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Sample records for hypoxanthine guanine xanthine

  1. Acyclic Immucillin Phosphonates. Second-Generation Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine- Guanine-Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase

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    Hazelton, Keith Z. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Ho, Meng-Chaio [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cassera, Maria B. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Clinch, Keith [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Crump, Douglas R. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Rosario Jr., Irving [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Merino, Emilio F. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Almo, Steve C. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Tyler, Peter C. [Industrial Research Ltd., Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Schramm, Vern L. [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2012-06-22

    We found that Plasmodium falciparum is the primary cause of deaths from malaria. It is a purine auxotroph and relies on hypoxanthine salvage from the host purine pool. Purine starvation as an antimalarial target has been validated by inhibition of purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Hypoxanthine depletion kills Plasmodium falciparum in cell culture and in Aotus monkey infections. Hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGXPRT) from P. falciparum is required for hypoxanthine salvage by forming inosine 5'-monophosphate, a branchpoint for all purine nucleotide synthesis in the parasite. We present a class of HGXPRT inhibitors, the acyclic immucillin phosphonates (AIPs), and cell permeable AIP prodrugs. The AIPs are simple, potent, selective, and biologically stable inhibitors. The AIP prodrugs block proliferation of cultured parasites by inhibiting the incorporation of hypoxanthine into the parasite nucleotide pool and validates HGXPRT as a target in malaria.

  2. Human T cell recognition of the blood stage antigen Plasmodium hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT in acute malaria

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    Woodberry Tonia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Plasmodium purine salvage enzyme, hypoxanthine guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGXPRT can protect mice against Plasmodium yoelii pRBC challenge in a T cell-dependent manner and has, therefore, been proposed as a novel vaccine candidate. It is not known whether natural exposure to Plasmodium falciparum stimulates HGXPRT T cell reactivity in humans. Methods PBMC and plasma collected from malaria-exposed Indonesians during infection and 7–28 days after anti-malarial therapy, were assessed for HGXPRT recognition using CFSE proliferation, IFNγ ELISPOT assay and ELISA. Results HGXPRT-specific T cell proliferation was found in 44% of patients during acute infection; in 80% of responders both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets proliferated. Antigen-specific T cell proliferation was largely lost within 28 days of parasite clearance. HGXPRT-specific IFN-γ production was more frequent 28 days after treatment than during acute infection. HGXPRT-specific plasma IgG was undetectable even in individuals exposed to malaria for at least two years. Conclusion The prevalence of acute proliferative and convalescent IFNγ responses to HGXPRT demonstrates cellular immunogenicity in humans. Further studies to determine minimal HGXPRT epitopes, the specificity of responses for Plasmodia and associations with protection are required. Frequent and robust T cell proliferation, high sequence conservation among Plasmodium species and absent IgG responses distinguish HGXPRT from other malaria antigens.

  3. Specificities and pH profiles of adenine and hypoxanthine-guanine-xanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (nucleotide synthases) of the thermoacidophile archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Rasmussen, Mads Skytte

    2014-01-01

    Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransfe......Two open reading frames in the genome of Sulfolobus solfataricus (SSO2341 and SSO2424) were cloned and expressed in E. coli. The protein products were purified and their enzymatic activity characterized. Although SSO2341 was annotated as a gene (gpT-1) encoding a 6-oxopurine...... phosphoribosyltransferase (PRTase), the protein product turned out to be a PRTase highly specific for adenine and we suggest that the reading frame should be renamed apT. The other reading frame SSO2424 (gpT-2) proved to be a true 6-oxopurine PRTase active with hypoxanthine, xanthine and guanine as substrates, and we...... suggest that the gene should be renamed gpT. Both enzymes exhibited unusual profiles of activity versus pH. The adenine PRTase showed the highest activity at pH 7.5-8.5, but had a distinct peak of activity also at pH 4.5. The 6-oxo PRTase showed maximal activity with hypoxanthine and guanine around pH 4...

  4. Purine salvage in the apicomplexan Sarcocystis neurona, and generation of hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient clones for positive-negative selection of transgenic parasites.

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    Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Zhang, Zijing; Howe, Daniel K

    2014-09-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an apicomplexan parasite that causes severe neurological disease in horses and marine mammals. The Apicomplexa are all obligate intracellular parasites that lack purine biosynthesis pathways and rely on the host cell for their purine requirements. Hypoxanthine-xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HXGPRT) and adenosine kinase (AK) are key enzymes that function in two complementary purine salvage pathways in apicomplexans. Bioinformatic searches of the S. neurona genome revealed genes encoding HXGPRT, AK and all of the major purine salvage enzymes except purine nucleoside phosphorylase. Wild-type S. neurona were able to grow in the presence of mycophenolic acid (MPA) but were inhibited by 6-thioxanthine (6-TX), suggesting that the pathways involving either HXGPRT or AK are functional in this parasite. Prior work with Toxoplasma gondii demonstrated the utility of HXGPRT as a positive-negative selection marker. To enable the use of HXGPRT in S. neurona, the SnHXGPRT gene sequence was determined and a gene-targeting plasmid was transfected into S. neurona. SnHXGPRT-deficient mutants were selected with 6-TX, and single-cell clones were obtained. These Sn∆HXG parasites were susceptible to MPA and could be complemented using the heterologous T. gondii HXGPRT gene. In summary, S. neurona possesses both purine salvage pathways described in apicomplexans, thus allowing the use of HXGPRT as a positive-negative drug selection marker in this parasite.

  5. Partial hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency without elevated urinary hypoxanthine excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dael, C. M. L.; Pierik, L. J. W. M.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Niezen-Koning, K. E.; van Diggelen, O. P.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    Partial hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) deficiency, also known as the Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome, can give rise to a wide range of neurological symptoms, and renal insufficiency. Biochemically, it is characterized by high uric acid concentrations in blood, high uric acid and

  6. Partial hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase deficiency without elevated urinary hypoxanthine excretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dael, C. M. L.; Pierik, L. J. W. M.; Reijngoud, D. J.; Niezen-Koning, K. E.; van Diggelen, O. P.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Partial hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) deficiency, also known as the Kelley-Seegmiller syndrome, can give rise to a wide range of neurological symptoms, and renal insufficiency. Biochemically, it is characterized by high uric acid concentrations in blood, high uric acid and

  7. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

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    Torres, Rosa J; Puig, Juan G

    2007-12-08

    Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent). Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic). Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay), and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts) and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15-18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10-12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The lack of precise

  8. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosophoribosyltransferase (HPRT deficiency: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

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    Puig Juan G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT activity is an inborn error of purine metabolism associated with uric acid overproduction and a continuum spectrum of neurological manifestations depending on the degree of the enzymatic deficiency. The prevalence is estimated at 1/380,000 live births in Canada, and 1/235,000 live births in Spain. Uric acid overproduction is present inall HPRT-deficient patients and is associated with lithiasis and gout. Neurological manifestations include severe action dystonia, choreoathetosis, ballismus, cognitive and attention deficit, and self-injurious behaviour. The most severe forms are known as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (patients are normal at birth and diagnosis can be accomplished when psychomotor delay becomes apparent. Partial HPRT-deficient patients present these symptoms with a different intensity, and in the least severe forms symptoms may be unapparent. Megaloblastic anaemia is also associated with the disease. Inheritance of HPRT deficiency is X-linked recessive, thus males are generally affected and heterozygous female are carriers (usually asymptomatic. Human HPRT is encoded by a single structural gene on the long arm of the X chromosome at Xq26. To date, more than 300 disease-associated mutations in the HPRT1 gene have been identified. The diagnosis is based on clinical and biochemical findings (hyperuricemia and hyperuricosuria associated with psychomotor delay, and enzymatic (HPRT activity determination in haemolysate, intact erythrocytes or fibroblasts and molecular tests. Molecular diagnosis allows faster and more accurate carrier and prenatal diagnosis. Prenatal diagnosis can be performed with amniotic cells obtained by amniocentesis at about 15–18 weeks' gestation, or chorionic villus cells obtained at about 10–12 weeks' gestation. Uric acid overproduction can be managed by allopurinol treatment. Doses must be carefully adjusted to avoid xanthine lithiasis. The

  9. Crystal structure of Leishmania tarentolae hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

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    Oliva Glaucius

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT (EC 2.4.2.8 is a central enzyme in the purine recycling pathway. Parasitic protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida cannot synthesize purines de novo and use the salvage pathway to synthesize purine bases, making this an attractive target for antiparasitic drug design. Results The glycosomal HGPRT from Leishmania tarentolae in a catalytically active form purified and co-crystallized with a guanosine monophosphate (GMP in the active site. The dimeric structure of HGPRT has been solved by molecular replacement and refined against data extending to 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals the contacts of the active site residues with GMP. Conclusion Comparative analysis of the active sites of Leishmania and human HGPRT revealed subtle differences in the position of the ligand and its interaction with the active site residues, which could be responsible for the different reactivities of the enzymes to allopurinol reported in the literature. The solution and analysis of the structure of Leishmania HGPRT may contribute to further investigations leading to a full understanding of this important enzyme family in protozoan parasites.

  10. Do clinical features of Lesch-Nyhan disease correlate more closely with hypoxanthine or guanine recycling?

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    Schretlen, David J; Callon, Wynne; Ward, Rebecca E; Fu, Rong; Ho, Tiffany; Gordon, Barry; Harris, James C; Jinnah, H A

    2016-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deficiency of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGprt), an enzyme in the purine salvage pathway. HGprt has two functions; it recycles hypoxanthine and guanine. Which of these two functions is more relevant for pathogenesis is unclear because some evidence points to hypoxanthine recycling, but other evidence points to guanine recycling. In this study, we selectively assayed hypoxanthine (Hprt) and guanine (Gprt) recycling in skin fibroblasts from 17 persons with LND, 11 with an attenuated variant of the disease (LNV), and 19 age-, sex-, and race-matched healthy controls (HC). Activity levels of both enzymes differed across groups (p < 0.0001), but only Gprt distinguished patients with LND from those with LNV (p < 0.05). Gprt also showed slightly stronger correlations than Hprt with 13 of 14 measures of the clinical phenotype, including the severity of dystonia, cognitive impairment, and behavioral abnormalities. These findings suggest that loss of guanine recycling might be more closely linked to the LND/LNV phenotype than loss of hypoxanthine recycling.

  11. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

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    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements.

  12. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

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    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  13. Separation of Guanine and Hypoxanthine with Some Ionic Liquids in RP-HPLC

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    J. Zheng

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, guanine and hypoxanthine were separated with four different ionic liquids as additives for the mobile phase using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC. The ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIm][BF4], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([EMIm][BF4], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate ([EMIm][MS] and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium methylsulfate ([OMIm][MS] were used. Guanine and hypoxanthine couldn’t be separated with many different kinds of unadjusted mobile phase, such as aqueous-methanol, aqueous-acetonitrile, etc. In this reason, present study introduced the ionic liquid for separation of guanine and hypoxanthine as an eluent modifier. And the effects of length of alkyl on the imidazolium ring and its counterion, the concentrations of ionic liquid on the retention factor and effect of pH of mobile phase on retention factor of solutes were investigated also. As a result, guanine and hypoxanthine were separated with the mobile phase including ionic liquid and the excellent separations of these sorbats were achieved using 2.0 mM Lˉ1 [OMIm][MS] as the eluent modifier.

  14. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase: characteristics of the mutant enzyme in erythrocytes from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

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    Arnold, W J; Meade, J C; Kelley, W N

    1972-07-01

    The Lesch-Nyhan syndrome is characterized clinically by choreoathetosis, spasticity, selfmutilation, and mental and growth retardation. Biochemically, there is a striking reduction of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity in affected individuals. We have examined erythrocytes from 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome for the presence of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity and enzyme protein. In contrast to the usual finding of no detectable hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity, we have found low levels (0.002-0.79 nmoles/mg protein per hr) of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates from five of these patients. In three of the five patients, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity appeared to be substantially more labile in vivo than normal using erythrocytes which had been separated according to their density (age). Immunochemical studies using a monospecific antiserum prepared from a homogeneous preparation of normal human erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase revealed immunoreactive protein (CRM) in hemolysate from all 14 patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. The immunoreactive protein from each patient gave a reaction of complete identity with normal erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and was present in quantities equal to those observed in normal erythrocytes. In addition, a constant amount of CRM was found in erythrocytes of increasing density (age) from patients with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome despite the decreasing hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. These studies confirm previous data which indicate that the mutations leading to the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome are usually, if not always on the structural gene coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase. In addition, although the mutant proteins appear to be present in normal amounts, they are often very labile in

  15. Structure-function Relationships in Human Hypoxanthine-guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) by Random Mutagenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase ( HGPRT, EC 2.4.2.8 ) is a key enzyme of the purine salvage pathway, which allows recycling of purine bases into DNA and RNA. It is widely distributed in nature and has been studied both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In humans, a complete lack of HGPRT activity causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which is characterized by hyperuricaemia and neural disorders, including mental retardation and compulsive self-mutilation behavior[1].

  16. Determination of Xanthine in the Presence of Hypoxanthine by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

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    Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini; Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    A stripping method for the determination of xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine at the submicromolar concentration levels is described. The method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation at the thin-film mercury electrode followed by a fast linear scan voltammetric measurement of the surface species. Optimum experimental conditions were found to be the use of 1.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 NaOH solution as supporting electrolyte, an accumulation potential of 0.00 V for xanthine and −0.50 V for hypoxanthine–copper, and a linear scan rate of 200 mV second−1. The response of xanthine is linear over the concentration ranges of 20–140 ppb. For an accumulation time of 30 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 36 ppt (2.3 × 10−10 mol L−1). Adequate conditions for measuring the xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine, copper and other metals, uric acid, and other nitrogenated bases were also investigated. The utility of the method is demonstrated by the presence of xanthine associated with hypoxanthine, uric acid, nitrogenated bases, ATP, and ssDNA. PMID:24940040

  17. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

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    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  18. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

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    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  19. Crystal structures of Apo and GMP bound hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase from Legionella pneumophila and the implications in gouty arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nannan; Gong, Xiaojian; Lu, Min; Chen, Xiaofang; Qin, Ximing; Ge, Honghua

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) (EC 2.4.2.8) reversibly catalyzes the transfer of the 5-phophoribosyl group from 5-phosphoribosyl-alpha-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP) to hypoxanthine or guanine to form inosine monophosphate (IMP) or guanosine monophosphate (GMP) in the purine salvage pathway. To investigate the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme in the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila, we determined the crystal structures of the L. pneumophila HGPRT (LpHGPRT) both in its apo-form and in complex with GMP. The structures reveal that LpHGPRT comprises a core domain and a hood domain which are packed together to create a cavity for GMP-binding and the enzymatic catalysis. The binding of GMP induces conformational changes of the stable loop II. This new binding site is closely related to the Gout arthritis-linked human HGPRT mutation site (Ser103Arg). Finally, these structures of LpHGPRT provide insights into the catalytic mechanism of HGPRT.

  20. Activation of Variants of Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase by the Normal Enzyme

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    Bakay, Bohdan; Nyhan, William L.

    1972-01-01

    Deficient hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT; EC 2.4.2.8) enzymes from erythrocytes of patients with hyperuricemia and with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome migrate 15% faster in polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis than the normal enzyme. A half-sister of two males with partial deficiency, who had 34% of normal HGPRT activity in her erythrocytes, yielded profiles containing two distinct zones of activity; one corresponded to the enzyme found in normal individuals and one to the variant of her half-brothers. However, in her profile her variant enzyme showed notably greater activity than that observed in her half-brothers. This increase was due to an activation of the variant by normal enzyme. Electrophoresis of mixtures of normal enzyme with partially deficient enzymes from patients with hyperuricemia and with the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome also led to activation of deficient HGPRT variants by normal enzymes. Deficient variants were also activated by normal enzyme on filtration through Sephadex G-25. Experiments in which deficient variant enzymes were activated with purified normal enzyme labeled with 125I indicated that deficient enzymes incorporate components of the normal enzyme. No such activation of deficient enzymes was ever obtained when mixtures of deficient and normal enzymes were put together in a test tube. Images PMID:4341698

  1. Differential Distortion of Purine Substrates by Human and Plasmodium falciparum Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase to Catalyse the Formation of Mononucleotides.

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    Karnawat, Vishakha; Gogia, Spriha; Balaram, Hemalatha; Puranik, Mrinalini

    2015-07-20

    Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) is a potential therapeutic target. Compared to structurally homologous human enzymes, it has expanded substrate specificity. In this study, 9-deazapurines are used as in situ probes of the active sites of human and Pf HGPRTs. Through the use of these probes it is found that non-covalent interactions stabilise the pre-transition state of the HGPRT-catalysed reaction. Vibrational spectra reveal that the bound substrates are extensively distorted, the carbonyl bond of nucleobase moiety is weakened and the substrate is destabilised along the reaction coordinate. Raman shifts of the human and Pf enzymes are used to quantify the differing degrees of hydrogen bonding in the homologues. A decreased Raman cross-section in enzyme-bound 9-deazaguanine (9DAG) shows that the phenylalanine residue (Phe186 in human and Phe197 in Pf) of HGPRT stacks with the nucleobase. Differential loss of the Raman cross-section suggests that the active site is more compact in human HGPRT as compared to the Pf enzyme, and is more so in the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (PRPP) complex 9DAG-PRPP-HGPRT than in 9-deazahypoxanthine (9DAH)-PRPP-HGPRT.

  2. Pre-thymic somatic mutation leads to high mutant frequency at hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene

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    Jett, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    While characterizing the background mutation spectrum of the Hypoxathine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene in a healthy population, an outlier with a high mutant frequency of thioguanine resistant lymphocytes was found. When studied at the age of 46, this individual had been smoking 60 cigarettes per day for 38 years. His mutant frequency was calculated at 3.6 and 4.2x10{sup {minus}4} for two sampling periods eight months apart. Sequencing analysis of the HPRT gene in his mutant thioguanine resistant T lymphocytes was done to find whether the cells had a high rate of mutation, or if the mutation was due to a single occurrence of mutation and, if so, when in the T lymphocyte development the mutation occurred. By T-cell receptor analysis it has been found that out of 35 thioguanine resistant clones there was no dominant gamma T cell receptor gene rearrangement. During my appointment in the Science & Engineering Research Semester, I found that 34 of those clones have the same base substitution of G{yields}T at cDNA position 197. Due to the consistent mutant frequency from both sampling periods and the varying T cell receptors, the high mutant frequency cannot be due to recent proliferation of a mature mutant T lymphocyte. From the TCR and DNA sequence analysis we conclude that the G{yields}T mutation must have occurred in a T lymphocyte precursor before thymic differentiation so that the thioguanine resistant clones share the same base substitution but not the same gamma T cell receptor gene.

  3. The housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT regulates multiple developmental and metabolic pathways of murine embryonic stem cell neuronal differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Hyuk Kang

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which mutations of the purinergic housekeeping gene hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT cause the severe neurodevelopmental Lesch Nyhan Disease (LND are poorly understood. The best recognized neural consequences of HPRT deficiency are defective basal ganglia expression of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA and aberrant DA neuronal function. We have reported that HPRT deficiency leads to dysregulated expression of multiple DA-related developmental functions and cellular signaling defects in a variety of HPRT-deficient cells, including human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. We now describe results of gene expression studies during neuronal differentiation of HPRT-deficient murine ESD3 embryonic stem cells and report that HPRT knockdown causes a marked switch from neuronal to glial gene expression and dysregulates expression of Sox2 and its regulator, genes vital for stem cell pluripotency and for the neuronal/glial cell fate decision. In addition, HPRT deficiency dysregulates many cellular functions controlling cell cycle and proliferation mechanisms, RNA metabolism, DNA replication and repair, replication stress, lysosome function, membrane trafficking, signaling pathway for platelet activation (SPPA multiple neurotransmission systems and sphingolipid, sulfur and glycan metabolism. We propose that the neural aberrations of HPRT deficiency result from combinatorial effects of these multi-system metabolic errors. Since some of these aberrations are also found in forms of Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease, we predict that some of these systems defects play similar neuropathogenic roles in diverse neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases in common and may therefore provide new experimental opportunities for clarifying pathogenesis and for devising new potential therapeutic targets in developmental and genetic disease.

  4. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase regulates early developmental programming of dopamine neurons: implications for Lesch-Nyhan disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Mockel, Lionel; Potier, Marie-Claude; Dauphinot, Luce; Shirley, Thomas L; Torero-Ibad, Raoul; Fuchs, Julia; Jinnah, H A

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency results in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND), where affected individuals exhibit a characteristic neurobehavioral disorder that has been linked with dysfunction of dopaminergic pathways of the basal ganglia. Since the functions of HPRT, a housekeeping enzyme responsible for recycling purines, have no direct relationships with the dopaminergic pathways, the mechanisms whereby HPRT deficiency affect them remain unknown. The current studies demonstrate that HPRT deficiency influences early developmental processes controlling the dopaminergic phenotype, using several different cell models for HPRT deficiency. Microarray methods and quantitative PCR were applied to 10 different HPRT-deficient (HPRT(-)) sublines derived from the MN9D cell line. Despite the variation inherent in such mutant sublines, several consistent abnormalities were evident. Most notable were increases in the mRNAs for engrailed 1 and 2, transcription factors known to play a key role in the specification and survival of dopamine neurons. The increases in mRNAs were accompanied by increases in engrailed proteins, and restoration of HPRT reverted engrailed expression towards normal levels, demonstrating a functional relationship between HPRT and engrailed. The functional relevance of the abnormal developmental molecular signature of the HPRT(-) MN9D cells was evident in impoverished neurite outgrowth when the cells were forced to differentiate chemically. To verify that these abnormalities were not idiosyncratic to the MN9D line, HPRT(-) sublines from the SK-N-BE(2) M17 human neuroblastoma line were evaluated and an increased expression of engrailed mRNAs was also seen. Over-expression of engrailed occurred even in primary fibroblasts from patients with LND in a manner that suggested a correlation with disease severity. These results provide novel evidence that HPRT deficiency may affect dopaminergic neurons by influencing early developmental

  5. An ultrasensitive electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of xanthine, hypoxanthine and uric acid based on Co doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavanya, N. [Department of Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003, Tamilnadu (India); Sekar, C., E-mail: Sekar2025@gmail.com [Department of Bioelectronics and Biosensors, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003, Tamilnadu (India); Murugan, R.; Ravi, G. [Department of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630003, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-08-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor has been fabricated using Co doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles for selective and simultaneous determination of xanthine (XA), hypoxanthine (HXA) and uric acid (UA) in a phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 5.0) for the first time. The Co-CeO{sub 2} NPs have been prepared by microwave irradiation method and characterized by Powder XRD, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM and VSM measurements. The electrochemical behaviours of XA, HXA and UA at the Co-CeO{sub 2} NPs modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry methods. The modified electrode exhibited remarkably well-separated anodic peaks corresponding to the oxidation of XA, HXA and UA over the concentration range of 0.1–1000, 1–600 and 1–2200 μM with detection limits of 0.096, 0.36, and 0.12 μM (S/N = 3), respectively. For simultaneous detection by synchronous change of the concentrations of XA, HXA and UA, the linear responses were in the range of 1–400 μM each with the detection limits of 0.47, 0.26, and 0.43 μM (S/N = 3), respectively. The fabricated sensor was further applied to the detection of XA, HXA and UA in human urine samples with good selectivity and high reproducibility. - Highlights: • A novel electrochemical sensor has been fabricated for simultaneous determination of purine metabolites xanthine, hypoxanthine, and uric acid based on Co doped CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • The Co-CeO{sub 2} modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited wide linear range towards the detection of XA, HXA and UA than ever reported in the literature. • The fabricated sensor was successfully applied for the analysis of human urine samples with satisfactory results.

  6. Exploring non-covalent interactions in guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplex structures: a comprehensive quantum chemical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurenko, Yevgen P; Novotný, Jan; Sklenář, Vladimir; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-07

    The study aimed to cast light on the structure and internal energetics of guanine- and xanthine-based model DNA quadruplexes and the physico-chemical nature of the non-covalent interactions involved. Several independent approaches were used for this purpose: DFT-D3 calculations, Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, Natural Bond Orbital Analysis, Energy Decomposition Analysis, Compliance Constant Theory, and Non-Covalent Interaction Analysis. The results point to an excellent degree of structural and energetic compatibility between the two types of model quadruplexes. This fact stems from both the structural features (close values of van der Waals volumes, pore radii, geometrical parameters of the H-bonds) and the energetic characteristics (comparable values of the energies of formation). It was established that hydrogen bonding makes the greatest (∼50%) contribution to the internal stability of the DNA quadruplexes, whereas the aromatic base stacking and ion coordination terms are commensurable and account for the rest. Energy decomposition analysis performed for guanine (Gua) and xanthine (Xan) quartets B4 and higher-order structures consisting of two or three stacked quartets indicates that whereas Gua structures benefit from a high degree of H-bond cooperativity, Xan models are characterized by a more favorable and cooperative π-π stacking. The results of electron density topological analysis show that Na(+)/K(+) ion coordination deeply affects the network of non-covalent interactions in Gua models due to the change in the twist angle between the stacked tetrads. For Xan models, ion coordination makes tetrads in stacks more planar without changing the twist angle. Therefore, the presence of the ion seems to be essential for the formation of planar stacks in Xan-based DNA quadruplexes. Detailed study of the nature of ion-base coordination suggests that this interaction has a partially covalent character and cannot be considered as purely electrostatic

  7. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris, semiaquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens and terrestrial (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna eBarjau Perez-Milicua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens can hold their breath for about 30 sec. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia and reduced blood supply (ischemia to tissues. Production of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa, are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal (n=11, semiaquatic (neotropical river otter (n=4 and terrestrial (domestic pig (n=11. Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX, inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP, adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP, adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP, ATP, guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP, guanosine 5’-triphosphate (GTP, and xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise, aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  8. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  9. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Townsend MH

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Michelle H Townsend, Michael D Anderson, Evita G Weagel, Edwin J Velazquez, K Scott Weber, Richard A Robison, Kim L O’Neill Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X

  10. Xanthine urolithiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargah Tahar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary xanthinuria type I, a defect of purine matabolism, results from a genetic deficiency of xanthine oxidase. It is an uncommon cause of stone formation in children. We report here two children with xanthine urolithiasis. The first patient was an 8-year-old boy who presented with repeated episodes of hematuria evaluated with excretory urography, which demonstrated radio-lucent pelvic stone in the right kidney, causing hydronephrosis. He had pyelolithotomy, and the extracted stone consisted of pure xanthine. Family study revealed an asymptomatic xanthinuria in younger brother. The second patient was a 5-year-old boy who had a 2-week history of abdominal pain and gross hematuria. Conventional excretory intravenous urography showed a non-functioning right kidney. Nephrectomy was performed, and histology revealed end-stage pyelonephritis. The calculi consisted of pure xanthine. In both patients, plasma and urinary concentrations of uric acid were low but xanthine and hypoxanthine concentrations were markedly elevated. Xanthine uroli-thiasis is usually a benign condition, easy to prevent or cure by appropriate alkalinization, forced hydration and restriction of dietary purines. However asymptomatic, and therefore undiagnosed, stones may invade the kidney and urinary tract, resulting in destruction of parenchyma, nephrec-tomy and renal failure.

  11. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O'Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  12. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Michelle H; Anderson, Michael D; Weagel, Evita G; Velazquez, Edwin J; Weber, K Scott; Robison, Richard A; O’Neill, Kim L

    2017-01-01

    In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen targets for treatment in late-stage lung cancer. Previous research on the salvage pathway enzyme TK1 shows a unique relationship with cancer patients as serum levels are raised according to cancer grade. To expand this analysis, the other salvage pathway enzymes were evaluated for possible upregulation within lung cancer. Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase, deoxycytidine kinase, and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) were assessed for their presentation on two non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H460 and A549. In the present study, we show that deoxycytidine kinase and adenine phosphoribosyltransferase have no significant relationship with the membrane of NCI-H460 cells. However, we found significant localization of HPRT to the membrane of NCI-H460 and A549 cells. When treated with anti-HPRT antibodies, the average fluorescence of the cell population increased by 24.3% and 12.9% in NCI-H460 and A549 cells, respectively, in comparison with controls. To ensure that expression was not attributed to cytoplasmic HPRT, confocal microscopy was performed to visualize HPRT binding on the plasma membrane. After staining NCI-H460 cells treated with both fluorescent antibodies and a membrane-specific dye, we observed direct overlap between HPRT and the membrane of the cancer cells. Additionally, gold-conjugated antibodies were used to label and quantify the amount of HPRT on the cell surface using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive analysis X-ray. Further confirming HPRT presence, the gold weight percentage of the sample increased significantly when NCI-H460 cells were exposed to HPRT antibody (P=0.012) in comparison with isotype controls. Our results show that HPRT is localized on the

  13. Design and synthesis of novel adenine fluorescence probe based on Eu(III) complexes with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengyun; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Dou, Xuekai; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2017-02-24

    A novel adenine (Ad) fluorescence probe (Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine)) was designed and synthesized by improving experimental method based on the Eu(III) complex and dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. The dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand was first synthesized by the acylation action between dtpaa and guanine (Gu), and the corresponding Eu(III) complex was successfully prepared through heat-refluxing method with dtpa-bis(guanine) ligand. As a novel fluorescence probe, the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) complex can detect adenine (Ad) with characteristics of strong targeting, high specificity and high recognition ability. The detection mechanism of the adenine (Ad) using this probe in buffer solution was studied by ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and fluorescence spectroscopy. When the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) was introduced to the adenine (Ad) solution, the fluorescence emission intensity was significantly enhanced. However, adding other bases such as guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) with similar composition and structure to that of adenine (Ad) to the Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) solution, the fluorescence emission intensities are nearly invariable. Meanwhile, the interference of guanine (Gu), xanthine (Xa), hypoxanthine (Hy) and uric acid (Ur) on the detection of the adenine using Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) probe was also studied. It was found that presence of these bases does not affect the detection of adenine (Ad). A linear response of fluorescence emission intensities of Eu(III)-dtpa-bis(guanine) at 570nm as a function of adenine (Ad) concentration in the range of 0.00-5.00×10(-5)molL(-1) was observed. The detection limit is about 4.70×10(-7)molL(-1).

  14. Morin, a dietary bioflavonol suppresses monosodium urate crystal-induced inflammation in an animal model of acute gouty arthritis with reference to NLRP3 inflammasome, hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase, and inflammatory mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, Chitra; Rasool, Mahaboobkhan

    2016-09-05

    The anti-inflammatory effect of morin, a dietary bioflavanol was explored on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation in rats, an experimental model for acute gouty arthritis. Morin treatment (30mg/kg b.wt) significantly attenuated the ankle swelling and the levels of lipid peroxidation, nitric oxide, serum pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF) -α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and articular elastase along with an increased anti-oxidant status (catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD)) in the joint homogenate of MSU crystal-induced rats. Histological assessment revealed that morin limited the diffusion of joint space, synovial hyperplasia, and inflammatory cell infiltrations. The mRNA expression of NLRP3 (nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) inflammasome, caspase-1, pro-inflammatory cytokines, MCP-1, inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) p65 was found downregulated and HPRT (hypo-xanthine phospho-ribosyl transferase) mRNA expression was upregulated in morin treated MSU crystal-induced rats. In addition, morin treatment reduced the protein expression of NF-κB p65, p-NF-κB p65, iNOS, COX-2, and TNF-α. The results clearly demonstrated that morin exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect on MSU crystal-induced inflammation in rats.

  15. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  16. Xanthine oxidase biosensor for monitoring meat spoilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, D. C.; Gomes, C.; McLamore, E. S.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have designed an electrochemical biosensor for real-time detection of specific biomarkers of bacterial metabolism related to meat spoilage (hypoxanthine and xanthine). The selective biosensor was developed by assembling a `sandwich' of nanomaterials and enzymes on a platinum-iridium electrode (1.6 mm tip diameter). The materials deposited on the sensor tip include amorphous platinum nanoclusters (i.e. Pt black), reduced graphene oxide, nanoceria, and xanthine oxidase. Xanthine oxidase was encapsulated in laponite hydrogel and used for the biorecognition of hypoxanthine and xanthine (two molecules involved in the rotting of meat by spoilage microorganisms). The developed biosensor demonstrated good electrochemical performance toward xanthine with sensitivity of 2.14 +/- 1.48 μA/mM, response time of 5.2 +/- 1.5 sec, lower detection limit of 150 +/- 39 nM, and retained at least 88% of its activity after 7 days of continuous use.

  17. Hypoxanthine induces cholesterol accumulation and incites atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hye-Myung; Kim, You-Jin; Oh, Eun-Joo; Oh, Se-Hyun; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Park, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2016-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during purine metabolism is associated with xanthine oxidase and uric acid. However, the direct effect of hypoxanthine on ROS generation and atherosclerosis has not been evaluated. Smoking and heavy drinking are associated with elevated levels of hypoxanthine. In this study, we investigated the role of hypoxanthine on cholesterol synthesis and atherosclerosis development, particularly in apolipoprotein E (APOE)-deficient mice. The effect of hypoxanthine on the regulation of cholesterol synthesis and atherosclerosis were evaluated in Apoe knockout (KO) mice and cultured HepG2 cells. Hypoxanthine markedly increased serum cholesterol levels and the atherosclerotic plaque area in Apoe KO mice. In HepG2 cells, hypoxanthine increased intracellular ROS production. Hypoxanthine increased cholesterol accumulation and decreased APOE and ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) mRNA and protein expression in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, H2 O2 also increased cholesterol accumulation and decreased APOE and ABCA1 expression. This effect was partially reversible by treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and allopurinol. Hypoxanthine and APOE knockdown using APOE-siRNA synergistically induced cholesterol accumulation and reduced APOE and ABCA1 expression. Hypoxanthine induces cholesterol accumulation in hepatic cells through alterations in enzymes that control lipid transport and induces atherosclerosis in APOE-deficient cells and mice. These effects are partially mediated through ROS produced in response to hypoxanthine. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  18. Effects of Hypoxanthine Substitution in Peptide Nucleic Acids Targeting KRAS2 Oncogenic mRNA Molecules: Theory and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeffrey M.; Wampole, Matthew E.; Chen, Chang-Po; Sethi, Dalip; Singh, Amrita; Dupradeau, François-Yves; Wang, Fan; Gray, Brian D.; Thakur, Mathew L.; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genetic disorders can arise from single base substitutions in a single gene. A single base substitution for wild type guanine in the twelfth codon of KRAS2 mRNA occurs frequently to initiate lung, pancreatic, and colon cancer. We have observed single base mismatch specificity in radioimaging of mutant KRAS2 mRNA in tumors in mice by in vivo hybridization with radiolabeled peptide nucleic acid (PNA) dodecamers. We hypothesized that multi-mutant specificity could be achieved with a PNA dodecamer incorporating hypoxanthine, which can form Watson-Crick basepairs with adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we show that hypoxanthine substitutions in PNAs are tolerated in KRAS2 RNA-PNA duplexes where wild type guanine is replaced by mutant uracil or adenine in RNA. To validate our predictions, we synthesized PNA dodecamers with hypoxanthine, and then measured the thermal stability of RNA-PNA duplexes. Circular dichroism thermal melting results showed that hypoxanthine-containing PNAs are more stable in duplexes where hypoxanthine-adenine and hypoxanthine-uracil base pairs are formed than single mismatch duplexes or duplexes containing hypoxanthine-guanine opposition. PMID:23972113

  19. 日本血吸虫中国株次黄嘌呤鸟嘌呤磷酸核糖转移酶的克隆、表达及其免疫保护性研究%Cloning, Expression and Immunization of The Hypoxanthine-guanine Phosphoribosyltransferase for Schistosoma japonicum Chinese Strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余俊龙; 吕志跃; 彭先楚; 周松华; 刘雪琴; 汪世平; 何卓; 戴橄; 李文凯; 姜孝新; 曾少华; 肖小芹; 徐绍锐

    2006-01-01

    A 1 270 bp full-length cDNA fragment was obtained from the Schistosoma japonicum (Chinese strain) adult cDNA library after the '3' and 5' ends of the incomplete expression sequence tag (EST) of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase of Schistosoma japonicum (SjHGPRT) were amplified by the anchored PCR with 2 pairs of primer that were designed according to the published incomplete SjHGPRT EST and the sequence of multiclone sites of library λgt1 1 vector. Sequence analysis indicated that this fragment, with an identity of 82% to hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase ofSchistosoma mansoni (SmHGPRT), contained a complete open reading frame(ORF). The deduced amino acid sequence showed 83% identity to that of SmHGPRT. This fragment was cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pQE30, and subsequently sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-PAGE revealed that M of the recombinant protein was about 28 ku. Western-blot analysis showed that the recombinant protein was recognized by the polyclonal antisera from rabbits immunized with Schistosoma japonicum adult worm antigen. Mice vaccinated with recombinant protein revealed significant worm burden, liver eggs per gram (LEPG), fecal eggs per gram (FEPG) and intrauterine eggs of the female worms reduction percentage, compared with the controls. Taken together, the SjHGPRT full-length cDNA can be cloned and expressed in E. coli as a recombinant protein that elicited immunity against the challenge infection with Schistosoma japonicum, indicating its potential as a partia1 protection vaccine candidate.%根据基因库中日本血吸虫次黄嘌呤鸟嘌呤磷酸核糖转移酶(HGPRT)EST(BU803192)以及日本血吸虫成虫cDNA文库载体λgt11多克隆位点邻近核苷酸序列设计引物,以日本血吸虫成虫cDNA文库为模板,采用锚式PCR对SjHGPRT基因不完整的3'端和5'端进行扩增、测序,用电子软件拼接,获得SjHGPRT全长cDNA(1 270 bp),经序列分析,推断该片段

  20. Hypoxanthine deregulates genes involved in early neuronal development. Implications in Lesch-Nyhan disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, R J; Puig, J G

    2015-11-01

    Neurological manifestations in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) are attributed to the effect of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) deficiency on the nervous system development. HPRT deficiency causes the excretion of increased amounts of hypoxanthine into the extracellular medium and we hypothesized that HPRT deficiency related to hypoxanthine excess may then lead, directly or indirectly, to transcriptional aberrations in a variety of genes essential for the function and development of striatal progenitor cells. We have examined the effect of hypoxanthine excess on the differentiation of neurons in the well-established human NTERA-2 cl.D1 (NT2/D1) embryonic carcinoma neurogenesis model. NT2/D1 cells differentiate along neuroectodermal lineages after exposure to retinoic acid (RA). Hypoxanthine effects on RA-differentiation were examined by the changes on the expression of various transcription factor genes essential to neuronal differentiation and by the changes in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine, adenosine and serotonin receptors (DRD, ADORA, HTR). We report that hypoxanthine excess deregulate WNT4, from Wnt/β-catenin pathway, and engrailed homeobox 1 gene and increased TH and dopamine DRD1, adenosine ADORA2A and serotonin HTR7 receptors, whose over expression characterize early neuro-developmental processes.

