keleg

    Full Text Available CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4 might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4 due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83 and validation (n = 221 cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26 and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20 or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma SCA, n = 13+20, premalignant (intraductal dysplastic IPMNs, n = 9+55, and malignant (IPMN-associated invasive carcinomas, n = 4+14; ductal adenocarcinomas, n = 35+86. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR (n = 139, western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. sCSPG4 was found in circulation, but its level was significantly lower in pancreatic patients than in donors. Selective maintenance was observed in advanced IPMNs and PDACs and showed a nodal association while lacking prognostic relevance. Pancreatic pCSPG4 expression was preserved or elevated, whereby neoplastic cells lacked pCSPG4 or tended to overexpress without shedding. Extreme pancreatic overexpression, membranous exposure and tissue(high/sera(low-discordance highlighted stroma-poor benign cystic neoplasm. SCA is known to display hypoxic markers and coincide with von-Hippel-Lindau and Peutz-Jeghers syndromes, in which pVHL and LBK1 mutations affect hypoxic signaling pathways. In vitro testing confined pCSPG4 overexpression to normal mesenchymal but not epithelial cells, and a third of tested carcinoma cell lines; however, only the latter showed pCSPG4-responsiveness to chronic hypoxia. siRNA-based knockdowns failed to reduce the malignant potential of either normoxic or hypoxic cells. Thus, overexpression of the newly established conditional hypoxic indicator, CSPG4, is apparently non-pathogenic in pancreatic malignancies but might mark distinct

  17. Hypoxia and oxidative stress markers in pediatric patients undergoing hemodialysis: cross section study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Enas A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue injury due to hypoxia and/or free radicals is common in a variety of disease processes. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate effect of chronic kidney diseases (CKD and hemodialysis (HD on hypoxia and oxidative stress biomarkers. Methods Forty pediatric patients with CKD on HD and 20 healthy children were recruited. Plasma hypoxia induced factor-1α (HIF-1α, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF were measured by specific ELISA kits while, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, total peroxide (TPX, pyruvate and lactate by enzymatic/chemical colorimetric methods. Oxidative stress index (OSI and lactate/pyruvate (L/P ratio were calculated. Results TAC was significantly lower while TPX, OSI and VEGF were higher in patients at before- and after-dialysis session than controls. Lactate and HIF-1α levels were significantly higher at before-dialysis session than controls. Before dialysis, TAC and L/P ratio were lower than after-dialysis. In before-dialysis session, VEGF correlated positively with pyruvate, HIF-1α and OSI correlated positively with TPX, but, negatively with TAC. In after-dialysis session, HIF-1α correlated negatively with TPX and OSI; while, OSI correlated positively with TPX. Conclusions CKD patients succumb considerable tissue hypoxia with oxidative stress. Hemodialysis ameliorated hypoxia but lowered antioxidants as evidenced by decreased levels of HIF-1α and TAC at before- compared to after-dialysis levels.

  18. Effects of hypoxia on expression of a panel of stem cell and chemosensitivity markers in glioblastoma cell line-derived spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolenda, Jesper; Jensen, Stine Skov; Aaberg-Jessen, Charlotte

    of a panel of stem cell and chemosensitivity markers was therefore investigated using glioma spheroids derived from the conventional glioblastoma cell line U87. The glioma spheroids were derived at normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) culturing conditions in serum-free medium with EGF and bFGF. The entire......Glioblastomas are the most frequent and malignant primary brain tumor. Tumor stem cells in these tumors have recently been suggested to possess innate resistance mechanisms against radiation and chemotherapy possibly explaining their high level of therapeutic resistance. Moreover tumor hypoxia...... immunohistochemical panel included hypoxia (HIF-1α, HIF-2α), proliferation (Ki-67) and stem cell (CD133, nestin, podoplanin, Bmi-1, Sox-2) markers as well as markers related to chemosensitivity (MGMT, MDR-1, TIMP-1, Lamp-1). Since spheroids derived in hypoxia were smaller than in normoxia, a set of experiments...

  19. The relationships between hypoxia-dependent markers: HIF-1alpha, EPO and EPOR in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaziak, Marek; Wincewicz, Andrzej; Kanczuga-Koda, Luiza; Lotowska, Joanna M; Koda, Mariusz; Sulkowska, Urszula; Baltaziak, Marcin; Podbielski, Monika; Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia triggers production of several cytoprotective proteins. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α) is a powerful stimulator of transcription of many genes, including erythropoietin (EPO) in hypoxia-affected cells. Recent data have also implicated signaling by EPO receptor (EPOR) as a new factor influencing tumor progression. The aim of the study was to detect by immunohistochemistry the presence of HIF-1α, EPO and EPOR in colorectal cancer (CRC) in reference to clinicopathological variables. We found the presence of the studied proteins in specimens of all 125 CRC patients which is suggestive of the occurrence of hypoxia in colorectal cancer tissues. The expression of HIF-1α correlated significantly with the presence of EPO and EPOR in all samples (P < 0.001, r = 0.549 and P < 0.001, r = 0.536, respectively). Significant correlations (from P < 0.024 to P < 0.001) were found in the analyses of CRC subgroups such as histopathological type tumor, tumor grade, tumor stage and patients with lymph nodes metastases. The same high significant correlations (P < 0.001) were observed in group of sex, age and tumor location. However, the values of the correlation coefficients (r) which usually ranged from 0.5 to 0.6 suggest the existence of independent or concurrent mechanism stimulating generation of these proteins in colorectal cancer.

  20. Immunohistochemical analysis of cancer stem cell markers in invasive breast carcinoma and associated ductal carcinoma in situ: relationships with markers of tumor hypoxia and microvascularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Margaret J; Beardsley, Brooke E; Harris, Gavin C; Gunningham, Sarah P; Dachs, Gabi U; Dijkstra, Birgit; Morrin, Helen R; Wells, J Elisabeth; Robinson, Bridget A

    2013-03-01

    We performed immunohistochemical analysis of 3 cancer stem cell-related markers (CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), aldehyde dehydrogenase [ALDH]-1, CD133) in 94 invasive ductal carcinomas and assessed relationships with markers of hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase IX [CAIX]), tumor microvessel density (CD31), and clinicopathologic variables. Overall, 10% of tumors were CD44(+)/CD24(-/low), 13% were ALDH-1(+), 25% were CD133(+), 35% were immunonegative, and 1 tumor was immunopositive for all 3 markers. Associated ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) was present in 48% of tumors. Marker immunopositivity was detected in DCIS in 13% (CD44(+)/CD24(-/low)), 7% (ALDH-1(+)), and 32% (CD133(+)) of these tumors and was more likely present in DCIS when also detected in the invasive compartment (P = .03, P = .001, and P = .009, respectively). CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) cells were more common in progesterone receptor-negative tumors (P breast cancers (P breast cancer and showed that CD44(+)/CD24(-/low) and CD133(+) cells were more frequently observed in hypoxic regions of tumor, whereas ALDH-1(+) cells more commonly colocalized to tumors with high microvessel density.

  1. Metabolic markers in relation to hypoxia; staining patterns and colocalization of pimonidazole, HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bussink Johan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellular response of malignant tumors to hypoxia is diverse. Several important endogenous metabolic markers are upregulated under hypoxic conditions. We examined the staining patterns and co-expression of HIF-1α, CAIX, LDH-5, GLUT-1, MCT1 and MCT4 with the exogenous hypoxic cell marker pimonidazole and the association of marker expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Methods 20 biopsies of advanced head and neck carcinomas were immunohistochemically stained and analyzed. All patients were given the hypoxia marker pimonidazole intravenously 2 h prior to biopsy taking. The tumor area positive for each marker, the colocalization of the different markers and the distribution of the markers in relation to the blood vessels were assessed by semiautomatic quantitative analysis. Results MCT1 staining was present in hypoxic (pimonidazole stained as well as non-hypoxic areas in almost equal amounts. MCT1 expression showed a significant overall correlation (r = 0.75, p Conclusions Colocalization and staining patterns of metabolic and hypoxia-related proteins provides valuable additional information over single protein analyses and can improve the understanding of their functions and environmental influences.

  2. An evaluation of iodine-123 iodoazomycinarabinoside as a marker of localized tissue hypoxia in patients with diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Arafaj, A. [Univ. of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton (Canada); Ryan, E.A. [Univ. of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Hutchison, K. [Univ. of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Mannan, R.H. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Mercer, J. [Univ. of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Wiebe, L.I. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Cross Cancer Inst., Edmonton, AB (Canada); McEwan, A.J.B. [Univ. of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Cross Cancer Inst., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1994-12-01

    Peripheral vascular disease is a serious and common complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Evaluation is, conventionally, by transcutaneous oxygen tension measurements (TcpO{sub 2}), although this technique has some limitations in the evaluation of tissue viability. We have evaluated a new, radiolabelled, in vivo marker of tissue hypoxia, iodoazomycinarabinoside (IAZA), by comparing TcpO{sub 2} measurements with patterns of iodine-123 IAZA uptake in ten patients (19 lower limbs) with DM and peripheral vascular disease using conventional gamma camera imaging techniques. Normal uptake patterns were seen in limbs in which normal TcpO{sub 2} measurements were obtained. Diffusely increased uptake of [{sup 123}I]IAZA was seen in limbs with reduced TcpO{sub 2}. Focally increased uptake was seen in ulcers or in areas of atrophic skin change. A semi-quantitative measure showed an inverse correlation between [{sup 123}I]IAZA and TcpO{sub 2} values. These data suggest that tissue hypoxia can be imaged in this population of patients and that severity of disease can be assessed. A longitudinal prospective trial is now being developed. (orig.)

  3. Fifteen days of 3,200 m simulated hypoxia marginally regulates markers for protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Hulst, Gommaar; Ferri, Alessandra; Naslain, Damien; Bertrand, Luc; Horman, Sandrine; Francaux, Marc; Bishop, David J; Deldicque, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia leads to muscle atrophy. The molecular mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon are not well defined in vivo. We sought to determine how chronic hypoxia regulates molecular markers of protein synthesis and degradation in human skeletal muscle and whether these regulations were related to the regulation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. Eight young male subjects lived in a normobaric hypoxic hotel (FiO2 14.1%, 3,200 m) for 15 days in well-controlled conditions for nutrition and physical activity. Skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained in the musculus vastus lateralis before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) hypoxic exposure. Intramuscular hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) protein expression decreased (−49%, P=0.03), whereas hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha (HIF-2α) remained unaffected from PRE to POST hypoxic exposure. Also, downstream HIF-1α target genes VEGF-A (−66%, P=0.006) and BNIP3 (−24%, P=0.002) were downregulated, and a tendency was measured for neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally Nedd4 (−47%, P=0.07), suggesting lowered HIF-1α transcriptional activity after 15 days of exposure to environmental hypoxia. No difference was found on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 type II/I (LC3b-II/I) ratio, and P62 protein expression tended to increase (+45%, P=0.07) compared to PRE exposure levels, suggesting that autophagy was not modulated after chronic hypoxia. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 pathway was not altered as Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin, S6 kinase 1, and 4E-binding protein 1 phosphorylation did not change between PRE and POST. Finally, myofiber cross-sectional area was unchanged between PRE and POST. In summary, our data indicate that moderate chronic hypoxia differentially regulates HIF-1α and HIF-2α, marginally affects markers of protein degradation, and does not modify markers of protein synthesis or myofiber cross-sectional area in human skeletal muscle.

  4. Synthesis, radiolabeling and in vivo biological evaluation of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAG{sub 3}-based bisnitroimidazole complexes as tumor hypoxia markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Lei; Chu, Taiwei [Peking Univ., Beijing (China). Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia, as a common phenomenon in solid tumors, is of interest for its relationship with resistance to tumor therapies and malignant progression of tumor. The noninvasive nuclear medical imaging technique using hypoxia markers is an important method for the detection of tumor hypoxia. The aim of current study is designing tumor hypoxia markers with hypoxia selectivity and improved properties. Two MAG{sub 3}-based bisnitroimidazole compounds were synthesized and purified by semi-preparative HPLC. Both the MAG{sub 3} derivatives were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-oxo-technetium core via stannous tartrate exchange method in high yields (> 95%). The {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3} complexes were stable at 37 C, 4 h after preparation, and were more hydrophilic than {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA complexes. As biodistribution results showed, clearances of background activity for both the complexes were fast and they were excreted mainly through the hepatobiliary tract and part of renal tract. Although tumor uptakes of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B2NIL were lower than those of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B4NIL, tumor-to-blood ratios of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B2NIL showed an increasing trend and were better than those of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B4NIL after 2 h due to their different blood clearances. Tumor-to-muscle ratios of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B2NIL and {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B4NIL were similar. Comparing with {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA complexes, {sup 99m}Tc-MAG{sub 3}-B2NIL with better tumor-to-blood ratios exhibits improved feature for hypoxia imaging, though it has lower tumor uptake than {sup 99m}Tc-MAMA complexes. (orig.)

  5. Relationships between hypoxia markers and the leptin system, estrogen receptors in human primary and metastatic breast cancer: effects of preoperative chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surmacz Eva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor hypoxia is marked by enhanced expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-1α and glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1. Hypoxic conditions have also been associated with overexpression of angiogenic factors, such as leptin. The aim of our study was to analyze the relationships between hypoxia markers HIF-1α, Glut-1, leptin, leptin receptor (ObR and other breast cancer biomarkers in primary and metastatic breast cancer in patients treated or untreated with preoperative chemotherapy. Methods The expression of different biomarkers was examined by immunohistochemistry in 116 primary breast cancers and 65 lymph node metastases. Forty five of these samples were obtained form patients who received preoperative chemotherapy and 71 from untreated patients. Results In primary tumors without preoperative chemotherapy, HIF-1α and Glut-1 were positively correlated (p = 0.02, r = 0.437. HIF-1α in primary and metastatic tumors without preoperative therapy positively correlated with leptin (p Conclusions Intratumoral hypoxia in breast cancer is marked by coordinated expression of such markers as HIF-1α, Glut-1, leptin and ObR. The relationships among these proteins can be altered by preoperative chemotherapy.

  6. Food intake during the previous 24 h as a percentage of usual intake: a marker of hypoxia in infants with bronchiolitis: an observational, prospective, multicenter study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrard François

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia associated with bronchiolitis is not always easy to assess on clinical grounds alone. The aim of this study was to determine the value of food intake during the previous 24 hours (bottle and spoon feeding, as a percentage of usual intake (24h FI, as a marker of hypoxia, and to compare its diagnostic value with that of usual clinical signs. Methods In this observational, prospective, multicenter study, 18 community pediatricians, enrolled 171 infants, aged from 0 to 6 months, with bronchiolitis (rhinorrhea + dyspnea + cough + expiratory sounds. Infants with risk factors (history of prematurity, chronic heart or lung disorders, breast-fed infants, and infants having previously been treated for bronchial disorders were excluded. The 24h FI, subcostal, intercostal, supracostal retractions, nasal flaring, respiratory rate, pauses, cyanosis, rectal temperature and respiratory syncytial virus test results were noted. The highest stable value of transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2 was recorded. Hypoxia was noted if SpO2 was below 95% and verified. Results 24h FI ≥ 50% was associated with a 96% likelihood of SpO2 ≥ 95% [95% CI, 91–99]. In univariate analysis, 24h FI  Conclusion In practice, the measure of 24 h FI may be useful in identifying hypoxia and deserves further study.

  7. Differentiation in neuroblastoma: diffusion-limited hypoxia induces neuro-endocrine secretory protein 55 and other markers of a chromaffin phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Hedborg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma is a childhood malignancy of sympathetic embryonal origin. A high potential for differentiation is a hallmark of neuroblastoma cells. We have previously presented data to suggest that in situ differentiation in tumors frequently proceeds along the chromaffin lineage and that decreased oxygen (hypoxia plays a role in this. Here we explore the utility of Neuro-Endocrine Secretory Protein 55 (NESP55, a novel member of the chromogranin family, as a marker for this process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemical analyses and in situ hybridizations were performed on human fetal tissues, mouse xenografts of human neuroblastoma cell lines, and on specimens of human neuroblastoma/ganglioneuroma. Effects of anaerobic exposure on gene expression by cultured neuroblastoma cells was analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR. Fetal sympathetic nervous system expression of NESP55 was shown to be specific for chromaffin cell types. In experimental and clinical neuroblastoma NESP55 immunoreactivity was specific for regions of chronic hypoxia. NESP55 expression also correlated strikingly with morphological evidence of differentiation and with other chromaffin-specific patterns of gene expression, including IGF2 and HIF2α. Anaerobic culture of five neuroblastoma cell lines resulted in an 18.9-fold mean up-regulation of NESP55. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data confirms that chronic tumor hypoxia is a key microenvironmental factor for neuroblastoma cell differentiation, causing induction of chromaffin features and NESP55 provides a reliable marker for this neuronal to neuroendocrine transition. The hypoxia-induced phenotype is the predominant form of differentiation in stroma-poor tumors, while in stroma-rich tumors the chromaffin phenotype coexists with ganglion cell-like differentiation. The findings provide new insights into the biological diversity which is a striking feature of this group of tumors.

  8. Expression and prognostic significance of a panel of tissue hypoxia markers in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Kong, Christina; Lavori, Phillip W;

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the expression pattern of hypoxia-induced proteins identified as being involved in malignant progression of head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and to determine their relationship to tumor pO(2) and prognosis. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We performed immunohistochemical...

  9. Metabolic profiling reveals potential metabolic markers associated with Hypoxia Inducible Factor-mediated signalling in hypoxic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Emily G; Kotze, Helen L; Allwood, J William; Dunn, Warwick B; Goodacre, Royston; Williams, Kaye J

    2015-10-28

    Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) plays an important role in oxygen compromised environments and therefore in tumour survival. In this research, metabolomics has been applied to study HIFs metabolic function in two cell models: mouse hepatocellular carcinoma and human colon carcinoma, whereby the metabolism has been profiled for a range of oxygen potentials. Wild type cells have been compared to cells deficient in HIF signalling to reveal its effect on cellular metabolism under normal oxygen conditions as well as low oxygen, hypoxic and anoxic environments. Characteristic responses to hypoxia that were conserved across both cell models involved the anti-correlation between 2-hydroxyglutarate, 2-oxoglutarate, fructose, hexadecanoic acid, hypotaurine, pyruvate and octadecenoic acid with 4-hydroxyproline, aspartate, cysteine, glutamine, lysine, malate and pyroglutamate. Further to this, network-based correlation analysis revealed HIF specific pathway responses to each oxygen condition that were also conserved between cell models. From this, 4-hydroxyproline was revealed as a regulating hub in low oxygen survival of WT cells while fructose appeared to be in HIF deficient cells. Pathways surrounding these hubs were built from the direct connections of correlated metabolites that look beyond traditional pathways in order to understand the mechanism of HIF response to low oxygen environments.

  10. Physiological noise in murine solid tumours using T2*-weighted gradient-echo imaging: a marker of tumour acute hypoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudelet, Christine; Ansiaux, Réginald; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Havaux, Xavier; Macq, Benoit; Gallez, Bernard

    2004-08-01

    T2*-weighted gradient-echo magnetic resonance imaging (T2*-weighted GRE MRI) was used to investigate spontaneous fluctuations in tumour vasculature non-invasively. FSa fibrosarcomas, implanted intramuscularly (i.m.) in the legs of mice, were imaged at 4.7 T, over a 30 min or 1 h sampling period. On a voxel-by-voxel basis, time courses of signal intensity were analysed using a power spectrum density (PSD) analysis to isolate voxels for which signal changes did not originate from Gaussian white noise or linear drift. Under baseline conditions, the tumours exhibited spontaneous signal fluctuations showing spatial and temporal heterogeneity over the tumour. Statistically significant fluctuations occurred at frequencies ranging from 1 cycle/3 min to 1 cycle/h. The fluctuations were independent of the scanner instabilities. Two categories of signal fluctuations were reported: (i) true fluctuations (TFV), i.e., sequential signal increase and decrease, and (ii) profound drop in signal intensity with no apparent signal recovery (SDV). No temporal correlation between tumour and contralateral muscle fluctuations was observed. Furthermore, treatments aimed at decreasing perfusion-limited hypoxia, such as carbogen combined with nicotinamide and flunarizine, decreased the incidence of tumour T2*-weighted GRE fluctuations. We also tracked dynamic changes in T2* using multiple GRE imaging. Fluctuations of T2* were observed; however, fluctuation maps using PSD analysis could not be generated reliably. An echo-time dependency of the signal fluctuations was observed, which is typical to physiological noise. Finally, at the end of T2*-weighted GRE MRI acquisition, a dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was performed to characterize the microenvironment in which tumour signal fluctuations occurred in terms of vessel functionality, vascularity and microvascular permeability. Our data showed that TFV were predominantly located in regions with functional vessels, whereas SDV occurred in regions

  11. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  12. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  13. HPV status, cancer stem cell marker expression, hypoxia gene signatures and tumour volume identify good prognosis subgroups in patients with HNSCC after primary radiochemotherapy: A multicentre retrospective study of the German Cancer Consortium Radiation Oncology Group (DKTK-ROG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linge, Annett; Lohaus, Fabian; Löck, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    carcinoma (HNSCC), who received primary radiochemotherapy (RCTx). MATERIALS AND METHODS: For 158 patients with locally advanced HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx or hypopharynx who were treated at six DKTK partner sites, the impact of tumour volume, HPV DNA, p16 overexpression, p53 expression, CSC marker...... expression and hypoxia-associated gene signatures on outcome of primary RCTx was retrospectively analyzed. The primary endpoint of this study was loco-regional control (LRC). RESULTS: Univariate Cox regression revealed a significant impact of tumour volume, p16 overexpression, and SLC3A2 and CD44 protein......-negative group). Logistic modelling showed that inclusion of CD44 protein expression and p16 overexpression significantly improved the performance to predict LRC at 2years compared to the model with tumour volume alone. CONCLUSIONS: Tumour volume, HPV status, CSC marker expression and hypoxia gene...

  14. A pilot study on potential plasma hypoxia markers in the radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer. Osteopontin, carbonic anhydrase IX and vascular endothelial growth factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, C.; Bache, M.; Guettler, A.; Vordermark, D. [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Kotzsch, M. [Technical University Dresden, Department of Pathology, Dresden (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Hypoxic radioresistance plays a critical role in the radiotherapy of cancer and adversely impacts prognosis and treatment response. This prospective study investigated the interrelationship and the prognostic significance of several hypoxia-related proteins in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Pretreatment osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) plasma levels were determined by ELISA in 55 NSCLC (M0) patients receiving 66 Gy curative-intent radiotherapy or chemoradiation. Marker correlation, association with clinicopathological parameters and the prognostic value of a biomarker combination was evaluated. All biomarkers were linearly correlated and linked to different clinical parameters including lung function, weight loss (OPN), gross tumor volume (VEGF) and T stage (CA IX). High OPN (p = 0.03), VEGF (p = 0.02) and CA IX (p = 0.04) values were significantly associated with poor survival. Double marker combination additively increased the risk of death by a factor of 2 and high plasma levels of the triple combination OPN/VEGF/CA IX yielded a 5.9-fold risk of death (p = 0.009). The combined assessment of OPN/VEGF/CA IX correlated independently with prognosis (p = 0.03) in a multivariate Cox regression model including N stage, T stage and GTV. This pilot study suggests that a co-detection augments the prognostic value of single markers and that the integration of OPN, VEGF and CA IX into a hypoxic biomarker profile for the identification of patients with largely hypoxic and radioresistant tumors should be further evaluated. (orig.) [German] Hypoxische Radioresistenz spielt eine kritische Rolle in der Radiotherapie maligner Tumoren und beeinflusst Prognose und Therapieansprechen negativ. Diese prospektive Studie untersuchte den Zusammenhang und die prognostische Bedeutung einiger hypoxieassoziierter Proteine bei Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom

  15. Use of Molecular Imaging Markers of Glycolysis, Hypoxia and Proliferation (18F-FDG, 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FLT) in a Dog with Fibrosarcoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zornhagen, Kamilla; Clausen, Malene; Hansen, Anders Elias

    2015-01-01

    Glycolysis, hypoxia, and proliferation are important factors in the tumor microenvironment contributing to treatment-resistant aggressiveness. Imaging these factors using combined functional positron emission tomography and computed tomography can potentially guide diagnosis and management...

  16. Hnf-1β transcription factor is an early hif-1α-independent marker of epithelial hypoxia and controls renal repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislas Faguer

    Full Text Available Epithelial repair following acute kidney injury (AKI requires epithelial-mesenchyme-epithelial cycling associated with transient re-expression of genes normally expressed during kidney development as well as activation of growth factors and cytokine-induced signaling. In normal kidney, the Hnf-1β transcription factor drives nephrogenesis, tubulogenesis and epithelial homeostasis through the regulation of epithelial planar cell polarity and expression of developmental or tubular segment-specific genes. In a mouse model of ischemic AKI induced by a 2-hours hemorrhagic shock, we show that expression of this factor is tightly regulated in the early phase of renal repair with a biphasic expression profile (early down-regulation followed by transient over-expression. These changes are associated to tubular epithelial differentiation as assessed by KSP-cadherin and megalin-cubilin endocytic complex expression analysis. In addition, early decrease in Hnf1b expression is associated with the transient over-expression of one of its main target genes, the suppressor of cytokine signaling Socs3, which has been shown essential for renal repair. In vitro, hypoxia induced early up-regulation of Hnf-1β from 1 to 24 hours, independently of the hypoxia-inducible factor Hif-1α. When prolonged, hypoxia induced Hnf-1β down-regulation while normoxia led to Hnf-1β normalization. Last, Hnf-1β down-regulation using RNA interference in HK-2 cells led to phenotype switch from an epithelial to a mesenchyme state. Taken together, we showed that Hnf-1β may drive recovery from ischemic AKI by regulating both the expression of genes important for homeostasis control during organ repair and the state of epithelial cell differentiation.

  17. Evaluation of uterine cervix cancer hypoxia by PET with {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M.. Relation with squamous cell carcinoma (S.C.C.) and osteopontin tumoral markers; Evaluation de l'hypoxie du cancer du col uterin par la TEP au {sup 18}F-FETNIM. Relation avec les marqueurs tumoraux SCC et osteopontine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barre, E.; Schlageter, M.H.; Groheux, D.; Vercellino, L.; Lussato, D.; Thoury, A.; Hennequin, V.; Hindie, E.; Barranger, E.; Moretti, J.L. [CHU Saint-Louis-Lariboisiere, universite Paris-7, IMDCT, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the imaging feasibility of hypoxia of cervical squamous cell carcinoma by PET with {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M. (Iason). to compare the {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M. uptake to the metabolic uptake in {sup 18}F-F.D.G. and to study their relationship with the squamous cell carcinoma, tumoral marker and osteoponin, circulating tracer of hypoxia. Conclusions: the F.E.T.N.I.M. uptake by the tumor is always of lower level than the {sup 18}F-F.D.G. uptake. By using the ratio Tumor/Muscle, these preliminary results do not enlighten any correlation between the circulating hypoxia tracer and the tumor uptake of {sup 18}F-F.E.T.N.I.M.. (N.C.)

  18. The prognostic value of the hypoxia markers CA IX and GLUT 1 and the cytokines VEGF and IL 6 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goethals Laurence

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several parameters of the tumor microenvironment, such as hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis, play a critical role in tumor aggressiveness and treatment response. A major question remains if these markers can be used to stratify patients to certain treatment protocols. The purpose of this study was to investigate the inter-relationship and the prognostic significance of several biological and clinicopathological parameters in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treated by radiotherapy ± chemotherapy. Methods We used two subgroups of a retrospective series for which CT-determined tumoral perfusion correlated with local control. In the first subgroup (n = 67, immunohistochemistry for carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX and glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1 was performed on the pretreatment tumor biopsy. In the second subgroup (n = 34, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA was used to determine pretreatment levels of the cytokines vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and interleukin-6 (IL-6 in serum. Correlation was investigated between tumoral perfusion and each of these biological markers, as well as between the markers mutually. The prognostic value of these microenvironmental parameters was also evaluated. Results For CA IX and GLUT-1, the combined assessment of patients with both markers expressed above the median showed an independent correlation with local control (p = 0.02 and disease-free survival (p = 0.04 with a trend for regional control (p = 0.06. In the second subgroup, IL-6 pretreatment serum level above the median was the only independent predictor of local control (p = 0.009, disease-free survival (p = 0.02 and overall survival (p = 0.005. Conclusion To our knowledge, we are the first to report a link in HNSCC between IL-6 pretreatment serum levels and radioresistance in vivo. This link is supported by the strong prognostic association of pretreatment IL-6 with local control, known to be

  19. Extracellular brain pH with or without hypoxia is a marker of profound metabolic derangement and increased mortality after traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, Ivan; Nortje, Jurgens; Al-Rawi, Pippa G; Hutchinson, Peter JA; Gupta, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia and acidosis can follow traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are associated with increased mortality. This study aimed to evaluate a relationship between reduced pHbt and disturbances of cerebral metabolism. Prospective data from 56 patients with TBI, receiving microdialysis and Neurotrend monitoring, were analyzed. Four tissue states were defined based on pHbt and PbtO2: 1—low PbtO2/pHbt, 2—low pHbt/normal PbtO2, 3—normal pHbt/low PbtO2, and 4—normal pHbt/PbtO2). Microdialysis values were compared between the groups. The relationship between PbtO2 and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio was evaluated at different pHbt levels. Proportional contribution of each state was evaluated against mortality. As compared with the state 4, the state 3 was not different, the state 2 exhibited higher levels of lactate, LP, and glucose and the state 1—higher LP and reduced glucose (P<0.001). A significant negative correlation between LP and PbtO2 (rho=−0.159, P<0.001) was stronger at low pHbt (rho=−0.201, P<0.001) and nonsignificant at normal pHbt (P=0.993). The state 2 was a significant discriminator of mortality categories (P=0.031). Decreased pHbt is associated with impaired metabolism. Measuring pHbt with PbtO2 is a more robust way of detecting metabolic derangements. PMID:23232949

  20. Hypoxia induces adipogenic differentitation of myoblastic cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoigawa, Yoshiaki [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kishimoto, Koshi N., E-mail: kishimoto@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Okuno, Hiroshi; Sano, Hirotaka [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan); Kaneko, Kazuo [Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Itoi, Eiji [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} C2C12 and G8 myogenic cell lines treated by hypoxia differentiate into adipocytes. {yields} The expression of C/EBP{beta}, {alpha} and PPAR{gamma} were increased under hypoxia. {yields} Myogenic differentiation of C2C12 was inhibited under hypoxia. -- Abstract: Muscle atrophy usually accompanies fat accumulation in the muscle. In such atrophic conditions as back muscles of kyphotic spine and the rotator cuff muscles with torn tendons, blood flow might be diminished. It is known that hypoxia causes trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow into adipocytes. However, it has not been elucidated yet if hypoxia turned myoblasts into adipocytes. We investigated adipogenesis in C2C12 and G8 murine myogenic cell line treated by hypoxia. Cells were also treated with the cocktail of insulin, dexamethasone and IBMX (MDI), which has been known to inhibit Wnt signaling and promote adipogenesis. Adipogenic differentiation was seen in both hypoxia and MDI. Adipogenic marker gene expression was assessed in C2C12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) {beta}, {alpha} and peroxisome proliferator activating receptor (PPAR) {gamma} were increased by both hypoxia and MDI. The expression profile of Wnt10b was different between hypoxia and MDI. The mechanism for adipogenesis of myoblasts in hypoxia might be regulated by different mechanism than the modification of Wnt signaling.

  1. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with aura is prevalent in high-altitude populations suggesting an association between migraine aura and hypoxia. We investigated whether experimental hypoxia triggers migraine and aura attacks in patients suffering from migraine with aura. We also investigated the metabolic and vascular...... response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...... in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...

  2. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  3. Hypoxia and brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyakas, Csaba; Buwalda, Bauke; Luiten, P.

    1996-01-01

    Hypoxia threatens brain function during the entire life-span starting from early fetal age up to senescence. This review compares the short-term, long-term and life-spanning effects of fetal chronic hypoxia and neonatal anoxia on several behavioural paradigms including novelty-induced spontaneous an

  4. Proteins modulation in human skeletal muscle in the early phase of adaptation to hypobaric hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigano, A.; Ripamonti, M.; Palma, S. De;

    2008-01-01

    High altitude hypoxia is a paraphysiological condition triggering redox status disturbances of cell organization leading, via oxidative stress, to proteins, lipids, and DNA damage. In man, skeletal muscle, after prolonged exposure to hypoxia, undergoes mass reduction and alterations at the cellul......, whereas the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a marker of protein synthesis, was reduced Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11...

  5. Hypoxia imaging; Nuklearmedizinische Verfahren zum Nachweis hypoxischer Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bares, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin; Reischl, G. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion Radiopharmazie; Eschmann, S.M. [Marien-Hospital Stuttgart (Germany). Abt. Nuklearmedizin

    2009-06-15

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. While it can be diagnosed clinically or assumed by indirect signs (reduced perfusion) in many instances, this cannot be achieved in malignant tumors. Besides invasive pO{sub 2}-polarography nuclear medicine procedures are the only practical approach to detect tumor hypoxia so far. {sup 18}F labelled derivatives of nitroimidazole were shown to be suitable in both experimental and clinical studies. After iv injection they enter the cells via diffusion, are reduced, and finally bind to intracellular macromolecules, if hypoxia is present. In case of normoxia they rapidly leave the cells by rediffusion. First clinical studies demonstrated that local retention of hypoxia markers in malignant tumors was indicative for poor therapeutic outcome and may therefore gain relevance for treatment planning in the future. Prior to this, however, large prospective trials are needed to substantiate the first clinical results. (orig.)

  6. Hypoxia-mediated metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joan; Erler, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for more than 90 % of deaths among cancer patient. It is a highly complex process that involves the interplay between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and even noncancerous host cells. Metastasis can be seen as a step-wise process: acquisition of malignant phenotype, invasion into surrounding tissue, intravasation into blood vessels, survival in circulation, extravasation to distant sites, and colonization of new organs. Before the actual metastatic process, the secondary site is also prepared for the arrival of the cancer cells through formation of "premetastatic niches." Hypoxia (low oxygen tension) is commonly found in solid tumors more than a few millimeters cubed and often is associated with a poor prognosis. Hypoxia increases angiogenesis, cancer cell survival, and metastasis. This chapter described how hypoxia regulates each step of the metastatic process and how blocking hypoxia-driven metastasis through targeting hypoxia-inducible factor 1, or downstream effector molecules such as the lysyl oxidase family may represent highly effective preventive strategies against metastasis in cancer patients.

  7. Kidney hypoxia, attributable to increased oxygen consumption, induces nephropathy independently of hyperglycemia and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-11-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. To date, it has been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia, per se, for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg per day per kg bodyweight by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion, and histological findings were determined and compared with vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose, or markers of oxidative stress but increased kidney oxygen consumption, and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen, and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia, per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease.

  8. Stromal Expression of Hypoxia Regulated Proteins Is an Adverse Prognostic Factor in Colorectal Carcinomas

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    Arjen H. G. Cleven

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia modifies the phenotype of tumors in a way that promotes tumor aggressiveness and resistance towards chemotherapy and radiotherapy. However, the expression and influence of hypoxia-regulated proteins on tumor biology are not well characterized in colorectal tumors. We studied the role of protein expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α, HIF-2α, carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9 and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 was quantified by immunohistochemistry in 133 colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of hypoxia markers was correlated with clinicopathological variables and overall patient survival. Results: Expression of these hypoxia markers was detected in the epithelial compartment of the tumor cells as well as in tumor-associated stromal cells. Although tumor cells frequently showed expression of one or more of the investigated hypoxia markers, no correlation among these markers or with clinical response was found. However, within the tumor stroma, positive correlations between the hypoxia markers HIF-2α, CA9 and GLUT1 were observed. Furthermore expression of HIF-2α and CA9 in tumor-associated stroma were both associated with a significantly reduced overall survival. In the Cox proportional hazard model, stromal HIF-2α expression was an independent prognostic factor for survival. Conclusion: These observations show, that expression of hypoxia regulated proteins in tumor-associated stromal cells, as opposed to their expression in epithelial tumor cells, is associated with poor outcome in colorectal cancer. This study suggests that tumor hypoxia may influence tumor-associated stromal cells in a way that ultimately contributes to patient prognosis.

  9. Intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice.

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    Sung-Min Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with ALS may be exposed to variable degrees of chronic intermittent hypoxia. However, all previous experimental studies on the effects of hypoxia in ALS have only used a sustained hypoxia model and it is possible that chronic intermittent hypoxia exerts effects via a different molecular mechanism from that of sustained hypoxia. No study has yet shown that hypoxia (either chronic intermittent or sustained can affect the loss of motor neurons or cognitive function in an in vivo model of ALS. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on motor and cognitive function in ALS mice. METHODS: Sixteen ALS mice and 16 wild-type mice were divided into 2 groups and subjected to either chronic intermittent hypoxia or normoxia for 2 weeks. The effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on ALS mice were evaluated using the rotarod, Y-maze, and wire-hanging tests. In addition, numbers of motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord were counted and western blot analyses were performed for markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway activation. RESULTS: Compared to ALS mice kept in normoxic conditions, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had poorer motor learning on the rotarod test, poorer spatial memory on the Y-maze test, shorter wire hanging time, and fewer motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Compared to ALS-normoxic and wild-type mice, ALS mice that experienced chronic intermittent hypoxia had higher levels of oxidative stress and inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic intermittent hypoxia can aggravate motor neuronal death, neuromuscular weakness, and probably cognitive dysfunction in ALS mice. The generation of oxidative stress with activation of inflammatory pathways may be associated with this mechanism. Our study will provide insight into the association of hypoxia with disease progression, and in turn, the rationale for an early non-invasive ventilation treatment in

  10. Acute hypoxia induces upregulation of microRNA-210 expression in glioblastoma spheroids

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    Rosenberg, Tine Agerbo; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Tumor hypoxia and presence of tumor stem cells are related to therapeutic resistance and tumorigenicity in glioblastomas. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify microRNAs deregulated in acute hypoxia and to identify possible associated changes in stem cell markers. MATERIALS...... & METHODS: Glioblastoma spheroid cultures were grown in either 2 or 21% oxygen. Subsequently, miRNA profiling was performed and expression of ten stem cell markers was examined. RESULTS: MiRNA-210 was significantly upregulated in hypoxia in patient-derived spheroids. The stem cell markers displayed...... a complex regulatory pattern. CONCLUSION: MiRNA-210 appears to be upregulated in hypoxia in immature glioblastoma cells. This miRNA may represent a therapeutic target although it is not clear from the results whether this miRNA may be related to specific cancer stem cell functions....

  11. Hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in chronic hypoxia- and antigen-mediated pulmonary vascular remodeling

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    Angelini Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both chronic hypoxia and allergic inflammation induce vascular remodeling in the lung, but only chronic hypoxia appears to cause PH. We investigate the nature of the vascular remodeling and the expression and role of hypoxia-induced mitogenic factor (HIMF/FIZZ1/RELMα in explaining this differential response. Methods We induced pulmonary vascular remodeling through either chronic hypoxia or antigen sensitization and challenge. Mice were evaluated for markers of PH and pulmonary vascular remodeling throughout the lung vascular bed as well as HIMF expression and genomic analysis of whole lung. Results Chronic hypoxia increased both mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP and right ventricular (RV hypertrophy; these changes were associated with increased muscularization and thickening of small pulmonary vessels throughout the lung vascular bed. Allergic inflammation, by contrast, had minimal effect on mPAP and produced no RV hypertrophy. Only peribronchial vessels were significantly thickened, and vessels within the lung periphery did not become muscularized. Genomic analysis revealed that HIMF was the most consistently upregulated gene in the lungs following both chronic hypoxia and antigen challenge. HIMF was upregulated in the airway epithelial and inflammatory cells in both models, but only chronic hypoxia induced HIMF upregulation in vascular tissue. Conclusions The results show that pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice induced by chronic hypoxia or antigen challenge is associated with marked increases in HIMF expression. The lack of HIMF expression in the vasculature of the lung and no vascular remodeling in the peripheral resistance vessels of the lung is likely to account for the failure to develop PH in the allergic inflammation model.

  12. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

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    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors.

  13. Hypoxia and fatty liver.

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    Suzuki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Satoko; Arai, Takatomo; Kanai, Mai; Goda, Nobuhito

    2014-11-07

    The liver is a central organ that metabolizes excessive nutrients for storage in the form of glycogen and lipids and supplies energy-producing substrates to the peripheral tissues to maintain their function, even under starved conditions. These processes require a considerable amount of oxygen, which causes a steep oxygen gradient throughout the hepatic lobules. Alcohol consumption and/or excessive food intake can alter the hepatic metabolic balance drastically, which can precipitate fatty liver disease, a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, ranging from simple steatosis, through steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis, to liver cirrhosis. Altered hepatic metabolism and tissue remodeling in fatty liver disease further disrupt hepatic oxygen homeostasis, resulting in severe liver hypoxia. As master regulators of adaptive responses to hypoxic stress, hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) modulate various cellular and organ functions, including erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, metabolic demand, and cell survival, by activating their target genes during fetal development and also in many disease conditions such as cancer, heart failure, and diabetes. In the past decade, it has become clear that HIFs serve as key factors in the regulation of lipid metabolism and fatty liver formation. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms by which hypoxia and HIFs regulate lipid metabolism in the development and progression of fatty liver disease.

  14. Temporal and topographic profiles of tissue hypoxia following transient focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noto, Takahisa; Furuichi, Yasuhisa; Ishiye, Masayuki; Matsuoka, Nobuya; Aramori, Ichiro; Mutoh, Seitaro; Yanagihara, Takehiko; Manabe, Noboru

    2006-08-01

    Intravascular accumulation of blood cells after brain ischemia-reperfusion can cause obstruction of cerebral blood flow and tissue hypoxia/ischemia as a consequence. In the present study, we examined temporal and topographic changes of tissue hypoxia/ischemia after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) for 60 min in rats with immunohistochemical staining for hypoxia (2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker: hypoxyprobe-1 adducts). Our results showed that tissue hypoxia expressed as positive staining for hypoxyprobe-1 adducts preceded neuronal degeneration. Platelets and granulocytes were detected close to the hypoxyprobe-1 adducts positive area. These results suggested that the hypoxic environment could persist even after reperfusion of MCA, because of vascular obstruction with accumulation of platelets and granulocytes.

  15. Is hypoxia training good for muscles and exercise performance?

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    Vogt, Michael; Hoppeler, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Altitude training has become very popular among athletes as a means to further increase exercise performance at sea level or to acclimatize to competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved during the last few decades, with "live high-train low" and "live low-train high" being the most popular. This review focuses on functional, muscular, and practical aspects derived from extensive research on the "live low-train high" approach. According to this, subjects train in hypoxia but remain under normoxia for the rest of the time. It has been reasoned that exercising in hypoxia could increase the training stimulus. Hypoxia training studies published in the past have varied considerably in altitude (2300-5700 m) and training duration (10 days to 8 weeks) and the fitness of the subjects. The evidence from muscle structural, biochemical, and molecular findings point to a specific role of hypoxia in endurance training. However, based on the available performance capacity data such as maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) and (maximal) power output, hypoxia as a supplement to training is not consistently found to be advantageous for performance at sea level. Stronger evidence exists for benefits of hypoxic training on performance at altitude. "Live low-train high" may thus be considered when altitude acclimatization is not an option. In addition, the complex pattern of gene expression adaptations induced by supplemental training in hypoxia, but not normoxia, suggest that muscle tissue specifically responds to hypoxia. Whether and to what degree these gene expression changes translate into significant changes in protein concentrations that are ultimately responsible for observable structural or functional phenotypes remains open. It is conceivable that the global functional markers such as Vo(2)max and (maximal) power output are too coarse to detect more subtle changes that might still be functionally relevant, at least to high-level athletes.

  16. Hypoxia inhibits hypertrophic differentiation and endochondral ossification in explanted tibiae.

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    Jeroen C H Leijten

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously described or whether alleviation of hypoxia and consequent changes in oxygen tension mediated signaling events also plays an active role in regulating the hypertrophic differentiation process itself. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fetal mouse tibiae (E17.5 explants were cultured up to 21 days under normoxic or hypoxic conditions (21% and 2.5% oxygen respectively. Tibiae were analyzed on growth kinetics, histology, gene expression and protein secretion. RESULTS: The oxygen level had a strong influence on the development of explanted fetal tibiae. Compared to hypoxia, normoxia increased the length of the tibiae, length of the hypertrophic zone, calcification of the cartilage and mRNA levels of hypertrophic differentiation-related genes e.g. MMP9, MMP13, RUNX2, COL10A1 and ALPL. Compared to normoxia, hypoxia increased the size of the cartilaginous epiphysis, length of the resting zone, calcification of the bone and mRNA levels of hyaline cartilage-related genes e.g. ACAN, COL2A1 and SOX9. Additionally, hypoxia enhanced the mRNA and protein expression of the secreted articular cartilage markers GREM1, FRZB and DKK1, which are able to inhibit hypertrophic differentiation. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data suggests that oxygen levels play an active role in the regulation of hypertrophic differentiation of hyaline chondrocytes. Normoxia stimulates hypertrophic differentiation evidenced by the expression of hypertrophic differentiation related genes. In contrast, hypoxia suppresses hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes, which might be at least partially explained by the induction of GREM1, FRZB and DKK1 expression.

  17. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irshad, Khushboo; Mohapatra, Saroj Kant; Srivastava, Chitrangda; Garg, Harshit; Mishra, Seema; Dikshit, Bhawana; Sarkar, Chitra; Gupta, Deepak; Chandra, Poodipedi Sarat; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad; Sinha, Subrata; Chosdol, Kunzang

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM). Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s) characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN) was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2). Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  18. A combined gene signature of hypoxia and notch pathway in human glioblastoma and its prognostic relevance.

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    Khushboo Irshad

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid tumors including glioblastoma (GBM. Its synergism with Notch signaling promotes progression in different cancers. However, Notch signaling exhibits pleiotropic roles and the existing literature lacks a comprehensive understanding of its perturbations under hypoxia in GBM with respect to all components of the pathway. We identified the key molecular cluster(s characteristic of the Notch pathway response in hypoxic GBM tumors and gliomaspheres. Expression of Notch and hypoxia genes was evaluated in primary human GBM tissues by q-PCR. Clustering and statistical analyses were applied to identify the combination of hypoxia markers correlated with upregulated Notch pathway components. We found well-segregated tumor-clusters representing high and low HIF-1α/PGK1-expressors which accounted for differential expression of Notch signaling genes. In combination, a five-hypoxia marker set (HIF-1α/PGK1/VEGF/CA9/OPN was determined as the best predictor for induction of Notch1/Dll1/Hes1/Hes6/Hey1/Hey2. Similar Notch-axis genes were activated in gliomaspheres, but not monolayer cultures, under moderate/severe hypoxia (2%/0.2% O2. Preliminary evidence suggested inverse correlation between patient survival and increased expression of constituents of the hypoxia-Notch gene signature. Together, our findings delineated the Notch-axis maximally associated with hypoxia in resected GBM, which might be prognostically relevant. Its upregulation in hypoxia-exposed gliomaspheres signify them as a better in-vitro model for studying hypoxia-Notch interactions than monolayer cultures.

  19. Acidosis, hypoxia and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Timothy R

    2010-11-01

    Bone homeostasis is profoundly affected by local pH and oxygen tension. It has long been recognised that the skeleton contains a large reserve of alkaline mineral (hydroxyapatite), which is ultimately available to neutralise metabolic H(+) if acid-base balance is not maintained within narrow limits. Bone cells are extremely sensitive to the direct effects of pH: acidosis inhibits mineral deposition by osteoblasts but it activates osteoclasts to resorb bone and other mineralised tissues. These reciprocal responses act to maximise the availability of OH(-) ions from hydroxyapatite in solution, where they can buffer excess H(+). The mechanisms by which bone cells sense small pH changes are likely to be complex, involving ion channels and receptors in the cell membrane, as well as direct intracellular effects. The importance of oxygen tension in the skeleton has also long been known. Recent work shows that hypoxia blocks the growth and differentiation of osteoblasts (and thus bone formation), whilst strongly stimulating osteoclast formation (and thus bone resorption). Surprisingly, the resorptive function of osteoclasts is unimpaired in hypoxia. In vivo, tissue hypoxia is usually accompanied by acidosis due to reduced vascular perfusion and increased glycolytic metabolism. Thus, disruption of the blood supply can engender a multiple negative impact on bone via the direct actions of reduced pO(2) and pH on bone cells. These observations may contribute to our understanding of the bone disturbances that occur in numerous settings, including ageing, inflammation, fractures, tumours, anaemias, kidney disease, diabetes, respiratory disease and smoking.

  20. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces cardiac inflammation and dysfunction in a rat obstructive sleep apnea model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Bian, Yeping; Yu, Fuchao; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Guanghao; Li, Yang; Song, Songsong; Ren, Xiaomei; Tong, Jiayi

    2016-11-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia is considered to play an important role in cardiovascular pathogenesis during the development of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We used a well-described OSA rat model induced with simultaneous intermittent hypoxia. Male Sprague Dawley rats were individually placed into plexiglass chambers with air pressure and components were electronically controlled. The rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia 8 hours daily for 5 weeks. The changes of cardiac structure and function were examined by ultrasound. The cardiac pathology, apoptosis, and fibrosis were analyzed by H&E staining, TUNNEL assay, and picosirius staining, respectively. The expression of inflammation and fibrosis marker genes was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. Chronic intermittent hypoxia/low pressure resulted in significant increase of left ventricular internal diameters (LVIDs), end-systolic volume (ESV), end-diastolic volume (EDV), and blood lactate level and marked reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increased TUNNEL-positive myocytes, disrupted normal arrangement of cardiac fibers, and increased Sirius stained collagen fibers. The expression levels of hypoxia induced factor (HIF)-1α, NF-kB, IL-6, and matrix metallopeptidase 2 (MMP-2) were significantly increased in the heart of rats exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. In conclusion, the left ventricular function was adversely affected by chronic intermittent hypoxia, which is associated with increased expression of HIF-1α and NF-kB signaling molecules and development of cardiac inflammation, apoptosis and fibrosis.

  1. Adipose tissue hypoxia in obesity and its impact on adipocytokine dysregulation.

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    Hosogai, Naomi; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Oshima, Kazuya; Miyata, Yugo; Tanaka, Sachiyo; Segawa, Katsumori; Furukawa, Shigetada; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Komuro, Ryutaro; Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2007-04-01

    Obesity is linked to a variety of metabolic disorders, such as insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Dysregulated production of fat-derived secretory factors, adipocytokines, is partly responsible for obesity-linked metabolic disorders. However, the mechanistic role of obesity per se to adipocytokine dysregulation has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that adipose tissue of obese mice is hypoxic and that local adipose tissue hypoxia dysregulates the production of adipocytokines. Tissue hypoxia was confirmed by an exogenous marker, pimonidazole, and by an elevated concentration of lactate, an endogenous marker. Moreover, local tissue hypoperfusion (measured by colored microspheres) was confirmed in adipose tissue of obese mice. Adiponectin mRNA expression was decreased, and mRNA of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated protein, was significantly increased in adipose tissue of obese mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, hypoxia dysregulated the expression of adipocytokines, such as adiponectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, and increased the mRNAs of ER stress marker genes, CHOP and GRP78 (glucose-regulated protein, 78 kD). Expression of CHOP attenuated adiponectin promoter activity, and RNA interference of CHOP partly reversed hypoxia-induced suppression of adiponectin mRNA expression in adipocytes. Hypoxia also increased instability of adiponectin mRNA. Our results suggest that hypoperfusion and hypoxia in adipose tissues underlie the dysregulated production of adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome in obesity.

  2. Coastal hypoxia and sediment biogeochemistry

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    J. J. Middelburg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity, duration and frequency of coastal hypoxia (oxygen concentration <63 μM are increasing due to human alteration of coastal ecosystems and changes in oceanographic conditions due to global warming. Here we provide a concise review of the consequences of coastal hypoxia for sediment biogeochemistry. Changes in bottom-water oxygen levels have consequences for early diagenetic pathways (more anaerobic at expense of aerobic pathways, the efficiency of re-oxidation of reduced metabolites and the nature, direction and magnitude of sediment-water exchange fluxes. Hypoxia may also lead to more organic matter accumulation and burial and the organic matter eventually buried is also of higher quality, i.e. less degraded. Bottom-water oxygen levels also affect the organisms involved in organic matter processing with the contribution of metazoans decreasing as oxygen levels drop. Hypoxia has a significant effect on benthic animals with the consequences that ecosystem functions related to macrofauna such as bio-irrigation and bioturbation are significantly affected by hypoxia as well. Since many microbes and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes depend on animal-induced transport processes (e.g. re-oxidation of particulate reduced sulphur and denitrification, there are indirect hypoxia effects on biogeochemistry via the benthos. Severe long-lasting hypoxia and anoxia may result in the accumulation of reduced compounds in sediments and elimination of macrobenthic communities with the consequences that biogeochemical properties during trajectories of decreasing and increasing oxygen may be different (hysteresis with consequences for coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  3. Hypoxia in Models of Lung Cancer: Implications for Targeted Therapeutics

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    Graves, Edward E.; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K.; Erler, Janine T.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Felsher, Dean; Sayles, Leanne; Sweet-Cordero, Alejandro; –Thu Le, Quynh; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose In order to efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer in order to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. Experimental Design Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ or subcutaneously were studied using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and fluoroazomycin arabinoside (FAZA) positron emission tomography (PET), and post-mortem by immunohistochemical observation of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole. The response of these models to the hypoxia-activated cytotoxin PR-104 was also quantified by formation of γH2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. Results Minimal FAZA and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, while subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping of both hypoxia probes. These observations correlated with the response of these tumors to PR-104, and with the reduced incidence of hypoxia in human lung cancers relative to other solid tumor types. Conclusions These findings suggest that in situ models of lung cancer in mice may be more reflective of the human disease, and encourage judicious selection of preclinical tumor models for the study of hypoxia imaging and anti-hypoxic cell therapies. PMID:20858837

  4. Hypoxia, Monitoring, and Mitigation System

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    2014-05-01

    al., (2012). Short-term exposure to hypoxia for work and leisure activities in health and disease: which level of hypoxia is safe? Sleep Breath, 16...Altitude Illness. Emergency Medical Clinics of North America. (2):329-55, viii. Travel to a high altitude requires that the human body acclimatize to...preventable. Practitioners working in or advising those traveling to a high altitude must be familiar with the early recognition of symptoms, prompt

  5. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

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    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  6. Differential risk assessments from five hypoxia specific assays: The basis for biologically adapted individualized radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsmark, Marianne; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Gebski, Val

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Hypoxia adversely relates with prognosis in human tumours. Five hypoxia specific predictive marker assays were compared and correlated with definitive radiotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty-seven patients with advanced head and neck carcinomas were studied for pre-treatment plasma...

  7. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors in leukaemias

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    Margaux eDeynoux

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite huge improvements in the treatment of leukaemia, the percentage of patients suffering relapse still remains significant. Relapse most often results from a small number of leukaemic stem cells (LSCs within the bone marrow, which are able to self-renew and therefore re-establish the full tumour. The marrow microenvironment contributes considerably in supporting the protection and development of leukaemic cells. LSCs share specific niches with normal haematopoietic stem cells with the niche itself being composed of a variety of cell types including mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, bone cells, immune cells, neuronal cells and vascular cells. A hallmark of the haematopoietic niche is low oxygen partial pressure, indeed this hypoxia is necessary for the long-term maintenance of HSCs. Hypoxia is a strong signal, principally maintained by members of the hypoxia-inducible factor family. In solid tumours, it has been well-established that hypoxia triggers intrinsic metabolic changes and microenvironmental modifications, such as the stimulation of angiogenesis, through activation of HIFs. As leukaemia is not considered a solid tumour, the role of oxygen in the disease was presumed to be inconsequential and remained long overlooked. This view has now been revised since hypoxia has been shown to influence leukaemic cell proliferation, differentiation and resistance to chemotherapy. However, the role of HIF proteins remains controversial with HIFs being considered as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes, depending on the study and model. The purpose of this review is to highlight our knowledge of hypoxia and HIFs in leukaemic development and therapeutic resistance, and to discuss the recent hypoxia-based strategies proposed to eradicate leukaemias.

  8. Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia attenuates hypoxia-induced depressor response.

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    Fang Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia (HIH produces many favorable effects in the cardiovascular system such as anti-hypertensive effect. In this study, we showed that HIH significantly attenuated a depressor response induced by acute hypoxia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley rats received HIH in a hypobaric chamber simulating an altitude of 5000 m. The artery blood pressure (ABP, heart rate (HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded in anesthetized control rats and rats received HIH. The baseline ABP, HR and RSNA were not different between HIH and control rats. Acute hypoxia-induced decrease in ABP was significantly attenuated in HIH rat compared with control rats. However, acute hypoxia-induced increases in HR and RSNA were greater in HIH rat than in control rats. After removal of bilateral ascending depressor nerves, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses were comparable in control and HIH rats. Furthermore, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses did not differ between control and HIH groups after blocking ATP-dependent K(+ channels by glibenclamide. The baroreflex function evaluated by intravenous injection of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was markedly augmented in HIH rats compared with control rats. The pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses evoked by intravenous injection of cyanide potassium were also significantly greater in HIH rats than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that HIH suppresses acute hypoxia-induced depressor response through enhancement of baroreflex and chemoreflex function, which involves activation of ATP-dependent K(+ channels. This study provides new information and underlying mechanism on the beneficiary effect of HIH on maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis.