  1. On-line electrochemical measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine of freely moving rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZiPin; LIN YuQing; MAO LanQun

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates an on-line method for continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine in the freely moving rats with integration of selective electrochemical biosensing with in vivo microdialysis sampling. The selective electrochemical biosensing is achieved by using xanthine oxidase (XOD) as the specific sensing element and Prussian blue (PB) as the electrocatalyst for the reduction of H_2O_2 generated from the oxidase-catalyzed reaction. The method is virtually interference-free from the coexisting electroactive species in the brain and exhibits a good stability and reproducibility. Upon integrated with in vivo microdialysis, the on-line method is well suitable for continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine of freely moving rats, which is illustrated by the measurements of the microdialysates after the hypoxanthine standard was externally infused into the rat brain. This study essen-tially offers a facile on-line electrochemical approach to continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine and could find some interesting applications in physiological and pathological investigations associated with hypoxanthine.

  2. On-line electrochemical measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine of freely moving rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates an on-line method for continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine in the freely moving rats with integration of selective electrochemical biosensing with in vivo microdialysis sampling. The selective electrochemical biosensing is achieved by using xanthine oxidase (XOD) as the specific sensing element and Prussian blue (PB) as the electrocatalyst for the reduction of H2O2 generated from the oxidase-catalyzed reaction. The method is virtually interference-free from the co-existing electroactive species in the brain and exhibits a good stability and reproducibility. Upon integrated with in vivo microdialysis, the on-line method is well suitable for continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine of freely moving rats, which is illustrated by the measurements of the microdi-alysates after the hypoxanthine standard was externally infused into the rat brain. This study essentially offers a facile on-line electrochemical approach to continuous measurements of cerebral hypoxanthine and could find some interesting applications in physiological and pathological investigations associated with hypoxanthine.

  3. Mechanisms of the Formation of Adenine, Guanine, and Their Analogues in UV-Irradiated Mixed NH3:H2O Molecular Ices Containing Purine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Partha P.; Stein, Tamar; Head-Gordon, Martin; Lee, Timothy J.

    2017-08-01

    We investigated the formation mechanisms of the nucleobases adenine and guanine and the nucleobase analogues hypoxanthine, xanthine, isoguanine, and 2,6-diaminopurine in a UV-irradiated mixed 10:1 H2O:NH3 ice seeded with precursor purine by using ab initio and density functional theory computations. Our quantum chemical investigations suggest that a multistep reaction mechanism involving purine cation, hydroxyl and amino radicals, together with water and ammonia, explains the experimentally obtained products in an independent study. The relative abundances of these products appear to largely follow from relative thermodynamic stabilities. The key role of the purine cation is likely to be the reason why purine is not functionalized in pure ammonia ice, where cations are promptly neutralized by free electrons from NH3 ionization. Amine group addition to purine is slightly favored over hydroxyl group attachment based on energetics, but hydroxyl is much more abundant due to higher abundance of H2O. The amino group is preferentially attached to the 6 position, giving 6-aminopurine, that is, adenine, while the hydroxyl group is preferentially attached to the 2 position, leading to 2-hydroxypurine. A second substitution by hydroxyl or amino group occurs at either the 6 or the 2 position depending on the first substitution. Given that H2O is far more abundant than NH3 in the experimentally studied ices (as well as based on interstellar abundances), xanthine and isoguanine are expected to be the most abundant bi-substituted photoproducts.

  4. On the accessibility to conical intersections in purines: hypoxanthine and its singly protonated and deprotonated forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villabona-Monsalve, Juan P; Noria, Raquel; Matsika, Spiridoula; Peón, Jorge

    2012-05-09

    The dynamics following electronic excitation of hypoxanthine and its nucleoside inosine were studied by femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion. Our objective was to explore variants of the purinic DNA bases in order to determine the molecular parameters that increase or reduce the accessibility to ground state conical intersections. From experiments in water and methanol solution we conclude that both dominant neutral tautomers of hypoxanthine exhibit ultrashort excited state lifetimes (τ conical intersection for the fluorescent state upon removal of the amino group, present in guanine but absent in hypoxanthine. The excited state dynamics of singly protonated hypoxanthine were also studied, showing biexponential decays with a 1.1 ps component (5%) besides a sub-0.2 ps ultrafast component. On the other hand, the S(1) lifetimes of the singly deprotonated forms of hypoxanthine and inosine show drastic differences, where the latter remains ultrafast but the singly deprotonated hypoxanthine shows a much longer lifetime of 19 ps. This significant variation is related to the different deprotonation sites in hypoxanthine versus inosine, which gives rise to significantly different resonance structures. In our study we also include multireference perturbation theory (MRMP2) excited state calculations in order to determine the nature of the initial electronic excitation in our experiments and clarify the ordering of the states in the singlet manifold at the ground state geometry. In addition, we performed multireference configuration interaction calculations (MR-CIS) that identify the presence of low-lying conical intersections for both prominent neutral tautomers of hypoxanthine. In both cases, the surface crossings occur at geometries reached by out of plane opposite motions of C2 and N3. The study of this simpler purine gives several insights into how small structural modifications, including amino substitution and protonation site and state, determine the accessibility

  5. Disposable amperometric biosensors based on xanthine oxidase immobilized in the Prussian blue modified screen-printed three-electrode system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The screen-printed three-electrode system was applied to fabricate a new type of disposable amperometric xanthine oxidase biosensor.Carbon-working,carbon-counter and Ag/AgCl reference electrodes were all manually printed on the polyethylene terephthalate substrate forming the screen-printed three-electrode system by the conventional screen-printing process.As a mediator,Prussian blue could not only catalyze the electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide produced from the enzyme reaction,but also keep the favorable potential around 0 V.The optimum operational conditions,including pH,potential and temperature,were investigated.The sensitivities of xanthine and hypoxanthine detections were 13.83 mA/M and 25.56 mA/M,respectively.A linear relationship was obtained in the concentration range between 0.10μM and 4.98μM for xanthine and between 0.50μM and 3.98μM for hypoxanthine.The small Michaelis-menten constant value of the xanthine oxidase biosensor was calculated to be 3.90 μM.The results indicate that the fabricated xanthine oxidase biosensor is effective and sensitive for the detection of xanthine and hypoxanthine.

  6. Arxula adeninivorans xanthine oxidoreductase and its application in the production of food with low purine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, D A; Trautwein-Schult, A; Cordes, A; Hoferichter, P; Klein, C; Bode, R; Baronian, K; Kunze, G

    2013-09-01

    Isolation and characterization of xanthine oxidoreductase and its application in the production of food with low purine content. The A. adeninivorans xanthine oxidoreductase is an inducible enzyme. The best inducers were identified by enzyme activity tests and real-time PCR and used to produce large amounts of the protein. Xanthine oxidoreductase was partially purified and biochemically characterized, showing pH and temperature optimum of 8·5 and 43°C, respectively. The enzyme decreased xanthine and hypoxanthine concentrations in yeast extract and was active simultaneously with other purine-degrading enzymes so that all of the substrates for uric acid production were reduced in a single step. It was shown that induced A. adeninivorans can produce sufficient amount of xanthine dehydrogenase and that the enzyme is able to reduce xanthine and hypoxanthine content in food, and when used in conjunction with other enzymes of the pathway, uric acid concentration is significantly reduced. Reduction in dietary purines is recommended to people suffering from hyperuricemia. Elimination of most purine-rich foods may affect balanced nutrition. Food with lowered purine concentration will assist in controlling the disease. This study is a continuation of previous studies that characterized and overexpressed other enzymes of the purine degradation pathway. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Brain purine metabolism and xanthine dehydrogenase/oxidase conversion in hyperammonemia are under control of NMDA receptors and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminsky, Yury; Kosenko, Elena

    2009-10-19

    In hyperammonemia, a decrease in brain ATP can be a result of adenine nucleotide catabolism. Xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are the end steps in the purine catabolic pathway and directly involved in depletion of the adenylate pool in the cell. Besides, XD can easily be converted to XO to produce reactive oxygen species in the cell. In this study, the effects of acute ammonia intoxication in vivo on brain adenine nucleotide pool and xanthine and hypoxanthine, the end degradation products of adenine nucleotides, during the conversion of XD to XO were studied. Injection of rats with ammonium acetate was shown to lead to the dramatic decrease in the ATP level, adenine nucleotide pool size and adenylate energy charge and to the great increase in hypoxanthine and xanthine 11 min after the lethal dose indicating rapid degradation of adenylates. Conversion of XD to XO in hyperammonemic rat brain was evidenced by elevated XO/XD activity ratio. Injection of MK-801, a NMDA receptor blocker, prevented ammonia-induced catabolism of adenine nucleotides and conversion of XD to XO suggesting that in vivo these processes are mediated by activation of NMDA receptors. The in vitro dose-dependent effects of sodium nitroprusside, a NO donor, on XD and XO activities are indicative of the direct modification of the enzymes by nitric oxide. This is the first report evidencing the increase in brain xanthine and hypoxanthine levels and adenine nucleotide breakdown in acute ammonia intoxication and NMDA receptor-mediated prevention of these alterations.

  8. Hypoxanthine urolithiasis in an 11-month-old child: A case report of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Midhat Elmacı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary xanthinuria is a novel autosomal recessive disorder of purine metabolism resulting from the deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase. An 11-month-old boy admitted with the complaints of irritability for 6 months, darkening of the urine and spontaneous passage of stone. Both serum and urine levels of uric acid were below normal. Urinary ultrasonography was normal. Stone analysis revealed that it was a hypoxanthine stone. The case is reported because hereditary xanthinuria is a rare cause of childhood urolithiasis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 128-130

  9. Determination of Activity of the Enzymes Hypoxanthine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (HPRT) and Adenine Phosphoribosyl Transferase (APRT) in Blood Spots on Filter Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auler, Kasie; Broock, Robyn; Nyhan, William L

    2015-07-01

    Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) deficiency is the cause of Lesch-Nyhan disease. Adenine phosphoribosyl-transferase (APRT) deficiency causes renal calculi. The activity of each enzyme is readily determined on spots of whole blood on filter paper. This unit describes a method for detecting deficiencies of HPRT and APRT. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Thermostable Xanthine Oxidase Activity from Bacillus pumilus RL-2d Isolated from Manikaran Thermal Spring: Production and Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nirmal Kant; Thakur, Shikha; Thakur, Neerja; Savitri; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2016-03-01

    Xanthine oxidase is an important enzyme of purine metabolism that catalyzes the hydroxylation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and then xanthine to uric acid. A thermostable xanthine oxidase is being reported from a thermophilic organism RL-2d isolated from the Manikaran (Kullu) hot spring of Himachal Pradesh (India). Based on the morphology, physiological tests, and 16S rDNA gene sequence, RL-2d was identified as Bacillus pumilus. Optimization of physiochemical parameters resulted into 4.1-fold increase in the xanthine oxidase activity from 0.051 U/mg dcw (dry cell weight) to 0.209 U/mg dcw. The xanthine oxidase of B. pumilus RL-2d has exhibited very good thermostability and its t1/2 at 70 and 80 °C were 5 and 1 h, respectively. Activity of this enzyme was strongly inhibited by Hg(2+), Ag(+) and allopurinol. The investigation showed that B. pumilus RL-2d exhibited highest xanthine oxidase activity and remarkable thermostability among the other xanthine oxidases reported so far.

  11. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes.

  12. Xanthine Oxidoreductase-Derived Reactive Species: Physiological and Pathological Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Giulia Battelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is the enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid and is widely distributed among species. In addition to this housekeeping function, mammalian XOR is a physiological source of superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide, which can function as second messengers in the activation of various pathways. This review intends to address the physiological and pathological roles of XOR-derived oxidant molecules. The cytocidal action of XOR products has been claimed in relation to tissue damage, in particular damage induced by hypoxia and ischemia. Attempts to exploit this activity to eliminate unwanted cells via the construction of conjugates have also been reported. Moreover, different aspects of XOR activity related to phlogosis, endothelial activation, leukocyte activation, and vascular tone regulation, have been taken into consideration. Finally, the positive and negative outcomes concerning cancer pathology have been analyzed because XOR products may induce mutagenesis, cell proliferation, and tumor progression, but they are also associated with apoptosis and cell differentiation. In conclusion, XOR activity generates free radicals and other oxidant reactive species that may result in either harmful or beneficial outcomes.

  13. Xanthine oxidoreductase and its inhibitors: relevance for gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard O; Kamel, Bishoy; Kannangara, Diluk R W; Williams, Kenneth M; Graham, Garry G

    2016-12-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in purine catabolism and converts hypoxanthine to xanthine, and xanthine into uric acid. When concentrations of uric acid exceed its biochemical saturation point, crystals of uric acid, in the form of monosodium urate, emerge and can predispose an individual to gout, the commonest form of inflammatory arthritis in men aged over 40 years. XOR inhibitors are primarily used in the treatment of gout, reducing the formation of uric acid and thereby, preventing the formation of monosodium urate crystals. Allopurinol is established as first-line therapy for gout; a newer alternative, febuxostat, is used in patients unable to tolerate allopurinol. This review provides an overview of gout, a detailed analysis of the structure and function of XOR, discussion on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of XOR inhibitors-allopurinol and febuxostat, and the relevance of XOR in common comorbidities of gout. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Polyethylene Glycols as Efficient Catalysts for the Oxidation of Xanthine Alkaloids by Ceric Ammonium Nitrate in Acetonitrile: A Kinetic and Mechanistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shylaja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinetics of oxidation of xanthine alkaloids, such as Xanthine (XAN, hypoxanthine (HXAN, caffeine (CAF, theophylline (TPL, and theobromine (TBR, have been studied with ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN using poly ethylene glycols (PEG as catalysts. Reaction obeyed first order kinetics in both [CAN] and [Xanthine alkaloid]. Highly sluggish CAN-xanthine alkaloid reactions (in acetonitrile media even at elevated temperatures are enhanced in presence PEGs (PEG-200, -300, -400, -600. An increase in [PEG] increased the rate of oxidation linearly. This observation coupled with a change in absorption of CAN in presence of PEG, [H–(OCH2–CH2n–O–NH4Ce(NO34(CH3CN] (PEG bound CAN species, is considered to be more reactive than CAN. The mechanism of oxidation in PEG media has been explained by Menger-Portnoy’s enzymatic model.

  15. The metabolic relation between hypoxanthine and uric acid in man following maximal short-distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westing, Y H; Ekblom, B; Sjödin, B

    1989-11-01

    This study was performed to assess the metabolic relation between hypoxanthine and uric acid following short-distance maximal running. Eleven trained males, mean age 22 years (16-31), were instructed to run 800 m in the shortest time possible. Blood samples were collected before warm-up, before the run, immediately after the run and periodically up to 24 h following the run. Blood lactate was determined after warm-up, and at 5, 10, and 30 min following the run. Mean VO2 max for the subjects was 65.8 (4.7) (SD) ml kg-1 min-1 and mean oxygen demand for the running was 118 (8)% of VO2 max. Plasma hypoxanthine levels rose from 3.3 (1.4) to a peak of 48.2 (19.0) mumol l-1 at 20 min following the run and at 180 min had almost returned to pre-run levels. Plasma uric acid levels rose from a pre-run value of 267 (34) to a peak value of 431 (87) mumol l-1 at 45 min following the run. Uric acid concentrations had not returned to normal at 10 h following the run. The blood lactate level peaked at 5 min with 13.7 (2.0) mmol l-1. The results obtained in this study indicate a metabolic relationship between the formation of hypoxanthine and the formation of uric acid. The data also indicate that xanthine oxidase is active following short-distance intensive running.

  16. Chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ken; Kusano, Teruo; Nishino, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), a complex flavoprotein, catalyzes the metabolic reactions leading from hypoxanthine to xanthine and from xanthine to urate, and both reactions take place at the molybdenum cofactor. The enzyme is a target of drugs for therapy of gout or hyperuricemia. We review the chemical nature and reaction mechanisms of the molybdenum cofactor of XOR, focusing on molybdenum-dependent reactions of actual or potential medical importance, including nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It is now generally accepted that XOR transfers the water-exchangeable -OH ligand of the molybdenum atom to the substrate. The hydroxyl group at OH-Mo(IV) can be replaced by urate, oxipurinol and FYX-051 derivatives and the structures of these complexes have been determined by xray crystallography under anaerobic conditions. Although formation of NO from nitrite or formation of xanthine from urate by XOR ischemically feasible, it is not yet clear whether these reactions have any physiological significance since the reactions are catalyzed at a slow rate even under anaerobic conditions.

  17. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nishino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors.

  18. Synthesis of 2-substituted 9-oxa-guanines {5-aminooxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7(6H-ones} and 9-oxa-2-thio-xanthines {5-mercaptooxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7(6H-ones}

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidines can be considered as 9-oxa-purine analogs of naturally occurring nucleic acid bases. Interest in this ring system has increased due to recent reports of biologically active derivatives. In particular, 5-aminooxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidine-7(6H-ones (9-oxa-guanines have been shown to inhibit ricin. The preparation of a series of 2-substituted 5-aminooxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7(6H-ones and related 5-thio-oxazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidines is described, including analogs suitable for further elaboration employing “click” chemistry utilizing copper-catalyzed Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions. Two of the compounds prepared were found to inhibit ricin with IC50 ca. 1–3 mM.

  19. Quick identification of xanthine oxidase inhibitor and antioxidant from Erycibe obtusifolia by a drug discovery platform composed of multiple mass spectrometric platforms and thin-layer chromatography bioautography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyong; Tao, Hongxun; Liao, Liping; Zhang, Zijia; Wang, Zhengtao

    2014-08-01

    As a final step of the purine metabolism process, xanthine oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of hypoxanthine and xanthine into uric acid. Our research has demonstrated that Erycibe obtusifolia has xanthine oxidase inhibitory properties. The purpose of this paper is to describe a new strategy based on a combination of multiple mass spectrometric platforms and thin-layer chromatography bioautography for effectively screening the xanthine oxidase inhibitory and antioxidant properties of E. obtusifolia. This strategy was accomplished through the following steps. (i) Separate the extract of E. obtusifolia into fractions by an autopurification system controlled by liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. (ii) Determine the active fractions of E. obtusifolia by thin-layer chromatography bioautography. (iii) Identify the structure of the main active compounds with the information provided by direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry. (iv) Calculate the IC50 value of each compound against xanthine oxidase using high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the caulis of E. obtusifolia as the experimental material, seven target peaks were screened out as xanthine oxidase inhibitors or antioxidants. Our screening strategy allows for rapid analysis of small molecules with almost no sample preparation and can be completed within a week, making it a useful assay to identify unstable compounds and provide the empirical foundation for E. obtusifolia as a natural remedy for gout and oxidative-stress-related diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and xanthine oxidase inhibition of Cu(II)-chrysin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Suyun; Zeng, Li; Zhang, Guowen; Liao, Yijing; Gong, Deming

    2017-05-05

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a key enzyme catalyzing hypoxanthine to xanthine and then uric acid causing hyperuricemia. A Cu(II) complex of chrysin was synthesized and characterized by UV-vis absorption, Fourier transform infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) and mass spectroscopy studies. The interaction of Cu(II)-complex with XO was investigated by spectroscopic methods and molecular simulation. The Cu(II)-chrysin complex exhibited a better inhibitory ability (IC50=0.82±0.034μM) against XO than its corresponding ligands chrysin and Cu(2+) in a mix-competitive manner. The binding affinity of Cu(II)-chrysin complex with XO was much higher than that of chrysin. The hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces played main roles in the binding. Analysis of circular dichroism spectra indicated that the complex induced the conformational change of XO. The molecular simulation found that the Cu(II)-chrysin complex inserted into the active cavity of XO with Cu acting as a bridge, occupying the catalytic center of the enzyme to avoid entry of the substrate xanthine, leading to the inhibition of XO. This study may provide new insights into the inhibition mechanism of the Cu(II)-chrysin complex as a promising XO inhibitor and its potential application for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  1. Arxula adeninivorans recombinant guanine deaminase and its application in the production of food with low purine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein-Schult, Anke; Jankowska, Dagmara; Cordes, Arno; Hoferichter, Petra; Klein, Christina; Matros, Andrea; Mock, Hans-Peter; Baronian, Keith; Bode, Rüdiger; Kunze, Gotthard

    2014-01-01

    Purines of exogenous and endogenous sources are degraded to uric acid in human beings. Concentrations >6.8 mg uric acid/dl serum cause hyperuricemia and its symptoms. Pharmaceuticals and the reduction of the intake of purine-rich food are used to control uric acid levels. A novel approach to the latter proposition is the enzymatic reduction of the purine content of food by purine-degrading enzymes. Here we describe the production of recombinant guanine deaminase by the yeast Arxula adeninivorans LS3 and its application in food. In media supplemented with nitrogen sources hypoxanthine or adenine, guanine deaminase (AGDA) gene expression is induced and intracellular accumulation of guanine deaminase (Agdap) protein occurs. The characteristics of the guanine deaminase isolated from wild-type strain LS3 and a transgenic strain expressing the AGDA gene under control of the strong constitutive TEF1 promoter were determined and compared. Both enzymes were dimeric and had temperature optima of 55°C with high substrate specificity for guanine and localisation in both the cytoplasm and vacuole of yeast. The enzyme was demonstrated to reduce levels of guanine in food. A mixture of guanine deaminase and other purine degradation enzymes will allow the reduction of purines in purine-rich foods. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Amperometric biosensor based on prussian blue and nafion modified screen-printed electrode for screening of potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors from medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harrad, Loubna; Amine, Aziz

    2016-04-01

    A simple and sensitive amperometric biosensor was developed for the screening of potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors from medicinal plants. This biosensor was prepared by immobilization of xanthine oxidase on the surface of prussian blue modified screen-printed electrodes using nafion and glutaraldehyde. The developed biosensor showed a linear amperometric response at an applied potential of +0.05 V toward the detection of hypoxanthine from 5 μM to 45 μM with a detection limit of 0.4 μM (S/N=3) and its sensitivity was found to be 600 mA M(-1) cm(-2). In addition, the biosensor exhibited a good storage stability. The inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol was studied under the optimized conditions. The linear range of allopurinol concentration is obtained up to 2.5 μM with an estimated 50% of inhibitionI50=1.8 μM. The developed biosensor was successfully applied to the screening of xanthine oxidase inhibitors from 13 medicinal plants belonging to different families. Indeed, Moroccan people traditionally use these plants as infusion for the treatment of gout and its related symptoms. For this purpose, water extracts obtained from the infusion of these plants were used for the experiments. In this work, 13 extracts were assayed and several of them demonstrated xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect, with an inhibition greater than 50% compared to spectrophotometry measurements that only few extracts showed an inhibition greater than 50%.

  3. Conserved guanine-guanine stacking in tetraplex and duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypr, J; Fialová, M; Chládková, J; Tůmová, M; Vorlícková, M

    2001-12-01

    Using a series of suitably chosen oligonucleotides, we demonstrate that the DNA duplex of d(CCCCGGGG) provides an almost identical CD spectrum as the parallel-stranded tetraplex of d(GGGG). The CD spectra are very sensitive to base stacking in DNA so that the above observation indicates that guanine-guanine stacking is essentially the same within the duplex of d(CCCCGGGG) and the tetraplex of d(GGGG). A very similar CD spectrum is also provided by the A-form of d(CCCCGGGG) induced by trifluoroethanol. These results reveal that guanine-guanine stacking is a structural invariant conserved in various nucleic acid conformers. The structural invariance is likely to cohere with evolution of the genetic molecules and be important for fundamental functions, e.g. initiation of transcription.

  4. Structural insights into the interactions of xpt riboswitch with novel guanine analogues: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swapan S; Sonavane, Uddhavesh B; Uppuladinne, Mallikarjunachari V N; McLaughlin, Emily C; Wang, Weiqing; Black, Sheneil; Joshi, Rajendra R

    2015-01-01

    Ligand recognition in purine riboswitches is a complex process requiring different levels of conformational changes. Recent efforts in the area of purine riboswitch research have focused on ligand analogue binding studies. In the case of the guanine xanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (xpt) riboswitch, synthetic analogues that resemble guanine have the potential to tightly bind and subsequently influence the genetic expression of xpt mRNA in prokaryotes. We have carried out 25 ns Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation studies of the aptamer domain of the xpt G-riboswitch in four different states: guanine riboswitch in free form, riboswitch bound with its cognate ligand guanine, and with two guanine analogues SJ1 and SJ2. Our work reveals novel interactions of SJ1 and SJ2 ligands with the binding core residues of the riboswitch. The ligands proposed in this work bind to the riboswitch with greater overall stability and lower root mean square deviations and fluctuations compared to guanine ligand. Reporter gene assay data demonstrate that the ligand analogues, upon binding to the RNA, lower the genetic expression of the guanine riboswitch. Our work has important implications for future ligand design and binding studies in the exciting field of riboswitches.

  5. Xanthine dehydrogenase and aldehyde oxidase impact plant hormone homeostasis and affect fruit size in 'Hass' avocado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicky J; Cowan, A Keith

    2004-04-01

    The contribution of xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH, EC 1.1.1.204) to fruit size was investigated using the normal and small-fruit variants of Persea americana Mill. cv. 'Hass'. Inhibition of XDH by treatment of normal fruit, in the linear phase of growth (phase II), with allopurinol (Allo) arrested fruit growth. Adenine (Ade), a less effective inhibitor of this enzyme, also arrested fruit growth when applied in phase II and slowed fruit growth when applied in phase III. A time-course study on the activity of XDH in mesocarp tissue from normal and small fruit showed that maximum activity occurred late in phase II and that the peak in activity was absent in mesocarp of the small fruit. Feeding Ade to growing fruit in phase III caused a transient decline in fruit growth (measured as change in fruit length). Thereafter, growth resumed although fruit size was irreversibly affected. Treatment of fruit with Ade and Ade-containing cytokinins altered activity of another molybdenum enzyme, aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1). Cytokinin oxidase was induced by cytokinin and auxin. Purine catabolism via hypoxanthine/xanthine was operative in normal fruit and in mesocarp from the small-fruit variant and as expected, Allo treatment caused accumulation of xanthine and adenine. In the absence of an increase in XDH during growth of the small-fruit phenotype, low levels of Ade were interpreted as resulting from respiration-enhanced adenylate depletion. Stress and/or pathogen induction of the alternative oxidase pathway is proposed as a possible cause.

  6. Preferential inhibition of xanthine oxidase by 2-amino-6-hydroxy-8-mercaptopurine and 2-amino-6-purine thiol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Anup

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The anticancer drug, 6-mercaptopurine (6MP is subjected to metabolic clearance through xanthine oxidase (XOD mediated hydroxylation, producing 6-thiouric acid (6TUA, which is excreted in urine. This reduces the effective amount of drug available for therapeutic efficacy. Co-administration of allopurinol, a suicide inhibitor of XOD, which blocks the hydroxylation of 6MP inadvertently enhances the 6MP blood level, counters this reduction. However, allopurinol also blocks the hydroxylation of hypoxanthine, xanthine (released from dead cancer cells leading to their accumulation in the body causing biochemical complications such as xanthine nephropathy. This necessitates the use of a preferential XOD inhibitor that selectively inhibits 6MP transformation, but leaves xanthine metabolism unaffected. Results Here, we have characterized two such unique inhibitors namely, 2-amino-6-hydroxy-8-mercaptopurine (AHMP and 2-amino-6-purinethiol (APT on the basis of IC50 values, residual activity in bi-substrate simulative reaction and the kinetic parameters like Km, Ki, kcat. The IC50 values of AHMP for xanthine and 6MP as substrate are 17.71 ± 0.29 μM and 0.54 ± 0.01 μM, respectively and the IC50 values of APT for xanthine and 6MP as substrates are 16.38 ± 0.21 μM and 2.57 ± 0.08 μM, respectively. The Ki values of XOD using AHMP as inhibitor with xanthine and 6MP as substrate are 5.78 ± 0.48 μM and 0.96 ± 0.01 μM, respectively. The Ki values of XOD using APT as inhibitor with xanthine and 6MP as substrate are 6.61 ± 0.28 μM and 1.30 ± 0.09 μM. The corresponding Km values of XOD using xanthine and 6MP as substrate are 2.65 ± 0.02 μM and 6.01 ± 0.03 μM, respectively. The results suggest that the efficiency of substrate binding to XOD and its subsequent catalytic hydroxylation is much superior for xanthine in comparison to 6MP. In addition, the efficiency of the inhibitor binding to XOD is much more superior when 6MP is the

  7. VASOACTIVE INTESTINAL POLYPEPTIDE PREVENTS INJURY OF PULMONARY VASCULAR PERMEABILITY DUE TO XANTHINE WITH XANTHINE OXIDASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林耀广

    1995-01-01

    Hyperpermeability is a crux of pathogenesis of sudden lung edema in many pulmooary disorders,espe=cially in acute lung injury and adult respiratory distress syndrome(ARDS). Using our modified method for assessment of pulmonary vascular permeability,we observed the effects of xanthine with xanthine oxi-dase (X-XO) perfused in rat pulmonary artery and the protection of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) against the injury of pulmonary vascular permesbility.After addition of xanthine oxidase in the perfusate reservoir containing xanthine,125I-albumin leak index (125IALI) was remarkably increased while peak airway pressure (Paw) was not significantly increased,and perfusion pressure of pulmonary artery (Ppa) and lung wet/dry weight ratio (W/D) were only slightly increased.Xanthine plus xanthine oxi-dase also increased thromboxane B2(TX B2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α(6-keto-PGF1α) in the perfusat-e.Treatment with VIP obviously reduced or totally prevented all signs of injury.Simultaneously,VIP also diminished or abolished the associated generation of arachidonate products.The results indicated that VIP bas potent protective activity against injury of pulmonary vasculat permeability and may be a physiological modulator of inflammatory damage to vaseular eodothelium associated with toxic oxygen metabolites.

  8. A review of the implication of hypoxanthine excess in the physiopathology of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, R J; Prior, C; Garcia, M G; Puig, J G

    2016-12-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is caused by HGprt deficiency, however, the mechanism by which enzyme deficiency leads to the severe neurological manifestations is still unknown. We hypothesized that hypoxanthine excess leads, directly or indirectly, through its action in adenosine transport, to aberrations in neuronal development. We found that hypoxanthine diminishes adenosine transport and enhances stimulation of adenosine receptors. These effects cause an imbalance between adenosine, dopamine, and serotonin receptors in HGprt deficient cells, and cells differentiated with hypoxanthine showed an increase in dopamine, adenosine and serotonin receptors expression. Hypoxanthine deregulates early neuronal differentiation increasing WNT4 and EN1 gene expression.

  9. Fabrication of amperometric xanthine biosensors based on direct chemistry of xanthine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Yansheng; Shen Chunping [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Di Junwei, E-mail: djw@suda.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Tu Yifeng [Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2009-08-31

    The construction of amperometric xanthine biosensor by immobilization of xanthine oxidase (XOD) on the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode surface was investigated. The direct chemistry of XOD was accomplished and the formal potential was about - 0.465 V (vs SCE). The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant was evaluated to be 2.0 {+-} 0.3 s{sup -1}. The xanthine biosensor based on XOD entrapped in silica sol-gel (SG) thin film on CNTs-modified GC electrode surface was also investigated. The XOD still maintains its activity to xanthine. The amperometric response to xanthine showed a linear relation in the range from 0.2 {mu}M to 10 {mu}M and a detection limit of 0.1 {mu}M (S/N = 3). The enzyme electrode retained 95% of its initial activity after 90 days of storage. The sensor exhibited high sensitivity, rapid response and good long-term stability.

  10. Bisphenol A 3,4-quinone induces the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase into oxidase in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Satoru; Nakanishi, Masahiko; Morinaga, Kazuhiro; Fujitake, Mihoyo; Wada, Shun-ichi; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we assessed the influence of bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol A 3,4-quinone (BPAQ) on the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) into xanthine oxidase (XO) in the rat liver in vitro. BPA up to 100 micromol/L did not affect the XO and XD activities in the partially purified cytosolic fraction from rat liver, whereas BPAQ (2-10 micromol/L) dose-dependently enhanced the XO activity concomitant with a decrease in the XD activity, implying that BPAQ, but not BPA, can convert XD into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing the form XO. Furthermore, it was found that BPAQ could increase the generation of ROS and oxidize the guanine moiety of deoxyguanosine in the DNA of primary rat hepatocyte cultures. These results suggest that BPAQ has the potential to convert XD into XO in the liver, which in turn may lead to ROS generation and oxidative DNA damage in this region. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic spectra and structures of some biologically important xanthines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M. K.; Mishra, P. C.

    1994-08-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of aqueous solutions of xanthine, caffeine, theophylline and theobromine have been studied at different pH. The observed spectra have been interpreted in terms of neutral and ionic forms of the molecules with the help of molecular orbital calculations. At neutral and acidic pH, the spectra can be assigned to the corresponding most stable neutral forms, with the exception that the fluorescence of xanthine at acidic pH appears to originate from the lowest singlet excited state of a cation of the molecule. At alkaline pH, xanthine and theophylline exist mainly as their monoanions. In xanthine and theophylline at alkaline pH, fluorescence originates from the lowest singlet excited state of the corresponding anion. However, in caffeine and theobromine, even at alkaline pH, fluorescence belongs to the neutral species. On the whole, the properties of xanthine are quite different from those of the methyl xanthines.

  12. XANTHINE OXYDASE INHIBITION OF KOMBUCHA TEA IN HYPERURICEMIA INDUCED WISTAR RAT: decrease of uric acid, malondialdehyde, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I D. M. Sukrama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperuricemia is a condition of high level of uric acid in the body due to distortion of purine nucleoside metabolism through hipoxanthin, xanthin, and guanin of basic purine. Objective: to find a cure of hyperuricemia base on the utilization of kombucha tea. Methods: This is a true experimental study by applying posttest only control group design to determine whether kombucha tea inhibit xanthine oxidase in hyperuricemic induced rat reveales by decrease of uric acid, malondialdehyde (MDA, and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. In this study, hyperuricemia rat was achieved by intake of high purine diet. Rats were fed with a mixture of 4 g/kg BW of Gnetum gnemon with 50 mL/kg BW of chicken liver ad libitum for 9 days. Treatments in this research are combination of fermentation time of Kombucha tea and volume of this tea, i.e fermentation time 4, 8, and 12 days and the volume are 1 mL and 4 mL. Therefore, there would be seven groups of treatment including control group. ANOVA was then applied to determine the treatment effect with p < 0.05 was concidered significant. Results: This study indicates that kombucha tea has an ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase in hyperuricemic induced rat and decrease uric acid, MDA, and 8-OHdG. This ability was achieved with combination treatment of 12 days fermentation and 4 mL of kombucha intake. Xanthine oxidase, uric acid, MDA, and 8-OHdG levels by this treatment were obtained significantly lower compare to control group. Conclusion: This study proved that kombucha tea was potent to cure hyperuricemia of wistar rat via inhibition of xanthine oxidase produced.

  13. Xanthine oxidase in human skeletal muscle following eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Frandsen, Ulrik; Orthenblad, N.

    1997-01-01

    1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised and the ......1. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of xanthine oxidase is elevated in injured human skeletal muscle in association with inflammatory events. Seven male subjects performed five bouts of strenuous one-legged eccentric exercise. Muscle biopsies from both the exercised...... the increase in xanthine oxidase in the muscle there were no detectable changes in the levels of muscle malondialdehyde or in plasma antioxidant capacity up to 4 days post-exercise. 5. It is concluded that eccentric exercise leads to an increased level of xanthine oxidase in human muscle and that the increase...

  14. Aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Henrik J; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2002-12-04

    In the present study, the aldehyde-induced pro-oxidative activity of xanthine oxidase was followed in an accelerated raw milk system using spin-trap electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The aldehydes acetaldehyde, propanal, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, trans-2-heptenal, trans-2-nonenal, and 3-methyl-2-butenal were all found to initiate radical reactions when added to milk. Formation of superoxide through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity is suggested as the initial reaction, as all tested aldehydes were shown to trigger superoxide formation in an ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk model system with added xanthine oxidase. It was found that addition of aldehydes to milk initially increased the ascorbyl radical concentration with a subsequent decay due to ascorbate depletion, which renders the formation of superoxide in milk with added aldehyde. The present study shows for the first time potential acceleration of oxidative events in milk through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity.

  15. Study of Drug Metabolism by Xanthine Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhou Sun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the studies of drug metabolism by xanthine oxidase (XOD with electrochemical techniques. Firstly, a pair of stable, well-defined and quasi-reversible oxidation/reduction peaks is obtained with the formal potential at −413.1 mV (vs. SCE after embedding XOD in salmon sperm DNA membrane on the surface of pyrolytic graphite electrode. Then, a new steady peak can be observed at −730 mV (vs. SCE upon the addition of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP to the electrochemical system, indicating the metabolism of 6-MP by XOD. Furthermore, the chronoamperometric response shows that the current of the catalytic peak located at −730 mV increases with addition of 6-MP in a concentration-dependent manner, and the increase of the chronoamperometric current can be inhibited by an XOD inhibitor, quercetin. Therefore, our results prove that XOD/DNA modified electrode can be efficiently used to study the metabolism of 6-MP, which may provide a convenient approach for in vitro studies on enzyme-catalyzed drug metabolism.

  16. Monochloramine produces reactive oxygen species in liver by converting xanthine dehydrogenase into xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Satoru; Miyoshi, Emi; Sadatoku, Namiko; Fujita, Junko; Negoro, Miki; Arakawa, Yukio; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2009-09-15

    In the present study, we assessed the influence of monochloramine (NH(2)Cl) on the conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) into xanthine oxidase (XO) in rat liver in vitro. When incubated with the partially purified cytosolic fraction from rat liver, NH(2)Cl (2.5-20 microM) dose-dependently enhanced XO activity concomitant with a decrease in XD activity, implying that NH(2)Cl can convert XD into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing form XO. The NH(2)Cl (5 microM)-induced XD/XO interconversion in the rat liver cytosol was completely inhibited when added in combination with an inhibitor of NH(2)Cl methionine (25 microM). A sulfhydryl reducing agent, dithiothreitol at concentrations of 0.1, 1 and 5 mM also dose-dependently reversed the NH(2)Cl (5 microM)-induced XD/XO interconversion. These imply that NH(2)Cl itself acts on the XD/XO interconversion, and that this conversion occurs at the cysteine residues in XD. Furthermore, using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, it was found that NH(2)Cl could increase ROS generation in the cytoplasm of rat primary hepatocyte cultures, and that this increase might be reversed by an XO inhibitor, allopurinol. These results suggest that NH(2)Cl has the potential to convert XD into XO in the liver, which in turn may induce the ROS generation in this region.

  17. Xanthine and 8-oxoguanine in G-quadruplexes: formation of a G·G·X·O tetrad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Vee Vee; Heddi, Brahim; Lech, Christopher Jacques; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2015-12-02

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded structures built from stacked G-tetrads (G·G·G·G), which are planar cyclical assemblies of four guanine bases interacting through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonds. A G-quadruplex containing a single guanine analog substitution, such as 8-oxoguanine (O) or xanthine (X), would suffer from a loss of a Hoogsteen hydrogen bond within a G-tetrad and/or potential steric hindrance. We show that a proper arrangement of O and X bases can reestablish the hydrogen-bond pattern within a G·G·X·O tetrad. Rational incorporation of G·G·X·O tetrads in a (3+1) G-quadruplex demonstrated a similar folding topology and thermal stability to that of the unmodified G-quadruplex. pH titration conducted on X·O-modified G-quadruplexes indicated a protonation-deprotonation equilibrium of X with a pKa ∼6.7. The solution structure of a G-quadruplex containing a G·G·X·O tetrad was determined, displaying the same folding topology in both the protonated and deprotonated states. A G-quadruplex containing a deprotonated X·O pair was shown to exhibit a more electronegative groove compared to that of the unmodified one. These differences are likely to manifest in the electronic properties of G-quadruplexes and may have important implications for drug targeting and DNA-protein interactions.

  18. Hypoxanthine: A Universal Metabolic Indicator of Training Status in Competitive Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Jacek; Kusy, Krzysztof

    2015-10-01

    Cardiorespiratory and biochemical indicators typically used by contemporary elite athletes seem to have limited applicability. According to some recent studies, purine metabolism better reflects exercise response and muscle adaptation in this group. We propose using purine derivatives, especially plasma hypoxanthine concentration, as indicators of training status in consecutive training phases in highly trained athletes.

  19. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F. Hoffmann; Y.M. Moshkin (Yuri); Mouton, S. (Stijn); Grzeschik, N.A. (Nicola A.); R.D. Kalicharan (Ruby); J. Kuipers (Jeroen); Wolters, A.H.G. (Anouk H.G.); Nishida, K. (Kazuki); A.V. Romashchenko; Postberg, J. (Jan); Lipps, H. (Hans); E. Berezikov (Eugene); O.C.M. Sibon (Ody); B.N.G. Giepmans (Ben); Lansdorp, P.M. (Peter M.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIncreasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochrom

  20. Guanine quadruplex structures localize to heterochromatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, Roland F.; Moshkin, Yuri M.; Mouton, Stijn; Grzeschik, Nicola A.; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Kuipers, Jeroen; Wolters, Anouk H. G.; Nishida, Kazuki; Romashchenko, Aleksander V.; Postberg, Jan; Lipps, Hans; Berezikov, Eugene; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing amounts of data support a role for guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA and RNA structures in various cellular processes. We stained different organisms with monoclonal antibody 1H6 specific for G4 DNA. Strikingly, immuno-electron microscopy showed exquisite specificity for heterochromatin.

  1. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Abdullahi

    2012-01-01

    Conclusions: Enzyme inhibition mechanism indicated that the mode of inhibition was of a mixed type. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed Xanthine oxidase inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  2. Inhibitory activity of xanthine oxidase by fractions Crateva adansonii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdullahi A; Kolo MZ; Hamzah RU; Jigam AA; Yahya A; Kabiru AY; Muhammad H; Sakpe S; Adefolalu FS; Isah MC

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the inhibitory effect of various extracts from Crateva adansonii (C. adansonii) used traditionally against several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, arthritis, and gout, was investigated on purified bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. Methods:Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295 nm associated with uric acid formation. Enzyme kinetics was carried out using Lineweaver-Burk plots using xanthine as the substrate. Results: Among the fractions tested, the chloroform fraction exhibited highest potency (IC50 20.2±1.6 μg/mL) followed by the petroleum ether (IC50 30.1±2.2 μg/mL), ethyl acetate (IC50 43.9±1.4 μg/mL) and residual (IC50 98.0±3.3 μg/mL) fractions. The IC50 value of allopurinol used, as the standard was 5.7±0.3 μg/mL. Conclusions: Enzyme inhibition mechanism indicated that the mode of inhibition was of a mixed type. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed Xanthine oxidase inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  3. Crystal structures and inhibition of Trypanosoma brucei hypoxanthine–guanine phosphoribosyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terán, David; Hocková, Dana; Česnek, Michal; Zíková, Alena; Naesens, Lieve; Keough, Dianne T.; Guddat, Luke W.

    2016-01-01

    Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei (Tbr). Due to the debilitating side effects of the current therapeutics and the emergence of resistance to these drugs, new medications for this disease need to be developed. One potential new drug target is 6-oxopurine phosphoribosyltransferase (PRT), an enzyme central to the purine salvage pathway and whose activity is critical for the production of the nucleotides (GMP and IMP) required for DNA/RNA synthesis within this protozoan parasite. Here, the first crystal structures of this enzyme have been determined, these in complex with GMP and IMP and with three acyclic nucleoside phosphonate (ANP) inhibitors. The Ki values for GMP and IMP are 30.5 μM and 77 μM, respectively. Two of the ANPs have Ki values considerably lower than for the nucleotides, 2.3 μM (with guanine as base) and 15.8 μM (with hypoxanthine as base). The crystal structures show that when two of the ANPs bind, they induce an unusual conformation change to the loop where the reaction product, pyrophosphate, is expected to bind. This and other structural differences between the Tbr and human enzymes suggest selective inhibitors for the Tbr enzyme can be designed. PMID:27786284

  4. Antioxidant effect of naturally occurring xanthines on the oxidative damage of DNA bases; Effet antioxydant de xanthines naturelles sur le dommage oxydant des bases de l`ADN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, A.J.S.C.; Telo, J.P.; Pereira, H.F.; Patrocinio, P.F. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal); Dias, R.M.B. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem codex (Portugal). Dept. de Quimica

    1999-01-01

    The repair of the oxidised radicals of adenine and guanosine by several naturally occurring xanthines was studied. Each pair of DNA purine/xanthine was made to react with the sulphate radical and the decrease of the concentration of both compounds was measured by HPLC as a function of irradiation time. The results show that xanthine efficiently prevents the oxidation of the two DNA purines. Theophylline and para-xanthine repair the oxidizes radical of adenine but not the one from guanosine. Theobromine and caffeine to do not show any protecting effect. An order of the oxidation potentials of all the purines studied is proposed. (authors) 10 refs.

  5. On the reactivity of platinum(IV) complexes: Synthesis and spectroscopic studies of platinum(IV) complexes with hypoxanthine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Akmal S.

    2006-01-01

    Na 2[PtCl 6] was found to react with (HypH)Cl·H 2O ( 2) (Hyp=hypoxanthine) in aqueous solution at room temperature yielding (HypH) 2[PtCl 6] ( 3). The same compound was obtained from hexachloroplatinic acid and hypoxanthine. Performing this reaction in methanol at 50 °C complex formation took place yielding the hypoxanthine complex [PtCl 4(Hyp) 2] ( 4). Both compounds were isolated in good yields as faint orange ( 3) and yellow ( 4) precipitates, respectively and characterized by microanalyses, IR and NMR ( 1H, 13C, 195Pt) spectroscopies as well as thermal analysis. Based on the data obtained an octahedral molecular structure is proposed for complex 4 with two hypoxanthine ligands coordinated through N7 to platinum(IV).

  6. Gamma ray irradiation inhibits Plasmodium falciparum multiplication in in vitro culture supplemented with tritium labeled hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HARRY NUGROHO EKO SURNIYANTORO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Surniyantoro HNE, Darlina, Nurhayati S, Tetriana D, Syaifudin M. 2015. Gamma ray irradiation inhibits Plasmodium falciparum multiplication in in vitro culture supplemented with tritium labeled hypoxanthine. Nusantara Bioscience 8: 8-13. Malaria remains a major public health threat in the world. Therefore an attempt to create malaria vaccine for supporting the control of disease was taken by attenuating parasites with gamma rays and it was proven effective based on microscopic observation. Objective of this research was to assess the effectiveness of gamma rays to attenuate malaria parasites based on isotopic method. A laboratory strain of P. falciparum (3D7 was in vitro cultured with standard procedure and it was irradiated with gamma rays at doses of 150-250 Gy and unirradiated parasites served as control. Twenty four hours after 1-2 µCi of 3H-hypoxanthine was added into culture 100 µl of medium was taken and was repeated at various times, then hypoxanthine incorporation was measured with beta counter. Microscopic observation of parasitemia in culture was also done. The results showed that there was a fluctuation in multiplication of parasites post irradiation mainly in higher dose (more than150 Gy. Irradiated of parasites were more active in incorporate with purine precursor up to 48 hours. Parasites returned to their highest activity at 116 hours after hypoxanthine addition. No significant difference was found among doses of irradiation with p of 0.05. This was quite different with the finding from microscopic observation. It was known that dose of 150 Gy was the most effective dose for inhibiting of the parasite multiplication where some factors affecting these facts.

  7. Urinary Hypoxanthine as a Measure of Increased ATP Utilization in Late Preterm Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Megan S.; Hopper, Andrew; Slater, Laurel; Asmerom, Yayesh; Esiaba, Ijeoma; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of neonatal morbidity on ATP breakdown in late preterm infants. Study Design Urinary hypoxanthine concentration, a marker of ATP breakdown, was measured from 82 late preterm infants on days of life (DOL) 3 to 6 using high-performance liquid chromatography. Infants were grouped according to the following diagnoses: poor nippling alone (n = 8), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (n = 21), poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (n = 26), and respiratory disease alone (n = 27). Results Neonates with respiratory disease alone had significantly higher urinary hypoxanthine over DOL 3 to 6 when compared with neonates with poor nippling (P = .020), poor nippling plus hyperbilirubinemia (P < .001), and poor nippling plus early respiratory disease (P = .017). Neonates with poor nippling who received respiratory support for 2 to 3 days had significantly higher hypoxanthine compared with infants who received respiratory support for 1 day (P = .017) or no days (P = .007). Conclusions These findings suggest that respiratory disorders significantly increase ATP degradation in late premature infants. PMID:26413195

  8. Non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460 express hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase on the plasma membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Townsend MH; Anderson MD; Weagel EG; Velazquez EJ; Weber KS; Robison RA; O'Neill KL

    2017-01-01

    Michelle H Townsend, Michael D Anderson, Evita G Weagel, Edwin J Velazquez, K Scott Weber, Richard A Robison, Kim L O’Neill Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA Abstract: In both males and females, lung cancer is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide and accounts for >30% of cancer-related deaths. Despite advances in biomarker analysis and tumor characterization, there remains a need to find suitable biomarker antigen...

  9. Xanthine Biosensor Based on Didodecyldimethylammonium Bromide Modified Pyrolytic Graphite Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Ji-Lin(唐纪琳); HAN,Xiao-Jun(韩晓军); HUANG,Wei-Min(黄卫民); WANG,Er-Kang(汪尔康)

    2002-01-01

    The vesicle of didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB)which contained tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) was mixed with xanthine oxidase, and the mixture was cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The lipid films were used to supply a biological environment resembling biomembrane on the surface of the electrode. TTF was used as a mediator because of its high electron-transfer efficiency. A novel xanthine biosensor based on cast DDAB film was developed. The effects of pH and operating potential were explored for optimum analytical performance by using the amperometric method. The response time of the biosensor was less than 10 s. The detection limit of the biosensor was 3.2 × 10-7 mol/L and the liner range was from 4 × 10-7 mol/L to 2.4 × 10-6 mol/L.

  10. Role of aspartate 143 in Escherichia coli tRNA-guanine transglycosylase: alteration of heterocyclic substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Katherine Abold; Garcia, George A

    2006-01-17

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is a key enzyme involved in the post-transcriptional modification of certain tRNAs in their anticodon wobble positions with queuine. To maintain the correct Watson-Crick base pairing properties of the wobble base (and hence proper translation of the genetic code), TGT must recognize its heterocyclic substrate with high specificity. The X-ray crystal structure of a eubacterial TGT bound to preQ1 [Romier, C., et al. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 2850-2857] suggested that aspartate 143 (Escherichia coli TGT numbering) was involved in heterocyclic substrate recognition. Subsequent mutagenic and computational modeling studies from our lab [Todorov, K. A., et al. (2005) Biophys. J. 89 (3), 1965-1977] provided experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. Herein, we report further studies probing the differential heterocyclic substrate recognition properties of the aspartate 143 mutant TGTs. Our results are consistent with one of the mutants exhibiting an inversion of substrate recognition preference (xanthine vs guanine) relative to that of the wild type, as evidenced by Km values. This confirms the key role of aspartate 143 in maintaining the anticodon identities of the queuine-containing tRNAs and suggests that TGT mutants could be developed that would alter the tRNA wobble base base pairing properties.

  11. Inactivation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase by xanthine oxidase, nicotinate hydroxylase, horseradish peroxidase, or glucose oxidase: effects of ferredoxin, putidaredoxin, and menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadtman, E R; Wittenberger, M E

    1985-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that several mixed-function oxidation (MFO) systems are capable of catalyzing the inactivation of glutamine synthetase (GS) [R.L. Levine, C. N. Oliver, R. M. Fulks, and E. R. Stadtman (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 2120-2124] and a number of the other enzymes [L. Fucci, C. N. Oliver, M. J. Coon, and E. R. Stadtman (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 1521-1525]. It has now been found that in the presence of Fe(III), O2, and an appropriate electron donor (hypoxanthine or NADPH, respectively) glutamine synthetase is also inactivated by either milk xanthine oxidase or Clostridial nicotinate hydroxylase. Inactivation of glutamine synthetase by either of these flavoproteins is greatly stimulated by the presence of electron carrier proteins possessing nonheme-iron-sulfur (NHIS) clusters (i.e., ferredoxin or putidaredoxin) or by the presence of menadione. The inactivation reactions are partially inhibited by free radical scavengers, superoxide dismutase, (SOD), histidine, mannitol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethylthiourea, and are inhibited completely by either Mn(II), EDTA, or catalase. The sensitivity to SOD inhibition is greatly suppressed when the xanthine oxidase system is supplemented with either ferredoxin or redoxin. In the presence of the latter NHIS-proteins (and only when they are present), MFO systems, comprised of either horseradish peroxidase and H2O2 or glucose oxidase, O2, and glucose, can also catalyze the inactivation of GS. The ability of ferredoxin and putidaredoxin to promote oxidation modification of GS by any one of these MFO systems suggests that proteins with NHIS centers may mediate the generation (or stabilization) of highly reactive radical intermediates.

  12. Selective bronchodilators from 1-(5'-oxohexyl)xanthines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K I; Sakai, R; Yamamoto, Y; Konno, K; Sanae, F; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K

    1992-11-01

    A series of twenty one 1-(5'-oxohexyl)xanthines substituted with alkyl chains at the N3 and N7 positions of the xanthine nucleus were prepared and their relaxant activity in guinea-pig isolated tracheal muscle and positive chronotropic activity in isolated right atrium of guinea-pig were compared. The tracheal relaxant activities were markedly increased with alkyl chain length at the N3 position, but decreased by the N7 alkylation. The positive chronotropic activities in the right atrium were increased by introduction of an n-propyl group at the N3 position but decreased by substitution of longer alkyl chains, and the action on the heart was diminished by N7 substitution. The activities of compounds on cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) and binding of [3H]8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine were measured in the homogenate of tracheal muscle and the membrane preparation of cerebral cortex, respectively. No relationship among tracheal muscle relaxant activity, cAMP-PDE inhibitory activity and adenosine antagonism of these xanthines was observed, and other action mechanisms should be considered for their relaxant activities. This study indicated that N3 alkylation is important for the selectivity for tracheal muscle, while the introduction of long alkyl chains such as n-butyl and n-pentyl groups at the N3 and N7 positions diminished the potency for the right atrium in guinea-pigs. 3-n-Pentyl- and 7-methyl-3-n-pentyl-1-(5'-oxohexyl)xanthines showed much higher bronchoselectivity than oxpentifylline and theophylline.

  13. Gypenosides Inhibits Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Ameliorates Urate Excretion in Hyperuricemic Rats Induced by High Cholesterol and High Fat Food (Lipid Emulsion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Minxia; Fang, Yingying; Chen, Suhong; Zhu, Xuexin; Shan, Chaowen; Su, Jie; Yu, Jingjing; Li, Bo; Yang, Yao; Chen, Bo; Liang, Kailun; Hu, Huiming; Lv, Guiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to study the effects of gypenosides (GPS) on lowering uric acid (UA) levels in hyperuricemic rats induced by lipid emulsion (LE) and the related mechanisms. GPS are natural saponins extracted from Gynostemma pentaphyllum. Material/Methods Forty-eight male SD rats were randomly divided into six groups: normal, model, two positive controls, and two GPS treated groups (two different doses of GPS). The normal group rats were fed a basic diet, and the other rats were orally pretreated with LE. Urine and blood were collected at regular intervals. Full automatic biochemical analyzer was used to detect the concentration levels of serum UA (SUA), serum creatinine (SCr), BUN, and urine UA (UUA), and urine creatinine (UCr) and fractional excretion of UA (FEUA). ELISA kits were used to detect enzymes activities: xanthine oxidase (XOD), adenosime deaminase (ADA), guanine deaminase (GDA), and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Immunohistochemistry was used to observe kidney changes and protein (URAT1, GLUT9, and OAT1) expression levels. RT-PCR was used to detect the relevant mRNA expression levels. Results Treatment with GPS significantly reduced the SUA, prevented abnormal weight loss caused by LE, and improved kidney pathomorphology. Treatment with GPS also decreased the levels of XOD, ADA, and XDH expression, increased the kidney index and FEUA, downregulated URAT1 and GLUT9 expression and upregulated OAT1 expression in the kidney. Conclusions GPS may be an effective treatment for hyperuricemia via a decrease in xanthine oxidoreductase through the XOD/XDH system; and via an increase in urate excretion through regulating URAT1, GLUT9, and OAT1 transporters. PMID:28258276

  14. Inhibition of Xanthine Oxidase Activity by Gnaphalium Affine Extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-qing Lin; Jian-xiang Xie; Xiao-mu Wu; Lin Yang; Hai-dong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the inhibitory effect of Gnaphalium affine extracts on xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of this effect. Methods In this in vitro study, Kinetic measurements were performed in 4 different inhibitor concentrations and 5 different xanthine concentrations (60, 100, 200, 300, 400 μmol/L). Dixon and Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis were used to determine Ki values and the inhibition mode for the compounds isolated from Gnaphalium affine extract. Results Four potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors were found in 95% ethanolic (v/v) Gnaphalium affine extract. Among them, the flavone Eupatilin exhibited the strongest inhibitory effect on XO with a inhibition constant (Ki) of 0.37μmol/L, lower than the Ki of allopurinol (4.56 mol/L), a known synthetic XO inhibitor. Apigenin (Ki of 0.56μmol/L, a proportion of 0.0053‰in Gnaphalium affine), luteolin (Ki of 2.63 μmol/L, 0.0032‰ in Gnaphalium affine) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3’,4’-tetramethoxyflavone (Ki of 3.15μmol/L, 0.0043‰ in Gnaphalium affine) also contributed to the inhibitory effect of Gnaphalium affine extract on XO activity. Conclusions These results suggest that the use of Gnaphalium affine in the treatment of gout could be attributed to its inhibitory effect on XO. This study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of Gnaphalium affine against gout.

  15. Effects of alkyl substituents of xanthine on phosphodiesterase isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Sakai, R; Kurita, M; Ohmae, S; Sanae, F; Sawanishi, H; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K

    1995-03-01

    The structure-activity relationships of a series of alkylxanthine derivatives were investigated. The partition coefficient of alkylxanthines enlarged with an elongation of the alkyl chain at the 1-, 3-, or 7-position of xanthine. There was a mild correlation between the apparent partition coefficient and the tracheal relaxant activity or the inhibitory activity on phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV isoenzyme, while the tracheal relaxant activity closely correlated with the PDE IV inhibitory activity. Regarding substituents at different positions, the alkylation at the 3-position increased the inhibitory activity on every PDE isoenzyme. The alkylation at the 1-position potentiated the inhibitory activity on PDE IV with the alkyl chain length, but decreased the activities on other PDE isoenzymes. The alkylation at the 7-position was characteristic in its decrease in inhibitory activity on PDE III. These results suggested that the potency of the inhibitory activity of xanthine derivatives on PDE isoenzymes is not dependent simply upon their hydrophobicity but upon change in the affinity for the active sites on PDE isoenzymes by the introduction of the alkyl group at particular positions of the xanthine skeleton.

  16. Effects of alkyl substitutions of xanthine skeleton on bronchodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, R; Konno, K; Yamamoto, Y; Sanae, F; Takagi, K; Hasegawa, T; Iwasaki, N; Kakiuchi, M; Kato, H; Miyamoto, K

    1992-10-30

    Structure-activity relationships in a series of 1,3,7-trialkyl-xanthine were studied with guinea pigs. Relaxant actions in the tracheal muscle were increased with alkyl chain length at the 1- and 3-positions of the xanthine skeleton, but decreased by alkylation at the 7-position. Positive chronotropic actions in the right atrium were potentiated with 3-alkyl chain length but tended to decrease with 1-alkylation and diminish by 7-substitution. Consequently, while the 1- and 3-substitutions were equally important for the tracheal smooth muscle relaxation, the substitution at the 1-position was more important than the 3-substitution for bronchoselectivity. The 7-alkylation may be significant to cancel heart stimulation. There were good correlations between the smooth muscle relaxant action and the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity in 3-substituents and the affinity for adenosine (A1) receptors in 1-, 3-, and 7-substituents. This suggests that not only the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity but also the adenosine antagonistic activity is important in the bronchodilatory effects of alkylxanthines. Among these xanthine derivatives, 1-butyl-3-propylxanthine and its 7-methylated derivative showed high bronchoselectivity in the in vitro and in vivo experiments compared to theophylline and enprofylline and may be new candidates for bronchodilator.

  17. Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y

    2001-12-01

    The Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors are multifunctional molecules that transduce diverse intracellular signals leading to the activation of Rho GTPases. The tandem Dbl-homology and pleckstrin-homology domains shared by all members of this family represent the structural module responsible for catalyzing the GDP-GTP exchange reaction of Rho proteins. Recent progress in genomic, genetic, structural and biochemical studies has implicated Dbl family members in diverse biological processes, including growth and development, skeletal muscle formation, neuronal axon guidance and tissue organization. The detailed pictures of their autoregulation, agonist-controlled activation and mechanism of interaction with Rho GTPase substrates, have begun to emerge.

  18. Calculation of the Stabilization Energies of Oxidatively Damaged Guanine Base Pairs with Guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Miyazawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly exposed to endogenous and exogenous oxidative stresses. Damaged DNA can cause mutations, which may increase the risk of developing cancer and other diseases. G:C-C:G transversions are caused by various oxidative stresses. 2,2,4-Triamino-5(2H-oxazolone (Oz, guanidinohydantoin (Gh/iminoallantoin (Ia and spiro-imino-dihydantoin (Sp are known products of oxidative guanine damage. These damaged bases can base pair with guanine and cause G:C-C:G transversions. In this study, the stabilization energies of these bases paired with guanine were calculated in vacuo and in water. The calculated stabilization energies of the Ia:G base pairs were similar to that of the native C:G base pair, and both bases pairs have three hydrogen bonds. By contrast, the calculated stabilization energies of Gh:G, which form two hydrogen bonds, were lower than the Ia:G base pairs, suggesting that the stabilization energy depends on the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, the Sp:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G base pairs. Furthermore, calculations showed that the Oz:G base pairs were less stable than the Ia:G, Gh:G and Sp:G base pairs, even though experimental results showed that incorporation of guanine opposite Oz is more efficient than that opposite Gh/Ia and Sp.

  19. Final Technical Report: Genetic Control of Nitrogen Assimilation in Klebsiella oxytoca.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valley Stewart

    2007-03-07

    Klebsiella oxytoca, an enterobacterium closely related to Escherichia coli and amenable to molecular genetic analysis, is a long-established model organism for studies of bacterial nitrogen assimilation. Our work concerned utilization of purines, nitrogen-rich compounds that are widespread in the biosphere. This project began with our observation that molybdenum cofactor (chlorate-resistant) mutants can use (hypo)xanthine as sole nitrogen source (Garzón et al., J. Bacteriol. 174:6298, 1992). Since xanthine dehydrogenase is a molybdoenzyme, Klebsiella must use an alternate route for (hypo)xanthine catabolsim. We identified and characterized a cluster of 22 genes that encode the enzymes, permeases and regulators for utilizing hypoxanthine and xanthine as sole nitrogen source. (Hypoxanthine and xanthine arise from deamination of adenine and guanine, respectively.) Growth and complementation tests with insertion mutants, combined with protein sequence comparisons, allow us to assign probable functions for the products of these genes and to deduce the overall pathway. We present genetic evidence that the first two enzymes for the Klebsiella purine utilization pathway have been recruited from pathways involved in catabolism of aromatic compounds. The first, HxaAB enzyme catalyzing (hypo)xanthine oxidation, is related to well-studied aromatic ring hydroxylating oxygenases such as phthalate dioxygenase. The second, HxbA enzyme catalyzing urate hydroxylation, is related to single-component monooxygenases. Thus, the Klebsiella purine utilization pathway has likely experienced non-orthologous gene displacement, substituting these oxygenases for the conventional enzymes, xanthine dehydrogenase and uricase. We also present evidence that transcription of the hxaAB operon is subject to dual regulation: global general nitrogen regulation (Ntr) through an unknown mechanism, and (hypo)xanthine induction mediated by a LysR-type activator.

  20. Micronuclei rate and hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase mutation in radon-exposed rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengmei Cui; Saijun Fan; Mingjiang Hu; Jihua Nie; Hongmei Li; Jian Tong

    2008-01-01

    The genetic changes in rats with radon exposure were studied by the micronucleus technology and detection of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) mutations.The rate of the micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes and tracheal-bronchial epithelial cells in the radon-inhaled rats was higher than that of the controls (P < 0.05).A similar result was obtained from the hprt assay,which showed a higher mutation frequency in radon-exposed rats.Our results suggested that micronuclei rate and hprt deficiency could be used as biomarkers for the genetic changes with radon exposure.

  1. [Forms of xanthine oxidoreductase in the tissues of Japanese quail].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankela, J; Baranovská, M; Antalíková, J

    1993-01-01

    The Japanese quail tissues--liver, kidney and pancreas were analysed for the presence of forms of xanthine oxidoreductase utilised cofactors NAD+, molecular oxygen or artificial acceptor--methylene blue, as well as for the validity of correlation between enzymatic activity and diet protein content. Four groups of animals with the experimental diets, the formulae of which are given in Tab. I, and control group with a commercial mash were fed for ten days. For enzyme preparation, the rough purification of cytoplasmic fraction with subsequent dialysis was used. The xanthine oxidoreductase utilised NAD+ (XOR-NAD) was detected in all examined tissues (Fig. 1), whereby the correlation of enzymatic activity with diet protein content was shown only in liver, according our previous findings (Jankela; 1978; Baranovská and Gazo, 1990). The values in liver and pancreas of animals fed a commercial mash were somewhat out of the range of linearity, probably because of the presence of nonprotein substances in mash, which affected the XOR activity in these organs (Jankela, 1992). The XOR utilised O2 (Fig. 2) was only detected in liver and kidney with certain activity in animals fed free protein diet. The percentage of this enzyme form was below 18% of the total activity (Fig. 5). The xanthine oxidoreductase utilised methylene blue (XOR-MM) was detected in liver, kidney and pancreas (Fig. 3). The correlation of enzymatic activity with diet protein content was linear in liver and kidney. The percentage of XOR-MM activity was very high, it amounted to 55% of the total activity (Fig. 4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Bioactive compounds of inhibiting xanthine oxidase from Selaginella labordei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wen-Jie; Xu, Jia-Cheng; Li, Li; Chen, Ke-Li

    2009-01-01

    Four flavone compounds were isolated from the effective fractions inhibiting xanthine oxidase (XOD) of the medicinal plant Selaginella labordei with anti-virus activity, and the structures were elucidated as 4'-methylether robustaflavone (1), robustaflavone (2), eriodictyol (3) and amentoflavone (4). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the three compounds of inhibiting XOD were 61.0, 0.199, 16.0 and 32.0 mg L(-1), respectively. All of these compounds were isolated from the species for the first time, and eriodictyol was found from Selaginellaceae for the first time. Among these compounds, robustaflavone has been reported as an effective compound against the hepatitis B virus.

  3. Hydroxychavicol: a potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor obtained from the leaves of betel, Piper betle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kazuya; Nakao, Kikuyo; Hirata, Noriko; Namba, Kensuke; Nomi, Takao; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Moriyama, Kenzo; Shintani, Takahiro; Iinuma, Munekazu; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    The screening of Piperaceous plants for xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity revealed that the extract of the leaves of Piper betle possesses potent activity. Activity-guided purification led us to obtain hydroxychavicol as an active principle. Hydroxychavicol is a more potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor than allopurinol, which is clinically used for the treatment of hyperuricemia.

  4. Experimental observation of guanine tautomers with VUV photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Nicolas, Christophe; Tang, Xiaonan; Belau, Leonid; de Vries, Mattanjah S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-01

    Two methods of preparing guanine in the gas phase, thermal vaporization and laser desorption, have been investigated. The guanine generated by each method is entrained in a molecular beam, single photon ionized with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation, and analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. The recorded photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves show a dramatic difference for experiments performed via thermal vaporization compared to laser desorption. The calculated vertical and adiabatic ionization energies for the eight lowest lying tautomers of guanine suggest the experimental observations arise from different tautomers being populated in the two different experimental methods.

  5. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Aryl-2H-pyrazole Derivatives as Potent Non-purine Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhi-Gang; Zhou, Xiao-Jing; Zhu, Ming-Li; Ding, Wen-Ze; Li, Zhen; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2015-01-01

    A series of aryl-2H-pyrazole derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors. Among them, 2 aryl-2H-pyrazole derivatives showed significant inhibitory activities against xanthine oxidase. Compound 19 emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50=9.8 µM) in comparison with allopurinol (IC50=9.5 µM). The docking study revealed that compound 19 might have strong interactions with the active site of xanthine oxidase. This compound is thus a new candidate for further development for the treatment of gout.

  6. Hypoxanthine in fetal umbilical venous blood and amniotic fluid from pregnancies complicated by rhesus isoimmunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangenberg, M; Legarth, J; Hong-Lie, C; Lingman, G; Persson, B; Rahman, F; Westgren, M

    1993-09-01

    Concentrations of hypoxanthine (HX) was determined in umbilical venous blood and amniotic fluid obtained at 74 instances in 36 rhesus immunized patients before the onset of labor. HX concentrations were related to gestational age, concentrations of hemoglobin and lactate, pH, and partial oxygen pressure in umbilical venous blood. Multiple regression analysis revealed hemoglobin concentration to be the only variable that had any explanatory power to HX in amniotic fluid. No one of the studied variables gave any significant contribution to a regression model to explain HX in umbilical venous blood. We conclude that HX levels in umbilical venous blood and in amniotic fluid from rhesus immunized patients were not associated with fetal blood gases before the onset of labor.

  7. Endogenous melatonin and oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Poulsen, Henrik E; Weimann, Allan

    2009-01-01

    attack and increase the rate of repair of that damage. This paper reports the results of a study relating the level of overnight melatonin production to the overnight excretion of the two primary urinary metabolites of the repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA. METHODS: Mother......-father-daughter(s) families (n = 55) were recruited and provided complete overnight urine samples. Total overnight creatinine-adjusted 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s/Cr) has been shown to be highly correlated with total overnight melatonin production. Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxoGua) results from the repair of DNA...... of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA, thereby possibly increasing the risk of developing cancer. The possible different effects of melatonin in the rates of utilization of pathways for repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA identified between older women and older men are intriguing....

  8. In silico docking studies and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of commercially available terpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUTHUSWAMY UMAMAHESWARI

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective Xanthine oxidase is a highly versatile enzyme that is widely distributed among different species. The hydroxylation of purines is catalysed by xanthine oxidase and especially the conversion of xanthine to uric acid. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors are much useful, since they possess lesser side effects compared to uricosuric and anti-inflammatory agents. The present study deals with in silico and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory analysis of commercially available terpenoids (bisabolol, β-caryophyllene, limonene, and α- terpinene. Methods Molecular docking studies were performed using AutoDock 4.2 and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was carried out using xanthine as the substrate. In addition, enzyme kinetics was performed using Lineweaver Burkplot analysis. Allopurinol, a known xanthine oxidase inhibitor was used as the standard. Results The results revealed that bisabolol exhibited a lowest binding energy value of about -7.33 kcal/mol. All other compounds showed binding energy values ranging between -7.33 to -5.87 kcal/mol which was less than the standard (-4.78 kcal/mol. In the xanthine oxidase assay, IC50 value of bisabolol was found to be 34.70 µg/ml, whereas that of allopurinol was 8.48 µg/ml. All the remaining compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging between 34.70 to 68.45 µg/ml.  In the enzyme kinetic studies, bisabolol, β-caryophyllene showed non competitive and Limonene, α- terpinene and allopurinol showed competitive type of enzyme inhibition. Conclusion It can be concluded that terpenoids could be a promising remedy for the treatment of gout and related inflammatory disorders. Further in vivo studies are required to develop potential compounds with lesser side effects.

  9. Electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase and its interaction with nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Xu, Yi; Chen, Ting; Suzuki, Iwao; Li, Genxi

    2006-02-01

    With the help of nanocrystalline TiO2, the direct electrochemistry of xanthine oxidase (XOD) was achieved and two pairs of redox waves were observed. The interaction between XOD and nitric oxide (NO) was also investigated. The experimental results reveal that NO can be reduced at a XOD-nano TiO2 film modified electrode. When the NO concentration was low, the reduced product, HNO, would inactivate the protein. However, when the NO concentration was high, HNO would continue to react with NO to form N2O2- and N3O3-, which would not inhibit XOD, and thus the amount of active protein did not decrease any further.

  10. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Hungarian wild-growing mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ványolós, Attila; Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Hohmann, Judit

    2014-08-01

    Mushrooms represent a remarkable and yet largely unexplored source of new, biologically active natural products. In this work, we report on the xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of 47 wild-growing mushrooms native to Hungary. Aqueous and organic (n-hexane, chloroform, and 50% methanol) extracts of selected mushrooms from different families were screened for their XO inhibitory activities. Among the 188 extracts investigated, the chloroform and 50% methanol fractions proved to be the most effective. Some species exhibited high inhibitory activity, e.g., Hypholoma fasciculare (IC50  =67.76 ± 11.05 µg/mL), Suillus grevillei (IC50  =13.28 ± 1.58 µg/mL), and Tricholoma populinum (IC50  =85.08 ± 15.02 µg/mL); others demonstrated moderate or weak activity. Additional studies are warranted to characterize the compounds responsible for the XO inhibitory activity of mushroom extracts.

  11. The Influence of Xanthine Derivatives on the Oxidative Balance in terms of Emotional Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey A. Sherstyuk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is dedicated to study the protective action among the xanthine derivatives in the model of acute emotional stress environment. It was experimentally proved that caffeine, euphylline and pentoxyphylline have the stress protective activity in the dose of 100 mg/kg which was given twice by intragastric way. It was shown that the most active drug is pentoxyphylline, which supports peroxydant and antioxydant balance at the expense of active product of thiobarbituric acid and superoxide dismutase. The findings attest the presence of the stress protective properties in the xanthine derivatives and also suggest to use the xanthine derivatives in the diseases prevention of stress genesis.

  12. [Triplet expansion cytosine-guanine-guanine: Three cases of OMIM syndrome in the same family].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pérez, Jesús; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Silvia; Fuertes-Rodrigo, Cristina; Monge-Galindo, Lorena; Peña-Segura, José Luis; López-Pisón, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-01

    The dynamic increase in the number of triplet repeats of cytosine-guanine-guanine (CGG) in the FMR1 gene mutation is responsible for three OMIM syndromes with a distinct clinical phenotype: Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and two pathologies in adult carriers of the premutation (55-200 CGG repeats): Primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI) and tremor-ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) associated with FXS. CGG mutation dynamics of the FMR1 gene were studied in DNA samples from peripheral blood from the index case and other relatives of first, second and third degree by TP-PCR, and the percentage methylation. Diagnosis of FXS was confirmed in three patients (21.4%), eight patients (57.1%) were confirmed in the premutation range transmitters, one male patient with full mutation/permutation mosaicism (7.1%) and two patients (14.3%) with normal study. Of the eight permutated patients, three had FXPOI and one male patient had FXTAS. Our study suggests the importance of making an early diagnosis of SXF in order to carry out a family study and genetic counselling, which allow the identification of new cases or premutated patients with FMR1 gene- associated syndromes (FXTAS, FXPOI). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of oxidative guanine damage and repair in mammalian telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG and 2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG are among the most common oxidative DNA lesions and are substrates for 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1-initiated DNA base excision repair (BER. Mammalian telomeres consist of triple guanine repeats and are subject to oxidative guanine damage. Here, we investigated the impact of oxidative guanine damage and its repair by OGG1 on telomere integrity in mice. The mouse cells were analyzed for telomere integrity by telomere quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (telomere-FISH, by chromosome orientation-FISH (CO-FISH, and by indirect immunofluorescence in combination with telomere-FISH and for oxidative base lesions by Fpg-incision/Southern blot assay. In comparison to the wild type, telomere lengthening was observed in Ogg1 null (Ogg1(-/- mouse tissues and primary embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs cultivated in hypoxia condition (3% oxygen, whereas telomere shortening was detected in Ogg1(-/- mouse hematopoietic cells and primary MEFs cultivated in normoxia condition (20% oxygen or in the presence of an oxidant. In addition, telomere length abnormalities were accompanied by altered telomere sister chromatid exchanges, increased telomere single- and double-strand breaks, and preferential telomere lagging- or G-strand losses in Ogg1(-/- mouse cells. Oxidative guanine lesions were increased in telomeres in Ogg1(-/- mice with aging and primary MEFs cultivated in 20% oxygen. Furthermore, oxidative guanine lesions persisted at high level in Ogg1(-/- MEFs after acute exposure to hydrogen peroxide, while they rapidly returned to basal level in wild-type MEFs. These findings indicate that oxidative guanine damage can arise in telomeres where it affects length homeostasis, recombination, DNA replication, and DNA breakage repair. Our studies demonstrate that BER pathway is required in repairing oxidative guanine damage in telomeres and maintaining telomere integrity

  14. Reactivity of chitosan derivatives and their interaction with guanine: A computational study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhabesh Chandra Deka; Pradip Kr Bhattacharyya

    2016-04-01

    The present study delves into the reactivity of a few chitosan derivatives (CSDs) and their interaction with guanine in vacuum and in different phases. Increase in the polarity of the solvent lowers reactivity of the chosen derivatives (evaluated by using reactivity descriptors). Interaction between the CSDs and guanine (measured by interaction energy) weakens in solvent media and CSD-guanine interaction is weaker than the interaction between guanine and unmodified chitosan (CS). Chemical stability of CSD-guanine adducts remains similar to that of CS-guanine adduct in both polar and non-polar media. Moreover, CSD-guanine adducts exhibit comparable thermodynamic stability (quantified by free energy of solvation, Gsol) to that of unmodified CS-guanine adduct in non-polar solvent but in polar medium they are immensely destabilized in comparison to CS-guanine adduct. Observed theoretical results are expected to provide guidance for future relevant experimental research on gene delivery by CS derivatives.