  9. Screening of hypoxia-inducible genes in sporadic ALS.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Genetic variations in two hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes, VEGF and ANG, have been linked with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (SALS). Common variations in these genes may reduce the levels or functioning of their products. VEGF and ANG belong to a larger group of angiogenic genes that are up-regulated under hypoxic conditions. We hypothesized that common genetic variation across other members of this group may also predispose to sporadic ALS. To screen other hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes for association with SALS, we selected 112 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tgSNPs) that captured the common genetic variation across 16 VEGF-like and eight ANG-like hypoxia-inducible genes. Screening for association was performed in 270 Irish individuals with typical SALS and 272 ethnically matched unrelated controls. SNPs showing association in the Irish phase were genotyped in a replication sample of 281 Swedish sporadic ALS patients and 286 Swedish controls. Seven markers showed association in the Irish. The one modest replication signal observed in the Swedish replication sample, at rs3801158 in the gene inhibin beta A, was for the opposite allele vs. the Irish cohort. We failed to detect association of common variation across 24 candidate hypoxia-inducible angiogenic genes with SALS.

  10. Hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon promotes trail-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbi, Giuliana; Masselli, Elena; Micheloni, Cristina; Nouvenne, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Santi, Patrizia; Matteucci, Alessandro; Cocco, Lucio; Vitale, Marco; Mirandola, Prisco

    2010-09-01

    Tumor oxygen status is considered as a prognostic marker that impacts on malignant progression and outcome of tumor therapy. TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) plays a key role in cancer immunity, with potential applications in cancer therapy. Protein kinase C (PKC)epsilon, a transforming oncogene, has a role in the protection of cardiomyocytes and neurons from hypoxia-induced damage while, it can also modulate the susceptibility of tumor cells to TRAIL-induced cell death. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia induces a tumor cell phenotype highly sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of TRAIL. Based on the observation that: i) PKCepsilon expression levels are impaired during hypoxia, ii) the overexpression of PKCepsilon, but not of a kinase-inactive PKCepsilon mutant, is able to revert the hypoxia-induced sensitivity to TRAIL, iii) the down-modulation of PKCepsilon levels by RNA interference, on the contrary, induces the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype, iv) the inhibition of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) by specific siRNA blocks both the hypoxia-induced down-modulation of PKCepsilon and the induction of the highly TRAIL-sensitive phenotype; we conclude that the HIF-1alpha upregulation during hypoxia is associated to PKCepsilon down-modulation that likely represents the key molecular event promoting the apoptogenic effects of TRAIL in hypoxic tumor cells.

  11. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  12. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araneda, O. F.; Tuesta, M.

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described. PMID:22966417

  13. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean. The negative impacts of hypoxia include...

  14. Overexpression of Dimethylarginine Dimethylaminohydrolase Enhances Tumor Hypoxia: An Insight into the Relationship of Hypoxia and Angiogenesis In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassiliki Kostourou

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The oxygenation status of tumors derived from wild-type C6 glioma cells and clone D27 cells overexpressing dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH was assessed in vivo using a variety of direct and indirect assays of hypoxia. Clone D27 tumors exhibit a more aggressive and better-vascularized phenotype compared to wild-type C6 gliomas. Immunohistochemical analyses using the 2-nitroimidazole hypoxia marker pimonidazole, fiber optic OxyLite measurements of tumor pO2, and localized 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements of tumor bioenergetic status and pH clearly demonstrated that the D27 tumors were more hypoxic compared to C6 wild type. In the tumor extracts, only glucose concentrations were significantly lower in the D27 tumors. Elevated Glut-1 expression, a reliable functional marker for hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated metabolic adaptation, was observed in the D27 tumors. Together, the data show that overexpression of DDAH results in C6 gliomas that are more hypoxic compared to wild-type tumors, and point strongly to an inverse relationship of tumor oxygenation and angiogenesis in vivo-a concept now being supported by the enhanced understanding of oxygen sensing at the molecular level.

  15. 用发夹寡核苷酸探针检测新生大鼠脑缺氧缺血时细胞凋亡的变化%Hairpin oligonucleotide probe as a marker of apoptotic change for cerebral hypoxia-ischemia in rat pups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱长连; 王小阳; 杨平; 程秀永

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To investigate temporal and spatial changes of DNA double-stranded break (DSB) detected by biotin-labeled hairpin oligonucleotide probe(HPP) and compare with TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) for detectiog DNA DSB in the immature rat brain after hypoxia-ischemia. Methods: 7-day-old rat pups were subjected to hypoxia-ischemia. The spatiotemporal pattern of DNA DSB was characterized with HPP in situ labeling. The relation of HPP labeling and brain damage was evaluated by double labeling with microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP 2). The sensitivity of HPP labeling was evaluated by double labeling with TUNEL.Results: HPP labeling localized in the ipsilateral hemisphere within the area of loss MAP 2 staining. The number of positive cells with nucleus condensation and cytoplasm shrinkage were remarkable with prolongation of reperfusion. The number of positive cells increased and reached peak at 24h post-HI. But in the nucleus habenularis displayed a faster time course. Hippocampus CA3, however, shows a more delayed time course. Double labeling of HPP and TUNEL showed more HPP labeling than TUNEL in the early reperfusion.Conclusion: HPP labeling shows typical apoptotic nucleus changes with different timepoints after HI. It is a sensitive marker for detecting apoptotic changes.%目的:观察用生物素标记的发夹寡核苷酸探针(HPP)检测未成熟大鼠脑缺氧缺血后DNA双链断裂(DSB)的短暂空间改变,并与TdT介导的dUTP缺口末端标记(TUNEL)的DNA DSB比较。方法:使7 d龄幼鼠缺氧缺血,用HPP位点标记显示DNA DSB短暂空间形式,用微管相关蛋白(MAP-2)双标记评价HPP标记和脑损伤的关系,用双标记的TUNEL评价HPP标记的灵敏度。结果:HPP标记局限在同侧半球MAP-2染色阴性区域;阳性细胞数与再灌注时间有关,在缺氧缺血后24 h,阳性细胞数上升达到高峰,但在松果体细胞核变化更早,而海马CA3区域细胞变化延迟。HPP和TUNEL双

  16. Hypoxia in adipose tissue: a basis for the dysregulation of tissue function in obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayhurn, Paul; Wang, Bohan; Wood, I Stuart

    2008-08-01

    White adipose tissue is a key endocrine and secretory organ, releasing multiple adipokines, many of which are linked to inflammation and immunity. During the expansion of adipose tissue mass in obesity there is a major inflammatory response in the tissue with increased expression and release of inflammation-related adipokines, including IL-6, leptin, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and TNF-alpha, together with decreased adiponectin production. We proposed in 2004 (Trayhurn & Wood, Br J Nutr 92, 347-355) that inflammation in adipose tissue in obesity is a response to hypoxia in enlarged adipocytes distant from the vasculature. Hypoxia has now been directly demonstrated in adipose tissue of several obese mouse models (ob/ob, KKAy, diet-induced) and molecular studies indicate that the level of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha, is increased, as is expression of the hypoxia-sensitive marker gene, GLUT1. Cell- culture studies on murine and human adipocytes show that hypoxia (induced by low O2 or chemically) leads to stimulation of the expression and secretion of a number of inflammation-related adipokines, including angiopoietin-like protein 4, IL-6, leptin, macrophage migration inhibitory factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. Hypoxia also stimulates the inflammatory response of macrophages and inhibits adipocyte differentiation from preadipocytes. GLUT1 gene expression, protein level and glucose transport by human adipocytes are markedly increased by hypoxia, indicating that low O2 tension stimulates glucose utilisation. It is suggested that hypoxia has a pervasive effect on adipocyte metabolism and on overall adipose tissue function, underpinning the inflammatory response in the tissue in obesity and the subsequent development of obesity-associated diseases, particularly type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

  17. Hypoxia Promotes Osteogenesis of Human Placental-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qiaoli; Gu, Yanzheng; Shi, Qin; Yang, Huilin

    2016-08-01

    Placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are promising candidates for regenerative medicine because they possess high proliferative capacity and multi-differentiation potential. Human pMSCs are residing in an environment with low oxygen tension in the body. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is known to participate in the regulation of MSC differentiation. The present study aimed to investigate the impact of hypoxia on the osteogenic differentiation of human pMSCs, and to elucidate the role of HO-1 in the osteogenic differentiation of hypoxic pMSCs. Human pMSCs were cultured under normoxia (21% O2) or hypoxia (5% O2) for 3 days. We found that hypoxia maintained the morphology and immunophenotype of human pMSCs. The expression of stemness markers Oct4, Nanog, and Sox2 was increased under hypoxia. After a 5-day hypoxic culture, the proliferation ability of pMSCs was increased, which might be correlated with the increased expression of stem cell factor. During osteogenic induction, hypoxia increased the expression of osteogenic genes including osteopontin, osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). Moreover, hypoxia increased the mineralization and ALP levels of human pMSCs as evidenced by Alizarin Red staining and ALP staining. Upregulation of HO-1 by cobalt-protoporphyrin treatment increased the osteogenic differentiation of pMSCs under hypoxia, while inhibition of HO-1 by Zn-protoporphyrin reduced the osteogenic differentiation of hypoxic pMSCs. Taken together, our data suggest that hypoxia can promote the osteogenic differentiation of human pMSCs. Upregulation of HO-1 can further increase the osteogenesis of human pMSCs under hypoxia. Our findings will highlight the therapeutic potential of MSCs in the tissue engineering of bones.

  18. Marker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  19. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierckx, Rudi Andre; de Wiele, Christophe Van

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceutic

  20. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  1. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nesland, Jahn Marthin [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aarnes, Eva-Katrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ree, Anne Hansen [Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Flatmark, Kjersti [Department of Tumor Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway); Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Lyng, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.lyng@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  2. Chronic hypoxia in pregnancy affects thymus development in Balb/c mouse offspring via IL2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Zhou, Xiuwen; Li, Lingjun; Sun, Miao; Gao, Qingqing; Zhang, Pengjie; Tang, Jiaqi; He, Yu; Zhu, Di; Xu, Zhice

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia during pregnancy can adversely affect development. This study, addressed the impact of prenatal hypoxia on thymus development in the rodent offspring. Pregnant Balb/c mice were exposed to hypoxia or normoxia during pregnancy, and the thymuses of their offspring were tested. Chronic hypoxia during pregnancy resulted in significantly decreased fetal body weight, with an increased thymus-to-body weight ratio. Histological analysis revealed a smaller cortical zone in the thymus of the offspring exposed to hypoxia. A reduction in the cortical T lymphocyte population corresponded to increased mRNA abundance of caspase 3 (Casp3) and decreased expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67 (Mki67). Differences in T lymphocyte sub-populations in the thymus further indicate that thymus development in offspring was retarded or stagnated by prenatal hypoxia. The abundance of IL2 and its receptor was reduced in the thymus following prenatal hypoxia. This was accompanied by an increase in thymus HIF1A and IKKβ and a decrease in phosphorylated NFKB, MAP2K1, and MAPK1/3 compared to control pregnancies. Together, these results implicate deficiencies in IL2-mediated signaling as one source of prenatal-hypoxia-impaired thymus development.

  3. Historical Assessment of Hypoxia in Narragansett Bay Using Geochemical Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eutrophication due to anthropogenic activities has affected aquatic ecosystems globally. Increased inputs of nitrogen and other nutrients to estuarine and marine ecosystems as a result of agricultural practices, urbanization and suburbanization have resulted in degradation of wat...

  4. Emerging evidence of the physiological role of hypoxia in mammary development and lactation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Shao; Feng-Qi Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is a physiological or pathological condition of a deficiency of oxygen supply in the body as a whole or within a tissue. During hypoxia, tissues undergo a series of physiological responses to defend themselves against a low oxygen supply, including increased angiogenesis, erythropoiesis, and glucose uptake. The effects of hypoxia are mainly mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), which is a heterodimeric transcription factor consisting ofαandβsubunits. HIF-1βis constantly expressed, whereas HIF-1αis degraded under normal oxygen conditions. Hypoxia stabilizes HIF-1αand the HIF complex, and HIF then translocates into the nucleus to initiate the expression of target genes. Hypoxia has been extensively studied for its role in promoting tumor progression, and emerging evidence also indicates that hypoxia may play important roles in physiological processes, including mammary development and lactation. The mammary gland exhibits an increasing metabolic rate from pregnancy to lactation to support mammary growth, lactogenesis, and lactation. This process requires increasing amounts of oxygen consumption and results in localized chronic hypoxia as confirmed by the binding of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole HCl in mouse mammary gland. We hypothesized that this hypoxic condition promotes mammary development and lactation, a hypothesis that is supported by the following several lines of evidence:i) Mice with an HIF-1αdeletion selective for the mammary gland have impaired mammary differentiation and lipid secretion, resulting in lactation failure and striking changes in milk compositions;ii) We recently observed that hypoxia significantly induces HIF-1α-dependent glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in mammary epithelial cells, which may be responsible for the dramatic increases in glucose uptake and GLUT1 expression in the mammary gland during the transition period from late pregnancy to early lactation;and ii ) Hypoxia and HIF-1αincrease the

  5. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...

  6. Influence of moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy against Vibrio anguillarum in Oreochromis niloticus (Nile tilapia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallage, Sanchala; Katagiri, Takayuki; Endo, Makoto; Futami, Kunihiko; Endo, Masato; Maita, Masashi

    2016-04-01

    Hypoxia is known as a potential immunomodulator in fish. This study therefore assesses the impact of chronic, moderate hypoxia on vaccine efficacy in Oreochromis niloticus. Serum antibody titer was used as a surrogate marker to detect vaccine efficacy. The fish were acclimatized to either moderate hypoxia (55 ± 5% DO) or normoxia (85 ± 5%DO) and immunized with formalin inactivated Vibrio anguillarum. Significantly, a higher antibody titer was found in normoxic fish than in moderate hypoxia. The normoxic group titer peaked at 14th dpv (days post vaccination) while the moderate hypoxic group peaked at 21st or 28th dpv. The absolute blood lymphocyte counts and serum bactericidal activities against V. anguillarum were significantly higher in normoxic fish. Serum killing of V. anguillarum appeared to be mainly via antibody-dependent classical complement pathway. Furthermore, the first week following vaccination appears critical for antibody production. This view was further supported by results obtained from gene expression assay, where the transcription level of all the detected immune related genes (IgM, IL-1 β, TCR-β, MHC-II β), except B cell activating factor, were significantly suppressed following exposure to moderate hypoxia. The overall results highlight that even though moderate hypoxia is not easily detectable in Oreochromis niloticus, it negatively affects antibody production by suppressing and delaying antibody response, ultimately affecting vaccine efficacy.

  7. Molecular imaging of tumour hypoxia;Imagerie moleculaire de l'hypoxie tumorale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huchet, A.; Maire, J.P.; Trouette, R. [Hopital Saint-Andre, CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Oncologie Medicale et de Radiotherapie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Fernandez, P.; Allard, M. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Hopital Henri-Mondor, AP-HP, Oncologie-radiotherapie, 94 - Creteil (France); Eimer, S. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service d' Anatomopathologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Tourdias, T. [CHU de Bordeaux, Service de Neuroradiologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [CHU de Bordeaux, Clinique universitaire de Neurochirurgie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Fernandez, P.; Allard, M.; Maire, J.P.; Eimer, S.; Tourdias, T.; Loiseau, H. [Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 - Bordeaux (France); Belkacemi, Y. [Paris-12 Univ., 94 - Creteil (France)

    2009-12-15

    By allowing an earlier diagnosis and a more exhaustive assessment of extension of the disease, the tomography by emission of positrons (PET) transforms the care of numerous cancers. At present, {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]-F.D.G.) imaging appears as the only one available but new molecular markers are being developed. In the next future they would modify the approach of cancers. In this context, the molecular imaging of the hypoxia and especially the {sup 18}Fluoromisonidazole PET ([{sup 18}F]-MISO PET) can give supplementary information allowing the mapping of hypoxic regions within the tumour. Because of the links, which exist between tumour hypoxia and treatment resistance of very numerous cancers, this information can have an interest, for determination of prognosis as well as for the delineation, volumes to be irradiated. Head and neck tumours are doubtless those for which the literature gives the most elements on the therapeutic impact of tumour hypoxia. Targeted therapies, based on hypoxia, already exist and the contribution of the molecular imaging could be decisive in the evaluation of the impact of such treatment. Molecular imaging of brain tumours remains to be developed. The potential contributions of the [{sup 18}F]-MISO PET for the care of these patients need to be confirmed. In this context, we propose a review of hypoxia molecular imaging taking as examples head and neck tumours and glioblastomas (GB), two tumours for which hypoxia is one of the key factors to overcome in order to increase therapeutics results

  8. Marker chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Marker chromosomes are a morphologically heterogeneous group of structurally abnormal chromosomes that pose a significant challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Phenotypes associated with marker chromosomes are highly variable and range from normal to severely abnormal. Clinical outcomes are very difficult to predict when marker chromosomes are detected prenatally. In this review, we outline the classification, etiology, cytogenetic characterization, and clinical consequences of marker chromosomes, as well as practical approaches to prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling.

  9. Normobaric Intermittent Hypoxia over 8 Months Does Not Reduce Body Weight and Metabolic Risk Factors - a Randomized, Single Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study in Normobaric Hypoxia and Normobaric Sham Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Gatterer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Both a 1- to 4-week continuous or intermittent stay and moderate exercise in hypoxia versus normoxia can lead to weight loss. We examined the reproducibility and durability of added hypoxic exposure in a feasible health program of several months. Methods: 32 obese persons, randomly assigned to either a hypoxia (age 50.3 ± 10.3 years, BMI 37.9 ± 8.1 kg/m² or a normoxia (age 52.4 ± 7.9 years, BMI 36.3 ± 4.0 kg/m² group, completed 52 exercise sessions within 8 months. Participants exercised for 90 min (65-70% HRpeak either at a simulated altitude of 3,500 m or in normoxia, and rested for further 90 min at 4,500 m or normoxia. Before, after 5 weeks, after 3 months, and after the intervention, body composition and exercise capacity were determined. Risk markers (e.g., blood pressure, cholesterol were measured before, after 3 months, and after the intervention period. Results: Body weight, BMI, waist and hip circumference, Ppeak and BPsys improved over time (p Conclusion: Long-term, moderate intensity exercise and rest in hypoxia does not lead to higher reductions in body weight than normoxia alone. Therefore, for weight loss and metabolic markers hypoxic exposure does not add effects at least when stimuli (i.e., hypoxia dose, exercise intensity/duration are unaltered throughout the intervention.

  10. Hyperplasia and hypertrophy of pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies, presumed airway hypoxia sensors, in hypoxia-inducible factor prolyl hydroxylase-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jie; Bishop, Tammie; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), presumed polymodal airway sensors, consist of innervated clusters of amine (serotonin) and peptide-producing cells. While NEB responses to acute hypoxia are mediated by a membrane-bound O2 sensor complex, responses to sustained and/or chronic hypoxia involve a prolyl hydroxylase (PHD)-hypoxia-inducible factor-dependent mechanism. We have previously reported hyperplasia of NEBs in the lungs of Phd1-/- mice associated with enhanced serotonin secretion. Here we use a novel multilabel immunofluorescence method to assess NEB distribution, frequency, and size, together with the number and size of NEB cell nuclei, and to colocalize multiple cytoplasmic and nuclear epitopes in the lungs of Phd1-/-, Phd2+/-, and Phd3-/- mice and compare them with wild-type controls. To define the mechanisms of NEB cell hyperplasia, we used antibodies against Mash1 and Prox1 (neurogenic genes involved in NEB cell differentiation/maturation), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, and the cell proliferation marker Ki67. Morphometric analysis of (% total lung area) immunostaining for synaptophysin (% synaptophysin), a cytoplasmic marker of NEB cells, was significantly increased in Phd1-/- and Phd3-/- mice compared to wild-type mice. In addition, NEB size and the number and size of NEB nuclei were also significantly increased, indicating that deficiency of Phds is associated with striking hyperplasia and hypertrophy of NEBs. In Phd2+/- mice, while mean % synaptophysin was comparable to wild-type controls, the NEB size was moderately increased, suggesting an effect even in heterozygotes. NEBs in all Phd-deficient mice showed increased expression of Mash1, Prox1, Ki67, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha, in keeping with enhanced differentiation from precursor cells and a minor component of cell proliferation. Since the loss of PHD activity mimics chronic hypoxia, our data provide critical information on the potential role of PHDs in the pathobiology and

  11. MicroRNA-146a Induced by Hypoxia Promotes Chondrocyte Autophagy through Bcl-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: There have been many studies on the etiology of osteoarthritis (OA with regard to the function of inflammatory cytokines, the process of cartilage degradation, the function of miR-146a, hypoxia stimulation and autophagy in OA chondrocytes, but there have been no reports on the relationship between miR-146a and autophagy in cartilage, especially under hypoxia. This study aimed to confirm the relationship of miR-146a and autophagy in cartilage under hypoxia. Methods: Chondrocytes were treated by hypoxia gradients, and the main factors including HIF-1α, HIF-2α, miR-146a and Bcl-2 and autophagy markers ULK-1, ATG-5 were detected by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR and western blotting. The autophagy marker LC-3 was detected by immunofluorescence. The reciprocal effects between miR-146a and Bcl-2 were confirmed by several combinations of shRNAs and adenovirus-gene systems followed by Q-PCR and western blot detection. Results: Hypoxia maintained the chondrocytes phenotype and promoted autophagy and miR-146a expression via HIF-1α, but not HIF-2α, while miR-146a did not reversely affect HIF-1α. The autophagy induced by hypoxia through HIF-1α, miR-146a and Bcl-2. Simply, hypoxia induced HIF-1α, and HIF-1α increased miR-146a, but miR-146a suppressed Bcl-2, an autophagy inhibitor. While Bcl-2 affected neither HIF-1α nor miR-146a. The absence of both HIF-1α and miR-146a or Bcl-2 over-expression inhibited hypoxia-induced autophagy. Conclusion: HIF-1α, miR-146a and Bcl-2 play crucial roles during hypoxia-induced autophagy, Hypoxia, HIF-1α and miR-146a promote chondrocytes autophagy via depressing Bcl-2. We conclude that miR-146a may serve as a novel therapeutic target for protecting cartilage from degeneration in OA.

  12. 慢性间歇低氧对高脂喂养大鼠心肌天冬氨酸特异性半胱氨酸蛋白酶-3和髓过氧化物酶活性的影响%Effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia on the activities of apoptosis regulating factor cysteine-containing aspartate-specific protease-3 and oxidative stress marker myeloperoxidase in cardiomyocyte in rats fed a high-fat diet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王卉; 田建立; 张蕴; 王林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on myocardial tissue pathology,oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat fed a high-fat diet,and to explore the possible mechanism of CIH induced cardiomyocyte injury.Methods A total of 24 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n=8 each).The control group was fed common rat forage,the high-fat group was fed high-fat forage,and the high-fat plus intermittent hypoxia group was fed high-fat forage combined with a 7h/d intermittent hypoxia treatment.The changes of myocardial tissue pathology and ultrastructure of cardiomyocyte,and the activities of apoptosis regulating factor cysteine-containing aspartate-specific proteases-3 (caspase-3) and oxidative stress marker myeloperoxidase (MPO) were observed in the 3 groups after 4 weeks of treatment.Results There were significant differences in the activities of caspase-3 and MPO among the three group (F=89.94,71.24,both P=0.001).The activities of caspase-3 and MPO were lower in the control group than in the high-fat group and in high fat plus intermittent hypoxia group [(0.21±0.06) vs.(0.80±0.11),(1.15±0.21),(3.20±0.58) vs.(10.87±1.96),(13.17±2.22),P<0.01].The activities of caspase-3 and MPO were higher in the high-fat plus intermittent hypoxia group than in the high fat group[(1.15±0.21) vs.(0.80±0.11),(13.17±2.22) vs.(10.87±1.96),P<0.01].No abnormal findings in the structure of cardiomyocyte were observed in the control group,while multiple pathologic damages in cardiomyocyte were detected in the high-fat group,and more obvious injuries in the high-fat plus intermittent hypoxia group.Conclusions The pathologic damages to cardiomyocyte are more serious in high fat and intermittent hypoxia group than in the high-fat group.Apoptosis induced by oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of these injuries.%目的 通过观察慢性间歇低氧对高脂喂养大鼠心肌细胞组织病理学、氧化应激

  13. Brain hypoxia imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The measurement of pathologically low levels of tissue pO{sub 2} is an important diagnostic goal for determining the prognosis of many clinically important diseases including cardiovascular insufficiency, stroke and cancer. The target tissues nowadays have mostly been tumors or the myocardium, with less attention centered on the brain. Radiolabelled nitroimidazole or derivatives may be useful in identifying the hypoxic cells in cerebrovascular disease or traumatic brain injury, and hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. In acute stroke, the target of therapy is the severely hypoxic but salvageable tissue. {sup 18}F-MISO PET and {sup 99m}Tc-EC-metronidazole SPECT in patients with acute ischemic stroke identified hypoxic tissues and ischemic penumbra, and predicted its outcome. A study using {sup 123}I-IAZA in patient with closed head injury detected the hypoxic tissues after head injury. Up till now these radiopharmaceuticals have drawbacks due to its relatively low concentration with hypoxic tissues associated with/without low blood-brain barrier permeability and the necessity to wait a long time to achieve acceptable target to background ratios for imaging in acute ischemic stroke. It is needed to develop new hypoxic marker exhibiting more rapid localization in the hypoxic region in the brain. And then, the hypoxic brain imaging with imidazoles or non-imidazoles may be very useful in detecting the hypoxic tissues, determining therapeutic strategies and developing therapeutic drugs in several neurological disease, especially, in acute ischemic stroke.

  14. Hypoxia induces mitochondrial mutagenesis and dysfunction in inflammatory arthritis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Biniecka, Monika

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the levels and spectrum of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations in synovial tissue from patients with inflammatory arthritis in relation to in vivo hypoxia and oxidative stress levels. METHODS: Random Mutation Capture assay was used to quantitatively evaluate alterations of the synovial mitochondrial genome. In vivo tissue oxygen levels (tPO(2)) were measured at arthroscopy using a Licox probe. Synovial expression of lipid peroxidation (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE]) and mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (CytcO II) deficiency were assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro levels of mtDNA point mutations, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, and markers of oxidative DNA damage (8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2\\'-deoxyguanine [8-oxodG]) and lipid peroxidation (4-HNE) were determined in human synoviocytes under normoxia and hypoxia (1%) in the presence or absence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or a hydroxylase inhibitor (dimethyloxalylglycine [DMOG]). Patients were categorized according to their in vivo tPO(2) level (<20 mm Hg or >20 mm Hg), and mtDNA point mutations, immunochemistry features, and stress markers were compared between groups. RESULTS: The median tPO(2) level in synovial tissue indicated significant hypoxia (25.47 mm Hg). Higher frequency of mtDNA mutations was associated with reduced in vivo oxygen tension (P = 0.05) and with higher synovial 4-HNE cytoplasmic expression (P = 0.04). Synovial expression of CytcO II correlated with in vivo tPO(2) levels (P = 0.03), and levels were lower in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (P < 0.05). In vitro levels of mtDNA mutations, ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential, 8-oxo-dG, and 4-HNE were higher in synoviocytes exposed to 1% hypoxia (P < 0.05); all of these increased levels were rescued by SOD and DMOG and, with the exception of ROS, by NAC. CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrate that hypoxia-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives

  15. Resveratrol has inhibitory effects on the hypoxia-induced inflammation and angiogenesis in human adipose tissue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullberg, Karina B; Olholm, Jens; Paulsen, Søren K; Foldager, Casper B; Lind, Martin; Richelsen, Bjørn; Pedersen, Steen B

    2013-05-13

    Hypoxia modulates the production of proteins involved in e.g. inflammation, angiogenesis and glucose utilization and hypoxia may therefore be an important factor underlying adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity. Resveratrol (RSV) is a natural polyphenolic compound and has been shown to have powerful anti-inflammatory effects and beneficial effects on several obesity-related complications. Thus, in the present study we investigated whether RSV has effects on hypoxic markers (GLUT-1, VEGF), hypoxia-induced key markers of inflammation (IL8, IL6), and leptin in human adipose tissue in vitro. Hypoxia was induced by incubating human adipose tissue fragments with 1% O2 for 24h as compared to 21% O2 The gene expressions were investigated by RT-PCR and protein release by Elisa. Hypoxia increases the expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1) (19-fold, pleptin (9-fold). The protein levels of VEGF released to the medium was increased (8-fold, padipose tissue in the expression and release of inflammation and angiogenesis-related adipokines. In addition the inhibition of hypoxia-mediated inflammation and angiogenesis might represent a novel mechanism of RSV in preventing obesity-related pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Hypoxia Impairs Vasodilation in the Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Norbert F Voelkel; McMurtry, Ivan F.; Reeves, John T.

    1981-01-01

    Alveolar hypoxia causes pulmonary vasoconstriction; we investigated whether hypoxia could also impair pulmonary vasodilation. We found in the isolated perfused rat lung a delay in vasodilation following agonist-induced vasoconstriction. The delay was not due to erythrocyte or plasma factors, or to alterations in base-line lung perfusion pressure. Pretreating lungs with arachidonic acid abolished hypoxic vasoconstriction, but did not influence the hypoxia-induced impairment of vasodilation aft...

  17. CD133 Modulate HIF-1α Expression under Hypoxia in EMT Phenotype Pancreatic Cancer Stem-Like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Maeda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Although CD133 is a known representative cancer stem cell marker, its function in tumor aggressiveness under hypoxia is not fully known. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that CD133 regulates hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α expression with tumor migration. The CD133+ pancreatic cancer cell line, Capan1M9, was compared with the CD133− cell line, shCD133M9, under hypoxia. HIF-1α expression levels were compared by Western blot, HIF-1α nucleus translocation assay and real-time (RT-PCR. The hypoxia responsive element (HRE was observed by luciferase assay. The migration ability was analyzed by migration and wound healing assays. Epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT related genes were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. HIF-1α was highly expressed in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9 under hypoxia because of the high activation of HRE. Furthermore, the migration ability of Capan1M9 was higher than that of shCD133M9 under hypoxia, suggesting higher expression of EMT related genes in Capan1M9 compared to shCD133M9. Conclusion: HIF-1α expression under hypoxia in CD133+ pancreatic cancer cells correlated with tumor cell migration through EMT gene expression. Understanding the function of CD133 in cancer aggressiveness provides a novel therapeutic approach to eradicate pancreatic cancer stem cells.

  18. Role of chronic hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Cells are endowed with a defensive mechanism against hypoxia,namely hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and hypoxia-responsive element (HRE).Under hypoxic conditions,activation of HIF leads to expression of a variety of adaptive genes with HRE in a coordinated manner.

  19. Brain dysfunction in mild to moderate hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G E; Pulsinelli, W; Blass, J P; Duffy, T E

    1981-06-01

    Hypoxia is commonly invoked to explain alterations in mental function, particularly in patients with cardiac pulmonary failure. The effects of acute graded hypoxia or higher integrative functions are well documented experimentally in man. Hypoxia in experimental animal models demonstrates that the pathophysiology is complex. In mild to moderate hypoxia, in contrast to severe hypoxia and to ischemia, the supply of energy for the brain is not impaired; cerebral levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenylate energy charge are normal. In contrast, the turnover of several neurotransmitters is altered by mild hypoxia. For example, acetylcholine synthesis is reduced proportionally to the reduction in carbohydrate oxidation. This relationship holds in vitro and with several in vivo models of hypoxia. Pharmacologic and physiologic studies in man and experimental animals are consistent with acetylcholine having an important role in mediating the cerebral effects of mild hypoxia. These observations raise the possibility that treatments directed to cholinergic or other central neurotransmitter systems may benefit patients with cerebral syndromes secondary to chronic hypoxia.

  20. Acute hypoxia and hypoxic exercise induce DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, P; Loft, S; Lundby, C

    2001-01-01

    ; lymphocytes were isolated for analysis of DNA strand breaks and oxidatively altered nucleotides, detected by endonuclease III and formamidipyridine glycosylase (FPG) enzymes. Urine was collected for 24 h periods for analysis of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a marker of oxidative DNA damage....... Urinary excretion of 8-oxodG increased during the first day in altitude hypoxia, and there were more endonuclease III-sensitive sites on day 3 at high altitude. The subjects had more DNA strand breaks in altitude hypoxia than at sea level. The level of DNA strand breaks further increased immediately after...... exercise in altitude hypoxia. Exercise-induced generation of DNA strand breaks was not seen at sea level. In both environments, the level of FPG and endonuclease III-sensitive sites remained unchanged immediately after exercise. DNA strand breaks and oxidative DNA damage are probably produced by reactive...

  1. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-30

    Jul 30, 2014 ... Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are the most widely used marker system for plant variety characterization and ... gene tagging in marker assisted breeding and gene cloning in .... PLS-2 and PAU Selection Long) to 1.00 (between PC. 2062 and .... Comparative analyses of genetic diversities within tomato.

  2. (SSR) markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-03

    Apr 3, 2012 ... seeded and black-seeded cultivars and breeding lines. The group B included 70 ... maize, rice and tomatoes (Reif et al., 2006; Vigouroux et al., 2005; Warburton et ..... development of molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding. .... Selection under domestication: evidence for a sweep in the rice Waxy ...

  3. Effect of Hypoxia on the Differentiation and the Self-Renewal of Metanephrogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaopeng; Song, Nana; He, Jianqiang; Yu, Xiaofang; Guo, Jia; Jiao, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important and influential factor in development. The embryonic kidney is exposed to a hypoxic environment throughout its development. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays vital roles in the differentiation and self-renewal of metanephrogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MMSCs) from which the kidney is derived. Thus, we hypothesized that hypoxia can regulate the differentiation and pluripotency of MMSCs through the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. To test this hypothesis, MMSCs from rats at embryonic day 18.5 were cultured in normoxic (21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions. The effects of hypoxia on differentiation, stemness, proliferation, and apoptosis of cultured MMSCs and on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway were tested. Our results revealed that the hypoxic condition increased the number of epithelial cells (E-cadherin+ or CK18+) as well the expression of markers of renal tubule epithelia cells (CDH6, Aqp1, and OPN), decreased the number and proliferation of stem cells (SIX-2+ or CITED1+), and induced apoptosis. Additionally, hypoxia reduced the expression of Wnt4 as well as its downstream molecules β-catenin, LEF-1, and Axin2. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway by LiCl or BIO modified the effects of hypoxia on the differentiation and self-renewal of MMSCs. Thus, we concluded that hypoxia induces the differentiation and inhibits the self-renewal of MMSCs by inhibiting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. The observations further our understanding of the effects of hypoxia on kidney. PMID:28194187

  4. Impact of interleukin-6 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and lung inflammation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izziki Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation may contribute to the pathogenesis of various forms of pulmonary hypertension (PH. Recent studies in patients with idiopathic PH or PH associated with underlying diseases suggest a role for interleukin-6 (IL-6. Methods To determine whether endogenous IL-6 contributes to mediate hypoxic PH and lung inflammation, we studied IL-6-deficient (IL-6-/- and wild-type (IL-6+/+ mice exposed to hypoxia for 2 weeks. Results Right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and the number and media thickness of muscular pulmonary vessels were decreased in IL-6-/- mice compared to wild-type controls after 2 weeks' hypoxia, although the pressure response to acute hypoxia was similar in IL-6+/+ and IL-6-/- mice. Hypoxia exposure of IL-6+/+ mice led to marked increases in IL-6 mRNA and protein levels within the first week, with positive IL-6 immunostaining in the pulmonary vessel walls. Lung IL-6 receptor and gp 130 (the IL-6 signal transducer mRNA levels increased after 1 and 2 weeks' hypoxia. In vitro studies of cultured human pulmonary-artery smooth-muscle-cells (PA-SMCs and microvascular endothelial cells revealed prominent synthesis of IL-6 by PA-SMCs, with further stimulation by hypoxia. IL-6 also markedly stimulated PA-SMC migration without affecting proliferation. Hypoxic IL-6-/- mice showed less inflammatory cell recruitment in the lungs, compared to hypoxic wild-type mice, as assessed by lung protein levels and immunostaining for the specific macrophage marker F4/80, with no difference in lung expression of adhesion molecules or cytokines. Conclusion These data suggest that IL-6 may be actively involved in hypoxia-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary vascular remodeling in mice.

  5. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Martin

    Full Text Available Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence. We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  6. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ng, C T

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO(2)) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic\\/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. METHODS: Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO(2) under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1beta (IL1beta), interferon gamma (IFNgamma), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3alpha (MIP3alpha) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. RESULTS: The tPO(2) was 22.5 (range 3.2-54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=-0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (-0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=-0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO(2) in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), IL1beta, IFNgamma and MIP3alpha in patients with tPO(2) <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO(2), inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint.

  7. Augmentation of aerobic respiration and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle by hypoxia preconditioning with cobalt chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Saurabh [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India); Shukla, Dhananjay [Department of Biotechnology, Gitam University, Gandhi Nagar, Rushikonda, Visakhapatnam-530 045 Andhra Pradesh (India); Bansal, Anju, E-mail: anjubansaldipas@gmail.com [Experimental Biology Division, Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Lucknow Road, Timarpur, Delhi, 110054 (India)

    2012-11-01

    High altitude/hypoxia training is known to improve physical performance in athletes. Hypoxia induces hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and its downstream genes that facilitate hypoxia adaptation in muscle to increase physical performance. Cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}), a hypoxia mimetic, stabilizes HIF-1, which otherwise is degraded in normoxic conditions. We studied the effects of hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation on physical performance, glucose metabolism, and mitochondrial biogenesis using rodent model. The results showed significant increase in physical performance in cobalt supplemented rats without (two times) or with training (3.3 times) as compared to control animals. CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats augmented the biological activities of enzymes of TCA cycle, glycolysis and cytochrome c oxidase (COX); and increased the expression of glucose transporter-1 (Glut-1) in muscle showing increased glucose metabolism by aerobic respiration. There was also an increase in mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle observed by increased mRNA expressions of mitochondrial biogenesis markers which was further confirmed by electron microscopy. Moreover, nitric oxide production increased in skeletal muscle in cobalt supplemented rats, which seems to be the major reason for peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) induction and mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus, in conclusion, we state that hypoxia preconditioning by CoCl{sub 2} supplementation in rats increases mitochondrial biogenesis, glucose uptake and metabolism by aerobic respiration in skeletal muscle, which leads to increased physical performance. The significance of this study lies in understanding the molecular mechanism of hypoxia adaptation and improvement of work performance in normal as well as extreme conditions like hypoxia via hypoxia preconditioning. -- Highlights: ► We supplemented rats with CoCl{sub 2} for 15 days along with training. ► Co

  8. Hypoxia-targeted triple suicide gene therapy radiosensitizes human colorectal cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    HSIAO, HUNG TSUNG; XING, LIGANG; DENG, XUELONG; SUN, XIAORONG; LING, C. CLIFTON; LI, GLORIA C.

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxic microenvironment, an important feature of human solid tumors but absent in normal tissue, may provide an opportunity for cancer-specific gene therapy. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether hypoxia-driven triple suicide gene TK/CD/UPRT expression enhances cytotoxicity to ganciclovir (GCV) and 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and sensitizes human colorectal cancer to radiation in vitro and in vivo. Stable transfectant of human colorectal HCT8 cells was established which expressed hypoxia-inducible vectors (HRE-TK/eGFP and HRE-CD/UPRT/mDsRed). Hypoxia-induced expression/function of TK, CD and UPRT was verified by western blot analysis, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy and cytotoxicity assay of GCV and 5-FC. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC and GCV treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of TK/eGFP and CD/UPRT/mDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC and GCV in mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in tumor regression, as compared with prodrug or radiation treatments alone. Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible TK/GCV+CDUPRT/5-FC triple suicide gene therapy may have the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:24912473

  9. Advances of Hypoxia and Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebing LI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the malignant tumors with fastest growing rates in incidence and mortality in our country, also with largest threat to human health and life. However, the exact mechanisms underlying lung cancer development remain unclear. The microenvironment of tumor hypoxia was discovered in 1955, but hypoxia in lung cancer tissues had not been successfully detected till 2006. Further studies show that hypoxia not only functions through the resistance to radiotherapy, but also regulates lung cancer development, invasion, metastasis, chemotherapy resistance and prognosis through an important oncogene HIF (hypoxia inducible factor, with its regulators PHD (prolyl hydroxylase domain and pVHL (product of von Hippel-Lindau gene. Therefore, hypoxia, HIF, PHD and pVHL should be considered as potential therapeutic targets for lung cancer pathogenesis and progression.

  10. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... markers may be seen in conditions such as: Osteoporosis Paget disease Cancer that has spread to the bone (metastatic bone disease) Hyperparathyroidism Hyperthyroidism Osteomalacia in adults and rickets in children—lack of bone mineralization, ...

  11. Cancer cell-associated cytoplasmic B7–H4 is induced by hypoxia through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and promotes cancer cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, You-Kyoung [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sae-Gwang; Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Woong [Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inhak, E-mail: miccih@inje.ac.kr [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Advanced Research Center for Multiple Myeloma, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-03

    Aberrant B7–H4 expression in cancer tissues serves as a novel prognostic biomarker for poor survival in patients with cancer. However, the factor(s) that induce cancer cell-associated B7–H4 remain to be fully elucidated. We herein demonstrate that hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription in primary CD138{sup +} multiple myeloma cells and cancer cell lines. In support of this finding, analysis of the Multiple Myeloma Genomics Portal (MMGP) data set revealed a positive correlation between the mRNA expression levels of B7–H4 and the endogenous hypoxia marker carbonic anhydrogenase 9. Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 expression was detected in the cytoplasm, but not in cancer cell membranes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated binding of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) to proximal hypoxia-response element (HRE) sites within the B7–H4 promoter. Knockdown of HIF-1α and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α diminished B7–H4 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of cytoplasmic B7–H4 in MCF-7 decreased the S-phase cell population under hypoxia. Finally, MMGP analysis revealed a positive correlation between the transcript levels of B7–H4 and proliferation-related genes including MKI67, CCNA1, and Myc in several patients with multiple myeloma. Our results provide insight into the mechanisms underlying B7–H4 upregulation and its role in cancer cell proliferation in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Hypoxia upregulates B7–H4 transcription and protein expression. • Hypoxia-induced B7–H4 is detected in the cytoplasm, but not on membrane. • ChIP assay reveals a binding of HIF-1α to B7–H4 promoter at HRE site. • Knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of HIF-1α reduce B7–H4 expression. • B7–H4 knockdown decrease the number of cells in S-phase of cell cycle.

  12. Curcumin improves hypoxia induced dysfunctions in 3T3-L1 adipocytes by protecting mitochondria and down regulating inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, Ariyapalli; Anusree, Sasidharan Suseela; Nisha, Vijayakumar Marykutty; Raghu, Kozhiparambil Gopalan

    2014-01-01

    Obesity induced metabolic syndrome is increasing worldwide at an alarming rate. It is characterized by excessive expansion of white adipose tissue which leads to hypoxia and impairs normal metabolism. Recent studies reveal that hypoxia could be one of the factors for inflammation, insulin resistance and other obesity related complications. There is a high demand for anti-obese phytoceuticals to control and manage the complications resulting from obesity. In this study, we investigated how hypoxia affect the physiological functions of 3T3-L1 adipocytes emphasizing on oxidative stress, inflammation, and mitochondrial functions. We also evaluated the protective role of various doses of curcumin, a well-known dietary antioxidant, on hypoxia induced alterations. The results revealed that hypoxia significantly altered the vital parameters of adipocyte biology like HIF 1α expression (103.47% ↑), lactate, and glycerol release (184.34% and 69.1% ↑, respectively), reactive oxygen species production (432.53% ↑), lipid and protein oxidation (376.6% and 566.6% ↑, respectively), reduction in antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase and catalase) status, secretion of inflammatory markers (TNF α, IL 6, IL 1β, and IFN γ), and mitochondrial functions (mitochondrial mass, membrane potential, permeability transition pore integrity, and superoxide generation). Curcumin substantially protected adipocytes from toxic effects of hypoxia in a dose dependent manner by protecting mitochondria and down regulating inflammation. Acriflavine is used as a positive control. A detailed investigation is required for the development of curcumin as an effective nutraceutical against obesity.

  13. Wheatgrass extract inhibits hypoxia-inducible factor-1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition in A549 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nam Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jae

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is involved in not only cancer development and metastasis but also non-cancerous conditions. Hypoxia is one of the proposed critical factors contributing to formation of chronic rhinosinusitis or nasal polyposis. Wheatgrass (Triticum aestivum) has antioxidant, anti-aging, and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we analyzed whether wheatgrass has an inhibitory effect on the EMT process in airway epithelial cells. MATERIALS/METHODS A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were incubated in hypoxic conditions (CO2 5%/O2 1%) for 24 h in the presence of different concentrations of wheatgrass extract (50, 75, 100, and 150 µg/mL) and changes in expression of epithelial or mesenchymal markers were evaluated by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence. Accordingly, associated EMT-related transcriptional factors, Snail and Smad, were also evaluated. RESULTS Hypoxia increased expression of N-cadherin and reduced expression of E-cadherin. Mechanistically, E-cadherin levels were recovered during hypoxia by silencing hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α or administering wheatgrass extract. Wheatgrass inhibited the hypoxia-mediated EMT by reducing the expression of phosphorylated Smad3 (pSmad3) and Snail. It suppressed the hypoxia-mediated EMT processes of airway epithelial cells via HIF-1α and the pSmad3 signaling pathway. CONCLUSION These results suggest that wheatgrass has potential as a therapeutic or supplementary agent for HIF-1-related diseases.

  14. Hypoxia induces apelin expression in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, K; Muendlein, A; Stark, N; Saely, C H; Wabitsch, M; Fraunberger, P; Drexel, H

    2011-06-01

    Adipokines play a central role in the development of diseases associated with insulin resistance and obesity. Hypoxia in adipose tissue leads to a dysregulation of the expression of adipokines. The effect of hypoxia on the more recently identified adipokine apelin in human adipocytes is unclear. Therefore, we aimed at investigating the role of hypoxia on the expression of the adipokine apelin. Differentiated human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes were cultured under hypoxic conditions for varying time periods. A modular incubator chamber was used to create a hypoxic tissue culture environment (defined as 1% O(2), 94% N, and 5% CO(2)). In addition, hypoxic conditions were mimicked by using CoCl(2). The effect of hypoxia on the expression of the investigated adipokines was measured by real-time PCR and the secretion of apelin was quantified by ELISA. Induction of hypoxia significantly induced mRNA expression of leptin and apelin in differentiated SGBS adipocytes compared with the normoxic control condition. Expression of adiponectin was significantly decreased by hypoxia. In addition, the amount of secreted apelin protein in response to hypoxia was elevated compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that the observed hypoxia-induced induction of apelin mRNA expression is in the first phase dependent on HIF-1α. In our study, we could demonstrate for the first time that apelin expression and secretion by human adipocytes are strongly induced under hypoxic conditions and that the early response on hypoxia with apelin induction is dependent on HIF-1α. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joergensen, Jesper T; Hansen, Anders E; Kjaer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  16. Focus on the controversial aspects of 64Cu-ATSM in tumoral hypoxia mapping by PET imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde eColombié

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mapping tumor hypoxia is a great challenge in Positron Emission Tomography (PET imaging as the precise functional information of the biological processes is needed for many effective therapeutic strategies. Tumor hypoxia has been widely reported as a poor prognostic indicator and is often associated with tumor aggressiveness, chemo and radio resistance. An accurate diagnosis of hypoxia is a challenge and is crucial for providing accurate treatment for patients’ survival benefits. This challenge has led to the emergence of new and novel PET tracers for the functional and metabolic characterization of tumor hypoxia non-invasively. Among these tracers, copper semicarbazone compound, [64Cu]- diacetyl-bis(N4 methylthiosemicarbazone (=64Cu-ATSM has been developed as a tracer for hypoxia imaging. This review focuses on 64Cu-ATSM PET imaging and the concept is presented in two sections. The first section describes its in vitro development and pre-clinical testing and particularly its affinity in different cell lines. The second section describes the controversial reports on its specificity for hypoxia imaging. The review concludes that 64Cu-ATSM - more than a hypoxic tracer, exhibits tracer accumulation in tumor which is linked to the redox potential and reactive oxygen species (ROS. The authors concluded that 64Cu-ATSNM is a marker of over-reduced cell state and thus an indirect marker for hypoxia imaging. The affinity of 64Cu-ATSM for over reduced cells was observed to be a complex phenomenon. And to provide a definitive and convincing mechanism, more in vivo studies are needed to prove the diagnostic utility of 64Cu-ATSM.

  17. The essential roles of CCR7 in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition induced by hypoxia in epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaomei; Han, Lin; Guo, Jingyan; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Jianfang; Yang, Xiangshan

    2014-12-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 and its ligands CCL19/21 mediate the tumor mobility, invasion, and metastasis (Wu et al. Curr Pharm Des. 15:742-57, 2009). Hypoxia induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) to facilitate the tumor biology. Here, we addressed the roles of CCR7 in epithelial ovarian carcinoma tissues and hypoxia-induced serous papillary cystic adenocarcinoma (SKOV-3) EMT. The expression level of CCR7 protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in 30 specimens of epithelial ovarian carcinomas. Western blot was used to investigate the expression of hypoxia-induced CCR7, HIF-1α, and EMT markers (N-cadherin, Snail, MMP-9). In addition, wound healing and Transwell assay were introduced to observe the capacity of migration and invasiveness. Our data showed CCR7 expression was observed in 22 cases of tissues and closely associated with lymph node metastasis and FIGO stage (III + IV). At 6, 12, 24, and 36 h following hypoxia, CCR7 and HIF-1α proteins were both obviously upregulated in a time-dependent method, compared with normal oxygen. In vitro, SKOV-3 expressed N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-9 once either CCL21 stimulation or hypoxia induction, while hypoxia accompanied with CCL21 induction exhibited strongest upregulation of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-9 proteins. Besides, wound healing and Transwell assay further identified that hypoxia with CCL21 stimulation can remarkably promote cell migration and invasiveness. Taken together, CCR7 can constitutively express in epithelial ovarian carcinomas and be induced rapidly in response to hypoxia, which indeed participates in EMT development and prompts the cell migration and invasion. Thus, this study suggested that the epithelial ovarian cancer invasion and metastasis can be inhibited by antagonizing CCR7.

  18. Notch signaling modulates hypoxia-induced neuroendocrine differentiation of human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Rosati, Fabiana; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Sturli, Niccolò; Kacer, Doreen; Pennella, Antonio; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; Barucci, Riccardo; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Prudovsky, Igor; Landriscina, Matteo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2012-02-01

    Prostate carcinoma is among the most common causes of cancer-related death in men, representing 15% of all male malignancies in developed countries. Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED) has been associated with tumor progression, poor prognosis, and with the androgen-independent status. Currently, no successful therapy exists for advanced, castration-resistant disease. Because hypoxia has been linked to prostate cancer progression and unfavorable outcome, we sought to determine whether hypoxia would impact the degree of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Exposure of LNCaP cells to low oxygen tension induced a neuroendocrine phenotype, associated with an increased expression of the transcription factor neurogenin3 and neuroendocrine markers, such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A, and β3-tubulin. Moreover, hypoxia triggered a significant decrease of Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA and protein expression, with subsequent downregulation of Notch-mediated signaling, as shown by reduced levels of the Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hey1. NED was promoted by attenuation of Hes1 transcription, as cells expressing a dominant-negative form of Hes1 displayed increased levels of neuroendocrine markers under normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia downregulated Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA transcription and receptor activation also in the androgen-independent cell lines, PC-3 and Du145, it did not change the extent of NED in these cultures, suggesting that androgen sensitivity may be required for transdifferentiation to occur. Hypoxia induces NED of LNCaP cells in vitro, which seems to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signaling with subsequent downregulation of Hes1 transcription. ©2011 AACR.

  19. NOTCH SIGNALLING MODULATES HYPOXIA-INDUCED NEUROENDOCRINE DIFFERENTIATION OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Rosati, Fabiana; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Sturli, Niccolò; Kacer, Doreen; Pennella, Antonio; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; Barucci, Riccardo; Piscazzi, Annamaria; Prudovsky, Igor; Landriscina, Matteo; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma is among the most common causes of cancer-related death in men, representing 15% of all male malignancies in developed countries. Neuroendocrine differentiation has been associated with tumor progression, poor prognosis and with the androgen-independent status. Currently, no successful therapy exists for advanced, castration-resistant disease. Because hypoxia has been linked to prostate cancer progression and unfavourable outcome, we sought to determine whether hypoxia would impact the degree of neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells, in vitro. Results exposure of LNCaP cells to low oxygen tension induced a neuroendocrine phenotype, associated with an increased expression of the transcription factor neurogenin3 and neuroendocrine markers, such as neuron-specific enolase, chromogranin A and β3-tubulin. Moreover, hypoxia triggered a significant decrease of Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA and protein expression, with subsequent down regulation of Notch-mediated signalling, as demonstrated by reduced levels of the Notch target genes, Hes1 and Hey1. Neuroendocrine differentiation was promoted by attenuation of Hes1 transcription, as cells expressing a dominant negative form of Hes1 displayed increased levels of neuroendocrine markers under normoxic conditions. Although hypoxia down regulated Notch 1 and Notch 2 mRNA transcription and receptor activation also in the androgen independent cell lines, PC3 and Du145, it did not change the extent of NE differentiation in these cultures, suggesting that androgen sensitivity may be required for transdifferentiation to occur. Conclusions hypoxia induces neuroendocrine differentiation of LNCaP cells in vitro, which appears to be driven by the inhibition of Notch signalling with subsequent down-regulation of Hes1 transcription. PMID:22172337

  20. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    to a standardized scheme. 2. The prognostic value of HIF-1α is investigated by SNP analysis and HIF-1α expression in tissue from 300 patients operated for colorectal cancer and the results is validated in a prospectively population of 200 patients. 3. The predictive value of HIF-1α will be investigated in patients......Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor...

  1. 2004 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  2. 2002 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. 2003 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  4. 2006 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  5. 2007 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  6. 2005 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  7. 2001 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  8. Measuring and monitoring eutrophication and hypoxia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Heidemeier, J.

    Coastal hypoxia is a complex problem and, although research has made great strides in understanding its causes and remedies, more knowledge is needed to fill critical gaps that impede action. To establish long-term trends and identify changes...

  9. Triptolide protects astrocytes from hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minfang Guo; Hongcui Fan; Jiezhong Yu; Ning Ji; Yongsheng Sun; Liyun Liang; Baoguo Xiao; Cungen Ma

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes in an in vitro murine astrocyte model of oxygen and glucose deprivation/hypoxia and reoxygenation were treated with different concentrations of triptolide (250, 500, 1 000 ng/mL) in a broader attempt to elucidate the protection and mechanism underlying triptolide treatment on astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. The results showed that the matrix metalloproteinase-9, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 expressions were significantly decreased after triptolide treatment in the astrocytes exposed to hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury, while interleukin-10 expression was upregulated. In addition, the vitality of the injured astrocytes was enhanced, the triptolide's effect was apparent at 500 ng/mL. These experimental findings indicate that triptolide treatment could protect astrocytes against hypoxia/ reoxygenation injury through the inhibition of inflammatory response and the reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

  10. Effect of Ca2EDTA on zinc mediated inflammation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of an in vivo mouse model of hypobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayabanu Malairaman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage. METHODS: Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation, pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2, NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose polymerase (PARP activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain. RESULTS: Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6. Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. CONCLUSION: We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia

  11. The impact of hypoxia on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase in two different pre-clinical tumour models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukacova, Slavka; Sørensen, Brita; Alsner, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the direct relationship between tumour hypoxia and lactate dehydrogenase (Ldh) levels in serum and tumour in two different pre-clinical murine models. Materials and methods. Experiments were performed in CDF1 or C3H/Km mice implanted with a C3H mammary carcinoma and SCCVII...... carcinoma bearing mice. Reoxygenation for 4 or 24 hours had no additional effect on Ldh activity in any of the models. Discussion. Serum Ldh activity can be a marker for tumour burden in certain types of cancer. The relationship between serum and tumour Ldh and tumour hypoxia has not been confirmed. However...

  12. Hypoxia independent drivers of melanoma angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eMeierjohann

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis is a process which is traditionally regarded as the tumor`s response to low nutrient supply occurring under hypoxic conditions. However, hypoxia is not a prerequisite for angiogenesis. The fact that even single tumor cells or small tumor cell aggregates are capable of attracting blood vessels reveals the early metastatic capability of tumor cells. This review sheds light on the hypoxia independent mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis in melanoma.

  13. Sensing and surviving hypoxia in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonz, Michael G; Buck, Leslie T; Perry, Steve F; Schwerte, Thorsten; Zaccone, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    Surviving hypoxia is one of the most critical challenges faced by vertebrates. Most species have adapted to changing levels of oxygen in their environment with specialized organs that sense hypoxia, while only few have been uniquely adapted to survive prolonged periods of anoxia. The goal of this review is to present the most recent research on oxygen sensing, adaptation to hypoxia, and mechanisms of anoxia tolerance in nonmammalian vertebrates. We discuss the respiratory structures in fish, including the skin, gills, and air-breathing organs, and recent evidence for chemosensory neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in these tissues that initiate reflex responses to hypoxia. The use of the zebrafish as a genetic and developmental model has allowed observation of the ontogenesis of respiratory and chemosensory systems, demonstration of a putative intracellular O2 sensor in chemoreceptors that may initiate transduction of the hypoxia signal, and investigation into the effects of extreme hypoxia on cardiorespiratory development. Other organisms, such as goldfish and freshwater turtles, display a high degree of anoxia tolerance, and these models are revealing important adaptations at the cellular level, such as the regulation of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission in defense of homeostasis in central neurons.