  15. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  16. Development of a Novel High-Density [3H]Hypoxanthine Scintillation Proximity Assay To Assess Plasmodium falciparum Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cózar, Cristina; Caballero, Iván; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Sanz, Laura M; Álvarez-Ruiz, Emilio; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Cid, Concepción

    2016-10-01

    The discovery and development of new antimalarial drugs are becoming imperative because of the spread of resistance to current clinical treatments. The lack of robustly validated antimalarial targets and the difficulties with the building in of whole-cell activity in screening hits are hampering target-based approaches. However, phenotypic screens of structurally diverse molecule libraries are offering new opportunities for the identification of novel antimalarials. Several methodologies can be used to determine the whole-cell in vitro potencies of antimalarial hits. The [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay is considered the "gold standard" assay for measurement of the activity of antimalarial compounds against intraerythrocytic forms of Plasmodium falciparum However, the method has important limitations, as the assay is not amenable for high-throughput screening since it remains associated with the 96-well plate format. We have overcome this drawback by adapting the [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation method to a 384-well high-density format by coupling a homogeneous scintillation proximity assay (SPA) and thus eliminating the limiting filtration step. This SPA has been validated using a diverse set of 1,000 molecules, including both a representative set from the Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set (TCAMS) of compounds and molecules inactive against whole cells. The results were compared with those from the P. falciparum lactate dehydrogenase whole-cell assay, another method that is well established as a surrogate for parasite growth and is amenable for high-throughput screening. The results obtained demonstrate that the SPA-based [(3)H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay is a suitable design that is adaptable to high-throughput antimalarial drug screening and that maintains the features, robustness, and reliability of the standard filtration hypoxanthine incorporation method.

  17. Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity of a Plectranthus saccatus aqueous extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caldeira F

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gout is a disease with high prevalence in developed countries, resulting from the deposition of uric acid crystals in various locations, particularly at the joints. The pharmacotherapeutic approach to chronic gout essentially consists of administration of uric acid-lowering agents. The main mechanism of action of these agents is the inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO, the enzyme responsible for the formation of uric acid. The therapeutic alternatives available for this purpose are limited, thus justifying the interest of the discovery of potential new uric acidlowering drugs. In this regard, an aqueous extract of the plant Plectranthus saccatus has been studied for its ability to inhibit XO. The composition of the extract was determined by HPLC and rosmarinic acid was identified as the major constituent. Both the extract and rosmarinic acid have demonstrated the ability to inhibit the production of uric acid by interfering with XO activity. The results obtained herein support the continuation of the study of their uric acid-lowering properties in cell-based and in vivo models to further explore their potential in gout therapy.

  18. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of compounds from Chythrantus claneianus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anar Sahib Gojayev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical investigation of the stem bark and the trunk of Chythrantus claneianus led to the isolation of six known compounds named β-sitosterol (1, umbelliferone (2, scopoletin (3, benjaminamide (4, β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (5 and Panconoside B (6. All these compounds were isolated for the first time from this plant species. The chemical structures of isolates were elucidated on the basis of 1 and 2 D-NMR spectra and other spectroscopic techniques including UV–vis, FT-IR, HR-ESIMS and HR-FABMS. The isolates were tested in vitro for their inhibitory properties towards xanthine oxidase enzyme. Compounds 2, 3 and 6 showed weak inhibi-tory activities on the enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 307 µM for com-pound 6 to 475 µM for compound 3, while the extract and compounds 1, 4 and 5 showed extremely weak activities with inhibition percentage less than 50%.

  19. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of extracts prepared from Polygonaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Lajter, Ildikó; Hohmann, Judit; Jakab, Gusztáv; Vasas, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of aqueous and organic extracts of 27 selected species belonging in five genera (Fallopia, Oxyria, Persicaria, Polygonum and Rumex) of the family Polygonaceae occurring in the Carpathian Basin were tested in vitro. From different plant parts (aerial parts, leaves, flowers, fruits and roots), a total of 196 extracts were prepared by subsequent extraction with methanol and hot H2O and solvent-solvent partition of the MeOH extract yielding n-hexane, chloroform and 50% MeOH subextracts. It was found that the chloroform subextracts and/or the remaining 50% MeOH extracts of Fallopia species (F. bohemica, F. japonica and F. sachalinensis), Rumex species (R. acetosa, R. acetosella, R. alpinus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathus, R. pulcher, R. stenophyllus, R. thyrsiflorus, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia) and Polygonum bistorta, Polygonum hydropiper, Polygonum lapathifolium and Polygonum viviparum demonstrated the highest XO inhibitory activity (>85% inhibition) at 400 µg/mL. The IC50 values of the active extracts were also determined. On the basis of the results, these plants, and especially P. hydropiper and R. acetosella, are considered worthy of activity-guided phytochemical investigations. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Xanthine oxidase activity regulates human embryonic brain cells growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevorkian G. A.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Involvement of Xanthine Oxidase (XO; EC1.1.3.22 in cellular proliferation and differentiation has been suggested by the numerous investigations. We have proposed that XO might have undoubtedly important role during the development, maturation as well as the death of human embryos brain cells. Methods. Human abortion material was utilized for the cultivation of brain cells (E90. XO activity was measured by the formation of uric acid in tissue. Cell death was detected by the utility of Trypan Blue dye. Results. Allopurinol suppressed the XO activity in the brain tissue (0.12 ± 0.02; 0.20 ± 0.03 resp., p < 0.05. On day 12th the number of cells in the culture treated with the Allopurinol at the early stage of development was higher in comparison with the Control (2350.1 ± 199.0 vs 2123 ± 96 and higher in comparison with the late period of treatment (1479.6 ± 103.8, p < < 0.05. In all groups, the number of the dead cells was less than in Control, indicating the protective nature of Allopurinol as an inhibitor of XO. Conclusions. Allopurinol initiates cells proliferation in case of the early treatment of the human brain derived cell culture whereas at the late stages it has an opposite effect.

  1. Preparation of a Xanthine Sensor Based on the Immobilization of Xanthine Oxidase on a Chitosan Modified Electrode by Cross-linking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉革; 李伟明; 魏长宾; 吕玲玲

    2012-01-01

    Here in this paper, xanthine oxidase (XOD) was immobilized onto the chitosan (CHT) modified electrode by a simple way of cross-linking with glutaraldehyde (GTD) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (KH). The electrode displayed a sharp peak to the oxidation of xanthine at a potential about 0.67 V and the optimum of pH for determination was investigated. Under the optimum conditions, the biosensor fabricated on the KH/GTD/XOD/CHT modified electrode showed excellent response to the oxidation of xanthine within the range of 0.5 to 18 μmol/L with a low detection limit of 0.0215 μmol/L, a good stability and a high selectivity. The sensor can also be used for the determination of hypoxantbine. The electrochemical results indicated that the immobilized enzyme still retained its biological activity and this provided a new way for the construction of biosensors and determination of xanthine.

  2. Endogenous melatonin and oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulsen Henrik E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant body of literature indicates that melatonin, a hormone primarily produced nocturnally by the pineal gland, is an important scavenger of hydroxyl radicals and other reactive oxygen species. Melatonin may also lower the rate of DNA base damage resulting from hydroxyl radical attack and increase the rate of repair of that damage. This paper reports the results of a study relating the level of overnight melatonin production to the overnight excretion of the two primary urinary metabolites of the repair of oxidatively damaged guanine in DNA. Methods Mother-father-daughter(s families (n = 55 were recruited and provided complete overnight urine samples. Total overnight creatinine-adjusted 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s/Cr has been shown to be highly correlated with total overnight melatonin production. Urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-guanine (8-oxoGua results from the repair of DNA or RNA guanine via the nucleobase excision repair pathway, while urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG may possibly result from the repair of DNA guanine via the nucleotide excision repair pathway. Total overnight urinary levels of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua are therefore a measure of total overnight guanine DNA damage. 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry assay. The mother, father, and oldest sampled daughter were used for these analyses. Comparisons between the mothers, fathers, and daughters were calculated for aMT6s/Cr, 8-oxodG, and 8-oxoGua. Regression analyses of 8-oxodG and 8-oxoGua on aMT6s/Cr were conducted for mothers, fathers, and daughters separately, adjusting for age and BMI (or weight. Results Among the mothers, age range 42-80, lower melatonin production (as measured by aMT6s/CR was associated with significantly higher levels of 8-oxodG (p Conclusion Low levels of endogenous melatonin production among older individuals may lead to

  3. Novel electrochemical xanthine biosensor based on chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muamer Dervisevic

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was the electrochemical detection of the adenosine-3-phosphate degradation product, xanthine, using a new xanthine biosensor based on a hybrid bio-nanocomposite platform which has been successfully employed in the evaluation of meat freshness. In the design of the amperometric xanthine biosensor, chitosan–polypyrrole–gold nanoparticles fabricated by an in situ chemical synthesis method on a glassy carbon electrode surface was used to enhance electron transfer and to provide good enzyme affinity. Electrochemical studies were carried out by the modified electrode with immobilized xanthine oxidase on it, after which the biosensor was tested to ascertain the optimization parameters. The Biosensor exhibited a very good linear range of 1–200 μM, low detection limit of 0.25 μM, average response time of 8 seconds, and was not prone to significant interference from uric acid, ascorbic acid, glucose, and sodium benzoate. The resulting bio-nanocomposite xanthine biosensor was tested with fish, beef, and chicken real-sample measurements.

  4. Fluorescence quenching study of quercetin interaction with bovine milk xanthine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh; Jabary, Hamideh Nadjarpour; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2009-02-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid with many important therapeutic properties. The interaction of this polyphenolic compound bovine milk xanthine oxidase as one of its major target proteins was studied using fluorescence quenching method for the first time. It was found that the fluorescence quenching of xanthine oxidase occurs through a static mechanism. The results revealed the presence of a single binding site on xanthine oxidase with the binding constant value equals to 1.153 × 10 4 l mol -1 at 310 K and pH 7.4. The thermodynamic parameters were also calculated at different temperatures. The enthalpy and entropy changes were found as -10.661 kJ mol -1 and +43.321 J mol -1 K -1 indicating that both hydrogen binding and hydrophobic are involved in the interaction of this polyphenolic natural compound with xanthine oxidase. The results may provide a ground for further studies with different flavonoids to find a safe alternative for allopurinol, the only xanthine oxidase inhibitor with clinical application.

  5. Selective tracheal relaxation and phosphodiesterase-IV inhibition by xanthine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Kurita, M; Ohmae, S; Sakai, R; Sanae, F; Takagi, K

    1994-05-17

    The effects of substitutions in the xanthine nucleus on tracheal relaxant activity, atrium chronotropic activity, adenosine A1 affinity, and inhibitory activities on cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase isoenzymes in guinea pigs were studied. Substitution with a long alkyl chain at the N1-position of xanthine nucleus increased the tracheal relaxant activity without leading to positive chronotropic action, and long alkyl chains at the N3-position increased both activities. N7-substitutions with n-propyl and 2'-oxopropyl groups, such as in denbufylline, increased bronchoselectivity. N7-substitution decreased the adenosine A1 affinity, but substitution at either the N1- or N3-position increased it. The bronchorelaxant activity of xanthine derivatives was closely correlated with their inhibition of phosphodiesterase-IV, but not with their adenosine A1 affinity; the positive chronotropic effects were related to their inhibition of phosphodiesterase-III. This study confirms that the bronchorelaxation of xanthine derivatives is mediated by inhibition of the isoenzyme phosphodiesterase-IV. The results of structure-activity analysis suggest that substitutions at the N1- and N7-positions should be tried in the development of xanthine derivatives that are selective bronchodilators and phosphodiesterase-IV inhibitors.

  6. Calculating Distortions of Short DNA Duplexes with Base Pairing Between an Oxidatively Damaged Guanine and a Guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayo Suzuki

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA is constantly being oxidized, and oxidized DNA is prone to mutation; moreover, guanine is highly sensitive to several oxidative stressors. Several oxidatively damaged forms of guanine—including 2,2,4-triamino-5(2H-oxazolone (Oz, iminoallantoin (Ia, and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp—can be paired with guanine, and cause G:C-C:G transversions. Previous findings indicate that guanine is incorporated more efficiently opposite Oz than opposite Ia or Sp, and that these differences in efficiency cannot be explained by differences in the stabilities of G:Oz, G:Ia, and G:Sp base pairs calculated ab initio. Here, to explain previous experimental result, we used a 3-base-pair model DNA duplex to calculate the difference in the stability and the distortion of DNA containing a G:Oz, G:Ia, or G:Sp base pair. We found that the stability of the structure containing 5ꞌ and 3ꞌ base pairs adjacent to G:Oz was more stable than that containing the respective base pairs adjacent to G:Ia or G:Sp. Moreover, the distortion of the structure in the DNA model duplex that contained a G:Oz was smaller than that containing a G:Ia or G:Sp. Therefore, our discussion can explain the previous results involving translesion synthesis past an oxidatively damaged guanine.

  7. Development of a New Reporter Gene System-dsRed/Xanthine Phosphoribosyltransferase-Xanthine for Molecular Imaging of Processes Behind the Intact Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Doubrovin

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a novel dual-modality fusion reporter gene system consisting of Escherichia coli xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRT for nuclear imaging with radiolabeled xanthine and Discosoma red fluorescent protein for optical fluorescent imaging applications. The dsRed/XPRT fusion gene was successfully created and stably transduced into RG2 glioma cells, and both reporters were shown to be functional. The level of dsRed fluorescence directly correlated with XPRT enzymatic activity as measured by ribophosphorylation of [14C]-xanthine was in vitro (Ki = 0.124 ± 0.008 vs. 0.00031 ± 0.00005 mL/min/g in parental cell line, and [*]-xanthine octanol/water partition coefficient was 0.20 at pH = 7.4 (logP = 0.69, meeting requirements for the blood-brain barrier (BBB penetrating tracer. In the in vivo experiment, the concentration of [* C]-xanthine in the normal brain varied from 0.20 to 0.16 + 0.05% dose/g under 0.87 + 0.24% dose/g plasma radiotracer concentration. The accumulation in vivo in the transfected flank tumor was to 2.4 ± 0.3% dose/g, compared to 0.78 ± 0.02% dose/g and 0.64 ± 0.05% dose/g in the control flank tumors and intact muscle, respectively. [14C]-Xanthine appeared to be capable of specific accumulation in the transfected infiltrative brain tumor (RG2-dsRed/XPRT, which corresponded to the 585 nm fluorescent signal obtained from the adjacent cryosections. The images of endogenous gene expression with the “sensory system” have to be normalized for the transfection efficiency based on the “beacon system” image data. Such an approach requires two different “reporter genes” and two different “reporter substrates.” Therefore, the novel dsRed/XPRT fusion gene can be used as a multimodality reporter system in the biological applications requiring two independent reporter genes, including the cells located behind the BBB.

  8. De novo analysis of receptor binding affinity data of xanthine adenosine receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, A; Gardenghi, A; Borea, P A

    1995-03-01

    The receptor binding affinity data to adenosine A1 and A2 receptors of a wide series of xanthine derivatives have been analyzed by means of the Free-Wilson model. The analysis of the individual group contribution shows, for both A1 and A2 receptors, the primary importance of the presence of bulky substituents at position 8 for an optimum receptor binding. Moreover, considering the different aij contributions of bulky substituents at position 8 for affinity to A1 with respect to A2 receptors, this position appears to be the most important for the synthesis of highly A1 selective xanthine derivatives. Moreover the analysis of group contributions for other substitution positions of the xanthine moiety allows to state that suitable substitutions at positions 3 and 7 could confer some degree of A2 selectivity.

  9. Vibrational spectral investigation on xanthine and its derivatives—theophylline, caffeine and theobromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, S.; Sankari, G.; Ponnusamy, S.

    2005-01-01

    A normal coordinate analysis has been carried out on four compounds having a similar ring structure with different side chain substitutions, which are xanthine, caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. Xanthine is chemically known as 2,6-dihydroxy purine. Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are methylated xanthines. Considering the methyl groups as point mass, the number of normal modes of vibrations can be distributed as Γ vib=27 A'+12 A″ based on C s point group symmetry associated with the structures. In the present work 15 A' and 12 A″ normal modes are considered. A new set of orthonormal symmetry co-ordinates have been constructed. Wilson's F- G matrix method has been adopted for the normal coordinate analysis. A satisfactory vibrational band assignment has been made by employing the FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the compounds. The potential energy distribution is calculated with the arrived values of the force constants and hence the agreement of the frequency assignment has been checked.

  10. QSAR and SAR studies on the reduction of some aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Mamta; Thakur, Abhilash; Balasubramanian, Krishnan

    2006-01-01

    This work describes QSAR and SAR studies on the reduction of 27 aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase using both distance-based topological indices and quantum molecular descriptors along with indicator parameters. The application of a multiple linear regression analysis indicated that a combination of distance-based topological indices with the ad hoc molecular descriptors and the indicator parameters yielded a statistically significant model for the activity, log K (the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds by xanthine oxidase). The final selection of a potential aromatic nitro compound for the reduction by xanthine oxidase is made by quantum molecular modeling. We have found that, among the various parameters, the quantum Mulliken charge parameters on the fourth atom or para position relative to the nitro group correlated best with the activity.

  11. Xanthine oxidase activity and free radical generation in patients with sepsis syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galley, H F; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Webster, N R

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine xanthine oxidase activity, free radical concentrations, and lipid peroxidation in patients with sepsis syndrome compared with noninfected critically ill patients. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: A nine-bed intensive care unit in a university teaching......). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sepsis have xanthine oxidase activation, high free-radical concentrations, and evidence of free radical damage. The finding that xanthine oxidase activity was lower in those patients who died, coupled with increased lactate concentrations implies more severe ischemia with incomplete...... to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score or to the presence of organ dysfunction. The mean ascorbyl radical concentration (arbitrary units) determined by electron paramagnetic resonance following spin trapping was increased in patients compared with healthy subjects (p

  12. Studies on the quantitative structure-activity relationship of the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by azaheterocyclic compounds.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naeff, H.S.D.

    1990-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of a QSAR analysis of the interaction of bovine milk xanthine oxidase with two azaheterocyclic compounds, namely the 6-arylpteridin- 4-ones and the 8-arylhypoxanthines. Xanthine oxidase has active sites for various substrates. The studies done for this thesis were of

  13. Determination of serum adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase levels in patients with crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kenan Celik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever is an acute viral hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. Despite increasing knowledge about hemorrhagic fever viruses, little is known about the pathogenesis of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. In this study, we measured serum adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase levels in Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever patients. METHODS: Serum adenosine deaminase levels were measured with a sensitive colorimetric method described by Giusti and xanthine oxidase levels by the method of Worthington in 30 consecutive hospitalized patients (mean age 42.6 ± 21.0. Laboratory tests confirmed their diagnoses of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. Thirty-five subjects (mean age 42.9 ± 19.1 served as the control group. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase levels between cases and controls (p0.05. CONCLUSION: Adenosine deaminase and xanthine oxidase levels were increased in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever. Elevated serum xanthine oxidase activity in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever may be associated with reactive oxygen species generated by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system during inflammatory responses. In addition, elevated lipid peroxidation may contribute to cell damage and hemorrhage. The association of cell damage and hemorrhage with xanthine oxidase activity should be further investigated in large-scale studies.

  14. Xanthine oxidase inhibition by allopurinol increases in vitro pyrazinamide-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tostmann, A.; Aarnoutse, R.E.; Peters, W.H.M.; Richard, P.N.; Boeree, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the important role of pyrazinamide in tuberculosis treatment, little is known about the mechanism of pyrazinamide-induced hepatotoxicity. We inhibited xanthine oxidase in HepG2 cells by using a nontoxic concentration of allopurinol, a well-known xanthine-oxidase inhibitor. This increased in

  15. Hypouricaemic action of mangiferin results from metabolite norathyriol via inhibiting xanthine oxidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yanfen; Liu, Jia; Liu, Hai-Yang; Gao, Li-Hui; Feng, Guo-Hua; Liu, Xu; Li, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Context Mangiferin has been reported to possess a potential hypouricaemic effect. However, the pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed that its oral bioavailability was only 1.2%, suggesting that mangiferin metabolites might exert the action. Objective The hypouricaemic effect and the xanthine oxidase inhibition of mangiferin and norathyriol, a mangiferin metabolite, were investigated. Inhibition of norathyriol analogues (compounds 3-9) toward xanthine oxidase was also evaluated. Materials and methods For a dose-dependent study, mangiferin (1.5-6.0 mg/kg) and norathyriol (0.92-3.7 mg/kg) were administered intragastrically to mice twice daily for five times. For a time-course study, mice received mangiferin and norathyriol both at a single dose of 7.1 μmol/kg. In vitro, inhibition of test compounds (2.4-2.4 mM) against xanthine oxidase activity was evaluated by the spectrophotometrical method. The inhibition type was identified from Lineweaver-Burk plots. Results Norathyriol (0.92, 1.85 and 3.7 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the serum urate levels by 27.0, 33.6 and 37.4%, respectively. The action was more potent than that of mangiferin at the low dose, but was equivalent at the higher doses. Additionally, the hypouricaemic action of them exhibited a time dependence. In vitro, norathyriol markedly inhibited the xanthine oxidase activities, with the IC50 value of 44.6 μM, but mangiferin did not. The kinetic studies showed that norathyriol was an uncompetitive inhibitor by Lineweaver-Burk plots. The structure-activity relationships exhibited that three hydroxyl groups in norathyriol at the C-1, C-3 and C-6 positions were essential for maintaining xanthine oxidase inhibition. Discussion and conclusion Norathyriol was responsible for the hypouricaemic effect of mangiferin via inhibiting xanthine oxidase activity.

  16. Antioxidant effect of naturally occurring xanthines on the oxidative damage of DNA bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, A. J. S. C.; Telo, J. P.; Pereira, H. F.; Patrocínio, P. F.; Dias, R. M. B.

    1999-01-01

    The repair of the oxidised radicals of adenine and guanosine by several naturally occurring xanthines was studied. Each pair of DNA purine/xanthine was made to react with the sulphate radical and the decrease of the concentration of both compounds was measured by HPLC as a function of irradiation time. The results show that xanthine efficiently prevents the oxidation of the two DNA purines. Theophyline and paraxanthine repair the oxidised radical of adenine but not the one from guanosine. Theobromine and caffeine do not show any protecting effect. An order of the oxidation potentials of all the purines studied is proposed. La réparation des radicaux oxydés de l'adénine et de la guanosine par des xanthines naturelles a été étudiée en soumettant chaque paire base de l'ADN/xanthine à l'oxydation par le radical sulfate et en mesurant par HPLC la disparition des deux composés en fonction du temps d'irradiation. Les résultats montrent que la xanthine joue un rôle protecteur efficace contre l'oxydation des deux purines de l'ADN. La théophyline et la paraxanthine réparent le radical oxydé de l'adénine mais pas celui de la guanosine. La théobromine et la cafeíne n'ont pas d'effet protecteur. Un ordre de potentiels d'oxydation des purines étudiées est proposé.

  17. Brain hypoxanthine concentration correlates to lactate/pyruvate ratio but not intracranial pressure in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Hauerberg, John; Jørgensen, Linda;

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cerebral edema in acute liver failure is suggested, in in vitro and animal studies, to involve a compromised oxidative metabolism with a decrease in cerebral ATP levels and an increase in purine concentrations. In this study we hypothesize that the cerebral concentrations...... of hypoxanthine, inosine, and lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio are increased and correlated in patients with acute liver failure. Furthermore, we expect the purines and L/P ratio to correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP) (positively), and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) (negatively)....

  18. Purine metabolism in Toxoplasma gondii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krug, E.C.; Marr, J.J.; Berens, R.L.

    1989-06-25

    We have studied the incorporation and interconversion of purines into nucleotides by freshly isolated Toxoplasma gondii. They did not synthesize nucleotides from formate, glycine, or serine. The purine bases hypoxanthine, xanthine, guanine, and adenine were incorporated at 9.2, 6.2, 5.1, and 4.3 pmol/10(7) cells/h, respectively. The purine nucleosides adenosine, inosine, guanosine, and xanthosine were incorporated at 110, 9.0, 2.7, and 0.3 pmol/10(7) cells/h, respectively. Guanine, xanthine, and their respective nucleosides labeled only guanine nucleotides. Inosine, hypoxanthine, and adenine labeled both adenine and guanine nucleotide pools at nearly equal ratios. Adenosine kinase was greater than 10-fold more active than the next most active enzyme in vitro. This is consistent with the metabolic data in vivo. No other nucleoside kinase or phosphotransferase activities were found. Phosphorylase activities were detected for guanosine and inosine; no other cleavage activities were detected. Deaminases were found for adenine and guanine. Phosphoribosyltransferase activities were detected for all four purine nucleobases. Interconversion occurs only in the direction of adenine to guanine nucleotides.

  19. Xanthine oxidase functionalized Ta2O5 nanostructures as a novel scaffold for highly sensitive SPR based fiber optic xanthine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2018-01-15

    Fabrication and characterization of a surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic xanthine sensor using entrapment of xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme in several nanostructures of tantalum (v) oxide (Ta2O5) have been reported. Chemical route was adopted for synthesizing Ta2O5 nanoparticles, nanorods, nanotubes and nanowires while Ta2O5 nanofibers were prepared by electrospinning technique. The synthesized Ta2O5 nanostructures were characterized by photoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectra and X-ray diffraction pattern. The probes were fabricated by coating an unclad core of the fiber with silver layer followed by the deposition of XO entrapped Ta2O5 nanostructures. The crux of sensing mechanism relies on the modification of dielectric function of sensing layer upon exposure to xanthine solution of diverse concentrations, reflected in terms of shift in resonance wavelength. The sensing probe coated with XO entrapped Ta2O5 nanofibers has been turned out to possess maximum sensitivity amongst the synthesized nanostructures. The probe was optimized in terms of pH of the sample and the concentration of XO entrapped in Ta2O5 nanofibers. The optimized sensing probe possesses a remarkably good sensitivity of 26.2nm/µM in addition to linear range from 0 to 3µM with an invincible LOD value of 0.0127µM together with a response time of 1min. Furthermore, probe selectivity with real sample analysis ensure the usage of the sensor for practical scenario. The results reported open a novel perspective towards a sensitive, rapid, reliable and selective detection of xanthine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Purine Metabolism in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Oreshnikov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of purine metabolism in clinically significant acute cerebral ischemia. Subjects and materials. Three hundred and fifty patients with the acutest cerebral ischemic stroke were examined. The parameters of gas and electrolyte composition, acid-base balance, the levels of malonic dialdehyde, adenine, guanine, hypox-anthine, xanthine, and uric acid, and the activity of xanthine oxidase were determined in arterial and venous bloods and spinal fluid. Results. In ischemic stroke, hyperuricemia reflects the severity of cerebral metabolic disturbances, hemodynamic instability, hypercoagulation susceptiility, and the extent of neurological deficit. In ischemic stroke, hyperuri-corachia is accompanied by the higher spinal fluid levels of adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine and it is an indirect indicator of respiratory disorders of central genesis, systemic acidosis, hypercoagulation susceptibility, free radical oxidation activation, the intensity of a stressor response to cerebral ischemia, cerebral metabolic disturbances, the depth of reduced consciousness, and the severity of neurological deficit. Conclusion. The high venous blood activity of xanthine oxidase in ischemic stroke is associated with the better neurological parameters in all follow-up periods, the better early functional outcome, and lower mortality rates. Key words: hyperuricemia, stroke, xanthine oxidase, uric acid, cerebral ischemia.

  1. Effect of base pairing on the electrochemical oxidation of guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Hajj, Viviane; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel; Tard, Cédric

    2010-07-28

    The effect of base pairing by cytosine on the electrochemical oxidation of guanine is examined by means of cyclic voltammetry on carefully purified reactants in a solvent, CHCl(3), which strongly favors the formation of an H-bonded pair. The thermodynamics and kinetics of the oxidation reaction are not strongly influenced by the formation of the pair. They are actually similar to those of the reaction in which 2,6-lutidine, an encumbered base that cannot form a pair with guanine, replaces cytosine. The reaction does not entail a concerted proton-electron mechanism, as attested by the absence of H/D isotope effect. It rather involves the rate-determining formation of the cation radical, followed by its deprotonation and dimerization of the resulting neutral radical in competition with its further oxidation.

  2. Amperometric determination of xanthine in fish meat by zinc oxide nanoparticle/chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline composite film bound xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rooma; Yadav, Sandeep; Pundir, C S

    2012-02-07

    Xanthine oxidase (XOD) was immobilized on a composite film of zinc oxide nanoparticle/chitosan/carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (ZnO-NP/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI) electrodeposited over the surface of a platinum (Pt) electrode. A xanthine biosensor was fabricated using XOD/ZnO-NP/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI/Pt as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode connected through a potentiostat. The ZnO-NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the enzyme electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The biosensor showed optimum response within 4 s at 0.5 V potential, pH 7.0, 35 °C and linear range 0.1-100 μM with a detection limit of 0.1 μM. The enzyme electrode was employed for determination of xanthine in fish meat during storage. The electrode lost 30% of its initial activity after 80 uses over one month, when stored at 4 °C.

  3. In vitro anti-inflammatory and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of Tephrosia purpurea shoot extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Shivraj H; Khobragade, Chandrahasy N

    2011-10-01

    The methanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea (Leguminosae) shoots was evaluated in-vitro for its anti-inflammatory and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was measured by the Diene-conjugate, HET-CAM and beta-glucuronidase methods. The enzyme inhibitory activity was tested against isolated cow milk xanthine oxidase. The average anti-inflammatory activity of T. purpurea shoot extract in the concentration range of 1-2 microg/mL in the reacting system revealed significant anti-inflammatory activities, which, as recorded by the Diene-conjugate, HET-CAM and beta-glucuronidase assay methods, were 45.4, 10.5, and 70.5%, respectively. Screening of the xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the extract in terms of kinetic parameters revealed a mixed type of inhibition, wherein the Km and Vmax values in the presence of 25 to 100 microg/mL shoot extract was 0.20 mM/mL and 0.035, 0.026, 0.023 and 0.020 microg/min, while, for the positive control, the Km and Vmax values were 0.21 mM/mL and 0.043 microg/min, respectively. These findings suggest that T. purpurea shoot extract may possess constituents with good medicinal properties that could be exploited to treat the diseases associated with oxidative stress, xanthine oxidase enzyme activity and inflammation.

  4. Inflammatory Role of Macrophage Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Pulmonary Hypertension: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    inflammatory macrophages. Recently we have obtained preliminary data showing XOR as a critical regulator of mitochondrial function during hypoxia (SA1b...TERMS Xanthine Oxidoreductase, Macrophage, Pulmonary hypertension, Inflammasone, Mitochondrial Repiration 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Shift To verify the effect of XOR ablation on mitochondrial OXPHOS, we measured levels of lactate and pyruvate in purified BMDM derived from XORfl/fl

  5. Subunit structure of bovine milk xanthine oxidase. Effect of limited cleavage by proteolytic enzymes on activity and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, L G; Vartanyan, L S

    1976-03-18

    Bovine milk xanthine oxidase (xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.2.3.2) has been purified by a modified method without the use of proteases, and its structure has been analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Native xanthine oxidase is found to consist of only two polypeptide chains A with molecular weights of 150 000 each. These chains have NH2-terminal methionine. Limited proteolysis with trypsin, chymotrypsin, or subtilisin at pH 8 did not affect molecular weight and activities of the enzyme while each of the A chains was cleaved under these conditions to three fragments C, E, and F with molecular weights of 92 00, 42 000 and 20 000, respectively. These fragments remained bound to each other and were relatively resistant to subsequent proteolysis. The isolation of xanthine oxidase in the presence of pancreatin as described by Hart et al. (1970, Biochem. J. 116, 851) gives partially digested enzyme composed mainly of chains C, E (Mr 35 000) and a small component (Mr approx. 15 0-0). The action of subtilisin on xanthine oxidase at pH 11 resulted in complete digestion of E chains, FAD separation, and total loss of xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase activity while xanthine:indophenol oxidoreductase activity was relatively little affected. The residual enzyme has a molecular weight of about 200 000, is composed mainly of two C chains (and may probably contain F and/or proteolytic fragments of low molecular weight), contains molybdenum, and does not contain FAD.

  6. Archaeal DNA Polymerase-B as a DNA Template Guardian: Links between Polymerases and Base/Alternative Excision Repair Enzymes in Handling the Deaminated Bases Uracil and Hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Abellón-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Archaea repair of uracil and hypoxanthine, which arise by deamination of cytosine and adenine, respectively, is initiated by three enzymes: Uracil-DNA-glycosylase (UDG, which recognises uracil; Endonuclease V (EndoV, which recognises hypoxanthine; and Endonuclease Q (EndoQ, (which recognises both uracil and hypoxanthine. Two archaeal DNA polymerases, Pol-B and Pol-D, are inhibited by deaminated bases in template strands, a feature unique to this domain. Thus the three repair enzymes and the two polymerases show overlapping specificity for uracil and hypoxanthine. Here it is demonstrated that binding of Pol-D to primer-templates containing deaminated bases inhibits the activity of UDG, EndoV, and EndoQ. Similarly Pol-B almost completely turns off EndoQ, extending earlier work that demonstrated that Pol-B reduces catalysis by UDG and EndoV. Pol-B was observed to be a more potent inhibitor of the enzymes compared to Pol-D. Although Pol-D is directly inhibited by template strand uracil, the presence of Pol-B further suppresses any residual activity of Pol-D, to near-zero levels. The results are compatible with Pol-D acting as the replicative polymerase and Pol-B functioning primarily as a guardian preventing deaminated base-induced DNA mutations.

  7. Guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides as synthetic riboregulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression by short oligonucleotides (antisense oligonucleotides), which can modulate RNA structures and inhibit subsequent associations with the translation machinery, is a potential approach for gene therapy. This chapter describes an alternative antisense strategy using guanine-tethered antisense oligonucleotides (G-ASs) to introduce a DNA-RNA heteroquadruplex structure at a designated sequence on RNA targets. The feasibility of using G-ASs to modulate RNA conformation may allow control of RNA function by inducing biologically important quadruplex structures. This approach to manipulate quadruplex structures using G-ASs may expand the strategies for regulating RNA structures and the functions of short oligonucleotide riboregulators.

  8. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  9. In vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of methanol extracts of Erythrina indica Lam. leaves and stem bark

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kandhasamy Sowndhararajan; Jince Mary Joseph; Dharmar Rajendrakumaran

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the total phenolic content and in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of methanol extracts of leaves and stem bark of Erythrina indica. Methods: Folin-ciocalteu method was used to determine the total phenolic content. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295nm associated with uric acid formation. Results:The methanol extract of stem bark of E. indica contains higher level of total phenolic content (412.8 mg GAE/g extract) and also exhibited higher xanthine oxidase inhibition activity (IC50 52.75μg/mL) than the leaves. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the stem bark of E. indica was highly effective in xanthine oxidase inhibition and might be used for the gout related disorders.

  10. Prototropic tautomerism and basic molecular principles of hypoxanthine mutagenicity: an exhaustive quantum-chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2013-01-01

    The molecular structures, relative stability order, and dipole moments of a complete family of 21 planar hypoxanthine (Hyp) prototropic molecular-zwitterionic tautomers including ylidic forms were computationally investigated at the MP2/6-311++G(2df,pd)//B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory in vacuum and in three different surrounding environments: continuum with a low dielectric constant (ϵ = 4) corresponding to a hydrophobic interface of protein-nucleic acid interactions, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), and water. The keto-N1HN7H tautomer was established to be the global minimum in vacuum and in continuum with ϵ = 4, while Hyp molecule exists as a mixture of the keto-N1HN9H and keto-N1HN7H tautomers in approximately equal amounts in DMSO and in water at T = 298.15 K. We found out that neither intramolecular tautomerization by single proton transfer in the Hyp base, nor intermolecular tautomerization by double proton transfer in the most energetically favorable Hyp·Hyp homodimer (symmetry C(2h)), stabilized by two equivalent N1H…O6 H-bonds, induces the formation of the enol tautomer (marked with an asterisk) of Hyp with cis-oriented O6H hydroxyl group relative to neighboring N1C6 bond. We first discovered a new scenario of the keto-enol tautomerization of Hyp · Hyp homodimer (C(2h)) via zwitterionic near-orthogonal transition state (TS), stabilized by N1⁺H…N1⁻ and O6⁺H…N1⁻ H-bonds, to heterodimer Hyp∗ · Hyp (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O6 and N1H…N1 H-bonds. We first showed that Hyp∗ · Thy mispair (C(s)), stabilized by O6H…O4, N3H…N1, and C2H…O2 H-bonds, mimicking Watson-Crick base pairing, converts to the wobble Hyp · Thy base pair (C(s)), stabilized by N3H…O6 and N1H…O2 H-bonds, via high- and low-energy TSs and intermediate Hyp · Thy∗, stabilized by O4H…O6, N1H…N3, and C2H…O2 H-bonds. The most energetically favorable TS is the zwitterionic pair Hyp⁺ · Thy⁻ (C(s)), stabilized by O6

  11. Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Is the Most Stable Reference Gene for Gene Expression Analysis by Quantitative PCR in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Women with the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Danijela Vojnović

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a frequent endocrine disorder that affects women of reproductive age. As the syndrome is strongly associated with obesity, it is of interest to examine the gene expression diffe rences that accompany its development and the associ a ted metabolic disturbances. Real-time RT PCR is a standard method for studying changes in gene expression. However, to obtain accurate and reliable results, validation of reference genes is obligatory. The aim of this study was to identify a suitable reference for the normalization of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from obese and normal-weight women with PCOS.

  12. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    OpenAIRE

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-...

  13. An updated patent review: xanthine oxidase inhibitors for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout (2011-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Ritu; Singh, Jagjeet; Ojha, Anu; Singh, Harbinder; Sharma, Sahil; Nepali, Kunal

    2017-03-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is a versatile molybdoflavoprotein, widely distributed, occurring in milk, kidney, lung, heart, and vascular endothelium. Catalysis by XO to produce uric acid and reactive oxygen species leads to many diseases. Anti hyperuricemic therapy by xanthine oxidase inhibitors has been mainly employed for the treatment of gout. Area covered: This review covers the patent literature (2011-2015) and also presents the interesting strategies/rational approaches employed for the design of xanthine oxidase inhibitors reported recently. Expert opinion: Recent literature indicates that various non purine scaffolds have been extensively investigated for xanthine oxidase inhibition. The significant potential endowed by heteroaryl based compounds, in particularly fused heterocycles clearly highlights their clinical promise and the need for detailed investigation. Studies by various research groups have also revealed that the flavone framework is open for isosteric replacements and structural modifications for yielding potent non purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors. In addition, various plant extracts recently reported to possess significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory potential presents enough promise to initiate a screening program for the identification of other plant extracts and phytoconstituents possessing inhibitory potential towards the enzyme.