  14. Bacopa monniera leaf extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Sunil Kumar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2009-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment has been attributed to several factors including increased oxidative stress, depleted mitochondrial bioenergetics, altered neurotransmission and apoptosis. This multifactorial response of the brain to hypobaric hypoxia limits the use of therapeutic agents that target individual pathways for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment. The present study aimed at exploring the therapeutic potential of a bacoside rich leaf extract of Bacopa monniera in improving the memory functions in hypobaric conditions. The learning ability was evaluated in male Sprague Dawley rats along with memory retrieval following exposure to hypobaric conditions simulating an altitude of 25,000 ft for different durations. The effect of bacoside administration on apoptosis, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP levels, and oxidative stress markers and on plasma corticosterone levels was investigated. Expression of NR1 subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, neuronal cell adhesion molecules and was also studied along with CREB phosphorylation to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of bacoside action. Bacoside administration was seen to enhance learning ability in rats along with augmentation in memory retrieval and prevention of dendritic atrophy following hypoxic exposure. In addition, it decreased oxidative stress, plasma corticosterone levels and neuronal degeneration. Bacoside administration also increased cytochrome c oxidase activity along with a concomitant increase in ATP levels. Hence, administration of bacosides could be a useful therapeutic strategy in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced cognitive dysfunctions and other related neurological disorders.

  15. Nanoparticles for Targeting Intratumoral Hypoxia: Exploiting a Potential Weakness of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldea, Mihaela; Florian, Ioan Alexandru; Kacso, Gabriel; Craciun, Lucian; Boca, Sanda; Soritau, Olga; Florian, Ioan Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Extensive hypoxic regions are the daunting hallmark of glioblastoma, as they host aggressive stem-like cells, hinder drug delivery and shield cancer cells from the effects of radiotherapy. Nanotechnology could address most of these issues, as it employs nanoparticles (NPs) carrying drugs that selectively accumulate and achieve controlled drug release in tumor tissues. Methods overcoming the stiff interstitium and scarce vascularity within hypoxic zones include the incorporation of collagenases to degrade the collagen-rich tumor extracellular matrix, the use of multistage systems that progressively reduce NP size or of NP-loaded cells that display inherent hypoxia-targeting abilities. The unfavorable hypoxia-induced low pH could be converted into a therapeutical advantage by pH-responsive NPs or multilayer NPs, while overexpressed markers of hypoxic cells could be specifically targeted for an enhanced preferential drug delivery. Finally, promising new gene therapeutics could also be incorporated into nanovehicles, which could lead to silencing of hypoxia-specific genes that are overexpressed in cancer cells. In this review, we highlight NPs which have shown promising results in targeting cancer hypoxia and we discuss their applicability in glioblastoma, as well as possible limitations. Novel research directions in this field are also considered.

  16. Notch3 is activated by chronic hypoxia and contributes to the progression of human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danza, Giovanna; Di Serio, Claudia; Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Sturli, Niccolò; Lonetto, Giuseppe; Rosati, Fabiana; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Ventimiglia, Giuseppina; del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Prudovsky, Igor; Marchionni, Niccolò; Tarantini, Francesca

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is still the second cause of cancer-related death among men. Although patients with metastatic presentation have an ominous outcome, the vast majority of PCs are diagnosed at an early stage. Nonetheless, even among patients with clinically localized disease the outcome may vary considerably. Other than androgen sensitivity, little is known about which other signaling pathways are deranged in aggressive, localized cancers. The elucidation of such pathways may help to develop innovative therapies aimed at specific molecular targets. We report that in a hormone-sensitive PC cell line, LNCaP, Notch3 was activated by hypoxia and sustained cell proliferation and colony formation in soft agar. Hypoxia also modulated cellular cholesterol content and the number and size of lipid rafts, causing a coalescence of small rafts into bigger clusters; under this experimental condition, Notch3 migrated from the non-raft into the raft compartment where it colocalized with the γ-secretase complex. We also looked at human PC biopsies and found that expression of Notch3 positively correlated with Gleason score and with expression of carbonic anhydrase IX, a marker of hypoxia. In conclusion, hypoxia triggers the activation of Notch3, which, in turn, sustains proliferation of PC cells. Notch3 pathway represents a promising target for adjuvant therapy in patients with PC.

  17. Hypoxia inducible factor 1α promotes survival of mesenchymal stem cells under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bingke; Li, Feng; Fang, Jie; Xu, Limin; Sun, Chengmei; Han, Jianbang; Hua, Tian; Zhang, Zhongfei; Feng, Zhiming; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are ideal materials for cell therapy. Research has indicated that hypoxia benefits MSC survival, but little is known about the underlying mechanism. This study aims to uncover potential mechanisms involving hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1A) to explain the promoted MSC survival under hypoxia. MSCs were obtained from Sprague-Dawley rats and cultured under normoxia or hypoxia condition. The overexpression vector or small interfering RNA of Hif1a gene was transfected to MSCs, after which cell viability, apoptosis and expression of HIF1A were analyzed by MTT assay, flow cytometry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Factors in p53 pathway were detected to reveal the related mechanisms. Results showed that hypoxia elevated MSCs viability and up-regulated HIF1A (P cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (BCL2) expression had the opposite pattern (P cell therapy.

  18. Hypoxia-on-a-chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Mathias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work a microfluidic cell cultivation device for perfused hypoxia assays as well as a suitable controlling unit are presented. The device features active components like pumps for fluid actuation and valves for fluid direction as well as an oxygenator element to ensure a sufficient oxygen transfer. It consists of several individually structured layers which can be tailored specifically to the intended purpose. Because of its clearness, its mechanical strength and chemical resistance as well as its well-known biocompatibility polycarbonate was chosen to form the fluidic layers by thermal diffusion bonding. Several oxygen sensing spots are integrated into the device and monitored with fluorescence lifetime detection. Furthermore an oxygen regulator module is implemented into the controlling unit which is able to mix different process gases to achieve a controlled oxygenation. First experiments show that oxygenation/deoxygenation of the system is completed within several minutes when pure nitrogen or air is applied to the oxygenator. Lastly the oxygen input by the pneumatically driven micro pump was quantified by measuring the oxygen content before and after the oxygenator.

  19. HIF induces human embryonic stem cell markers in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Julie; Zhang, Zhan; Zhou, Wenyu; Wang, Amy J; Heddleston, John M; Pinna, Claudia M A; Hubaud, Alexis; Stadler, Bradford; Choi, Michael; Bar, Merav; Tewari, Muneesh; Liu, Alvin; Vessella, Robert; Rostomily, Robert; Born, Donald; Horwitz, Marshall; Ware, Carol; Blau, C Anthony; Cleary, Michele A; Rich, Jeremy N; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2011-07-01

    Low oxygen levels have been shown to promote self-renewal in many stem cells. In tumors, hypoxia is associated with aggressive disease course and poor clinical outcomes. Furthermore, many aggressive tumors have been shown to display gene expression signatures characteristic of human embryonic stem cells (hESC). We now tested whether hypoxia might be responsible for the hESC signature observed in aggressive tumors. We show that hypoxia, through hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), can induce an hESC-like transcriptional program, including the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) inducers, OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, KLF4, cMYC, and microRNA-302 in 11 cancer cell lines (from prostate, brain, kidney, cervix, lung, colon, liver, and breast tumors). Furthermore, nondegradable forms of HIFα, combined with the traditional iPSC inducers, are highly efficient in generating A549 iPSC-like colonies that have high tumorigenic capacity. To test potential correlation between iPSC inducers and HIF expression in primary tumors, we analyzed primary prostate tumors and found a significant correlation between NANOG-, OCT4-, and HIF1α-positive regions. Furthermore, NANOG and OCT4 expressions positively correlated with increased prostate tumor Gleason score. In primary glioma-derived CD133 negative cells, hypoxia was able to induce neurospheres and hESC markers. Together, these findings suggest that HIF targets may act as key inducers of a dynamic state of stemness in pathologic conditions.

  20. An insert-based enzymatic cell culture system to rapidly and reversibly induce hypoxia: investigations of hypoxia-induced cell damage, protein expression and phosphorylation in neuronal IMR-32 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2013-11-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury and tissue hypoxia are of high clinical relevance because they are associated with various pathophysiological conditions such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms causing cell damage are still not fully understood, which is at least partially due to the lack of cell culture systems for the induction of rapid and transient hypoxic conditions. The aim of the study was to establish a model that is suitable for the investigation of cellular and molecular effects associated with transient and long-term hypoxia and to gain insights into hypoxia-mediated mechanisms employing a neuronal culture system. A semipermeable membrane insert system in combination with the hypoxia-inducing enzymes glucose oxidase and catalase was employed to rapidly and reversibly generate hypoxic conditions in the culture medium. Hydrogen peroxide assays, glucose measurements and western blotting were performed to validate the system and to evaluate the effects of the generated hypoxia on neuronal IMR-32 cells. Using the insert-based two-enzyme model, hypoxic conditions were rapidly induced in the culture medium. Glucose concentrations gradually decreased, whereas levels of hydrogen peroxide were not altered. Moreover, a rapid and reversible (onoff generation of hypoxia could be performed by the addition and subsequent removal of the enzyme-containing inserts. Employing neuronal IMR-32 cells, we showed that 3 hours of hypoxia led to morphological signs of cellular damage and significantly increased levels of lactate dehydrogenase (a biochemical marker of cell damage. Hypoxic conditions also increased the amounts of cellular procaspase-3 and catalase as well as phosphorylation of the pro-survival kinase Akt, but not Erk1/2 or STAT5. In summary, we present a novel framework for investigating hypoxia-mediated mechanisms at the cellular level. We claim that the model, the first of its kind, enables researchers to rapidly and

  1. Hypoxia-induced angiogenesis: good and evil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krock, Bryan L; Skuli, Nicolas; Simon, M Celeste

    2011-12-01

    The vascular network delivers oxygen (O(2)) and nutrients to all cells within the body. It is therefore not surprising that O(2) availability serves as a primary regulator of this complex organ. Most transcriptional responses to low O(2) are mediated by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), highly conserved transcription factors that control the expression of numerous angiogenic, metabolic, and cell cycle genes. Accordingly, the HIF pathway is currently viewed as a master regulator of angiogenesis. HIF modulation could provide therapeutic benefit for a wide array of pathologies, including cancer, ischemic heart disease, peripheral artery disease, wound healing, and neovascular eye diseases. Hypoxia promotes vessel growth by upregulating multiple pro-angiogenic pathways that mediate key aspects of endothelial, stromal, and vascular support cell biology. Interestingly, recent studies show that hypoxia influences additional aspects of angiogenesis, including vessel patterning, maturation, and function. Through extensive research, the integral role of hypoxia and HIF signaling in human disease is becoming increasingly clear. Consequently, a thorough understanding of how hypoxia regulates angiogenesis through an ever-expanding number of pathways in multiple cell types will be essential for the identification of new therapeutic targets and modalities.

  2. Cognition and chronic hypoxia in pulmonary diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Areza-Fegyveres

    Full Text Available Abstract Lung disease with chronic hypoxia has been associated with cognitive impairment of the subcortical type. Objectives: To review the cognitive effects of chronic hypoxia in patients with lung disease and its pathophysiology in brain metabolism. Methods: A literature search of Pubmed data was performed. The words and expressions from the text subitems including "pathophysiology of brain hypoxia", "neuropsychology and hypoxia", "white matter injury and chronic hypoxia", for instance, were key words in a search of reports spanning from 1957 to 2009. Original articles were included. Results: According to national and international literature, patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sleep obstructive apnea syndrome perform worse on tests of attention, executive functions and mental speed. The severity of pulmonary disease correlates with degree of cognitive impairment. These findings support the diagnosis of subcortical type encephalopathy. Conclusion: Cognitive effects of clinical diseases are given limited importance in congresses and symposia about cognitive impairment and its etiology. Professionals that deal with patients presenting cognitive loss should be aware of the etiologies outlined above as a major cause or potential contributory factors, and of their implications for treatment adherence and quality of life.

  3. Preparation and Preservation of Hypoxia UW Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Chidang; WANG Chunyou; LIU Tan; CHENG Rui; YANG Zhiyong

    2007-01-01

    In order to explore the method to prepare hypoxia UW solution and the stability and preservation of hypoxia UW solution, UW solution was purged by argon or air for 15 min or 60 at a flow rate of 0.8 or 2 L/min, and the oxygen partial pressure of UW solution was detected. The hy-poxia UW solution was exposed to the air or sealed up to preserve by using different methods, and the changes of oxygen partial pressure was tested. The results showed that oxygen partial pressure of 50 mL UW solution, purged by argon for 15 min at a flow rate of 2 L/min, was declined from 242±6 mmHg to 83±10 mmHg. After exposure to the air, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was gradually increased to 160±7 mmHg at 48 h. After sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bad filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of hypoxia UW solution was stable, about 88±13 mmHg at 72 h. It was concluded that oxygen of UW solution could be purged by argon efficiently. Sealed up by the centrifuge tube and plastic bag filled with argon, oxygen partial pressure of UW so- lution could be stabilized.

  4. Accumulation of Tc-99m HL91 in Tumor Hypoxia: In Vitro Cell Culture and In Vivo Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi-Fang Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic cells within a tumor can account, in part, for resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Indeed, the oxygenation status has been shown to be a prognostic marker for the outcome of therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Tc-99m HL91 (HL91, a noninvasive imaging tracer, detects tumor hypoxia in vitro in cell culture and in vivo in a tumor model. Uptake of HL91 in vitro into human lung cancer cells (A549 and murine Lewis lung cancer cells (LL2 was investigated at oxygen concentrations of 20% O2 (normoxia, and 1% O2 (hypoxia. HL91 biodistribution was studied in four groups: severe combined immune deficiency (SCID mice bearing A549 tumors, C57BL/6NCrj (B6 mice bearing LL2 tumors, SCID controls, and B6 controls. Accumulation of the tracer was compared between tumors treated with hydralazine or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. Scintigraphic images were obtained for hydralazine-treated mice and PBS-treated mice in each of the four study groups. Autoradiography of tumor slices was also acquired. In vitro studies identified hypoxia-selective uptake of HL91, with significantly increased uptake in the hypoxic state than in the normoxic state. Biodistribution and scintigraphy showed increased HL91 uptake during tumor hypoxia at 0.5 hours, and there was progressively increased activity for up to 4 hours after tracer administration. HL91 accumulation in tumor hypoxia was markedly increased in mice treated with hydralazine compared with those treated with PBS. Autoradiography revealed high HL91 uptake in the peripheral areas around the necrotic regions of the tumor, which were identified by histologic examination. HL91 exhibits selectivity for tumor hypoxia both in vitro and in vivo and provides a successful imaging modality for the detection of tumor hypoxia in vivo.

  5. Hypoxia Inhibits Hypertrophic Differentiation and Endochondral Ossification in Explanted Tibiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, Jeroen Christianus Hermanus; Moreira Teixeira, Liliana; Landman, Ellie; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Karperien, Hermanus Bernardus Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Hypertrophic differentiation of growth plate chondrocytes induces angiogenesis which alleviates hypoxia normally present in cartilage. In the current study, we aim to determine whether alleviation of hypoxia is merely a downstream effect of hypertrophic differentiation as previously

  6. Hypoxia-regulated target genes implicated in tumor metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Ya-Ping

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxia is an important microenvironmental factor that induces cancer metastasis. Hypoxia/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α regulates many important steps of the metastatic processes, especially epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT that is one of the crucial mechanisms to cause early stage of tumor metastasis. To have a better understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia-regulated metastasis, various hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes are categorized into different classes including transcription factors, histone modifiers, enzymes, receptors, kinases, small GTPases, transporters, adhesion molecules, surface molecules, membrane proteins, and microRNAs. Different roles of these target genes are described with regards to their relationship to hypoxia-induced metastasis. We hope that this review will provide a framework for further exploration of hypoxia/HIF-1α-regulated target genes and a comprehensive view of the metastatic picture induced by hypoxia.

  7. Moderate Hypoxia Down-Regulates Interleukin-6 Secretion and TLR4 Expression in Human Sw.71 Placental Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumei Shirasuna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The placenta is a vital organ for pregnancy. Many in vitro placental experiments are conducted under 21% O2; however, O2 tension could influence cellular functions, including cytokine secretion. We investigated the effects of oxygen tension between moderate hypoxia (5% O2 and normoxia (21% O2 by testing the hypothesis that moderate hypoxia regulates cellular phenotypes differently from normoxia in human trophoblast cells. Methods and Results: Sw.71 trophoblast cells were incubated under normoxic or moderately hypoxic conditions. Cells were also treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS as a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 ligand inducing inflammation. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 as an inflammatory cytokine was determined, and TLR4, hypoxia-induced factor-1α (HIF1α, and reactive oxygen species (ROS production were detected. Moderate hypoxia increased HIF1α expression and cell proliferation and acted by two different mechanisms to decrease IL-6 secretion compared with normoxia: it limits the TLR4 expression and ROS production. Treatment with cobalt chloride as an HIF1 activator inhibited IL-6 secretion and TLR4 expression; this effect was reversed on treatment with PX-12 as an HIF1 suppressor. Conclusion: IL-6 secretion, TLR4 expression, and ROS production, classical markers of inflammation, are down-regulated by moderate hypoxia, and HIF1α and ROS have a potential to regulate these responses in human trophoblast cells.

  8. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  9. Morphological evaluation of the cerebral blood vessels in the late gestation fetal sheep following hypoxia in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Lo, Camden; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Walker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia can significantly contribute to the development of permanent brain injury in the term neonate; however the response of cerebral blood vessels is not well understood. This study aimed to quantitatively measure vascular density and morphology using laminin immunohistochemistry as a marker of blood vessels, and determine the effects of a single, severe bout of hypoxia (umbilical cord occlusion, UCO) late in gestation on the developing cerebrovasculature in fetal sheep. At 124-126 days gestation singleton fetal sheep underwent surgery for implantation of catheters and placement of an inflatable cuff around the umbilical cord. A 10 min UCO or sham UCO (n=5) occurred at 132 days gestation. Fetal brains were collected at 24 h (n=5) or 48 h (n=4) after UCO for vascular density and morphology analysis of laminin immunohistochemistry. 48 h following a single, brief bout of severe hypoxia late in gestation decreased vascular density was seen in the caudate nucleus and no changes in vascular morphology occurred. However closer analysis revealed a significant shift in the frequency of smaller (≤10 μm) to larger (≤100 μm) perimeter blood vessels in periventricular and subcortical white matter. Close examination of the frequency distribution of vascular perimeter highlights that alterations in vascular morphology persist in the near term fetal brain for up to 48 h following a brief (10 min) hypoxia in white but not gray matter. These findings suggest that the near term brain may still be vulnerable to white matter injury following in utero hypoxia.

  10. Rat reaction to hypokinesia after prior adaptation to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barashova, Z. I.; Tarakanova, O. I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of prior hypoxia adaptation on body tolerance to hypokinesia was investigated. Rats trained to a 50 day period of hypokinesia and hypoxia with a preliminary month of adaptation to hypoxia showed less weight loss, higher indices for red blood content, heightened reactivity of the overall organism and the central nervous system to acute hypoxia, and decreased modification of the skeletal muscles compared to rats subjected to hypokinesia alone.

  11. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases. CONCLUSIONS: These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  12. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  13. The clinical impact of hypoxia-regulated gene expression in loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Tramm, T.

    2015-01-01

    squamous cell carcinomas (ESCC) compared with adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction and the stomach (AC), and was a potential prognostic marker in patients with ESCC. The purpose of the present study was to confirm these results. Materials and Methods: The study population consisted of 152......Purpose/Objective: In a former study (1), the hypoxia gene expression classifier, developed in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, was applied in 89 patients with loco-regional gastroesophageal cancer (GC). Analysis of the 15 genes was indicative of hypoxia being more profound in esophagus...... were available in 135 patients; ESCC: 89 patients (66%), AC: 43 patients (32%) and other carcinomas: 3 patients (2%). Comparing the cohorts of the original and present study, patient characteristics were similar except for a significantly lower T- and N-stage in the present cohort. Tumor specimens were...

  14. Cellular uptake of PET tracers of glucose metabolism and hypoxia and their linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busk, Morten; Horsman, Michael R.; Overgaard, Jens [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus C (Denmark); Jakobsen, Steen [Aarhus University Hospital, PET Centre, Aarhus (Denmark); Bussink, Johan; Kogel, Albert van der [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    Tumour hypoxia and elevated glycolysis (Warburg effect) predict poor prognosis. Each parameter is assessable separately with positron emission tomography, but they are linked through anaerobic glycolysis (Pasteur effect). Here, we compare the oxygenation-dependent retention of fluoroazomycin arabinoside ([{sup 18}F]FAZA), a promising but not well-characterised hypoxia-specific tracer, and fluorodeoxyglucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG) in four carcinoma cell lines. Cells seeded on coverslips were positioned in modified Petri dishes that allow physically separated cells to share the same tracer-containing medium pool. Following oxic, hypoxic or anoxic tracer incubation, coverslips were analysed for radioactivity ([{sup 18}F]FDG+[{sup 18}F]FAZA) or re-incubated in tracer-free oxygenated medium and then measured ([{sup 18}F]FAZA). Next, we tested the reliability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a relative measure of glucose metabolic rate. Finally, from two cell lines, xenografts were established in mice, and the tracer distribution between hypoxic and well-oxygenated areas were deduced from tissue sections. Three hours of anoxia strongly stimulated [{sup 18}F]FAZA retention with anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratios typically above 30. Three out of four cell lines displayed similar selectivity of [{sup 18}F]FDG versus glucose, but oxic uptake and anoxic-to-oxic uptake ratio of [{sup 18}F]FDG varied considerably. Although less pronounced, [{sup 18}F]FAZA also showed superior in vivo hypoxia specificity compared with [{sup 18}F]FDG. [{sup 18}F]FAZA displays excellent in vitro characteristics for hypoxia imaging including modest cell-to-cell line variability and no binding in oxic cells. In contrast, the usability of [{sup 18}F]FDG as a surrogate marker for hypoxia is questionable due to large variations in baseline (oxic) glucose metabolism and magnitudes of the Pasteur effects. (orig.)

  15. Effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced airway inflammation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broytman, Oleg; Braun, Rudolf K; Morgan, Barbara J; Pegelow, David F; Hsu, Pei-Ning; Mei, Linda S; Koya, Ajay K; Eldridge, Marlowe; Teodorescu, Mihaela

    2015-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea aggravates asthma, but its mechanisms are unknown. Chronic intermittent hypoxia is one hallmark feature of sleep apnea. In this study, we tested the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia on allergen-induced inflammation in rats. Four groups (n = 9-11/group) of ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized Brown-Norway rats underwent intermittent hypoxia (10% oxygen, 30 cycles/h, 10 h/d) or normoxia for 30 days concurrent with weekly OVA or vehicle challenges. Lung physiology, differential leukocyte counts from bronchoalveolar lavage, and histology (Picro Sirius Red staining for collagen content) were compared between groups 2 days after the last challenge. Gene expression in bronchoalveolar lavage cells was quantified by quantitative PCR. Compared with normoxia, chronic intermittent hypoxia reduced the FEV0.1/FVC ratio (P = 0.005), peak expiratory flow (P = 0.002), and mean midexpiratory flow (P = 0.004), predominantly in medium and large airways; decreased the baseline eosinophil number (P = 0.01) and amplified the effect of OVA on monocyte number (P = 0.02 for the interaction); in proximal airways, increased (P = 0.008), whereas in distal airways it decreased (P = 0.004), collagen density; induced qualitative emphysematous changes in lung periphery; and increased expression of the M2 macrophage marker YM-1 and augmented OVA-induced expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. Chronic intermittent hypoxia alters immune response to allergen toward a more TH-1-predominant cellular phenotype with collagen deposition and matrix degradation, leading to airflow limitation. These findings highlight the potential of sleep apnea to aggravate airway dysfunction in patients with preexistent asthma.

  16. Protective effect of salidroside on cardiac apoptosis in mice with chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Mei-Chih; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Pai, Pei-Ying; Lai, Mei-Hsin; Lin, Yueh-Min; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Cheng, Shiu-Min; Liu, Yi-fan; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study is to determine if salidroside has protective effects on hypoxia-induced cardiac widely dispersed apoptosis in mice with severe sleep apnea model. Sixty-four C57BL/6J mice 5-6 months of age were divided into four groups, i.e. Control group (21% O2, 24h per day, 8 weeks, n=16); Hypoxia group (Hypoxia: 7% O2 60s, 20% O2 alternating 60s, 8h per day, 8 weeks, n=16); and Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S 30 groups (Hypoxia for 1st 4 weeks, hypoxia pretreated 10mg/kg and 30 mg/kg salidroside by oral gavage per day for 2nd 4 weeks, n=16 and 16). The excised hearts from four groups were measured by the heart weight index, H&E staining, TUNEL-positive assays and Western blotting. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells in mice heart were less in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 than those in the Hypoxia group. Compared with Hypoxia, the protein levels of Fas ligand, Fas death receptors, Fas-Associated Death Domain (FADD), activated caspase 8, and activated caspase 3 (Fas pathways) were decreased in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30. In the mitochondria pathway, the protein levels of BcLx, Bcl2, and Bid (anti-apoptotic Bcl2 family) in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 were more than those in Hypoxia. The protein levels of Bax, t-Bid, activated caspase 9, and activated caspase 3 were less in Hypoxia+S10 and Hypoxia+S30 than those in hypoxia. Our findings suggest that salidroside has protective effects on chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways in mice hearts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pheochromocytomas: the (pseudo)-hypoxia hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2010-12-01

    Hypoxia and pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma have a long common history. Since the description, almost 40 years ago, of an increased incidence of head and neck paragangliomas in chronic hypoxia, discoveries on oxygen-sensing and on hereditary paraganglioma in the beginning of years 2000 provided the proof of concept of a strong link between these neuroendocrine tumors and the hypoxic pathway. It was demonstrated that both SDH and VHL genes mutations lead to the abnormal stabilization and activation of hypoxia-inducible factors, and to the subsequent regulation of multiple target genes, the products of which are implicated in proliferation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, energy metabolism or invasiveness and metastases. Altogether, physiological, genetic, cellular and molecular data collected over years all point to a central role of the hypoxic or pseudohypoxic pathway in pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma tumorigenesis. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia ...... of NO and nitrite signaling in the adaptive response to hypoxia in vertebrate animals....... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  19. Arginine-vasopressin marker copeptin is a sensitive plasma surrogate of hypoxic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostergaard L

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Louise Ostergaard,1,2,* Alain Rudiger,3,* Sven Wellmann,2,4,5 Elena Gammella,6 Beatrice Beck-Schimmer,2,3 Joachim Struck,7 Marco Maggiorini,2,8 Max Gassmann,1,2,9 1Institute of Veterinary Physiology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Zürich, 2Zürich Center for Integrative Human Physiology, 3Institute of Anesthesiology, 4Division of Neonatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, 5Department of Neonatology, University Children's Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 6Department of Human Morphology and Biomedical Science, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 7Research Department, B•R•A•H•M•S Biomarkers, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Hennigsdorf, Germany; 8Medical Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland; 9Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru *These authors contributed equally to this work and share first authorship Background: A reduced oxygen supply puts patients at risk of tissue hypoxia, organ damage, and even death. In response, several changes are activated that allow for at least partial adaptation, thereby increasing the chances of survival. We aimed to investigate whether the arginine vasopressin marker, copeptin, can be used as a marker of the degree of acclimatization/adaptation in rats exposed to hypoxia. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 10% oxygen for up to 48 hours. Arterial and right ventricular pressures were measured, and blood gas analysis was performed at set time points. Pulmonary changes were investigated by bronchoalveolar lavage, wet and dry weight measurements, and lung histology. Using a newly developed specific rat copeptin luminescence immunoassay, the regulation of vasopressin in response to hypoxia was studied, as was atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP by detecting mid-regional proANP. Results: With a decreasing oxygen supply, the rats rapidly became cyanotic and inactive. Despite continued exposure to 10% oxygen, all animals recuperated within 16 hours and

  20. Mast cells and hypoxia drive tissue metaplasia and heterotopic ossification in idiopathic arthrofibrosis after total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Theresa A; Parvizi, Javad; Dela Valle, Craig J; Steinbeck, Marla J

    2010-09-01

    Idiopathic arthrofibrosis occurs in 3-4% of patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, little is known about the cellular or molecular changes involved in the onset or progression of this condition. To classify the histomorphologic changes and evaluate potential contributing factors, periarticular tissues from the knees of patients with arthrofibrosis were analyzed for fibroblast and mast cell proliferation, heterotopic ossification, cellular apoptosis, hypoxia and oxidative stress. The arthrofibrotic tissue was composed of dense fibroblastic regions, with limited vascularity along the outer edges. Within the fibrotic regions, elevated numbers of chymase/fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-expressing mast cells were observed. In addition, this region contained fibrocartilage and associated heterotopic ossification, which quantitatively correlated with decreased range of motion (stiffness). Fibrotic, fibrocartilage and ossified regions contained few terminal dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive or apoptotic cells, despite positive immunostaining for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)5, a marker of hypoxia, and nitrotyrosine, a marker for protein nitrosylation. LDH5 and nitrotyrosine were found in the same tissue areas, indicating that hypoxic areas within the tissue were associated with increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Taken together, we suggest that hypoxia-associated oxidative stress initiates mast cell proliferation and FGF secretion, spurring fibroblast proliferation and tissue fibrosis. Fibroblasts within this hypoxic environment undergo metaplastic transformation to fibrocartilage, followed by heterotopic ossification, resulting in increased joint stiffness. Thus, hypoxia and associated oxidative stress are potential therapeutic targets for fibrosis and metaplastic progression of idiopathic arthrofibrosis after TKA.

  1. Withanolide A Prevents Neurodegeneration by Modulating Hippocampal Glutathione Biosynthesis during Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitharu, Iswar; Jain, Vishal; Deep, Satya Narayan; Shroff, Sabita; Sahu, Jayanta Kumar; Naik, Pradeep Kumar; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera root extract has been used traditionally in ayurvedic system of medicine as a memory enhancer. Present study explores the ameliorative effect of withanolide A, a major component of withania root extract and its molecular mechanism against hypoxia induced memory impairment. Withanolide A was administered to male Sprague Dawley rats before a period of 21 days pre-exposure and during 07 days of exposure to a simulated altitude of 25,000 ft. Glutathione level and glutathione dependent free radicals scavenging enzyme system, ATP, NADPH level, γ-glutamylcysteinyl ligase (GCLC) activity and oxidative stress markers were assessed in the hippocampus. Expression of apoptotic marker caspase 3 in hippocampus was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional alteration and expression of GCLC and Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–related factor 2 (Nrf2) were investigated by real time PCR and immunoblotting respectively. Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia decreased reduced glutathione (GSH) level and impaired reduced gluatathione dependent free radical scavenging system in hippocampus resulting in elevated oxidative stress. Supplementation of withanolide A during hypoxic exposure increased GSH level, augmented GSH dependent free radicals scavenging system and decreased the number of caspase and hoescht positive cells in hippocampus. While withanolide A reversed hypoxia mediated neurodegeneration, administration of buthionine sulfoximine along with withanolide A blunted its neuroprotective effects. Exogenous administration of corticosterone suppressed Nrf2 and GCLC expression whereas inhibition of corticosterone synthesis upregulated Nrf2 as well as GCLC. Thus present study infers that withanolide A reduces neurodegeneration by restoring hypoxia induced glutathione depletion in hippocampus. Further, Withanolide A increases glutathione biosynthesis in neuronal cells by upregulating GCLC level through Nrf2 pathway in a corticosterone dependenet manner

  2. Characterization of positron emission tomography hypoxia tracer uptake and tissue oxygenation via electrochemical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, Stephen R., E-mail: srbowen@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kogel, Albert J. van der [University Medical Centre St. Radboud, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nordsmark, Marianne [Aarhus University Hospital, Department of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus (Denmark); Bentzen, Soren M. [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Clinical Sciences Center, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Jeraj, Robert [University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Human Oncology, Clinical Sciences Center, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2011-08-15

    microenvironment acidity, while FMISO uptake was representative of a wide range of PO{sub 2} values that were independent of acidity. The models shed light on possible causes of these discrepancies, particularly as it pertains to image contrast, and may prove to be a useful methodology in quantifying relationships between other hypoxia tracers. Comprehensive and robust assessment of tumor hypoxia prior to as well as in response to therapy may be best provided by imaging of multiple hypoxia markers that provide complementary rather than interchangeable information.

  3. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...... by hyperventilation of room air, elicited a normoxic increase in the haemoglobin oxygen affinity without changing serum-EPO. Among the measured blood gas and acid-base parameters, only the partial pressures of oxygen in arterial blood during hypocapnic hypoxia were related to the peak values of serum-EPO (r = -0...

  4. Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daris Ferrari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of tongue cancer is increasing worldwide, and its aggressiveness remains high regardless of treatment. Genetic changes and the expression of abnormal proteins have been frequently reported in the case of head and neck cancers, but the little information that has been published concerning tongue tumours is often contradictory. This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. Most of these proteins are associated with nodal stage, tumour progression and metastases, but there is still controversy concerning their impact on disease-free and overall survival, and treatment response. More extensive clinical studies are needed to identify the patterns of molecular alterations and the most reliable predictors in order to develop tailored anti-tumour strategies based on the targeting of hypoxia markers, vascular and lymphangiogenic factors, epidermal growth factor receptors, intracytoplasmatic signalling and apoptosis.

  5. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  6. Hypoxia, HIF-1 Regulation and Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen insufficiency (hypoxia) is a common feature of human cancer and associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are more resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy contributing to their unfavorable prognosis. The oxygen sensing pathway is cont

  7. Hypoxia and Angiogenesis in Endometrioid Endometrial Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Horrée

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α plays an essential role in the adaptive response of cells to hypoxia, triggering biologic events associated with aggressive tumor behavior. Methods: Expression of HIF-1α and proteins in the HIF-1α pathway (Glut-1, CAIX, VEGF in paraffin-embedded specimens of normal (n = 17, premalignant (n = 17 and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (n = 39 was explored by immunohistochemistry, in relation to microvessel density (MVD. Results: HIF-1α overexpression was absent in inactive endometrium but present in hyperplasia (61% and carcinoma (87%, with increasing expression in a perinecrotic fashion pointing to underlying hypoxia. No membranous expression of Glut-1 and CAIX was noticed in inactive endometrium, in contrast with expression in hyperplasia (Glut-1 0%, CAIX 61%, only focal and diffuse and carcinoma (Glut-1 94.6%, CAIX 92%, both mostly perinecrotically. Diffuse HIF-1α was accompanied by activation of downstream targets. VEGF was significantly higher expressed in hyperplasias and carcinomas compared to inactive endometrium. MVD was higher in hyperplasias and carcinomas than in normal endometrium (p < 0.001. Conclusion: HIF-1α and its downstream genes are increasingly expressed from normal through premalignant to endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, paralleled by activation of its downstream genes and increased angiogenesis. This underlines the potential importance of hypoxia and its key regulator HIF-1α in endometrial carcinogenesis.

  8. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, Maria; Bloomer, William D.; Bloomer, William D.

    1994-01-01

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula ##STR1## wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO.sub.2 is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers.

  9. Acridine-intercalator based hypoxia selective cytotoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou-Rosenzweig, M.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1994-03-15

    Hypoxia selective cytotoxins of the general formula STR1 wherein n is from 1 to 5, and NO[sub 2] is in at least one of the 2, 4 or 5-positions of the imidazole are developed. Such compounds have utility as radiosensitizers and chemosensitizers. 9 figs.

  10. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...

  11. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...

  12. The hypoxia signaling pathway and hypoxic adaptation in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wuhan

    2015-02-01

    The hypoxia signaling pathway is an evolutionarily conserved cellular signaling pathway present in animals ranging from Caenorhabditis elegans to mammals. The pathway is crucial for oxygen homeostasis maintenance. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α) are master regulators in the hypoxia signaling pathway. Oxygen concentrations vary a lot in the aquatic environment. To deal with this, fishes have adapted and developed varying strategies for living in hypoxic conditions. Investigations into the strategies and mechanisms of hypoxia adaptation in fishes will allow us to understand fish speciation and breed hypoxia-tolerant fish species/strains. This review summarizes the process of the hypoxia signaling pathway and its regulation, as well as the mechanism of hypoxia adaptation in fishes.

  13. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent

  14. Fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment resulted in a failure of cord blood endothelial progenitor cell adaptation against chronic hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, U Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) has long-term health consequences, and fetal exposure to a diabetic intrauterine environment increases cardiovascular risk for her adult offspring. Some part of this could be related to their endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Understanding the vessel-forming ability of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB)-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) against pathological stress such as GDM response to hypoxia could generate new therapeutic strategies. This study aims to investigate the role of chronic hypoxia in EPCs functional and vessel-forming ability in GDM subjects. Each ECFC was expressed in endothelial and pro-angiogenic specific markers, namely endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), platelet (PECAM-1) endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1, vascular endothelial-cadherin CdH5 (Ca-dependent cell adhesion molecule), vascular endothelial growth factor A, (VEGFA) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1). Chronic hypoxia did not affect CdH5, but PECAM1 MRNA expressions were increased in control and GDM subjects. Control hypoxic and GDM normoxic VEGFA MRNA expressions and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF1α) protein expressions were significantly increased in HUCB ECFCs. GDM resulted in most failure of HUCB ECFC adaptation and eNOS protein expressions against chronic hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia resulted in an overall decline in HUCB ECFCs’ proliferative ability due to reduction of clonogenic capacity and diminished vessel formation. Furthermore, GDM also resulted in most failure of cord blood ECFC adaptation against chronic hypoxic environment. PMID:25565870

  15. Micro Regional Heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG Uptake in Canine Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Relation to Cell Proliferation, Hypoxia and Glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zornhagen, Kamilla Westarp; Hansen, Anders E.; Oxboel, Jytte; Clemmensen, Andreas E.; El Ali, Henrik H.; Kristensen, Annemarie T.; Kjær, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tumour microenvironment heterogeneity is believed to play a key role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. However, little is known about micro regional distribution of hypoxia, glycolysis and proliferation in spontaneous solid tumours. The overall aim was simultaneous investigation of micro regional heterogeneity of 64Cu-ATSM (hypoxia) and 18F-FDG (glycolysis) uptake and correlation to endogenous markers of hypoxia, glycolysis, proliferation and angiogenesis to better therapeutically target aggressive tumour regions and prognosticate outcome. Methods Exploiting the different half-lives of 64Cu-ATSM (13h) and 18F-FDG (2h) enabled simultaneous investigation of micro regional distribution of hypoxia and glycolysis in 145 tumour pieces from four spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. Pairwise measurements of radioactivity and gene expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia (HIF-1α, CAIX), glycolysis (HK2, GLUT1 and GLUT3), proliferation (Ki-67) and angiogenesis (VEGFA and TF) were performed. Dual tracer autoradiography was compared with Ki-67 immunohistochemistry. Results Micro regional heterogeneity in hypoxia and glycolysis within and between tumour sections of each tumour piece was observed. The spatial distribution of 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG was rather similar within each tumour section as reflected in moderate positive significant correlations between the two tracers (ρ = 0.3920–0.7807; p = 0.0180 –Micro regional heterogeneity of hypoxia and glycolysis was documented in spontaneous canine soft tissue sarcomas. 64Cu-ATSM and 18F-FDG uptakes and distributions showed significant moderate correlations at the micro regional level indicating overlapping, yet different information from the tracers.18F-FDG better reflected cell proliferation as measured by Ki-67 gene expression than 64Cu-ATSM. PMID:26501874

  16. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  17. Cyclosporine Treatment Reduces Oxygen Free Radical Generation and Oxidative Stress in the Brain of Hypoxia-Reoxygenated Newborn Piglets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang-Qin; Chaudhary, Hetal; Brocks, Dion R.; Bigam, David L.; Cheung, Po-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1–4 d, 1.4–2.5 kg) were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation)(n = 8/group). At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls) or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus) in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4) underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe), cerebral cortical H2O2 production (electrochemical sensor), cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA) and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot) levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40–48% of baseline), hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27–31 mmHg) and acidosis (pH 7.04) at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg), significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H2O2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H2O2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia

  18. Protective effect of Angelica sinensis on cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuling Wu; Hongxian Zhao; Hong Yu

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The enhanced expression of c-Fos protein in nerve cells after hypoxia is the marker for converting extracellular hypoxia information to intracellular changes at hypoxia, and it is suspected that the increase of c-Fos protein can lead to the synthesis and excretion of related neurotrophic factor and nerve growth factor. However, it is still unclear what functional changes of nerve cells are induced by the increase of c-Fos protein at hypoxia, and whether it is good for the survival of damaged neurons.OBJECTIVE: To observe the expression of c-Fos in the cerebral neurons from embryos of rats with hypoxia in uterus, and investigate the pathway for the protective effect of Angelica sinensis injection on the cerebral neurons from rat embryos under hypoxia.DESIGN: A completely randomized controlled study.SETTING: Department of Histology and Embryology, Luzhou Medical College.MATERIALS: Twelve female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male adult Wistar rat with body mass of 220 to 250 g were selected. Rabbit-anti-rat neuro-specific enolase (NSE) and rabbit-anti-rat c-Fos were purchased from Wuhan Boster Biological Technology Co., Ltd.; Double-staining kit was bought from Beijing Zhongshan Golden Bridge Biotechnology Co., Ltd. Angelica sinensis injection was produced by the Department of Pharmacy, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Hubei Medical University.METHODS: The experiments were completed in the experimental animal center and the Department of Histology and Embryology of Luzhou Medical College from December 2004 to December 2005. ① Twelve adult female Wistar rats in oestrum and 1 male Wistar rat were housed in one rearing cage. The appearance of vaginal embolus at 8:00 in the next morning was recorded as 0 day of pregnancy and the rats were recorded for 15 days, and they were divided randomly into three groups, control group (n =4), hypoxia group (n =4)and Angelica group (n =4). The pregnant rats in the hypoxia group were firstly injected with saline (8 m

  19. HIF-1α Promotes A Hypoxia-Independent Cell Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyuan; Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Andrew; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is known as a transactivator for VEGF gene promoter. It can be induced by hypoxia. However, no study has been done so far to dissect HIF-1α-mediated effects from hypoxia or VEGF-mediated effects. By using a HIF-1α knockout (HIF-1α KO) cell system in mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, this study analyzes cell migration and HIF-1α, hypoxia and VEGF activation. A hypoxia-mediated HIF-1α induction and VEGF transactivation were observed: both HIF-1α WT lines had significantly increased VEGF transactivation, as an indicator for HIF-1α induction, in hypoxia compared to normoxia; in contrast, HIF-1α KO line had no increased VEGF transactivation under hypoxia. HIF-1α promotes cell migration: HIF-1α-KO cells had a significantly reduced migration compared to that of the HIF-1α WT cells under both normoxia and hypoxia. The significantly reduced cell migration in HIF-1α KO cells can be partially rescued by the restoration of WT HIF-1α expression mediated by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer. Interestingly, hypoxia has no effect on cell migration: the cells had a similar cell migration rate under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for both HIF-1α WT and HIF-1α KO lines, respectively. Collectively, these data suggest that HIF-1α plays a role in MEF cell migration that is independent from hypoxia-mediated effects.

  20. Exogenous HGF Prevents Cardiomyocytes from Apoptosis after Hypoxia via Up-Regulating Cell Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunle Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF is widely known as a protective factor in ischemic myocardium, however HGF sensitive cellular mechanism remained ill-defined. Autophagy at early stage of hypoxia has been demonstrated to play a role in protecting myocardium both in vivo and vitro. We performed this study to investigate the association between the protective effect of HGF and autophagy. Methods: Ventricular myocytes were isolated from neonatal rat heart (NRVMs. We evaluated cardiomyocytes apoptosis by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry. Autophagy was assessed by transmission electron microscope and mRFP-GFP-LC3 adenovirus infection. Mitochondrial membrane potential was estimated by JC-1 staining. Western blotting and ELISA assay were used to quantify protein concentrations. Results: We found that autophagy in NRVMs increased at early stage after hypoxia and HGF release was consistent with the change of autophagy. Exogenous HGF enhanced autophagy and decreased apoptosis, while neutralizing HGF yielded opposite effects. Besides, inhibition of autophagy increased apoptosis of myocytes. Furthermore, exogenous HGF induced Parkin, the marker of mitochondrial autophagy, indicating increased clearance of injured mitochondria. Conclusions: Our results revealed a potential mechanism in which exogenous HGF prevented NRVMs from apoptosis after hypoxia. Upregulation of Parkin through administration of exogenous HGF may be a potential therapeutic strategy ptotecting myocytes during ischemia.

  1. Hypoxia in Head and Neck Cancer in Theory and Practice: A PET-Based Imaging Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana G. Marcu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in tumour recurrence among head and neck cancer patients. The identification and quantification of hypoxic regions are therefore an essential aspect of disease management. Several predictive assays for tumour oxygenation status have been developed in the past with varying degrees of success. To date, functional imaging techniques employing positron emission tomography (PET have been shown to be an important tool for both pretreatment assessment and tumour response evaluation during therapy. Hypoxia-specific PET markers have been implemented in several clinics to quantify hypoxic tumour subvolumes for dose painting and personalized treatment planning and delivery. Several new radiotracers are under investigation. PET-derived functional parameters and tracer pharmacokinetics serve as valuable input data for computational models aiming at simulating or interpreting PET acquired data, for the purposes of input into treatment planning or radio/chemotherapy response prediction programs. The present paper aims to cover the current status of hypoxia imaging in head and neck cancer together with the justification for the need and the role of computer models based on PET parameters in understanding patient-specific tumour behaviour.

  2. Hypoxia-Inducible Factors: Mediators of Cancer Progression; Prognostic and Therapeutic Targets in Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadri, Navid; Zhang, Paul J., E-mail: pjz@mail.med.upenn.edu [Anatomic Pathology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, 6th Floor Founders Building, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2013-04-02

    Soft-tissue sarcomas remain aggressive tumors that result in death in greater than a third of patients due to either loco-regional recurrence or distant metastasis. Surgical resection remains the main choice of treatment for soft tissue sarcomas with pre- and/or post-operational radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy employed in more advanced stage disease. However, in recent decades, there has been little progress in the average five-year survival for the majority of patients with high-grade soft tissue sarcomas, highlighting the need for improved targeted therapeutic agents. Clinical and preclinical studies demonstrate that tumor hypoxia and up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) is associated with decreased survival, increased metastasis, and resistance to therapy in soft tissue sarcomas. HIF-mediated gene expression regulates many critical aspects of tumor biology, including cell survival, metabolic programming, angiogenesis, metastasis, and therapy resistance. In this review, we discuss HIFs and HIF-mediated genes as potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in sarcomas. Many pharmacological agents targeting hypoxia-related pathways are in development that may hold therapeutic potential for treating both primary and metastatic sarcomas that demonstrate increased HIF expression.

  3. Hypoxia inducible factors 1 and 2 are important transcriptional effectors in primary macrophages experiencing hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hsin-Yu; Hughes, Russell; Murdoch, Craig; Coffelt, Seth; Biswas, Subhra K.; Harris, Adrian L.; Johnson, Randall S.; Imityaz, Hongxia Z.; Simon, M. Celeste; Fredlund, Erik; Greten, Florian; Rius, Jordi; Lewis, Claire E.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia exists in many diseased tissues including arthritic joints, atherosclerotic plaques and malignant tumors. Macrophages accumulate in these sites and upregulate hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) 1 and 2 in response to the hypoxia present. Here we show that the gene expression profile in primary human and murine macrophages changes markedly when they are exposed to hypoxia for 18h. For example, they were seen to upregulate the cell surface receptors, CXCR4 and GLUT1, and the potent, tumor-promoting cytokines, VEGFA, interleukins 1β and 8, adrenomedullin, CXCR4 and angiopoietin-2. Hypoxia also stimulated their expression and/or phosphorylation of various proteins in the NF-κB signalling pathway. We then used both genetic and pharmacological methods to manipulate the levels of HIFs 1α and 2α or NF-κB in primary macrophages in order to elucidate their role in the hypoxic induction of many of these key genes. These studies showed that both HIFs 1 and 2, but not NF-κB, are important transcriptional effectors regulating the responses of macrophages to such a period of hypoxia. Further studies using experimental mouse models are now warranted to investigate the role of such macrophage responses in the progression of various diseased tissues like malignant tumors. PMID:19454749

  4. Hypoxia tolerance, nitric oxide, and nitrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Jensen, Frank Bo

    2015-01-01

    Among vertebrates able to tolerate periods of oxygen deprivation, the painted and red-eared slider turtles (Chrysemys picta and Trachemys scripta) and the crucian carp (Carassius carassius) are the most extreme and can survive even months of total lack of oxygen during winter. The key to hypoxia...... survival resides in concerted physiological responses, including strong metabolic depression, protection against oxidative damage and – in air breathing animals - redistribution of blood flow. Each of these responses is known to be tightly regulated by nitric oxide (NO) and during hypoxia by its metabolite...... nitrite. The aim of this review is to highlight recent work illustrating the widespread roles of NO and nitrite in the tolerance to extreme oxygen deprivation, in particular in the red-eared slider turtle and crucian carp, but also in diving marine mammals. The emerging picture underscores the importance...

  5. Neuroepithelial cells and the hypoxia emersion response in the amphibious fish Kryptolebias marmoratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Kelly S; Jonz, Michael G; Wright, Patricia A

    2011-08-01

    Teleost fish have oxygen-sensitive neuroepithelial cells (NECs) in the gills that appear to mediate physiological responses to hypoxia, but little is known about oxygen sensing in amphibious fish. The mangrove rivulus, Kryptolebias marmoratus, is an amphibious fish that respires via the gills and/or the skin. First, we hypothesized that both the skin and gills are sites of oxygen sensing in K. marmoratus. Serotonin-positive NECs were abundant in both gills and skin, as determined by immunohistochemical labelling and fluorescence microscopy. NECs retained synaptic vesicles and were found near nerve fibres labelled with the neuronal marker zn-12. Skin NECs were 42% larger than those of the gill, as estimated by measurement of projection area, and 45% greater in number. Moreover, for both skin and gill NECs, NEC area increased significantly (30-60%) following 7 days of exposure to hypoxia (1.5 mg l(-1) dissolved oxygen). Another population of cells containing vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) proteins were also observed in the skin and gills. The second hypothesis we tested was that K. marmoratus emerse in order to breathe air cutaneously when challenged with severe aquatic hypoxia, and this response will be modulated by neurochemicals associated chemoreceptor activity. Acute exposure to hypoxia induced fish to emerse at 0.2 mg l(-1). When K. marmoratus were pre-exposed to serotonin or acetylcholine, they emersed at a significantly higher concentration of oxygen than untreated fish. Pre-exposure to receptor antagonists (ketanserin and hexamethonium) predictably resulted in fish emersing at a lower concentration of oxygen. Taken together, these results suggest that oxygen sensing occurs at the branchial and/or cutaneous surfaces in K. marmoratus and that serotonin and acetylcholine mediate, in part, the emersion response.

  6. Examining the polymorphisms in the hypoxia pathway genes in relation to outcome in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asan M S Haja Mohideen

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy. Identification of genetic prognostic markers may help prognostic estimations in colorectal cancer. Genes that regulate response to hypoxia and other genes that are regulated under the hypoxic conditions have been shown to play roles in cancer progression. In this study, we hypothesized that genetic variations in the hypoxia pathway genes were associated with the risk of outcome in colorectal cancer patients.This study was performed in two phases. In the first phase, 49 SNPs from six hypoxia pathway genes (HIF1A, HIF1B, HIF2A, LOX, MIF and CXCL12 in 272 colorectal cancer patients were analyzed. In the second phase, 77 SNPs from seven hypoxia pathway genes (HIF1A, HIF1B, HIF2A, HIF2B, HIF3A, LOX and CXCL12 were analyzed in an additional cohort of 535 patients. Kaplan Meier, Cox univariate and multivariable regression analyses were performed to analyze the relationship between the SNPs and overall survival (OS, disease free survival (DFS or disease specific survival (DSS. Since this was a hypothesis-generating study, no correction for multiple testing was applied.In phase I, one SNP (HIF2A rs11125070 was found to be associated with DFS in multivariable analysis; yet association of a proxy polymorphism (HIF2A rs4953342 was not detected in the phase II patient cohort. In phase II, associations of two SNPs (HIF2A rs4953352 and HIF2B rs12593988 were significant in both OS and DFS multivariable analyses. However, association of HIF2A rs4953352 was not replicated in the phase I cohort using a proxy SNP (HIF2A rs6706003.Overall, our study did not find a convincing evidence of association of the investigated polymorphisms with the disease outcomes in colorectal cancer.

  7. Effect of hypoxia on cerebrovascular and cognitive function during moderate intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Babcock, Matthew C; Tiss, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-10-15

    Exercise in hypoxia places added demands on the brain and cerebrovasculature that can impact cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular hemodynamics, markers of neuro-steroidal modulation and brain-blood barrier (BBB) integrity, and cognition during exercise. Thirty healthy participants (21±4yrs., BMI 24.0±2.6kg∙m(-2); 15 men) were randomized to both a≈2.5h normoxic (FiO2 20.0%) and hypoxic (FiO2 12.5%) condition on two separate days. After 1.25h, participants underwent 10min of exercise-alone (cycling at 55% HRmax) and 15min of exercise+cognitive testing. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood velocity (MnV) were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler respectively at rest, during exercise-alone, and during exercise+cognitive testing. Salivary levels of dehydroepiandosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEAS]) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured pre and post exercise. Cognition was assessed using standard metrics of accuracy and reaction time (RT), and advanced metrics from drift-diffusion modeling across memory recognition, N-Back and Flanker tasks. MCA MnV increased from rest to exercise (pDHEA and NSE increased and decreased post-exercise, respectively, in both normoxia and hypoxia (pmemory recognition (pmemory RT were due to increases in caution (p<0.01). Overall cognitive performance is maintained during exercise in hypoxia concomitant with slower RT in select cognitive tasks and reduced oxygenation in the PFC. These changes were accompanied by slight increases in neuro-steroidal modulation but appear independent of changes in NSE, a biomarker of BBB integrity. Maintained accuracy and select increases in RT during hypoxic exercise may be related behavioral changes in caution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin: Its Response to Hypoxia and Association with Acute Mountain Sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Mellor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS is a common clinical challenge at high altitude (HA. A point-of-care biochemical marker for AMS could have widespread utility. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL rises in response to renal injury, inflammation and oxidative stress. We investigated whether NGAL rises with HA and if this rise was related to AMS, hypoxia or exercise. NGAL was assayed in a cohort (n=22 undertaking 6 hours exercise at near sea-level (SL; a cohort (n=14 during 3 hours of normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 11.6% and on two trekking expeditions (n=52 to over 5000 m. NGAL did not change with exercise at SL or following normobaric hypoxia. During the trekking expeditions NGAL levels (ng/ml, mean ± sd, range rose significantly (P<0.001 from 68 ± 14 (60–102 at 1300 m to 183 ± 107 (65–519; 143 ± 66 (60–315 and 150 ± 71 (60–357 at 3400 m, 4270 m and 5150 m respectively. At 5150 m there was a significant difference in NGAL between those with severe AMS (n=7, mild AMS (n=16 or no AMS (n=23: 201 ± 34 versus 171 ± 19 versus 124 ± 12 respectively (P=0.009 for severe versus no AMS; P=0.026 for mild versus no AMS. In summary, NGAL rises in response to prolonged hypobaric hypoxia and demonstrates a relationship to the presence and severity of AMS.

  9. Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1α induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Shubhra; McCullough, Sandra S; Hennings, Leah; Letzig, Lynda; Simpson, Pippa M; Hinson, Jack A; James, Laura P

    2011-05-01

    HIF-1α is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1α. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1α in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1α in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10mg/kg) reduced HIF-1α induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1α induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

  10. Hypoxia promotes radioresistance of CD133-positive Hep-2 human laryngeal squamous carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoxin; Li, Xiaoming; Qu, Yongtao; Xu, Ou; Sun, Qingjia

    2013-07-01

    Hypoxia promotes the radioresistance of laryngeal carcinomas and CD133 is one of the markers expressed by tumor-initiating, human laryngeal carcinoma cells. In order to investigate whether CD133-positive Hep-2 cells exhibit a radioresistant phenotype and to determine whether hypoxia promotes this phenotype, we performed a series of experiments. Hep-2 cells, and Hep-2 cells stably expressing hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) were cultured under hypoxic and normoxic conditions and were treated with varying doses of γ-rays (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 Gy). MTT and cell cycle assays were subsequently performed. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), CD133-positive Hep-2 cells and CD133-positive HIF-siRNA Hep-2 cells were isolated. These cells were grown as spheres under hypoxic and normoxic conditions for MTT and soft agar colony formation assays. The expression levels of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), survivin, p53 and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) were also assayed using flow cytometry. The data showed that the growth of Hep-2 cells exposed to hypoxic conditions and treated with 10 Gy radiation (group A) was less compared to that of groups B-D (PHep-2 cells grown under hypoxic conditions and exposed to irradiation (group E) (P0.05). In conclusion, CD133-positive Hep-2 cells exhibited a radioresistant phenotype that was enhanced with hypoxia. Furthermore, an increase in DNA-PK activity was associated with this enhancement.

  11. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  12. Acute normobaric hypoxia stimulates erythropoietin release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Richard W A; Watt, Peter W; Maxwell, Neil S

    2008-01-01

    Investigations studying the secretion of EPO (erythropoietin) in response to acute hypoxia have produced mixed results. Further, the errors associated with the various methods used to determine EPO are not well documented. The purpose of the current study was to determine the EPO response of 17 trained male subjects to either an acute bout of normobaric hypoxia (Hy; n = 10) or normoxia (Con; n = 7). A secondary aim was to determine the error associated with the measurement of EPO. After baseline tests, the treatment group (Hy) underwent a single bout of hypoxic exposure (F(I(O(2))) approximately 0.148; 3100 m) consisting of a 90-min rest period followed by a 30-min exercise phase (50% V(O)(2max)). Venous blood samples were drawn pre (0 min) and post (120 min) each test to assess changes in plasma EPO (DeltaEPO). The control (Con) group was subjected to the same general experimental design, but placed in a normoxic environment (F(I(O(2))) approximately 0.2093). The Hy group demonstrated a mean increase in EPO [19.3 (4.4) vs. 24.1 (5.1) mU/mL], p < 0.04, post 120 min of normobaric hypoxia. The calculated technical error of measurement for EPO was 2.1 mU/mL (9.8%). It was concluded that an acute bout of hypoxia, has the capacity to elevate plasma EPO. This study also demonstrates that the increase in EPO accumulation was 2 times greater than the calculated measurement of error.

  13. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  14. Dietary supplementation of some antioxidants against hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanaa Ahmed Ali; Hanan Farouk Aly; Lilla Mohammed Faddah; Zeenat F Zaidi

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to clarifythe protective effect of supplementation with some antioxidants,such as idebenone (200 mg/kg,ip),melatonin (10 mg/kg,ip) and arginine (200 mg/kg,ip) and their combination,on liver function (T.protein,albumin,alanine aminotransferase,aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase),energetic parameters (adenosine triphosphate,adenosine diphosphate,adenosine monophosphate,inorganic phosphate,total adenylate,adenylate energy charge and potential phosphate).The effect on glycolytic and glycogenolytic enzymes (glucose,glycogen,glycogen phosphorylase,pyruvate kinase and phosphofructokinase against hypoxia) was also studied.The drugs were administered 24 and 1 h prior sodium nitrite intoxication.All biochemical parameters were estimated 1 h after sodium nitrite injection.Injection of sodium nitrite (75 mg/kg,sc) produced a significant disturbance in all biochemical parameters of liver function,energetic parameters and glycolytic and glycogenolytic enzymes.Hepatic damage was confirmed by histopathological examination of the liver as compared to controls.The marked changes in hepatic cells induced by sodium nitrite were completely abolished by pretreatment with the drug combination,suggesting potential protection against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia.It could be concluded that a combination of both idebenone and melatonin or idebenone and arginine provides potential protection against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia by improving biochemical parameters and preserving liver histology.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Macrophage Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Amit Rahat

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Monocytes and Macrophages (Mo/Mϕ exhibit great plasticity, as they can shift between different modes of activation and, driven by their immediate microenvironment, perform divergent functions. These include, among others, patrolling their surroundings and maintaining homeostasis (resident Mo/Mϕ, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells (classically activated or M1 Mo/Mϕ, orchestrating wound healing (alternatively activated or M2 Mo/Mϕ, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response (resolution Mϕ. Hypoxia is an important factor in the Mϕ microenvironment, is prevalent in many physiological and pathological conditions, and is interdependent with the inflammatory response. Although Mo/Mϕ have been studied in hypoxia, the mechanisms by which hypoxia influences the different modes of their activation, and how it regulates the shift between them, remain unclear. Here we review the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms that mediate this hypoxic regulation of Mϕ activation. Much is known about the hypoxic transcriptional regulatory network, which includes the master regulators HIF-1 and NF-κB, as well as other transcription factors (e.g. AP-1, Erg-1, but we also highlight the role of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms. These mechanisms mediate hypoxic induction of Mϕ pro-angiogenic mediators, suppress M1 Mϕ by post-transcriptionally inhibiting pro-inflammatory mediators, and help shift the classically activated Mϕ into an activation state which approximate the alternatively activated or resolution Mϕ.

  16. Intrauterine hypoxia: clinical consequences and therapeutic perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thompson LP

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Loren P Thompson,1 Sarah Crimmins,1 Bhanu P Telugu,2 Shifa Turan1 1Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Animal Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA Abstract: Intrauterine hypoxia is a significant clinical challenge in obstetrics that affects both the pregnant mother and fetus. Intrauterine hypoxia can occur in pregnant women living at high altitude and/or with cardiovascular disease. In addition, placental hypoxia can be generated by altered placental development and spiral artery remodeling leading to placental insufficiency and dysfunction. Both conditions can impact normal maternal cardiovascular homeostasis leading to preeclampsia and/or impair transfer of O2/nutrient supply resulting in fetal growth restriction. This review discusses the mechanisms underlying altered placental vessel remodeling, maternal and fetal consequences, patient management, and potential future therapies for improving these conditions. Keywords: fetal growth restriction, oxidative stress, extravillous trophoblast invasion, Doppler ultrasound, pulsatility index, preeclampsia 

  17. Structural integration in hypoxia-inducible factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dalei; Potluri, Nalini; Lu, Jingping; Kim, Youngchang; Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2015-08-20

    The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) coordinate cellular adaptations to low oxygen stress by regulating transcriptional programs in erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and metabolism. These programs promote the growth and progression of many tumours, making HIFs attractive anticancer targets. Transcriptionally active HIFs consist of HIF-alpha and ARNT (also called HIF-1 beta) subunits. Here we describe crystal structures for each of mouse HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT heterodimers in states that include bound small molecules and their hypoxia response element. A highly integrated quaternary architecture is shared by HIF-2 alpha-ARNT and HIF-1 alpha-ARNT, wherein ARNT spirals around the outside of each HIF-alpha subunit. Five distinct pockets are observed that permit small-molecule binding, including PAS domain encapsulated sites and an interfacial cavity formed through subunit heterodimerization. The DNA-reading head rotates, extends and cooperates with a distal PAS domain to bind hypoxia response elements. HIF-alpha mutations linked to human cancers map to sensitive sites that establish DNA binding and the stability of PAS domains and pockets.

  18. Hypoxia in the changing marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Cowie, G.; Naqvi, S. W. A.

    2013-03-01

    The predicted future of the global marine environment, as a combined result of forcing due to climate change (e.g. warming and acidification) and other anthropogenic perturbation (e.g. eutrophication), presents a challenge to the sustainability of ecosystems from tropics to high latitudes. Among the various associated phenomena of ecosystem deterioration, hypoxia can cause serious problems in coastal areas as well as oxygen minimum zones in the open ocean (Diaz and Rosenberg 2008 Science 321 926-9, Stramma et al 2008 Science 320 655-8). The negative impacts of hypoxia include changes in populations of marine organisms, such as large-scale mortality and behavioral responses, as well as variations of species distributions, biodiversity, physiological stress, and other sub-lethal effects (e.g. growth and reproduction). Social and economic activities that are related to services provided by the marine ecosystems, such as tourism and fisheries, can be negatively affected by the aesthetic outcomes as well as perceived or real impacts on seafood quality (STAP 2011 (Washington, DC: Global Environment Facility) p 88). Moreover, low oxygen concentration in marine waters can have considerable feedbacks to other compartments of the Earth system, like the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and can affect the global biogeochemical cycles of nutrients and trace elements. It is of critical importance to prediction and adaptation strategies that the key processes of hypoxia in marine environments be precisely determined and understood (cf Zhang et al 2010 Biogeosciences 7 1-24).

  19. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Is an Inductor of Transcription Factor Activating Protein 2 Epsilon Expression during Chondrogenic Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Niebler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcription factor AP-2ε (activating enhancer-binding protein epsilon is expressed in cartilage of humans and mice. However, knowledge about regulatory mechanisms influencing AP-2ε expression is limited. Using quantitative real time PCR, we detected a significant increase in AP-2ε mRNA expression comparing initial and late stages of chondrogenic differentiation processes in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, in these samples the expression pattern of the prominent hypoxia marker gene angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4 strongly correlated with that of AP-2ε suggesting that hypoxia might represent an external regulator of AP-2ε expression in mammals. In order to show this, experiments directly targeting the activity of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1, the complex mediating responses to oxygen deprivation, were performed. While the HIF1-activating compounds 2,2′-dipyridyl and desferrioxamine resulted in significantly enhanced mRNA concentration of AP-2ε, siRNA against HIF1α led to a significantly reduced expression rate of AP-2ε. Additionally, we detected a significant upregulation of the AP-2ε mRNA level after oxygen deprivation. In sum, these different experimental approaches revealed a novel role for the HIF1 complex in the regulation of the AP-2ε gene in cartilaginous cells and underlined the important role of hypoxia as an important external regulatory stimulus during chondrogenic differentiation modulating the expression of downstream transcription factors.

  20. Tariquidar sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to proteasome inhibitors via reduction of hypoxia-induced P-gp-mediated drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muz, Barbara; Kusdono, Hubert D; Azab, Feda; de la Puente, Pilar; Federico, Cinzia; Fiala, Mark; Vij, Ravi; Salama, Noha N; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2017-12-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) presents a poor prognosis and high lethality of patients due to development of drug resistance. P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug-efflux transporter, is upregulated in MM patients post-chemotherapy and is involved in the development of drug resistance since many anti-myeloma drugs (including proteasome inhibitors) are P-gp substrates. Hypoxia develops in the bone marrow niche during MM progression and has long been linked to chemoresistance. Additionally, hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF-1α) was demonstrated to directly regulate P-gp expression. We found that in MM patients P-gp expression positively correlated with the hypoxic marker, HIF-1α. Hypoxia increased P-gp protein expression and its efflux capabilities in MM cells in vitro using flow cytometry. We reported herein that hypoxia-mediated resistance to carfilzomib and bortezomib in MM cells is due to P-gp activity and was reversed by tariquidar, a P-gp inhibitor. These results suggest combining proteasome inhibitors with P-gp inhibition for future clinical studies.

  1. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α in a New Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Recapitulating the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigim, Fares; Cavanaugh, Jill; Patel, Anoop P; Curry, William T; Esaki, Shin-ichi; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Chi, Andrew S; Louis, David N; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tissue hypoxia and necrosis represent pathophysiologic and histologic hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Although hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays crucial roles in the malignant phenotypes of GBM, developing HIF-1α-targeted agents has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preclinical model that recapitulates the complex biology of clinical GBM. We present a new GBM model, MGG123, which was established from a recurrent human GBM. Orthotopic xenografting of stem-like MGG123 cells reproducibly generated lethal tumors that were characterized by foci of palisading necrosis, hypervascularity, and robust stem cell marker expression. Perinecrotic neoplastic cells distinctively express HIF-1α and are proliferative in both xenografts and the patient tissue. The xenografts contain scattered hypoxic foci that were consistently greater than 50 μm distant from blood vessels, indicating intratumoral heterogeneity of oxygenation. Hypoxia enhanced HIF-1α expression in cultured MGG123 cells, which was abrogated by the HIF-1α inhibitors digoxin or ouabain. In vivo, treatment of orthotopic MGG123 xenografts with digoxin decreased HIF-1α expression, vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels, and CD34-positive vasculature within the tumors, and extended survival of mice bearing the aggressive MGG123 GBM. This preclinical tumor model faithfully recapitulates the GBM-relevant hypoxic microenvironment and stemness and is a suitable platform for studying disease biology and developing hypoxia-targeted agents.

  2. Hypoxia induces miR-210, leading to anti-apoptosis in ovarian follicular cells of marine medaka Oryzias melastigma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tse, Anna Chung-Kwan [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Li, Jing-Woei; Chan, Ting-Fung [School of Life Sciences, Hong Kong Bioinformatics Centre, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Wu, Rudolf Shiu-Sun [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China); Lai, Keng-Po, E-mail: balllai@hku.hk [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong SAR (China); State Key Laboratory in Marine Pollution, Hong Kong SAR (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • We demonstrate hypoxia induced miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells. • We show anti-apoptotic roles of miR-210 in ovarian follicular cells under hypoxia. • Apoptotic genes (DLC1, SLK, TNFRSF10B, RBM25, and USP7) are target of miR-210. • MiR-210 is vital for ovarian follicular cells proliferation in response to hypoxia. - Abstract: Hypoxia is a major global problem that impairs reproductive functions and reduces the quality and quantity of gametes and the fertilization success of marine fish. Nevertheless, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying hypoxia-induced female reproductive impairment remains largely unknown. There is increasing evidence that miRNA is vital in regulating ovarian functions and is closely associated with female fertility in humans. Certain miRNAs that regulate apoptotic genes can be induced by hypoxia, resulting in cell apoptosis. Using primary ovarian follicular cells of the marine medaka, Oryzias melastigma, as a model, we investigated the response of miR-210 to hypoxic stress in ovarian tissues to see if it would interrupt reproductive functions. A significant induction of miR-210 was found in primary ovarian follicular cells exposed to hypoxia, and gene ontology analysis further highlighted the potential roles of miR-210 in cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis. A number of miR-210 target apoptotic genes, including Deleted in liver cancer 1 protein (DLC1), STE20-like serine/threonine-protein kinase (SLK), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 10b (TNFRSF10B), RNA binding motif protein 25 (RBM25), and Ubiquitin-specific-processing protease 7 (USP7), were identified. We further showed that ectopic expression of miR-210 would result in down-regulation of these apoptotic genes. On the other hand, the inhibition of miR-210 promoted apoptotic cell death and the expression of apoptotic marker – caspase 3 in follicular cells under hypoxic treatment, supporting the regulatory role of mi

  3. Hypoxia stimulates invasion and migration of human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa through the Rab11 trafficking of integrin αvβ3/FAK/PI3K pathway-mediated Rac1 activation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAO XU; YUAN YUAN; WENQIAN WU; MIN ZHOU; QIAN JIANG; LINJUN NIU; JIAYIN JI; NIANLI LIU; LONGZHEN ZHANG; XIA WANG

    2017-09-01

    Hypoxia plays a key role in tumour cell survival, invasion, and metastasis. An increasing number of studies have attemptedto characterize the tumour response to hypoxia and to identify predictive markers of disease. Here we show that hypoxiaincreases tumour cell invasion and migration by the modulation of Rab11, an important molecule for vesicular trafficking.In our study, we found that Rab11, together with the activation of Rac1, could stimulate invasion and migration of cervicalcancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa in hypoxia. Activation of Rac1 activity by hypoxia seems to be central to carcinoma invasion.We also found that these effects could be related to the integrin αvβ3. In addition, we studied the molecular pathway for thisprocess. Our results showed that in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa/SiHa, Rac1 activation in hypoxia could stimulateinvasion and migration, and this process was mediated by integrin αvβ3-mediated FAK and PI3K phosphorylation.Furthermore, hypoxia induced a dramatic increase in αvβ3 integrin surface expression, and this increase is dependent onRab11. In conclusion, our study might provide a new mechanism for the effect of hypoxia on stimulating cervicalcarcinoma invasion.

  4. Determinants of maximal oxygen uptake in severe acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calbet, J A L; Boushel, Robert Christopher; Rådegran, G

    2003-01-01

    To unravel the mechanisms by which maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) is reduced with severe acute hypoxia in humans, nine Danish lowlanders performed incremental cycle ergometer exercise to exhaustion, while breathing room air (normoxia) or 10.5% O2 in N2 (hypoxia, approximately 5,300 m above sea...... level). With hypoxia, exercise PaO2 dropped to 31-34 mmHg and arterial O2 content (CaO2) was reduced by 35% (P ..., as reflected by the higher alveolar-arterial O2 difference in hypoxia (P stroke VOlume (P

  5. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuhaus C

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3–6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.Keywords: cognitive response, aviation training, pilot, hypoxia, oxygen, loss of consciousness

  6. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Bendinelli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine, and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients.

  7. The effects of hypoxia on the stemness properties of human dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nermeen El-Moataz Bellah; Murakami, Masashi; Kaneko, Satoru; Nakashima, Misako

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that culture under hypoxia has beneficial effects on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, there are limitations to achieving a stable condition in conventional hypoxic CO2 incubators. DPSCs are a unique type of MSCs which are promising in many regenerative therapies. In this study, we investigated the ideal hypoxic culture environment for DPSCs using a new system that can provide controlled O2 environment. The effects of hypoxia (3%, 5%) on the stemness properties of DPSCs. Their morphology, proliferation rate, expression of stem cell markers, migration ability, mRNA expression of angiogenic/neurotrophic factors and immunomodulatory genes were evaluated and compared. Additionally, the effect of the discrete secretome on proliferation, migration, and neurogenic induction was assessed. Hypoxic DPSCs were found to be smaller in size and exhibited larger nuclei. 5% O2 significantly increased the proliferation rate, migration ability, expression of stem cell markers (CXCR4 and G-CSFR), and expression of SOX2, VEGF, NGF, and BDNF genes of DPSCs. Moreover, secretome collected from 5%O2 cultures displayed higher stimulatory effects on proliferation and migration of NIH3T3 cells and on neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells. These results demonstrate that 5%O2 may be ideal for enhancing DPSCs growth, stem cell properties, and secretome trophic effect. PMID:27739509

  8. Cell and Signal Components of the Microenvironment of Bone Metastasis Are Affected by Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastatic cells release bone microenvironment proteins, such as the matricellular protein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine), and share a cell signaling typical of the bone metabolism controlled by Runx2. The megakaryocytes in the bone marrow engrafted by the metastases seem to be one of the principal microenvironment sources of the biological stimuli, implicated in the formation of an osteoblastic niche, and affecting metastasis phenotype and colonization. Educated platelets in the circulation might derive from megakaryocytes in bone metastasis. The evaluation of predictive markers in the circulating platelets might be useful for the stratification of patients for therapeutic purposes. The hypoxic environment in bone metastasis is one of the key regulators of the network of the biological soluble and structural components of the matrix. In bone metastatic cells under hypoxia, similar patterns of Runx2 and SPARC are observed, both showing downregulation. Conversely, hypoxia induces Endothelin 1, which upregulates SPARC, and these biological stimuli may be considered prognostic markers of bone metastasis in breast carcinoma patients. PMID:27187355

  9. Hypoxia-activated microglial mediators of neuronal survival are differentially regulated by tetracyclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Aaron Y; Todd, Kathryn G

    2006-06-01

    The tetracycline derivatives minocycline (MINO) and doxycycline (DOXY) have been shown to be neuroprotective in in vivo and in vitro models of stroke. This neuroprotection is thought to be due to the suppression of microglial activation. However, the specific molecular parameters in microglia of the tetracyclines' effect are not understood. We subjected cultured rat microglial and neuronal cells to in vitro hypoxia and examined the effects of MINO and DOXY pre-treatments. Our data showed that MINO and DOXY protect against hypoxia-induced neuronal death by a mechanism dependent on regulation of microglial factors, but likely unrelated to regulation of microglial proliferation/viability. Both MINO and DOXY suppressed the hypoxic activation of ED-1, a marker for microglial activation. Morphological analyses of hypoxic microglia using the microglial marker Iba1 revealed that treatment with MINO and DOXY caused a higher percentage of microglia to remain in a non-activated state. MINO suppressed the hypoxic upregulation of pro-inflammatory agents nitric oxide (NO), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), while DOXY down-regulated only NO and IL-1beta. In contrast, the hypoxic activation of pro-survival/neuroprotective microglial proteins, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), were unaffected by tetracycline treatments. Taken together, these results suggest that MINO and DOXY may provide neuroprotection against stroke by selectively down-regulating microglial toxic factors while maintaining functional pro-survival factors.

  10. The physiological effects of hypobaric hypoxia versus normobaric hypoxia: a systematic review of crossover trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppel, Jonny; Hennis, Philip; Gilbert-Kawai, Edward; Grocott, Michael Pw

    2015-01-01

    Much hypoxia research has been carried out at high altitude in a hypobaric hypoxia (HH) environment. Many research teams seek to replicate high-altitude conditions at lower altitudes in either hypobaric hypoxic conditions or normobaric hypoxic (NH) laboratories. Implicit in this approach is the assumption that the only relevant condition that differs between these settings is the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), which is commonly presumed to be the principal physiological stimulus to adaptation at high altitude. This systematic review is the first to present an overview of the current available literature regarding crossover studies relating to the different effects of HH and NH on human physiology. After applying our inclusion and exclusion criteria, 13 studies were deemed eligible for inclusion. Several studies reported a number of variables (e.g. minute ventilation and NO levels) that were different between the two conditions, lending support to the notion that true physiological difference is indeed present. However, the presence of confounding factors such as time spent in hypoxia, temperature, and humidity, and the limited statistical power due to small sample sizes, limit the conclusions that can be drawn from these findings. Standardisation of the study methods and reporting may aid interpretation of future studies and thereby improve the quality of data in this area. This is important to improve the quality of data that is used for improving the understanding of hypoxia tolerance, both at altitude and in the clinical setting.

  11. Hypoxia-regulated MicroRNAs in Gastroesophageal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Mette; Alsner, Jan; Sørensen, Brita Singers

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The present study aimed to identify hypoxia-regulated microRNAs (HRMs) in vitro and investigate the clinical role of candidate HRMs in patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: microRNA expression changes induced by hypoxia in human GEC cell lines were...

  12. Ageing and hypoxia cause protein aggregation in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Daniel M; Wu, Xia; Scott, Barbara A; Itani, Omar A; Van Gilst, Marc R; Bruce, James E; Michael Crowder, C

    2017-10-01

    Aggregation of cytosolic proteins is a pathological finding in disease states, including ageing and neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously reported that hypoxia induces protein misfolding in Caenorhabditis elegans mitochondria, and electron micrographs suggested protein aggregates. Here, we seek to determine whether mitochondrial proteins actually aggregate after hypoxia and other cellular stresses. To enrich for mitochondrial proteins that might aggregate, we performed a proteomics analysis on purified C. elegans mitochondria to identify relatively insoluble proteins under normal conditions (110 proteins identified) or after sublethal hypoxia (65 proteins). A GFP-tagged mitochondrial protein (UCR-11 - a complex III electron transport chain protein) in the normally insoluble set was found to form widespread aggregates in mitochondria after hypoxia. Five other GFP-tagged mitochondrial proteins in the normally insoluble set similarly form hypoxia-induced aggregates. Two GFP-tagged mitochondrial proteins from the soluble set as well as a mitochondrial-targeted GFP did not form aggregates. Ageing also resulted in aggregates. The number of hypoxia-induced aggregates was regulated by the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) master transcriptional regulator ATFS-1, which has been shown to be hypoxia protective. An atfs-1(loss-of-function) mutant and RNAi construct reduced the number of aggregates while an atfs-1(gain-of-function) mutant increased aggregates. Our work demonstrates that mitochondrial protein aggregation occurs with hypoxic injury and ageing in C. elegans. The UPRmt regulates aggregation and may protect from hypoxia by promoting aggregation of misfolded proteins.

  13. Hypoxia-induced retinopathy model in adult zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Ziquan; Jensen, Lasse D.; Rouhi, Pegah;

    2010-01-01

    . In this article, we describe protocols that create hypoxia-induced retinopathy in adult zebrafish. Adult fli1: EGFP zebrafish are placed in hypoxic water for 3-10 d and retinal neovascularization is analyzed using confocal microscopy. It usually takes 11 d to obtain conclusive results using the hypoxia...

  14. Hypoxia-regulated MicroRNAs in gastroesophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, M.; Alsner, J.; Sørensen, B.S.

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim: The present study aimed to identify hypoxia-regulated microRNAs (HRMs) in vitro and investigate the clinical role of candidate HRMs in patients with gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). Materials and Methods: microRNA expression changes induced by hypoxia in human GEC cell lines were...

  15. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  16. Lysyl oxidase is essential for hypoxia-induced metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erler, Janine Terra; Bennewith, Kevin L; Nicolau, Monica

    2006-01-01

    role in tumorigenesis seems dependent on cellular location, cell type and transformation status. Here we show that LOX expression is regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and is associated with hypoxia in human breast and head and neck tumours. Patients with high LOX-expressing tumours have poor...

  17. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Terraneo

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Prolonged mild hyperoxia leads to persistent cerebral damage, comparable to that inferred by prolonged mild hypoxia. The underlying mechanism appears related to a model whereby the imbalance between ROS generation and anti-ROS defense is similar, but occurs at higher levels in hypoxia than in hyperoxia.

  18. The infectious hypoxia: occurrence and causes during Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ellen T; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Nigro, Giulia; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Marteyn, Benoit S

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia is defined as a tissue oxygenation status below physiological needs. During Shigella infection, an infectious hypoxia is induced within foci of infection. In this review, we discuss how Shigella physiology and virulence are modulated and how the main recruited immune cells, the neutrophils, adapt to this environment. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Christopher; Hinkelbein, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and to show relevant implications for aviation training. A principal element of hypoxia-awareness training is the intentional evocation of hypoxia symptoms during specific training sessions within a safe and controlled environment. Repetitive training should enable pilots to learn and recognize their personal hypoxia symptoms. A time span of 3-6 years is generally considered suitable to refresh knowledge of the more subtle and early symptoms especially. Currently, there are two different technical approaches available to induce hypoxia during training: hypobaric chamber training and reduced-oxygen breathing devices. Hypoxia training for aircrew is extremely important and effective, and the hypoxia symptoms should be emphasized clearly to aircrews. The use of tight-fitting masks, leak checks, and equipment checks should be taught to all aircrew and reinforced regularly. It is noteworthy that there are major differences in the required quality and quantity of hypoxia training for both military and civilian pilots.

  20. Hypoxia in head and neck cancer: how much, how important?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, H.L.K.; Haustermans, K.; Balm, A.J.M.; Begg, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia develops in tumors because of a less ordered, often chaotic, and leaky vascular supply compared with that in normal tissues. In preclinical models, hypoxia has been shown to be associated with treatment resistance and increased malignant potential. In the clinic, several reports

  1. In vivo imaging and quantification of carbonic anhydrase IX expression as an endogenous biomarker of tumor hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagna Bao

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX is a transmembrane protein that has been shown to be greatly upregulated under conditions of hypoxia in many tumor cell lines. Tumor hypoxia is associated with impaired efficacy of cancer therapies making CA IX a valuable target for preclinical and diagnostic imaging. We have developed a quantitative in vivo optical imaging method for detection of CA IX as a marker of tumor hypoxia based on a near-infrared (NIR fluorescent derivative of the CA IX inhibitor acetazolamide (AZ. The agent (HS680 showed single digit nanomolar inhibition of CA IX as well as selectivity over other CA isoforms and demonstrated up to 25-fold upregulation of fluorescent CA IX signal in hypoxic versus normoxic cells, which could be blocked by 60%-70% with unlabeled AZ. CA IX negative cell lines (HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231, as well as a non-binding control agent on CA IX positive cells, showed low fluorescent signal under both conditions. In vivo FMT imaging showed tumor accumulation and excellent tumor definition from 6-24 hours. In vivo selectivity was confirmed by pretreatment of the mice with unlabeled AZ resulting in >65% signal inhibition. HS680 tumor signal was further upregulated >2X in tumors by maintaining tumor-bearing mice in a low oxygen (8% atmosphere. Importantly, intravenously injected HS680 signal was co-localized specifically with both CA IX antibody and pimonidazole (Pimo, and was located away from non-hypoxic regions indicated by a Hoechst stain. Thus, we have established a spatial correlation of fluorescence signal obtained by non-invasive, tomographic imaging of HS680 with regions of hypoxia and CA IX expression. These results illustrate the potential of HS680 and combined with FMT imaging to non-invasively quantify CA IX expression as a hypoxia biomarker, crucial to the study of the underlying biology of hypoxic tumors and the development and monitoring of novel anti-cancer therapies.

  2. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)--a promising approach to diagnosis of forensic types of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Johanna; Meissner, Christoph; Oehmichen, Manfred

    2005-12-01

    The loss of neuronal immunoreactivity of the cytoskeletal microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) is known to be a marker of--at least--transient functional failure of neurons following ischemia. Because there are no specific neuropathological findings in forensic types of acute hypoxia-ischemia, detection of this relevant cause of death is often complicated and a reliable ischemic biomarker would be of great importance. We therefore investigated the neuronal immunoreactivity of MAP2 in human cases of forensic significance. A control group (n=27) was compared to a group of cases of hypoxia-ischemia (n=45), comprising death due to hanging (n=19), drowning (n=14) and carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning (n=12). Using immunohistochemical staining, the percentage of MAP2-positive neurons in the hippocampus (areas CA1-CA4) and frontal cortex (layers II-VI) was evaluated and compared. The hypoxia-ischemia group showed decreased MAP2 immunostaining in the hippocampal areas CA2-CA4 (P<0.05) and in cortical layers II-VI (P<0.001) compared to controls. Most vulnerable regions seem to be the hippocampal CA4 area and cortical layers III-V. Within the hypoxia-ischemia group, death due to CO poisoning was characterized by the lowest MAP2 immunoreactivity. The hypoxic-ischemic groups differ from controls by a distinct decrease of MAP2 immunostaining. Thus, the loss of MAP2 immunoreactivity may support the diagnosis of neuronal injury in forensic types of hypoxia-ischemia, although investigations on postmortem tissue must be interpreted cautiously.

  3. Growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) signaling modulates intermittent hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and cognitive deficits in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C; Schally, Andrew V; Gozal, David

    2013-11-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development, and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here, we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, and increases in hypoxia inducible factor-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of insulin growth factor-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. Sleep apnea, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH), is associated with substantial cognitive and behavioral deficits. Here, we show that administration of a GHRH agonist (JI-34) reduces oxidative stress, increases both HIF-1α nuclear binding and downstream expression of IGF1 and erythropoietin (EPO) in hippocampus and cortex, and markedly attenuates water maze performance deficits in mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia during sleep.

  4. Physiological Determinants of Human Acute Hypoxia Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    approved in advance by the Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects, which conforms to the...45.72 ± 10.40 (25.30 – 70.43) Resting VO2 (ml/kg/min) 3.93 ± 0.90 (2.76 – 6.35) DLO2 (ml/mm Hg/min) 40.65 ± 7.72 (25.83 – 59.00) Total Hgb...less SpO2 fell during the 5-min exposure. Max velocity of MCA flow gradually increased after the start of the hypoxia exposure in all subjects and

  5. A new device to mimic intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil J Chodzyński

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (hypoxia-reoxygenation is often associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We describe a new device which can be used to submit cohorts of mice to controlled and standardised hypoxia-normoxia cycles at an individual level. Mice were placed in individual compartments to which similar gas flow parameters were provided using an open loop strategy. Evaluations made using computational fluid dynamics were confirmed by studying changes in haemoglobin oxygen saturation in vivo. We also modified the parameters of the system and demonstrated its ability to generate different severities of cyclic hypoxemia very precisely, even with very high frequency cycles of hypoxia-reoxygenation. The importance of the parameters on reoxygenation was shown. This device will allow investigators to assess the effects of hypoxia-reoxygenation on different pathological conditions, such as obstructive sleep apnoea or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Ischaemic Markers in Acute Hepatic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Sushanta Kumar; Nanda, Rachita; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Nayak, Parsuram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatic injury of varied aetiology may progress to Acute Liver Failure (ALF). Compromised microcirculation is thought to be a deciding factor of hepatic hypoxia may be involved in disease progression that needs early detection. Ischaemia markers like serum Ischaemia- modified albumin (IMA), ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index have been suggested for its detection at early stage. Aim To find out the association of Ischaemia markers like serum IMA, ALT-LDH ratio and ALT-LDH index in acute hepatic injury cases. Materials and Methods Forty one diagnosed acute liver injury cases of varied aetiology admitted in Department of Medicine, and Gastroenterology of SCB Medical College, Cuttack were enrolled in the study along with 30 age and sex matched healthy controls. Blood collected at time of admission and at time of discharge (1st day and 7th day) were evaluated for FPG, RFT, LFT, Serum Albumin along with serum LDH, IMA, PT-INR and platelet count. Result Serum bilirubin, hepatic enzymes, IMA, PT-INR was more markedly raised in cases than controls on the 1st day of admission. ALT-LDH ratio and index were significantly low in complicated cases. However, on responding to treatment the ALT-LDH index on 7th day registered a rise in comparison to the 1st day, while serum IMA revealed an insignificant decline showing improvement in hepatic hypoxia. ALT-LDH ratio remains more or less same on response to treatment. Conclusion Serum IMA and ALT-LDH Index reveals association with disease process in Acute Hepatic Injury cases both clinically and biochemically and can be used as supportive parameters for the diagnosis of disease process. PMID:27190791

  7. Regulation of glut1 mRNA by hypoxia-inducible factor-1. Interaction between H-ras and hypoxia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, C; Pore, N; Behrooz, A; Ismail-Beigi, F; Maity, A

    2001-01-01

    Oncogenic transformation and hypoxia both induce glut1 mRNA. We studied the interaction between the ras oncogene and hypoxia in up-regulating glut1 mRNA levels using Rat1 fibroblasts transformed with H-ras (Rat1-ras...

  8. The usability of a 15-gene hypoxia classifier as a universal hypoxia profile in various cancer cell types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Brita Singers; Knudsen, Anders Bisgård; Wittrup, Catja Foged

    2015-01-01

    genes, with BNIP3 not being upregulated at hypoxic conditions in 3 out of 6 colon cancer cell lines, and ALDOA in OE21 and FAM162A and SLC2A1 in SW116 only showing limited hypoxia induction. Furthermore, in the esophagus cell lines, the normoxic and hypoxic expression levels of LOX and BNIP3 were below......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A 15-gene hypoxia profile has previously demonstrated to have both prognostic and predictive impact for hypoxic modification in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. This gene expression profile may also have a prognostic value in other histological cancer types...... the tissue type dependency of hypoxia induced genes included in a 15-gene hypoxic profile in carcinoma cell lines from prostate, colon, and esophagus cancer, and demonstrated that in vitro, with minor fluctuations, the genes in the hypoxic profile are hypoxia inducible, and the hypoxia profile may...

  9. News about VDAC1 in hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie M. Mazure

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites and ATP. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulates the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC, which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis and other processes. Second we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1.

  10. News about VDAC1 in Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, N M

    2016-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main interface between the cytosol and mitochondria of cells. It plays a crucial role in both mitochondrial metabolism and cell death. The main basic function of this channel is to mediate and gate the flux of small ions, metabolites, and adenosine triphosphate. Changes in its structure, and thus conformation, are expected to affect its activity and modulate the ability of cancer cells to expand. In this review, we describe a novel mechanism by which mitochondria of cells in hypoxia, a low level of oxygen, protects from apoptosis. In hypoxia, some mitochondria become enlarged due to hyperfusion. These mitochondria possess a truncated form of VDAC1 (VDAC1-ΔC), which is linked to the higher metabolic capacity and the greater resistance to cell death of hypoxic cells. However, not all of the VDAC1 protein is truncated, but the amount of the full-length form is diminished compared to the amount in normoxic cells. First, we describe how such a decrease effects cell proliferation, respiration, glycolysis, and other processes. Second, we report on a novel mitochondrial-endolysosomal crosstalk that leads to VDAC1 truncation. By pharmacological targeting of VDAC1-ΔC, the production of energy could be turned off and the sensitivity to cell death restored. This could counteract the favorable microenvironment that gives cancer cells a growth advantage and thereby disrupts the balance between life and death, which is controlled by VDAC1.

  11. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  12. Boron PLA for oxygen sensing & hypoxia imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Fraser

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen is essential for many forms of life and its depletion in the body and the environment can lead to deleterious effects. Low oxygen conditions, even anoxia, are associated with eutrophication of lakes and rivers, wherein an over abundance of nutrients often caused by pollution result in excessive plant growth and decay, threatening water quality, ecosystem balance, and aquatic life. In the body, low oxygen conditions or hypoxia may be generalized, as can occur at high altitude or during strenuous exercise, or localized in particular tissues, when there is a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. Hypoxia is present in many important diseases as well. Low oxygen levels in tumors are often associated with biochemical changes, increased invasiveness, cancer progression, and resistance to radiation and chemotherapies. Vascular blockage in strokes, heart attacks, and peripheral artery disease, which is common in diabetes, are other situations where oxygen levels can drop precipitously and cause great damage to affected tissues. Clearly, innovative sensing technologies that provide new insight into these many oxygen dependent processes can impact global society in significant ways.

  13. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, C.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (United States). Rockwell Hanford Operations

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  14. Hypoxia-induced down-regulation of microRNA-34a promotes EMT by targeting the Notch signaling pathway in tubular epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Du

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypoxia-induced renal tubular cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an important event leading to renal fibrosis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that bind to their mRNA targets, thereby leading to translational repression. The role of miRNA in hypoxia-induced EMT is largely unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: miRNA profiling was performed for the identification of differentially expressed miRNAs in HK-2 cells under normal and low oxygen, and the results were then verified by quantitative real time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. The function of miRNAs in hypoxia-induced renal tubular cell EMT was assessed by the transfection of specific miRNA inhibitors and mimics. Luciferase reporter gene assays and western blot analysis were performed to validate the target genes of miR-34a. siRNA against Jagged1 was designed to investigate the role of the miR-34a-Notch pathway in hypoxia induced renal tubular cell EMT. miRNA-34a was identified as being downregulated in hypoxic renal tubular epithelial cells. Inhibition of miR-34a expression in HK-2 cells, which highly express endogenous miR-34a, promoted a mesenchymal phenotype accompanied by reduced expression of the epithelial marker Z0-1, E-cadherin and increased expression of the mesenchymal markers α-SMA and vimentin. Conversely, miR-34a mimics effectively prevented hypoxia-induced EMT. Transfection of miRNA-34a in HK-2 cells under hypoxia abolished hypoxia-induced expression of Notch1 and Jagged1 as well as Notch downstream signals, such as snail. Western blot analysis and luciferase reporter gene assays showed direct evidence for miR-34a targeting Notch1 and Jagged1. siRNAs against Jagged1 or Notch1 effectively prevented miR-34a inhibitor-induced tubular epithelial cell EMT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides evidence that the hypoxia-induced decrease of miR-34a expression could promote EMT in renal tubular epithelial cells by directly targeting Notch1 and

  15. Occurrence of hypoxia in the wards of a teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Appearance of hypoxia in a patient may be an indicator of a serious medical condition that can have grave consequences. Clinical evaluation fails to detect majority of the patients of hypoxia, and therefore, it may remain unnoticed in the wards. We planned to assess the magnitude of hypoxia in different wards of our tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: We studied all the patients admitted in various medical and surgical wards during 1 week of study. Oxygen saturation (SpO 2 was measured with the help of a pulse oximeter in all the patients who remained admitted for at least 24 h. Hypoxia was diagnosed in a patient when he had SpO 2 less than 90%. Results: During the study period, 1167 patients were admitted in various wards of the hospital. Hypoxia was detected in 121 patients (10.36%. Among them, 7 (0.59% patients were already having a diagnosis of respiratory failure, but were not on oxygen therapy while 5 (0.42% patients were having SpO 2 less than 90% despite of oxygen therapy. In 109 (9.34% patients, hypoxia was detected incidentally. Conclusion: Unnoticed hypoxia was detected in a significant number of the patients admitted in the wards of the hospital. Therefore, it is concluded that oxygen saturation measurements should be included with other vital parameters like pulse, temperature, and blood pressure, in the monitoring chart of all the admitted patients.

  16. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Beom Ju; Kim, Jong Woo; Jeong, Hoi Bin; Bok, Seo Yeon; Kim, Young Eun; Ahn, G One [Division of Integrative Biosciences and Biotechnology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy.

  17. Myocardial metabolism during hypoxia: Maintained lactate oxidation during increased glycolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazer, C.D.; Stanley, W.C.; Hickey, R.F.; Neese, R.A.; Cason, B.A.; Demas, K.A.; Wisneski, J.A.; Gertz, E.W. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-09-01

    In the intact animal, myocardial lactate utilization and oxidation during hypoxia are not well understood. Nine dogs were chronically instrumented with flow probes on the left anterior descending coronary artery and with a coronary sinus sampling catheter. ({sup 14}C)lactate and ({sup 13}C)glucose tracers, or ({sup 13}C)lactate and ({sup 14}C)glucose were administered to quantitate lactate and glucose oxidation, lactate conversion to glucose, and simultaneous lactate extraction and release. The animals were anesthetized and exposed to 90 minutes of severe hypoxia (PO2 = 25 +/- 4 torr). Hypoxia resulted in significant increases in heart rate, cardiac output and myocardial blood flow, but no significant change in myocardial oxygen consumption. The arterial/coronary sinus differences for glucose and lactate did not change from normoxia to hypoxia; however, the rate of glucose uptake increased significantly due to the increase in myocardial blood flow. Tracer-measured lactate extraction did not decrease with hypoxia, despite a 250% increase in lactate release. During hypoxia, 90% +/- 4% of the extracted {sup 14}C-lactate was accounted for by the appearance of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in the coronary sinus, compared with 88% +/- 4% during normoxia. Thus, in addition to the expected increase in glucose uptake and lactate production, we observed an increase in lactate oxidation during hypoxia.

  18. Tumor hypoxia and reoxygenation: the yin and yang for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Beom-Ju; Kim, Jeongwoo; Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Kim, Young-Eun; Ahn, G-One

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia, a common feature occurring in nearly all human solid tumors is a major contributing factor for failures of anticancer therapies. Because ionizing radiation depends heavily on the presence of molecular oxygen to produce cytotoxic effect, the negative impact of tumor hypoxia had long been recognized. In this review, we will highlight some of the past attempts to overcome tumor hypoxia including hypoxic radiosensitizers and hypoxia-selective cytotoxin. Although they were (still are) a very clever idea, they lacked clinical efficacy largely because of ‘reoxygenation’ phenomenon occurring in the conventional low dose hyperfractionation radiotherapy prevented proper activation of these compounds. Recent meta-analysis and imaging studies do however indicate that there may be a significant clinical benefit in lowering the locoregional failures by using these compounds. Latest technological advancement in radiotherapy has allowed to deliver high doses of radiation conformally to the tumor volume. Although this technology has brought superb clinical responses for many types of cancer, recent modeling studies have predicted that tumor hypoxia is even more serious because ‘reoxygenation’ is low thereby leaving a large portion of hypoxic tumor cells behind. Wouldn’t it be then reasonable to combine hypoxic radiosensitizers and/or hypoxia-selective cytotoxin with the latest radiotherapy? We will provide some preclinical and clinical evidence to support this idea hoping to revamp an enthusiasm for hypoxic radiosensitizers or hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as an adjunct therapy for radiotherapy. PMID:28030900

  19. Intermittent hypoxia-activated cyclooxygenase pathway: role in atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier-Veyret, Elodie; Arnaud, Claire; Bäck, Magnus; Pépin, Jean-Louis; Petri, Marcelo H; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Tamisier, Renaud; Lévy, Patrick; Stanke-Labesque, Françoise

    2013-08-01

    Intermittent hypoxia, the main stimulus of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), induces inflammation, leading to early atherosclerosis. Whether the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway contributes to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherosclerosis remains to be determined. We studied the effects of 8-weeks of intermittent hypoxia exposure on COX-pathway gene expression and atherosclerosis, and the influence of COX-1 inhibition by SC-560 on atherosclerosis progression in aortas of apolipoprotein E(-/-) mice. Urinary 11-dehydrothromboxane B2 (11-dTXB2) was assessed in 50 OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor matched for age and body mass index with 25 controls, and 56 OSA with cardiovascular risk factor. Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased atherosclerotic lesion sizes, mRNA levels of COX-1 and thromboxane synthase (TXBS). Lesion sizes correlated to COX-1 (r = 0.654, p = 0.0003) and TXBS (r = 0.693, pintermittent hypoxia mice only (p = 0.04). Urinary 11-dTXB2 was similar in OSA subjects free of cardiovascular risk factor and controls, but was increased by 13% (p = 0.007) in OSA subjects with cardiovascular risk factor compared with those without. Although OSA itself was not associated with increased urinary 11-dTXB2 concentration, the COX-1 pathway was activated in intermittent hypoxia-exposed mice and in OSA subjects presenting with cardiovascular risk factor, and may contribute to intermittent hypoxia-induced atherogenesis. COX-1 inhibition could be of clinical interest in the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity in OSA.

  20. Doxycycline reduces cleaved caspase-3 and microglial activation in an animal model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantzie, Lauren L; Cheung, Po-Yin; Todd, Kathryn G

    2005-03-01

    Neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a major contributor to many perinatal neurologic disorders and, thus, the search for therapies and effective treatments for the associated brain damage has become increasingly important. The tetracycline derivative, doxycycline (DOXY), has been reported to be neuroprotective in adult animal models of cerebral ischemia. To investigate the putative neuroprotective effects of DOXY in an animal model of neonatal HI, a time-course study was run such that pups received either DOXY (10 mg/kg) or VEH immediately before hypoxia, 1, 2, or 3 hours after HI (n=6). At 7 days after injury, the pups were euthanized, and the brains were removed and processed for immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses using antibodies against specific markers for neurons, apoptotic markers, microglia, oligodendrocytes, and astrocytes. Results showed that in vulnerable brain regions including the hippocampal formation, thalamus, striatum, cerebral cortex and white matter tracts, DOXY significantly decreased caspase-3 immunoreactivity (a marker of apoptosis), promoted neuronal survival, inhibited microglial activation and reduced reactive astrocytosis compared with VEH-treated HI pups. These effects were found to occur in a time-dependent manner. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that doxycycline has potential as a pharmacological treatment for mild HI in neonates.

  1. Hypoxia Mediated Release of Endothelial Microparticles and Increased Association of S100A12 with Circulating Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca V. Vince

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microparticles are released from the endothelium under normal homeostatic conditions and have been shown elevated in disease states, most notably those characterised by endothelial dysfunction. The endothelium is sensitive to oxidative stress/status and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 expression is upregulated upon activated endothelium, furthermore the presence of VCAM-1 on microparticles is known. S100A12, a calcium binding protein part of the S100 family, is shown to be present on circulating leukocytes and is thought a sensitive marker to local inflammatory process, which may be driven by oxidative stress. Eight healthy males were subjected to breathing hypoxic air (15% O2, approximately equivalent to 3000 metres altitude for 80 minutes in a temperature controlled laboratory and venous blood samples were processed immediately for VCAM-1 microparticles (VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with leukocytes by flow cytometry. A pre-hypoxic blood sample was used for comparison. Both VCAM-1 MP and S100A12 association with neutrophils were significantly elevated post hypoxic breathing later declining to levels observed in the pre-test samples. A similar trend was observed in both cases and a correlation may exist between these two markers in response to hypoxia. These data offer evidence using novel markers of endothelial and circulating blood responses to hypoxia.

  2. EXPRESSION OF HYPOXIA INDUCIBLE FACTOR-1α AND ITS REGULATORY ROLE IN DEVELOPING VERTEBRAE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xun-bing; DENG Lian-fu; XIAO Yu-zhou

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the expression pattern and possible role of hypoxia inducible factor-1α(HIF-1α) in fetal vertebrae development of mouse.Methods The developmental stages of mice fetal vertebrae were observed from embryonic days 13.5 to 18.5 (E13.5 to E18.5) by stereoscopic and light microscopes respectively, and the expressions of HIF-1α at various times were also detected at levels of mRNA and protein by using methods of RT-PCR and Western blotting. Distribution of HIF-1α in the vertebrae was examined by immunohistochemical assay. Vascular endothelia growth factor (VEGF) mRNA and other chondro-osteoblast marker genes as type Ⅱ collagen a1 (Coll2a1) and osteocalcin (OCN) were detected by RT-PCR too.Results The cartilaginous spine column began to form at E13.5, followed by the arising of the primary ossification center in vertebrae at E15.5, then the osteogenesis expanded and extended to both sides of the vertebrae. HIF-1α mRNA began to express at E13.5, and showed significantly higher level at E14.5 (P<0.05), then declined to a low level. VEGF mRNA expressed coincidently with HIF-1α. While HIF-1α protein expression was observed at E14.5 and lasted at low level till to birth. The expression pattern of Coll2a1 and OCN elucidated the cell evolution from chondrocyte to osteoblast.Conclusion The developmental pattern of vertebrae appears to be an endochondral osteogenesis process. Existed hypoxia microenviroment in the vertebrae may increase HIF-1α mRNA and protein contents thus activate VEGF expression, as may be related to the activation of other downstream genes of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and initiate the cascade of endochondral osteogenesis.

  3. “BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging identifies cortical hypoxia in severe renovascular disease”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Monika L; Glockner, James F; Crane, John A; McKusick, Michael A; Misra, Sanjay; Grande, Joseph P; Lerman, Lilach O; Textor, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has a range of manifestations depending upon the severity of vascular occlusion. The aim of this study was to examine whether exceeding the limits of adaptation to reduced blood flow ultimately leads to tissue hypoxia as determined by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. We compared three groups of hypertensive patients (24 with essential hypertension [EH]), 13 with “moderate” (Doppler velocities 200-384 cm/sec) and 17 with “severe” atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis ([ARAS]; velocities above 384 cm/sec and loss of functional renal tissue). Cortical and medullary blood flows and volumes were determined by multi-detector CT. Post-stenotic kidney size and blood flow were reduced with ARAS, and tissue perfusion fell in the most severe lesions. Tissue deoxyhemoglobin, as reflected by R2* values, was higher in medulla as compared to cortex for all groups and did not differ between subjects with renal artery lesions and EH. By contrast, cortical R2* levels were elevated for severe ARAS (21.6 ±9.4 /sec) as compared with either EH (17.8±2.3 /sec, p<.01) or moderate ARAS (15.7± 2.1 /sec, p<.01). Changes in medullary R2* after furosemide administration tended to be blunted in severe ARAS as compared to unaffected (contralateral) kidneys. These results demonstrate that severe vascular occlusion overwhelms the capacity of the kidney to adapt to reduced blood flow, manifest as overt cortical hypoxia as measured by BOLD MRI. The level of cortical hypoxia is out of proportion to medulla and may provide a marker to identify irreversible parenchymal injury. PMID:22042812

  4. Overexpression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protects against Brain Injury Induced by Chronic Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Hardik; Codipilly, Champa; Marambaud, Philippe; Dewey, Stephen; Frattini, Stephen; Huerta, Patricio T.; Nasim, Mansoor; Miller, Edmund J.; Ahmed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1%) for 10 days (H-KI) and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI), wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT). Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET) showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation. PMID:25268361

  5. Overexpression of extracellular superoxide dismutase protects against brain injury induced by chronic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Zaghloul

    Full Text Available Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1% for 10 days (H-KI and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI, wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT. Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation.

  6. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (Ppress.

  7. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 3 Is an Oxygen-Dependent Transcription Activator and Regulates a Distinct Transcriptional Response to Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs play key roles in the cellular response to hypoxia. It is widely accepted that whereas HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as transcriptional activators, HIF-3 inhibits HIF-1/2α action. Contrary to this idea, we show that zebrafish Hif-3α has strong transactivation activity. Hif-3α is degraded under normoxia. Mutation of P393, P493, and L503 inhibits this oxygen-dependent degradation. Transcriptomics and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identify genes that are regulated by Hif-3α, Hif-1α, or both. Under hypoxia or when overexpressed, Hif-3α binds to its target gene promoters and upregulates their expression. Dominant-negative inhibition and knockdown of Hif-3α abolish hypoxia-induced Hif-3α-promoter binding and gene expression. Hif-3α not only mediates hypoxia-induced growth and developmental retardation but also possesses hypoxia-independent activities. Importantly, transactivation activity is conserved and human HIF-3α upregulates similar genes in human cells. These findings suggest that Hif-3 is an oxygen-dependent transcription factor and activates a distinct transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  8. Hypoxia in models of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Edward E; Vilalta, Marta; Cecic, Ivana K

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To efficiently translate experimental methods from bench to bedside, it is imperative that laboratory models of cancer mimic human disease as closely as possible. In this study, we sought to compare patterns of hypoxia in several standard and emerging mouse models of lung cancer...... to establish the appropriateness of each for evaluating the role of oxygen in lung cancer progression and therapeutic response. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Subcutaneous and orthotopic human A549 lung carcinomas growing in nude mice as well as spontaneous K-ras or Myc-induced lung tumors grown in situ......H2AX foci in vitro and in vivo. Finally, our findings were compared with oxygen electrode measurements of human lung cancers. RESULTS: Minimal fluoroazomycin arabinoside and pimonidazole accumulation was seen in tumors growing within the lungs, whereas subcutaneous tumors showed substantial trapping...

  9. Modulation of hydrogen sulfide by vascular hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmond JM

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jessica M Osmond, Nancy L KanagyVascular Physiology Group, Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USAAbstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has emerged as a key regulator of cardiovascular function. This gasotransmitter is produced in the vasculature and is involved in numerous processes that promote vascular homeostasis, including vasodilation and endothelial cell proliferation. Although H2S plays a role under physiological conditions, it has become clear in recent years that hypoxia modulates the production and action of H2S. Furthermore, there is growing evidence that H2S is cytoprotective in the face of hypoxic insults. This review focuses on the synthesis and signaling of H2S in hypoxic conditions in the vasculature, and highlights recent studies providing evidence that H2S is a potential therapy for preventing tissue damage in hypoxic conditions.Keywords: H2S, cystathionine γ-lyase, vascular smooth muscle, endothelium

  10. Tracheal remodelling in response to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lazaro; Gorr, Thomas A.; Wappner, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    The insect tracheal system is a continuous tubular network that ramifies into progressively thinner branches to provide air directly to every organ and tissue throughout the body. During embryogenesis the basic architecture of the tracheal system develops in a stereotypical and genetically controlled manner. Later, in larval stages, the tracheal system becomes plastic, and adapts to particular oxygen needs of the different tissues of the body. Oxygen sensing is mediated by specific prolyl-4-hydroxylases that regulate protein stability of the alpha subunit of oxygen-responsive transcription factors from the HIF family. Tracheal cells are exquisitely sensitive to oxygen levels, modulating the expression of hypoxia-inducible proteins that mediate sprouting of tracheal branches in direction to oxygen-deprived tissues. PMID:19482033

  11. Low-O₂ acclimation shifts the hypoxia avoidance behaviour of snapper (Pagrus auratus) with only subtle changes in aerobic and anaerobic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Denham G; Iftikar, Fathima I; Baker, Daniel W; Hickey, Anthony J R; Herbert, Neill A

    2013-02-01

    It was hypothesised that chronic hypoxia acclimation (preconditioning) would alter the behavioural low-O(2) avoidance strategy of fish as a result of both aerobic and anaerobic physiological adaptations. Avoidance and physiological responses of juvenile snapper (Pagrus auratus) were therefore investigated following a 6 week period of moderate hypoxia exposure (10.2-12.1 kPa P(O(2)), 21 ± 1 °C) and compared with those of normoxic controls (P(O(2))=20-21 kPa, 21 ± 1 °C). The critical oxygen pressure (P(crit)) limit of both groups was unchanged at ~7 kPa, as were standard, routine and maximum metabolic rates. However, hypoxia-acclimated fish showed increased tolerances to hypoxia in behavioural choice chambers by avoiding lower P(O(2)) levels (3.3 ± 0.7 vs 5.3 ± 1.1 kPa) without displaying greater perturbations of lactate or glucose. This behavioural change was associated with unexpected physiological adjustments. For example, a decrease in blood O(2) carrying capacity was observed after hypoxia acclimation. Also unexpected was an increase in whole-blood P(50) following acclimation to low O(2), perhaps facilitating Hb-O(2) off-loading to tissues. In addition, cardiac mitochondria measured in situ using permeabilised fibres showed improved O(2) uptake efficiencies. The proportion of the anaerobic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, at least relative to the aerobic marker enzyme citrate synthase, also increased in heart and skeletal red muscle, indicating enhanced anaerobic potential, or in situ lactate metabolism, in these tissues. Overall, these data suggest that a prioritization of O(2) delivery and O(2) utilisation over O(2) uptake during long-term hypoxia may convey a significant survival benefit to snapper in terms of behavioural low-O(2) tolerance.