  14. Development, optimization and biological evaluation of chitosan scaffold formulations of new xanthine derivatives for treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupascu, Florentina Geanina; Dash, Mamoni; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Dubruel, Peter; Lupusoru, Catalina Elena; Lupusoru, Raoul-Vasile; Dragostin, Oana; Profire, Lenuta

    2015-09-18

    New xanthine derivatives as antidiabetic agents were synthesized and new chitosan formulations have been developed in order to improve their biological and pharmacokinetic profile. Their physicochemical properties in terms of particle size, morphology, swelling degree, crystalline state, the loading efficiency as well as in vitro release and biodegradation rate were evaluated. According to the results the optimized formulations have a high drug loading efficiency (more than 70%), small particle size, a good release profile in the simulated biological fluids (the percentage of cumulative release being more than 55%) and improved biodegradation rate in reference with chitosan microparticles. The presence of xanthine derivatives (6, 7) in chitosan microparticles was demonstrated by means of FTIR analysis. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) proved that xanthine derivatives present a crystalline state. The biological evaluation assays confirmed the antioxidant and antidiabetic effects of the xanthine derivatives (6, 7) and their chitosan formulations (CS-6, CS-7). Xanthine derivative 6 showed a high antiradical scavenging effect (DPPH remaining=41.78%). It also reduced the glucose blood level with 59.30% and recorded level of glycosylated hemoglobin was 4.53%. The effect of its chitosan formulation (CS-6) on the level of blood glucose (114.5mg/dl) was even more intense than the one recorded by pioglitazone (148.5mg/dl) when used as standard antidiabetic drug. These results demonstrated the potential application of xanthine derivative 6 and its chitosan formulation (CS-6) in the treatment of the diabetes mellitus syndrome.

  15. Inhibitory effects of cardols and related compounds on superoxide anion generation by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuoka, Noriyoshi; Nihei, Ken-ichi; Maeta, Ayami; Yamagiwa, Yoshiro; Kubo, Isao

    2015-01-01

    5-Pentadecatrienylresorcinol, isolated from cashew nuts and commonly known as cardol (C₁₅:₃), prevented the generation of superoxide radicals catalysed by xanthine oxidase without the inhibition of uric acid formation. The inhibition kinetics did not follow the Michelis-Menten equation, but instead followed the Hill equation. Cardol (C₁₀:₀) also inhibited superoxide anion generation, but resorcinol and cardol (C₅:₀) did not inhibit superoxide anion generation. The related compounds 3,5-dihydroxyphenyl alkanoates and alkyl 2,4-dihydroxybenzoates, had more than a C9 chain, cooperatively inhibited but alkyl 3,5-dihydroxybenzoates, regardless of their alkyl chain length, did not inhibit the superoxide anion generation. These results suggested that specific inhibitors for superoxide anion generation catalysed by xanthine oxidase consisted of an electron-rich resorcinol group and an alkyl chain having longer than C9 chain.

  16. Novel insights into the inhibitory mechanism of kaempferol on xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yajie; Zhang, Guowen; Pan, Junhui; Gong, Deming

    2015-01-21

    Xanthine oxidase (XO), a key enzyme in purine catabolism, is widely distributed in human tissues. It can catalyze xanthine to generate uric acid and cause hyperuricemia and gout. Inhibition kinetics assay showed that kaempferol inhibited XO activity reversibly in a competitive manner. Strong fluorescence quenching and conformational changes of XO were found due to the formation of a kaempferol-XO complex, which was driven mainly by hydrophobic forces. The molecular docking further revealed that kaempferol inserted into the hydrophobic cavity of XO to interact with some amino acid residues. The main inhibition mechanism of kaempferol on XO activity may be due to the insertion of kaempferol into the active site of XO occupying the catalytic center of the enzyme to avoid the entrance of the substrate and inducing conformational changes of XO. In addition, luteolin exhibited a stronger synergistic effect with kaempferol than did morin at the lower concentration.

  17. Extraction optimization of polyphenols, antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities from Prunus salicina Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin LI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Optimization of polyphenols extraction from plum (Prunus salicina Lindl. was evaluated using response surface methodology. The Box-Behnken experimental results showed the optimal conditions involved an extraction temperature of 59 °C, a sonication time of 47 min, and an ethanol concentration of 61% respectively. The maximum extraction yield of total polyphenols was 44.74 mg gallic acid equivalents per gram of dried plum at optimal conditions. Polyphenol extracts exhibited stronger antioxidant activities than Vc by evaluating of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and hydroxyl radical scavenging activity. Furthermore, polyphenol extracts (IC50 = 179 g/mL showed obvious inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase. These findings suggest that polyphenol extracts from P. salicina can be potentially used as natural antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory agents.

  18. Serum xanthine oxidase profile in stressed Marwari sheep from arid tracts in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maan R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was aimed to determine serum xanthine oxidase profile in stressed Marwari breed of sheep belonging to arid tracts in Rajasthan, India. Extreme hot and cold ambiences were considered as stress conditions to the animals. Blood samples were collected to obtain sera during moderate, extreme hot and cold ambiences. The mean value of serum xanthine oxidase during moderate ambience was 93.33±1.11 mU L-1.The mean value of serum xanthine oxidase was significantly (p≤0.05higher during hot and significantly (p≤0.05 lower during cold ambiences as compared to moderate mean value serving as control. The sex and age effects were significant (p≤0.05 in all ambiences. The mean values were significantly (p≤0.05 higher in males than females. In each ambience the age effect showed a significant (p≤0.05 increase in the mean values being highest in the animals of 2.5-4.5 years of age. The effects of extreme ambiences were observed on the male and female animals of all age groups as revealed by various interactions studied viz. ambience X age; ambience X sex and age X sex (p≤0.01. Further sex effect was present in the animals of each age group. It can be concluded that serum xanthine oxidase can be used as an effective marker to assess oxidative stress in these animals. Mean values obtained from large number of animals during moderate ambience will help in providing physiological reference values for future research and clinical interpretations.

  19. CSF xanthine, homovanillic acid, and their ratio as biomarkers of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeWitt, Peter; Schultz, Lonni; Auinger, Peggy; Lu, Mei

    2011-08-23

    Diminished nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotransmission is a biochemical hallmark of Parkinson's disease. Despite this, a reliable trait biomarker of sporadic Parkinson's disease has not emerged from measurements of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine metabolites. Previous studies have highlighted strong neurochemical relationships between dopamine and various purine compounds. In this study, we analyzed cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid (the major catabolite of dopamine) and the purine compound xanthine for a comparison of 217 unmedicated Parkinson's disease subjects and 26 healthy controls. These compounds were highly correlated for both the Parkinson's disease subjects (r=0.68) and for controls (r=0.73; both groups, pParkinson's disease from controls, their ratio did. For controls, the mean [xanthine]/[homovanillic acid] quotient was 13.1±5.5 as compared to the Parkinson's disease value of 17.4±6.7 at an initial lumbar CSF collection (p=0.0017), and 19.7±8.7 (pParkinson's disease subjects differed as a function of disease severity, as measured by the sum of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Activities of Daily Living and Motor Exam ratings. The [xanthine]/[homovanillic acid] ratio also increased between the first and second CSF collections, suggesting that this quotient provides both a state and trait biomarker of Parkinson's disease. These observations add to other neurochemical evidence that links purine metabolism to Parkinson's disease.

  20. Vibrational spectral investigation on xanthine and its derivatives--theophylline, caffeine and theobromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, S; Sankari, G; Ponnusamy, S

    2005-01-01

    A normal coordinate analysis has been carried out on four compounds having a similar ring structure with different side chain substitutions, which are xanthine, caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine. Xanthine is chemically known as 2,6-dihydroxy purine. Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine are methylated xanthines. Considering the methyl groups as point mass, the number of normal modes of vibrations can be distributed as Gamma(vib) = 27 A' + 12 A" based on C(s) point group symmetry associated with the structures. In the present work 15 A' and 12 A'' normal modes are considered. A new set of orthonormal symmetry co-ordinates have been constructed. Wilson's F-G matrix method has been adopted for the normal coordinate analysis. A satisfactory vibrational band assignment has been made by employing the FTIR and FT Raman spectra of the compounds. The potential energy distribution is calculated with the arrived values of the force constants and hence the agreement of the frequency assignment has been checked.

  1. Xanthine oxidase/laponite nanoparticles immobilized on glassy carbon electrode: direct electron transfer and multielectrocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Dan; Wang, Yan-Na; Xue, Huai-Guo; Cosnier, Serge; Ding, Shou-Nian

    2009-08-15

    In this work, colloidal laponite nanoparticles were further expanded into the design of the third-generation biosensor. Direct electrochemistry of the complex molybdoenzyme xanthine oxidase (XnOx) immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by laponite nanoparticles was investigated for the first time. XnOx/laponite thin film modified electrode showed only one pair of well defined and reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks attributed to XnOx-FAD cofactor at about -0.370 V vs. SCE (pH 5). The formal potential of XnOx-FAD/FADH(2) couple varied linearly with the increase of pH in the range of 4.0-8.0 with a slope of -54.3 mV pH(-1), which indicated that two-proton transfer was accompanied with two-electron transfer in the electrochemical reaction. More interestingly, the immobilized XnOx retained its biological activity well and displayed an excellent electrocatalytic performance to both the oxidation of xanthine and the reduction of nitrate. The electrocatalytic response showed a linear dependence on the xanthine concentration ranging from 3.9 x 10(-8) to 2.1 x 10(-5)M with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-8)M based on S/N=3.

  2. Determination of the base composition of deoxyribonucleic acid by measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, J. T. O.

    1967-01-01

    A method is described for determination of the base composition (as guanine+cytosine or adenine+thymine content) of DNA by accurate measurement of the adenine/guanine ratio. The DNA is hydrolysed with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid for 40min. to release the purines. The hydrolysate is subjected to ion-exchange chromatography on Zeo-Karb 225. Apurinic acids are eluted with 0·03n-hydrochloric acid and then guanine and adenine are eluted separately with 2n-hydrochloric acid. Guanine and adenine are each collected as a single fraction, and the amount of base in each case is determined by measuring the volume and the extinction at suitable wavelengths. For use in the calculations, millimolar extinction coefficients in 2n-hydrochloric acid of 12·09 for adenine at 262mμ, and 10·77 for guanine at 248mμ, were determined with authentic samples of bases. The method gives extremely reproducible results: from 12 determinations with calf thymus DNA the adenine/guanine molar ratio had a standard deviation of 0·011; this corresponds to a standard deviation in guanine+cytosine content of 0·2% guanine+cytosine. PMID:5626094

  3. Bronchodilator activity of xanthine derivatives substituted with functional groups at the 1- or 7-position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Yamamoto, Y; Kurita, M; Sakai, R; Konno, K; Sanae, F; Ohshima, T; Takagi, K; Hasegawa, T; Iwasaki, N

    1993-05-14

    Xanthine derivatives with several functional groups at the 1- or 7-position were synthesized, and their pharmacological activities in guinea pigs were studied. In general, the in vitro tracheal relaxant action and positive chronotropic action of 3-propylxanthines were increased by substitutions with nonpolar functional groups at the 1-position, but decreased by any substitution at the 7-position. On the other hand, because positive chronotropic actions of substituents with allyl, aminoalkyl, alkoxyalkyl, and normal alkyl groups were much less than tracheal muscle became very high with substitutions of 3'-butenyl, (dimethylamino)ethyl, 2'-ethoxyethyl, 3'-methoxypropyl, and n-propyl groups at the 1-position and of 2'-ethoxyethyl, 2'-oxopropyl, and n-propyl groups at the 7-position, compared with theophylline and the corresponding unsubstituted xanthines, 3-propylxanthine and 1-methyl-3-propylxanthine. When compounds were intraduodenally administered to the guinea pig, 1-(2'-ethoxyethyl)-, 1-(3'-methoxypropyl)-, 1-(3'-butenyl)-, and 1-[(dimethylamino)-ethyl]-3-propylxanthines, 1-methyl-7-(2'-oxopropyl)-3-propylxanthine, and denbufylline (1,3-di-n-butyl-7-(2'-oxopropyl)xanthine) effectively inhibited the acetylcholine-induced bronchospasm without heart stimulation or central nervous system-stimulation at the effective dosage range. Particularly, the bronchodilatory effect of 1-(2'-ethoxyethyl)-3-propylxanthine was much stronger and more continuous than those of theophylline and pentoxifylline. On the other hand, there were certain relationships among the in vitro tracheal relaxant activities of these compounds, their affinities for adenosine (A1) receptors in the brain membrane, and their inhibition of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the tracheal muscle. The affinity for A2 receptors of these compounds was very low or negligible. This suggests that both the action on A1 receptors or interaction with adenosine and the cyclic AMP-PDE inhibitory activity contribute

  4. Deficiency of the purine metabolic gene HPRT dysregulates microRNA-17 family cluster and guanine-based cellular functions: a role for EPAC in Lesch-Nyhan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibinga, Ghiabe-Henri; Murray, Fiona; Barron, Nikki; Pandori, William; Hrustanovic, Gorjan

    2013-11-15

    Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the purine metabolic enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). A series of motor, cognitive and neurobehavioral anomalies characterize this disease phenotype, which is still poorly understood. The clinical manifestations of this syndrome are believed to be the consequences of deficiencies in neurodevelopmental pathways that lead to disordered brain function. We have used microRNA array and gene ontology analysis to evaluate the gene expression of differentiating HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines. We set out to identify dysregulated genes implicated in purine-based cellular functions. Our approach was based on the premise that HPRT deficiency affects preeminently the expression and the function of purine-based molecular complexes, such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and small GTPases. We found that several microRNAs from the miR-17 family cluster and genes encoding GEF are dysregulated in HPRT deficiency. Most notably, our data show that the expression of the exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is blunted in HPRT-deficient human neuron-like cell lines and fibroblast cells from LNS patients, and is altered in the cortex, striatum and midbrain of HPRT knockout mouse. We also show a marked impairment in the activation of small GTPase RAP1 in the HPRT-deficient cells, as well as differences in cytoskeleton dynamics that lead to increased motility for HPRT-deficient neuron-like cell lines relative to control. We propose that the alterations in EPAC/RAP1 signaling and cell migration in HPRT deficiency are crucial for neuro-developmental events that may contribute to the neurological dysfunctions in LNS.

  5. Construction and application of an amperometric xanthine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanoparticles-polypyrrole composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Rooma; Thakur, Manish; Pundir, C S

    2011-04-15

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) were synthesized from zinc nitrate by simple and efficient method in aqueous media at 55°C without any requirement of calcinations step. A mixture of ZnO-NPs and pyrrole was eletropolymerized on Pt electrode to form a ZnO-NPs-polypyrrole (PPy) composite film. Xanthine oxidase (XOD) was immobilized onto this nanocomposite film through physiosorption. The ZnO-NPs/polypyrrole/Pt electrode was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) before and after immobilization of XOD. The XOD/ZnO-NPs-PPy/Pt electrode as working electrode, Ag/AgCl as reference electrode and Pt wire as auxiliary electrode were connected through a potentiostat to construct a xanthine biosensor. The biosensor exhibited optimum response within 5s at pH 7.0, 35°C and linearity from 0.8 μM to 40 μM for xanthine with a detection limit 0.8 μM (S/E=3). Michaelis Menten constant (K(m)) for xanthine oxidase was 13.51 μM and I(max) 0.071 μA. The biosensor measured xanthine in fish meat and lost 40% of its initial activity after its 200 uses over 100 days, when stored at 4°C.

  6. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peifer Susanne

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1. Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1 derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization.

  7. Application of Ammonium Persulfate for Selective Oxidation of Guanines for Nucleic Acid Sequencing

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    Yafen Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acids can be sequenced by a chemical procedure that partially damages the nucleotide positions at their base repetition. Many methods have been reported for the selective recognition of guanine. The accurate identification of guanine in both single and double regions of DNA and RNA remains a challenging task. Herein, we present a new, non-toxic and simple method for the selective recognition of guanine in both DNA and RNA sequences via ammonium persulfate modification. This strategy can be further successfully applied to the detection of 5-methylcytosine by using PCR.

  8. Spectroscopic evidence of xanthine compounds fluorescence quenching effect on water-soluble porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarska-Bialokoz, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    The formation of π-stacked complexes between water-soluble porphyrins: 4,4‧,4″,4″‧-(21H,23H-porphine-5,10,15,20-tetrayl)tetrakis-(benzoic acid) (H2TCPP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-21H,23H-porphine (H2TPPS4), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis[4-(trimethylammonio)phenyl]-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TTMePP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)-21H,23H-porphine tetra-p-tosylate (H2TMePyP), the Cu(II) complexes of H2TTMePP and H2TMePyP, as well as chlorophyll a with xanthine, theophylline (1,3-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) has been studied analysing their absorption and steady-state fluorescence spectra in aqueous (or acetone in case of chlorophyll a) solution. During titration by the compounds from xanthine group the bathochromic effect in the porphyrin absorption spectra as well as the hypochromicity of the porphyrin Soret maximum can be noticed. The fluorescence quenching effect observed during interactions in the systems examined suggests the process of static quenching. The association and fluorescence quenching constants are of the order of magnitude of 103 - 102 mol-1. The results obtained show that xanthine and its derivatives can quench the fluorescence of the porphyrins according to the number of methyl groups in the molecule of quencher.

  9. The extraordinary specificity of xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase from Bacillus subtilis elucidated by reaction kinetics, ligand binding, and crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arent, Susan; Kadziola, Anders; Larsen, Sine

    2006-01-01

    (X)GPRTases with respect to sequence, PRPP binding motif, and oligomeric structure. They are more related with the PurR repressor of Gram-positive bacteria, the adenine PRTase, and orotate PRTase. The catalytic function and high specificity for xanthine of B. subtilis XPRTase were investigated by ligand binding studies...... related to a few key residues in the active site. Asn27 can in different orientations form hydrogen bonds to an amino group or an oxo group at the 2-position of the purine base, and Lys156 is positioned to make a hydrogen bond with N7. This and the absence of a catalytic carboxylate group near the N7......Xanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (XPRTase) from Bacillus subtilis is a representative of the highly xanthine specific XPRTases found in Gram-positive bacteria. These XPRTases constitute a distinct subclass of 6-oxopurine PRTases, which deviate strongly from the major class of H...

  10. A novel colorimetric method based on copper nanoclusters with intrinsic peroxidase-like for detecting xanthine in serum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhengyu; Niu, Qianqian; Mou, Mingyao; Wu, Yi; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liao, Shenghua

    2017-07-01

    A facile strategy for detecting xanthine in serum samples by copper nanocluster (CuNCs) with high intrinsic peroxidase-like activity was reported. Firstly, a simple, mild and time-saving method for preparing CuNCs was developed, in which dithiothreitol (DTT) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were used as reductant and stabilizer, respectively. The as-prepared CuNCs exhibited a fluorescence emission at 590 nm with a quantum yield (QY) of approximately 5.29%, the fluorescence intensity of the as-prepared CuNCs exhibited no considerable change when stored under ambient condition with the lifetime is 1.75 μs. Moreover, the as-prepared CuNCs exhibited high intrinsic peroxidase-like activity with lower K m ( K m = 8.90 × 10-6 mol L-1) for H2O2, which indicated that CuNCs have a higher affinity for H2O2. Compared with natural enzyme, the as-synthesized CuNCs are more catalytic stable over a wide range of pH (4.0 13.0) and temperature (4 80 °C). Finally, an indirect method for sensing xanthine was established because xanthine oxidase can catalyse the oxidation of xanthine to produce H2O2. Xanthine could be detected as low as 3.8 × 10-7 mol L-1 with a linear range from 5.0 × 10-7 to 1.0 × 10-4 mol L-1. These results proved that the proposed method is sensitive and accurate and could be successfully applied to the determination of xanthine in the serum sample with satisfaction.

  11. Expression systems for industrial Gram-positive bacteria with low guanine and cytosine content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Willem M. de; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    1997-01-01

    Recent years have seen an increase in the development of gene expression systems for industrial Gram-positive bacteria with low guanine and cytosine content that belong to the genera Bacillus, Clostridium, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus. In particular, considerable

  12. G-quartet type self-assembly of guanine functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prabhpreet; Venkatesh, V.; Nagapradeep, N.; Verma, Sandeep; Bianco, Alberto

    2012-03-01

    The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy.The simple strategy of linking guanine to single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through covalent functionalization permitted generation of the alignment of the nanotubes into lozenges reminiscent of guanine quartets (G-quartets) in the presence of potassium ions as observed by atomic force microscopy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the synthesis and characterization of the precursors and MWCNT conjugates. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11849a

  13. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

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    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  14. Fluorescence enhancement of DNA-silver nanoclusters from guanine proximity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Hsin-chih [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sharma, Jaswinder [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Hyojong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Jennifer S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Oligonucleotide-templated, silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a versatile set of fluorophores and have already been used for live cell imaging, detection of specific metal ions, and single-nucleotide variation identification. Compared to commonly used organic dyes, these fluorescent nanoclusters have much better photostability and are often a few times brighter. Owing to their small size, simple preparation, and biocompatibility (i.e. made of nontoxic metals), DNA/Ag NCs should find more applications in biological imaging and chemical detection in the years to come. While clearly promising as new fluorophores, DNA/Ag NCs possess a unique and poorly understood dynamic process not shared by organic dyes or photoluminescent nanocrystals - the conversion among different NC species due to silver oxidation/reduction or NC regrouping. While this environmental sensitivity can be viewed as a drawback, in the appropriate context, it can be used as a sensor or reporter. Often reversible, conversions among different NC species have been found to depend upon a number of factors, including time, temperature, oxygen and salt content. In this communication, we report significant fluorescence enhancement of DNA/Ag NCs via interactions with guanine-rich DNA sequences. Moreover, we demonstrated this property can be used for sensitive detection of specific target DNA from a human oncogene (i.e. Braf gene).

  15. Generation of Guanine – Thymidine Cross-links in DNA by Peroxynitrite/Carbon Dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, is an important chemical mediator of inflammation. In aqueous solutions, it rapidly decomposes to the reactive species CO3•− and •NO2 radicals that are known to initiate the selective oxidation and nitration of guanine in DNA. We have previously demonstrated that the reactions of carbonate radical anions with guanine in 2′-deoxyoligoribonucleotides generate a previously unknown intrastrand cross-linked gu...

  16. Guanine-06 methylation reduces the reactivity of d(GpG) towards platinum complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struik, A F; Zuiderwijk, C T; van Boom, J H; Elding, L I; Reedijk, J

    1991-12-01

    6-methylated guanine dinucleotides were used to study the influence of hydrogen bonding on the specific binding of the antitumor drug cDDP, cis-PtCl2(NH3)2, to DNA. In this interaction, the guanine-06 site appears to be important in explaining the preference for a pGpG-N7(1),N7(2) chelate, which results from H-bridge formation with the ammine ligand of cDDP. Guanine-06 methylated dinucleotides and the nonmodified dinucleotides were reacted with [Pt(dien)Cl]+, cis-PtCl2(NH3)2, and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(H2O)2]2+ and the reaction products were characterized by 1H NMR using pH titrations. Methylation at guanine-06 clearly reduces the preference for the guanine. In competition experiments monitored by NMR and experiments using UV spectrophotometry a decreasing reactivity towards [Pt(dien)(H2O)]2+ and cis-[Pt(NH3)2(H2O)2]2+ was found, in the order of d(GpG) greater than d(GomepG) greater than d(GpGome) greater than d(GomepGome). The difference in reactivity between 5' guanine methylation and 3' guanine methylation is ascribed to differences in the H-bond formation with the backbone phosphate. The resulting reduced stacking of the bases in both modified dinucleotides, compared to the bases in d(GpG), results in a preference for the 3' guanine over 5'.

  17. Theoretical Study of Hydrated Cd~(2+) Interactions with Guanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 洒荣建; 吴克琛; 李巧红; 韦永勤

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical study was performed to investigate how the hydration of cadmium ca-tion influences the structure and properties of guanine.The aqueous environment was simulated by both explicit solvent(1-5 water molecules) model and implicit solvent model.For complexes in which Cd2+ attached to the N(7) and O(6) sites of guanine,energy analysis together with the Natural Bonding Orbital(NBO) analysis were performed to elucidate the bonding characteristics in detail.The most stable structures are penta-coordinate complexes without aqua ligand located at the guanine site.Higher number of water ligands corresponds to higher stabilization energies.Average bonding energies of G-Cd increase with the number of water molecules.Bonding energies of water ligands depend on its position in the complexes.The charge distribution of guanine changed with increasing the number of water ligands,which may also influence the base-pairing pattern of guanine.There is positive charge transfer from guanine to aqua ligand as the number of the hydration waters increases.IEFPCM optimization has results comparable to the [CdG(H2O)5]2+ structure 5a.

  18. Catalase, carbonic anhydrase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with mycosis fungoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Beyaztas, Serap; Gokce, Basak; Arslan, Oktay; Guler, Ozen Ozensoy

    2015-04-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) is the most common form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. In several studies the relationship between catalase (CAT), human cytosolic carbonic anhydrases (CA; hCA-I and hCA-II) and xanthine oxidase (XO) enzyme activities have been investigated in various types of cancers but carbonic anhydrase, catalase and xanthine oxidase activities in patients with MF have not been previously reported. Therefore, in this preliminary study we aim to investigate CAT, CA and XO activities in patients with MF. This study enrolled 32 patients with MF and 26 healthy controls. According to the results, CA and CAT activities were significantly lower in patients with mycosis fungoides than controls (p < 0.001) (p < 0.001). There was no significant difference in XO activity between patient and control group (p = 0.601). Within these findings, we believe these enzyme activity levels might be a potentially important finding as an additional diagnostic biochemical tool for MF.

  19. Study of potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors: In silico and in vitro biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuswamy Umamaheswari

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to develop potent anti gout agents, coumarin derivatives and polyphenolic compounds were selected for present study. The docking energy of 2-benzyl coumarin was found to be -7.50 kcal/mol which was less than that of the standard allopurinol (-4.47 kcal/mol. All the selected compounds were found to exhibit lower binding energy (-7.50 to -4.68 kcal/mol than allopurinol. Docking results confirm that selected compounds showed greater inhibition of xanthine oxidase due to their active binding sites. In xanthine oxidase assay, IC50 value of 2-benzyl coumarin was found to be 26 ± 1.16 µg/mL, whereas that of allopurinol was 24 ± 0.28 µg/mL. All the compounds exhibited IC50 values ranging between 26 ± 1.16 to 58 ± 0.74 µg/mL. In enzyme kinetic studies, coumarin derivatives showed competitive and polyphenolic compounds showed non competitive type of enzyme inhibition. It can be concluded that coumarin derivatives could be a remedy for the treatment of gout and related inflammatory disorders.

  20. Xanthine oxidase/tyrosinase inhibiting, antioxidant, and antifungal oxindole alkaloids from Isatis costata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ijaz; Ijaz, Fozia; Fatima, Itrat; Ahmad, Nisar; Chen, Shilin; Afza, Nighat; Malik, Abdul

    2010-06-01

    Phytochemical investigations on the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the whole plant of Isatis costata Linn. (Brassicaseae) led to the isolation of the oxindole alkaloids costinones A (1), B (2), isatinones A (3), B (4), indirubin (5), and trisindoline (6). Compounds 1-6 displayed significant to moderate inhibition against xanthine oxidase enzyme with IC50 values ranging from 90.3+/-0.06 to 179.6+/-0.04 microM, whereas the standard inhibitor of xanthine oxidase (allopurinol) had an IC(50) value of 7.4+/-0.07 microM. Compounds 1 (IC50 7.21+/-0.05 microM), 2 (IC50 9.40+/-0.03 microM), 3 (IC50 11.51+/-0.07 microM), 4 (IC50 12.53+/-0.06 microM), 5 (IC50 14.29+/-0.09 microM), and 6 (IC50 17.34+/-0.04 microM) exhibited pronounced activities when compared with the standard tyrosinase inhibitor L-mimosine (IC50 3.70+/-0.03 microM), along with DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 226, 270, 300, 320, 401, and 431 microM, respectively. The crude extract and compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 showed significant antifungal activity against Trichophyton schoen leinii, Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Trichophyton simii, and Macrophomina phaseolina.

  1. Xanthine oxidase mediates hypoxia-inducible factor-2α degradation by intermittent hypoxia.

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    Jayasri Nanduri

    Full Text Available Sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apnea produces chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH. We previously reported that IH leads to down-regulation of HIF-2α protein via a calpain-dependent signaling pathway resulting in oxidative stress. In the present study, we delineated the signaling pathways associated with calpain-dependent HIF-2α degradation in cell cultures and rats subjected to chronic IH. Reactive oxygen species (ROS scavengers prevented HIF-2α degradation by IH and ROS mimetic decreased HIF-2α protein levels in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell cultures, suggesting that ROS mediate IH-induced HIF-2α degradation. IH activated xanthine oxidase (XO by increased proteolytic conversion of xanthine dehydrogenase to XO. ROS generated by XO activated calpains, which contributed to HIF-2α degradation by IH. Calpain-induced HIF-2α degradation involves C-terminus but not the N-terminus of the HIF-2α protein. Pharmacological blockade as well as genetic knock down of XO prevented IH induced calpain activation and HIF-2α degradation in PC12 cells. Systemic administration of allopurinol to rats prevented IH-induced hypertension, oxidative stress and XO activation in adrenal medulla. These results demonstrate that ROS generated by XO activation mediates IH-induced HIF-2α degradation via activation of calpains.

  2. A QM/QTAIM microstructural analysis of the tautomerisationviathe DPT of the hypoxanthine·adenine nucleobase pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O.; Zhurakivsky, Roman O.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2014-08-01

    We provide a pathway for the tautomerisation of the biologically important hypoxanthine.adenine (Hyp.Ade) nucleobase pair (Cs) formed by the keto tautomer of the Hyp and the amino tautomer of the Ade into the Hyp*.Ade* base pair (Cs) formed by the enol tautomer of the Hyp and the imino tautomer of the Ade by applying quantum-mechanical calculations and Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules analysis. It was found out that the dipole active Hyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* tautomerisation occurs via the asynchronous concerted double proton transfer (DPT) through the TSHyp.Ade↔Hyp*.Ade* (Cs). Based on the sweeps of the energies of the intermolecular H-bonds along the intrinsic reaction coordinate, it was established that the N6H...O6 H-bond (5.40) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (6.99) in the Hyp.Ade base pair, as well as the O6H...N6 H-bond (11.50) is cooperative with the N1H...N1 H-bond (7.28 kcal.mol-1) in the Hyp*.Ade* base pair, mutually strengthening each other. The Hyp*.Ade* base pair possesses an extremely short lifetime 2.68.10-14 s, which is predetermined by the negative value of the Gibbs free energy of the reverse barrier of its tautomerisation, and all of the six low-frequency intermolecular vibrations cannot develop during this period of time. Consequently, the Hyp.Ade→Hyp*.Ade* DPT tautomerisation cannot serve as a source of the rare tautomers of the bases.

  3. Inhibition of calcineurin by FK506 stimulates germinal vesicle breakdown of mouse oocytes in hypoxanthine-supplemented medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhen, Yan-Hong; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Cao, Jing; Wang, Yan-Ling

    2017-01-01

    Calcineurin (CN) is a serine/threonine phosphatase which plays important roles in meiosis maturation in invertebrate oocytes; however, the role of CN in mouse oocytes is relatively unexplored. In this study, we examined the expression, localization and functional roles of CN in mouse oocytes and granulosa cells. The RT-PCR results showed that the β isoform of calcineurin A subunit (Cn A) expressed significantly higher than α and γ isoforms, and the expression of Cn Aβ mRNA obviously decreased in oocytes in which germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) occurred, while only B1 of calcineurin B subunit (Cn B) was detected in oocytes and stably expressed during oocytes maturation. The following fluorescence experiment showed that Cn A was mainly located in the nucleus of germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes and gruanlosa cells, and subsequently dispersed into the entire cytoplasm after GVBD. The decline of Cn A in oocytes suggested that it may play an important role in GVBD. To further clarify the role of calcineurin during meiotic maturation, FK506 (a calcineurin inhibitor) was used in the culture medium contained hypoxanthine (HX) which could keep mouse oocytes staying at GV stage. As expected, FK506 could induce a significant elevation of GVBD rate and increase the MPF level of denuded oocytes (DOs). Furthermore, FK506 could also play an induction role of GVBD of oocytes in COCs and follicles, and the process could be counteracted by MAPK kinase inhibitor (U0126). Above all, the results implied that calcineurin might play a crucial role in development of mouse oocytes and MPF and MAPK pathways are involved in this process. PMID:28243539

  4. Thermal properties of milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins in pulsed electric field-treated bovine whole milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Oey, Indrawati; Everett, David W

    2016-09-15

    Thermodynamics of milk components (milk fat, xanthine oxidase, caseins and whey proteins) in pulsed electric field (PEF)-treated milk were compared with thermally treated milk (63 °C for 30 min and 73 °C for 15s). PEF treatments were applied at 20 or 26 kV cm(-1) for 34 μs with or without pre-heating of milk (55 °C for 24s), using bipolar square wave pulses in a continuous mode of operation. PEF treatments did not affect the final temperatures of fat melting (Tmelting) or xanthine oxidase denaturation (Tdenaturation), whereas thermal treatments increased both the Tmelting of milk fat and the Tdenaturation for xanthine oxidase by 2-3 °C. Xanthine oxidase denaturation was ∼13% less after PEF treatments compared with the thermal treatments. The enthalpy change (ΔH of denaturation) of whey proteins decreased in the treated-milk, and denaturation increased with the treatment intensity. New endothermic peaks in the calorimetric thermograms of treated milk revealed the formation of complexes due to interactions between MFGM (milk fat globule membrane) proteins and skim milk proteins. Evidence for the adsorption of complexes onto the MFGM surface was obtained from the increase in surface hydrophobicity of proteins, revealing the presence of unfolded hydrophobic regions.

  5. Synthesis and bioevaluation of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acids as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qi; Cheng, Zengjin; Ma, Xiaoxue; Wang, Lijie; Feng, Dongjie; Cui, Yuanhang; Bao, Kai; Wu, Lan; Zhang, Weige

    2014-10-06

    A series of 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid derivatives (8a-f, 9a-m) were synthesized and evaluated for inhibitory activity against xanthine oxidase in vitro. Structure-activity relationship analyses have also been presented. Most of the target compounds exhibited potency levels in the nanomolar range. Compound 9e emerged as the most potent xanthine oxidase inhibitor (IC50 = 5.5 nM) in comparison to febuxostat (IC50 = 18.6 nM). Steady-state kinetics measurements with the bovine milk enzyme indicated a mixed type inhibition with Ki and Ki' values of 0.9 and 2.3 nM, respectively. A molecular modeling study on compounds 9e was performed to gain an insight into its binding mode with xanthine oxidase, and to provide the basis for further structure-guided design of new non-purine xanthine oxidase inhibitors related with 2-phenyl-4-methyl-1,3-selenazole-5-carboxylic acid scaffold.

  6. QM/MM studies of xanthine oxidase: variations of cofactor, substrate, and active-site Glu802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Sebastian; Thiel, Walter

    2010-01-28

    In continuation of our previous QM/MM study on the reductive half-reaction of wild-type xanthine oxidase, we consider the effects of variations in the cofactor, the substrate, and the active-site Glu802 residue on the reaction mechanism. Replacement of the sulfido ligand in the natural cofactor by an oxo ligand leads to a substantial increase in the computed barriers, consistent with the experimentally observed inactivity of this modified cofactor, whereas the selenido form is predicted to have lower barriers and hence higher activity. For the substrate 2-oxo-6-methylpurine, the calculated pathways for three different tautomers show great similarity to those found previously for xanthine, contrary to claims in the literature that the mechanisms for these two substrates are different. Compared with the wild-type enzyme, the conversion of xanthine to uric acid follows a somewhat different pathway in the Glu802 --> Gln mutant which exhibits a lower overall activity, in agreement with recently published kinetic data. The present results confirm the basic stepwise reaction mechanism and the orientation of the substrate that has been proposed in our previous QM/MM work on aldehyde oxidoreductase and xanthine oxidase.

  7. Increased xanthine oxidase-related ROS production and TRPV1 synthesis preceding DOMS post-eccentric exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retamoso, Leandro T; Silveira, Mauro E P; Lima, Frederico D; Busanello, Guilherme L; Bresciani, Guilherme; Ribeiro, Leandro R; Chagas, Pietro M; Nogueira, Cristina W; Braga, Ana Claudia M; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro S; Fighera, Michele R; Royes, Luiz Fernando F

    2016-05-01

    It is well-known that unaccustomed exercise, especially eccentric exercise, is associated to delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Whether DOMS is associated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is still an open question. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between TRPV1 and xanthine oxidase-related ROS production in muscle and DOMS after a bout of eccentric exercise. Male Wistar rats performed a downhill running exercise on a treadmill at a -16° tilt and a constant speed for 90min (5min/bout separated by 2min of rest). Mechanical allodynia and grip force tests were performed before and 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48 and 72h after the downhill running. Biochemical assays probing oxidative stress, purine degradation, xanthine oxidase activity, Ca(2+) ATPase activity and TRPV1 protein content were performed in gastrocnemius muscle at 12, 24, and 48h after the downhill running. Our statistical analysis showed an increase in mechanical allodynia and a loss of strength after the downhill running. Similarly, an increase in carbonyl, xanthine oxidase activity, uric acid levels and TRPV1 immunoreactivity were found 12h post-exercise. On the other hand, Ca(2+) ATPase activity decreased in all analyzed times. Our results suggest that a possible relationship between xanthine oxidase-related ROS and TRPV1 may exist during the events preceding eccentric exercise-related DOMS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel riboswitch ligand analogs as selective inhibitors of guanine-related metabolic pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Mulhbacher

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Riboswitches are regulatory elements modulating gene expression in response to specific metabolite binding. It has been recently reported that riboswitch agonists may exhibit antimicrobial properties by binding to the riboswitch domain. Guanine riboswitches are involved in the regulation of transport and biosynthesis of purine metabolites, which are critical for the nucleotides cellular pool. Upon guanine binding, these riboswitches stabilize a 5'-untranslated mRNA structure that causes transcription attenuation of the downstream open reading frame. In principle, any agonistic compound targeting a guanine riboswitch could cause gene repression even when the cell is starved for guanine. Antibiotics binding to riboswitches provide novel antimicrobial compounds that can be rationally designed from riboswitch crystal structures. Using this, we have identified a pyrimidine compound (PC1 binding guanine riboswitches that shows bactericidal activity against a subgroup of bacterial species including well-known nosocomial pathogens. This selective bacterial killing is only achieved when guaA, a gene coding for a GMP synthetase, is under the control of the riboswitch. Among the bacterial strains tested, several clinical strains exhibiting multiple drug resistance were inhibited suggesting that PC1 targets a different metabolic pathway. As a proof of principle, we have used a mouse model to show a direct correlation between the administration of PC1 and the reduction of Staphylococcus aureus infection in mammary glands. This work establishes the possibility of using existing structural knowledge to design novel guanine riboswitch-targeting antibiotics as powerful and selective antimicrobial compounds. Particularly, the finding of this new guanine riboswitch target is crucial as community-acquired bacterial infections have recently started to emerge.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of xanthine oxidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of 2-arylbenzo[b]furan derivatives based on salvianolic acid C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong-Jin; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Yang, Lin; Li, Wei; Li, Jia-Huang; Wang, Jin-Xin; Chen, Jun

    2016-11-29

    Xanthine oxidase (XO) is the key enzyme in humans which is related to a variety of diseases such as gout, hyperuricemia and cardiovascular diseases. In this work, a series of 2-arylbenzo[b]furan derivatives were synthesized based on salvianolic acid C, and they were evaluated for xanthine oxidase inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Compounds 5b, 6a, 6e and 6f showed potent xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 3.99 to 6.36 μM, which were comparable with that of allopurinol. Lineweaver-Burk plots analysis revealed that the representative derivative 6e could bind to either xanthine oxidase or the xanthine oxidase-xanthine complex, which exhibited a mixed-type competitive mechanism. A DPPH radical scavenging assay showed most of the hydroxyl-functionalized 2-arylbenzo[b]furan derivatives possessed the potent antioxidant activity, which was further validated on LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages model. The structure-activity relationships were preliminary analyzed and indicated that the structural skeleton of 2-arylbenzo[b]furan and phenolic hydroxyl groups played an important role in maintaining xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect and antioxidant property for the series of derivatives. Meanwhile, molecular docking studies were performed to further confirm the structure-activity relationships and investigate the proposed binding mechanisms of compounds 5d, 6d and 10d binding to the protein.

  10. Behavior of the guanine base in G-quadruplexes probed by the fluorescent guanine analog, 6-methyl isozanthopterin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Ji Hoon; Chitrapriya, Nataraj; Lee, Hyun Suk; Lee, Young Ae; Kim, Seog K. [Dept. of Chemistry, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Maeng Joon [Dept. of Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this study, circular dichroism (CD) spectrum and fluorescence techniques were used to examine the dynamic properties and microenvironment of the guanine base (G) at the central loop and at the middle of the G-stem of the G-quadruplex formed from the G{sub 3}T{sub 2}G{sub 3}TGTG{sub 3}T{sub 2}G{sub 3} sequence (G-quadruplex 1), in which the G base at the 10th and 13th position were replaced with a fluorescent G analog, 6-methyl isoxanthopterin (6MI) (G-quadruplex 2 and 3, respectively). For all G-quadruplexes, the CD spectrum revealed a positive band at 263 nm and a shoulder at 298 nm, and the thermal melting profiles were the sum of at least two sigmoidal curves. These observations indicated the presence of two conformers in the G-quadruplex. The fluorescence intensity of G-quadruplex 2 was greater than 3, as expected from the extent of stacking interaction, which is larger in the G(6MI)G sequence than the T(6MI)T sequence. The efficiency of fluorescence quenching by the polar acrylamide quencher and negatively charged I− quencher were larger for G-quadruplex 3, suggesting that 6MI in the G(6MI)G stem is exposed more to the aqueous environment compared to that in the T(6MI)T central loop. In the latter case, 6MI may direct to the center of the top G-quartet layer. The possibility of hydrogen bond formation between the carbonyl group of 6MI and the acrylamide of the G-quadruplex 3 was proposed.

  11. Identification of N2-(1-carboxyethyl)guanine (CEG) as a guanine advanced glycosylation end product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papoulis, A; al-Abed, Y; Bucala, R

    1995-01-17

    Reducing sugars such as glucose react nonenzymatically with protein amino groups to initiate a posttranslational modification process known as advanced glycosylation. Nucleotide bases also participate in advanced glycosylation reactions, producing DNA-linked advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs) that cause mutations and DNA transposition. Although several protein-derived AGEs have been isolated and structurally characterized, AGE-modified nucleotides have not yet been reported. We systematically examined the reactivities of the model nucleotide bases 9-methylguanine (9-mG), 9-methyladenine (9-mA), and 1-methylcytosine (1-mC) toward glucose and several glucose-derived reactants. In "fast" reactions performed at refluxing temperature and physiological pH, 1 equiv of nucleotide base was reacted with 10 equiv of D-glucose, D-glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P), D-glucose 6-phosphate/lysine (G-6-P/Lys), the Schiff base 1-n-propylamino-N-D-glucoside (SB), or the Amadori product 1-n-propylamino-N-D-fructose (AP). In every reaction involving 9-mG, N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine (CEmG) was a major product which was produced. N2-(1-carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine also formed from 9-mG and AP in long-term incubations performed at 37 degrees C. Direct treatment of 9-mG with methylglyoxal (MG), a Maillard reaction propagator that forms from the decomposition of AP, also produced CEmG in high yield. N2-(1-Carboxyethyl)-9-methylguanine appears to result from the nucleophilic addition of the primary amino group of guanine to the ketone group of MG followed by an intramolecular rearrangement. Methylglyoxal is a known prokaryotic mutagen and was shown additionally to be mutagenic in a eukaryotic shuttle vector assay system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Apparent affinity of some 8-phenyl-substituted xanthines at adenosine receptors in guinea-pig aorta and atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, M. G.; Jacobson, K. A.; Tomkins, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    1 Some 8-phenyl-substituted, 1,3 dipropyl xanthines have previously been demonstrated to have a 20-400 fold greater affinity for A1 binding sites in rat CNS membranes than for A2 adenosine receptors in intact CNS cells from guinea-pigs. In the present study these compounds (1,3, dipropyl-8-phenylxanthine: DPPX; 1,3 dipropyl-8-(2 amino-4-chlorophenyl) xanthine: PACPX; 8-(4-(2-amino-ethyl)amino) carbonyl methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XAC; and D-Lys-XAC) together with two that have not been reported to exhibit A1-receptor selectively (8-(p-sulphophenyl)theophylline: 8-PST; 8-(4-carboxy methyl oxyphenyl)-1,3-dipropylxanthine: XCC) have been evaluated as antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine in two isolated cardiovascular tissues. 2 The isolated tissues used were guinea-pig atria (bradycardic response) and aorta (relaxation), which are thought to possess A1 and A2 adenosine receptors, respectively. 3 All the xanthines antagonized responses evoked by 2-chloroadenosine in both tissues but did not affect responses evoked by acetylcholine (atria) or sodium nitrite (aorta). 4 The xanthines, 8-PST, XAC, D-Lys XAC, XCC and DPPX appeared to be competitive antagonists of the effects of 2-chloroadenosine, as Schild plot slopes did not differ significantly from unity. The 1,3-dipropyl substituted compounds had pA2 values from 6.5 to 7.4 and were more potent than the 1,3 dimethyl substituted 8-PST (pA2 4.9 to 5). 5 For individual xanthines, there was no difference between pA2 values obtained in the atria and in the aorta.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3664093

  13. Actions of water extract from Cordyceps militaris in hyperuricemic mice induced by potassium oxonate combined with hypoxanthine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Tianqiao; Zhang, Minglong; Chen, Diling; Shuai, Ou; Chen, Shaodan; Su, Jiyan; Jiao, Chunwei; Feng, Delong; Xie, Yizhen

    2016-12-24

    Cordyceps militaris was recorded in the classic traditional Chinese medicine book with the main functions of "protecting liver and enhancing kidney functions", influencing serum uric acid levels. The aim is to investigate the hypouricemic effects and possible mechanism of C. militaris in hyperuricemic mice. A water extract (WECM) was prepared by decocting C. militaris directly at 80 °C in water bath, followed by lyophilization. WECM at 50, 100 and 200mg/kg was orally administered to hyperuricemic mice induced by potassium oxonate and hypoxanthine combinedly and allopurinol (5mg/kg) was served as a positive control. WECM exhibited excellent hypouricemic activity, which could decrease the serum uric acid levels of the hyperuricemic mice (306μmol/L) to 189, 184 and 162μmol/L at different doses respectively (P<0.01), approaching the levels of normal mice (184μmol/L). The urate transporter 1 (URAT1) protein levels of kidney at different doses of WECM were 28.15, 17.43, 9.03pg/mL respectively, much lower than that in the hyperuricemia group (93.45pg/mL, P<0.01); and suggested WECM may interact with URAT1. Docking simulations using modeled structure of URAT1 suggested that LYS145, ARG325, ARG477 and ASP168 of URAT1 are key functional residues of URAT1. Four active compounds in C. militaris were identified and their interaction energies with target were estimated between -200 and -400kcal/mol. These findings suggested that C. militaris produced significant hypouricemic actions and the hypouricemic effects of WECM may be attributed to the inhibitive effect of WECM on URAT1 protein levels. The results of blood urine nitrogen and serum creatinine levels and liver, kidney and spleen coefficients showed that WECM have no negative impacts on liver, renal and spleen functions. The screened four active compounds using molecular docking method deserve further investigation in other work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic heterogeneity within electrophoretic "alleles" of xanthine dehydrogenase in Drosophila pseudoobscura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R S; Lewontin, R C; Felton, A A

    1976-11-01

    An experimental plan for an exhaustive determination of genic variation at structural gene loci is presented. In the initial steps of this program, 146 isochromosomal lines from 12 geographic populations of D. pseudoobscura were examined for allelic variation of xanthine dehydrogenase by the serial use of 4 different electrophoretic conditions and a head stability test. The 5 criteria revealed a total of 37 allelic classes out of the 146 genomes examined where only 6 had been previously revealed by the usual method of gel electrophoresis. This immense increase in genic variation also showed previously unsuspected population differences between the main part of the species distribution and the isolated population of Bogotá population. The average heterozygosity at the Xdh locus is at least 72% in natural populations. This result, together with the very large number of alleles segregating and the pattern of allelic frequencies, has implications for theories of genetic polymorphism which are discussed.

  15. Honey as an apitherapic product: its inhibitory effect on urease and xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate new natural inhibitor sources for the enzymes urease and xanthine oxidase (XO). Chestnut, oak and polyfloral honey extracts were used to determine inhibition effects of both enzymes. In addition to investigate inhibition, the antioxidant capacities of these honeys were determined using total phenolic content (TPC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and DPPH radical scavenging activity assays. Due to their high phenolic content, chestnut and oak honeys are found to be a powerful source for inhibition of both enzymes. Especially, oak honeys were efficient for urease inhibition with 0.012-0.021 g/mL IC50 values, and also chestnut honeys were powerful for XO inhibition with 0.028-0.039 g/mL IC50 values. Regular daily consumption of these honeys can prevent gastric ulcers deriving from Helicobacter pylori and pathological disorders mediated by reactive oxygen species.

  16. Guanine-based structural coloration as an indicator of oxidative stress in a cichlid fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Matthew D; Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2015-07-01

    Vertebrate pigmentation is known to be influenced by oxidative stress, but few studies have tested the hypothesis that structural coloration can be similarly affected. We tested whether fish iridophores, which produce structural color using guanine stacks, might be affected by the prooxidant-antioxidant balance of the animal. Specifically, we hypothesized that convict cichlids (Amatitlania nigrofasciata) metabolize guanine present in iridophores to uric acid, an antioxidant, in response to oxidative damage. We used Hunter's contrast gloss and high performance liquid chromatography to determine whether dietary guanine supplementation allows fish to maintain their structural coloration despite oxidative stress induced via ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation. We found that dietary guanine was associated with greater skin gloss, and that exposure to UV-B light reduced glossiness. UV-B exposure did not increase oxidative damage (acrolein) or total antioxidant capacity in the skin or liver. Our experiment did not detect effects of dietary guanine or UV-B light on uric acid, but uric acid was positively related to antioxidant capacity. Our results support the hypothesis that structural color in fish may be altered by environmental stressors such as exposure to UV light, and highlight the need for future studies to consider the role of iridophores in condition-dependent visual signaling.

  17. Electrochemical studies on the oxidation of guanine and adenine at cyclodextrin modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim; Noori, Abolhassan

    2008-12-01

    An electrochemical sensor for guanine and adenine using cyclodextrin-modified poly(N-acetylaniline) (PNAANI) on a carbon paste electrode has been developed. The oxidation mechanism of guanine and adenine on the surface of the electrode was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. It was found that the electrode processes are irreversible, pH dependent, and involve several reaction products. The electron transfer process occurs in consecutive steps with the formation of a strongly adsorbed intermediate on the electrode surface. Also, a new method for estimating the apparent formation constants of guanine and adenine with the immobilized cyclodextrins, through the change of surface coverage of studied analytes has been reported. Both guanine and adenine showed linear concentrations in the range of 0.1-10 microM by using differential pulse voltammetry, with an experimental limit of detection down to 0.05 microM. Linear concentration ranges of 2-150 microM for guanine and 6-104 microM for adenine have been found when cyclic voltammetry was used for determination of both analytes.

  18. Theoretical Study of the Photophysics of 8-Vinylguanine, an Isomorphic Fluorescent Analogue of Guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochman, Michał A; Pola, Martina; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-08-11

    Paving the way for the application of the algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second-order (ADC(2)) to systems based on the guanine chromophore, we demonstrate the this excited-state electronic structure method provides a realistic description of the photochemistry of 9H-guanine, in close agreement with the benchmark provided by the CASPT2 method. We then proceed to apply the ADC(2) method to the photochemistry of 8-vinylguanine (8vG), a minimally modified analogue of guanine which, unlike the naturally occurring nucleobase, displays intense fluorescence, indicative of a much longer-lived excited electronic state. The emissive electronic state of 8vG is identified as an ππ*-type intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state, in which a charge of roughly -0.2 e is transferred from the guanine moiety onto the vinyl substituent. The main radiationless deactivation pathway competing with fluorescence is predicted to involve the molecule leaving the minimum on the ICT ππ* state, and reaching a region of the S1 adiabatic state where it resembles the La ππ* state of unmodified 9H-guanine. The topology of the La ππ* region of the S1 state favors subsequent internal conversion at a crossing seam with the ground electronic state. The sensitivity of this process to environment polarity may explain the experimentally observed fluorescence quenching of 8vG upon incorporation in single- and double-stranded DNA.

  19. Inhibition Kinetics of Sida rhombifolia L. Extract Toward Xanthine Oxidase by Electrochemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Iswantini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sida rhombifolia L. is a traditional medicinal plant that has been known with potential as antigout. The previous research suggested that flavonoids crude extract of S. rhombifolia had an inhibitory activity toward xanthine oxidase by 71% and a spectrophotometric measurement showed that the type of flavonoids crude extract inhibition was a competitive inhibition. The purpose of the research was to investigate the type of inhibition kinetic of S. Rhombifolia’s ethanol extract by electrochemical method and to compare the measurements of linearity and sensitivity between spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods. The results showed that the yield of S. Rhombifolia’s ethanol extract was 9.82% with the inhibitory activity ranging from 13.64% to 82.69% (5.00-200 mg L-1 and IC50 value was 91.15±5.74 mg L-1. Allopurinol as a control showed the inhibitory activity of 15.26-70.95% (0.10-4.00 mg L-1 and IC50 value was 2.45±2.21 mg L-1. Inhibition kinetics of the ethanol extract caused a KM increase and unchange of VMAX. Based on the data, the type of inhibition kinetics was a competitive inhibition, with an inhibitor affinity (α value of 3.18. Linearity of xanthine oxidase activity assay by electrochemical and spectrophotometric methods showed the range of 0.01-1.00 mM (R2 = 0.978 and 0.05-0.70 mM (R2 = 0.977 respectively. The sensitivity of electrochemical method was reported higher (0.95 μA mM-1 than the spectrophotometric method (0.007 min-1.

  20. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoe, Jun; Petchampai, Natthida; Isoe, Yurika E; Co, Katrina; Mazzalupo, Stacy; Scaraffia, Patricia Y

    2017-02-08

    Aedesaegypti has 2 genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). We analyzed XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression by real-time quantitative PCR in tissues from sugar- and blood-fed females. Differential XDH1 and XDH2 gene expression was observed in tissues dissected throughout a time course. We next exposed females to blood meals supplemented with allopurinol, a well-characterized XDH inhibitor. We also tested the effects of injecting double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against XDH1, XDH2, or both. Disruption of XDH by allopurinol or XDH1 by RNA interference significantly affected mosquito survival, causing a disruption in blood digestion, excretion, oviposition, and reproduction. XDH1-deficient mosquitoes showed a persistence of serine proteases in the midgut at 48 h after blood feeding and a reduction in the uptake of vitellogenin by the ovaries. Surprisingly, analysis of the fat body from dsRNA-XDH1-injected mosquitoes fell into 2 groups: one group was characterized by a reduction of the XDH1 transcript, whereas the other group was characterized by an up-regulation of several transcripts including XDH1, glutamine synthetase, alanine aminotransferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase, ornithine decarboxylase, glutamate receptor, and ammonia transporter. Our data demonstrate that XDH1 plays an essential role and that XDH1 has the potential to be used as a metabolic target for Ae.aegypti vector control.-Isoe, J., Petchampai, N., Isoe, Y. E., Co, K., Mazzalupo, S., Scaraffia, P. Y. Xanthine dehydrogenase-1 silencing in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes promotes a blood feeding-induced adulticidal activity.

  1. A role for xanthine oxidase in the control of fetal cardiovascular function in late gestation sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, E A; Kane, A D; Hansell, J A; Thakor, A S; Allison, B J; Niu, Y; Giussani, D A

    2012-04-15

    Virtually nothing is known about the effects on fetal physiology of xanthine oxidase inhibition. This is despite maternal treatment with the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol being considered in human complicated pregnancy to protect the infant’s brain from excessive generation of ROS.We investigated the in vivo effects of maternal treatment with allopurinol on fetal cardiovascular function in ovine pregnancy in late gestation. Under anaesthesia, pregnant ewes and their singleton fetus were instrumented with vascular catheters and flow probes around an umbilical and a fetal femoral artery at 118±1 dGA (days of gestational age; termca. 145 days). Five days later, mothers were infused I.V. with either vehicle (n =11) or allopurinol (n =10). Fetal cardiovascular function was stimulated with increasing bolus doses of phenylephrine (PE) following maternal vehicle or allopurinol. The effects of maternal allopurinol on maternal and fetal cardiovascular function were also investigated following fetal NO blockade (n =6) or fetal β1-adrenergic antagonism (n =7). Maternal allopurinol led to significant increases in fetal heart rate, umbilical blood flow and umbilical vascular conductance, effects abolished by fetal β1-adrenergic antagonism but not by fetal NO blockade. Maternal allopurinol impaired fetal α1-adrenergic pressor and femoral vasopressor responses and enhanced the gain of the fetal cardiac baroreflex. These effects of maternal allopurinol were restored to control levels during fetal NO blockade. Maternal treatment with allopurinol induced maternal hypotension, tachycardia and acid–base disturbance. We conclude that maternal treatment with allopurinol alters in vivo maternal, umbilical and fetal vascular function via mechanisms involving NO and β1-adrenergic stimulation. The evidence suggests that the use of allopurinol in clinical practice should be approached with caution.

  2. The solute specificity profiles of nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) from Zea mays and Setaria viridis illustrate functional flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Micah; Schein, Jessica; Hunt, Kevin A; Nalam, Vamsi; Mourad, George S; Schultes, Neil P

    2016-03-01

    The solute specificity profiles (transport and binding) for the nucleobase cation symporter 1 (NCS1) proteins, from the closely related C4 grasses Zea mays and Setaria viridis, differ from that of Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii NCS1. Solute specificity profiles for NCS1 from Z. mays (ZmNCS1) and S. viridis (SvNCS1) were determined through heterologous complementation studies in NCS1-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. The four Viridiplantae NCS1 proteins transport the purines adenine and guanine, but unlike the dicot and algal NCS1, grass NCS1 proteins fail to transport the pyrimidine uracil. Despite the high level of amino acid sequence similarity, ZmNCS1 and SvNCS1 display distinct solute transport and recognition profiles. SvNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, cytosine, and allantoin and competitively binds xanthine and uric acid. ZmNCS1 transports adenine, guanine, and cytosine and competitively binds, 5-fluorocytosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid. The differences in grass NCS1 profiles are due to a limited number of amino acid alterations. These amino acid residues do not correspond to amino acids essential for overall solute and cation binding or solute transport, as previously identified in bacterial and fungal NCS1, but rather may represent residues involved in subtle solute discrimination. The data presented here reveal that within Viridiplantae, NCS1 proteins transport a broad range of nucleobase compounds and that the solute specificity profile varies with species.

  3. Nitrite reductase activity of rat and human xanthine oxidase, xanthine dehydrogenase, and aldehyde oxidase: evaluation of their contribution to NO formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Luisa B; Pereira, Vânia; Mira, Lurdes; Moura, José J G

    2015-01-27

    Nitrite is presently considered a NO "storage form" that can be made available, through its one-electron reduction, to maintain NO formation under hypoxia/anoxia. The molybdoenzymes xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase (XO/XD) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) are two of the most promising mammalian nitrite reductases, and in this work, we characterized NO formation by rat and human XO/XD and AO. This is the first characterization of human enzymes, and our results support the employment of rat liver enzymes as suitable models of the human counterparts. A comprehensive kinetic characterization of the effect of pH on XO and AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction showed that the enzyme's specificity constant for nitrite increase 8-fold, while the Km(NO2(-)) decrease 6-fold, when the pH decreases from 7.4 to 6.3. These results demonstrate that the ability of XO/AO to trigger NO formation would be greatly enhanced under the acidic conditions characteristic of ischemia. The dioxygen inhibition was quantified, and the Ki(O2) values found (24.3-48.8 μM) suggest that in vivo NO formation would be fine-tuned by dioxygen availability. The potential in vivo relative physiological relevance of XO/XD/AO-dependent pathways of NO formation was evaluated using HepG2 and HMEC cell lines subjected to hypoxia. NO formation by the cells was found to be pH-, nitrite-, and dioxygen-dependent, and the relative contribution of XO/XD plus AO was found to be as high as 50%. Collectively, our results supported the possibility that XO/XD and AO can contribute to NO generation under hypoxia inside a living human cell. Furthermore, the molecular mechanism of XO/AO-catalyzed nitrite reduction was revised.

  4. Synthesis of a Pseudodisaccharide α-C-Glycosidically Linked to an 8-Alkylated Guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Duchek

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of stable guanofosfocin analogues has attracted considerable attention in the past 15 years. Several guanofosfocin analogues mimicking the three constitutional elements of mannose, ribose, and guanine were designed and synthesized. Interest in ether-linked pseudodisaccharides and 8-alkylated guanines is increasing, due to their potential applications in life science. In this article, a novel guanofosfocin analogue 6, an ether-linked pseudodisaccharide connected α-C-glycosidically to an 8-alkylated guanine, was synthesized in a 10-longest linear step sequence from known diol 13, resulting in an overall yield of 26%. The key steps involve the ring-opening of cyclic sulfate 8 by alkoxide generated from 7 and a reductive cyclization of 4-N-acyl-2,4-diamino-5-nitrosopyrimidine 19 to form compound 6.

  5. In vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of leaves, fruits and peel extracts of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon

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    Muthiah PL

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: To evaluate the in vitro xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the extract of leaves, fruits and peel of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon.   Materials and Methods: Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was assayed spectrophotometrically under aerobic conditions and the degree of enzyme inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295nm associated with uric acid formation.   Results: Among the extracts tested, the C.limetta peel extract exhibited highest potency of xanthine oxidase inhibition (IC50 40.16±0.88μg/ml. This was followed by C.aurantium peel (IC50 51.50±2.05μg/ml, C.limon peel (IC50 64.90±1.24μg/ml, C.aurantium leaf (IC5073.50±1.26μg/ml, C.limetta leaf (IC50 74.83±2.42μg/ml, C.limon leaf (IC50 76.83±2.02μg/ml, C.limetta fruit (IC50 95.16±0.60μg/ml extracts compared with the IC50 value of standard allopurinol was 6.6μg/ml.   Conclusion: Recent findings show that the occurrence of gout is increasing worldwide, possibly due to the changes in dietary habits like intake of food rich in nucleic acids, such as meat, sea foods, etc. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors such as allopurinol is the drug of choice, however it has been observed more side effects.  An alternative to allopurinol is the use of medicinal plants, We thus began our program to look for xanthine oxidase inhibitors of phytochemical origin. In conclusion, the study suggests that the leaves and peel extracts of Citrus aurantium, Citrus limetta and Citrus limon possess xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity that might be helpful in preventing or slowing the progress of gout and related disorders.

  6. Mechanisms of oxidation of guanine in DNA by carbonate radical anion, a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Kim, Seog K; Margolin, Yelena; Dedon, Peter C; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is produced during inflammation and combines rapidly with carbon dioxide to yield the unstable nitrosoperoxycarbonate, which decomposes (in part) to CO(3) (.-) and (.)NO(2) radicals. The CO(3) (.-) radicals oxidize guanine bases in DNA through a one-electron transfer reaction process that ultimately results in the formation of stable guanine oxidation products. Here we have explored these mechanisms, starting with a spectroscopic study of the kinetics of electron transfer from 20-22mer double-stranded oligonucleotides to CO(3) (.-) radicals, together with the effects of base sequence on the formation of the end-products in runs of one, two, or three contiguous guanines. The distributions of these alkali-labile lesions were determined by gel electrophoresis methods. The cascade of events was initiated through the use of 308 nm XeCl excimer laser pulses to generate CO(3) (.-) radicals by an established method based on the photodissociation of persulfate to sulfate radicals and the oxidation of bicarbonate. Although the Saito model (Saito et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1995, 117, 6406-6407) predicts relative ease of one-electron oxidations in DNA, following the trend 5'-GGG > 5'-GG > 5'-G, we found that the rate constants for CO(3) (.-)-mediated oxidation of guanines in these sequence contexts (k(5)) showed only small variation within a narrow range [(1.5-3.0)x10(7) M(-1) s(-1)]. In contrast, the distributions of the end-products are dependent on the base sequence context and are higher at the 5'-G in 5'-GG sequences and at the first two 5'-guanines in the 5'-GGG sequences. These effects are attributed to a combination of initial hole distributions among the contiguous guanines and the subsequent differences in chemical reaction yields at each guanine. The lack of dependence of k(5) on sequence context indicates that the one-electron oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3) (.-) radicals occurs by an inner-sphere mechanism.

  7. Ligand-induced folding of the guanine-sensing riboswitch is controlled by a combined predetermined induced fit mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ottink, O.M.; Rampersad, S.M.; Tessari, M.; Zaman, G.J.; Heus, H.A.; Wijmenga, S.S.

    2007-01-01

    All known guanine-sensing riboswitches regulate gene expression by specifically binding to guanine (G) or related analogs with high affinity to switch off transcription. The aptamers of this class of riboswitches are characterized by three helices (P1-P3), surrounding a central core of phylogenetica

  8. Virtual and in vitro bioassay screening of phytochemical inhibitors from flavonoids and isoflavones against xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 for gout treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadi; Frenz, Christopher M; Li, Zhiwen; Chen, Mianhua; Wang, Yurong; Li, Fengjuan; Luo, Cheng; Sun, Jian; bohlin, Lars; Li, Zhenjing; Yang, Hua; Wang, Changlu

    2013-04-01

    Synthetic drugs such as allopurinol and benzbromarone are commonly used to treat the complex pathogenesis of gout, a metabolic disease that results from an inflammation of the joints caused by precipitation of uric acid. We seek to discover novel phytochemicals that could treat gout, by targeting the xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 enzymes. In this study, we report the screening of nine compounds of flavonoids from the ZINC and PubChem databases (containing 2092 flavonoids) using the IGEMDOCK software tool against the xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 3D protein structures. Each compound was also evaluated by an in vitro bioassay testing the inhibition of xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2. Myricetin and luteolin were found to be the potential dual inhibitors of xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 as demonstrated by IC(50): 62.7 and 3.29 μg/mL (xanthine oxidase)/70.8 and 16.38 μg/mL (cyclooxygenase-2), respectively. In addition, structure-activity relationships and other important factors of the flavonoids binding to the active site of xanthine oxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 were discussed, which is expected for further rational drug design.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structures, fluorescence and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, De-Qiang; Yu, Chuan-Ming; You, Jin-Zong; Yang, Guang-Hui; Wang, Xue-Jie; Zhang, Yi-Ping

    2015-11-01

    A series of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives were rationally designed and synthesized in good yields by following a convenient route. All the newly synthesized molecules were fully characterized by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis. Eight compounds were structurally determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The fluorescence properties of all the compounds were investigated in dimethyl sulfoxide media. In addition, these newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for in vitro inhibitory activity against commercial enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) by measuring the formation of uric acid from xanthine. Among the compounds synthesized and tested, 3d and 3e were found to be moderate inhibitory activity against commercial XO with IC50 = 72.4 μM and 75.6 μM. The studies gave a new insight in further optimization of pyrazole-based 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives with excellent fluorescence properties and XO inhibitory activity.

  10. Freeze-quench magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopic study of the very rapid intermediate in xanthine oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, R.M.; Inscore, F.E.; Hille, R.; Kirk, M.L.

    1999-11-01

    Freeze-quench magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy (MCD) has been used to trap and study the excited-state electronic structure of the Mo(V) active site in a xanthine oxidase intermediate generated with substoichiometric concentrations of the slow substrate 2-hydroxy-6-methylpurine. EPR spectroscopy has shown that the intermediate observed in the MCD experiment is the very rapid intermediate, which lies on the main catalytic pathway. The observed in the MCD experiment is the very rapid intermediate, which lies on the main catalytic pathway. The low-energy ({lt}{approximately}30,000 cm{sup {minus}1}) C-term MCD of this intermediate is remarkably similar to that of the model compound LMoO(bdt)(L = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate; bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate), and the MCD bands have been assigned as dithiolate S{sub ip} {yields} Mo d{sub xy} and S{sub op} {yields} Mo d{sub xz,yz} LMCT transitions. These transitions result from a coordination geometry of the intermediate where the Mo{double{underscore}bond}O bond is oriented cis to the ene-1,2-dithiolate of the pyranopterin. Since X-ray crystallography has indicated that a terminal sulfido ligand is oriented cis to the ene-1,2-dithiolate in oxidized xanthine oxidase related Desulfovibrio gigas aldehyde oxidoreductase, the authors have suggested that a conformational change occurs upon substrate binding. The substrate-mediated conformational change is extremely significant with respect to electron-transfer regeneration of the active site, as covalent interactions between the redox-active Mo d{sub xy} orbital and the S{sub ip} orbitals of the ene-1,2-dithiolate are maximized when the oxo ligand is oriented cis to the dithiolate plane. This underlies the importance of the ene-1,2-dithiolate portion of the pyranopterin in providing an efficient superexchange pathway for electron transfer. The results of this study indicate that electron-transfer regeneration of the active site may be gated by the orientation

  11. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of novel xanthine carboxylate amides as A2A adenosine receptor ligands exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh; Bansal, Ranju; Rohilla, Suman; Kachler, Sonja; Klotz, Karl-Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The carboxylate amides of 8-phenyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine described herein represent a new series of selective ligands of the adenosine A2A receptors exhibiting bronchospasmolytic activity. The effects of location of 8-phenyl substitutions on the adenosine receptor (AR) binding affinities of the newly synthesized xanthines have also been studied. The compounds displayed moderate to potent binding affinities toward various adenosine receptor subtypes when evaluated through radioligand binding studies. However, most of the compounds showed the maximum affinity for the A2A subtype, some with high selectivity versus all other subtypes. Xanthine carboxylate amide 13b with a diethylaminoethylamino moiety at the para-position of the 8-phenylxanthine scaffold was identified as the most potent A2A adenosine receptor ligand with Ki=0.06μM. Similarly potent and highly A2A-selective are the isovanillin derivatives 16a and 16d. In addition, the newly synthesized xanthine derivatives showed good in vivo bronchospasmolytic activity when tested in guinea pigs.

  12. Antioxidant, α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of bioactive compounds from maize (Zea mays L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nile, Shivraj H; Park, Se W

    2014-01-01

    Chemical investigations into maize (Zea mays L.) kernels yielded phenolic compounds, which were structurally established using chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. The isolated phenolic compounds from maize kernel were examined in vitro for their antioxidant abilities by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazine) radical, OH radical scavenging activity, and reducing ability, along with α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition. The isolated maize phenolics revealed significant xanthine oxidase and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity to that of allopurinol and acarbose in vitro and in vivo, respectively. The kinetics study with xanthine oxidase revealed competitive type of inhibition by isolated maize vanillic acid (M2), ferulic acid (M5), 3'-methoxyhirsutrin (M7), and peonidin-3-glucoside (M10) as compared to control allopurinol. Overall, with few exceptions, all the phenolic compounds from maize kernel revealed significant biological activities with all parameters examined. Also, the phenolic compounds from maize were found to be more reactive toward DPPH radical and had considerable reducing ability and OH radical scavenging activity. These findings suggest that maize kernel phenolic compounds can be considered as potential antioxidant, α-glucosidase, and XO inhibitory agents those might be further explored for the design of lead antioxidant, antidiabetic and antigout drug candidates using in vivo trials.

  13. Disulfide S-monoxides convert xanthine dehydrogenase into oxidase in rat liver cytosol more potently than their respective disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Satoru; Fujita, Junko; Nakanishi, Masahiko; Wada, Shun-ich; Fujimoto, Yohko

    2008-05-01

    Xanthine oxidase (XO)/xanthine dehydrogenase (XD) oxidizes oxypurines to uric acid, with only the XO form producing reactive oxygen species. In the present study, the effects of cystamine S-monoxide and cystine S-monoxide (disulfide S-monoxides) on the conversion of XD to XO in rat liver were examined. A partially purified enzyme fraction from the rat liver was incubated with xanthine in the presence or absence of NAD+, and the uric acid formed was measured by HPLC. Under basal conditions, XO activity represented about 15% of the total XO plus XD activity. Cystamine S-monoxide and cystine S-monoxide converted XD into XO in a dose-dependent manner, and the concentrations required to increase XO activity by 50% were approximately 1 and 2 microM, respectively. Their respective thiols (cysteamine and cysteine) and disulfides (cystamine and cystine) up to 10 microM showed weak or no effects on the activities of XO and XD and their conversion. Experiments utilizing a sulfhydryl reducing reagent (dithiothreitol) and sulfhydryl modifiers (4,4'-dithiodipyridine and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) indicated that disulfide S-monoxides-induced conversion of XD to XO occurs via disulfide bridge formation in XD, but not the modification of sulfhydryl groups. These results suggest that disulfide S-monoxides have the potential to increase the generation of reactive oxygen species through the conversion of XD to XO in liver.

  14. Guanine-containing copper(II) complexes: synthesis, X-ray structures and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastropietro, Teresa F; Armentano, Donatella; Grisolia, Ettore; Zanchini, Claudia; Lloret, Francesc; Julve, Miguel; De Munno, Giovanni

    2008-01-28

    Three new compounds of formula {[Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](BF(4))(SiF(6))(1/2)}(n) (1), {[Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](CF(3)SO(3))(2).H(2)O}(n) (2) and [Cu(gua)(2)(H(2)O)(HCOO)]ClO(4).H(2)O.1/2HCOOH] (3) [gua = 2-amino-1H-purin-6(9H)-one] showing the unprecedented coordination of neutral guanine, have been synthesised and structurally characterized. The structures of the compounds 1 and 2 contain uniform copper(II) chains of formula [Cu(gua)(H(2)O)(3)](n)(2n+), where the copper atoms are bridged by guanine ligands coordinated via N(3) and N(7). The electroneutrality is achieved by uncoordinated tetrafluoroborate and hexafluorosilicate (1) and triflate (2). Each copper atom in 1 and 2 is five-coordinated in a distorted square pyramidal environment: two water molecules in trans positions and the N(3) and N(7a) nitrogen atoms of two guanine ligands build the basal plane whereas a water molecule fills the axial position. The values of the copper-copper separation across the bridging guanine ligand are 7.183(1) (1) and 7.123(1) A (2). is an ionic salt whose structure is made up of mononuclear [Cu(gua)(2)(H(2)O)(HCOO)](+) cations and perchlorate anions plus water and formic acid as crystallization molecules. The two guanine ligands in the cation are coordinated to the copper centre through the N(9) atom. The copper atom in 3 is four-coordinated with two monodentate guanine molecules in the trans position, a water molecule and a monodenate formate ligand building a quasi square planar surrounding. Magnetic susceptibility measurements for 1 and 2 in the temperature range 1.9-300 K show the occurrence of significant intrachain antiferromagnetic interactions between the copper(ii) ions across the guanine bridge [J = -9.6(1) (1) and -10.3(1) cm(-1) (2) with H = -J summation operator(i)S(i).S(i+1)].

  15. Hydrogen-bonded proton transfer in the protonated guanine-cytosine (GC+H)+ base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuexia; Wang, Hongyan; Gao, Simin; Schaefer, Henry F

    2011-10-13

    The single proton transfer at the different sites of the Watson-Crick (WC) guanine-cytosine (GC) DNA base pair are studied here using density functional methods. The conventional protonated structures, transition state (TS) and proton-transferred product (PT) structures of every relevant species are optimized. Each transition state and proton-transferred product structure has been compared with the corresponding conventional protonated structure to demonstrate the process of proton transfer and the change of geometrical structures. The relative energies of the protonated tautomers and the proton-transfer energy profiles in gas and solvent are analyzed. The proton-transferred product structure G(+H(+))-H(+)C(N3)(-H(+))(PT) has the lowest relative energy for which only two hydrogen bonds exist. Almost all 14 isomers of the protonated GC base pair involve hydrogen-bonded proton transfer following the three pathways, with the exception of structure G-H(+)C(O2). When the positive charge is primarily "located" on the guanine moiety (H(+)G-C, G-H(+)C(C4), and G-H(+)C(C6)), the H(1) proton transfers from the N(1) site of guanine to the N(3) site of cytosine. The structures G-H(+)C(C5) and G-H(+)C(C4) involve H(4a) proton transfer from the N(4) of cytosine to the O(6) site of guanine. H(2a) proton transfer from the N(2) site of guanine to the O(2) site of cytosine is found only for the structure G-H(+)C(C4). The structures to which a proton is added on the six-centered sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds are more prone to proton transfer in the gas phase, whereas a proton added on the minor groove and the sites adjoining the hydrogen bonds is favorable to the proton transfer in energy in the aqueous phase.

  16. [A study on inclusion complexes of cyclodextrin with three anticancer xanthines by fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan-li; Dong, Chuan

    2004-07-01

    The inclusion complexes of beta-Cyclodextrin (beta-CD) and HP-beta-Cyclodextrin (HP-beta-CD) with 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP), Azathioprine (BAN) and 8-Azaguanine (Azan) were investigated by fluorescence. Various factors affecting the formation of inclusion complexes were discussed in detail including formation time and pH effect. The formation constants of their inclusion complexes were determined. The results indicated that their inclusion was affected significantly by laying time and pH. The formation time of beta-CD inclusion complexes is much longer than that of HP-beta-CD. The optimum pH is about pH = 7.7-12. Their maximum excitation wavelengths are all in the range of 276-285 nm and the maximum emission wavelengths are all in the range of 328-353 nm. The fluorescence signals are intensified with increasing concentration of CD. The stoichiometries of the inclusion complexes of CD with these three anticancer xanthines are all 1:1 and the formation constants are calculated.