  12. PLC-β2 is modulated by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and plays a phenotype dependent role in their hypoxia-related malignant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugnoli, Federica; Grassilli, Silvia; Al-Qassab, Yasamin; Capitani, Silvano; Bertagnolo, Valeria

    2016-12-01

    Limited oxygen availability plays a critical role in the malignant progression of breast cancer by orchestrating a complex modulation of the gene transcription largely dependent on the tumor phenotype. Invasive breast tumors belonging to different molecular subtypes are characterized by over-expression of PLC-β2, whose amount positively correlates with the malignant evolution of breast neoplasia and supports the invasive potential of breast tumor cells. Here we report that hypoxia modulates the expression of PLC-β2 in breast tumor cells in a phenotype-related manner, since a decrease of the protein was observed in the BT-474 and MCF7 cell lines while an increase was revealed in MDA-MB-231 cells as a consequence of low oxygen availability. Under hypoxia, the down-modulation of PLC-β2 was mainly correlated with the decrease of the EMT marker E-cadherin in the BT-474 cells and with the up-regulation of the stem cell marker CD133 in MCF7 cells. The increase of PLC-β2 induced by low oxygen in MDA-MB-231 cells supports the hypoxia-related reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and sustains invasion capability. In all examined cell lines, but with an opposite role in the ER-positive and ER-negative cells, PLC-β2 was involved in the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α, known to affect both EMT and CD133 expression. Our data include PLC-β2 in the complex and interconnected signaling pathways induced by low oxygen availability in breast tumor cells and suggest that the forced modulation of PLC-β2 programmed on the basis of tumor phenotype may prevent the malignant progression of breast neoplasia as a consequence of intra-tumoral hypoxia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Characterisation of the timing of binding of the hypoxia tracer FMISO after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Neil J; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Howells, David W

    2009-09-08

    The hypoxia tracer fluorine-18 fluoromisonidazole ([18F]FMISO) and its tritiated counterpart ([(3)H]FMISO) have been used as markers of potentially salvageable brain (ischemic penumbra) after stroke. In experimental models, the dynamics and half-life of [3H]FMISO allow concurrent histology after 24 h. Our aim was to further validate these techniques, by determining the optimum tracer exposure interval to delineate ischemic penumbra, and the effects of prolonged exposure on tracer retention in permanent ischemia. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) of varying durations was created in rats using the thread occlusion model. Autoradiography using objective thresholding to define tracer-retention volume was performed to determine the time course of tracer retention in hypoxic tissues and the duration of ongoing retention after bolus administration. An ischemic duration of 1/2. Two hour ischemia resulted in a volume equal to 'tissue at risk'. Twenty-four hour permanent ischemia resulted in tracer-retaining tissue volumes greater than final infarction. However, the use of more stringent thresholding of autoradiographic signal produced a volume of FMISO retention closely approximating infarct volume. The findings indicate that the timing of imaging is crucial, with an optimal imaging time of 2 h using the current threshold. Earlier imaging is limited by tracer dynamics with this particular agent, however autoradiography with a longer ischemic interval (permanent occlusion) is feasible with modified thresholds. These findings support a role for hypoxia tracers in providing new insight into the ischemic penumbra.

  14. Unsupervised clustering of gene expression data points at hypoxia as possible trigger for metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    York David

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classification of large volumes of data produced in a microarray experiment allows for the extraction of important clues as to the nature of a disease. Results Using multi-dimensional unsupervised FOREL (FORmal ELement algorithm we have re-analyzed three public datasets of skeletal muscle gene expression in connection with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (DM2. Our analysis revealed the major line of variation between expression profiles of normal, insulin resistant, and diabetic skeletal muscle. A cluster of most "metabolically sound" samples occupied one end of this line. The distance along this line coincided with the classic markers of diabetes risk, namely obesity and insulin resistance, but did not follow the accepted clinical diagnosis of DM2 as defined by the presence or absence of hyperglycemia. Genes implicated in this expression pattern are those controlling skeletal muscle fiber type and glycolytic metabolism. Additionally myoglobin and hemoglobin were upregulated and ribosomal genes deregulated in insulin resistant patients. Conclusion Our findings are concordant with the changes seen in skeletal muscle with altitude hypoxia. This suggests that hypoxia and shift to glycolytic metabolism may also drive insulin resistance.

  15. Assessment of intratumor hypoxia by integrated 18F-FDG PET / perfusion CT in a liver tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Stewart, Errol; Desjardins, Lise; Hadway, Jennifer; Morrison, Laura; Crukley, Cathie

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Hypoxia in solid tumors occurs when metabolic demands in tumor cells surpass the delivery of oxygenated blood. We hypothesize that the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) metabolism and tumor blood flow mismatch would correlate with tumor hypoxia. Methods Liver perfusion computed tomography (CT) and 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) imaging were performed in twelve rabbit livers implanted with VX2 carcinoma. Under CT guidance, a fiber optic probe was inserted into the tumor to measure the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2). Tumor blood flow (BF) and standardized uptake value (SUV) were measured to calculate flow-metabolism ratio (FMR). Tumor hypoxia was further identified using pimonidazole immunohistochemical staining. Pearson correlation analysis was performed to determine the correlation between the imaging parameters and pO2 and pimonidazole staining. Results Weak correlations were found between blood volume (BV) and pO2 level (r = 0.425, P = 0.004), SUV and pO2 (r = -0.394, P = 0.007), FMR and pimonidazole staining score (r = -0.388, P = 0.031). However, there was stronger correlation between tumor FMR and pO2 level (r = 0.557, P < 0.001). Conclusions FMR correlated with tumor oxygenation and pimonidazole staining suggesting it may be a potential hypoxic imaging marker in liver tumor. PMID:28264009

  16. Oroxylin A inhibits hypoxia-induced invasion and migration of MCF-7 cells by suppressing the Notch pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yao; Zhao, Kai; Li, Guojun; Yao, Jing; Dai, Qinsheng; Hui, Hui; Li, Zhiyu; Guo, Qinglong; Lu, Na

    2014-08-01

    Tumor invasion and migration obstructs the treatment and prognosis of cancer. In this research, we investigated the effect of oroxylin A, a natural compound extracted from Scutellaria radix, the root of Scutellaria baicalensis, on inhibition of the invasion and migration of three different tumor cell lines: MCF-7, DU145, and HepG2. The results suggested that oroxylin A could inhibit hypoxia-induced migration and invasion of the three cell lines mentioned above. To study the detailed mechanisms, studies were carried out on MCF-7 cells and it was found that oroxylin A could regulate the expression of related markers in MCF-7 cells including E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and Vimentin. It was also found that oroxylin A inhibited the hypoxia-induced invasion and migration of MCF-7 cells by suppressing the Notch pathway. Oroxylin A inhibited N1ICD translocating to the nucleus and binding to epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related transcription factor Snail, thus suppressing the invasion and migration of MCF-7 cells. Therefore, oroxylin A is expected to be a promising candidate for antimetastasis treatment through suppression of the hypoxia-induced Notch pathway.

  17. [The distribution of GABA-ergic neurons in rat neocortex in the postnatal period after the perinatal hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozhaĭ, L I; Otelin, V A

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of GABA-ergic neurons in different areas of the neocortex (frontal, sensorimotor, visual cortex) was studied in Wistar rats at different time periods of postnatal development after their exposure to perinatal hypoxia. To identify these neurons, the antibodies against GAD-67, the marker of GABA-ergic neurons, were used. It was found that the exposure to perinatal hypoxia caused a significant reduction in the number of GAD-67-expressing neurons in both upper and deep layers of the cortex in juvenile age (day 20 of postnatal period), that persisted until the prepubertal period (day 40). In experimental animals at postnatal day 40, the numbers of neurons that synthesized GAD-67, were two times lower in each of the layers of the neocortex than those in control animals. It is suggested that a drastic reduction in the number of GABA-ergic neurons in the neocortex could be a result of the damaging effects of acute perinatal hypoxia on the processes of progenitor cell migration from the subventricular zone, or on the synthesis of the factors controlling these migration processes as well as on GABA-ergic neuron maturation, leading to a delay of GAD-67 expression.

  18. Glycation and Hypoxia: Two Key Factors for Adipose Tissue Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matafome, Paulo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Seica, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Many aspects of adipose tissue pathophysiology in metabolic diseases have been described in the last years. One of such aspects is certainly hypoxia, which was shown to develop in adipose tissue of obese individuals and animal models. Recent data suggest two main factors for adipose tissue hypoxia: adipocyte hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction. In addition, glycation was also shown to induce morphological and functional alterations in adipose tissue. In particular, methylglyoxal directly formed from glucose was shown to potently induce AGE formation in vivo and to contribute to metabolic and vascular alterations in adipose tissue. Glycation and hypoxia are both thought to be on the basis of low grade inflammatory activation, further increasing metabolic dysregulation in adipose tissue. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the factors that contribute for tissue hypoxia and the role of glycation, not only at the vascular level, but also at the metabolic, oxidative and inflammatory levels.

  19. 2014 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. 2009 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  1. 2008 Fall Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  2. 2010 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  3. 2011 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  4. 2008 (Summer) Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  5. 2012 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  6. Rearing of silkworm under hypobaric and hypoxia conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Shin; Yamashita, Masamichi; Space Agriculture Task Force, J.

    In order to investigate of a possibility of utilizing silkworm for the space agriculture, rearing of silkworms was examined under hypobaric and hypoxia conditions. In terms of structural mechanics, the lower inner pressure of Martian greenhouse has advantage to reduce requirements on physical properties of mechanical member of the pressurized structure. The main objective of this study is to know the influence of lower total pressure and hypoxia condition on silkworm. Silkworms are reared under following four hypobaric and hypoxia conditions, 10kPa pure oxygen, 20kPa pure oxygen, 10kPa oxygen and 10kPa nitrogen, and 10kPa oxygen and 90kPa nitrogen. After rearing them to pupa stage, growth of silkworms was found poor under all hypobaric hypoxia conditions compared to those grown under the normal atmospheric condition; the control group. The growth under total pressure of 20kPa is slightly fast.

  7. 2015 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  8. An insight into tumoral hypoxia: the radiomarkers and clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Abrantes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumoral hypoxia is related to severe structural abnormalities of tumor microvessels, leading to deteriorated O2 diffusion. This decreased O2 concentration in cancer cells compromises cellular functions, besides being responsible for resistance to radiation therapy. Consequently, it is very important to know the hypoxic status of a tumor. In this review, the different methodologies available for evaluating cellular hypoxia in vivo are discussed, particularly those in which the hypoxia information is obtained through imaging. Among these the nuclear medicine approach uses ligands to complex with radionuclides. The resulting radioactive complexes which may be single photon or positron emitters, are very useful as imaging probes. The nature of ligands and their corresponding complexes, with application or potential application as hypoxia detectors, will be described. A summary of the most significant results so far obtained in clinical or preclinical applications will also be discussed.

  9. 2013 Summer Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  10. Exercise performed at hypoxia influences mood state and anxiety symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Tavares de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During hypoxia conditions, psychological states can be worsened. However, little information is available regarding the effect of physical exercise performed in hypoxia conditions on mood state and anxiety symptoms. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the acute effect of moderate physical exercise performed at hypoxia on mood states and anxiety symptoms in healthy young subjects. Ten volunteers were subjected to the following conditions: a normoxic condition (NC and a hypoxic condition (HC. They performed 45 min of physical exercise. Their anxiety symptoms and mood states were evaluated at the initial time point as well as immediately following and 30 and 60 min after the exercise session. Our results showed a significant increase in post-exercise anxiety symptoms and a significant decrease in mood scores immediately after and 30 min after exercise performed in the HC. Moderate physical activity performed at hypoxia condition increased post-exercise anxiety and worsened mood state.

  11. Local tissue hypoxia and formation of nasal polyps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜舒; 董震; 朱冬冬; 杨占泉

    2003-01-01

    Objective To explore the response of nasal mucosa epithelial cells to hypoxia in terms of formation of nasal polyps (NP). Methods Epithelial cells of NP and inferior turbinate (IT) were cultured serum-fr ee under normal oxygen and hypoxic circumstances with stimulation of IL-1β and TNFα. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)mRNA and VEGF protein leve ls of the cultured cells were detected using in situ hybridization and ELISA, re spectively. Results The expression of VEGF mRNA was significantly higher in epithelial cells of NP t han in IT exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines or hypoxia (P<0.01). VEGF levels were higher in NP epithelial cells than those of IT (P<0.01) under hypoxia.Conclusion VEGF-induced by hypoxia is very important for the early stages of forming polyps.

  12. High expression of arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase and proinflammatory markers in human ischemic heart tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Lisa U.; Lundqvist, Annika [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Asp, Julia [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Synnergren, Jane [Systems Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, University of Skoevde, Skoevde (Sweden); Johansson, Cecilia Thalen [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Palmqvist, Lars [Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Jeppsson, Anders [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden); Hulten, Lillemor Mattsson, E-mail: Lillemor.Mattsson@wlab.gu.se [Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Wallenberg Laboratory, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 in the ischemic heart. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incubation of human muscle cells in hypoxia showed a 22-fold upregulation of ALOX15. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observed increased levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suggesting a link between ischemia and inflammation in ischemic heart biopsies. -- Abstract: A common feature of the ischemic heart and atherosclerotic plaques is the presence of hypoxia (insufficient levels of oxygen in the tissue). Hypoxia has pronounced effects on almost every aspect of cell physiology, and the nuclear transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) regulates adaptive responses to low concentrations of oxygen in mammalian cells. In our recent work, we observed that hypoxia increases the proinflammatory enzyme arachidonate 15-lipoxygenase (ALOX15B) in human carotid plaques. ALOX15 has recently been shown to be present in the human myocardium, but the effect of ischemia on its expression has not been investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that ischemia of the heart leads to increased expression of ALOX15, and found an almost 2-fold increase in HIF-1{alpha} mRNA expression and a 17-fold upregulation of ALOX15 mRNA expression in the ischemic heart biopsies from patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery compared with non ischemic heart tissue. To investigate the effect of low oxygen concentration on ALOX15 we incubated human vascular muscle cells in hypoxia and showed that expression of ALOX15 increased 22-fold compared with cells incubated in normoxic conditions. We also observed increased mRNA levels of proinflammatory markers in ischemic heart tissue compared with non-ischemic controls. In summary, we demonstrate increased ALOX15 in human ischemic heart biopsies. Furthermore we demonstrate that hypoxia increases ALOX15 in human muscle cells. Our results yield

  13. Upregulated copper transporters in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

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    Adriana M Zimnicka

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vascular remodeling and increased arterial wall stiffness are two major causes for the elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure in patients and animals with pulmonary hypertension. Cellular copper (Cu plays an important role in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix remodeling; increased Cu in vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated to be associated with atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal experiments. In this study, we show that the Cu-uptake transporter 1, CTR1, and the Cu-efflux pump, ATP7A, were both upregulated in the lung tissues and pulmonary arteries of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. Hypoxia also significantly increased expression and activity of lysyl oxidase (LOX, a Cu-dependent enzyme that causes crosslinks of collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix. In vitro experiments show that exposure to hypoxia or treatment with cobalt (CoCl2 also increased protein expression of CTR1, ATP7A, and LOX in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC. In PASMC exposed to hypoxia or treated with CoCl2, we also confirmed that the Cu transport is increased using 64Cu uptake assays. Furthermore, hypoxia increased both cell migration and proliferation in a Cu-dependent manner. Downregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α with siRNA significantly attenuated hypoxia-mediated upregulation of CTR1 mRNA. In summary, the data from this study indicate that increased Cu transportation due to upregulated CTR1 and ATP7A in pulmonary arteries and PASMC contributes to the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. The increased Cu uptake and elevated ATP7A also facilitate the increase in LOX activity and thus the increase in crosslink of extracellular matrix, and eventually leading to the increase in pulmonary arterial stiffness.

  14. Hypoxia decreases podocyte expression of slit diaphragm proteins

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    Lu H

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hong Lu,1 Gaurav Kapur,1 Tej K Mattoo,1 William D Lyman1,21Carman and Ann Adams Department of Pediatrics, 2Children's Research Center of Michigan, Children's Hospital of Michigan, Detroit, MI, USABackground: Chronic hypoxia contributes to progressive tubulointerstitial injury and, consequently, renal failure. However, the effect of hypoxia on glomerular podocytes, which are integral to the slit diaphragm complex and responsible for selectivity of the glomerular filtration barrier, has not been completely determined. Methods: Conditionally immortalized mouse podocyte cells were exposed to hypoxic (1% O2 or normoxic (room air conditions for 24, 48, or 72 hours, after which cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Cells were stained with podocin and phalloidin to determine podocin and intracellular actin distribution. Expression of synaptopodin, CD2-associated protein (CD2AP, NcK, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction.Results: Podocytes exposed to hypoxia had significantly reduced viability at 48 (87% and 72 hours (66%. There was disarrangement of intracellular filament actin by phalloidin staining, a 30% weaker fluorescence intensity by podocin staining, significantly reduced expression of synaptopodin (12%, CD2AP (42%, NcK (38%, and increased expression of TGF-β1 and P-ERK after hypoxia treatment.Conclusion: Podocyte exposure to hypoxia leads to reduced viability and SD protein expression, which may explain persistent and/or increasing proteinuria in patients with progressive renal failure. Increased expression of TGF-β1 and P-ERK is associated with apoptosis and fibrosis, which could be the link between hypoxia and glomerular injury.Keywords: podocytes, hypoxia, slit-diaphragm proteins

  15. Chemoreceptors and cardiovascular control in acute and chronic systemic hypoxia

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    J.M. Marshall

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the ways in which the primary bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction evoked by selective stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can be modified by the secondary effects of a chemoreceptor-induced increase in ventilation. The evidence that strong stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors can evoke the behavioural and cardiovascular components of the alerting or defence response which is characteristically evoked by novel or noxious stimuli is considered. The functional significance of all these influences in systemic hypoxia is then discussed with emphasis on the fact that these reflex changes can be overcome by the local effects of hypoxia: central neural hypoxia depresses ventilation, hypoxia acting on the heart causes bradycardia and local hypoxia of skeletal muscle and brain induces vasodilatation. Further, it is proposed that these local influences can become interdependent, so generating a positive feedback loop that may explain sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS. It is also argued that a major contributor to these local influences is adenosine. The role of adenosine in determining the distribution of O2 in skeletal muscle microcirculation in hypoxia is discussed, together with its possible cellular mechanisms of action. Finally, evidence is presented that in chronic systemic hypoxia, the reflex vasoconstrictor influences of the sympathetic nervous system are reduced and/or the local dilator influences of hypoxia are enhanced. In vitro and in vivo findings suggest this is partly explained by upregulation of nitric oxide (NO synthesis by the vascular endothelium which facilitates vasodilatation induced by adenosine and other NO-dependent dilators and attenuates noradrenaline-evoked vasoconstriction.

  16. Hypoxia modulates the effect of dihydroartemisinin on endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    D'Alessandro, S.; Basilico, N.; Corbett, Y; Scaccabarozzi, D.; Omodeo-Salè, F.; Saresella, M.; Marventano, I.; Vaillant, M.; P. Olliaro; Taramelli, D

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Artemisinin derivatives, the current cornerstone of malaria treatment, possess also anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activity. Hypoxia plays a crucial role both in severe malaria (as a consequence of the cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes to the microvasculature) and in cancer (due to the restricted blood supply in the growing tumour mass). However, the consequences of hypoxia onto the effects of artemisinins is under-researched. This study aimed at assessing ...

  17. Management of renal dysfunction following term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweetman, Deirdre U

    2013-03-01

    Acute kidney injury frequently develops following the term perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia. Quantifying the degree of acute kidney injury is difficult, however, as the methods currently in use are suboptimal. Acute kidney injury management is largely supportive with little evidence basis for many interventions. This review discusses management strategies and novel biomarkers that may improve diagnosis and management of renal injury following perinatal hypoxia-ischaemia.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia protects cerebral mitochondrial function from calcium overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Liao, Weigong; Gao, Wenxiang; Huang, Jian; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-12-01

    Hypoxia leads to Ca(2+) overload and results in mitochondrial uncoupling, decreased ATP synthesis, and neuronal death. Inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload protects mitochondrial function after hypoxia. The present study was aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia on mitochondrial function and mitochondrial tolerance to Ca(2+) overload. Wistar rats were divided into control and intermittent hypoxia (IH) groups. The IH group was subject to hypoxia for 4 h daily in a hypobaric cabin (5,000 m) for 7 days. Brain mitochondria were isolated on day 7 following hypoxia. The baseline mitochondrial functions, such as ST3, ST4, and respiratory control ratio (RCR = ST3/ST4), were measured using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. Mitochondrial adenine nucleotide concentrations were measured by HPLC. Mitochondrial membrane potential was determined by measuring rhodamine 123 (Rh-123) fluorescence in the absence and presence of high Ca(2+) concentration (0.1 M), which simulates Ca(2+) overload. Our results revealed that IH did not affect mitochondrial respiratory functions, but led to a reduction in AMP and an increase in ADP concentrations in mitochondria. Both control and IH groups demonstrated decreased mitochondrial membrane potential in the presence of high Ca(2+) (0.1 M), while the IH group showed a relative higher mitochondrial membrane potential. These results indicated that the neuroprotective effect of intermittent hypoxia was resulted partly from preserving mitochondrial membrane potential, and increasing mitochondrial tolerance to high calcium levels. The increased ADP and decreased AMP in mitochondria following intermittent hypoxia may be a mechanism underlying this protection.

  19. Molecular marker databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Kaitao; Lorenc, Michał Tadeusz; Edwards, David

    2015-01-01

    The detection and analysis of genetic variation plays an important role in plant breeding and this role is increasing with the continued development of genome sequencing technologies. Molecular genetic markers are important tools to characterize genetic variation and assist with genomic breeding. Processing and storing the growing abundance of molecular marker data being produced requires the development of specific bioinformatics tools and advanced databases. Molecular marker databases range from species specific through to organism wide and often host a variety of additional related genetic, genomic, or phenotypic information. In this chapter, we will present some of the features of plant molecular genetic marker databases, highlight the various types of marker resources, and predict the potential future direction of crop marker databases.

  20. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia. PMID:28205556

  1. NITRIC OXIDE INTERFERES WITH HYPOXIA SIGNALING DURING COLONIC INFLAMMATION

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    Cintia Rabelo e Paiva CARIA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Context Intestinal inflammation can induce a local reduction in oxygen levels that triggers an adaptive response centered on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs. Nitric oxide, a well-described inflammatory mediator, may interfere with hypoxia signaling. Objectives We aimed to evaluate the role of nitric oxide in hypoxia signaling during colonic inflammation. Methods Colitis was induced by single (acute or repeated (reactivated colitis trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid administration in rats. In addition, one group of rats with reactivated colitis was also treated with Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride to block nitric oxide synthase. Colitis was assessed by macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity in the colon samples. Hypoxia was determined using the oxygen-dependent probe, pimonidazole. The expression of HIF-1α and HIF-induced factors (vascular endothelial growth factor - VEGF and apelin was assessed using Western blotting. Results The single or repeated administration of trinitrobenzenosulfonic acid to rats induced colitis which was characterized by a high macroscopic score and myeloperoxidase activity. Hypoxia was observed with both protocols. During acute colitis, HIF-1α expression was not increased, but VEGF and apelin were increased. HIF-1α expression was inhibited during reactivated colitis, and VEGF and apelin were not increased. Nw-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride blockade during reactivated colitis restored HIF-1α, VEGF and apelin expression. Conclusions Nitric oxide could interfere with hypoxia signaling during reactivated colitis inflammation modifying the expression of proteins regulated by HIF-1α.

  2. Macrophage-mediated response to hypoxia in disease

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    Tazzyman S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Simon Tazzyman,1 Craig Murdoch,2 James Yeomans,1 Jack Harrison,1 Munitta Muthana3 1Department of Oncology, 2School of Clinical Dentistry, 3Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Hypoxia plays a critical role in the pathobiology of various inflamed, diseased tissues, including malignant tumors, atherosclerotic plaques, myocardial infarcts, the synovia of rheumatoid arthritic joints, healing wounds, and sites of bacterial infection. These areas of hypoxia form when the blood supply is occluded and/or the oxygen supply is unable to keep pace with cell growth and/or infiltration of inflammatory cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in all tissues of the body and exhibit great plasticity, allowing them to perform divergent functions, including, among others, patrolling tissue, combating invading pathogens and tumor cells, orchestrating wound healing, and restoring homeostasis after an inflammatory response. The number of tissue macrophages increases markedly with the onset and progression of many pathological states, with many macrophages accumulating in avascular and necrotic areas, where they are exposed to hypoxia. Recent studies show that these highly versatile cells then respond rapidly to the hypoxia present by altering their expression of a wide array of genes. Here we review the evidence for hypoxia-driven macrophage inflammatory responses in various disease states, and how this influences disease progression and treatment. Keywords: macrophage, hypoxia, inflammation, cytokine

  3. Influence of sustained hypoxia on the sensation of dyspnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonan, T; Okabe, S; Hida, W; Satoh, M; Kikuchi, Y; Takishima, T; Shirato, K

    1998-08-01

    We assessed the effect of sustained isocapnic hypoxia (PCO2 = 40 Torr, SaO2 = 80%) on the sensation of dyspnea in 16 normal healthy males. Subjects rated the sensation of dyspnea (c) on 15 cm visual analog scales during 20 min of sustained hypoxia. Following this hypoxic period, 8 subjects undertook mild exercise (10-50 W on a bicycle ergometer for 3 min) under the continuation of hypoxia. During sustained hypoxia, psi increased initially with ventilation from 0.6 +/- 0.2 (n = 16, mean +/- SE) to 2.9 +/- 0.6 at peak ventilation, but it decreased with ventilatory depression to 1.6 +/- 0.4. Dyspnea intensity during hypoxic exercise was significantly smaller than that at peak ventilation in the resting hypoxic period (2.3 +/- 0.7 vs. 3.9 +/- 1.0), although the ventilation was greater during exercise (24.0 +/- 3.0 vs. 19.7 +/- 1.4 l/min). These results indicate that sustained hypoxia has a biphasic, i.e., initial stimulatory and delayed depressant, effect on dyspnea and on ventilation. It is suggested that the dyspnea sensing mechanism is suppressed during mild exercise under sustained hypoxia.

  4. Hypoxia and adipose tissue function and dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trayhurn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The rise in the incidence of obesity has led to a major interest in the biology of white adipose tissue. The tissue is a major endocrine and signaling organ, with adipocytes, the characteristic cell type, secreting a multiplicity of protein factors, the adipokines. Increases in the secretion of a number of adipokines occur in obesity, underpinning inflammation in white adipose tissue and the development of obesity-associated diseases. There is substantial evidence, particularly from animal studies, that hypoxia develops in adipose tissue as the tissue mass expands, and the reduction in Po(2) is considered to underlie the inflammatory response. Exposure of white adipocytes to hypoxic conditions in culture induces changes in the expression of >1,000 genes. The secretion of a number of inflammation-related adipokines is upregulated by hypoxia, and there is a switch from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. Glucose utilization is increased in hypoxic adipocytes with corresponding increases in lactate production. Importantly, hypoxia induces insulin resistance in fat cells and leads to the development of adipose tissue fibrosis. Many of the responses of adipocytes to hypoxia are initiated at Po(2) levels above the normal physiological range for adipose tissue. The other cell types within the tissue also respond to hypoxia, with the differentiation of preadipocytes to adipocytes being inhibited and preadipocytes being transformed into leptin-secreting cells. Overall, hypoxia has pervasive effects on the function of adipocytes and appears to be a key factor in adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

  5. HRGFish: A database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Iliyas; Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Srivastava, Prachi; Kumar, Ravindra; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Singh, Mahender; Kushwaha, Basdeo

    2017-02-01

    Several studies have highlighted the changes in the gene expression due to the hypoxia response in fishes, but the systematic organization of the information and the analytical platform for such genes are lacking. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop a database of hypoxia responsive genes in fishes (HRGFish), integrated with analytical tools, using LAMPP technology. Genes reported in hypoxia response for fishes were compiled through literature survey and the database presently covers 818 gene sequences and 35 gene types from 38 fishes. The upstream fragments (3,000 bp), covered in this database, enables to compute CG dinucleotides frequencies, motif finding of the hypoxia response element, identification of CpG island and mapping with the reference promoter of zebrafish. The database also includes functional annotation of genes and provides tools for analyzing sequences and designing primers for selected gene fragments. This may be the first database on the hypoxia response genes in fishes that provides a workbench to the scientific community involved in studying the evolution and ecological adaptation of the fish species in relation to hypoxia.

  6. Renal parenchymal oxygenation and hypoxia adaptation in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Christian; Rosen, Seymour; Heyman, Samuel N

    2006-10-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI), formally termed acute tubular necrosis, is complex and, phenotypically, may range from functional dysregulation without overt morphological features to literal tubular destruction. Hypoxia results from imbalanced oxygen supply and consumption. Increasing evidence supports the view that regional renal hypoxia occurs in AKI irrespective of the underlying condition, even under circumstances basically believed to reflect 'direct' tubulotoxicity. However, at present, it is remains unclear whether hypoxia per se or, rather, re-oxygenation (possibly through reactive oxygen species) causes AKI. Data regarding renal hypoxia in the clinical situation of AKI are lacking and our current concepts regarding renal oxygenation during acute renal failure are presumptive and largely derived from experimental studies. There is robust experimental evidence that AKI is often associated with altered intrarenal microcirculation and oxygenation. Furthermore, renal parenchymal oxygen deprivation seems to participate in the pathogenesis of experimental AKI, induced by exogenous nephrotoxins (such as contrast media, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or amphotericin), sepsis, pigment and obstructive nephropathies. Sub-lethal cellular hypoxia engenders adaptational responses through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Forthcoming technologies to modulate the HIF system form a novel potential therapeutic approach for AKI.

  7. Carotid body oxygen sensing and adaptation to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barneo, José; Macías, David; Platero-Luengo, Aida; Ortega-Sáenz, Patricia; Pardal, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) is the principal arterial chemoreceptor that mediates the hyperventilatory response to hypoxia. Our understanding of CB function and its role in disease mechanisms has progressed considerably in the last decades, particularly in recent years. The sensory elements of the CB are the neuron-like glomus cells, which contain numerous transmitters and form synapses with afferent sensory fibers. The activation of glomus cells under hypoxia mainly depends on the modulation of O2-sensitive K(+) channels which leads to cell depolarization and the opening of Ca(2+) channels. This model of sensory transduction operates in all mammalian species studied thus far, including man. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the modulation of ion channel function by changes in the O2 level are as yet unknown. The CB plays a fundamental role in acclimatization to sustained hypoxia. Mice with CB atrophy or patients who have undergone CB resection due to surgical treatments show a marked intolerance to even mild hypoxia. CB growth under hypoxia is supported by the existence of a resident population of neural crest-derived stem cells of glia-like phenotype. These stem cells are not highly affected by exposure to low O2 tension; however, there are abundant synapse-like contacts between the glomus cells and stem cells (chemoproliferative synapses), which may be needed to trigger progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation under hypoxia. CB hypo- or hyper-activation may also contribute to the pathogenesis of several prevalent human diseases.

  8. Hypoxia inhibits colonic ion transport via activation of AMP kinase.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Mucosal hypoxia is a common endpoint for many pathological processes including ischemic colitis, colonic obstruction and anastomotic failure. Previous studies suggest that hypoxia modulates colonic mucosal function through inhibition of chloride secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this observation are poorly understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a metabolic energy regulator found in a wide variety of cells and has been linked to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediated chloride secretion in several different tissues. We hypothesized that AMPK mediates many of the acute effects of hypoxia on human and rat colonic electrolyte transport. METHODS: The fluorescent chloride indicator dye N-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-6-methoxyquinolinium bromide was used to measure changes in intracellular chloride concentrations in isolated single rat colonic crypts. Ussing chamber experiments in human colonic mucosa were conducted to evaluate net epithelial ion transport. RESULTS: This study demonstrates that acute hypoxia inhibits electrogenic chloride secretion via AMPK mediated inhibition of CFTR. Pre-treatment of tissues with the AMPK inhibitor 6-[4-(2-piperidin-1-yl-ethoxy)-phenyl)]-3-pyridin-4-yl-pyyrazolo [1,5-a] pyrimidine (compound C) in part reversed the effects of acute hypoxia on chloride secretion. CONCLUSION: We therefore suggest that AMPK is a key component of the adaptive cellular response to mucosal hypoxia in the colon. Furthermore, AMPK may represent a potential therapeutic target in diseased states or in prevention of ischemic intestinal injury.

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Respond to Hypoxia by Increasing Diacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Kinga; Kalomoiris, Stefanos; Merkely, Béla; Nolta, Jan A; Fierro, Fernando A

    2016-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are currently being tested clinically for a plethora of conditions, with most approaches relying on the secretion of paracrine signals by MSC to modulate the immune system, promote wound healing, and induce angiogenesis. Hypoxia has been shown to affect MSC proliferation, differentiation, survival and secretory profile. Here, we investigate changes in the lipid composition of human bone marrow-derived MSC after exposure to hypoxia. Using mass spectrometry, we compared the lipid profiles of MSC derived from five different donors, cultured for two days in either normoxia (control) or hypoxia (1% oxygen). Hypoxia induced a significant increase of total triglycerides, fatty acids and diacylglycerols (DG). Remarkably, reduction of DG levels using the phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C inhibitor D609 inhibited the secretion of VEGF and Angiopoietin-2, but increased the secretion of interleukin-8, without affecting significantly their respective mRNA levels. Functionally, incubation of MSC in hypoxia with D609 inhibited the potential of the cells to promote migration of human endothelial cells in a wound/scratch assay. Hence, we show that hypoxia induces in MSC an increase of DG that may affect the angiogenic potential of these cells.

  10. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-01

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity.

  11. Increased Umbilical Cord PAI-1 Levels in Placental Insufficiency Are Associated with Fetal Hypoxia and Angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferovic, Maxim D; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2016-01-01

    In intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), a subset of pregnancies undergoes placental vascular dysregulation resulting in restricted blood flow and fetal hypoxemia. Altered transcription of hypoxic regulated plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) has been associated with pregnancy complications and angiogenic regulation. Here we assessed circulating PAI-1 as an indicator of placental insufficiency. Venous umbilical PAI-1 of hypoxemic (VpO2 20 versus 35 mmHg, p PAI-1 was increased (~10-fold, p PAI-1 levels correlated to blood oxygen (r = -0.68, p PAI-1 levels (r = 0.65, p PAI-1 inhibiting antibody (p PAI-1 as a potential marker of placental insufficiency and identify its close association with pathological hypoxia and angiogenesis in a subset of growth restricted pregnancies.

  12. Deletion of Metallothionein Exacerbates Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative and Inflammatory Injury in Aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was to explore the effect of metallothionein (MT on intermittent hypoxia (IH induced aortic pathogenic changes. Markers of oxidative damages, inflammation, and vascular remodeling were observed by immunohistochemical staining after 3 days and 1, 3, and 8 weeks after IH exposures. Endogenous MT was induced after 3 days of IH but was significantly decreased after 8 weeks of IH. Compared with the wild-type mice, MT knock-out mice exhibited earlier and more severe pathogenic changes of oxidative damages, inflammatory responses, and cellular apoptosis, as indicated by the significant accumulation of collagen, increased levels of connective tissue growth factor, transforming growth factor β1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, vascular cell adhesion molecule 1,3-nitrotyrosine, and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in the aorta. These findings suggested that chronic IH may lead to aortic damages characterized by oxidative stress and inflammation, and MT may play a pivotal role in the above pathogenesis process.

  13. Therapeutic Targeting of Lipid Droplets as Disease Markers in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    induced aerobic glycolysis. Also, transient overexpression of HSulf-1 in PC3, H358 and MDA231 cancer cell lines reduced lactate secretion (Figure S3...regulates lactate production in hypoxia and is associated with poor prognosis in head and neck squamous cancer . Br J Cancer . 2008; 98:1975-1984. 25. Wu...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0119 TITLE: Therapeutic Targeting of Lipid Droplets as Disease Markers in Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  14. STAT3 is a key transcriptional regulator of cancer stem cell marker CD133 in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Sarani; Fuchs, Bryan C.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cell (CSC) marker CD133 was found to be upregulated in many cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the molecular mechanism of CD133 regulation in the liver tumor microenvironment has remained elusive. In this study Won and colleagues report that interleukin-6 (IL-6) mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) signaling and hypoxia enhance the expression of CD133 and promote the progression of HCC. PMID:27275460

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan CSPG4 as a Novel Hypoxia-Sensitive Marker in Pancreatic Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shereen Keleg; Alexandr Titov; Anette Heller; Thomas Giese; Christine Tjaden; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Gaida, Matthias M; Andrea S Bauer; Jens Werner; Giese, Nathalia A.

    2014-01-01

    CSPG4 marks pericytes, undifferentiated precursors and tumor cells. We assessed whether the shed ectodomain of CSPG4 (sCSPG4) might circulate and reflect potential changes in CSPG4 tissue expression (pCSPG4) due to desmoplastic and malignant aberrations occurring in pancreatic tumors. Serum sCSPG4 was measured using ELISA in test (n = 83) and validation (n = 221) cohorts comprising donors (n = 11+26) and patients with chronic pancreatitis (n = 11+20) or neoplasms: benign (serous cystadenoma S...

  16. Hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210 regulates the DIMT1-IRF4 oncogenic axis in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Sho; Kitadate, Akihiro; Abe, Fumito; Saitoh, Hirobumi; Michishita, Yoshihiro; Hatano, Yoshiaki; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Kitabayashi, Atsushi; Teshima, Kazuaki; Kume, Masaaki; Takahashi, Naoto; Tagawa, Hiroyuki

    2017-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by the accumulation of a population of malignant plasma cells within the bone marrow and its microenvironment. A hypoxic niche is located within the microenvironment, which causes myeloma cells to become quiescent, anti-apoptotic, glycolytic, and immature. Cell heterogeneity may be related to distinct gene expression profiles under hypoxic and normoxic conditions. During hypoxia, myeloma cells acquire these phenotypes by downregulating interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), an essential transcription factor in myeloma oncogenesis. To identify essential microRNAs and their targets regulated under hypoxic conditions, we undertook microRNA and cDNA microarray analyses using hypoxia-exposed primary MM samples and myeloma cell lines. Under hypoxia, only miR-210 was highly upregulated and was accompanied by direct downregulation of an 18S rRNA base methyltransferase, DIMT1. This inverse expression correlation was validated by quantitative RT-PCR for primary MM samples. We further determined that DIMT1 has an oncogenic potential as its knockdown reduced tumorigenicity of myeloma cells through regulation of IRF4 expression. Notably, by analyzing gene expression omnibus datasets in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database, we found that DIMT1 expression increased gradually with MM progression. In summary, by screening for targets of hypoxia-inducible microRNA-210, we identified DIMT1 as a novel diagnostic marker and therapeutic target for all molecular subtypes of MM. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  17. Placental Hypoxia During Early Pregnancy Causes Maternal Hypertension and Placental Insufficiency in the Hypoxic Guinea Pig Model.

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    Thompson, Loren P; Pence, Laramie; Pinkas, Gerald; Song, Hong; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2016-12-01

    Chronic placental hypoxia is one of the root causes of placental insufficiencies that result in pre-eclampsia and maternal hypertension. Chronic hypoxia causes disruption of trophoblast (TB) development, invasion into maternal decidua, and remodeling of maternal spiral arteries. The pregnant guinea pig shares several characteristics with humans such as hemomonochorial placenta, villous subplacenta, deep TB invasion, and remodeling of maternal arteries, and is an ideal animal model to study placental development. We hypothesized that chronic placental hypoxia of the pregnant guinea pig inhibits TB invasion and alters spiral artery remodeling. Time-mated pregnant guinea pigs were exposed to either normoxia (NMX) or three levels of hypoxia (HPX: 16%, 12%, or 10.5% O2) from 20 day gestation until midterm (39-40 days) or term (60-65 days). At term, HPX (10.5% O2) increased maternal arterial blood pressure (HPX 57.9 ± 2.3 vs. NMX 40.4 ± 2.3, P < 0.001), decreased fetal weight by 16.1% (P < 0.05), and increased both absolute and relative placenta weights by 10.1% and 31.8%, respectively (P < 0.05). At midterm, there was a significant increase in TB proliferation in HPX placentas as confirmed by increased PCNA and KRT7 staining and elevated ESX1 (TB marker) gene expression (P < 0.05). Additionally, quantitative image analysis revealed decreased invasion of maternal blood vessels by TB cells. In summary, this animal model of placental HPX identifies several aspects of abnormal placental development, including increased TB proliferation and decreased migration and invasion of TBs into the spiral arteries, the consequences of which are associated with maternal hypertension and fetal growth restriction.

  18. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors.

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    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2014-01-08

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis.

  19. Effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 on ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjie Luo; Xiaoping Wang; Hongbin Sun

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a nuclear transcription factor, is induced by hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor I, a heterodimeric DNA-binding protein, is composed of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 β subunits, which are family members of the basic helix-loop-helix-PER, ARNT, SIM (PAS) protein. O2 concentration regulates hypoxia-inducible factor 1 activity via this subunit. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α plays a major role in response to hypoxia and transcriptional activation, as well as in the target gene specificity of the DNA enhancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1β cannot be induced by hypoxia. This effect may be due to hypoxia-inducible factor 1 stability and activated conformation due to dimerization. Previous studies have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mRNA expression increases in the penumbra following ischemia/hypoxia. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 plays an important role in brain tissue injury alter ischemia by affecting a series of target genes, elevating tolerance to hypoxia, and ensuring survival of neural cells. This article summarizes the structure, function, expression, regulatory mechanisms, biological effects, and significance of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease. As a transcriptional activator, hypoxia- inducible factor 1 plays a key role in hypoxic responses by stabilizing the internal environment. It also has been shown to regulate the expression of several genes. The regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease have been described. The present review re-examined the concept of brain protection at the level of gene regulation.

  20. Glycogen synthesis is induced in hypoxia by the hypoxia-inducible factor and promotes cancer cell survival

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    Joffrey ePelletier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1, were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these hypoxia-preconditioned cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO2 acts as an alarm that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  1. Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.

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    Cho, Sung Hoon; Raybuck, Ariel L; Stengel, Kristy; Wei, Mei; Beck, Thomas C; Volanakis, Emmanuel; Thomas, James W; Hiebert, Scott; Haase, Volker H; Boothby, Mark R

    2016-09-08

    Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.

  2. Intermittent Hypoxia Influences Alveolar Bone Proper Microstructure via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and VEGF Expression in Periodontal Ligaments of Growing Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Shuji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Hosomichi, Jun; Kuma, Yoichiro; Maeda, Hideyuki; Nagai, Hisashi; Usumi-Fujita, Risa; Kaneko, Sawa; Shibutani, Naoki; Suzuki, Jun-ichi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Ono, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) recapitulates morphological changes in the maxillofacial bones in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Recently, we found that IH increased bone mineral density (BMD) in the inter-radicular alveolar bone (reflecting enhanced osteogenesis) in the mandibular first molar (M1) region in the growing rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway to assess the effect of IH by testing the null hypothesis of no significant differences in the mRNA-expression levels of relevant factors associated with the HIF pathway, between control rats and growing rats with IH. To test the null hypothesis, we investigated how IH enhances mandibular osteogenesis in the alveolar bone proper with respect to HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in periodontal ligament (PDL) tissues. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to IH for 3 weeks. The microstructure and BMD in the alveolar bone proper of the distal root of the mandibular M1 were evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA in PDL tissues were measured, whereas osteogenesis was evaluated by measuring mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2). The null hypothesis was rejected: we found an increase in the expression of all of these markers after IH exposure. The results provided the first indication that IH enhanced osteogenesis of the mandibular M1 region in association with PDL angiogenesis during growth via HIF-1α in an animal model. PMID:27695422

  3. Intermittent Hypoxia Influences Alveolar Bone Proper Microstructure via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor and VEGF Expression in Periodontal Ligaments of Growing Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Oishi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia (IH recapitulates morphological changes in the maxillofacial bones in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. Recently, we found that IH increased bone mineral density (BMD in the inter-radicular alveolar bone (reflecting enhanced osteogenesis in the mandibular first molar (M1 region in the growing rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we focused on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF pathway to assess the effect of IH by testing the null hypothesis of no significant differences in the mRNA-expression levels of relevant factors associated with the HIF pathway, between control rats and growing rats with IH. To test the null hypothesis, we investigated how IH enhances mandibular osteogenesis in the alveolar bone proper with respect to HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in periodontal ligament (PDL tissues. Seven-week-old male Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to IH for 3 weeks. The microstructure and BMD in the alveolar bone proper of the distal root of the mandibular M1 were evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT. Expression of HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA in PDL tissues were measured, whereas osteogenesis was evaluated by measuring mRNA levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP and bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2. The null hypothesis was rejected: we found an increase in the expression of all of these markers after IH exposure. The results provided the first indication that IH enhanced osteogenesis of the mandibular M1 region in association with PDL angiogenesis during growth via HIF-1α in an animal model.

  4. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  5. Dopamine does not limit fetal cerebrovascular responses to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayock, Dennis E; Bennett, Rachel; Robinson, Roderick D; Gleason, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine is used clinically to stabilize mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in sick infants. One goal of this therapeutic intervention is to maintain adequate cerebral blood flow (CBF) and perfusion pressure. High-dose intravenous dopamine has been previously demonstrated to increase cerebrovascular resistance (CVR) in near-term fetal sheep. We hypothesized that this vascular response might limit cerebral vasodilatation during acute isocapnic hypoxia. We studied nine near-term chronically catheterized unanesthetized fetal sheep. Using radiolabeled microspheres to measure fetal CBF, we calculated CVR at baseline, during fetal hypoxia, and then with the addition of an intravenous dopamine infusion at 2.5, 7.5, and 25 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) while hypoxia continued. During acute isocapnic fetal hypoxia, CBF increased 73.0 +/- 14.1% and CVR decreased 38.9 +/- 4.9% from baseline. Dopamine infusion at 2.5 and 7.5 microg.kg(-1).min(-1), begun during hypoxia, did not alter CVR or MAP, but MAP increased when dopamine infusion was increased to 25 microg.kg(-1).min(-1). Dopamine did not alter CBF or affect the CBF response to hypoxia at any dose. However, CVR increased at a dopamine infusion rate of 25 microg.kg(-1).min(-1). This increase in CVR at the highest dopamine infusion rate is likely an autoregulatory response to the increase in MAP, similar to our previous findings. Therefore, in chronically catheterized unanesthetized near-term fetal sheep, dopamine does not alter the expected cerebrovascular responses to hypoxia.

  6. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G.; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W.; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Compared to FDG, the signal of 18F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties—well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning—for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in ‘inter-corporal’ transport properties—blood volume and clearance rate—as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  7. Nutritional status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: role of hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raguso, Comasia A; Luthy, Christophe

    2011-02-01

    In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), malnutrition and limited physical activity are very common and contribute to disease prognosis, whereas a balance between caloric intake and exercise allows body weight stability and muscle mass preservation. The goal of this review is to analyze the implications of chronic hypoxia on three key elements involved in energy homeostasis and its role in COPD cachexia. The first one is energy intake. Body weight loss, often observed in patients with COPD, is related to lack of appetite. Inflammatory cytokines are known to be involved in anorexia and to be correlated to arterial partial pressure of oxygen. Recent studies in animals have investigated the role of hypoxia in peptides involved in food consumption such as leptin, ghrelin, and adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase. The second element is muscle function, which is strongly related to energy use. In COPD, muscle atrophy and muscle fiber shift to the glycolytic type might be an adaptation to chronic hypoxia to preserve the muscle from oxidative stress. Muscle atrophy could be the result of a marked activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as found in muscle of patients with COPD. Hypoxia, via hypoxia inducible factor-1, is implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis and autophagy. Third, hormonal control of energy balance seems to be affected in patients with COPD. Insulin resistance has been described in this group of patients as well as a sort of "growth hormone resistance." Hypoxia, by hypoxia inducible factor-1, accelerates the degradation of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine, decreasing cellular oxygen consumption, suggesting an adaptive mechanism rather than a primary cause of COPD cachexia. COPD rehabilitation aimed at maintaining function and quality of life needs to address body weight stabilization and, in particular, muscle mass preservation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantifying hypoxia in human cancers using static PET imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Edward; Yeung, Ivan; Keller, Harald; Wouters, Bradley G; Milosevic, Michael; Hedley, David W; Jaffray, David A

    2016-11-21

    Compared to FDG, the signal of (18)F-labelled hypoxia-sensitive tracers in tumours is low. This means that in addition to the presence of hypoxic cells, transport properties contribute significantly to the uptake signal in static PET images. This sensitivity to transport must be minimized in order for static PET to provide a reliable standard for hypoxia quantification. A dynamic compartmental model based on a reaction-diffusion formalism was developed to interpret tracer pharmacokinetics and applied to static images of FAZA in twenty patients with pancreatic cancer. We use our model to identify tumour properties-well-perfused without substantial necrosis or partitioning-for which static PET images can reliably quantify hypoxia. Normalizing the measured activity in a tumour voxel by the value in blood leads to a reduction in the sensitivity to variations in 'inter-corporal' transport properties-blood volume and clearance rate-as well as imaging study protocols. Normalization thus enhances the correlation between static PET images and the FAZA binding rate K 3, a quantity which quantifies hypoxia in a biologically significant way. The ratio of FAZA uptake in spinal muscle and blood can vary substantially across patients due to long muscle equilibration times. Normalized static PET images of hypoxia-sensitive tracers can reliably quantify hypoxia for homogeneously well-perfused tumours with minimal tissue partitioning. The ideal normalizing reference tissue is blood, either drawn from the patient before PET scanning or imaged using PET. If blood is not available, uniform, homogeneously well-perfused muscle can be used. For tumours that are not homogeneously well-perfused or for which partitioning is significant, only an analysis of dynamic PET scans can reliably quantify hypoxia.

  9. Intermittent Hypoxia Impairs Endothelial Function in Early Preatherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleta, I; França, C N; Wenzel, D; Fleischmann, B; Nickenig, G; Werner, N; Skowasch, D

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia seems to be a major pathomechanism of obstructive sleep apnea-associated progression of atherosclerosis. The goal of the present study was to assess the influence of hypoxia on endothelial function depending on the initial stage of vasculopathy. We used 16 ApoE-/- mice were exposed to a 6-week-intermittent hypoxia either immediately (early preatherosclerosis) or after 5 weeks of high-cholesterol diet (advanced preatherosclerosis). Another 16 ApoE-/- mice under normoxia served as corresponding controls. Endothelial function was measured by an organ bath technique. Blood plasma CD31+/annexin V+ endothelial microparticles as well as sca1/flk1+ endothelial progenitor cells in blood and bone marrow were analyzed by flow cytometry. The findings were that intermittent hypoxia impaired endothelial function (56.6±6.2% of maximal phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction vs. 35.2±4.1% in control) and integrity (increased percentage of endothelial microparticles: 0.28±0.05% vs. 0.15±0.02% in control) in early preatherosclerosis. Peripheral repair capacity expressed as the number of endothelial progenitor cells in blood was attenuated under hypoxia (2.0±0.5% vs. 5.3±1.9% in control), despite the elevated number of these cells in the bone marrow (2.0±0.4% vs. 1.1±0.2% in control). In contrast, endothelial function, as well as microparticle and endothelial progenitor cell levels were similar under hypoxia vs. control in advanced preatherosclerosis. We conclude that hypoxia aggravates endothelial dysfunction and destruction in early preatherosclerosis.

  10. Intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhao, Tong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2016-05-01

    Increasing studies have shown protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain injury and heart ischemia. However, the effect of intermittent hypoxia on blood glucose metabolism, especially in diabetic conditions, is rarely observed. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent hypoxia influences blood glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced diabetic adult rats and age-matched control rats were treated with intermittent hypoxia (at an altitude of 3 km, 4 h per day for 3 weeks) or normoxia as control. Fasting blood glucose, body weight, plasma fructosamine, plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), pancreas β-cell mass, and hepatic and soleus glycogen were measured. Compared with diabetic rats before treatment, the level of fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment was increased (19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L vs. 14.79 ± 5.84 mmol/L, p  0.05). Meanwhile, fasting blood glucose in diabetic rats after hypoxic treatment was also lower than that in diabetic rats after normoxic treatment (13.14 ± 5.77 mmol/L vs. 19.88 ± 5.69 mmol/L, pintermittent hypoxia was significantly lower than that in diabetic rats receiving normoxia (1.28 ± 0.11 vs. 1.39 ± 0.11, p intermittent hypoxia showed effect on the increase of soleus glycogen but not hepatic glycogen. We conclude that intermittent hypoxia maintains glycemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and its regulation on muscular glycogenesis may play a role in the underlying mechanism.

  11. Relaxin protects astrocytes from hypoxia in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M Willcox

    Full Text Available The peptide relaxin has recently been shown to protect brain tissues from the detrimental effects of ischemia. To date, the mechanisms for this remain unclear. In order to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms by which relaxin may protect the brain, we investigated the possibility that relaxin protects astrocytes from hypoxia or oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD. Cultured astrocytes were pre-treated with either relaxin-2 or relaxin-3 and exposed to OGD for 24 or 48 hours. Following OGD exposure, viability assays showed that relaxin-treated cells exhibited a higher viability when compared to astrocytes that experienced OGD-alone. Next, to test whether relaxin reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS astrocytes were exposed to the same conditions as the previous experiment and a commercially available ROS detection kit was used to detect ROS production. Astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 showed a marked decrease in ROS production when compared to control astrocytes that were exposed only to OGD. Finally, experiments were performed to determine whether or not the mitochondrial membrane potential was affected by relaxin treatment during 24 hour OGD. Mitochondrial membrane potential was higher in astrocytes that were treated with relaxin-2 and relaxin-3 compared to untreated OGD-alone astrocytes. Taken together, these data present novel findings that show relaxin protects astrocytes from ischemic conditions through the reduction of ROS production and the maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential.

  12. Hypoxia Adjacent to the Mississippi River Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabalais, N. N.; Turner, R. E.

    2005-05-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico receives the freshwater and constituent flux from the Mississippi River, which integrates 40% of the lower 48 United States. In the last half of the 20th century, the flux of nitrogen tripled, phosphorus concentration appears to have increased, and silicate concentration decreased. These changes result from landscape alterations over two centuries with an intensification of human activities that increased the flux of nitrogen and phosphorus particularly in the 1960s to 1980s. Evidence for eutrophication in the coastal ecosystem includes an increase in algal biomass, carbon accumulation from nutrient-enhanced production, worsening oxygen deficiency in the lower water column, and shifts in food web structure. The extent of the oxygen deficiency reaches 20,000 km2 of the inner continental shelf over long periods in summer with the potential for affecting commercially important fisheries in the Gulf. There is daily, weekly and seasonal variability in currents and stratification on the shelf and, therefore, no simple description of the couplings between nutrient delivery, carbon production in surface waters and delivery to and cycling in bottom waters. There are, however, multiple lines of evidence to implicate changes in riverine nutrient loads with overall primary and secondary production, carbon accumulation at the seabed, and low oxygen conditions on the shelf. The change in nutrient loads and responses of the northern Gulf coastal ecosystem, including widespread, severe seasonal hypoxia, parallel similar conditions in the coastal ocean on a global scale.

  13. Hypoxia induces heart regeneration in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Yuji; Canseco, Diana C; Thet, SuWannee; Abdisalaam, Salim; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Santos, Celio X; Shah, Ajay M; Zhang, Hua; Faber, James E; Kinter, Michael T; Szweda, Luke I; Xing, Chao; Hu, Zeping; Deberardinis, Ralph J; Schiattarella, Gabriele; Hill, Joseph A; Oz, Orhan; Lu, Zhigang; Zhang, Cheng Cheng; Kimura, Wataru; Sadek, Hesham A

    2017-01-12

    The adult mammalian heart is incapable of regeneration following cardiomyocyte loss, which underpins the lasting and severe effects of cardiomyopathy. Recently, it has become clear that the mammalian heart is not a post-mitotic organ. For example, the neonatal heart is capable of regenerating lost myocardium, and the adult heart is capable of modest self-renewal. In both of these scenarios, cardiomyocyte renewal occurs via the proliferation of pre-existing cardiomyocytes, and is regulated by aerobic-respiration-mediated oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we reasoned that inhibiting aerobic respiration by inducing systemic hypoxaemia would alleviate oxidative DNA damage, thereby inducing cardiomyocyte proliferation in adult mammals. Here we report that, in mice, gradual exposure to severe systemic hypoxaemia, in which inspired oxygen is gradually decreased by 1% and maintained at 7% for 2 weeks, results in inhibition of oxidative metabolism, decreased reactive oxygen species production and oxidative DNA damage, and reactivation of cardiomyocyte mitosis. Notably, we find that exposure to hypoxaemia 1 week after induction of myocardial infarction induces a robust regenerative response with decreased myocardial fibrosis and improvement of left ventricular systolic function. Genetic fate-mapping analysis confirms that the newly formed myocardium is derived from pre-existing cardiomyocytes. These results demonstrate that the endogenous regenerative properties of the adult mammalian heart can be reactivated by exposure to gradual systemic hypoxaemia, and highlight the potential therapeutic role of hypoxia in regenerative medicine.

  14. Hypoxia precondition promotes adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells based repair of diabetic erectile dysfunction via augmenting angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XiYou Wang

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether hypoxia preconditioning could improve therapeutic effects of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (AMSCs for diabetes induced erectile dysfunction (DED. AMSCs were pretreated with normoxia (20% O2, N-AMSCs or sub-lethal hypoxia (1% O2, H-AMSCs. The hypoxia exposure up-regulated the expression of several angiogenesis and neuroprotection related cytokines in AMSCs, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and its receptor FIK-1, angiotensin (Ang-1, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF, stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1 and its CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4. DED rats were induced via intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg and were randomly divided into three groups-Saline group: intracavernous injection with phosphate buffer saline; N-AMSCs group: N-AMSCs injection; H-AMSCs group: H-AMSCs injection. Ten rats without any treatment were used as normal control. Four weeks after injection, the mean arterial pressure (MAP and intracavernosal pressure (ICP were measured. The contents of endothelial, smooth muscle, dorsal nerve in cavernoursal tissue were assessed. Compared with N-AMSCs and saline, intracavernosum injection of H-AMSCs significantly raised ICP and ICP/MAP (p<0.05. Immunofluorescent staining analysis demonstrated that improved erectile function by MSCs was significantly associated with increased expression of endothelial markers (CD31 and vWF (p<0.01 and smooth muscle markers (α-SMA (p<0.01. Meanwhile, the expression of nNOS was also significantly higher in rats receiving H-AMSCs injection than those receiving N-AMSCs or saline injection. The results suggested that hypoxic preconditioning of MSCs was an effective approach to enhance their therapeutic effect for DED, which may be due to their augmented angiogenesis and neuroprotection.

  15. Hypoxia, leptin, and vascular endothelial growth factor stimulate vascular endothelial cell differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekhite, Mohamed M; Finkensieper, Andreas; Rebhan, Jennifer; Huse, Stephanie; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Sauer, Heinrich; Wartenberg, Maria

    2014-02-15

    The plasticity of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hASCs) is promising, but differentiation in vitro toward endothelial cells is poorly understood. Flow cytometry demonstrated that hASCs isolated from excised fat tissue were positive for CD29, CD44, CD70, CD90, CD105, and CD166 and negative for the endothelial marker CD31, and the hematopoietic cell markers CD34 and CD133. hASCs differentiated into adipocytes after cultivation in adipogenic medium. Exposure of hASCs for 10 days under hypoxia (3% oxygen) in combination with leptin increased the percentage of CD31(+) endothelial cells as well as CD31, VE-Cadherin, Flk-1, Tie2, von Willebrand factor, and endothelial cell nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression. This was enhanced on co-incubation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and leptin, whereas VEGF alone was not sufficient. Moreover, hASCs cultured on a matrigel surface under hypoxia/VEGF/leptin, showed a stable branching network. Hypoxic conditions significantly decreased apoptosis as evaluated by cleaved caspase-3, and increased prolyl hydroxylase domain 3 mRNA expression. Hypoxia increased expression of VEGF as well as leptin transcripts, which were significantly inhibited on co-incubation with either VEGF or leptin or a combination of both. Furthermore, leptin treatment of hypoxic cells increased the expression of the long/signaling form of the leptin receptor (ObRL), which was augmented on co-incubation with VEGF. The observed endothelial differentiation was dependent on the Akt pathway, as co-administration with Akt inhibitor abolished the observed effects. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that hASCs can be efficiently differentiated to endothelial cells by mimicking the hypoxic and pro-angiogenic microenvironment of adipose tissue.

  16. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  17. The Linkage between Breast Cancer, Hypoxia, and Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Linda K; Netzer, Nikolaus C; Hoegel, Josef; Pramsohler, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    The development of breast cancer cells is linked to hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced factor HIF-1α influences metastasis through neovascularization. Hypoxia seems to decrease the responsiveness to hormonal treatment due to loss of estrogen receptors (ERs). Obesity is discussed to increase hypoxia in adipocytes, which promotes a favorable environment for tumor cells in mammary fat tissue, whereas, tumor cells profit from good oxygen supply and are influenced by its deprivation as target regions within tumors show. This review gives an overview of the current state on research of hypoxia and breast cancer in human adipose tissue. A systematic literature search was conducted on PubMed (2000-2016) by applying hypoxia and/or adipocytes and breast cancer as keywords. Review articles were excluded as well as languages other than English or German. There was no restriction regarding the study design or type of breast cancer. A total of 35 papers were found. Eight studies were excluded due to missing at least two of the three keywords. One paper was removed due to Russian language, and one was dismissed due to lack of adherence. Seven papers were identified as reviews. After applying exclusion criteria, 18 articles were eligible for inclusion. Two articles describe the impairment of mammary epithelial cell polarization through hypoxic preconditioning. A high amount of adipocytes enhances cancer progression due to the increased expression of HIF-1α which causes the loss of ER α protein as stated in four articles. Four articles analyzed that increased activation of HIF's induces a series of transcriptions resulting in tumor angiogenesis. HIF inhibition, especially when combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy, holds strong potential for tumor suppression as stated in further four articles. In two articles there is evidence of a strong connection between hypoxia, oxidative stress and a poor prognosis for breast cancer via HIF regulated pathways. Acute hypoxia seems to normalize the

  18. Marker development in ornamental plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusden, van A.W.; Arens, P.

    2009-01-01

    Development of markers for a new crop or development of additional markers for a crop where markers have been developed in the past raises the question of the intended use of the markers. Depending on the different objectives in mind one marker type may be better suited then another. In general one

  19. Hypoxia adaptation and hemoglobin mutation in Tibetan chick embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Xiao; LI Ning; LIAN Linsheng; YAN Dawei; ZHANG Hao; WU Changxin

    2005-01-01

    Tibetan chick lives at high altitudes between 2600 and 4200 m with a high hatchability and low land breeds survive rarely with a hatchability of 3.0% under hypoxia of simulated 4200 m. Under hypoxia of whole 21 d, the hatchability of Tibetan chick and Recessive White Feather broiler differed with a greatest disparity from day 4 to 11 and also significantly in other stages except from day 1 to 3. Hypoxia in each stage did not reduce significantly survival rate of this stage except hatchability. These two results indicated that the hypoxia in the early stage had an adverse effect on the later stage. All exons encoding chick hemoglobins were sequenced to analyze gene polymorphism. The functional mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu, related with hypoxia, was found in αD globin chain and the mutation frequency increased with increased altitude. In addition, under hypoxic conditions, the population with higher mutation frequency had a higher hatchability. The automated homology model building was carried out using crystal structure coordinates of chick HbD. The results indicated that the substitution Met-32(B13)-Leu provides a more hydrophobic environment which leads to higher stability of heme and oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. The occurrence of the mutation Met-32(B13)-Leu is related to the origin of Tibetan chick.

  20. Hypoxia promotes adipose-derived stem cell proliferation via VEGF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuc Van Pham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs are a promising mesenchymal stem cell source with therapeutic applications. Recent studies have shown that ADSCs could be expanded in vitro without phenotype changes. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of hypoxia on ADSC proliferation in vitro and to determine the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF in ADSC proliferation. ADSCs were selectively cultured from the stromal vascular fraction obtained from adipose tissue in DMEM/F12 medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% antibiotic-antimycotic. ADSCs were cultured under two conditions: hypoxia (5% O2 and normal oxygen (21% O2. The effects of the oxygen concentration on cell proliferation were examined by cell cycle and doubling time. The expression of VEGF was evaluated by the ELISA assay. The role of VEGF in ADSC proliferation was studied by neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies. We found that the ADSC proliferation rate was significantly higher under hypoxia compared with normoxia. In hypoxia, ADSCs also triggered VEGF expression. However, neutralizing VEGF with anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies significantly reduced the proliferation rate. These results suggest that hypoxia stimulated ADSC proliferation in association with VEGF production. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(1.000: 476-482

  1. Insights into the cellular responses to hypoxia in filamentous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Falk; Shekhova, Elena; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2015-08-01

    Most eukaryotes require molecular oxygen for growth. In general, oxygen is the terminal electron acceptor of the respiratory chain and represents an important substrate for the biosynthesis of cellular compounds. However, in their natural environment, such as soil, and also during the infection, filamentous fungi are confronted with low levels of atmospheric oxygen. Transcriptome and proteome studies on the hypoxic response of filamentous fungi revealed significant alteration of the gene expression and protein synthesis upon hypoxia. These analyses discovered not only common but also species-specific responses to hypoxia with regard to NAD(+) regeneration systems and other metabolic pathways. A surprising outcome was that the induction of oxidative and nitrosative stress defenses during oxygen limitation represents a general trait of adaptation to hypoxia in many fungi. The interplay of these different stress responses is poorly understood, but recent studies have shown that adaptation to hypoxia contributes to virulence of pathogenic fungi. In this review, results on metabolic changes of filamentous fungi during adaptation to hypoxia are summarized and discussed.

  2. Kidney EPO expression during chronic hypoxia in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benderro, Girriso F; LaManna, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain normal cellular function, mammalian tissue oxygen concentrations must be tightly regulated within a narrow physiological range. The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) is essential for maintenance of tissue oxygen supply by stimulating red blood cell production and promoting their survival. In this study we compared the effects of 290 Torr atmospheric pressure on the kidney EPO protein levels in young (4-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after being anesthetized, and kidney samples were collected and processed by Western blot analysis. Relatively low basal expression of EPO during normoxia in young mice showed significant upregulation in hypoxia and stayed upregulated throughout the hypoxic period (threefold compared to normoxic control), showing a slight decline toward the third week. Whereas, a relatively higher normoxic basal EPO protein level in aged mice did not show significant increase until seventh day of hypoxia, but showed significant upregulation in prolonged hypoxia. Hence, we confirmed that there is a progressively increased accumulation of EPO during chronic hypoxia in young and aged mouse kidney, and the EPO upregulation during hypoxia showed a similarity with the pattern of increase in hematocrit, which we have reported previously.

  3. Heart disease link to fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Dino A; Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Richter, Hans G; Camm, Emily J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Kane, Andrew D; Hansell, Jeremy A; Brain, Kirsty L; Skeffington, Katie L; Itani, Nozomi; Wooding, F B Peter; Cross, Christine M; Allison, Beth J

    2014-01-01

    The quality of the intrauterine environment interacts with our genetic makeup to shape the risk of developing disease in later life. Fetal chronic hypoxia is a common complication of pregnancy. This chapter reviews how fetal chronic hypoxia programmes cardiac and endothelial dysfunction in the offspring in adult life and discusses the mechanisms via which this may occur. Using an integrative approach in large and small animal models at the in vivo, isolated organ, cellular and molecular levels, our programmes of work have raised the hypothesis that oxidative stress in the fetal heart and vasculature underlies the mechanism via which prenatal hypoxia programmes cardiovascular dysfunction in later life. Developmental hypoxia independent of changes in maternal nutrition promotes fetal growth restriction and induces changes in the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine systems of the adult offspring, which are normally associated with disease states during ageing. Treatment with antioxidants of animal pregnancies complicated with reduced oxygen delivery to the fetus prevents the alterations in fetal growth, and the cardiovascular, metabolic and endocrine dysfunction in the fetal and adult offspring. The work reviewed offers both insight into mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for clinical intervention against the early origin of cardiometabolic disease in pregnancy complicated by fetal chronic hypoxia.

  4. Hypoxia and dehydroepiandrosterone in old age: a mouse survival study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quillard Janine

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival remains an issue in pulmonary hypertension, a chronic disorder that often affects aged human adults. In young adult mice and rats, chronic 50% hypoxia (11% FIO2 or 0.5 atm induces pulmonary hypertension without threatening life. In this framework, oral dehydroepiandrosterone was recently shown to prevent and reverse pulmonary hypertension in rats within a few weeks. To evaluate dehydroepiandrosterone therapy more globally, in the long term and in old age, we investigated whether hypoxia decreases lifespan and whether dehydroepiandrosterone improves survival under hypoxia. Methods 240 C57BL/6 mice were treated, from the age of 21 months until death, by normobaric hypoxia (11% FIO2 or normoxia, both with and without dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (25 mg/kg in drinking water (4 groups, N = 60. Survival, pulmonary artery and heart remodeling, weight and blood patterns were assessed. Results In normoxia, control mice reached the median age of 27 months (median survival: 184 days. Hypoxia not only induced cardiopulmonary remodeling and polycythemia in old animals but also induced severe weight loss, trembling behavior and high mortality (p Conclusion Dehydroepiandrosterone globally reduced what may be called an age-related frailty induced by hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. This interestingly recalls an inverse correlation found in the prospective PAQUID epidemiological study, between dehydroepiandrosterone blood levels and mortality in aged human smokers and former smokers.

  5. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Tvisha; Baccino-Calace, Martin; Meyenhofer, Felix; Rodriguez-Crespo, David; Akarsu, Hatice; Armenta-Calderón, Ricardo; Gorr, Thomas A.; Frei, Christian; Cantera, Rafael; Egger, Boris

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia) rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD) of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response. PMID:28011628

  6. Peripheral hypoxia in restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Aaro V; Rimpilä, Ville; Polo, Olli

    2014-05-27

    A case-control study to measure oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures in the legs in order to assess the involvement of peripheral hypoxia or hypercapnia in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS severity was assessed with a standard questionnaire. Suggested immobilization tests were performed twice in 15 patients with RLS and 14 healthy controls. Patients with RLS participated in the tests with and without pramipexole medication. During the tests, peripheral oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures were measured noninvasively on the skin of the legs and the chest. During immobilization, the patients with RLS had lower partial pressure of oxygen in their legs (5.54 vs 7.19 kPa, p < 0.01) but not on the chest (8.75 vs 8.20 kPa, p = 0.355). More severe RLS correlated with high chest-to-foot oxygen gradient (ρ = 0.692, p < 0.01). Carbon dioxide levels did not differ between the groups. Pramipexole corrected the peripheral hypoxia toward the levels observed in the controls (from 5.54 to 6.65 kPa, p < 0.05). Peripheral hypoxia is associated with the appearance of RLS symptoms. Strong correlation with RLS severity suggests a close pathophysiologic link between peripheral hypoxia and the symptoms of RLS. This is further supported by the simultaneous reversal of hypoxia and discomfort by dopaminergic treatment. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Predicted effects of climate change on northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. state and federal partners are working cooperatively to develop nutrient management strategies to reduce hypoxia (O2 Mexico. Numerical models that represent eutrophication and hypoxia development processes have been an important too...

  8. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Bonne, T C; Zaar, M; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition...

  9. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of [Beta]-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    C Siebenmann; P Rasmussen; H Sørensen; T C Bonne; M Zaar; N J Aachmann-Andersen; N B Nordsborg; N H Secher; C Lundby

    2015-01-01

      Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition...

  10. Hypoxia-based strategies for regenerative dentistry-Views from the different dental fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anna Sonja; Janjić, Klara; Lilaj, Bledar; Edelmayer, Michael; Agis, Hermann

    2017-09-01

    The understanding of the cell biological processes underlying development and regeneration of oral tissues leads to novel regenerative approaches. Over the past years, knowledge on key roles of the hypoxia-based response has become more profound. Based on these findings, novel regenerative approaches for dentistry are emerging, which target cellular oxygen sensors. These approaches include hypoxia pre-conditioning and pharmacologically simulated hypoxia. The increase in studies on hypoxia and hypoxia-based strategies in regenerative dentistry highlights the growing attention to hypoxia's role in regeneration and its underlying biology, as well as its application in a therapeutic setting. In this narrative review, we present the current knowledge on the role of hypoxia in oral tissues and review the proposed hypoxia-based approaches in different fields of dentistry, including endodontics, orthodontics, periodontics, and oral surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on single-channel EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tinglin; Wang, You; Li, Guang

    2016-03-23

    A single-channel algorithm was proposed in order to study effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on EEG pattern. EEG was decomposed by ensemble empirical mode decomposition into a finite number of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) based on the intrinsic local characteristic time scale. Analytic amplitude, analytic frequency, and recurrence property quantified by recurrence quantification analysis were explored on IMFs, and the first two scales revealed difference between normal EEG and hypoxia EEG. Classification accuracy of hypoxia EEG and normal EEG could reach 67.8% before decline of neurobehavioral ability, which represented that hypoxia EEG pattern could be detected at an early stage. Classification accuracy of hypoxia EEG and normal EEG increased with time and deepened intensity of hypoxia was observed by regular shift of hypoxia EEG pattern with time in a three dimensional subspace. The reduced shift and classification accuracy after intermittent hypoxic training represented that hypoxia tolerance enhanced.

  12. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  13. The effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming capacity and growth performance of southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Han; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effects of diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation on the hypoxia tolerance, swimming and growth performance of juvenile southern catfish, we initially measured the critical oxygen tension (P(crit)), oxygen thresholds of aquatic surface respiration (ASR) and loss of equilibrium (LOE) of diel-cycling hypoxia-acclimated (15 d, 7:00-21:00, dissolved oxygen level (DO) = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1); 21:00-7:00, DO = 3.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) and non-acclimated (15 d, DO = 7.0 ± 0.2 mg L(-1)) southern catfish at 25 °C. We then measured the critical swimming speed (U(crit)) and metabolic rate (MR) of hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish (under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions). The feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) of fish in hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated groups were also measured. The P(crit), ASR and LOE of hypoxia-acclimated fish were significantly lower than those of non-acclimated fish. Hypoxia acclimation resulted in a significantly higher U(crit) when the individuals swam in hypoxia. The U(crit), maximum metabolic rate (MMR) and metabolic scope (MS) of both the hypoxia-acclimated and non-acclimated fish all decreased with the decrease of DO. However, the U(crit), MMR and MS decreased by 31, 43 and 54%, respectively, in non-acclimated fish, whereas these values decreased by 15, 28 and 29%, respectively, in hypoxia-acclimated fish, which suggests that hypoxia-acclimated fish were less sensitive to the DO decrease. The FR, FE and SGR all decreased by 21, 20 and 45%, respectively, in the hypoxia-acclimated group compared to the non-acclimated group. This result suggests that diel-cycling hypoxia acclimation improved the hypoxia tolerance and aerobic swimming performance of southern catfish, whereas impaired the growth performance. The high hypoxia tolerance and physiological plasticity to hypoxia-acclimated southern catfish may be related to its lower maintenance energy expenditure, sit-and-wait lifestyle and

  14. VT Roadside Historic Markers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Roadside Historic Site Marker program has proven an effective way to commemorate Vermont’s many people, events, and places of regional, statewide, or national...

  15. Fiducial Marker Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media Computed Tomography (CT) - Body General Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Introduction to Cancer Therapy (Radiation Oncology) Proton Therapy Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Images related to Fiducial Marker Placement Sponsored by ...

  16. Inhibition of phospholipaseD2 increases hypoxia-induced human colon cancer cell apoptosis through inactivating of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Maoxi; Fu, Zhongxue; Wu, Xingye; Du, Kunli; Zhang, Shouru; Zeng, Li

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumor, and is a direct stress that triggers apoptosis in many human cell types. As one of solid cancer, hypoxia exists in the whole course of colon cancer occurrence and progression. Our previous studies shown that hypoxia induce high expression of phospholipase D2 (PLD2) and survivin in colon cancer cells. However, the correlation between PLD2 and survivin in hypoxic colon cancer cells remains unknown. In this study, we observed significantly elevated PLD2 and survivin expression levels in colon cancer tissues and cells. This is a positive correlation between of them, and co-expression of PLD2 and survivin has a positive correlation with the clinicpatholic features including tumor size, TNM stage, and lymph node metastasis. We also found that hypoxia induced the activity of PLD increased significant mainly caused by PLD2 in colon cancer cells. However, inhibition the activity of PLD2 induced by hypoxia promotes the apoptosis of human colon cancer cells, as well as decreased the expression of apoptosis markers including survivin and bcl2. Moreover, the pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/AKT supported the hypothesis that promotes the apoptosis of hypoxic colon cancer cells by PLD2 activity inhibition may through inactivation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Furthermore, interference the PLD2 gene expression leaded to the apoptosis of hypoxic colon cancer cells increased and also decreased the expression level of survivin and bcl2 may through inactivation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. These results indicated that PLD2 play antiapoptotic role in colon cancer under hypoxic conditions, inhibition of the activity, or interference of PLD2 gene expression will benefit for the treatment of colon cancer patients.

  17. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) promotes breast cancer cell metastasis and the mechanism implicates epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xinping; Zhao, Hu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jing; Li, Xia; Zhang, Yan; Bu, Xin; Shi, Man; Yao, Libo; Su, Jin

    2014-12-01

    A wide range of genes involved in breast cancer metastasis have been reported to be related to the microenvironment. We studied the role of discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), a collagen-binding receptor, in breast cancer progression under hypoxic conditions. We showed that DDR2 protein expression closely correlated with the expression of hypoxic marker HIF-1α in clinical breast cancer specimens. The in vitro data demonstrated that hypoxia treatment increased the levels of both expression and phosphorylation of DDR2 in human breast cancer cell lines. In vivo, orthotopic breast tumour xenografts with DDR2 knockdown displayed reduced dissemination and significant prevention in pulmonary and lymphatic metastasis; conversely, these processes were significantly facilitated by the enforced expression of the activated form of DDR2. Further mechanism studies indicated that DDR2 plays an indispensable role in a series of hypoxia-induced behaviours of breast cancer cells, including migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The transcription factor Snail was found to mediate DDR2-induced down-regulation of the cell-cell adhesion molecule E-cadherin. It was also documented that there is a correlation between DDR2 and E-cadherin expression with the presence of lymph node metastases in 160 cases of invasive human breast carcinoma. In addition, we provided evidence that DDR2 silencing in breast cancer cells prevents the hypoxia-induced activation of ERK MAPK, suggesting its potential involvement in mediating the effect of DDR2 on hypoxia-induced signalling. Based on the results of this study, we conclude that DDR2 participates in hypoxia-induced breast cancer metastasis through the regulation of cell migration, invasion, and EMT, and thus may serve as an accessible therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  18. Progressive multicystic encephalopathy: is there more than hypoxia-ischemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garten, Lars; Hueseman, Dieter; Stoltenburg-Didinger, Gisela; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Weizsaecker, Katharina; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Obladen, Michael

    2007-05-01

    Progressive multicystic encephalopathy following prenatal or perinatal hypoxia-ischemia is a well-described phenomenon in the literature. The authors report on a term infant with a devastating encephalopathy and severe neuronal dysfunction immediately after delivery without a known antecedent of prenatal or perinatal hypoxia or distress. Clinical and paraclinical findings in the patient are compared with those described in the literature. The authors focus on the specific results guiding to the final diagnosis of progressive multicystic encephalopathy and the timing of morphologic changes. As in this case, if the criteria of an acute hypoxic event sufficient to cause neonatal encephalopathy are not met, then factors other than hypoxia-ischemia may be leading to progressive multicystic encephalopathy.

  19. Susceptibility of dogs with heartworm disease to hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, C A; Losonsky, J M; Lewis, R E

    1977-09-01

    Dogs with Dirofilaria immitis microfilariae and early radiographic pulmonary artery changes, but without pulmonary hypertension or clinical signs of heartworm disease, were studied. An exaggerated pulmonary hypertensive response was found in these dogs if subjected to 10% inspired oxygen. The mean pulmonary artery pressure of control dogs was increased from base line (prehypoxia control) of 15.8 +/- 2.3 (SEM) mm of Hg to 20.2 +/- 2.3 during hypoxia, and the mean pulmonary pressure of dogs with heartworm disease increased from base line of 16.4 +/- 2.4 to 26.4 +/- 1.6 during hypoxia. Pulmonary blood flow was not affected by hypoxia indicating that the increased pulmonary artery pressure was the result of increased pulmonary vascular resistance. There was an individual variation of this pulmonary hypertensive response of dogs with heartworm disease that did not appear related to the severity of the pulmonary arterial lesions, as evaluated by pulmonary arteriography.

  20. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics:targeting tumor hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher P. Guise; Alexandra M. Mowday; Amir Ashoorzadeh; Ran Yuan; Wan-Hua Lin; Dong-Hai Wu; Jeff B. Smaill; Adam V. Patterson; Ke Ding

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cels in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracelular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples.

  1. Bioreductive prodrugs as cancer therapeutics: targeting tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Christopher P; Mowday, Alexandra M; Ashoorzadeh, Amir; Yuan, Ran; Lin, Wan-Hua; Wu, Dong-Hai; Smaill, Jeff B; Patterson, Adam V; Ding, Ke

    2014-02-01

    Hypoxia, a state of low oxygen, is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with disease progression as well as resistance to radiotherapy and certain chemotherapeutic drugs. Hypoxic regions in tumors, therefore, represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. To date, five distinct classes of bioreactive prodrugs have been developed to target hypoxic cells in solid tumors. These hypoxia-activated prodrugs, including nitro compounds, N-oxides, quinones, and metal complexes, generally share a common mechanism of activation whereby they are reduced by intracellular oxidoreductases in an oxygen-sensitive manner to form cytotoxins. Several examples including PR-104, TH-302, and EO9 are currently undergoing phase II and phase III clinical evaluation. In this review, we discuss the nature of tumor hypoxia as a therapeutic target, focusing on the development of bioreductive prodrugs. We also describe the current knowledge of how each prodrug class is activated and detail the clinical progress of leading examples.

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Effect of acute hypobaric hypoxia on the endothelial glycocalyx and digital reactive hyperemia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Pär I; Bergström, Anita; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hypoxia is associated with increased capillary permeability. This study tested whether acute hypobaric hypoxia involves degradation of the endothelial glycocalyx. METHODS: We exposed 12 subjects to acute hypobaric hypoxia (equivalent to 4500 m for 2-4 h) and measured venous blood co...

  4. Reduced Cardiac Calcineurin Expression Mimics Long-Term Hypoxia-Induced Heart Defects in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarndt, Rachel; Walls, Stanley M; Ocorr, Karen; Bodmer, Rolf

    2017-10-01

    Hypoxia is often associated with cardiopulmonary diseases, which represent some of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Long-term hypoxia exposures, whether from disease or environmental condition, can cause cardiomyopathy and lead to heart failure. Indeed, hypoxia-induced heart failure is a hallmark feature of chronic mountain sickness in maladapted populations living at high altitude. In a previously established Drosophila heart model for long-term hypoxia exposure, we found that hypoxia caused heart dysfunction. Calcineurin is known to be critical in cardiac hypertrophy under normoxia, but its role in the heart under hypoxia is poorly understood. In the present study, we explore the function of calcineurin, a gene candidate we found downregulated in the Drosophila heart after lifetime and multigenerational hypoxia exposure. We examined the roles of 2 homologs of Calcineurin A, CanA14F, and Pp2B in the Drosophila cardiac response to long-term hypoxia. We found that knockdown of these calcineurin catalytic subunits caused cardiac restriction under normoxia that are further aggravated under hypoxia. Conversely, cardiac overexpression of Pp2B under hypoxia was lethal, suggesting that a hypertrophic signal in the presence of insufficient oxygen supply is deleterious. Our results suggest a key role for calcineurin in cardiac remodeling during long-term hypoxia with implications for diseases of chronic hypoxia, and it likely contributes to mechanisms underlying these disease states. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress characterizes a necrotic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Stromal fibrosis and tissue necrosis are major histological sequelae of hypoxia. The hypoxia-to-fibrosis sequence is well-documented in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, hypoxic and necrotic PDAC phenotypes are insufficiently characterized. Recently, reduction of tuberous sclerosis expression in mice together with oncogenic Kras demonstrated a rapidly metastasizing phenotype with histologically eccentric necrosis, transitional hypoxia and devascularisation. We established cell...

  6. Marker development in ornamental plants

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Development of markers for a new crop or development of additional markers for a crop where markers have been developed in the past raises the question of the intended use of the markers. Depending on the different objectives in mind one marker type may be better suited then another. In general one can think of two main objectives for the use of markers; variety identification and breeding applications. In view of recent developments in molecular genetics, and sequencing technologies in parti...

  7. Skeletal muscle vasodilation during systemic hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinenno, Frank A

    2016-01-15

    In humans, the net effect of acute systemic hypoxia in quiescent skeletal muscle is vasodilation despite significant reflex increases in muscle sympathetic vasoconstrictor nerve activity. This vasodilation increases tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery to maintain tissue oxygen consumption. Although several mechanisms may be involved, we recently tested the roles of two endothelial-derived substances during conditions of sympathoadrenal blockade to isolate local vascular control mechanisms: nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Our findings indicate that 1) NO normally plays a role in regulating vascular tone during hypoxia independent of the PG pathway; 2) PGs do not normally contribute to vascular tone during hypoxia, however, they do affect vascular tone when NO is inhibited; 3) NO and PGs are not independently obligatory to observe hypoxic vasodilation when assessed as a response from rest to steady-state hypoxia; and 4) combined NO and PG inhibition abolishes hypoxic vasodilation in human skeletal muscle. When the stimulus is exacerbated via combined submaximal rhythmic exercise and systemic hypoxia to cause further red blood cell (RBC) deoxygenation, skeletal muscle blood flow is augmented compared with normoxic exercise via local dilator mechanisms to maintain oxygen delivery to active tissue. Data obtained in a follow-up study indicate that combined NO and PG inhibition during hypoxic exercise blunts augmented vasodilation and hyperemia compared with control (normoxic) conditions by ∼50%; however, in contrast to hypoxia alone, the response is not abolished, suggesting that other local substances are involved. Factors associated with greater RBC deoxygenation such as ATP release, or nitrite reduction to NO, or both likely play a role in regulating this response.

  8. Impaired response of mature adipocytes of diabetic mice to hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Seok Jong, E-mail: seok-hong@northwestern.edu; Jin, Da P.; Buck, Donald W.; Galiano, Robert D.; Mustoe, Thomas A., E-mail: tmustoe@nmh.org

    2011-10-01

    Adipose tissue contains various cells such as infiltrated monocytes/macrophages, endothelial cells, preadipocytes, and adipocytes. Adipocytes have an endocrine function by secreting adipokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, leptin, and adiponectin. Dysregulation of adipokines in adipose tissues leads to a chronic low-grade inflammation which could result in atherosclerosis, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes. A sustained inflammatory state, which is characterized by prolonged persistence of macrophages and neutrophils, is found in diabetic wounds. In addition, subcutaneous adipocytes are enormously increased in amount clinically in type 2 diabetes. However, the function of subcutaneous adipocytes, which play an important role in injured tissue subjected to hypoxia, has not been well characterized in vitro due to the difficulty of maintaining mature adipocytes in culture using conventional methods because of their buoyancy. In this study, we established a novel in vitro culture method of mature adipocytes by enclosing them in a hyaluronan (HA) based hydrogel to study their role in response to stress such as hypoxia. BrdU labeling and Ki67 immunostaining experiments showed that hydrogel enclosed mature adipocytes proliferate in vitro. Both mRNA and protein expression analyses for hypoxia regulated genes, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), showed that mature adipocytes of wild type mice respond to hypoxia. In contrast, mature adipocytes of diabetic db/db and TallyHo mice did not efficiently respond to hypoxia. Our studies suggest that mature adipocytes are functionally active cells, and their abnormal function to hypoxia can be one of underlining mechanisms in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Nitric Oxide And Hypoxia Response In Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Caballano Infantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of pluripotent cells (ESCs and iPSCs under conditions that maintain their pluripotency is necessary to implement a cell therapy program. Previously, we have described that low nitric oxide (NO donor diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO added to the culture medium, promote the expansion of these cell types. The molecular mechanisms are not yet known. We present evidences that ESC and iPSCs in normoxia in presence of low NO triggers a similar response to hypoxia, thus maintaining the pluripotency. We have studied the stability of HIF-1α (Hypoxia Inducible Factor in presence of low NO. Because of the close relationship between hypoxia, metabolism, mitochondrial function and pluripotency we have analyzed by q RT-PCR the expression of genes involved in the glucose metabolism such as: HK2, LDHA and PDK1; besides other HIF-1α target gene. We further analyzed the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC1α, TFAM and NRF1 and we have observed that low NO maintains the same pattern of expression that in hypoxia. The study of the mitochondrial membrane potential using Mito-Tracker dye showed that NO decrease the mitochondrial function. We will analyze other metabolic parameters, to determinate if low NO regulates mitochondrial function and mimics Hypoxia Response. The knowledge of the role of NO in the Hypoxia Response and the mechanism that helps to maintain self-renewal in pluripotent cells in normoxia, can help to the design of culture media where NO could be optimal for stem cell expansion in the performance of future cell therapies.

  10. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaolin; XU Cunshuan; WANG Xiujie; WANG Dongjie; WANG Qingshang; ZHANG Baochen

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  11. Design and conduct of Caudwell Xtreme Everest: an observational cohort study of variation in human adaptation to progressive environmental hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythen Monty G

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The physiological responses to hypoxaemia and cellular hypoxia are poorly understood, and inter-individual differences in performance at altitude and outcome in critical illness remain unexplained. We propose a model for exploring adaptation to hypoxia in the critically ill: the study of healthy humans, progressively exposed to environmental hypobaric hypoxia (EHH. The aim of this study was to describe the spectrum of adaptive responses in humans exposed to graded EHH and identify factors (physiological and genetic associated with inter-individual variation in these responses. Methods Design Observational cohort study of progressive incremental exposure to EHH. Setting University human physiology laboratory in London, UK (75 m and 7 field laboratories in Nepal at 1300 m, 3500 m, 4250 m, 5300 m, 6400 m, 7950 m and 8400 m. Participants 198 healthy volunteers and 24 investigators trekking to Everest Base Camp (EBC (5300 m. A subgroup of 14 investigators studied at altitudes up to 8400 m on Everest. Main outcome measures Exercise capacity, exercise efficiency and economy, brain and muscle Near Infrared Spectroscopy, plasma biomarkers (including markers of inflammation, allele frequencies of known or suspected hypoxia responsive genes, spirometry, neurocognitive testing, retinal imaging, pupilometry. In nested subgroups: microcirculatory imaging, muscle biopsies with proteomic and transcriptomic tissue analysis, continuous cardiac output measurement, arterial blood gas measurement, trans-cranial Doppler, gastrointestinal tonometry, thromboelastography and ocular saccadometry. Results Of 198 healthy volunteers leaving Kathmandu, 190 reached EBC (5300 m. All 24 investigators reached EBC. The completion rate for planned testing was more than 99% in the investigator group and more than 95% in the trekkers. Unique measurements were safely performed at extreme altitude, including the highest (altitude field measurements of exercise

  12. The acquired radioresistance in HeLa cells under conditions mimicking hypoxia was attenuated by a decreased expression of HIF subunit genes induced by RNA interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Nobutaka [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Ogawa, Ryohei, E-mail: ogawa@med.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Cui, Zheng-Guo [Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Morii, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akihiko [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama (Japan); Kanayama, Shinji; Yoneda, Yuko [New Products Research & Development, Gene Engineering Division, NIPPON GENE Co., Ltd. (Japan); Kondo, Takashi [Department of Radiological Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    The cancer cells residing in the hypoxic layer are resistant to radiation and these are ones responsible for cancer recurrence after radiation therapy. One of the reasons why hypoxic cancer cells acquire radioresistance may be attributable to changes in the gene expression profile by the activation of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs). However, the details underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of knockdown of HIF subunit genes to elucidate how HIF subunit genes may be involved in the radioresistance acquired by HeLa cells following exposure to a hypoxia mimic. Interestingly, HIF-1α and HIF-2α seemed mutually complementary for each other when either of them was suppressed. We thus suppressed the expression of both genes simultaneously. To do this, we developed a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting a high homology region between HIF-1α and HIF-2α. It was shown that the expression of the shRNA effectively suppressed the acquisition of radioresistance following the hypoxia mimic. Moreover, it was confirmed that suppression of both subunits resulted in the downregulation of stem cell markers and the suppression of spheroid formation during the hypoxia mimicking-conditions. This shRNA-mediated knockdown method targeting a common region shared by a family of genes may offer a new candidate cancer treatment. - Highlights: • Incubation with CoCl{sub 2} confers radioresistance to HeLa cells. • Both HIF-1α and HIF-2α are involved in the acquisition of radioresistance. • An shRNA to a homology region of HIF-1α and HIF-2α suppressed the radioresistance. • The shRNA decreased cells with stem cell markers and a stem cell phenotype.

  13. Peak heart rate decreases with increasing severity of acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Araoz, M; Van Hall, Gerrit

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the degree to which peak heart rate is reduced during exhaustive exercise in acute hypoxia. Five sea-level lowlanders performed maximal exercise at normobaric normoxia and at three different levels of hypobaric hypoxia (barometric pressures of 518......, 459, and 404 mmHg) in a hypobaric chamber and while breathing 9% O(2) in N(2). These conditions were equivalent to altitudes of 3300, 4300, 5300, and 6300 m above sea level, respectively. At 4300 m, maximal exercise was also repeated after 4 and 8 h. Peak heart rate (HR) decreased from 191 (182...

  14. Past Occurrences of Hypoxia in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillen, L.; Conley, D. J.; Bjorck, S.

    2007-12-01

    The hypoxic zone in the Baltic Sea has increased in area by about four times since 1950. Widespread oxygen deficiency below the halocline has severely reduced macro benthic communities in the Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland over the past decades and negatively effected food chain dynamics, fish habitats and fisheries in the entire Baltic Sea. In addition, hypoxia alters nutrient biogeochemical cycles. The cause of the increased hypoxia is believed to be enhanced eutrophication through increased anthropogenic input of nutrients, such as phosphorous and nitrogen. Conditions prior to the 1950s are considered as the benchmark and some authors suggest that the earlier Baltic Sea was an oligothrophic, clear-water body with oxygenated deep waters. By contrast, studies of short sediment cores reveal that hypoxia has been present in some of the deepest basins for at least the last 100-200 years. In addition, long sediment cores suggest that hypoxia in the Baltic Sea has occurred intermittently in deep basins over the last c. 8500 years. Thus, the occurrence of present day hypoxia in the deeper basins need not necessarily be attributed to human activity but rather to natural oceanographic, geologic and climate conditions. We present a compilation of previous publications that reported the occurrence of laminated sediments (i.e. a palaeo-proxy for hypoxia) in the Baltic Sea. This review shows that the deeper parts of the Baltic Sea have experienced either intermittent or more regular hypoxia during most of the Holocene and that more continuous laminations started to form c. 7800-8500 cal. yr BP ago, in association with the establishment of a permanent halocline during the transition from the Ancylus Lake to the Littorina Sea. Laminated sediments were more common during the early and late Holocene and coincided with intervals of high organic productivity (high TOC content) and high salinity during the Holocene Thermal Maximum and the Medieval Climate Optimum. This study

  15. Effects of Maternal Hypoxia during Pregnancy on Bone Development in Offspring: A Guinea Pig Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice M. C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low birth weight is associated with reduced bone mass and density in adult life. However, effects of maternal hypoxia (MH on offspring bone development are not known. Objective. The current study investigated the effects of fetal growth restriction induced by MH during the last half of gestation on bone structure and volume in the offspring of the fetus near term and the pup in adolescence. Methods. During 35–62-day gestation (term, 69d, guinea pigs were housed in room air (21% O2; control or 12% O2 (MH. Offspring femur and tibia were collected at 62d gestation and 120d after birth. Results. MH decreased fetal birth weight but did not affect osteogenic potential pools in the fetal bone marrow. Histological analysis showed no effects of MH on tibial growth plate thickness in either fetal or postnatal offspring, although there was increased VEGF mRNA expression in the growth plate of postnatal offspring. MH did not change primary spongiosa height but lowered collagen-1 mRNA expression in postnatal offspring. There was increased mRNA expression of adipogenesis-related gene (FABP4 in bone from the MH postnatal offspring. Conclusion. MH during late gestation did not change the pool of osteogenic cells before birth or growth plate heights before and after birth. However, MH reduced expression of bone formation marker (collagen-1 and increased expression of fat formation marker (FABP4 in postnatal offspring bone.

  16. Clinical significance of hypoxia in nasopharyngeal carcinoma with a focus on existing and novel hypoxia molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Connie; Cook, Gary J R; Wee, Joseph; Fong, Kam Weng; Tan, Terence; Goh, Vicky

    2016-04-01

    Locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is still associated with significant locoregional failure and poor overall survival (OS) after chemoradiation. The maximal therapeutic effect of conventional chemotherapy combined with radiation may have been reached and there is a clinical need to identify additional adverse prognostic factors that could be targeted therapeutically. Hypoxia, a known prognostic factor in head and neck cancers is an attractive target in NPC with various treatment strategies available such as hypoxic cell sensitisers/cytotoxins and increasing intratumoral oxygen delivery, to overcome the poorer outcomes associated with this phenotype. Thus, we aim to review the clinical significance of hypoxia as well as the current and future of molecular hypoxia imaging in NPC.

  17. ATR controls cellular adaptation to hypoxia through positive regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallone, F; Britton, S; Nieto, L; Salles, B; Muller, C

    2013-09-12

    Tumor cells adaptation to severe oxygen deprivation (hypoxia) plays a major role in tumor progression. The transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1), whose α-subunit is stabilized under hypoxic conditions is a key component of this process. Recent studies showed that two members of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase), regulate the hypoxic-dependent accumulation of HIF-1. These proteins initiate cellular stress responses when DNA damage occurs. In addition, it has been demonstrated that extreme hypoxia induces a replicative stress resulting in regions of single-stranded DNA at stalled replication forks and the activation of ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related protein), another member of the PIKKs family. Here, we show that even less severe hypoxia (0.1% O2) also induces activation of ATR through replicative stress. Importantly, in using either transiently silenced ATR cells, cells expressing an inactive form of ATR or cells exposed to an ATR inhibitor (CGK733), we demonstrate that hypoxic ATR activation positively regulates the key transcription factor HIF-1 independently of the checkpoint kinase Chk1. We show that ATR kinase activity regulates HIF-1α at the translational level and we find that the elements necessary for the regulation of HIF-1α translation are located within the coding region of HIF-1α mRNA. Finally, by using three independent cellular models, we clearly show that the loss of ATR expression and/or kinase activity results in the decrease of HIF-1 DNA binding under hypoxia and consequently affects protein expression levels of two HIF-1 target genes, GLUT-1 and CAIX. Taken together, our data show a new function for ATR in cellular adaptation to hypoxia through regulation of HIF-1α translation. Our work offers new prospect for cancer therapy using ATR inhibitors with the potential to decrease cellular adaptation in hypoxic

  18. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

  19. Markers of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelvin P Davies

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development and marketing of oral pharmacotherapy that is both noninvasive and successful in treating erectile dysfunction (ED, the quest to identify markers of organic ED lost ground. Indeed, the multi-factorial nature of ED may have led many researchers to conclude that searching for a universal marker of ED was futile. However, the realization that ED is strongly correlated with the overall health of men, and may act as a predictor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD and diabetes, has stimulated interest in identifying genes that can distinguish organic ED. In addition, the potential ability to suggest to the patient that ED is reversible (i.e., psychogenic with a simple test would be of significance to both the physician and patient, as well as for reimbursement issues for therapy by insurance companies. Such a marker may also act as a non-subjective measure of the degree of ED and the efficacy of treatment. This review discusses the importance of identifying such markers and recent work identifying potential markers in human patients.

  20. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in skeletal muscle of humans exposed to high-altitude hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Carsten; Pilegaard, Henriette; van Hall, Gerrit

    2003-01-01

    ) was unaltered by prolonged hypoxia, in accordance with the notion that HO-1 is an acute stress response protein. In conclusion, our data indicate high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a good model for oxidative stress and that antioxidant genes are not upregulated in muscle tissue by prolonged hypoxia despite......Recent research suggests that high-altitude hypoxia may serve as a model for prolonged oxidative stress in healthy humans. In this study, we investigated the consequences of prolonged high-altitude hypoxia on the basal level of oxidative damage to nuclear DNA in muscle cells, a major oxygen...

  1. Proliferation and apoptosis property of mesenchymal stem cells derived from peripheral blood under the culture conditions of hypoxia and serum deprivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Wei-li; JIA Zhu-qing; WANG Wei-ping; ZHANG Ji-ying; FU Xin; DUAN Xiao-ning; LEUNG Kevin Kar Ming; ZHOU Chun-yan; YU Jia-kuo

    2011-01-01

    Background The proliferation and apoptosis property of mesenchymal stem cells derived from peripheral blood (PB-MSCs) were investigated under hypoxia and serum deprivation conditions in vitro so as to evaluate the feasibility for autologous PB-MSCs applications in cartilage repair.Methods MSCs were mobilized into peripheral blood by granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and AMD3100.The blood samples were collected from central ear artery of rabbits.Adhered cells were obtained by erythrocyte lysis buffer and identified as MSCs by adherence to plastic,spindle shaped morphology,specific surface markers,differentiation abilities into osteoblasts,adipocytes and chondroblasts in vitro under appropriate conditions.MSCs were cultured in four groups at different oxygen tension (20% O2 and 2% O2),with or without 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS)conditions:20% O2 and 10% FBS complete medium (normal medium,N),20% O2 and serum deprivation medium (D),2% O2 and 10% FBS complete medium (hypoxia,H),2% O2 and serum deprivation (HD).Cell proliferation was determined by CCK-8 assay.Apoptosis was detected by Annexin V/Pl and terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining.Results Spindle-shaped adherent cells were effectively mobilized from peripheral blood by a combined administration of G-CSF plus AMD3100.These cells showed typical fibroblast-like phenotype similar to MSCs from bone marrow (BM-MSCs),and expressed a high level of typical MSCs markers CD29 and CD44,but lacked in the expression of hematopoietic markers CD45 and major histocompatibility complex Class Ⅱ (MHC Ⅱ).They could also differentiate into osteoblasts,adipocytes and chondroblasts in vitro under appropriate conditions.No significant morphological differences were found among the four groups.It was found that hypoxia could enhance proliferation of PB-MSCs regardless of serum concentration,but serum deprivation inhibited proliferation at the later stage of culture

  2. Expression and role of factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in pulmonary arteries of rat with hypoxia-induced hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daiyan Fu; Aiguo Dai; Ruicheng Hu; Yunrong Chen; Liming Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-11α subunit (HIF-1α) plays a pivotal role during the development of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH) by transactivating it's target genes. As an oxygen-sensitive attenuator, factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH)hydroxylates a conserved asparagine residue within the C-terminal transactivation domain of HIF-1α under normoxia and moderate hypoxia. FIH protein is downregulated in response to hypoxia, but its dynamic expression and role during the development of HPH remains unclear. In this study,an HPH rat model was established. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia.The pulmonary artery remodeling index became evident after 7 d of hypoxia, while the right ventricular hypertrophy index became significant after 14 d of hypoxia. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a well-characterized target gene of HIF-1α, were markedly upregulated after exposure to hypoxia in pulmonary arteries. FIH protein in lung tissues declined after 7 d of hypoxia and continued to decline through the duration of hypoxia. FIH mRNA had few changes after exposure to hypoxia compared with after exposure to normoxia.In hypoxic rats, FIH protein showed significant negative correlation with VEGF mRNA and VEGF protein. FIH protein was negatively correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure, pulmonary artery remodeling index and right ventricular hypertrophy index. Taken together, our results suggest that, in the pulmonary arteries of rat exposed to moderate hypoxia, a time-dependent decrease in FIH protein may contribute to the development of rat HPH by enhancing the transactivation of HIF-1α target genes such as VEGF.

  3. Assessment of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α mRNA expression in mantis shrimp as a biomarker of environmental hypoxia exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Keita; Rahman, Md Saydur; Horiguchi, Toshihiro; Thomas, Peter

    2012-04-23

    Efforts to assess the ecological impacts of the marked increase in coastal hypoxia worldwide have been hampered by a lack of biomarkers of hypoxia exposure in marine benthic organisms. Here, we show that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) transcript levels in the heart and cerebral ganglion of mantis shrimp (Oratosquilla oratoria) collected from hypoxic sites in Tokyo Bay are elevated several-fold over those in shrimp collected from normoxic sites. Upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in the heart after exposure to sub-lethal hypoxia was confirmed in controlled laboratory experiments. HIF-1α transcript levels were increased at approximately threefold after 7 and 14 days of hypoxia exposure and declined to control levels within 24 h of restoration to normoxic conditions. The results provide the first evidence for upregulation of HIF-1α transcript levels in two hypoxia-sensitive organs, heart and cerebral ganglion, in a marine invertebrate exposed to environmental hypoxia. These results suggest that upregulation of HIF-1α transcript levels is an important component in adaptation of mantis shrimp to chronic hypoxia and is a potentially useful biomarker of environmental hypoxia exposure.

  4. β-Adrenergic signaling in rat heart is similarly affected by continuous and intermittent normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnova, Klara; Kasparova, Dita; Zurmanova, Jitka; Neckar, Jan; Kolar, Frantisek; Novotny, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Chronic hypoxia may produce a cardioprotective phenotype characterized by increased resistance to ischemia-reperfusion injury. Nevertheless, the molecular basis of cardioprotective effects of hypoxia is still not quite clear. The present study investigated the consequences of a 3-week adaptation to cardioprotective (CNH, continuous normobaric hypoxia) and nonprotective (INH, intermittent normobaric hypoxia; 23 h/day hypoxia followed by 1 h/day reoxygenation) regimen of hypoxia on β-adrenergic signaling in the rat myocardium. Both regimens of hypoxia lowered body weight and led to marked right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, which was accompanied by 25% loss of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1-ARs) in the RV. No significant changes were found in β-ARs in left ventricular (LV) preparations from animals adapted to hypoxia. Although adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity stimulated through the G proteins was decreased in the RV and increased in the LV after exposure to hypoxia, there were no significant changes in the expression of the dominant myocardial AC 5/6 isoforms and the stimulatory G proteins. These data suggest that chronic normobaric hypoxia may strongly affect myocardial β-adrenergic signaling but adaptation to cardioprotective and nonprotective regimens of hypoxia does not cause notably diverse changes.

  5. Hypoxia as a Biomarker and for Personalized Radiation Oncology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vordermark, Dirk; Horsman, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a clinically relevant cause of radiation resistance. Direct measurements of tumor oxygenation have been performed predominantly with the Eppendorf histograph and these have defined the reduced prognosis after radiotherapy in poorly oxygenated tumors, especially head-and-neck canc...

  6. Hypoxia-inducible factor 3 biology: complexities and emerging themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Cunming

    2016-02-15

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family has three distinct members in most vertebrates. All three HIFs consist of a unique and oxygen-labile α-subunit and a common and stable β-subunit. While HIF-1 and HIF-2 function as master regulators of the transcriptional response to hypoxia, much less is known about HIF-3. The HIF-3α gene gives rise to multiple HIF-3α variants due to the utilization of different promoters, different transcription initiation sites, and alternative splicing. These HIF-3α variants are expressed in different tissues, at different developmental stages, and are differentially regulated by hypoxia and other factors. Recent studies suggest that different HIF-3α variants have different and even opposite functions. There is strong evidence that full-length HIF-3α protein functions as an oxygen-regulated transcription activator and that it activates a unique transcriptional program in response to hypoxia. Many HIF-3α target genes have been identified. While some short HIF-3α variants act as dominant-negative regulators of HIF-1/2α actions, other HIF-3α variants can inhibit HIF-1/2α actions by competing for the common HIF-β. There are also a number of HIF-3α variants yet to be explored. Future studies of these naturally occurring HIF-3α variants will provide new and important insights into HIF biology and may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  7. [Thermal dissipation pathway in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yong-xi; Sun, Jin; Wang, Li-ping; Shu, Sheng; Guo, Shi-rong

    2011-03-01

    A water culture experiment was conducted to study the relationship between photosynthetic thermal dissipation and xanthophyll cycle in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress (the dissolved oxygen concentration in nutrient solution was 0.9-1.1 mg x L(-1)). Under the hypoxia stress, there was a significant decrease in the quantum yield of PS II photochemistry rate (phi(PS II)), net photosynthetic rate (Pn) under saturation light intensity, quanta yield (AQY), and maximal photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm), suggesting that the photoinhibition of the seedling leaves was induced. Meanwhile, the thermal dissipation (NPQ) and the allocation of dissipation energy (D) by antenna increased, but the photochemical quenching apparent (q(p)) decreased, suggesting the enhancement of thermal dissipation in cucumber leaves under hypoxia stress. A positive correlation was observed between NPQ and xanthophyll de-epoxidation state (DEPS), and both of them were promoted by ascorbic acid (AsA) and inhibited by 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT), suggesting that xanthophyll cycle was the major pathway of photosynthetic thermal dissipation in cucumber seedling leaves under hypoxia stress.

  8. Interaction of Hydrogen Sulfide with Oxygen Sensing under Hypoxia

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    Bo Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the discovery of endogenous H2S production, many in depth studies show this gasotransmitter with a variety of physiological and pathological functions. Three enzymes, cystathionine β-synthase (CBS, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST, are involved in enzymatic production of H2S. Emerging evidence has elucidated an important protective role of H2S in hypoxic conditions in many mammalian systems. However, the mechanisms by which H2S senses and responses to hypoxia are largely elusive. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs function as key regulators of oxygen sensing, activating target genes expression under hypoxia. Recent studies have shown that exogenous H2S regulates HIF action in different patterns. The activation of carotid bodies is a sensitive and prompt response to hypoxia, rapidly enhancing general O2 supply. H2S has been identified as an excitatory mediator of hypoxic sensing in the carotid bodies. This paper presents a brief review of the roles of these two pathways which contribute to hypoxic sensing of H2S.

  9. Epo deficiency alters cardiac adaptation to chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hasnaoui-Saadani, Raja; Marchant, Dominique; Pichon, Aurélien; Escoubet, Brigitte; Pezet, Mylène; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Hoch, Melanie; Pham, Isabelle; Quidu, Patricia; Voituron, Nicolas; Journé, Clément; Richalet, Jean-Paul; Favret, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The involvement of erythropoietin in cardiac adaptation to acute and chronic (CHx) hypoxia was investigated in erythropoietin deficient transgenic (Epo-TAg(h)) and wild-type (WT) mice. Left (LV) and right ventricular functions were assessed by echocardiography and hemodynamics. HIF-1α, VEGF and Epo pathways were explored through RT-PCR, ELISA, Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Epo gene and protein were expressed in cardiomyocytes of WT mice in normoxia and hypoxia. Increase in blood hemoglobin, angiogenesis and functional cardiac adaptation occurred in CHx in WT mice, allowing a normal oxygen delivery (O2T). Epo deficiency induced LV hypertrophy, increased cardiac output (CO) and angiogenesis, but O2T remained lower than in WT mice. In CHx Epo-TAg(h) mice, LV hypertrophy, CO and O2T decreased. HIF-1α and Epo receptor pathways were depressed, suggesting that Epo-TAg(h) mice could not adapt to CHx despite activation of cardioprotective pathways (increased P-STAT-5/STAT-5). HIF/Epo pathway is activated in the heart of WT mice in hypoxia. Chronic hypoxia induced cardiac adaptive responses that were altered with Epo deficiency, failing to maintain oxygen delivery to tissues.

  10. Hypoxia impairs visual acuity in snapper (Pagrus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Esme; Jerrett, Alistair; Black, Suzanne; Davison, William

    2013-07-01

    We investigated the effect of environmental hypoxia on vision in snapper (Pagrus auratus). Juvenile snapper inhabit estuarine environments where oxygen conditions fluctuate on a seasonal basis. Optomotor experiments demonstrated that visual acuity is impaired by environmental hypoxia, but not until levels approach the critical oxygen tension (P crit) of this species (around 25% air-saturated seawater). In 100, 80, and 60% air-saturated seawater, a positive optomotor response was present at a minimum separable angle (M SA) of 1°. In 40% air-saturated seawater, vision was partially impaired with positive responses at M SAs of 2° and above. However, in 25% air-saturated seawater, visual acuity was seriously impaired, with positive responses only present at M SAs of 6° and above. Snapper were found to possess a choroid rete, facilitating the maintenance of high ocular oxygen partial pressures (PO2) during normoxia and moderate hypoxia (PO2, between 269 and 290 mmHg). However, at 40 and 25% water oxygen saturation, ocular PO2 was reduced to below 175 mmHg, which is perhaps linked to impairment of visual acuity in these conditions. The ability to preserve visual function during moderate hypoxia is beneficial for the maintenance of a visual lifestyle in the fluctuating oxygen environments of estuaries.

  11. Neurological damage arising from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rei, M; Ayres-de-Campos, D; Bernardes, J

    2016-01-01

    Complications occurring at any level of foetal oxygen supply will result in hypoxaemia, and this may ultimately lead to hypoxia/acidosis and neurological damage. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the short-term neurological dysfunction caused by intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, and this diagnosis requires the presence of a number of findings, including the confirmation of newborn metabolic acidosis, low Apgar scores, early imaging evidence of cerebral oedema and the appearance of clinical signs of neurological dysfunction in the first 48 h of life. Cerebral palsy (CP) consists of a heterogeneous group of nonprogressive movement and posture disorders, frequently accompanied by cognitive and sensory impairments, epilepsy, nutritional deficiencies and secondary musculoskeletal lesions. Although CP is the most common long-term neurological complication associated with intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis, >80% of cases are caused by other phenomena. Data on minor long-term neurological deficits are scarce, but they suggest that less serious intellectual and motor impairments may result from intrapartum hypoxia/acidosis. This chapter focuses on the existing evidence of neurological damage associated with poor foetal oxygenation during labour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combinatorial MicroRNAs Suppress Hypoxia-Induced Cardiomyocytes Apoptosis

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    Yingqi Xu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Our previous in silico analysis revealed potential synergy in the activities of micro(miRNAs in myocardial infarction. The present study investigated whether miR-1 and -21 act synergistically to protect against cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Methods: Cell survival was analyzed with cell viability assay; apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling, and the caspase-3 activity assay; and protein expression level was determined by western blotting. Results: MiR-1:miR-21 and several other miRNA pairs were evaluated for their potentially synergistic effects against myocardial hypoxia in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes. Lower combination indices suggested that miRNA pairs acted synergistically to inhibit apoptosis; miR-1 and -21 jointly blocked hypoxia-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Moreover, combined application of miR-1 and -21 activated Akt and blocked hypoxia-induced upregulation of p53 in these cells. Conclusion: MiR-1 and -21 exert synergistic effects against hypoxia-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis. These results provide a basis for the development of combined miRNA-based therapeutics to treat cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Hypoxia-regulated microRNAs in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guomin SHEN; Xiaobo LI; Yong-feng JIA; Gary A PIAZZA; Yaguang XI

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia plays an important role in the tumor microenvironment by allowing the development and maintenance of cancer cells,but the regulatory mechanisms by which tumor cells adapt to hypoxic conditions are not yet well understood.MicroRNAs are recognized as a new class of master regulators that control gene expression and are responsible for many normal and pathological cellular processes.Studies have shown that hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1) regulates a panel of microRNAs,whereas some of microRNAs target HIF1.The interaction between microRNAs and HIF1 can account for many vital events relevant to tumorigenesis,such as angiogenesis,metabolism,apoptosis,cell cycle regulation,proliferation,metastasis,and resistance to anticancer therapy.This review will summarize recent findings on the roles of hypoxia and microRNAs in human cancer and illustrate the machinery by which microRNAs interact with hypoxia in tumor cells,It is expected to update our knowledge about the regulatory roles of microRNAs in regulating tumor microenvironments and thus benefit the development of new anticancer drugs.