  17. Tetrahydroamentoflavone (THA) from Semecarpus anacardium as a potent inhibitor of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimboor, Ranjith; Rangan, Meena; Aravind, S G; Arumughan, C

    2011-02-16

    Seed of Semecarpus anacardium L. is widely used in Indian traditional medicine; Ayurveda and Sidha, for treatment of inflammatory disorders and gout. The present study was aimed at isolation of a compound for its potential to inhibit xanthine oxidase (XO), over expression of which lead to inflammation and gout. Activity guided fractionation of S. anacardium seed was conducted using liquid-liquid partition and preparative HPLC. The fractions were evaluated for their XO inhibition and antioxidant activity. The ethyl acetate fraction with the highest XO activity yielded a biflavonoid compound tetrahydroamentoflavone (THA). Lineweaver-Burk (LB) plot for the XO inhibition of THA and allopurinol was constructed from the kinetic data. IC₅₀ values of THA and allopurinol for XO inhibition were 92 and 100 nM respectively and their corresponding values for K(i) were 0.982 and 0.612 μM respectively. THA was a potent XO inhibitor which could be considered as a drug candidate or chemopreventive agent, after establishing its pharmacological and clinical evaluation. The study results appear to support the claim of the traditional medicine with respect to the efficacy of S. anacardium seed against inflammation and gout. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  18. Xanthine oxidoreductase-catalyzed reactive species generation: A process in critical need of reevaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E

    2013-06-10

    Nearly 30 years have passed since the discovery of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) as a critical source of reactive species in ischemia/reperfusion injury. Since then, numerous inflammatory disease processes have been associated with elevated XOR activity and allied reactive species formation solidifying the ideology that enhancement of XOR activity equates to negative clinical outcomes. However, recent evidence may shatter this paradigm by describing a nitrate/nitrite reductase capacity for XOR whereby XOR may be considered a crucial source of beneficial (•)NO under ischemic/hypoxic/acidic conditions; settings similar to those that limit the functional capacity of nitric oxide synthase. Herein, we review XOR-catalyzed reactive species generation and identify key microenvironmental factors whose interplay impacts the identity of the reactive species (oxidants vs. (•)NO) produced. In doing so, we redefine existing dogma and shed new light on an enzyme that has weathered the evolutionary process not as gadfly but a crucial component in the maintenance of homeostasis.

  19. New Markers: Urine Xanthine Oxidase and Myeloperoxidase in the Early Detection of Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Ciragil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate if xanthine oxidase and myeloperoxidase levels quantitation method may alternate routine culture method, which takes more time in the diagnosis of urinary tract infections. Material and Methods. Five hundred and forty-nine outpatients who had admitted to Clinic Microbiology Laboratory were included in the study. The microorganisms were identified by using VITEK System. The urine specimens that were negative from the quantitative urine culture were used as controls. The activities of MPO and XO in spot urine were measured by spectrophotometric method. Results. Through the urine cultures, 167 bacteria were isolated from 163 urine specimens; 386 cultures yielded no bacterial growth. E. coli was the most frequent pathogen. In infection with E. coli both XO and MPO levels were increased the most. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for XO were 100%, 100%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. These values for MPO were 87%, 100%, 100%, and 94%, respectively. Conclusion. These data obtained suggest that urine XO and MPO levels may be new markers in the early detection of UTI.

  20. Determination of Flavonoids, Phenolic Acids, and Xanthines in Mate Tea (Ilex paraguariensis St.-Hil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Bojić

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Raw material, different formulations of foods, and dietary supplements of mate demands control of the content of bioactive substances for which high performance thin layer chromatography (TLC, described here, presents simple and rapid approach for detections as well as quantification. Using TLC densitometry, the following bioactive compounds were identified and quantified: chlorogenic acid (2.1 mg/g, caffeic acid (1.5 mg/g, rutin (5.2 mg/g, quercetin (2.2 mg/g, and kaempferol (4.5 mg/g. The results obtained with TLC densitometry for caffeine (5.4 mg/g and theobromine (2.7 mg/g show no statistical difference to the content of total xanthines (7.6 mg/g obtained by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Thus, TLC remains a technique of choice for simple and rapid analysis of great number of samples as well as a primary screening technique in plant analysis.

  1. Study on inclusion complex of cyclodextrin with methyl xanthine derivatives by fluorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan-Li; Ding, Li-Hua; Dong, Chuan; Niu, Wei-Ping; Shuang, Shao-Min

    2003-10-01

    The inclusion complexes of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and HP-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) with caffeine, theophylline and theobromine were investigated by fluorimetry. Various factors affecting the formation of inclusion complexes were discussed in detail including forming time, pH effect and temperature. The results indicate that inclusion process was affected seriously by laying time and pH. The forming time of β-CD inclusion complexes is much longer than that of HP-β-CD. The optimum pH range is about 7-12 for caffeine, 8-10 for TP, 10.5-12 for TB. The intensities of their fluorescence increase with the decreasing of temperature. Their maximum excitation wavelengths are all in the range of 280-290 nm. The emission wavelength of caffeine and theophylline are both in the range of 340-360 nm, and that of theobromine is about 325 nm. The fluorescence signals are intensified with the increasing concentration of CD. The stoichiometry of the inclusion complexes of CD with these three methyl xanthine derivatives are all 1:1 and the formation constant are all calculated.

  2. Studies on the biotechnological production of methyl xanthines. Untersuchung zur biotechnologischen Gewinnung von Methylxanthinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glueck, M.

    1986-04-25

    Two strains of Pseudomonas putida were isolated during enrichment of caffeine-degrading microorganisms of the two, the strain Pseudomonas putida WS grew on media containing up to 2% of caffeine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Of 25 further strains of bacteria and fungi, only one yeast also had caffeine-degrading characteristics. Caffeine degradation was much slower than with the two Pseudomonas strains, and caffeine was used only as a nitrogen source. This suggests two alternative methods of methyl xanthine production: 1) When graining Mutant H8 on glucose caffeine, the reaction could be interrupted with good yields after a short time. This method requires the processing of a complex mixture of caffeine, theobromine, and heteroxanthine. 2) When growing Mutant H8 on a mixture of peptone meat broth plus caffeine, the reaction can be interrupted with average yields after near-complete conversion. This method is recommended for heteroxanthine production, owing to the fact that peak heteroxanthine yields of 50% are not reached until all other methyl anthines have been converted more or less completely.

  3. Analysis of xanthines in beverages using a fully automated SPE-SPC-DAD hyphenated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedovici, A. [Bucarest Univ., Bucarest (Romania). Faculty of Chemistry, Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; David, F.; David, V.; Sandra, P. [Research Institute of Chromatography, Kortrijk (Belgium)

    2000-08-01

    Analysis of some xanthines (caffeine, theophylline and theobromine) in beverages has been achieved by a fully automated on-line Solid Phase Extraction - Supercritical Fluid Chromatography - Diode Array Detection (Spe - Sofc - Dad). Three adsorbents have been tested for the Spe procedure: octadecyl modified silicagel (ODS) and two types of styrene-divinylbenzen copolymer based materials, from which Porapack proved to be the most suitable adsorbent. Optimisation and correlation of both Spe and Sofc operational parameters are also discussed. By this technique, caffeine was determined in ice tea and Coca-Cola in a concentration of 0.15 ppm, theobromine - 1.5 ppb, and theophylline - 0.15 ppb. [Italian] Si e' realizzata l'analis di alcune xantine (caffeina, teofillina e teobromina) mediante un sistema, in linea, completamente automatizzato basato su Estrazione in Fase Solida - Cromatografia in Fase Supercritica - Rivelazione con Diode Array (Spe - Sfc - Dad). Per la procedura Spe sono stati valutati tre substrati: silice ottadecilica (ODS) e due tipi di materiali polimerici a base stirene-divinilbenzene, di cui, quello denominato PRP-1, e' risultato essere il piu' efficiente. Sono discusse sia l'ottimizzazione che la correlazione dei parametri operazionali per la Spe e la Sfc. Con questa tecnica sono state determinate, in te' ghiacciato e Coca-Cola, la caffeina, la teobromina e la teofillina alle concentrazini di 0.15, 1.5 e 0.15 ppm.

  4. HIF-1α activation by intermittent hypoxia requires NADPH oxidase stimulation by xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanduri, Jayasri; Vaddi, Damodara Reddy; Khan, Shakil A; Wang, Ning; Makarenko, Vladislav; Semenza, Gregg L; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) mediates many of the systemic and cellular responses to intermittent hypoxia (IH), which is an experimental model that simulates O2 saturation profiles occurring with recurrent apnea. IH-evoked HIF-1α synthesis and stability are due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by NADPH oxidases, especially Nox2. However, the mechanisms by which IH activates Nox2 are not known. We recently reported that IH activates xanthine oxidase (XO) and the resulting increase in ROS elevates intracellular calcium levels. Since Nox2 activation requires increased intracellular calcium levels, we hypothesized XO-mediated calcium signaling contributes to Nox activation by IH. We tested this possibility in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells subjected to IH consisting alternating cycles of hypoxia (1.5% O2 for 30 sec) and normoxia (21% O2 for 5 min). Kinetic analysis revealed that IH-induced XO preceded Nox activation. Inhibition of XO activity either by allopurinol or by siRNA prevented IH-induced Nox activation, translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47phox and p67phox to the plasma membrane and their interaction with gp91phox. ROS generated by XO also contribute to IH-evoked Nox activation via calcium-dependent protein kinase C stimulation. More importantly, silencing XO blocked IH-induced upregulation of HIF-1α demonstrating that HIF-1α activation by IH requires Nox2 activation by XO.

  5. Untargeted plasma metabolite profiling reveals the broad systemic consequences of xanthine oxidoreductase inactivation in mice.

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    Qiuying Chen

    Full Text Available A major challenge in systems biology is integration of molecular findings for individual enzyme activities into a cohesive high-level understanding of cellular metabolism and physiology/pathophysiology. However, meaningful prediction for how a perturbed enzyme activity will globally impact metabolism in a cell, tissue or intact organisms is precluded by multiple unknowns, including in vivo enzymatic rates, subcellular distribution and pathway interactions. To address this challenge, metabolomics offers the potential to simultaneously survey changes in thousands of structurally diverse metabolites within complex biological matrices. The present study assessed the capability of untargeted plasma metabolite profiling to discover systemic changes arising from inactivation of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR, an enzyme that catalyzes the final steps in purine degradation. Using LC-MS coupled with a multivariate statistical data analysis platform, we confidently surveyed >3,700 plasma metabolites (50-1,000 Da for differential expression in XOR wildtype vs. mice with inactivated XOR, arising from gene deletion or pharmacological inhibition. Results confirmed the predicted derangements in purine metabolism, but also revealed unanticipated perturbations in metabolism of pyrimidines, nicotinamides, tryptophan, phospholipids, Krebs and urea cycles, and revealed kidney dysfunction biomarkers. Histochemical studies confirmed and characterized kidney failure in xor-nullizygous mice. These findings provide new insight into XOR functions and demonstrate the power of untargeted metabolite profiling for systemic discovery of direct and indirect consequences of gene mutations and drug treatments.

  6. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli cell factory for highly active xanthine dehydrogenase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Hua; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2017-05-31

    The aim of this work was to demonstrate the first proof-of-concept for the use of ab initio-aided assembly strategy intensifying in vivo biosynthesis process to construct Escherichia coli cell factory overproducing highly active xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Three global regulator (IscS, TusA and NarJ) and four chaperone proteins (DsbA, DsbB, NifS and XdhC) were overexpressed to aid the formation and ordered assembly of three redox center cofactors of Rhodobacter capsulatus XDH in E. coli. The NifS, IscS and DsbB enhanced the specific activity of RcXDH by 30%, 94% and 49%, respectively. The combinatorial expression of NarJ and IscS synergistically increased the specific activity by 129% and enhanced the total enzyme activity by a remarkable 3.9-fold. The crude enzyme showed nearly the same coupling efficiency of electron transfer and product formation as previously purified XDHs, indicating an integrity and efficient assembly of highly active XDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Flavonoid glycosides isolated from unique legume plant extracts as novel inhibitors of xanthine oxidase.

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    Chrysoula Spanou

    Full Text Available Legumes and the polyphenolic compounds present in them have gained a lot of interest due to their beneficial health implications. Dietary polyphenolic compounds, especially flavonoids, exert antioxidant properties and are potent inhibitors of xanthine oxidase (XO activity. XO is the main contributor of free radicals during exercise but it is also involved in pathogenesis of several diseases such as vascular disorders, cancer and gout. In order to discover new natural, dietary XO inhibitors, some polyphenolic fractions and pure compounds isolated from two legume plant extracts were tested for their effects on XO activity. The fractions isolated from both Vicia faba and Lotus edulis plant extracts were potent inhibitors of XO with IC(50 values range from 40-135 µg/mL and 55-260 µg/mL, respectively. All the pure polyphenolic compounds inhibited XO and their K(i values ranged from 13-767 µM. Ten of the compounds followed the non competitive inhibitory model whereas one of them was a competitive inhibitor. These findings indicate that flavonoid isolates from legume plant extracts are novel, natural XO inhibitors. Their mode of action is under investigation in order to examine their potential in drug design for diseases related to overwhelming XO action.

  8. Characterization of alternative molecular forms of xanthine oxidase in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, E J; Joyce, P; Ryan, J P

    1973-02-01

    1. Two major forms of xanthine oxidase are demonstrated for the mouse. On polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis the duodenal form migrates faster towards the anode than that of the liver. Both forms also differ in their (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation patterns and sucrose-density-gradient molecular-weight determinations. 2. The liver form is fully converted into the duodenal form by incubation at 37 degrees C with 2.5mg of crude trypsin/ml for 1(1/2)h, without loss of activity. The trypsin-treated liver form behaves like the normal duodenal form as characterized by electrophoresis, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) precipitation patterns, and sucrose-density-gradient molecular-weight determinations. 3. Partial conversion is also brought about by purified trypsin and chymotrypsin, but not with beta-carboxypeptidase or lipase. The conversion is inhibited by soya-bean trypsin inhibitor. 4. In embryo mice the duodenal form is similar to the liver form on electrophoresis. 5. These studies indicate, as might be expected, that the duodenal form is a modified version of the liver enzyme, probably caused by proteolytic alteration.

  9. Characterization and Thermodynamic Relationship of Three Polymorphs of a Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitor, Febuxostat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jinish; Jagia, Moksh; Bansal, Arvind Kumar; Patel, Sarsvatkumar

    2015-11-01

    Febuxostat (FXT), a xanthine oxidase inhibitor, is an interesting and unique molecule, which exhibits extensive polymorphism, with over 15 polymorphic forms reported to date. The primary purpose of the study was to characterize the three polymorphic forms with respect to their thermodynamic quantities and establish thermodynamic relationship between them. The polymorphs were characterized by thermal and powder X-ray diffraction methods. Three different methods were used to calculate the transition temperatures (Ttr) and thereby their thermodynamic relationships. Although the first and second method used calorimetric data (melting point and heat of fusion), the third method employed the use of configurational free energy phase diagram. The onset melting points of three polymorphic forms were found to be 482.89 ± 0.37 K for form I, 476.30 ± 1.21 K for form II, and 474.19 ± 0.11 K for form III. Moreover, the powder X-ray diffraction patterns for each form were also unique. The polymorphic pair of form I and II and of form I and III was found to be enantiotropic, whereas pair of form II and III was monotropic. Besides the relative thermodynamic aspects (free energy differences, enthalpy, entropy contributions) using different methods, the pharmaceutical implications and phase transformation aspects have also been covered.

  10. Hydroxylated chalcones with dual properties: Xanthine oxidase inhibitors and radical scavengers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Emily; Webster, Jonathan; Do, Thuy; Kline, Reid; Snider, Lindsey; Hauser, Quintin; Higginbottom, Grace; Campbell, Austin; Ma, Lili; Paula, Stefan

    2016-02-15

    In this study, we evaluated the abilities of a series of chalcones to inhibit the activity of the enzyme xanthine oxidase (XO) and to scavenge radicals. 20 mono- and polyhydroxylated chalcone derivatives were synthesized by Claisen-Schmidt condensation reactions and then tested for inhibitory potency against XO, a known generator of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In parallel, the ability of the synthesized chalcones to scavenge a stable radical was determined. Structure-activity relationship analysis in conjunction with molecular docking indicated that the most active XO inhibitors carried a minimum of three hydroxyl groups. Moreover, the most effective radical scavengers had two neighboring hydroxyl groups on at least one of the two phenyl rings. Since it has been proposed previously that XO inhibition and radical scavenging could be useful properties for reduction of ROS-levels in tissue, we determined the chalcones' effects to rescue neurons subjected to ROS-induced stress created by the addition of β-amyloid peptide. Best protection was provided by chalcones that combined good inhibitory potency with high radical scavenging ability in a single molecule, an observation that points to a potential therapeutic value of this compound class.

  11. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of some leafy vegetables collected from Palakkad regions of Kerala

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    L. SUTHARSON

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sauropus androgynus, Aerva lanata & Benincasa hispida have been using as leafy vegetable in kerala. The investigation undertaken was aimed to study xanthine oxidase (XO inhibitory activity of these three plants and it was demonstrated the usefulness and beneficial effects in the treatment of Gout. Inhibition of XO is an effective therapeutic approach for treating hyperuricemia that causes gout. Allopurinol, a known inhibitor of XO, was used to validate the method and was adopted as positive control in the studies. The degree of inhibition was determined by measuring the increase in absorbance at 295 nm associated with uric acid formation. Aerva lanata showed a significant XO inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 62.53μg/ml. Benincasa hispida and Sauropus androgynus showed a moderate significant XO inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 67.97μg/ml,80.12 μg/ml respectively. The study recommended that leaves possess XO inhibitory activity that might be useful in preventing or slow down the progress of gout.

  12. Longevity and aging. Role of free radicals and xanthine oxidase. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labat-Robert, J; Robert, L

    2014-04-01

    Longevity and aging are differently regulated. Longevity has an important part of genetic determinants, aging is essentially post-genetic. Among the genes involved in longevity determination, sirtuins, activated also by calorie restriction and some others as the TOR pathway, attracted special interest after the insulin–IGF pathway first shown to regulate longevity in model organisms. For most of these genes, postponement of life-threatening diseases is the basis of their action which never exceeds about 35% of all determinants, in humans. Among the post-genetic mechanisms responsible for age-related decline of function, free radicals attracted early interest as well as the Maillard reaction, generating also free radicals. Most attempts to remediate to free radical damage failed however, although different scavenger mechanisms and protective substances are present in the organism. Synthetic protectors were also tested without success. The only example of a successful treatment of a free radical mediated pathology is the case of xanthine oxidase, involved in cardiovascular pathology, essentially during the ischemia-reperfusion process. Its inhibition by allopurinol is currently used to fight this deadly syndrome.

  13. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities and crystal structures of methoxyflavones from Kaempferia parviflora rhizome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Kikuyo; Murata, Kazuya; Deguchi, Takahiro; Itoh, Kimihisa; Fujita, Takanori; Higashino, Masayuki; Yoshioka, Yuri; Matsumura, Shin-Ichi; Tanaka, Rika; Shinada, Tetsuro; Ohfune, Yasufumi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP), a Zingiberaceae plant, is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms, including general pains, colic gastrointestinal disorders, and male impotence. In this study, the inhibitory activities of KP against xanthine oxidase (XOD) were investigated. The extract of KP rhizomes showed more potent inhibitory activity (38% at 500 µg/ml) than those of the other Zingiberaceae plants tested. Ten methoxyflavones were isolated from the KP extract as the major chemical components and their chemical structures were elucidated by X-ray crystallography. The structurally confirmed methoxyflavones were subjected to the XOD inhibitory test. Among them, 3,5,7,4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone and 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone showed inhibitory activities (IC(50) of 0.9 and >4 mM, respectively) and their modes of inhibition are clarified as competitive/non-competitive mixed type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to present the inhibitory activities of KP, 3,5,7,4',5'-pentamethoxyflavone and 3',4',5,7-tetramethoxyflavone against XOD.

  14. Determination of Hypoxanthine in Qinbai Qingfei Concentrated Pills by HPLC%HPLC测定芩百清肺浓缩丸中次黄嘌呤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟明; 霍金海; 孙国东

    2011-01-01

    目的:建立芩百清肺浓缩丸中次黄嘌呤的高效液相含量测定法.方法:采用HPLC-DAD法,色谱柱Diamonsil C18(4.6 mm×250 mm,5 μm);流动相甲醇-水(2∶98),检测波长254 nm,流速1.0 mL·min-1,柱温30℃.结果:次黄嘌呤在1.94~31.04μg呈良好线性关系,r=0.999 9,平均回收率为99.14%,RSD 1.28%.结论:方法操作简便、灵敏度高、准确性和重复性好,可作为芩百清肺浓缩丸的质量控制方法.%Objective:To establish the HPLC-DAD method for determination of the Hypoxanthine in Qinbaiqingfeinongsuo pills. Method :The separation was performed in a Diamonsil C is ( 4. 6 mm × 250 mm, 5 μm) column with a mobile phase of methanol-water (2: 98) in a flow rate of 1.0 mL·min-1 elution at 254 nm and the column temperature was 30 ℃. Result:The linear range of Hypoxanthine was 1.94-31.04 mg·L-1 (r =0. 999 9). The average recovery was 99. 14% , RSD 1.28%. Conclusion: This method is simple, reliable, accurate, which offers advantages of higher sensitivity and precision. It can be used for quality control of Qinbai qingfei nongsuo pills.

  15. Pt(Ⅱ), Pd(Ⅱ) and Ni(Ⅱ) Complexes Binding to the N(7) Position of Guanine: Influence on the Guanine and Watson-crick GC Base Pair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章志强; 周立新; 和芹; 赵亚英

    2005-01-01

    Comprehensive ab initio calculations were performed on the coordination of Pt(II), Pd(II) and Ni(II) adducts to the N(7) of guanine and guanine-cytosine (GC) base pair at the DFT level. The fully optimized geometries of the metal complexes were obtained and the stabilization energies of the interaction between metal adducts and nucleobase were calculated with B3LYP method by using 6-31* basis set for the light atom. While the effective core potential (ECP) is used for metal cation. The results show that both cispalladium and cisnickel cause similar geometric changes of the base pair as cisplatin. For the coordination of metal adducts to guanine, platinum adduct possesses the highest stabilization energy; but the interaction between metal-guanine and cytosine for nickel is larger than that for platinum and palladium. It is worthy to note that hydrolysis effect can also cause significant changes in H-bonds.

  16. Xanthine Oxidase Activity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients with and without Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

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    Dijana J. Miric

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationship between serum xanthine oxidase (XOD activity and the occurrence of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Serum XOD activity, ischemia-modified albumin (IMA, uric acid (UA, albumin, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, advanced glycation end products (AGE, total free thiols, atherogenic index of plasma (AIP, and body mass index (BMI were measured in 80 T2DM patients (29 with and 51 without DPN, and 30 nondiabetic control subjects. Duration of diabetes, hypertension, medication, and microalbuminuria was recorded. Serum XOD activities in controls, non-DPN, and DPN were 5.7±2.4 U/L, 20.3±8.6 U/L, and 27.5±10.6 U/L (p<0.01, respectively. XOD activity was directly correlated to IMA, UA, BMI, HbA1c, and AGE, while inversely correlated to serum total free thiols. A multivariable logistic regression model, which included duration of diabetes, hypertension, AIP, HbA1c, UA, and XOD activity, revealed HbA1c [OR = 1.03 (1.00–1.05; p=0.034] and XOD activity [OR = 1.07 (1.00–1.14; p=0.036] as independent predictors of DPN. Serum XOD activity was well correlated to several other risk factors. These results indicate the role of XOD in the development of DPN among T2DM patients.

  17. Regulation of xanthine dehydrogensase gene expression and uric acid production in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Ryan D; Hsu, Alan C-Y; Nichol, Kristy S; Jones, Bernadette; Knight, Darryl A; Wark, Peter A B; Hansbro, Philip M; Hirota, Jeremy A

    2017-01-01

    The airway epithelium is a physical and immunological barrier that protects the pulmonary system from inhaled environmental insults. Uric acid has been detected in the respiratory tract and can function as an antioxidant or damage associated molecular pattern. We have demonstrated that human airway epithelial cells are a source of uric acid. Our hypothesis is that uric acid production by airway epithelial cells is induced by environmental stimuli associated with chronic respiratory diseases. We therefore examined how airway epithelial cells regulate uric acid production. Allergen and cigarette smoke mouse models were performed using house dust mite (HDM) and cigarette smoke exposure, respectively, with outcome measurements of lung uric acid levels. Primary human airway epithelial cells isolated from clinically diagnosed patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were grown in submerged cultures and compared to age-matched healthy controls for uric acid release. HBEC-6KT cells, a human airway epithelial cell line, were grown under submerged monolayer conditions for mechanistic and gene expression studies. HDM, but not cigarette smoke exposure, stimulated uric acid production in vivo and in vitro. Primary human airway epithelial cells from asthma, but not COPD patients, displayed elevated levels of extracellular uric acid in culture. In HBEC-6KT, production of uric acid was sensitive to the xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) inhibitor, allopurinol, and the ATP Binding Cassette C4 (ABCC4) inhibitor, MK-571. Lastly, the pro-inflammatory cytokine combination of TNF-α and IFN-γ elevated extracellular uric acid levels and XDH gene expression in HBEC-6KT cells. Our results suggest that the active production of uric acid from human airway epithelial cells may be intrinsically altered in asthma and be further induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines.

  18. Renoprotective effect of the xanthine oxidoreductase inhibitor topiroxostat on adenine-induced renal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamijo-Ikemori, Atsuko; Sugaya, Takeshi; Hibi, Chihiro; Nakamura, Takashi; Murase, Takayo; Oikawa, Tsuyoshi; Hoshino, Seiko; Hisamichi, Mikako; Hirata, Kazuaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Shibagaki, Yugo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to reveal the effect of a xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) inhibitor, topiroxostat (Top), compared with another inhibitor, febuxostat (Feb), in an adenine-induced renal injury model. We used human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) chromosomal transgenic mice, and urinary L-FABP, a biomarker of tubulointerstitial damage, was used to evaluate tubulointerstitial damage. Male transgenic mice (n = 24) were fed a 0.2% (wt/wt) adenine-containing diet. Two weeks after the start of this diet, renal dysfunction was confirmed, and the mice were divided into the following four groups: the adenine group was given only the diet containing adenine, and the Feb, high-dose Top (Top-H), and low-dose Top (Top-L) groups were given diets containing Feb (3 mg/kg), Top-H (3 mg/kg), and Top-L (1 mg/kg) in addition to adenine for another 2 wk. After withdrawal of the adenine diet, each medication was continued for 2 wk. Serum creatinine levels, the degree of macrophage infiltration, tubulointerstitial damage, renal fibrosis, urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane levels, and renal XOR activity were significantly attenuated in the kidneys of the Feb, Top-L, and Top-H groups compared with the adenine group. Serum creatinine levels in the Top-L and Top-H groups as well as renal XOR in the Top-H group were significantly lower than those in the Feb group. Urinary excretion of L-FABP in both the Top-H and Top-L groups was significantly lower than in the adenine and Feb groups. In conclusion, Top attenuated renal damage in an adenine-induced renal injury model.

  19. A mouse model of early-onset renal failure due to a xanthine dehydrogenase nonsense mutation.

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    Sian E Piret

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by renal fibrosis that can lead to end-stage renal failure, and studies have supported a strong genetic influence on the risk of developing CKD. However, investigations of the underlying molecular mechanisms are hampered by the lack of suitable hereditary models in animals. We therefore sought to establish hereditary mouse models for CKD and renal fibrosis by investigating mice treated with the chemical mutagen N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea, and identified a mouse with autosomal recessive renal failure, designated RENF. Three-week old RENF mice were smaller than their littermates, whereas at birth they had been of similar size. RENF mice, at 4-weeks of age, had elevated concentrations of plasma urea and creatinine, indicating renal failure, which was associated with small and irregularly shaped kidneys. Genetic studies using DNA from 10 affected mice and 91 single nucleotide polymorphisms mapped the Renf locus to a 5.8 Mbp region on chromosome 17E1.3. DNA sequencing of the xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh gene revealed a nonsense mutation at codon 26 that co-segregated with affected RENF mice. The Xdh mutation resulted in loss of hepatic XDH and renal Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 expression. XDH mutations in man cause xanthinuria with undetectable plasma uric acid levels and three RENF mice had plasma uric acid levels below the limit of detection. Histological analysis of RENF kidney sections revealed abnormal arrangement of glomeruli, intratubular casts, cellular infiltration in the interstitial space, and interstitial fibrosis. TUNEL analysis of RENF kidney sections showed extensive apoptosis predominantly affecting the tubules. Thus, we have established a mouse model for autosomal recessive early-onset renal failure due to a nonsense mutation in Xdh that is a model for xanthinuria in man. This mouse model could help to increase our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with renal fibrosis and the

  20. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  1. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-01-01

    Inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26558346

  2. Uric acid, an important screening tool to detect inborn errors of metabolism: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinge, Eresha; Kularatnam, Grace Angeline Malarnangai; Dilanthi, Hewa Warawitage; Vidanapathirana, Dinesha Maduri; Jayasena, Kandana Liyanage Subhashinie Priyadarshika Kapilani Menike; Chandrasiri, Nambage Dona Priyani Dhammika; Indika, Neluwa Liyanage Ruwan; Ratnayake, Pyara Dilani; Gunasekara, Vindya Nandani; Fairbanks, Lynette Dianne; Stiburkova, Blanka

    2017-09-06

    Uric acid is the metabolic end product of purine metabolism in humans. Altered serum and urine uric acid level (both above and below the reference ranges) is an indispensable marker in detecting rare inborn errors of metabolism. We describe different case scenarios of 4 Sri Lankan patients related to abnormal uric acid levels in blood and urine. CASE 1: A one-and-half-year-old boy was investigated for haematuria and a calculus in the bladder. Xanthine crystals were seen in microscopic examination of urine sediment. Low uric acid concentrations in serum and low urinary fractional excretion of uric acid associated with high urinary excretion of xanthine and hypoxanthine were compatible with xanthine oxidase deficiency. CASE 2: An 8-month-old boy presented with intractable seizures, feeding difficulties, screaming episodes, microcephaly, facial dysmorphism and severe neuro developmental delay. Low uric acid level in serum, low fractional excretion of uric acid and radiological findings were consistent with possible molybdenum cofactor deficiency. Diagnosis was confirmed by elevated levels of xanthine, hypoxanthine and sulfocysteine levels in urine. CASE 3: A 3-year-10-month-old boy presented with global developmental delay, failure to thrive, dystonia and self-destructive behaviour. High uric acid levels in serum, increased fractional excretion of uric acid and absent hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme level confirmed the diagnosis of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. CASE 4: A 9-year-old boy was investigated for lower abdominal pain, gross haematuria and right renal calculus. Low uric acid level in serum and increased fractional excretion of uric acid pointed towards hereditary renal hypouricaemia which was confirmed by genetic studies. Abnormal uric acid level in blood and urine is a valuable tool in screening for clinical conditions related to derangement of the nucleic acid metabolic pathway.

  3. Prolonged fasting increases purine recycling in post-weaned northern elephant seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soñanez-Organis, José Guadalupe; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Aguilar, Andres; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2012-05-01

    Northern elephant seals are naturally adapted to prolonged periods (1-2 months) of absolute food and water deprivation (fasting). In terrestrial mammals, food deprivation stimulates ATP degradation and decreases ATP synthesis, resulting in the accumulation of purines (ATP degradation byproducts). Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) salvages ATP by recycling the purine degradation products derived from xanthine oxidase (XO) metabolism, which also promotes oxidant production. The contributions of HGPRT to purine recycling during prolonged food deprivation in marine mammals are not well defined. In the present study we cloned and characterized the complete and partial cDNA sequences that encode for HGPRT and xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in northern elephant seals. We also measured XO protein expression and circulating activity, along with xanthine and hypoxanthine plasma content in fasting northern elephant seal pups. Blood, adipose and muscle tissue samples were collected from animals after 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks of their natural post-weaning fast. The complete HGPRT and partial XOR cDNA sequences are 771 and 345 bp long and encode proteins of 218 and 115 amino acids, respectively, with conserved domains important for their function and regulation. XOR mRNA and XO protein expression increased 3-fold and 1.7-fold with fasting, respectively, whereas HGPRT mRNA (4-fold) and protein (2-fold) expression increased after 7 weeks in adipose tissue and muscle. Plasma xanthine (3-fold) and hypoxanthine (2.5-fold) levels, and XO (1.7- to 20-fold) and HGPRT (1.5- to 1.7-fold) activities increased during the last 2 weeks of fasting. Results suggest that prolonged fasting in elephant seal pups is associated with increased capacity to recycle purines, which may contribute to ameliorating oxidant production and enhancing the supply of ATP, both of which would be beneficial during prolonged food deprivation and appear to be adaptive in this species.

  4. A Minimal Rac Activation Domain in the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Dock180†

    OpenAIRE

    Xin WU; Ramachandran, Sekar; Cerione, Richard A.; Erickson, Jon W.

    2011-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of bound GDP for GTP, thereby resulting in downstream effector recognition. Two metazoan families of GEFs have been described: Dbl-GEF family members that share conserved Dbl homology (DH) and Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains and the more recently described Dock180 family members that share little sequence homology with the Dbl family and are characterized by conserved Dock homology regions 1 and 2 (DHR...

  5. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activities of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L. Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nana, Fernand W; Hilou, Adama; Millogo, Jeanne F; Nacoulma, Odile G

    2012-06-15

    This paper describes a preliminary assessment of the nutraceutical value of Amaranthus cruentus (A. cruentus) and Amaranthus hybridus (A. hybridus), two food plant species found in Burkina Faso. Hydroacetonic (HAE), methanolic (ME), and aqueous extracts (AE) from the aerial parts were screened for in vitro antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins and betalains. Hydroacetonic extracts have shown the most diversity for secondary metabolites. The TLC analyses of flavonoids from HAE extracts showed the presence of rutin and other unidentified compounds. The phenolic compound contents of the HAE, ME and AE extracts were determined using the Folin-Ciocalteu method and ranged from 7.55 to 10.18 mg Gallic acid equivalent GAE/100 mg. Tannins, flavonoids, and flavonols ranged from 2.83 to 10.17 mg tannic acid equivalent (TAE)/100 mg, 0.37 to 7.06 mg quercetin equivalent (QE) /100 mg, and 0.09 to 1.31 mg QE/100 mg, respectively. The betacyanin contents were 40.42 and 6.35 mg Amaranthin Equivalent/100 g aerial parts (dry weight) in A. cruentus and A. hybridus, respectively. Free-radical scavenging activity expressed as IC50 (DPPH method) and iron reducing power (FRAP method) ranged from 56 to 423 µg/mL and from 2.26 to 2.56 mmol AAE/g, respectively. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts of A. cruentus and A. hybridus were 3.18% and 38.22%, respectively. The A. hybridus extract showed the best antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibition activities. The results indicated that the phytochemical contents of the two species justify their traditional uses as nutraceutical food plants.

  6. Down-regulation of hepatic urea synthesis by oxypurines: xanthine and uric acid inhibit N-acetylglutamate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Itzhak; Horyn, Oksana; Nissim, Ilana; Daikhin, Yevgeny; Caldovic, Ljubica; Barcelona, Belen; Cervera, Javier; Tuchman, Mendel; Yudkoff, Marc

    2011-06-24

    We previously reported that isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), a derivative of oxypurine, inhibits citrulline synthesis by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we demonstrate that IBMX and other oxypurines containing a 2,6-dione group interfere with the binding of glutamate to the active site of N-acetylglutamate synthetase (NAGS), thereby decreasing synthesis of N-acetylglutamate, the obligatory activator of carbamoyl phosphate synthase-1 (CPS1). The result is reduction of citrulline and urea synthesis. Experiments were performed with (15)N-labeled substrates, purified hepatic CPS1, and recombinant mouse NAGS as well as isolated mitochondria. We also used isolated hepatocytes to examine the action of various oxypurines on ureagenesis and to assess the ameliorating affect of N-carbamylglutamate and/or l-arginine on NAGS inhibition. Among various oxypurines tested, only IBMX, xanthine, or uric acid significantly increased the apparent K(m) for glutamate and decreased velocity of NAGS, with little effect on CPS1. The inhibition of NAGS is time- and dose-dependent and leads to decreased formation of the CPS1-N-acetylglutamate complex and consequent inhibition of citrulline and urea synthesis. However, such inhibition was reversed by supplementation with N-carbamylglutamate. The data demonstrate that xanthine and uric acid, both physiologically occurring oxypurines, inhibit the hepatic synthesis of N-acetylglutamate. An important and novel concept emerging from this study is that xanthine and/or uric acid may have a role in the regulation of ureagenesis and, thus, nitrogen homeostasis in normal and disease states.

  7. Mechanism of porcine liver xanthine oxidoreductase mediated N-oxide reduction of cyadox as revealed by docking and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigang Chen

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424-434 loop, exhibited a much lower K(m and a decreased V(max respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides.

  8. Investigation of solvent polarity effect on molecular structure and vibrational spectrum of xanthine with the aid of quantum chemical computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat, Turgay; Yıldırım, Gurcan

    2014-04-05

    The main scope of this study is to determine the effects of 8 solvents on the geometric structure and vibrational spectra of the title compound, xanthine, by means of the DFT/B3LYP level of theory in the combination with the polarizable conductor continuum model (CPCM) for the first time. After determination of the most-steady state (favored structure) of the xanthine molecule, the role of the solvent polarity on the SCF energy (for the molecule stability), atomic charges (for charge distribution) and dipole moments (for molecular charge transfer) belonging to tautomer is discussed in detail. The results obtained indicate not only the presence of the hydrogen bonding and strong intra-molecular charge transfer (ICT) in the compound but the increment of the molecule stability with the solvent polarity, as well. Moreover, it is noted that the optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the available experimental results found in the literature. In fact, the correlations between the experimental and theoretical findings for the molecular structures improve with the enhancement of the solvent polarity. At the same time, the dimer forms of the xanthine compound are simulated to describe the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies. It is found that the CO and NH stretching vibrations shift regularly to lower frequency value with higher IR intensity as the dielectric medium enhances systematically due to the intermolecular NH⋯O hydrogen bonds. Theoretical vibrational spectra are also assigned based on the potential energy distribution (PED) using the VEDA 4 program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. N7-(carboxymethyl)guanine-Lithium Crystalline Complex: A Bioinspired Solid Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Dipak; Nagapradeep, N.; Zhu, Haijin; Forsyth, Maria; Verma, Sandeep; Bhattacharyya, Aninda J.

    2016-04-01

    Electrochemical device with components having direct significance to biological life processes is a potent futuristic strategy for the realization of all-round green and sustainable development. We present here synthesis design, structural analysis and ion transport of a novel solid organic electrolyte (G7Li), a compound reminiscent of ion channels, derived from regioisomeric N7-guanine-carboxylate conjugate and Li-ions. G7Li, with it’s in-built supply of Li+-ions, exhibited remarkably high lithium-ion transference number (= 0.75) and tunable room temperature ionic conductivity spanning three decades (≈10-7 to 10-3 Ω-1 cm-1) as a function of moisture content. The ionic conductivity show a distinct reversible transition around 80-100 °C, from a dual Li+ and H+ (100 °C). Systematic studies reveal a transition from water-assisted Li-ion transport to Li hopping-like mechanism involving guanine-Li coordination. While as-synthesized G7Li has potential in humidity sensors, the anhydrous G7Li is attractive for rechargeable batteries.

  10. A crystallographic view of interactions between Dbs and Cdc42: PH domain-assisted guanine nucleotide exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Rossman, Kent L.; Worthylake, David K.; Snyder, Jason T; Siderovski, David P.; Campbell, Sharon L; Sondek, John

    2002-01-01

    Dbl-related oncoproteins are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) specific for Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) and invariably possess tandem Dbl (DH) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains. While it is known that the DH domain is the principal catalytic subunit, recent biochemical data indicate that for some Dbl-family proteins, such as Dbs and Trio, PH domains may cooperate with their associated DH domains in promoting guanine nucleotide exchange of Rho GTPases. In order to gain ...