  14. Hypoxia, Color Vision Deficiencies, and Blood Oxygen Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Kobrick, 1970; Ernest & Krill, 1971; Kobrick, Zwick , Witt, & Devine,1984; Connolly & Barbur, 2009; Connolly, 2011). With the exception of two studies...Physiol, 28, 741-747. Kobrick, J.L., Zwick , H., Witt, C.E., & Devine, J.A. (1984). Effects of extended hypoxia on night vision. Aviat Space Environ Med

  15. Human skin hypoxia modulates cerebrovascular and autonomic functions.

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    Olivia Pucci

    Full Text Available Because the skin is an oxygen sensor in amphibians and mice, we thought to confirm this function also in humans. The human upright posture, however, introduces additional functional demands for the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in which cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system (ANS function may also be involved. We examined nine males and three females. While subjects were breathing ambient air, at sea level, we changed gases in a plastic body-bag during two conditions of the experiment such as to induce skin hypoxia (with pure nitrogen or skin normoxia (with air. The subjects performed a test of hypoxic ventilatory drive during each condition of the experiment. We found no differences in the hypoxic ventilatory drive tests. However, ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities were modulated by skin hypoxia and the effect was significantly greater on the left than right middle cerebral arteries. We conclude that skin hypoxia modulates ANS function and cerebral blood flow velocities and this might impact life styles and tolerance to ambient hypoxia at altitude. Thus the skin in normal humans, in addition to its numerous other functions, is also an oxygen sensor.

  16. Osteogenic Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Is Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Independent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Suchit; Williams, Amanda; Skiles, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a promising approach to repair critical-size defects in bone. Damage to vasculature at the defect site can create a lower O2 environment compared with healthy bone. Local O2 levels influence stem cell behavior, as O2 is not only a nutrient, but also a signaling molecule. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that regulates a wide range of O2-related genes and its contribution in bone repair/formation is an important area that can be exploited. In this study, we examined the effect of low O2 environments (1% and 2% O2) on the osteogenic differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells in both two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems. To determine the role of HIF-1 in the differentiation process, an inhibitor was used to block the HIF-1 activity. The samples were examined for osteogenesis markers as measured by quantification of the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineral deposition, and expression of osteonectin (ON) and osteopontin (OPN). Results show a downregulation of the osteogenic markers (ALP activity, mineralization, ON, OPN) in both 1% and 2% O2 when compared to 20% O2 in both 2-D and 3-D culture. Vascular endothelial growth factor secretion over 28 days was significantly higher in low O2 environments and HIF-1 inhibition reduced this effect. The inhibition of the HIF-1 activity did not have a significant impact on the expression of the osteogenic markers, suggesting HIF-1-independent inhibition of osteogenic differentiation in hypoxic conditions. PMID:23394201

  17. Comparative and Experimental Studies on the Genes Altered by Chronic Hypoxia in Human Brain Microendothelial Cells

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    Eugenia Mata-Greenwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A is a master regulator of acute hypoxia; however, with chronic hypoxia, HIF1A levels return to the normoxic levels. Importantly, the genes that are involved in the cell survival and viability under chronic hypoxia are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia leads to the upregulation of a core group of genes with associated changes in the promoter DNA methylation that mediates the cell survival under hypoxia.Results : We examined the effect of chronic hypoxia (3 days; 0.5% oxygen on human brain micro endothelial cells (HBMEC viability and apoptosis. Hypoxia caused a significant reduction in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Next, we examined chronic hypoxia associated changes in transcriptome and genome-wide promoter methylation. The data obtained was compared with 16 other microarray studies on chronic hypoxia. Nine genes were altered in response to chronic hypoxia in all 17 studies. Interestingly, HIF1A was not altered with chronic hypoxia in any of the studies. Furthermore, we compared our data to three other studies that identified HIF-responsive genes by various approaches. Only two genes were found to be HIF dependent. We silenced each of these 9 genes using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Downregulation of EGLN3 significantly increased the cell death under chronic hypoxia, whereas downregulation of ERO1L, ENO2, adrenomedullin, and spag4 reduced the cell death under hypoxia.Conclusions : We provide a core group of genes that regulates cellular acclimatization under chronic hypoxic stress, and most of them are HIF independent.

  18. Cellular and developmental adaptations to hypoxia: a Drosophila perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Nuria Magdalena; Dekanty, Andrés; Wappner, Pablo

    2007-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a widely utilized genetic model, is highly resistant to oxygen starvation and is beginning to be used for studying physiological, developmental, and cellular adaptations to hypoxia. The Drosophila respiratory (tracheal) system has features in common with the mammalian circulatory system so that an angiogenesis-like response occurs upon exposure of Drosophila larvae to hypoxia. A hypoxia-responsive system homologous to mammalian hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) has been described in the fruit fly, where Fatiga is a Drosophila oxygen-dependent HIF prolyl hydroxylase, and the basic helix-loop-helix Per/ARNT/Sim (bHLH-PAS) proteins Sima and Tango are, respectively, the Drosophila homologues of mammalian HIF-alpha (alpha) and HIF-beta (beta). Tango is constitutively expressed regardless of oxygen tension and, like in mammalian cells, Sima is controlled at the level of protein degradation and subcellular localization. Sima is critically required for development in hypoxia, but, unlike mammalian model systems, it is dispensable for development in normoxia. In contrast, fatiga mutant alleles are all lethal; however, strikingly, viability to adulthood is restored in fatiga sima double mutants, although these double mutants are not entirely normal, suggesting that Fatiga has Sima-independent functions in fly development. Studies in cell culture and in vivo have revealed that Sima is activated by the insulin receptor (InR) and target-of-rapamycin (TOR) pathways. Paradoxically, Sima is a negative regulator of growth. This suggests that Sima is engaged in a negative feedback loop that limits growth upon stimulation of InR/TOR pathways.

  19. Historical records of coastal eutrophication-induced hypoxia

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    A. J. Gooday

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions, sediment cores from coastal settings subject to hypoxia can yield records of environmental changes over time scales ranging from decades to millennia, sometimes with a resolution of as little as a few years. A variety of biological and geochemical indicators (proxies derived from such cores have been used to reconstruct the development of eutrophication and hypoxic conditions over time. Those based on (1 the preserved remains of benthic organisms (mainly foraminiferans and ostracods, (2 sedimentary features (e.g. laminations and (3 sediment chemistry and mineralogy (e.g. presence of sulphides and redox-sensitive trace elements reflect conditions at or close to the seafloor. Those based on (4 the preserved remains of planktonic organisms (mainly diatoms and dinoflagellates, (5 pigments and lipid biomarkers derived from prokaryotes and eukaryotes and (6 organic C, N and their stable isotope ratios reflect conditions in the water column. However, the interpretation of these indicators is not straightforward. A central difficulty concerns the fact that hypoxia is strongly correlated with, and often induced by, organic enrichment caused by eutrophication, making it difficult to separate the effects of these phenomena in sediment records. The problem is compounded by the enhanced preservation in anoxic and hypoxic sediments of organic microfossils and biomarkers indicating eutrophication. The use of hypoxia-specific proxies, such as the trace metals molybdenum and rhenium and the bacterial biomarker isorenieratene, together with multi-proxy approaches, may provide a way forward. All proxies of bottom-water hypoxia are basically qualitative; their quantification presents a major challenge to which there is currently no satisfactory solution. Finally, it is important to separate the effects of natural ecosystem variability from anthropogenic effects. Despite these problems, in the absence of historical data for dissolved oxygen

  20. Causes of Acute Intranatal and Postnatal Hypoxia in Neonatal Infants

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    S. A. Perepelitsa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the causes of acute intranatal hypoxia and reveal a relationship of placental changes to respiratory failure (RF in newborn infants. Subjects and methods. The investigation included 252 neonates with the complicated course of an early neonatal period. Their gestational age was 26 weeks to 40 weeks, birth weight varied from 850 g to 4100 g. 95.3% of the newborn infants were born with a low Apgar score and RF, which required mechanical ventilation immediately after birth. The neonatal status was clinically evaluated; the values of blood gas composition and acid-base balance were recorded; the pathogen was discharged from the tracheobronchial tree; chest X-ray survey and placental morphological examination were performed. Results. The main cause of neonatal respiratory failure is chronic intrauterine hypoxia caused by placental inflammatory changes and fetal-placental blood circulatory disorders, which gives rise to preterm delivery, cerebral hemodynamic disorders, and neonatal amniotic fluid aspiration. Bacteriological examination of tracheobronchial aspirations showed that no microflora growth occured in the majority of the newborns acute intranatal hypoxia. Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus epidermidis were isolated in 12.3% and 8.7%, respectively. Growth of в-hemolytic streptococcus was observed in 2.8% of cases. The rate of microbial association specific only for rate premature infants with neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS was 4.8%. Conclusion. Placental changes causing fetal-placental circulatory disorders were ascertained to be responsible for acute intranatal and postnatal neonatal hypoxia. Placental inflammatory changes occurred in the majority of cases, as confirmed by bacteriological examinations of neonatal infants. Isolation of the varying microbial flora in infants with RF to a greater extent is, indicative of the infectious process occurring in the maternal body. Key words: acute intranatal

  1. Historical records of coastal eutrophication-induced hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gooday

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Under certain conditions, sediment cores from coastal settings subject to hypoxia can yield records of environmental changes over time scales ranging from decades to millennia, sometimes with a resolution of as little as a few years. A variety of biological and geochemical proxies derived from such cores have been used to reconstruct the development of eutrophication and hypoxic conditions over time. Proxies based on 1 the preserved remains of benthic organisms (mainly foraminiferans and ostracods, 2 sedimentary features (e.g. laminations and 3 sediment chemistry and mineralogy (e.g. presence of sulphides and redox-sensitive trace elements reflect conditions at or close to the seafloor. Those based on 4 the preserved remains of planktonic organisms (mainly diatoms and dinoflagellates, 5 pigments and lipid biomarkers derived from prokaryotes and eukaryotes and 6 organic C, N and their isotope values reflect conditions in the water column. However, the interpretation of these proxies is not straightforward. A central difficulty concerns the fact that hypoxia is strongly correlated with, and often induced by, organic enrichment (eutrophication, making it difficult to separate the effects of these phenomena in sediment records. The problem is compounded by the enhanced preservation in anoxic and hypoxic sediments of organic microfossils and biomarkers indicating eutrophication. The use of hypoxia-specific indicators, such as the trace metals molybdenum and rhenium and the bacterial biomarker isorenieratene, which have not been used often in historical studies, may provide a way forward. All proxies of bottom-water hypoxia are basically qualitative; their quantification presents a major challenge to which there is currently no satisfactory solution. Finally, it is important to separate the effects of natural ecosystem variability from anthropogenic effects. Despite these problems, in the absence of historical data for dissolved oxygen concentrations

  2. Therapeutic potential of intermittent hypoxia: a matter of dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Opazo, Angela; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2014-11-15

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) has been the subject of considerable research in recent years, and triggers a bewildering array of both detrimental and beneficial effects in multiple physiological systems. Here, we review the extensive literature concerning IH and its impact on the respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, metabolic, bone, and nervous systems. One major goal is to define relevant IH characteristics leading to safe, protective, and/or therapeutic effects vs. pathogenesis. To understand the impact of IH, it is essential to define critical characteristics of the IH protocol under investigation, including potentially the severity of hypoxia within episodes, the duration of hypoxic episodes, the number of hypoxic episodes per day, the pattern of presentation across time (e.g., within vs. consecutive vs. alternating days), and the cumulative time of exposure. Not surprisingly, severe/chronic IH protocols tend to be pathogenic, whereas any beneficial effects are more likely to arise from modest/acute IH exposures. Features of the IH protocol most highly associated with beneficial vs. pathogenic outcomes include the level of hypoxemia within episodes and the number of episodes per day. Modest hypoxia (9-16% inspired O2) and low cycle numbers (3-15 episodes per day) most often lead to beneficial effects without pathology, whereas severe hypoxia (2-8% inspired O2) and more episodes per day (48-2,400 episodes/day) elicit progressively greater pathology. Accumulating evidence suggests that "low dose" IH (modest hypoxia, few episodes) may be a simple, safe, and effective treatment with considerable therapeutic potential for multiple clinical disorders.

  3. Hypoxia-ischemia and retinal ganglion cell damage

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    Charanjit Kaur

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Charanjit Kaur1, Wallace S Foulds2, Eng-Ang Ling11Department of Anatomy, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, SingaporeAbstract: Retinal hypoxia is the potentially blinding mechanism underlying a number of sight-threatening disorders including central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic central retinal vein thrombosis, complications of diabetic eye disease and some types of glaucoma. Hypoxia is implicated in loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurring in such conditions. RGC death occurs by apoptosis or necrosis. Hypoxia-ischemia induces the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Increased production of VEGF results in disruption of the blood retinal barrier leading to retinal edema. Enhanced expression of NOS results in increased production of nitric oxide which may be toxic to the cells resulting in their death. Excess glutamate release in hypoxic-ischemic conditions causes excitotoxic damage to the RGCs through activation of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Activation of glutamate receptors is thought to initiate damage in the retina by a cascade of biochemical effects such as neuronal NOS activation and increase in intracellular Ca2+ which has been described as a major contributing factor to RGC loss. Excess production of proinflammatory cytokines also mediates cell damage. Besides the above, free-radicals generated in hypoxic-ischemic conditions result in RGC loss because of an imbalance between antioxidant- and oxidant-generating systems. Although many advances have been made in understanding the mediators and mechanisms of injury, strategies to improve the damage are lacking. Measures to prevent neuronal injury have to be developed.Keywords: retinal hypoxia, retinal ganglion cells, glutamate receptors, neuronal injury, retina

  4. Effects of post-resuscitation administration with sodium hydrosulfide on cardiac recovery in hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Po-Yin; Miedzyblocki, Margaret; Lee, Tze-Fun; Bigam, David L

    2013-10-15

    Hydrogen sulfide may protect multiple organ systems against ischemic-reperfusion injuries. It is unknown if treatment with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor) will improve myocardial function and minimize oxidative stress in hypoxic-reoxygenated newborn piglets. Mixed breed piglets (1-5 day, 1.5-2.5 kg) were anesthetized and acutely instrumented for the measurement of systemic, pulmonary and regional (carotid, superior mesenteric and renal) hemodynamics and blood gas parameters. The piglets were induced with normocapnic alveolar hypoxia (10-15% oxygen, 2h) followed by reoxygenation with 100% (1h) then 21% oxygen (3h). At 10 min of reoxygenation, either NaHS (10mg/kg, 5 ml) or saline (5 ml) was administered intravenously for 30 min (5 min bolus followed by 25 min of continuous infusion) in a blinded, block-randomized fashion (n = 7/group). Plasma lactate and troponin I levels and tissue markers of myocardial oxidative stress were also determined. Two hours hypoxia caused cardiogenic shock (45 ± 3% of respective normoxic baseline), reduced regional perfusion with metabolic acidosis (pH 6.94 ± 0.02). NaHS infusion significantly improved recovery of cardiac index (84 ± 3% vs. 72 ± 5% in controls), systemic oxygen delivery (84 ± 3% vs. 72 ± 5% in controls) and systemic oxygen consumption (102 ± 5% vs. 84 ± 6% in controls) at 4h of reoxygenation. NaHS had no significant effect on systemic and pulmonary blood pressures, regional blood flows, plasma lactate and troponin I levels. The myocardial glutathionine ratio was reduced in piglets treated with NaHS (vs. controls, P<0.05). Post-resuscitation administration of NaHS improves cardiac function and systemic perfusion and attenuates myocardial oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  5. Changes in brain iron concentration after exposure to high-altitude hypoxia measured by quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Congbo; Yang, Tianhe; Lin, Jianzhong; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Hypoxia can induce physiological changes. This study aims to explore effects of high-altitude (HA) hypoxia on cerebral iron concentration. Twenty-nine healthy sea-level participants were tested shortly before and after approximately 4-week adaptation to the HA environment at fQinghai-Tibet Plateau (4200m), and were re-investigated after re-adaptation to the sea-level environment one year later. Iron concentration was quantified with quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), and the results were compared with transverse relaxation rate (R(*)2) measurements. The variations of magnetic susceptibility indicate that the iron concentration in gray matter regions, especially in basal ganglia, including caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, increases significantly after HA exposure. This increase appears consistent with the conclusion from R(*)2 value variations. However, unlike QSM, the R(*)2 value fails to demonstrate the statistical difference of iron content in red nucleus. The re-investigation results show that most variations are recovered after sea-level re-adaptation for one year. Additionally, hemisphere- and gender-related differences in iron concentration changes were analyzed among cerebral regions. The results show greater possibilities in the right hemisphere and females. Further studies based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) suggest that the fractional anisotropy increases and the mean diffusivity decreases after HA exposure in six deep gray matter nuclei, with linear dependence on iron concentration only in putamen. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility value can serve as a quantitative marker of brain iron, and variations of regional susceptibility reported herein indicate that HA hypoxia can result in significant iron deposition in most deep gray matter regions. Additionally, the linear dependence of DTI metrics on iron concentration in putamen indicates a potential relationship between ferritin and water diffusion.

  6. Hypoxia-Targeted Drug Q6 Induces G2-M Arrest and Apoptosis via Poisoning Topoisomerase II under Hypoxia.

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    Linlin Chang

    Full Text Available In spite of the tremendous efforts dedicated to developing hypoxia-activated prodrugs, no agents yet have been approved for clinical therapy. In the present study, the hypoxic selective anti-cancer activity as well as the cellular target of a novel tirapazamine (TPZ analogue, 7-methyl-3-(3-chlorophenyl-quinoxaline-2-carbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (Q6 were investigated. Q6 implemented anti-cancer effects via poisoning topoisomerase II (topo II under hypoxia. Modified trapped in agarose DNA immunostaining (TARDIS assay showed more topo II-DNA cleavage complexes trapped by Q6 than TPZ at even lower concentration. In addition, by introducing ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM kinase inhibitors caffeine and KU-60019, we displayed that Q6-triggered apoptosis was attributed, at least partially, to DNA double-strand breaks generated by the topo II-targeting effect. Collectively, Q6 stood out for its better hypoxia-selectivity and topo II-poisoning than the parental compound TPZ. All these data shed light on the research of Q6 as a promising hypoxia-activated prodrug candidate for human hepatocellular carcinoma therapy.

  7. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  8. Magik Markers Trehvis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  9. Magik Markers Trehvis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  10. Doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury: Implications from an in-vitro hypoxia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummitzsch, Lars; Zitta, Karina; Berndt, Rouven; Kott, Matthias; Schildhauer, Christin; Parczany, Kerstin; Steinfath, Markus; Albrecht, Martin

    2017-04-15

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a grave clinical emergency and associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Based on the complex underlying mechanisms, a multimodal pharmacological approach seems necessary to prevent intestinal I/R injury. The antibiotic drug doxycycline, which exhibits a wide range of pleiotropic therapeutic properties, might be a promising candidate for also reducing I/R injury in the intestine. To investigate possible protective effects of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury, human intestinal CaCo-2 cells were exposed to doxycycline at clinically relevant concentrations. In order to mimic I/R injury, CaCo-2 were thereafter subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation by using our recently described two-enzyme in-vitro hypoxia model. Investigations of cell morphology, cell damage, apoptosis and hydrogen peroxide formation were performed 24h after the hypoxic insult. Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury resulted in morphological signs of cell damage, elevated LDH concentrations in the respective culture media (P<0.001) and increased protein expression of proapoptotic caspase-3 (P<0.05) in the intestinal cultures. These events were associated with increased levels hydrogen peroxide (P<0.001). Preincubation of CaCo-2 cells with different concentrations of doxycycline (5µM, 10µM, 50µM) reduced the hypoxia induced signs of cell damage and LDH release (P<0.001 for all concentrations). The reduction of cellular damage was associated with a reduced expression of caspase-3 (5µM, P<0.01; 10µM, P<0.01; 50µM, P<0.05), while hydrogen peroxide levels remained unchanged. In summary, doxycycline protects human intestinal cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in-vitro. Further animal and clinical studies are required to prove the protective potential of doxycycline on intestinal I/R injury under in-vivo conditions.

  11. Hypoxia and Inactivity Related Physiological Changes (Constipation, Inflammation) Are Not Reflected at the Level of Gut Metabolites and Butyrate Producing Microbial Community: The PlanHab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šket, Robert; Treichel, Nicole; Debevec, Tadej; Eiken, Ola; Mekjavic, Igor; Schloter, Michael; Vital, Marius; Chandler, Jenna; Tiedje, James M; Murovec, Boštjan; Prevoršek, Zala; Stres, Blaž

    2017-01-01

    We explored the assembly of intestinal microbiota in healthy male participants during the run-in (5 day) and experimental phases [21-day normoxic bed rest (NBR), hypoxic bedrest (HBR)], and hypoxic ambulation (HAmb) in a strictly controlled laboratory environment, balanced fluid, and dietary intakes, controlled circadian rhythm, microbial ambiental burden, and 24/7 medical surveillance. The fraction of inspired O2 (FiO2) and partial pressure of inspired O2 (PiO2) were 0.209 and 133.1 ± 0.3 mmHg for NBR and 0.141 ± 0.004 and 90.0 ± 0.4 mmHg for both hypoxic variants (HBR and HAmb; ~4,000 m simulated altitude), respectively. A number of parameters linked to intestinal transit spanning Bristol Stool Scale, defecation rates, zonulin, α1-antitrypsin, eosinophil derived neurotoxin, bile acids, reducing sugars, short chain fatty acids, total soluble organic carbon, water content, diet composition, and food intake were measured (167 variables). The abundance, structure, and diversity of butyrate producing microbial community were assessed using the two primary bacterial butyrate synthesis pathways, butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase (but) and butyrate kinase (buk) genes. Inactivity negatively affected fecal consistency and in combination with hypoxia aggravated the state of gut inflammation (p < 0.05). In contrast, gut permeability, various metabolic markers, the structure, diversity, and abundance of butyrate producing microbial community were not significantly affected. Rearrangements in the butyrate producing microbial community structure were explained by experimental setup (13.4%), experimentally structured metabolites (12.8%), and gut metabolite-immunological markers (11.9%), with 61.9% remaining unexplained. Many of the measured parameters were found to be correlated and were hence omitted from further analyses. The observed progressive increase in two immunological intestinal markers suggested that the transition from healthy physiological state toward the

  12. Dynamics and distribution of natural and human-caused hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Rabalais

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Water masses can become undersaturated with oxygen when natural processes alone or in combination with anthropogenic processes produce enough organic carbon that is aerobically decomposed faster than the rate of oxygen re-aeration. The dominant natural processes usually involved are photosynthetic carbon production and microbial respiration. The re-supply rate is indirectly related to its isolation from the surface layer. Hypoxic water masses (<2 mg L−1, or approximately 30% saturation can form, therefore, under "natural" conditions, and are more likely to occur in marine systems when the water residence time is extended, water exchange and ventilation are minimal, stratification occurs, and where carbon production and export to the bottom layer are relatively high. Hypoxia has occurred through geological time and naturally occurs in oxygen minimum zones, deep basins, eastern boundary upwelling systems, and fjords.

    Hypoxia development and continuation in many areas of the world's coastal ocean is accelerated by human activities, especially where nutrient loading increased in the Anthropocene. This higher loading set in motion a cascading set of events related to eutrophication. The formation of hypoxic areas has been exacerbated by any combination of interactions that increase primary production and accumulation of organic carbon leading to increased respiratory demand for oxygen below a seasonal or permanent pycnocline. Nutrient loading is likely to increase further as population growth and resource intensification rises, especially with increased dependency on crops using fertilizers, burning of fossil fuels, urbanization, and waste water generation. It is likely that the occurrence and persistence of hypoxia will be even more widespread and have more impacts than presently observed.

    Global climate change will further complicate the causative factors in both natural and human-caused hypoxia. The likelihood of

  13. Effect of Hachimijiogan against Renal Dysfunction and Involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α in the Remnant Kidney Model

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    Hiroshi Oka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic renal failure, hypoxia of renal tissue is thought to be the common final pathway leading to end-stage renal failure. In this study the effects of hachimijiogan, a Kampo formula, were studied with respect to hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF. Using remnant kidney rats, we studied the effects of hachimijiogan on renal function in comparison with angiotensin II receptor blocker. The result showed that oral administration of hachimijiogan for seven days suppressed urinary protein excretion and urinary 8-OHdG, a marker of antioxidant activity, equally as well as oral administration of candesartan cilexetil. In contrast, the protein volume of HIF-1α in the renal cortex was not increased in the candesartan cilexetil group, but that in the hachimijiogan group was increased. In immunohistochemical studies as well, the expression of HIF-1α of the high-dose hachimijiogan group increased compared to that of the control group. Vascular endothelial growth factor and glucose transporter 1, target genes of HIF-1α, were also increased in the hachimijiogan group. These results suggest that hachimijiogan produces a protective effect by a mechanism different from that of candesartan cilexetil.

  14. High intensity aerobic exercise training improves chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced insulin resistance without basal autophagy modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauly, Marion; Assense, Allan; Rondon, Aurélie; Thomas, Amandine; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Freyssenet, Damien; Benoit, Henri; Castells, Josiane; Flore, Patrice

    2017-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (insulin resistance: IR). Autophagy is involved in the pathophysiology of IR and high intensity training (HIT) has recently emerged as a potential therapy. We aimed to confirm IH-induced IR in a tissue-dependent way and to explore the preventive effect of HIT on IR-induced by IH. Thirty Swiss 129 male mice were randomly assigned to Normoxia (N), Intermittent Hypoxia (IH: 21–5% FiO2, 30 s cycle, 8 h/day) or IH associated with high intensity training (IH HIT). After 8 days of HIT (2*24 min, 50 to 90% of Maximal Aerobic Speed or MAS on a treadmill) mice underwent 14 days IH or N. We found that IH induced IR, characterized by a greater glycemia, an impaired insulin sensitivity and lower AKT phosphorylation in adipose tissue and liver. Nevertheless, MAS and AKT phosphorylation were greater in muscle after IH. IH associated with HIT induced better systemic insulin sensitivity and AKT phosphorylation in liver. Autophagy markers were not altered in both conditions. These findings suggest that HIT could represent a preventive strategy to limit IH-induced IR without change of basal autophagy. PMID:28255159

  15. Xanthine oxidase mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-2α degradation by intermittent hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Nanduri

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apnea produces chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH. We previously reported that IH leads to down-regulation of HIF-2α protein via a calpain-dependent signaling pathway resulting in oxidative stress. In the present study, we delineated the signaling pathways associated with calpain-dependent HIF-2α degradation in cell cultures and rats subjected to chronic IH. Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers prevented HIF-2α degradation by IH and ROS mimetic decreased HIF-2α protein levels in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell cultures, suggesting that ROS mediate IH-induced HIF-2α degradation. IH activated xanthine oxidase (XO by increased proteolytic conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase to XO. ROS generated by XO activated calpains, which contributed to HIF-2α degradation by IH. Calpain-induced HIF-2α degradation involves C-terminus but not the N-terminus of the HIF-2α protein. Pharmacological blockade as well as genetic knock down of XO prevented IH induced calpain activation and HIF-2α degradation in PC12 cells. Systemic administration of allopurinol to rats prevented IH-induced hypertension, oxidative stress and XO activation in adrenal medulla. These results demonstrate that ROS generated by XO activation mediates IH-induced HIF-2α degradation via activation of calpains.

  16. Ultrastructural modifications in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Guy; Hsiao, Yu-hsin; Yin, Songyue; Tjong, Jonathan; Tran, My T; Lau, Jenna; Xue, Jin; Liu, Siqi; Ellisman, Mark H; Zhou, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia (CH) occurs under certain physiological or pathological conditions, including in people who reside at high altitude or suffer chronic cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases. As mitochondria are the predominant oxygen-consuming organelles to generate ATP through oxidative phosphorylation in cells, their responses, through structural or molecular modifications, to limited oxygen supply play an important role in the overall functional adaptation to hypoxia. Here, we report the adaptive mitochondrial ultrastructural modifications and the functional impacts in a recently generated hypoxia-adapted Drosophila melanogaster strain that survives severe, otherwise lethal, hypoxic conditions. Using electron tomography, we discovered increased mitochondrial volume density and cristae abundance, yet also cristae fragmentation and a unique honeycomb-like structure in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted flies. The homeostatic levels of adenylate and energy charge were similar between hypoxia-adapted and naïve control flies and the hypoxia-adapted flies remained active under severe hypoxia as quantified by negative geotaxis behavior. The equilibrium ATP level was lower in hypoxia-adapted flies than those of the naïve controls tested under severe hypoxia that inhibited the motion of control flies. Our results suggest that the structural rearrangement in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted flies may be an important adaptive mechanism that plays a critical role in preserving adenylate homeostasis and metabolism as well as muscle function under chronic hypoxic conditions.

  17. Ultrastructural modifications in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Perkins

    Full Text Available Chronic hypoxia (CH occurs under certain physiological or pathological conditions, including in people who reside at high altitude or suffer chronic cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases. As mitochondria are the predominant oxygen-consuming organelles to generate ATP through oxidative phosphorylation in cells, their responses, through structural or molecular modifications, to limited oxygen supply play an important role in the overall functional adaptation to hypoxia. Here, we report the adaptive mitochondrial ultrastructural modifications and the functional impacts in a recently generated hypoxia-adapted Drosophila melanogaster strain that survives severe, otherwise lethal, hypoxic conditions. Using electron tomography, we discovered increased mitochondrial volume density and cristae abundance, yet also cristae fragmentation and a unique honeycomb-like structure in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted flies. The homeostatic levels of adenylate and energy charge were similar between hypoxia-adapted and naïve control flies and the hypoxia-adapted flies remained active under severe hypoxia as quantified by negative geotaxis behavior. The equilibrium ATP level was lower in hypoxia-adapted flies than those of the naïve controls tested under severe hypoxia that inhibited the motion of control flies. Our results suggest that the structural rearrangement in the mitochondria of hypoxia-adapted flies may be an important adaptive mechanism that plays a critical role in preserving adenylate homeostasis and metabolism as well as muscle function under chronic hypoxic conditions.

  18. Gefitinib circumvents hypoxia-induced drug resistance by the modulation of HIF-1alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Lee, Jin Kyung; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Na, Im Ii; Yang, Sung Hyun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Yoo, Young Do; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2009-03-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a transcriptional factor which is activated by hypoxia and associated with cell survival, proliferation and drug resistance. Recent studies have shown that the down-stream molecules of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal are involved in the hypoxia-dependent or -independent HIF-1alpha protein accumulation. Thus, we hypothesized that an EGFR-TK inhibitor, gefitinib, might circumvent the hypoxia-induced drug resistance via the regulation of HIF-1alpha expression. In our data, treatment of gefitinib suppressed induced HIF-1alpha by hypoxia. This action of gefitinib was caused by reduced protein stability without any change in the level of HIF-1alpha mRNA. The effect of gefitinib on down-regulation of HIF-1alpha was reversed by transfection of constitutively active form of Akt. The cellular response to gefitinib was similar in both normoxia and hypoxia condition. However, the response to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs decreased >50% under hypoxia condition and they did not change HIF-1alpha expression. In addition, the suppression of HIF-1alpha using siRNA overcame partially hypoxia-induced drug resistance. In conclusion, gefitinib was able to circumvent hypoxia-induced drug resistance suggesting that the effective suppression of HIF-1alpha by the inhibition of EGFR-Akt pathway may overcome the hypoxia-induced drug resistance.

  19. Intermittent hypoxia: a low-risk research tool with therapeutic value in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateika, Jason H; El-Chami, Mohamad; Shaheen, David; Ivers, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Intermittent hypoxia has generally been perceived as a high-risk stimulus, particularly in the field of sleep medicine, because it is thought to initiate detrimental cardiovascular, respiratory, cognitive, and metabolic outcomes. In contrast, the link between intermittent hypoxia and beneficial outcomes has received less attention, perhaps because it is not universally understood that outcome measures following exposure to intermittent hypoxia may be linked to the administered dose. The present review is designed to emphasize the less recognized beneficial outcomes associated with intermittent hypoxia. The review will consider the role intermittent hypoxia has in cardiovascular and autonomic adaptations, respiratory motor plasticity, and cognitive function. Each section will highlight the literature that contributed to the belief that intermittent hypoxia leads primarily to detrimental outcomes. The second segment of each section will consider the possible risks associated with experimentally rather than naturally induced intermittent hypoxia. Finally, the body of literature indicating that intermittent hypoxia initiates primarily beneficial outcomes will be considered. The overarching theme of the review is that the use of intermittent hypoxia in research investigations, coupled with reasonable safeguards, should be encouraged because of the potential benefits linked to the administration of a variety of low-risk intermittent hypoxia protocols.

  20. Intermittent hypoxia selects for genotypes and phenotypes that increase survival, invasion, and therapy resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Verduzco

    Full Text Available Hypoxia in tumors correlates with greater risk of metastases, increased invasiveness, and resistance to systemic and radiation therapy. The evolutionary dynamics that links specific adaptations to hypoxia with these observed tumor properties have not been well investigated. While some tumor populations may experience fixed hypoxia, cyclical and stochastic transitions from normoxia to hypoxia are commonly observed in vivo. Although some phenotypic adaptations to this cyclic hypoxia are likely reversible, we hypothesize that some adaptations may become fixed through mutations promoted by hypoxia-induced genomic instability. Here we seek to identify genetic alterations and corresponding stable phenotypes that emerge following cyclic hypoxia. Although these changes may originate as adaptations to this specific environmental stress, their fixation in the tumor genome may result in their observation in tumors from regions of normoxia, a condition known as pseudohypoxia. We exposed several epithelial cell lines to 50 cycles of hypoxia-normoxia, followed by culture in normoxia over a period of several months. Molecular analyses demonstrated permanent changes in expression of several oncogenes and tumor-suppressors, including p53, E-cadherin, and Hif-1α. These changes were associated with increased resistance to multiple cytotoxins, increased survival in hypoxia and increased anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest cycles of hypoxia encountered in early cancers can select for specific and stable genotypic and phenotypic properties that persist even in normoxic conditions, which may promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy.

  1. The effect of DN (dominant-negative) Ku70 and reoxygenation on hypoxia cell-kill: evidence of hypoxia-induced potentially lethal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urano, Muneyasu; Li, Gloria C; He, Fuqiu; Minami, Akiko; Burgman, Paul; Ling, C Clifton

    2012-07-01

    To study the effect of DN (dominant-negative) Ku70 and reoxygenation on the hypoxia-induced cell-kill. Cell lines were human colorectal carcinoma HCT8 and HT29 cells and their respective derivatives, v-HCT8 and v-HT29 infected with DNKu70-containing adenovirus. Cells were plated in glass tubes and made hypoxic by flushing N(2) gas containing 0, 0.1 or 0.5% O(2). Cell survival was determined by colony formation assay immediately after 0-96 h hypoxia. To reoxygenate medium were replaced fresh following 48 or 72 h in hypoxia and cells were incubated in aerobic environment for 2-24 h before survival assay. When incubated in hypoxia, cells lost reproductive capability ∼ exponentially as a function of time in hypoxia, and depending on the O(2) concentration. DNKu70 rendered cells more prone to hypoxia-induced cell-kill. Following reoxygenation cell survival increased rapidly but without detectable cell proliferation during first 24 hours. This evinced hypoxia-induced potentially lethal damage (PLD) that was repairable upon reoxygenation. DNKu70 did not significantly inhibit this repair. Hypoxia-induced cell lethality was facilitated by DNKu70, but substantially repaired upon reoxygenation. This may have negative impact on the effect of reoxygenation in cancer therapy.

  2. STR MARKERS. GENOTYPING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Sirbu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available STR (short tandem repeats loci consist of short, repetitive sequence elements of 2-8 bp in length. These abundant repeats are well distributed throughout the human genome and are rich source of highly polymorphic markers. There are literally hundreds of STR systems which have been mapped throughout the human genome. Several dozen have been investigated for application to human identity testing. These STR loci are found on almost every chromosome in the genome. They may be amplified using a variety of PCR primers. Tetranucleotide repeats have been most popular among forensic scientists due to their fidelity in PCR amplification although some tri- and pentanucleotide repeats are also in use. In this paper we intend (far from being exhaustive to present a synthesis of the characteristics of these genetic markers and their applications in genotyping, giving as an example the use of the STRs in a paternity testing case.

  3. The urine marker test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylandsted; Elsborg, Peter

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urine sample collection for doping control tests is a key component of the World Anti-Doping Agency's fight against doping in sport. However, a substantial number of athletes experience difficulty when having to urinate under supervision. Furthermore, it cannot always be ensured...... that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs......) are given orally prior to urination. Urine samples can be traced to the donor by analysis of the PEGs previously given. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the use of the urine marker during urine doping control testing. METHODS: Two studies investigated athletes' acceptance...

  4. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubicciotti, Roger S. (El Cerrito, CA); Karu, Alexander E. (Kensington, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA)

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  5. Alcoholism: Current Marker Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    mongolism are high-risk candidates for certain types of leukemia. Similarly, hemophiliacs have a correspondingly high incidence of color blindness . (4...genetically determined characteristics such as color blindness and blood type. GENETIC MARKER STUDIES In 1966 Dr. Cruz-Coke and Dr. Varela reported that...their study had linked color blindness , cirrhosis of the liver and alcoholism. They further hypothesized the existence of a sex-linked carrier gene

  6. CD146+ human umbilical cord perivascular cells maintain stemness under hypoxia and as a cell source for skeletal regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Pui Tsang

    Full Text Available The human umbilical cord perivascular cells (HUCPVCs have been considered as an alternative source of mesenchymal progenitors for cell based regenerative medicine. However, the biological properties of these cells remain to be well characterized. In the present study, HUCPVCs were isolated and sorted by CD146(+ pericyte marker. The purified CD146(+ HUCPVCs were induced to differentiate efficiently into osteoblast, chondrocyte and adipocyte lineages in vitro. Six weeks following subcutaneous transplantation of CD146(+ HUCPVCs-Gelfoam-alginate 3D complexes in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice, newly formed bone matrix with embedded osteocytes of donor origin was observed. The functional engraftment of CD146(+ HUCPVCs in the new bone regenerates was further confirmed in a critical-sized bone defect model in SCID mice. Hypoxic conditions suppressed osteogenic differentiation while increased cell proliferation and colony-forming efficiency of CD146(+ HUCPVCs as compared to that under normoxic conditions. Re-oxygenation restored the multi-differentiation potential of the CD146(+ HUCPVCs. Western blot analysis revealed an upregulation of HIF-1α, HIF-2α, and OCT-4 protein expression in CD146(+ HUCPVCs under hypoxia, while there was no remarkable change in SOX2 and NANOG expression. The gene expression profiles of stem cell transcription factors between cells treated by normoxia and hypoxic conditions were compared by PCR array analysis. Intriguingly, PPAR-γ was dramatically downregulated (20-fold in mRNA expression under hypoxia, and was revealed to possess a putative binding site in the Hif-2α gene promoter region. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the binding of PPAR-γ protein to the Hif-2α promoter and the binding was suppressed by hypoxia treatment. Luciferase reporter assay showed that the Hif-2α promoter activity was suppressed by PPAR expression. Thus, PPAR-γ may involve in the regulation of HIF-2α for stemness

  7. Cardiorespiratory Effects of One-Legged High-Intensity Interval Training in Normoxia and Hypoxia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menz, Verena; Semsch, Mona; Mosbach, Florian; Burtscher, Martin

    2016-06-01

    A higher-than-average maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), is closely associated with decreased morbidity and mortality and improved quality of life and acts as a marker of cardiorespiratory fitness. Although there is no consensus about an optimal training method to enhance VO2max, nevertheless training of small muscle groups and repeated exposure to hypoxia seem to be promising approaches. Therefore, this study was aimed at gaining innovative insights into the effects of small muscle group training in normoxia and hypoxia. Thirteen healthy participants were randomly assigned to the hypoxic (HG, n = 7) or normoxic (NG, n = 6) training group. Both groups completed nine high-intensity interval training sessions in 3 wks. The NG performed the training in normoxia (FiO2: 0.21; ~ 600 m) and the HG in hypoxia (FiO2: 0.126; ~ 4500 m). Each session consisted of 4 x 4 min one-legged cycling at 90% of maximal heart rate separated by 4 min recovery periods. Before and after the intervention period, VO2max and peak power output (Wmax) and responses to submaximal cycling (100 and 150 watts) were assessed in a laboratory cycling test. Peak power output significantly improved within both groups (9.6 ± 4.8% and 12.6 ± 8.9% for HG and NG, respectively) with no significant interaction (p = 0.277). However, VO2max only significantly increased after training in hypoxia from 45.4 ± 10.1 to 50.0 ± 9.8 ml/min/kg (10.8 ± 6.0%; p = 0.002) with no significant interaction (p = 0.146). The maximal O2-pulse improved within the HG and demonstrated a significant interaction (p = 0.040). One-legged cycling training significantly improved VO2max and peak power output. Training under hypoxic conditions may generate greater effects on VO2max than a similar training in normoxia and is considered as a promising training method for improving cardiorespiratory fitness. Key pointsNine sessions of one-legged high-intensity interval training significantly improved physical fitness.One-legged hypoxic

  8. Differential Expression of Three Hypoxia-inducible Factor-α Subunits in Pulmonary Arteries of Rat with Hypoxia-induced Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi-Fang LI; Ai-Guo DAI

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1α plays an important role in the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, but little is known about HIF-2α and HIF-3α with respect to transcriptional regulation by hypoxia. To examine the expression patterns of all HIF-α subunits (HIF-1α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α) in pulmonary arteries of rats undergoing systemic hypoxia, five groups of healthy male Wistar rats were exposed to normoxia (N) and hypoxia for 3 (H3), 7 (H7), 14 (H14) and 21 (H21) d respectively. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), vessel morphometry and right ventricular hypertrophy index were measured. Lungs were inflation fixed for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, and homogenized for Western blot. mPAP increased significantly after 7 d of hypoxia [(18.4±0.4) vs. (14.4±0.4) mmHg, H7 vs.N], reached its peak after 14 d of hypoxia, then remained stable. Pulmonary artery remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy developed significantly after 14 d of hypoxia. During normoxia, HIF-1 α and HIF-3α staining were slightly positive regarding mRNA levels. A substantial alteration of HIF-1 α and HIF-3α staining occurred in pulmonary arteries after 14 d and 7 d of hypoxia, respectively, but HIF-2α stainin g showed an inversed trend after 14 d of hypoxia. Protein levels of all HIF-α subunits except HIF-3α showed a marked increase corresponding to the duration of hypoxia, which was obtained by Western blot. Our study found that HIF-1 α, HIF-2α and HIF-3α may not only confer different target genes, but also play key pathogenetic roles in hypoxic-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  9. PHD2: from hypoxia regulation to disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Ana M; Wielockx, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen represents one of the major molecules required for the development and maintenance of life. An adequate response to hypoxia is therefore required for the functioning of the majority of living organisms and relies on the activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain-2 (PHD2) has long been recognized as the major regulator of this response, controlling a myriad of outcomes that range from cell death to proliferation. However, this enzyme has been associated with more pathways, making the role of this protein remarkably complex under distinct pathologies. While a protective role seems to exist in physiological conditions such as erythropoiesis; the picture is more complex during pathologies such as cancer. Since the regulation of this enzyme and its closest family members is currently considered as a possible therapy for various diseases, understanding the different particular roles of this protein is essential.

  10. The Role of Hypoxia in Orthodontic Tooth Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orthodontic forces are known to have various effects on the alveolar process, such as cell deformation, inflammation, and circulatory disturbances. Each of these conditions affecting cell differentiation, cell repair, and cell migration, is driven by numerous molecular and inflammatory mediators. As a result, bone remodeling is induced, facilitating orthodontic tooth movement. However, orthodontic forces not only have cellular effects but also induce vascular changes. Orthodontic forces are known to occlude periodontal ligament vessels on the pressure side of the dental root, decreasing the blood perfusion of the tissue. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, which is known to either affect cell proliferation or induce apoptosis, depending on the oxygen gradient. Because upregulated tissue proliferation rates are often accompanied by angiogenesis, hypoxia may be assumed to fundamentally contribute to bone remodeling processes during orthodontic treatment.

  11. Hypoxia and the initiation of erythropoietin production. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooley, J.C.; Mahlmann, L.J.

    1975-01-01

    The initiation of erythropoietin production in rats by hypoxia is dependent upon the magnitude of the hypoxic exposure, the position of the oxygen dissociation curve at the time of the hypoxic exposure, and the animal's endocrine status. Normal male rats produce more erythropoietin and elevate their intraerythrocytic 2,3-DPG levels more than female rats exposed to the same degree of hypoxia. Hypophysectomized rats produce erythropoietin following severe hypoxic exposure, but do not elevate their 2,3-DPG levels above control values. Respiratory acidosis in rats produced by breathing 10 percent CO/sub 2/ or by the injection of acetazolamide inhibits the initiation of erythropoietin production by hypoxic environments, but this inhibition is minimal in animals with metabolic acidosis produced by ureterligation. Changes in serum erythropoietin levels and the in vitro P/sub 50/ appear to be two separate but interrelated physiological events which occur during the adaptation of animals to hypoxic environments.

  12. Thyroid function during intermittent exposure to hypobaric hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, R. C.; Malhotra, A. S.

    1990-09-01

    Circulatory levels of triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) and their kinetics were studied in rabbits exposed to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (5200 m, 395 mm Hg, PO2 83 mm Hg) 6 h daily for 5 weeks in a decompression chamber maintained at room temperature of 22° 24° C. Kinetics of T3 and T4 were studied on days 21 and 28 of hypoxic exposure. The T3 and T4 values were found to be significantly lower on day 8 of exposure to hypoxia compared to the pre-exposure values. The decreased levels were maintained throughout the entire period of hypoxic stress. The metabolic clearance rate, production rate, distribution space and extrathyroidal T3 and T4 pools were significantly decreased in animals under hypoxic stress compared to the control animals. The decline in thyroid hormone levels and their production in rabbits under hypoxic stress indicate an adaptive phenomenon under conditions of low oxygen availability.

  13. Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Beta-2 Microglobulin Tumor Marker Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... Microglobulin, Serum, Urine, or CSF Related tests: Albumin , Tumor Markers , CSF Analysis All content on Lab Tests Online ...

  14. Intracellular adenosine formation and release by freshly-isolated vascular endothelial cells from rat skeletal muscle: effects of hypoxia and/or acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G Y; Essackjee, H C; Ballard, H J

    2014-07-18

    Previous studies suggested indirectly that vascular endothelial cells (VECs) might be able to release intracellularly-formed adenosine. We isolated VECs from the rat soleus muscle using collagenase digestion and magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). The VEC preparation had >90% purity based on cell morphology, fluorescence immunostaining, and RT-PCR of endothelial markers. The kinetic properties of endothelial cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase suggested it was the AMP-preferring N-I isoform: its catalytic activity was 4 times higher than ecto-5'nucleotidase. Adenosine kinase had 50 times greater catalytic activity than adenosine deaminase, suggesting that adenosine removal in VECs is mainly through incorporation into adenine nucleotides. The maximal activities of cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine kinase were similar. Adenosine and ATP accumulated in the medium surrounding VECs in primary culture. Hypoxia doubled the adenosine, but ATP was unchanged; AOPCP did not alter medium adenosine, suggesting that hypoxic VECs had released intracellularly-formed adenosine. Acidosis increased medium ATP, but extracellular conversion of ATP to AMP was inhibited, and adenosine remained unchanged. Acidosis in the buffer-perfused rat gracilis muscle elevated AMP and adenosine in the venous effluent, but AOPCP abolished the increase in adenosine, suggesting that adenosine is formed extracellularly by non-endothelial tissues during acidosis in vivo. Hypoxia plus acidosis increased medium ATP by a similar amount to acidosis alone and adenosine 6-fold; AOPCP returned the medium adenosine to the level seen with hypoxia alone. These data suggest that VECs release intracellularly formed adenosine in hypoxia, ATP during acidosis, and both under simulated ischaemic conditions, with further extracellular conversion of ATP to adenosine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Abbreviated exposure to hypoxia is sufficient to induce CNS dysmyelination, modulate spinal motor neuron composition, and impair motor development in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watzlawik, Jens O; Kahoud, Robert J; O'Toole, Ryan J; White, Katherine A M; Ogden, Alyssa R; Painter, Meghan M; Wootla, Bharath; Papke, Louisa M; Denic, Aleksandar; Weimer, Jill M; Carey, William A; Rodriguez, Moses

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal white matter injury (nWMI) is an increasingly common cause of cerebral palsy that results predominantly from hypoxic injury to progenitor cells including those of the oligodendrocyte lineage. Existing mouse models of nWMI utilize prolonged periods of hypoxia during the neonatal period, require complex cross-fostering and exhibit poor growth and high mortality rates. Abnormal CNS myelin composition serves as the major explanation for persistent neuro-motor deficits. Here we developed a simplified model of nWMI with low mortality rates and improved growth without cross-fostering. Neonatal mice are exposed to low oxygen from postnatal day (P) 3 to P7, which roughly corresponds to the period of human brain development between gestational weeks 32 and 36. CNS hypomyelination is detectable for 2-3 weeks post injury and strongly correlates with levels of body and brain weight loss. Immediately following hypoxia treatment, cell death was evident in multiple brain regions, most notably in superficial and deep cortical layers as well as the subventricular zone progenitor compartment. PDGFαR, Nkx2.2, and Olig2 positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cell were significantly reduced until postnatal day 27. In addition to CNS dysmyelination we identified a novel pathological marker for adult hypoxic animals that strongly correlates with life-long neuro-motor deficits. Mice reared under hypoxia reveal an abnormal spinal neuron composition with increased small and medium diameter axons and decreased large diameter axons in thoracic lateral and anterior funiculi. Differences were particularly pronounced in white matter motor tracts left and right of the anterior median fissure. Our findings suggest that 4 days of exposure to hypoxia are sufficient to induce experimental nWMI in CD1 mice, thus providing a model to test new therapeutics. Pathological hallmarks of this model include early cell death, decreased OPCs and hypomyelination in early postnatal life, followed by

  16. Diagnostic and prognostic gene expression signatures in 177 soft tissue sarcomas: hypoxia-induced transcription profile signifies metastatic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendahl Pär-Ola

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soft tissue sarcoma (STS diagnosis is challenging because of a multitude of histopathological subtypes, different genetic characteristics, and frequent intratumoral pleomorphism. One-third of STS metastasize and current risk-stratification is suboptimal, therefore, novel diagnostic and prognostic markers would be clinically valuable. We assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of array-based gene expression profiles using 27 k cDNA microarrays in 177, mainly high-grade, STS of 13 histopathological subtypes. Results Unsupervised analysis resulted in two major clusters – one mainly containing STS characterized by type-specific genetic alterations and the other with a predominance of genetically complex and pleomorphic STS. Synovial sarcomas, myxoid/round-cell liposarcomas, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors clustered tightly within the former cluster and discriminatory signatures for these were characterized by developmental genes from the EGFR, FGFR, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, RAR and KIT signaling pathways. The more pleomorphic STS subtypes, e.g. leiomyosarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma/undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma and dedifferentiated/pleomorphic liposarcoma, were part of the latter cluster and were characterized by relatively heterogeneous profiles, although subclusters herein were identified. A prognostic signature partly characterized by hypoxia-related genes was identified among 89 genetically complex pleomorphic primary STS and could, in a multivariate analysis including established prognostic markers, independently predict the risk of metastasis with a hazard ratio of 2.2 (P = 0.04. Conclusion Diagnostic gene expression profiles linking signaling pathways to the different STS subtypes were demonstrated and a hypoxia-induced metastatic profile was identified in the pleomorphic, high-grade STS. These findings verify diagnostic utility and application of expression data for improved selection of high

  17. Hepcidin: A Critical Regulator Of Iron Metabolism During Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Critical Regulator of IronMetabolism during Hypoxia Korry J. Hintze1 and James P. McClung2 1Department of Nutrition , Dietetics & Food Sciences, Utah State...University, Logan, UT 84322, USA 2Military Nutrition Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine (USARIEM), Natick, MA 01760, USA...through a series of cellular transport proteins that are sensitive to the recently discovered iron regulatory hormone, hepcidin. The discovery of

  18. A theoretical stochastic control framework for adapting radiotherapy to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberian, Fatemeh; Ghate, Archis; Kim, Minsun

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia, that is, insufficient oxygen partial pressure, is a known cause of reduced radiosensitivity in solid tumors, and especially in head-and-neck tumors. It is thus believed to adversely affect the outcome of fractionated radiotherapy. Oxygen partial pressure varies spatially and temporally over the treatment course and exhibits inter-patient and intra-tumor variation. Emerging advances in non-invasive functional imaging offer the future possibility of adapting radiotherapy plans to this uncertain spatiotemporal evolution of hypoxia over the treatment course. We study the potential benefits of such adaptive planning via a theoretical stochastic control framework using computer-simulated evolution of hypoxia on computer-generated test cases in head-and-neck cancer. The exact solution of the resulting control problem is computationally intractable. We develop an approximation algorithm, called certainty equivalent control, that calls for the solution of a sequence of convex programs over the treatment course; dose-volume constraints are handled using a simple constraint generation method. These convex programs are solved using an interior point algorithm with a logarithmic barrier via Newton’s method and backtracking line search. Convexity of various formulations in this paper is guaranteed by a sufficient condition on radiobiological tumor-response parameters. This condition is expected to hold for head-and-neck tumors and for other similarly responding tumors where the linear dose-response parameter is larger than the quadratic dose-response parameter. We perform numerical experiments on four test cases by using a first-order vector autoregressive process with exponential and rational-quadratic covariance functions from the spatiotemporal statistics literature to simulate the evolution of hypoxia. Our results suggest that dynamic planning could lead to a considerable improvement in the number of tumor cells remaining at the end of the treatment course

  19. Activation of the Astrocytic Endothelin System in Response to Hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    An Ding Xua; Kai M.Schmidt-Ott; Scbastian Tuschick; Lutz Liefeldt; Susan Lyons; Helmut Kettcnmann; Martin.Paul

    2000-01-01

    Objcctive:To determine the gene expression patterns of endothelin (ET)system components in cultured astrocytes(AC),and to examine the direct effcct of hypoxia on ET system gene expression in cultured AC.Background:The ET system was considered to be related to the activation of AC. However,how hypoxia affects the ET system in transcriptional levels remains unclear.Methods:AC was prepared form mouse brain,and cultured 4 days.then further incubated under normoxic or hypoxic conditions for 24h. ET peptide levels were determined by RIA.The transcripts of ET system components were measured by Northern Blot RNA hybridization and RT-PCR.Results:In normoxic AC,ET-1,ET converting enzyme(ECE)-2,ETA receptor,and ETB receptor mRNAs were detected by Northern blot hybridization with ETB receptor mRNA appearing to be the predominant receptor transcript.ET-3and ECE-1 were only detected by RT-PCR,indicating low expression levels of these components.Hypoxia induced a 1.7-fold increase in ET peptide level in culture supernatants as comparcd to controls(p<0.001).At the same time,a 3-fold increase of ET-1 mRNA(p<0.001)was determined by Northern blot RNA analysis,indicating a regulation at the transcriptional Ievel.Both ETA and ETB receptor mRNASweredownregulated to approximately 20% of control levels(p<0.001), while ECE-2 mRNA remained unchanged.Conclusions:These results indicate direct effects of hypoxia on astrocytic ET system gene expression.Therefore,similar changes observed in ischemic conditions in vivo are likely to be at least partially independent from the modified cerebral microenvironment.

  20. Hypoxia reoxygenation induces premature senescence in neonatal SD rat cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-xiang ZHANG; Ming-long CHEN; Qi-jun SHAN; Jian-gang ZOU; Chun CHEN; Bing YANG; Dong-jie XU; Yu JIN; Ke-jiang CAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether hypoxia reoxygenation induces premature senes-cence in neonatal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat cardiomyocytes. Methods: Cardio-myocytes were isolated from neonatal SD rat heart and identified by immunohisto-chemistry. The control cultures were incubated at 37 ℃ in a humidified atmo-sphere of 5% CO and 95% air. The hypoxic cultures were incubated in a modular incubator chamber filled with 1% O2, 5% CO2, and balance N2 for 6 h. The reoxygen-ated cultures were subjected to 1% O2 and 5% CO2 for 6 h, then 21% oxygen for 4,8, 12, 24, and 48 h, respectively. Cell proliferation was determined using bromo-deoxyuridine labeling. The ultrastructure of cardiomyocytes was observed by using an electron microscope. Β-Galactosidase activity was determined by using a senescence β-galactosidase Staining Kit. P16INK4a and telomerase reverse tran-scriptase (TERT) mRNA levels were measured by real time quantitative PCR. TERT protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. Telomerase activi-ties were assayed by using the Telo TAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISApplus kit. Results:The initial cultures consisted of pure cardiomyocytes identified by immunohisto-chemistry. The proportion of BrdU positive cells was reduced significantly in the hypoxia reoxygenation-treated group (P<0.01). Under the condition of hypoxia reoxygenation, mitochondrial dehydration appeared; p16'INK4a and TERT mRNA levels, β-galactosidase activity, TERT protein expression and telomerase activi-ties were all significantly increased (P<0.01 or P<0.05). Conclusion: These data indicate that premature senescence could be induced in neonatal SD rat cardiomyo-cytes exposed to hypoxia reoxygenation. Although TERT significantly increased,it could not block senescence.

  1. Restraint Stress Intensifies Interstitial K+ Accumulation during Severe Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Christian; Janc, Oliwia A.; Kempkes, Belinda; Callis, Carolina Araya; Flügge, Gabriele; Hülsmann, Swen; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress affects neuronal networks by inducing dendritic retraction, modifying neuronal excitability and plasticity, and modulating glial cells. To elucidate the functional consequences of chronic stress for the hippocampal network, we submitted adult rats to daily restraint stress for 3 weeks (6 h/day). In acute hippocampal tissue slices of stressed rats, basal synaptic function and short-term plasticity at Schaffer collateral/CA1 neuron synapses were unchanged while long-term potentiation was markedly impaired. The spatiotemporal propagation pattern of hypoxia-induced spreading depression episodes was indistinguishable among control and stress slices. However, the duration of the extracellular direct current potential shift was shortened after stress. Moreover, K+ fluxes early during hypoxia were more intense, and the postsynaptic recoveries of interstitial K+ levels and synaptic function were slower. Morphometric analysis of immunohistochemically stained sections suggested hippocampal shrinkage in stressed rats, and the number of cells that are immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in the CA1 subfield indicating activation of astrocytes. Western blots showed a marked downregulation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 in stressed rats. Yet, resting membrane potentials, input resistance, and K+-induced inward currents in CA1 astrocytes were indistinguishable from controls. These data indicate an intensified interstitial K+ accumulation during hypoxia in the hippocampus of chronically stressed rats which seems to arise from a reduced interstitial volume fraction rather than impaired glial K+ buffering. One may speculate that chronic stress aggravates hypoxia-induced pathophysiological processes in the hippocampal network and that this has implications for the ischemic brain. PMID:22470344

  2. Cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia: implications for aviation training

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus C; Hinkelbein J

    2014-01-01

    Christopher Neuhaus,1,2 Jochen Hinkelbein2,31Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Ruprecht Karls University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 2Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue Working Group, German Society of Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM), Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: The aim of this narrative review is to provide an overview on cognitive responses to hypobaric hypoxia and ...

  3. Ibuprofen Blunts Ventilatory Acclimatization to Sustained Hypoxia in Humans.

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    Kemal Erdem Basaran

    Full Text Available Ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia is a time-dependent increase in ventilation and the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR that involves neural plasticity in both carotid body chemoreceptors and brainstem respiratory centers. The mechanisms of such plasticity are not completely understood but recent animal studies show it can be blocked by administering ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, during chronic hypoxia. We tested the hypothesis that ibuprofen would also block the increase in HVR with chronic hypoxia in humans in 15 healthy men and women using a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. The isocapnic HVR was measured with standard methods in subjects treated with ibuprofen (400 mg every 8 hrs or placebo for 48 hours at sea level and 48 hours at high altitude (3,800 m. Subjects returned to sea level for at least 30 days prior to repeating the protocol with the opposite treatment. Ibuprofen significantly decreased the HVR after acclimatization to high altitude compared to placebo but it did not affect ventilation or arterial O2 saturation breathing ambient air at high altitude. Hence, compensatory responses prevent hypoventilation with decreased isocapnic ventilatory O2-sensitivity from ibuprofen at this altitude. The effect of ibuprofen to decrease the HVR in humans provides the first experimental evidence that a signaling mechanism described for ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia in animal models also occurs in people. This establishes a foundation for the future experiments to test the potential role of different mechanisms for neural plasticity and ventilatory acclimatization in humans with chronic hypoxemia from lung disease.

  4. Hypoxia-Inducible Factor as an Angiogenic Master Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) regulate the transcription of genes that mediate the response to hypoxia. HIFs are constantly expressed and degraded under normoxia, but stabilized under hypoxia. HIFs have been widely studied in physiological and pathological conditions and have been shown to contribute to the pathogenesis of various vascular diseases. In clinical settings, the HIF pathway has been studied for its role in inhibiting carcinogenesis. HIFs might also play a protective role in the pathology of ischemic diseases. Clinical trials of therapeutic angiogenesis after the administration of a single growth factor have yielded unsatisfactory or controversial results, possibly because the coordinated activity of different HIF-induced factors is necessary to induce mature vessel formation. Thus, manipulation of HIF activity to simultaneously induce a spectrum of angiogenic factors offers a superior strategy for therapeutic angiogenesis. Because HIF-2α plays an essential role in vascular remodeling, manipulation of HIF-2α is a promising approach to the treatment of ischemic diseases caused by arterial obstruction, where insufficient development of collateral vessels impedes effective therapy. Eukaryotic initiation factor 3 subunit e (eIF3e)/INT6 interacts specifically with HIF-2α and induces the proteasome inhibitor-sensitive degradation of HIF-2α, independent of hypoxia and von Hippel-Lindau protein. Treatment with eIF3e/INT6 siRNA stabilizes HIF-2α activity even under normoxic conditions and induces the expression of several angiogenic factors, at levels sufficient to produce functional arteries and veins in vivo. We have demonstrated that administration of eIF3e/INT6 siRNA to ischemic limbs or cold-injured brains reduces ischemic damage in animal models. This review summarizes the current understanding of the relationship between HIFs and vascular diseases. We also discuss novel oxygen-independent regulatory proteins that bind HIF-α and the implications

  5. Effect of simulated high-altitude hypoxia on Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-jing HUANG

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of simulated high-altitude hypoxia on the detection rate and endotoxin level of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg of subgingival bacterial plagues in rabbit periodontitis models. Methods Forty male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, namely, normoxia control group (group A1, normoxia experimental group (group A2, hypoxia control group (group B1, and hypoxia experimental group (group B2. Each group included 10 rabbits. Periodontitis models was established in groups A2 and B2 combined by ligating both lower central incisors with steel ligature and feeding periodontitis diets, and then the animals were housed in a hypoxia chamber (simulating 5000m altitude, 23h per day. Groups A1 and A2 were raised normal diet in normoxia environment. After eight weeks, the rabbit periodontitis model was evaluated by observing radiographic features of the X-ray films and histopathologic changes under a light microscope. Subgingival plague sample from periodontal pockets on both lower central incisors were collected for isolation, culture and identification of Pg, and for detection of the endotoxin level. Results The histopathologic observation and X-ray examination results showed that the periodontitis of rabbits in group B2 was significantly more severe than that in group A2. The detection rates of Pg in group A1, A2, B1 and B2 was 0%, 50%, 55% and 95% (P < 0.05. Pg detection rate and endotoxin level were higher in group B2 (95%, 0.46±0.04EU/ml than in group A2 (50%, 0.38±0.02EU/ml, P < 0.05. Conclusions The process speed and damage degree of periodontitis in hypoxic environment is higher than that in normoxic environment. Moreover, the hypoxic environment is more suitable in the colonization of Pg with higher endotoxin level in subgingival plague.

  6. Clinical study of diffusion hypoxia after nitrous oxide analgesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Quarnstrom, F. C.; Milgrom, P.; Bishop, M. J.; DeRouen, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    In order to estimate the incidence of diffusion hypoxia, arterial oxygen saturation was measured in 104 healthy adult dental patients who were administered nitrous oxide-oxygen analgesia and who did not receive postcessation oxygen. Pretreatment saturation levels as determined by pulse oximetry ranged from 93% to 100%. When the nitrous oxide-oxygen administration ceased, the saturation levels were from 95% to 100%. The mean saturation dropped about 2% over the next 4 min and then stabilized. ...

  7. [The application value of water flea Daphnia pulex for hypoxia model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiajia; Sheng, Bo; Yang, Lei; Zuo, Yunxia; Lin, Jin; Li, Guohua

    2011-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is an important transcription factor under hypoxic condition in many organisms, and plays a key role in the induction of hypoxia tolerance. It is necessary to establish a hypoxia model for HIF and to perform further hypoxia tolerance research. To investigate the value of Daphnia as a model organism in hypoxia precondition, we developed a preconditioning protocol with a model organism, Daphnia pulex. We found that two episodes of exposure to hypoxic solution resulted in enhanced hypoxia tolerance which is dependent on HIF. Comparative genomic analysis was also made to highlight the homology of HIF-related genes among Daphnia, fruitfly and human. We found that Daphnia is suitable for the study of human hypoxic injury as a model organism.

  8. Hypoxia imaging using Positron Emission Tomography in non-small cell lung cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollineni, Vikram Rao; Wiegman, Erwin M; Pruim, Jan; Groen, Harry J M; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2012-12-01

    Tumour hypoxia is an important contributor to radioresistance. Thus, increasing the radiation dose to hypoxic areas may result in improved locoregional tumour control. However, this strategy requires accurate detection of the hypoxic sub-volume using PET imaging. Secondly, hypoxia imaging may also provide prognostic information and may be of help to monitor treatment response. Therefore, a systematic review of the scientific literature was carried out on the use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) to image Tumour hypoxia in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). More specifically, the purpose of this review was (1) to summarize the different hypoxia tracers used, (2) to investigate whether Tumour hypoxia can be detected in NSCLC and finally (3) whether the presence of hypoxia can be used to predict outcome.

  9. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  10. Flavonoid Compound Icariin Activates Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α in Chondrocytes and Promotes Articular Cartilage Repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengzhen Wang

    Full Text Available Articular cartilage has poor capability for repair following trauma or degenerative pathology due to avascular property, low cell density and migratory ability. Discovery of novel therapeutic approaches for articular cartilage repair remains a significant clinical need. Hypoxia is a hallmark for cartilage development and pathology. Hypoxia inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1α has been identified as a key mediator for chondrocytes to response to fluctuations of oxygen availability during cartilage development or repair. This suggests that HIF-1α may serve as a target for modulating chondrocyte functions. In this study, using phenotypic cellular screen assays, we identify that Icariin, an active flavonoid component from Herba Epimedii, activates HIF-1α expression in chondrocytes. We performed systemic in vitro and in vivo analysis to determine the roles of Icariin in regulation of chondrogenesis. Our results show that Icariin significantly increases hypoxia responsive element luciferase reporter activity, which is accompanied by increased accumulation and nuclear translocation of HIF-1α in murine chondrocytes. The phenotype is associated with inhibiting PHD activity through interaction between Icariin and iron ions. The upregulation of HIF-1α mRNA levels in chondrocytes persists during chondrogenic differentiation for 7 and 14 days. Icariin (10-6 M increases the proliferation of chondrocytes or chondroprogenitors examined by MTT, BrdU incorporation or colony formation assays. Icariin enhances chondrogenic marker expression in a micromass culture including Sox9, collagen type 2 (Col2α1 and aggrecan as determined by real-time PCR and promotes extracellular matrix (ECM synthesis indicated by Alcian blue staining. ELISA assays show dramatically increased production of aggrecan and hydroxyproline in Icariin-treated cultures at day 14 of chondrogenic differentiation as compared with the controls. Meanwhile, the expression of chondrocyte catabolic

  11. Acute normobaric hypoxia reduces body temperature in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPasquale, Dana M; Kolkhorst, Fred W; Buono, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    Anapyrexia is the regulated decrease in body temperature during acute exposure to hypoxia. This study examined resting rectal temperature (Trec) in adult humans during acute normobaric hypoxia (NH). Ten subjects breathed air consisting of 21% (NN), 14% (NH14), and 12% oxygen (NH12) for 30 min each in thermoneutral conditions while Trec and blood oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Linear regression indicated that Spo2 was progressively lower in NH14 (p=0.0001) and NH12 (p=0.0001) compared to NN, and that Spo2 in NH14 was different than NH12 (p=0.00001). Trec was progressively lower during NH14 (p=0.014) and in NH12 (p=0.0001) compared to NN. The difference in Trec between NH14 and NH12 was also significant (p=0.0287). Spo2 was a significant predictor of Trec such that for every 1% decrease in Spo2, Trec decreased by 0.15°C (p=0.0001). The present study confirmed that, similar to many other species, human adults respond to acute hypoxia exposure by lowering rectal temperature.

  12. IGFBP-3, hypoxia and TNF-{alpha} inhibit adiponectin transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zappala, Giovanna, E-mail: zappalag@mail.nih.gov [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Rechler, Matthew M. [Diabetes Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Clinical Endocrinology Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone, an agonist ligand for the nuclear receptor PPAR-{gamma}, improves insulin sensitivity in part by stimulating transcription of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin. It activates PPAR-{gamma}-RXR-{alpha} heterodimers bound to PPAR-{gamma} response elements in the adiponectin promoter. Rosiglitazone-stimulated adiponectin protein synthesis in 3T3-L1 mouse adipocytes has been shown to be inhibited by IGFBP-3, which can be induced by hypoxia and the proinflammatory cytokine, TNF-{alpha}, two inhibitors of adiponectin transcription. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3, the hypoxia-mimetic agent cobalt chloride, and TNF-{alpha} inhibit rosiglitazone-induced adiponectin transcription in mouse embryo fibroblasts that stably express PPAR-{gamma}2. Native IGFBP-3 can bind RXR-{alpha} and inhibited rosiglitazone stimulated promoter activity, whereas an IGFBP-3 mutant that does not bind RXR-{alpha} did not. These results suggest that IGFBP-3 may mediate the inhibition of adiponectin transcription by hypoxia and TNF-{alpha}, and that IGFBP-3 binding to RXR-{alpha} may be required for the observed inhibition.

  13. Interlinking of hypoxia and estrogen in thyroid cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoria, S; Hanly, E; Nicolini, A; George, A L; Geliebter, J; Shin, E J; Suriano, R; Carpi, A; Tiwari, R K

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen aids in neo-vascularization of various tumors during hypoxic conditions, however the role of estrogen within the hypoxic environment of thyroid cancer is not known. In a series of experimentations, using human thyroid cancer cells, we observed that estrogen and hypoxia modulate the hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) signaling which is abrogated by the anti-estrogen fulvestrant and the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole). Furthermore, we found that the conditioned medium from estrogen treated thyroid cancer cells lead to enhanced migration and tubulogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) which is abrogated by HIF-1 inhibitor. These findings, in addition to our previous and other scientific literature data, lead us to conclude that estrogen and hypoxia are interlinked in thyroid cancer and can equally modulate epithelial-endothelial cell interactions by mediating key cellular, metabolic and molecular processes of thyroid cancer progression. We believe that the hormonal component and cellular adaptation to oxygen tension of cancer cells are functionally equivalent with a cellular transition that can be exploited clinically for a combinational approach for thyroid cancer treatment involving antiestrogens as well as anti-hypoxic agents.

  14. Beneficial effects of intermittent hypobaric hypoxia on the body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi ZHANG; Zhao-nian ZHOU

    2012-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) is a common problem in clinic and there is no satisfactory method for prevention or treatment of I/R injury so far.Chronic intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (CIHH),similar to the concept of ischemia preconditioning(IPC)or altitude hypoxia adaptation (AHA),has been recognized to confer a protective effect on heart against I/R injury with a longer protective effect than IPC and a less adverse effect than AHA.It has been proved that CIHH increases myocardial tolerance to ischemia or hypoxia,reserving cardiac function and preventing arrhythmia during I/R.Multiple mechanisms or pathway underlying the cardiac protection of ClHH have been proposed,such as induction of heatshock protein,enhancement of myocardial antioxidation capacity,increase of coronary flow and myocardial capillary angiogenesis,activation of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels,inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition pores,and activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).In addition,CIHH has been found having many beneficial effects on the body,such as promotion of health,increase of oxygen utilization,and prevention or treatment for some diseases.The beneficial effects of ClHH and potential mechanisms are reviewed mainly based on the researches performed by our group.

  15. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  16. Polychaete Annelid Biomass Size Spectra: The Effects of Hypoxia Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative benthic samples were taken during spring and summer at three locations on the Louisiana continental shelf from 2004 to 2012 to assess the influence of hypoxia on the mean sizes (wet weight of polychaete annelid worms. While the mean body size over the entire study of 64 samples was 3.99 ± 4.66 mg wet weight per individual, the mean ranged from 2.97 ± 2.87 mg during consistently hypoxic conditions (2 mg/L. The variations in size within assemblages were estimated from conventional biomass size spectra (BSS and normalized biomass size spectra (NBSS across a broad range of oxygen concentrations. The decline in size was due to the elimination of large species under hypoxic conditions (<2 mg/L, not a reduction in size within species. At “severe” levels of hypoxia (<1 mg/L, the smallest species also declined in abundance, whereas the ubiquitous “medium-sized” Paraprionospio pinnata flourished. These results suggest that there will be enhanced selection for small sizes and species with enlarged branchial palps such as those in P. pinnata if, as predicted, hypoxia becomes more commonplace in time and space worldwide.

  17. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, is often present in diabetic (DB patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J (db/db mice (10 weeks old and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic, IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic, IADB (intermittent air diabetic, and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  18. Use of Culture Geometry to Control Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion from Adipose-Derived Stem Cells: Optimizing a Cell-Based Approach to Drive Vascular Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L.; Sahai, Suchit; Rucker, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) possess potent angiogenic properties and represent a source for cell-based approaches to delivery of bioactive factors to drive vascularization of tissues. Hypoxic signaling appears to be largely responsible for triggering release of these angiogenic cytokines, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Three-dimensional (3D) culture may promote activation of hypoxia-induced pathways, and has furthermore been shown to enhance cell survival by promoting cell–cell interactions while increasing angiogenic potential. However, the development of hypoxia within ADSC spheroids is difficult to characterize. In the present study, we investigated the impact of spheroid size on hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF)-1 activity in spheroid cultures under atmospheric and physiological oxygen conditions using a fluorescent marker. Hypoxia could be induced and modulated by controlling the size of the spheroid; HIF-1 activity increased with spheroid size and with decreasing external oxygen concentration. Furthermore, VEGF secretion was impacted by the hypoxic status of the culture, increasing with elevated HIF-1 activity, up to the point at which viability was compromised. Together, these results suggest the ability to use 3D culture geometry as a means to control output of angiogenic factors from ADSCs, and imply that at a particular environmental oxygen concentration an optimal culture size for cytokine production exists. Consideration of culture geometry and microenvironmental conditions at the implantation site will be important for successful realization of ADSCs as a pro-angiogenic therapy. PMID:23668629

  19. Role of hypoxia and glycolysis in the development of multi-drug resistance in human tumor cells and the establishment of an orthotopic multi-drug resistant tumor model in nude mice using hypoxic pre-conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Zhenfeng

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of multi-drug resistant (MDR cancer is a significant challenge in the clinical treatment of recurrent disease. Hypoxia is an environmental selection pressure that contributes to the development of MDR. Many cancer cells, including MDR cells, resort to glycolysis for energy acquisition. This study aimed to explore the relationship between hypoxia, glycolysis, and MDR in a panel of human breast and ovarian cancer cells. A second aim of this study was to develop an orthotopic animal model of MDR breast cancer. Methods Nucleic and basal protein was extracted from a panel of human breast and ovarian cancer cells; MDR cells and cells pre-exposed to either normoxic or hypoxic conditions. Western blotting was used to assess the expression of MDR markers, hypoxia inducible factors, and glycolytic proteins. Tumor xenografts were established in the mammary fat pad of nu/nu mice using human breast cancer cells that were pre-exposed to either hypoxic or normoxic conditions. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the MDR character of excised tumors. Results Hypoxia induces MDR and glycolysis in vitro, but the cellular response is cell-line specific and duration dependent. Using hypoxic, triple-negative breast cancer cells to establish 100 mm3 tumor xenografts in nude mice is a relevant model for MDR breast cancer. Conclusion Hypoxic pre-conditiong and xenografting may be used to develop a multitude of orthotopic models for MDR cancer aiding in the study and treatment of the disease.

  20. Network-based association of hypoxia-responsive genes with cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Oldham, William M.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Molecular oxygen is indispensable for cellular viability and function. Hypoxia is a stress condition in which oxygen demand exceeds supply. Low cellular oxygen content induces a number of molecular changes to activate regulatory pathways responsible for increasing the oxygen supply and optimizing cellular metabolism under limited oxygen conditions. Hypoxia plays critical roles in the pathobiology of many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and chronic lung diseases. Although the complicated associations between hypoxia and cardiovascular (and cerebrovascular) diseases (CVD) have been recognized for some time, there are few studies that investigate their biological link from a systems biology perspective. In this study, we integrate hypoxia genes, CVD genes, and the human protein interactome in order to explore the relationship between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases at a systems level. We show that hypoxia genes are much closer to CVD genes in the human protein interactome than that expected by chance. We also find that hypoxia genes play significant bridging roles in connecting different cardiovascular diseases. We construct a hypoxia-CVD bipartite network and find several interesting hypoxia-CVD modules with significant gene ontology similarity. Finally, we show that hypoxia genes tend to have more CVD interactors in the human interactome than in random networks of matching topology. Based on these observations, we can predict novel genes that may be associated with CVD. This network-based association study gives us a broad view of the relationships between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases and provides new insights into the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular biology.

  1. Late Holocene changes in hypoxia off the west coast of India: Micropalaeontological evidences

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Prasad, V.; Mazumder, A.; Garg, R.; Saraswat, R.; Henriques, P.J.

    . and Turner, R. E., Hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico: description, causes and change. In Coastal Hypoxia: Consequences for Living Resources and Ecosystems (eds Rabalais, N. N. and Turner, R. E.), American Geophysical Union, New York, 2001, pp. 1.... In Modern Foraminifera (ed. Sen Gupta, B. K.), Kluwer, Great Britain, 1999, pp. 201–216. 30. Osterman, L. E., Benthic foraminifera from the continental shelf and slope of the Gulf of Mexico: an indicator of shelf hypoxia. Estuarine Coastal Shelf Sci...

  2. Hypoxia-induced modulation of apoptosis and BCL-2 family proteins in different cancer cell types.

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    Audrey Sermeus

    Full Text Available Hypoxia plays an important role in the resistance of tumour cells to chemotherapy. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this process are not well understood. Moreover, according to the cell lines, hypoxia differently influences cell death. The study of the effects of hypoxia on the apoptosis induced by 5 chemotherapeutic drugs in 7 cancer cell types showed that hypoxia generally inhibited the drug-induced apoptosis. In most cases, the effect of hypoxia was the same for all the drugs in one cell type. The expression profile of 93 genes involved in apoptosis as well as the protein level of BCL-2 family proteins were then investigated. In HepG2 cells that are strongly protected against cell death by hypoxia, hypoxia decreased the abundance of nearly all the pro-apoptotic BCL-2 family proteins while none of them are decreased in A549 cells that are not protected against cell death by hypoxia. In HepG2 cells, hypoxia decreased NOXA and BAD abundance and modified the electrophoretic mobility of BIM(EL. BIM and NOXA are important mediators of etoposide-induced cell death in HepG2 cells and the hypoxia-induced modification of these proteins abundance or post-translational modifications partly account for chemoresistance. Finally, the modulation of the abundance and/or of the post-translational modifications of most proteins of the BCL-2 family by hypoxia involves p53-dependent and -independent pathways and is cell type-dependent. A better understanding of these cell-to-cell variations is crucial in order to overcome hypoxia-induced resistance and to ameliorate cancer therapy.

  3. Radix Scrophulariae extracts (harpagoside) suppresses hypoxia-induced microglial activation and neurotoxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sheu, Shiow-Yunn; Hong, Yi-Wen; Sun, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Man-Hai; Chen, Ching-Yun; Ke, Cherng-Jyh

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypoxia could lead to microglia activation and inflammatory mediators’ overproduction. These inflammatory molecules could amplify the neuroinflammatory process and exacerbate neuronal injury. The aim of this study is to find out whether harpagoside could reduce hypoxia-induced microglia activation. Methods In this study, primary microglia cells harvested from neonatal ICR mice were activated by exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2 for 3 h). Harpagoside had been shown to be no cytotoxicity o...

  4. Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training

    OpenAIRE

    Kon, Michihiro; Ohiwa, Nao; Honda, Akiko; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Ikeda, Tatsuaki; Akimoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Yuichi; Russell, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Hypoxia is an important modulator of endurance exercise‐induced oxidative adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether hypoxia affects resistance exercise‐induced muscle adaptations remains unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance exercise training under systemic hypoxia on muscular adaptations known to occur following both resistance and endurance exercise training, including muscle cross‐sectional area (CSA), one‐repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, and ma...

  5. Hypoxia and classical activation limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival by Akt-dependent glycolytic shift in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Matta, S K; Kumar, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major antibacterial defense mechanism used by macrophages upon activation. Exposure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-infected macrophages to hypoxia is known to compromise the survival of the pathogen. Here we report that the hypoxia-induced control of intracellular Mtb load in RAW 264.7 macrophages was mediated by regulating the cellular ROS levels. We show that similar to classical activation, hypoxia incubation of macrophages resulted in decre...

  6. Estrogen Effects after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    et al. Intermittent hypobaric hypoxia increases the ability of neutrophils to generate superoxide anion in humans. Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2003...AFRL-SA-WP-TR-2015-0007 Estrogen Effects after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia Dr. Barbara St...after a Crush Muscle Injury and Acute Exposure to Hypobaric Hypoxia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA7014-10-2-0001 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  7. Intermittent Hypoxia Regulates Stem-like Characteristics and Differentiation of Neuroblastoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vasantha Kumar Bhaskara; Indra Mohanam; Jasti S Rao; Sanjeeva Mohanam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastomas are the most common extracranial solid tumors in children. Neuroblastomas are derived from immature cells of the sympathetic nervous system and are characterized by clinical and biological heterogeneity. Hypoxia has been linked to tumor progression and increased malignancy. Intermittent hypoxia or repeated episodes of hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation is a common phenomenon in solid tumors including neuroblastoma and it has a significant influence on the outcome of...

  8. Network analysis of temporal effects of intermittent and sustained hypoxia on rat lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Wei; Dave, Nilesh B.; Yu, Guoying; Strollo, Patrick J.; Kovkarova-Naumovski, Elizabeta; Stefan W. Ryter; Reeves, Stephen R; Dayyat, Ehab; Wang, Yang; Choi, Augustine M K; Gozal, David; Kaminski, Naftali

    2008-01-01

    The molecular networks underlying the lung response to hypoxia are not fully understood. We employed systems biology approaches to study temporal effects of intermittent or sustained hypoxia on gene expression in rat lungs. We obtained gene expression profiles from rats exposed to intermittent or sustained hypoxia lasting 0–30 days and identified differentially expressed genes, their patterns, biological processes, and regulatory networks critical for lung response to intermittent or sustaine...

  9. Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Healthy Volunteers

    OpenAIRE

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Shannon Bevans-Fonti; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Punjabi, Naresh M.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent hypoxia of obstructive sleep apnea is implicated in the development and progression of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to systemic inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia leads to pro-inflammatory gene up-regulation in cell culture, but the effects of intermittent hypoxia on gene expression in humans have not been elucidated. A cross-over study was performed expos...

  10. Hypoxia-induced modulation of PTEN activity and EMT phenotypes in lung cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnoh, Takashi; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ando, Akira; Sakamoto, Koji; Miyazaki, Shinichi; Aoyama, Daisuke; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kimura, Motohiro; Omote, Norihito; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Kawabe, Tsutomu; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hypoxia stimulation, one of the most critical microenvironmental factors, accelerates the acquisition of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypes in lung cancer cells. Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted from chromosome 10 (PTEN) expression might accelerate the development of lung cancer in vivo. Recent studies suggest that tumor microenvironmental factors might modulate the PTEN activity though a decrease in total PTEN expression and an increase in phosphorylation of the PTEN C-terminus (p-PTEN), resulting in the acquisition of the EMT phenotypes. Nevertheless, it is not known whether persistent hypoxia can modulate PTEN phosphatase activity or whether hypoxia-induced EMT phenotypes are negatively regulated by the PTEN phosphatase activity. We aimed to investigate hypoxia-induced modulation of PTEN activity and EMT phenotypes in lung cancers. Western blotting was performed in five lung cancer cell lines to evaluate total PTEN expression levels and the PTEN activation. In a xenograft model of lung cancer cells with endogenous PTEN expression, the PTEN expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. To examine the effect of hypoxia on phenotypic alterations in lung cancer cells in vitro, the cells were cultured under hypoxia. The effect of unphosphorylated PTEN (PTEN4A) induction on hypoxia-induced EMT phenotypes was evaluated, by using a Dox-dependent gene expression system. Lung cancer cells involving the EMT phenotypes showed a decrease in total PTEN expression and an increase in p-PTEN. In a xenograft model, loss of PTEN expression was observed in the tumor lesions showing tissue hypoxia. Persistent hypoxia yielded an approximately eight-fold increase in the p-PTEN/PTEN ratio in vitro. PTEN4A did not affect stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α. PTEN4A blunted hypoxia-induced EMT via inhibition of β-catenin translocation into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our study strengthens the therapeutic possibility that

  11. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is required for organismal adaptation to hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Robert B. Hamanaka; Samuel E. Weinberg; Colleen R. Reczek; Navdeep S. Chandel

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are crucial for cellular and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. The mitochondrial respiratory chain is the largest consumer of oxygen in most mammalian cells; however, it is unknown whether the respiratory chain is necessary for in vivo activation of HIFs and organismal adaptation to hypoxia. HIF-1 activation in the epidermis has been shown to be a key regulator of the organismal response to hypoxic conditions, including renal production of erythropoietin (Epo)...

  12. Hypoxia Inducible Factor Pathway and Physiological Adaptation: A Cell Survival Pathway?

    OpenAIRE

    Hemant Kumar; Dong-Kug Choi

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen homeostasis reflects the constant body requirement to generate energy. Hypoxia (0.1–1% O2), physioxia or physoxia (∼1–13%), and normoxia (∼20%) are terms used to define oxygen concentration in the cellular environment. A decrease in oxygen (hypoxia) or excess oxygen (hyperoxia) could be deleterious for cellular adaptation and survival. Hypoxia can occur under both physiological (e.g., exercise, embryonic development, underwater diving, or high altitude) and pathological conditions (e.g...

  13. Autophagy-associated atrophy and metabolic remodeling of the mouse diaphragm after short-term intermittent hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Giordano

    Full Text Available Short-term intermittent hypoxia (IH is common in patients with acute respiratory disorders. Although prolonged exposure to hypoxia induces atrophy and increased fatigability of skeletal muscle, the response to short-term IH is less well known. We hypothesized that the diaphragm and limb muscles would adapt differently to short-term IH given that hypoxia stimulates ventilation and triggers a superimposed exercise stimulus in the diaphragm.We determined the structural, metabolic, and contractile properties of the mouse diaphragm after 4 days of IH (8 hours per day, 30 episodes per hour to a FiO2 nadir=6%, and compared responses in the diaphragm to a commonly studied reference limb muscle, the tibialis anterior. Outcome measures included muscle fiber size, assays of muscle proteolysis (calpain, ubiquitin-proteasome, and autophagy pathways, markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial function, quantification of intramyocellular lipid and lipid metabolism genes, type I myosin heavy chain (MyHC expression, and in vitro contractile properties.After 4 days of IH, the diaphragm alone demonstrated significant atrophy (30% decrease of myofiber size together with increased LC3B-II protein (2.4-fold and mRNA markers of the autophagy pathway (LC3B, Gabarapl1, Bnip3, whereas active calpain and E3 ubiquitin ligases (MuRF1, atrogin-1 were unaffected in both muscles. Succinate dehydrogenase activity was significantly reduced by IH in both muscles. However, only the diaphragm exhibited increased intramyocellular lipid droplets (2.5-fold after IH, along with upregulation of genes linked to activated lipid metabolism. In addition, although the diaphragm showed evidence for acute fatigue immediately following IH, it underwent an adaptive fiber type switch toward slow type I MyHC-expressing fibers, associated with greater intrinsic endurance of the muscle during repetitive stimulation in vitro.Short-term IH induces preferential atrophy in the mouse diaphragm

  14. hypoxia-inducible factors activate CD133 promoter through ETS family transcription factors.

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    Shunsuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available CD133 is a cellular surface protein that has been reported to be a cancer stem cell marker, and thus it is considered to be a potential target for cancer treatment. However, the mechanism regulating CD133 expression is not yet understood. In this study, we analyzed the activity of five putative promoters (P1-P5 of CD133 in human embryonic kidney (HEK 293 cells and colon cancer cell line WiDr, and found that the activity of promoters, particularly of P5, is elevated by overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Deletion and mutation analysis identified one of the two E-twenty six (ETS binding sites (EBSs in the P5 region as being essential for its promoter activity induced by HIF-1α and HIF-2α. In addition, a chromatin imunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α and HIF-2α bind to the proximal P5 promoter at the EBSs. The immunoprecipitation assay showed that HIF-1α physically interacts with Elk1; however, HIF-2α did not bind to Elk1 or ETS1. Furthermore, knockdown of both HIF-1α and HIF-2α resulted in a reduction of CD133 expression in WiDr. Taken together, our results revealed that HIF-1α and HIF-2α activate CD133 promoter through ETS proteins.

  15. Developmental changes of glutamate acid decarboxylase 67 in mouse brain after hypoxia ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fa-Lin XU; Chang-Lian ZHU; Xiao-Yang WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the developmental changes of glutamic acid decarboxylase-67 ( GAD-67, a GABA synthetic enzyme) in normal and hypoxic ischemic (HI) brain. Methods C57/BL6 mice on postnatal day (P) 5, 9, 21and 60, corresponding developmentally to premature, term, juvenile and adult human brain were investigated by using both Western blot and immunohistochemistry methods either in normal condition or after hypoxic ischemic insult. Results The immunoreactivity of GAD67 was up regulated with brain development and significant difference was seen between mature (P21, P60) and immature (P5, P9) brain. GAD67 immunoreactivity decreased in the ipsilateral hemisphere in all the ages after hypoxia ischemia (HI) insult, but, significant decrease was only seen in the immature brain. Double labeling of GAD67 and cell death marker, TUNEL, in the cortex at 8h post-HI in the P9 mice showed that (15.6 ±7.0)%TUNEL positive cells were GAD67 positive which was higher than that of P60 mice. Conclusion These data suggest that GABAergic neurons in immature brain were more vulnerable to HI insult than that of mature brain.

  16. RNA Sequencing Reveals that Kaposi Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Infection Mimics Hypoxia Gene Expression Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Coralie; Davis, David A.; Tekeste, Shewit S.; Reczko, Martin; Pezzella, Francesco; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) causes several tumors and hyperproliferative disorders. Hypoxia and hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) activate latent and lytic KSHV genes, and several KSHV proteins increase the cellular levels of HIF. Here, we used RNA sequencing, qRT-PCR, Taqman assays, and pathway analysis to explore the miRNA and mRNA response of uninfected and KSHV-infected cells to hypoxia, to compare this with the genetic changes seen in chronic latent KSHV infection, and to explore the degree to which hypoxia and KSHV infection interact in modulating mRNA and miRNA expression. We found that the gene expression signatures for KSHV infection and hypoxia have a 34% overlap. Moreover, there were considerable similarities between the genes up-regulated by hypoxia in uninfected (SLK) and in KSHV-infected (SLKK) cells. hsa-miR-210, a HIF-target known to have pro-angiogenic and anti-apoptotic properties, was significantly up-regulated by both KSHV infection and hypoxia using Taqman assays. Interestingly, expression of KSHV-encoded miRNAs was not affected by hypoxia. These results demonstrate that KSHV harnesses a part of the hypoxic cellular response and that a substantial portion of hypoxia-induced changes in cellular gene expression are induced by KSHV infection. Therefore, targeting hypoxic pathways may be a useful way to develop therapeutic strategies for KSHV-related diseases. PMID:28046107

  17. Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Rasmus; Johansen, Jacob L; Rummer, Jodie L; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CTmax). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax We found that CTmax was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CTmax declined sharply with water oxygen tension (PwO2). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CTmax was unaffected by elevated CO2 Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Periods of cardiovascular susceptibility to hypoxia in embryonic american alligators (Alligator mississippiensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Kevin B; Rhen, Turk; Eme, John; Kohl, Zachary F; Crossley, Janna; Elsey, Ruth M; Crossley, Dane A

    2016-06-01

    During embryonic development, environmental perturbations can affect organisms' developing phenotype, a process known as developmental plasticity. Resulting phenotypic changes can occur during discrete, critical windows of development. Critical windows are periods when developing embryos are most susceptible to these perturbations. We have previously documented that hypoxia reduces embryo size and increases relative heart mass in American alligator, and this study identified critical windows when hypoxia altered morphological, cardiovascular function and cardiac gene expression of alligator embryos. We hypothesized that incubation in hypoxia (10% O2) would increase relative cardiac size due to cardiac enlargement rather than suppression of somatic growth. We exposed alligator embryos to hypoxia during discrete incubation periods to target windows where the embryonic phenotype is altered. Hypoxia affected heart growth between 20 and 40% of embryonic incubation, whereas somatic growth was affected between 70 and 90% of incubation. Arterial pressure was depressed by hypoxic exposure during 50-70% of incubation, whereas heart rate was depressed in embryos exposed to hypoxia during a period spanning 70-90% of incubation. Expression of Vegf and PdgfB was increased in certain hypoxia-exposed embryo treatment groups, and hypoxia toward the end of incubation altered β-adrenergic tone for arterial pressure and heart rate. It is well known that hypoxia exposure can alter embryonic development, and in the present study, we have identified brief, discrete windows that alter the morphology, cardiovascular physiology, and gene expression in embryonic American alligator.

  19. [Effects of exogenous spermidine on Cucumis sativus L. seedlings photosynthesis under root zone hypoxia stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tian; Wang, Suping; Guo, Shirong; Sun, Yanjun

    2006-09-01

    With water culture, this paper studied the effects of exogenous spermidine (Spd) on the net photosynthetic rate (Pn), intercellular CO2 concentrations (Ci), stomatal conductance (Gs), transpiration rate (Tr), apparent quantum yield (phi c), and carboxylation efficiency (CE) of cucumber seedlings tinder hypoxia stress. The results showed that the Pn decreased gradually under hypoxia stress, and reached the minimum 10 days after by 63. 33% of the control. Compared with that of hypoxia-stressed plants, the Pn after 10 days application of exogenous Spd increased 1.25 times. A negative correlation (R2 = 0.4730 - 0.7118) was found between Pn and Ci. Gs and Tr changed in wider ranges, which decreased under hypoxia-stress, but increased under hypoxia-stress plus exogenous Spd application. There was a significant positive correlation between Gs and Tr (R2 = 0.7821 - 0.9458), but these two parameters had no significant correlation with Pn; Hypoxia stress induced a decrease of phi c and CE by 63.01% and 72.33%, respectively, while hypoxia stress plus exogenous Spd application made phi c and CE increase by 23% and 14%, respectively. The photo-inhibition of cucumber seedlings under hypoxia stress was mainly caused by non-stomatal limitation, while exogenous Spd alleviated the hypoxia stress by repairing photosynthesis system.

  20. [Salidroside inhibits hypoxia-induced phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Lü, Bo-Dong; Chen, Shi-Tao; Zhang, Shi-Geng; Yang, Ke-Bing

    2013-08-01

    To explore the effects of salidroside on the phenotypic modulation of corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMC) in hypoxic SD rats. CCSMCs were cultured in vitro and identified by immunohistochemistry. The cells were divided into six groups: normal control (21% O2), hypoxia (1% O2), hypoxia + salidroside 1 mg/L, hypoxia + salidroside 3 mg/L, hypoxia + salidroside 5 mg/L and hypoxia + PGE1 0.4 microg/L, and then cultured for 48 hours. The relative expressions of alpha-actin and osteopontin (OPN) in each group were determined by RT-PCR. The in vitro cultured CCSMCs grew well, with anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin monoclonal antibodies immunohistochemically positive. The relative expression of alpha-actin was markedly decreased while that of OPN remarkably increased in the hypoxia group as compared with the normal control group (P salidroside 5 mg/L group showed a significantly higher expression of alpha-actin and lower expression of OPN than the hypoxia group (P 0.05). Hypoxia can reduce the relative expression level of alpha-actin and increase that of OPN in the CCSMCs of SD rats, namely, induce their phenotypic modulation from the contraction to the non-contraction type. Salidroside can restrain hypoxia-induced phenotypic modulation of CCSMCs, and its inhibitory effect at 5 mg/L is similar to that of PGE1.

  1. Blueberry Extracts Protect Testis from Hypobaric Hypoxia Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Zepeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia causes oxidative damage to male rat reproductive function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of a blueberry extract (BB-4 in testis of rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. Morphometric analysis, cellular DNA fragmentation, glutathione reductase (GR, and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were evaluated. Our results showed that supplementation of BB-4 reduced lipid peroxidation, decreased apoptosis, and increased GR and SOD activities in rat testis under hypobaric hypoxia conditions . Therefore, this study demonstrates that blueberry extract significantly reduced the harmful effects of oxidative stress caused by hypobaric hypoxia in rat testis by affecting glutathione reductase and superoxide dismutase activities.

  2. Intermittent hypoxia alters gut microbiota diversity in a mouse model of sleep apnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Indias, Isabel; Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Sanchez-Alcoholado, Lidia; Cardona, Fernando; Tinahones, Francisco J; Gozal, David; Poroyko, Valeryi A; Navajas, Daniel; Queipo-Ortuño, Maria I; Farré, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    We assessed whether intermittent hypoxia, which emulates one of the hallmarks of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), leads to altered faecal microbiome in a murine model. In vivo partial pressure of oxygen was measured in colonic faeces during intermittent hypoxia in four anesthetised mice. 10 mice were subjected to a pattern of chronic intermittent hypoxia (20 s at 5% O2 and 40 s at room air for 6 h·day(-1)) for 6 weeks and 10 mice served as normoxic controls. Faecal samples were obtained and microbiome composition was determined by 16S rRNA pyrosequencing and bioinformatic analysis by Quantitative Insights into Microbial Ecology. Intermittent hypoxia exposures translated into hypoxia/re-oxygenation patterns in the faeces proximal to the bowel epithelium (intermittent hypoxia on global microbial community structure was found. Intermittent hypoxia increased the α-diversity (Shannon index, pintermittent hypoxia-exposed mice showed a higher abundance of Firmicutes and a smaller abundance of Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria phyla than controls. Faecal microbiota composition and diversity are altered as a result of intermittent hypoxia realistically mimicking OSA, suggesting the possibility that physiological interplays between host and gut microbiota could be deregulated in OSA.

  3. Hypoxia-independent upregulation of placental hypoxia inducible factor-1α gene expression contributes to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriyama, Takayuki; Wang, Wei; Parchim, Nicholas F; Song, Anren; Blackwell, Sean C; Sibai, Baha M; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-06-01

    Accumulation of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is commonly an acute and beneficial response to hypoxia, whereas chronically elevated HIF-1α is associated with multiple disease conditions, including preeclampsia, a serious hypertensive disease of pregnancy. However, the molecular basis underlying the persistent elevation of placental HIF-1α in preeclampsia and its role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia are poorly understood. Here we report that Hif-1α mRNA and HIF-1α protein were elevated in the placentas of pregnant mice infused with angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody, a pathogenic factor in preeclampsia. Knockdown of placental Hif-1α mRNA by specific siRNA significantly attenuated hallmark features of preeclampsia induced by angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody in pregnant mice, including hypertension, proteinuria, kidney damage, impaired placental vasculature, and elevated maternal circulating soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 levels. Next, we discovered that Hif-1α mRNA levels and HIF-1α protein levels were induced in an independent preeclampsia model with infusion of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (LIGHT). SiRNA knockdown experiments also demonstrated that elevated HIF-1α contributed to LIGHT-induced preeclampsia features. Translational studies with human placentas showed that angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody or LIGHT is capable of inducing HIF-1α in a hypoxia-independent manner. Moreover, increased HIF-1α was found to be responsible for angiotensin II type I receptor agonistic autoantibody or LIGHT-induced elevation of Flt-1 gene expression and production of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 in human villous explants. Overall, we demonstrated that hypoxia-independent stimulation of HIF-1α gene expression in the placenta is a common pathogenic mechanism promoting disease progression. Our findings reveal new insight to preeclampsia and highlight

  4. Object Markers in Ikalanga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Letsholo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an on-going debate amongst linguists regarding the status of the object marker (OM. Some scholars argue that OMs are agreement morphology (Baker 2010, Riedel 2009 while others argue that OMs are pronominal and not agreement morphology (Nevins 2010, Kramer, under review, Labelle 2007, Demuth and Johnson 1990, Mchombo 2002. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to this debate using data from Ikalanga to support the view that OMs are pronominal clitics. I discuss evidence in favor of the agreement analysis as well as that in favor of the pronominal analysis. OMs in Ikalanga behave like agreement morphology in that they attach only to the verbal stem, only one OM occurs in a clause, and they share grammatical features (person, gender and number with the lexical NP with which they co-refer. However, there are many ways in which OMs behave like pronominals. For example, OMs do not vary in form according to the mood of a sentence or negation while subject markers, which I analyze as agreement morphemes do. They are not obligatory in Ikalanga sentences while subject markers are. OMs are not subject to locality constraints while agreement is. They can be bound by the subject (backward pronominalization, something unexpected of agreement and there is ample evidence to show that the lexical NP with which the OM co-refers is an adjunct, a fact which has been used in the literature to argue that the OM is pronominal in such a set up. The evidence in favor of the pronominal analysis however, is more compelling and therefore I conclude that OMs are pronominal clitics and not agreement morphology.

  5. Hypoxia-induced cell death and changes in hypoxia-inducible factor-1 activity in PC12 cells upon exposure to nerve growth factor.

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    Charlier, Nico; Leclere, Norbert; Felderhoff, Ursula; Heldt, Julia; Kietzmann, Thomas; Obladen, Michael; Gross, Johann

    2002-07-15

    The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) strongly contributes to the expression of adaptive genes under hypoxic conditions. In addition, HIF-1 has been implicated in the regulation of delayed neuronal cell death. Suspension-grown and adherent PC12 cells treated with NGF were used as an experimental model for studying the relationship between hypoxia-induced cell death and activation of HIF-1. Cell damage was assessed by flow cytometry of double-stained (Annexin V and propidiumiodide) cells, and by analysis of the overall death parameters LDH and mitochondrial dehydrogenase. In parallel, cells were transfected with a control and a three-hypoxia-responsive-elements (HRE)-containing vector and HIF-1-driven luciferase activity was determined. Exposure of NGF-treated PC12 cells to hypoxia resulted in a higher cell death rate when compared to untreated controls. PC12 cells exposed for 2 days to NGF exhibited a decrease of HIF-1 activity up to a factor of ten. This decrease may contribute to the enhanced hypoxia-induced cell death via reduced expression of HIF-1alpha-regulated genes responsible for adaptation to hypoxia, like those for glucose transport proteins and enzymes of the glycolytic chain. The decrease in HIF-1 activity and the increase in hypoxia sensitivity may suggest that NGF act as an hierarchically organized signaling molecule.

  6. Expression of DDX3 is directly modulated by hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in breast epithelial cells.

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    Mahendran Botlagunta

    Full Text Available DEAD box protein, DDX3, is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer cells ranging from weakly invasive to aggressive phenotypes and functions as an important regulator of cancer cell growth and survival. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia inducible factor-1α is a transcriptional activator of DDX3 in breast cancer cells. Within the promoter region of the human DDX3 gene, we identified three putative hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements. By luciferase reporter assays in combination with mutated hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements, we determined that the hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive element at position -153 relative to the translation start site is essential for transcriptional activation of DDX3 under hypoxic conditions. We also demonstrated that hypoxia inducible factor-1 binds to the DDX3 promoter and that the binding is specific, as revealed by siRNA against hypoxia inducible factor-1 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Thus, the activation of DDX3 expression during hypoxia is due to the direct binding of hypoxia inducible factor-1 to hypoxia responsive elements in the DDX3 promoter. In addition, we observed a significant overlap in the protein expression pattern of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and DDX3 in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the role of DDX3 as a hypoxia-inducible gene that exhibits enhanced expression through the interaction of hypoxia inducible factor-1 with hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements in its promoter region.

  7. Expression of DDX3 is directly modulated by hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha in breast epithelial cells.

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    Botlagunta, Mahendran; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Vesuna, Farhad; Winnard, Paul T; Bol, Guus M; Patel, Arvind H; Raman, Venu

    2011-03-23

    DEAD box protein, DDX3, is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer cells ranging from weakly invasive to aggressive phenotypes and functions as an important regulator of cancer cell growth and survival. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia inducible factor-1α is a transcriptional activator of DDX3 in breast cancer cells. Within the promoter region of the human DDX3 gene, we identified three putative hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements. By luciferase reporter assays in combination with mutated hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements, we determined that the hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive element at position -153 relative to the translation start site is essential for transcriptional activation of DDX3 under hypoxic conditions. We also demonstrated that hypoxia inducible factor-1 binds to the DDX3 promoter and that the binding is specific, as revealed by siRNA against hypoxia inducible factor-1 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Thus, the activation of DDX3 expression during hypoxia is due to the direct binding of hypoxia inducible factor-1 to hypoxia responsive elements in the DDX3 promoter. In addition, we observed a significant overlap in the protein expression pattern of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and DDX3 in MDA-MB-231 xenograft tumors. Taken together, our results demonstrate, for the first time, the role of DDX3 as a hypoxia-inducible gene that exhibits enhanced expression through the interaction of hypoxia inducible factor-1 with hypoxia inducible factor-1 responsive elements in its promoter region.

  8. Large-scale transcriptional response to hypoxia in Aspergillus fumigatus observed using RNAseq identifies a novel hypoxia regulated ncRNA.

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    Losada, Liliana; Barker, Bridget M; Pakala, Suman; Pakala, Suchitra; Joardar, Vinita; Zafar, Nikhat; Mounaud, Stephanie; Fedorova, Natalie; Nierman, William C; Cramer, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    We utilized RNAseq analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus response to early hypoxic condition exposure. The results show that more than 89% of the A. fumigatus genome is expressed under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Replicate samples were highly reproducible; however, comparisons between normoxia and hypoxia revealed that >23 and 35% of genes were differentially expressed after 30 and 120 min of hypoxia exposure, respectively. Consistent with our previous report detailing transcriptomic and proteomic responses at later time points, the results here show major repression of ribosomal function and induction of ergosterol biosynthesis, as well as activation of alternate respiratory mechanisms at the later time point. RNAseq data were used to define 32 hypoxia-specific genes, which were not expressed under normoxic conditions. Transcripts of a C6 transcription factor and a histidine kinase-response regulator were found only in hypoxia. In addition, several genes involved in the phosphoenylpyruvate and D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate metabolism were only expressed in hypoxia. Interestingly, a 216-bp ncRNA Afu-182 in the 3' region of insA (AFUB_064770) was significantly repressed under hypoxia with a 40-fold reduction in expression. A detailed analysis of Afu-182 showed similarity with several genes in the genome, many of which were also repressed in hypoxia. The results from this study show that hypoxia induces very early and widely drastic genome-wide responses in A. fumigatus that include expression of protein-coding and ncRNA genes. The role of these ncRNA genes in regulating the fungal hypoxia response is an exciting future research direction.

  9. Acute hypoxia up-regulates HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels in Amazon hypoxia-tolerant Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus).

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    Baptista, R B; Souza-Castro, N; Almeida-Val, V M F

    2016-10-01

    Amazon fish maintain oxygen uptake through a variety of strategies considered evolutionary and adaptive responses to the low water oxygen saturation, commonly found in Amazon waters. Oscar (Astronotus ocellatus) is among the most hypoxia-tolerant fish in Amazon, considering its intriguing anaerobic capacity and ability to depress oxidative metabolism. Previous studies in hypoxia-tolerant and non-tolerant fish have shown that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) gene expression is positively regulated during low oxygen exposure, affecting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) transcription and fish development or tolerance in different manners. However, whether similar isoforms exists in tolerant Amazon fish and whether they are affected similarly to others physiological responses to improve hypoxia tolerance remain unknown. Here we evaluate the hepatic HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA levels after 3 h of acute hypoxia exposure (0.5 mgO2/l) and 3 h of post-hypoxia recovery. Additionally, hematological parameters and oxidative enzyme activities of citrate synthase (CS) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were analyzed in muscle and liver tissues. Overall, three sets of responses were detected: (1) as expected, hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, red blood cells, and blood glucose increased, improving oxygen carrying capacity and glycolysis potential; (2) oxidative enzymes from liver decreased, corroborating the tendency to a widespread metabolic suppression; and (3) HIF-1α and VEGF increased mRNA levels in liver, revealing their role in the oxygen homeostasis through, respectively, activation of target genes and vascularization. This is the first study to investigate a hypoxia-related transcription factor in a representative Amazon hypoxia-tolerant fish and suggests that HIF-1α and VEGF mRNA regulation have an important role in enhancing hypoxia tolerance in extreme tolerant species.

  10. Ginsenoside 20(S-Rg3 targets HIF-1α to block hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in ovarian cancer cells.

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    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available The prognosis of patients with ovarian cancer has remained poor mainly because of aggressive cancer progression. Since epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an important mechanism mediating invasion and metastasis of cancer cells, targeting the EMT process with more efficacious and less toxic compounds to inhibit metastasis is of great therapeutic value for the treatment of ovarian cancer. We have found for the first time that the ginsenoside 20(S-Rg3, a pharmacologically active component of the traditional Chinese herb Panax ginseng, potently blocks hypoxia-induced EMT of ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies confirm the mode of action of 20(S-Rg3, which reduces the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α by activating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote HIF-1α degradation. A decrease in HIF-1α in turn leads to up-regulation, via transcriptional suppression of Snail, of the epithelial cell-specific marker E-cadherin and down-regulation of the mesenchymal cell-specific marker vimentin under hypoxic conditions. Importantly, 20(S-Rg3 effectively inhibits EMT in nude mouse xenograft models of ovarian cancer, promising a novel therapeutic agent for anticancer therapy.

  11. Hypoxia attenuates purinergic P2X receptor-induced inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia

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    Smith SMC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie MC Smith,1,2 Gordon S Mitchell,1,2 Scott A Friedle,3 Christine M Sibigtroth,1 Stéphane Vinit,1 Jyoti J Watters1–31Department of Comparative Biosciences, 2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Training Program, 3Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Hypoxia and increased extracellular nucleotides are frequently coincident in the brainstem. Extracellular nucleotides are potent modulators of microglial inflammatory gene expression via P2X purinergic receptor activation. Although hypoxia is also known to modulate inflammatory gene expression, little is known about how hypoxia or P2X receptor activation alone affects inflammatory molecule production in brainstem microglia, nor how hypoxia and P2X receptor signaling interact when they occur together. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of a brief episode of hypoxia (2 hours in the presence and absence of the nonselective P2X receptor agonist 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyladenosine-5′-triphosphate (BzATP to promote inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia in adult rats. We evaluated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin (IL-6 messenger RNA levels in immunomagnetically isolated brainstem microglia. While iNOS and IL-6 gene expression increased with hypoxia and BzATP alone, TNFα expression was unaffected. Surprisingly, BzATP-induced inflammatory effects were lost after hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia impairs proinflammatory P2X-receptor signaling. We also evaluated the expression of key P2X receptors activated by BzATP, namely P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7. While hypoxia did not alter their expression, BzATP upregulated P2X4 and P2X7 mRNAs; these effects were ablated in hypoxia. Although both P2X4 and P2X7 receptor expression correlated with increased microglial iNOS and IL-6 levels in microglia from normoxic rats, in hypoxia, P2X7 only correlated with IL-6, and P2X

  12. Hypothermia reduces VEGF-165 expression, but not osteogenic differentiation of human adipose stem cells under hypoxia

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    Bakker, Astrid D.; Hogervorst, Jolanda M. A.; Nolte, Peter A.; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2017-01-01

    Cryotherapy is successfully used in the clinic to reduce pain and inflammation after musculoskeletal damage, and might prevent secondary tissue damage under the prevalent hypoxic conditions. Whether cryotherapy reduces mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) number and differentiation under hypoxic conditions, causing impaired callus formation is unknown. We aimed to determine whether hypothermia modulates proliferation, apoptosis, nitric oxide production, VEGF gene and protein expression, and osteogenic/chondrogenic differentiation of human MSCs under hypoxia. Human adipose MSCs were cultured under hypoxia (37°C, 1% O2), hypothermia and hypoxia (30°C, 1% O2), or control conditions (37°C, 20% O2). Total DNA, protein, nitric oxide production, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene expression, and VEGF protein concentration were measured up to day 8. Hypoxia enhanced KI67 expression at day 4. The combination of hypothermia and hypoxia further enhanced KI67 gene expression compared to hypoxia alone, but was unable to prevent the 1.2-fold reduction in DNA amount caused by hypoxia at day 4. Addition of hypothermia to hypoxic cells did not alter the effect of hypoxia alone on BAX-to-BCL-2 ratio, alkaline phosphatase activity, gene expression of SOX9, COL1, or osteocalcin, or nitric oxide production. Hypothermia decreased the stimulating effect of hypoxia on VEGF-165 gene expression by 6-fold at day 4 and by 2-fold at day 8. Hypothermia also decreased VEGF protein expression under hypoxia by 2.9-fold at day 8. In conclusion, hypothermia decreased VEGF-165 gene and protein expression, but did not affect differentiation, or apoptosis of MSCs cultured under hypoxia. These in vitro results implicate that hypothermia treatment in vivo, applied to alleviate pain and inflammation, is not likely to harm early stages of callus formation. PMID:28166273

  13. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

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    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  14. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

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    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  15. Hypoxia transiently affects skeletal muscle hypertrophy in a functional overload model.

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    Chaillou, Thomas; Koulmann, Nathalie; Simler, Nadine; Meunier, Adélie; Serrurier, Bernard; Chapot, Rachel; Peinnequin, Andre; Beaudry, Michèle; Bigard, Xavier

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia induces a loss of skeletal muscle mass, but the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We hypothesized th