  11. Structural and functional insights into the catalytic inactivity of the major fraction of buffalo milk xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh S Gadave

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH and xanthine oxidase (XO, catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (k cat/K m of 0.11 sec(-1 µM(-1 of buffalo XO was 8-10 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (Δε430 nm of 46,000 M(-1 cm(-1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ∼30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD(+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. CONCLUSION: A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way.

  12. X-ray crystal structure of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase: μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongnan; Hall, James; Hille, Russ

    2011-08-17

    Xanthine oxidoreductase is a molybdenum-containing enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation reaction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon centers of a variety of substrates, including purines, aldehydes, and other heterocyclic compounds. The complex of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase has been characterized previously by UV-vis, electron paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and the catalytically essential sulfido ligand of the square-pyrimidal molybdenum center has been suggested to be involved in arsenite binding through either a μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridge or a single μ-sulfido bridge. However, this is contrary to the crystallographically observed single μ-oxo bridge between molybdenum and arsenic in the desulfo form of aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas (an enzyme closely related to xanthine oxidase), whose molybdenum center has an oxo ligand replacing the catalytically essential sulfur, as seen in the functional form of xanthine oxidase. Here we use X-ray crystallography to characterize the molybdenum center of arsenite-inhibited xanthine oxidase and solve the structures of the oxidized and reduced inhibition complexes at 1.82 and 2.11 Å resolution, respectively. We observe μ-sulfido,μ-oxo double bridges between molybdenum and arsenic in the active sites of both complexes. Arsenic is four-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-pyramidal geometry in the oxidized complex and three-coordinate with a distorted trigonal-planar geometry in the reduced complex. The doubly bridged binding mode is in agreement with previous XAS data indicating that the catalytically essential sulfur is also essential for the high affinity of reduced xanthine oxidoreductase for arsenite.

  13. Total purine and purine base content of common foodstuffs for facilitating nutritional therapy for gout and hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Aoyagi, Yasuo; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Inazawa, Katsunori; Yamaoka, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    Purines are natural substances found in all of the body's cells and in virtually all foods. In humans, purines are metabolized to uric acid, which serves as an antioxidant and helps to prevent damage caused by active oxygen species. A continuous supply of uric acid is important for protecting human blood vessels. However, frequent and high intake of purine-rich foods reportedly enhances serum uric acid levels, which results in gout and could be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the daily intake of dietary purines is recommended to be less than 400 mg to prevent gout and hyperuricemia. We have established an HPLC method for purine analysis and determined purines in a total of 270 foodstuffs. A relatively small number of foods contained concentrated amounts of purines. For the most part, purine-rich foods are also energy-rich foods, and include animal meats, fish meats, organs such as the liver and fish milt, and yeast. When the ratio of the four purine bases (adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, and xanthine) was compared, two groups of foods were identified: one that contained mainly adenine and guanine and one that contained mainly hypoxanthine. For patients with gout and hyperuricemia, the amount of total purines and the types of purines consumed, particularly hypoxanthine, are important considerations. In this context, the data from our analysis provide a purine content reference, and thereby clinicians and patients could utilize that reference in nutritional therapy for gout and hyperuricemia.

  14. Purine transport by malpighian tubules of pteridine-deficient eye color mutants of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D T; Bell, L A; Paton, D R; Sullivan, M C

    1979-06-01

    Uptakes of guanine into Malpighian tubules of wild-type Drosophila and the eye color mutants white (w), brown (bw), and pink-peach (pp) have been compared. Tubules for each of these mutants are unable to concentrate guanine intracellularly. The transport of xanthine and riboflavin is also deficient in w tubules. The transport of guanosine, adenine, hypoxanthine, and guanosine monophosphate is similar in wild-type and white Malpighian tubules. These data and other information about these mutants make it likely that these pteridine-deficient eye color mutants do not produce pigments because of the inability to transport a pteridine precursor. This view supports the hypothesis that mutants which lack both pteridine and ommochromes do so because precursors to both classes of pigments share a common transport system.

  15. Antidepressant-like effects of the xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor allopurinol in rats. A comparison with fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürbüz Özgür, Börte; Aksu, Hatice; Birincioğlu, Mustafa; Dost, Turhan

    2015-11-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase enzyme inhibitor that is widely used for the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. The activity of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, which metabolizes tryptophan (TRP), is decreased by xanthine oxidase inhibitors, causing TRP levels in the body to be increased. Increases in TRP levels in the brain might have antidepressant effects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the antidepressant effects of allopurinol compared to those of fluoxetine, which is a proven antidepressant. Thirty-two Wistar albino male rats were divided into four groups (control, 10mg/kg fluoxetine, 50mg/kg allopurinol, 50mg/kg allopurinol+10 mg/kg fluoxetine; n=8 per group), and forced swimming tests were performed before and after 14days of drug administration. Serotonin, 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid and uric acid levels were measured in blood samples after the final treatment. When allopurinol and fluoxetine were administered separately, a decrease in the duration of immobility and an increased duration of swimming were observed in the forced swimming test. The results showed similar antidepressant efficacies between allopurinol and fluoxetine. However, we found no statistically significant difference in the antidepressant effect of the combined therapy versus single drug therapy.

  16. Design, synthesis of novel pyranotriazolopyrimidines and evaluation of their anti-soybean lipoxygenase, anti-xanthine oxidase, and cytotoxic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïd, Abderrahim Ben; Romdhane, Anis; Elie, Nicolas; Touboul, David; Jannet, Hichem Ben; Bouajila, Jalloul

    2016-12-01

    The synthesis of 14-(aryl)-14H-naphto[2,1-b]pyrano[3,2-e][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine-2-yl) acetamidoximes 2a-e has been accomplished by reaction of 2-acetonitrile derivatives 1a-e with hydroxylamine. Cyclocondensation reaction of precursors 2a-e with some elctrophilic species such as ethylorthoformate, acetic anhydride, and methyl-acetoacetate provided the new oxadiazole derivatives 3a-e, 4a-e, and 5a-e, respectively. On the other hand, the reaction of precursors 2a-e with 2-chloropropanoyl chloride afforded the new acetimidamides 6a-e which evolve under reflux of toluene to the new oxadiazoles 7a-e. The synthetic compounds were screened for their anti-xanthine oxidase, anti-soybean lipoxygenase, and cytotoxic activities. Moderate to weak xanthine oxidase and soybean lipoxygenase inhibitions were obtained but significant cytotoxic activities were noted. The most cytotoxic activities were recorded mainly (i) 5a was the most active (IC50 = 4.0 μM) and selective against MCF-7 and (ii) 2a was cytotoxic against the four cell lines with selectivity for MCF-7 and OVCAR-3 (IC50 = 17 and 12 μM, respectively) while 2e is highly selective against OVCAR-3 (IC50 = 10 μM).

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Tart Cherry (Prunus cerasus) Juice on Xanthine Oxidoreductase Activity and its Hypouricemic and Antioxidant Effects on Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, F; Mohammad Shahi, M; Keshavarz, S A; Rashidi, M R

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tart cherry juice on serum uric acid levels, hepatic xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration), in normal and hyperuricemic rats. Tart cherry juice (5 ml/kg) was given by oral gavage to rats for 2 weeks. Allopurinol (5 mg/kg) was used as a positive control and was also given by oral gavage. Data showed that tart cherry juice treatment did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced (PTart cherry juice treatment also inhibited hepatic xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase activity. Moreover, a significant increase (Ptart cherry juice treated-rats in both normal and hyperuricemic groups. The oral administration of tart cherry juice also led to a significant reduction (Ptart cherry, it could not significantly change anti-oxidative parameters. These features of tart cherry make it an attractive candidate for the prophylactic treatment of hyperuricaemia, particularly if it is to be taken on a long-term basis. Further investigations to define its clinical efficacy would be highly desirable.

  18. The role of the C-terminal region on the oligomeric state and enzymatic activity of Trypanosoma cruzi hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Wanda M; Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Defelipe, Lucas A; Mitschler, André; Podjarny, Alberto; Santos, Javier; Delfino, José M

    2016-06-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase from Trypanosoma cruzi (TcHPRT) is a critical enzyme for the survival of the parasite. This work demonstrates that the full-length form in solution adopts a stable and enzymatically active tetrameric form, exhibiting large inter-subunit surfaces. Although this protein irreversibly aggregates during unfolding, oligomerization is reversible and can be modulated by low concentrations of urea. When the C-terminal region, which is predicted as a disordered stretch, is excised by proteolysis, TcHPRT adopts a dimeric state, suggesting that the C-terminal region acts as a main guide for the quaternary arrangement. These results are in agreement with X-ray crystallographic data presented in this work. On the other hand, the C-terminal region exhibits a modulatory role on the enzyme, as attested by the enhanced activity observed for the dimeric form. Bisphosphonates act as substrate-mimetics, uncovering long-range communications among the active sites. All in all, this work contributes to establish new ways applicable to the design of novel inhibitors that could eventually result in new drugs against parasitic diseases.

  19. Changes in serum and urinary uric acid levels in normal human subjects fed purine-rich foods containing different amounts of adenine and hypoxanthine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulé, D; Sarwar, G; Savoie, L

    1992-06-01

    The effect of ingesting some purine-rich foods (beef liver, haddock fillets and soybeans) on uric acid metabolism was investigated in 18 male subjects with no history of gout or kidney disorder. In a crossover design, three isoenergetic and isonitrogenous meals were fed to volunteers during a 3-week period. Only the content of uricogenic bases (adenine and hypoxanthine) varied among the test meals. Ingestion of all experimental meals caused an increase in serum uric acid levels at 120 minutes and this increase was more marked (about twofold) with haddock and soybean ingestion. In all groups, the postprandial serum uric acid levels at 240 minutes were lower than those obtained at 120 minutes, but still remained elevated in comparison to the fasting level. The test foods had little or no effect on serum and urinary creatinine values. As expected, 24-hour urinary uric acid excretion was similar for the three test meals due to the isonitrogenous load of proteins and purines. Assessment of each purine base content rather than the total purine content of foods should be considered in future recommendations for hyperuricemic individuals.

  20. Ab Initio Study of the Electron Transfer in an Ionized Stacked Complex of Guanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauët, Emilie; Liévin, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    The charge transfer process in an ionized stacking of two consecutive guanines (G5'G3')+ has been studied by means of state-averaged CASSCF/MRCI and RASSCF/RASPT2 calculations. The ground and two first excited states of the radical cation have been characterized, and the topology of the corresponding potential energy surfaces (PESs) has been studied as a function of all intermolecular geometrical parameters. The results demonstrate that the charge transfer process in (G5'G3')+ is governed by the avoiding crossing between the ground and first excited states of the complex. Relative translation motions of both guanines in their molecular planes are shown to lead to the charge migration between G5' and G3'. Five stationary points (three minima and two saddle points) have been characterized along the reaction path describing the passage of the positive charge from G5' to G3'. The global minimum on the PES is found to correspond to the charge configuration G5'+G3'. The existence of an intermediate minimum along the reaction path has been established, characterizing a structure where the positive charge is equally distributed between the two guanines. The calculated energy profile allowed us to determine the height of the potential energy barrier (7.33 kcal/mol) and to evaluate the electronic coupling at a geometry close to the avoiding crossing (3.6 kcal/mol). Test calculations showed that the topology of the ground state PES of the complex GG+ is qualitatively conserved upon optimization of the intramolecular geometrical parameters of the stationary points.

  1. Fragmentation of the adenine and guanine molecules induced by electron collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minaev, B. F., E-mail: bfmin@rambler.ru, E-mail: boris@theochem.kth.se [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine); Tomsk State University, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Shafranyosh, M. I.; Svida, Yu. Yu; Sukhoviya, M. I.; Shafranyosh, I. I. [Uzhgorod National University, 88000 Uzhgorod (Ukraine); Baryshnikov, G. V.; Minaeva, V. A. [Bohdan Khmelnitsky National University, 18031 Cherkasy (Ukraine)

    2014-05-07

    Secondary electron emission is the most important stage in the mechanism of radiation damage to DNA biopolymers induced by primary ionizing radiation. These secondary electrons ejected by the primary electron impacts can produce further ionizations, initiating an avalanche effect, leading to genome damage through the energy transfer from the primary objects to sensitive biomolecular targets, such as nitrogenous bases, saccharides, and other DNA and peptide components. In this work, the formation of positive and negative ions of purine bases of nucleic acids (adenine and guanine molecules) under the impact of slow electrons (from 0.1 till 200 eV) is studied by the crossed electron and molecular beams technique. The method used makes it possible to measure the molecular beam intensity and determine the total cross-sections for the formation of positive and negative ions of the studied molecules, their energy dependences, and absolute values. It is found that the maximum cross section for formation of the adenine and guanine positive ions is reached at about 90 eV energy of the electron beam and their absolute values are equal to 2.8 × 10{sup −15} and 3.2 × 10{sup −15} cm{sup 2}, respectively. The total cross section for formation of the negative ions is 6.1 × 10{sup −18} and 7.6 × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} at the energy of 1.1 eV for adenine and guanine, respectively. The absolute cross-section values for the molecular ions are measured and the cross-sections of dissociative ionization are determined. Quantum chemical calculations are performed for the studied molecules, ions and fragments for interpretation of the crossed beams experiments.

  2. Topoisomerase IB of Deinococcus radiodurans resolves guanine quadruplex DNA structures in vitro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swathi Kota; Hari S Misra

    2015-12-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans genome contains a large number of guanine repeats interrupted by a few non-guanine bases, termed G motifs. Some of these G motifs were shown forming guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA structure in vitro. How is the formation and relaxation of G4 DNA regulated in the genome of D. radiodurans is not known and is worth investigating. Here, we showed that the topoisomerase lb of D. radiodurans (DraTopolB) could change the electrophoretic mobility of fast migrating intramolecular rec-G4 DNA into the slow migrating species. DraTopolB also reduced the positive ellipticity in circular diachroism (CD) spectra of intramolecular rec-G4 DNA structures stabilized by K+. On the contrary, when DraTopolB is incubated with G-motifs annealed without K+, it showed neither any change in electrophoretic mobility nor was ellipticity of the CD spectra affected. DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase through G4 DNA structure was attenuated in the presence of G4 DNA binding drugs, which was abrogated by DraTopolB. This implies that DraTopolB could destabilize the G4 DNA structure, which is required for G4 drugs binding and stabilization. Camptothecin treatment inhibited DraTopolB activity on intramolecular G4 DNA structures. These results suggested that DraTopolB can relax intramolecular G4 DNA structure in vitro and it may be one such protein that could resolve G4 DNA under normal growth conditions in D. radiodurans.

  3. Experimental treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bovine intramammary infection using a guanine riboswitch ligand analog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ster, C; Allard, M; Boulanger, S; Lamontagne Boulet, M; Mulhbacher, J; Lafontaine, D A; Marsault, E; Lacasse, P; Malouin, F

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of intramammary infections (IMI). We recently demonstrated that Staph. aureus strains express the gene guaA during bovine IMI. This gene codes for a guanosine monophosphate synthetase and its expression is regulated by a guanine riboswitch. The guanine analog 2,5,6-triaminopyrimidine-4-one (PC1) is a ligand of the guanine riboswitch. Interactions between PC1 and its target result in inhibition of guanosine monophosphate synthesis and subsequent death of the bacterium. The present study describes the investigational use of PC1 for therapy of Staph. aureus IMI in lactating cows. The in vitro minimal inhibitory concentration of PC1 ranged from 0.5 to 4 μg/mL for a variety of Staph. aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strains and required a reducing agent for stability and full potency. A safety assessment study was performed, whereby the healthy quarters of 4 cows were infused with increasing doses of PC1 (0, 150, 250, and 500 mg). Over the 44 h following infusions, no obvious adverse effect was observed. Ten Holstein multiparous cows in mid lactation were then experimentally infused into 3 of the quarters with approximately 50 cfu of Staph. aureus strain SHY97-3906 and infection was allowed to progress for 2 wk before starting PC1 treatment. Bacterial counts reached then about 10(3) to 10(4) cfu/mL of milk. Infected quarters were treated with 1 of 3 doses of PC1 (0, 250, or 500 mg) after each morning and evening milking for 7d (i.e., 14 intramammary infusions of PC1). During the treatment period, milk from PC1-treated quarters showed a significant reduction in bacterial concentrations. However, this reduction of Staph. aureus count in milk was not maintained during the 4 wk following the end of the treatment and only 15% of the PC1-treated quarters underwent bacteriological cure. The somatic cell count and the quarter milk production were not affected by treatments. Although bacterial clearance was not achieved following

  4. Generation of Guanine – Thymidine Cross-links in DNA by Peroxynitrite/Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, is an important chemical mediator of inflammation. In aqueous solutions, it rapidly decomposes to the reactive species CO3•− and •NO2 radicals that are known to initiate the selective oxidation and nitration of guanine in DNA. We have previously demonstrated that the reactions of carbonate radical anions with guanine in 2′-deoxyoligoribonucleotides generate a previously unknown intrastrand cross-linked guanine-thymine product G*-T* with a covalent bond between the C8 (G*) and thymine N3 (T*) atoms (Crean et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 2008, 36, 742–755). In this work we demonstrate that G*-T* cross-linked products are also formed when peroxynitrite (0.1 mM) reacts with native DNA in aqueous solutions (pH 7.5–7.7) containing 25 mM carbon dioxide/bicarbonate, in addition to the well known nitration/oxidation products of guanine such as 8-nitroguanine (8-nitroG), 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole (NIm), 8-oxo-7,8-dehydroguanine (8-oxoG) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). The yields of these products, after enzymatic digestion with P1 nuclease and alkaline phosphatase to the nucleotide level, and reversed phase HPLC separation, were compared with those obtained with the uniformly, isotopically labeled 15N,13C-labeled 2′-deoxy oligoribonucleotides 5′-dGpT and 5′-dGpCpT. The d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) cross-linked products derived from the di- and tri-oligonucleotides, respectively, were used as standards for identifying the analogous lesions in calf thymus DNA by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS methods in the selected reaction-monitoring mode. The Nim and 8nitroG are the major products formed (~ 0.05% each), and lesser amounts of 8-oxoG (~ 0.02%), and d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) enzymatic digestion products (~ 0.002% each) were found. It is shown that the formation of d(G*pT*) enzyme digestion product can arise only from intrastrand cross-links, whereas d(G*-T*) can arise from both

  5. Generation of guanine-thymidine cross-links in DNA by peroxynitrite/carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2011-07-18

    Nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite is an important chemical mediator of inflammation. In aqueous solutions, it rapidly decomposes to the reactive species CO(3)(•-) and (•)NO(2) radicals that are known to initiate the selective oxidation and nitration of guanine in DNA. We have previously demonstrated that the reactions of carbonate radical anions with guanine in 2'-deoxyoligoribonucleotides generate a previously unknown intrastrand cross-linked guanine-thymine product G*-T* with a covalent bond between the C8 (G*) and the thymine N3 (T*) atoms (Crean Nucleic Acids Res. 2008, 36, 742-755). In this work, we demonstrate that G*-T* cross-linked products are also formed when peroxynitrite (0.1 mM) reacts with native DNA in aqueous solutions (pH 7.5-7.7) containing 25 mM carbon dioxide/bicarbonate, in addition to the well-known nitration/oxidation products of guanine such as 8-nitroguanine (8-nitro-G), 5-guanidino-4-nitroimidazole (NIm), 8-oxo-7,8-dehydroguanine (8-oxo-G), and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp). The yields of these products, after enzymatic digestion with P1 nuclease and alkaline phosphatase to the nucleotide level and reversed phase HPLC separation, were compared with those obtained with the uniformly, isotopically labeled (15)N,(13)C-labeled 2'-deoxy oligoribonucleotides 5'-dGpT and 5'-dGpCpT. The d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) cross-linked products derived from the di- and trioligonucleotides, respectively, were used as standards for identifying the analogous lesions in calf thymus DNA by isotope dilution LC-MS/MS methods in the selected reaction monitoring mode. The NIm and 8-nitro-G are the major products formed (∼0.05% each), and lesser amounts of 8-oxo-G (∼0.02%) and d(G*pT*) and d(G*-T*) enzymatic digestion products (∼0.002% each) were found. It is shown that the formation of d(G*pT*) enzyme digestion product can arise only from intrastrand cross-links, whereas d(G*-T*) can arise from both interstrand

  6. Insights into the biological functions of Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Mélanie; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-15

    Rho GTPases play key regulatory roles in many aspects of embryonic development, regulating processes such as differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, and migration. Two families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) found in metazoans, Dbl and Dock, are responsible for the spatiotemporal activation of Rac and Cdc42 proteins and their downstream signaling pathways. This review focuses on the emerging roles of the mammalian DOCK family in development and disease. We also discuss, when possible, how recent discoveries concerning the biological functions of these GEFs might be exploited for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  7. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some methylated xanthines and the laser desorption of caffeine and theophylline from thin layer chromatography plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1993-02-01

    Laser desorption/laser ionization time-of-flight mass spectra of caffeine, theophylline, theobromine and xanthine are reported. These mass spectra are compared with published spectra obtained using electron impact ionization. Mass spectra of caffeine and theophylline obtained by IR laser desorption from thin layer chromatography plates are also described. The laser desorption of materials from thin layer chromatography plates is discussed.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Lesch-Nyhan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and build up under the skin and cause gouty arthritis (arthritis caused by an accumulation of uric acid ... hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency hypoxanthine ... mental retardation syndrome juvenile hyperuricemia syndrome Lesch- ...

  9. Effect of hydration on the lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry of guanine: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, M K; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2005-09-15

    An ab-initio computational study was performed to investigate the effect of explicit hydration on the ground and lowest singlet PiPi* excited-state geometry and on the selected stretching vibrational frequencies corresponding to the different NH sites of the guanine acting as hydrogen-bond donors. The studied systems consisted of guanine interacting with one, three, five, six, and seven water molecules. Ground-state geometries were optimized at the HF level, while excited-state geometries were optimized at the CIS level. The 6-311G(d,p) basis set was used in all calculations. The nature of potential energy surfaces was ascertained via the harmonic vibrational frequency analysis; all structures were found minima at the respective potential energy surfaces. The changes in the geometry and the stretching vibrational frequencies of hydrogen-bond-donating sites of the guanine in the ground and excited state consequent to the hydration are discussed. It was found that the first solvation shell of the guanine can accommodate up to six water molecules. The addition of the another water molecule distorts the hydrogen-bonding network by displacing other neighboring water molecules away from the guanine plane.

  10. Simultaneous Determination of Adenine and Guanine Using Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots-Graphene Oxide Nanocomposite Modified Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaivani, Arumugam; Narayanan, Sangilimuthu Sriman

    2015-06-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor was fabricated by immobilizing Cadmium Selenide Quantum Dots (CdSe QDs)-Graphene Oxide (GO) nanocomposite on a paraffin wax impregnated graphite electrode (PIGE) and was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine. The CdSe QDs-GO nanocomposite was prepared by ultrasonication and was characterized with spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nanocomposite modified electrode was characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidative determination of adenine and guanine with a good peak separation of 0.31 V. This may be due to the high surface area and fast electron transfer kinetics of the nanocomposite. The modified electrode exhibited wide linear ranges from 0.167 μM to 245 μM for Guanine and 0.083 μM to 291 μM for Adenine with detection limits of 0.055 μM Guanine and 0.028 μM of Adenine (S/N = 3) respectively. Further, the modified electrode was used for the quantitative determination of adenine and guanine in herring sperm DNA with satisfactory results. The modified electrode showed acceptable selectivity, reproducibility and stability under optimal conditions.

  11. CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical determination of guanine and adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Yan [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Huang Qinan [Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Li Maoguo [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Huang Xingjiu [Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang Bin, E-mail: binfang_47@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Wang Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Sub-10 nm CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been constructed for electrochemial determination of guanine and adenine. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the nanoparticles CeO{sub 2}/MWCNTs. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the electrode modifying process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to study the electrocatalytic activity toward the electrochemical oxidation of guanine and adenine. The detection limit (S/N = 3) for adenine and guanine was found to be 20 and 10 nM, respectively. The obtained sensitivity toward guanine and adenine was 1.26 and 1.13 {mu}A/{mu}M in the linear concentration range 5-50 {mu}M and 5-35 {mu}M, respectively. These results demonstrate that the carbon nanotubes could provide huge locations and facilitate the adsorptive accumulation of the guanine and adenine, and the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles are promising substrates for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing.

  12. Role of xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and NO in the innate immune system of mammary secretion during active involution in dairy cows: manipulation with casein hydrolyzates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silanikove, Nissim; Shapiro, Fira; Shamay, Avi; Leitner, Gabriel

    2005-05-01

    The aims of this study were to test whether xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and NO are components of the innate immune system of mammary secretion during active involution in dairy cows, and whether the innate immune system is activated by casein hydrolysates. Our laboratory has shown recently that infusion of CNH into mammary glands induced involution and was associated with earlier increases in the concentrations of components of the innate immune system. Intact casein is inactive and served as control. Half of the glands of 8 Holstein cows scheduled for dry off (approximately 60 days before parturition) were injected for 3 days with a single dose of casein hydrolyzates and the contralateral glands with a single dose of intact casein with the same concentration. Involution elicited marked increases in xanthine oxidase and lactoperoxidase activities, and accumulation of urate and nitrate. NO and H(2)O(2) were constantly produced in the mammary gland secretion. Nitrite formed either by autooxidation of NO or by conversion of nitrate to nitrite by xanthine oxidase was converted into the powerful nitric dioxide radical by lactoperoxidase and H(2)O(2) that is derived from the metabolism of xanthine oxidase. Nitric dioxide is most likely responsible for the formation of nitrosothiols on thiol-bearing groups, which allows an extended NO presence in mammary secretion. Nitrite is effectively converted to nitrate, which accumulated in the range of approximately 25 microM -1 mM from the start of the experiment to the complete involution of glands. The mammary secretion in all glands was bactericidal and bacteriostatic during established involution, and this appeared sooner and more acutely in glands treated with casein hydrolyzates, within 8 to 24 h. It is concluded that xanthine oxidase, lactoperoxidase, and NO are components of the mammary innate immune system that form bactericidal and bacteriostatic activities in mammary secretions. The innate immune system play a

  13. Oxidation of Guanine by Carbonate Radicals Derived from Photolysis of Carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) Complexes and the pH Dependence of Intrastrand DNA Cross-links Mediated by Guanine Radical Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Crean, Conor; Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The carbonate radical anion CO3•− is a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, an important biological byproduct of the inflammatory response. The selective oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO3•− radicals is known to yield spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), guanidinohydantoin (Gh), and a novel intrastrand cross-linked product, 5’-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) between guanine C8 (G*) and thymine N3 (T*) atoms in the oligonucleotide (Crean et ...

  14. Exogenous ATP administration prevents ischemia/reperfusion-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury by modulation of hypoxanthine metabolic pathway in rat ovary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Kumbasar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, xanthine oxidase (XO, malondialdehyde (MDA, myeloperoxidase (MPO and glutathione (GSH levels in the ovarian tissues of rats during the development of ischemia and postischemia-induced reperfusion were investigated, and the effect of ATP on ischemia-reperfusion (I/R damage was biochemically and histopathologically examined. The results of the biochemical analyses demonstrated that ATP significantly reduced the level of XO and MDA and increased the amount of GSH in both ischemia and I/R-applied ovarian tissue at the doses administered. Furthermore, ATP significantly suppressed the increase in MPO activity that occurred following the application of post ischemia reperfusion in the ovarian tissue. The biochemical results obtained in the present study coincide with the histological findings. The severity of the pathological findings, such as dilatation, congestion, haemorrhage, oedema and polymorphonuclear nuclear leukocytes (PMNLs, increased in parallel with the increase observed in the products of XO metabolism. In conclusion, exogenously applied ATP prevented I/R damage by reducing the formation of XO in ischemic ovarian tissue.

  15. Electrocatalytic activity of oxidation products of guanine and 5'-GMP towards the oxidation of NADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Alvarez, Noemi de los; Lobo-Castanon, Maria Jesus; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Tunon-Blanco, Paulino [Departamento de Quimica Fisica y Analitica, Universidad de Oviedo, Julian Claveria 8, 33006 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: ptb@uniovi.es

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the potential electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of NADH of several oxidation products of guanine and its derivative guanosine-5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) on pyrolytic graphite electrodes (PGE). The distribution of products generated strongly depends on the experimental conditions. Our investigations focused on the oxidation products that are adsorbed on the electrode surface, are redox active and, exhibited electrocatalytic activity toward the oxidation of NADH. These compounds were electrochemically and kinetically characterized in terms of dependence of the formal potential on pH and electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}). The voltammetric and catalytic behavior of both guanine and 5'-GMP oxidation products was compared with that of other guanine derivatives we have previously studied. Some mechanistic aspects concerning the generation of the catalysts are also discussed.

  16. The role for an invariant aspartic acid in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases is examined using saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canyuk, B; Focia, P J; Eakin, A E

    2001-03-01

    The role of an invariant aspartic acid (Asp137) in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferases (HPRTs) was examined by site-directed and saturation mutagenesis, functional analysis, and X-ray crystallography using the HPRT from Trypanosoma cruzi. Alanine substitution (D137A) resulted in a 30-fold decrease of k(cat), suggesting that Asp137 participates in catalysis. Saturation mutagenesis was used to generate a library of mutant HPRTs with random substitutions at position 137, and active enzymes were identified by complementation of a bacterial purine auxotroph. Functional analyses of the mutants, including determination of steady-state kinetic parameters and pH-rate dependence, indicate that glutamic acid or glutamine can replace the wild-type aspartate. However, the catalytic efficiency and pH-rate profile for the structural isosteric mutant, D137N, were similar to the D137A mutant. Crystal structures of four of the mutant enzymes were determined in ternary complex with substrate ligands. Structures of the D137E and D137Q mutants reveal potential hydrogen bonds, utilizing several bound water molecules in addition to protein atoms, that position these side chains within hydrogen bond distance of the bound purine analogue, similar in position to the aspartate in the wild-type structure. The crystal structure of the D137N mutant demonstrates that the Asn137 side chain does not form interactions with the purine substrate but instead forms novel interactions that cause the side chain to adopt a nonfunctional rotamer. The results from these structural and functional analyses demonstrate that HPRTs do not require a general base at position 137 for catalysis. Instead, hydrogen bonding sufficiently stabilizes the developing partial positive charge at the N7-atom of the purine substrate in the transition-state to promote catalysis.

  17. N7-guanine adducts of the epoxy metabolites of 1,3-butadiene in mice lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, P; Peltonen, K

    2001-06-01

    Epoxy metabolites of 1,3-butadiene are electrophilic and can bind to nucleophilic sites in DNA forming DNA adducts. In this study, guanine N7 adducts of epoxy butene and guanine N7 adducts of epoxy butanediol were measured in lung tissues of mice inhalation exposed to various concentrations of 1,3-butadiene. 32P-postlabeling of DNA adducts were used to demonstrate that the DNA adducts derived from epoxybutene and epoxybutanediol were formed in a dose dependent manner. More than 98% of all adducts detected were formed from epoxybutanediol. Enantiomeric distribution of the adducts formed in vivo differs from that of in vitro experiments demonstrated before. In the case of epoxybutene most of the adducts were formed to the terminal carbon of the S-epoxybutene enantiomer. Most of the adducts derived from epoxybutanediol were formed from the 2S-3R enantiomer. The data demonstrates that enzymatic processes involved with activation and/or detoxification of the metabolites are enantiospecific and/or DNA repair machinery repairs the damage with stereochemical considerations. These are the crucial factors if interspecies differences in tumor sensitiveness is concerned.

  18. The Emerging Role of Guanine Exchange Factors in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian eDroppelmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Small GTPases participate in a broad range of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation and migration. The exchange of GDP for GTP resulting in the activation of these GTPases is catalyzed by a group of enzymes called guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, of which two classes: Dbl-related exchange factors and the more recently described Dock family exchange factors. Increasingly, deregulation of normal GEF activity or function has been associated with a broad range of disease states, including neurodegeneration and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this review, we examine this evidence with special emphasis on the novel role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RGNEF/p190RhoGEF in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. RGNEF is the first neurodegeneration-linked GEF that regulates not only RhoA GTPase activation but also functions as an RNA binding protein that directly acts with low molecular weight neurofilament (NEFL mRNA 3’UTR to regulate its stability. This dual role for RGNEF, coupled with the increasing understanding of the key role for GEFs in modulating the GTPase function in cell survival suggests a prominent role for GEFs in mediating a critical balance between cytotoxicity and neuroprotection which, when disturbed, contributes to neuronal loss.

  19. New investigations of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijanić, Ivana; Matković-Čalogović, Dubravka; Pilepić, Viktor; Ivanišević, Irena; Mohaček-Grošev, Vlasta; Sanković, Krešimir

    2017-01-01

    Crystals of the guanine trichloro cuprate(II) complex, (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O (HGua = protonated guanine), were prepared and analysed by spectroscopic (IR, Raman) and computational methods. A new single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was conducted to obtain data with lower standard uncertainties than those in the previously published structure. Raman and IR spectroscopy and quantum-mechanical analysis gave us new insight into the vibrational states of the (HGua)2[Cu2Cl6]·2H2O crystal. The vibrational spectra of the crystal were assigned by performing a normal coordinate analysis for a free dimer with a centre of inversion as the only symmetry element. The stretching vibration observed at 279 cm-1 in the infrared spectrum corresponds to the N-Cu bond. The noncovalent interaction (NCI) plots and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analysis of the electron density obtained from periodic DFT calculations elucidated the interactions that exist within the crystal structure. Closed-shell ionic attractions, as well as weak and medium strength hydrogen bonds, prevailed in the crystal packing.

  20. Electronic structure of some adenosine receptor antagonists. III. Quantitative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of alkyl xanthines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, H.; Shalaby, Samia H.; El-sawy, K. M.; Hilal, Rifaat

    2002-07-01

    Quantitative and comparative investigation of the electronic absorption spectra of theophylline, caffeine and their derivatives is reported. The spectra of theophylline, caffeine and theobromine were compared to establish the predominant tautomeric species in solution. This comparison, analysis of solvent effects and assignments of the observed transitions via MO computations indicate the exits of only one tautomeric species in solution that is the N7 form. A low-lying triplet state was identified which corresponds to a HOMO-LUMO transition. This relatively long-lived T 1 state is always less polar than the ground state and may very well underlie the photochemical reactivity of alkyl xanthines. Substituents of different electron donating or withdrawing strengths and solvent effects are investigated and analyzed. The present analysis is facilitated via computer deconvolution of the observed spectra and MO computation.

  1. Palm vitamin E reduces catecholamines, xanthine oxidase activity and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Fahami Nur Azlina

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study examined the effects of Palm vitamin E (PVE and α-tocopherol (α-TF supplementations on adrenalin, noradrenalin, xanthine oxidase plus dehydrogenase (XO + XD activities and gastric lesions in rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS. Methods Sixty male Sprague–Dawley rats (200-250 g were randomly divided into three equal sized groups. The control group was given a normal diet, while the treated groups received the same diet with oral supplementation of PVE or α-TF at 60 mg/kg body weight. After the treatment period of 28 days, each group was further subdivided into two groups with 10 rats without exposing them to stress and the other 10 rats were subjected to WIRS for 3.5 hours. Blood samples were taken to measure the adrenalin and noradrenalin levels. The rats were then sacrificed following which the stomach was excised and opened along the greater curvature and examined for lesions and XO + XD activities. Results The rats exposed to WIRS had lesions in their stomach mucosa. Our findings showed that dietary supplementations of PVE and α-TF were able to reduce gastric lesions significantly in comparison to the stressed control group. WIRS increased plasma adrenalin and noradrenalin significantly. PVE and α-TF treatments reduced these parameters significantly compared to the stressed control. Conclusions Supplementations with either PVE or α-TF reduce the formation of gastric lesions. Their protective effect was related to their abilities to inhibit stress induced elevation of adrenalin and noradrenalin levels as well as through reduction in xanthine oxidase and dehydrogenase activities.

  2. The reductive half-reaction of xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus: the role of Glu232 in catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, James; Reschke, Stefan; Cao, Hongnan; Leimkühler, Silke; Hille, Russ

    2014-11-14

    The kinetic properties of an E232Q variant of the xanthine dehydrogenase from Rhodobacter capsulatus have been examined to ascertain whether Glu(232) in wild-type enzyme is protonated or unprotonated in the course of catalysis at neutral pH. We find that kred, the limiting rate constant for reduction at high [xanthine], is significantly compromised in the variant, a result that is inconsistent with Glu(232) being neutral in the active site of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of the pH dependence of both kred and kred/Kd from reductive half-reaction experiments between wild-type and enzyme and the E232Q variant suggests that the ionized Glu(232) of wild-type enzyme plays an important role in catalysis by discriminating against the monoanionic form of substrate, effectively increasing the pKa of substrate by two pH units and ensuring that at physiological pH the neutral form of substrate predominates in the Michaelis complex. A kinetic isotope study of the wild-type R. capsulatus enzyme indicates that, as previously determined for the bovine and chicken enzymes, product release is principally rate-limiting in catalysis. The disparity in rate constants for the chemical step of the reaction and product release, however, is not as great in the bacterial enzyme as compared with the vertebrate forms. The results indicate that the bacterial and bovine enzymes catalyze the chemical step of the reaction to the same degree and that the faster turnover observed with the bacterial enzyme is due to a faster rate constant for product release than is seen with the vertebrate enzyme.

  3. 黄嘌呤氧化还原酶与代谢综合征%Xanthine oxidoreductase and metabolic syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严天连; 徐承富; 厉有名

    2013-01-01

    黄嘌呤氧化还原酶(XOR)通过将嘌呤分解为尿酸,控制着人体内嘌呤代谢的限速步骤.近年来研究表明XOR活性的异常不仅可导致高尿酸血症和痛风,还积极地参与了代谢综合征的发生、发展.XOR如何影响肥胖、高血压、动脉粥样硬化、糖尿病等代谢综合征相关疾病尚不明确,其可能机制包括调节脂质代谢转录调控因子,影响尿酸、一氧化氮及活性氧簇的生成等.XOR抑制剂如别嘌呤醇和非布索坦对上述疾病有一定的保护效果,这为代谢综合征的防治提供了新思路.%Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) controls the rate limiting step of purine catabolism by converting xanthine to uric acid.Recent studies showed that the abnormal activity of XOR not only led to hyperuricemia and gout,but also actively participated in the development of metabolic syndrome.However,how XOR affects obesity,hypertension,atherosclerosis,diabetes and other metabolic syndrome related diseases remains unclear.Its possible mechanism includes regulating the transcription factors of adipogenesis,affecting the synthesis of uric acid,nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species,etc.XOR inhibitor such as allopurinol and febuxostat has a protective effect of the diseases mentioned above.These findings would provide new ideas for treatment of metabolic syndrome.

  4. Circulating purine compounds, uric acid, and xanthine oxidase/dehydrogenase relationship in essential hypertension and end stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boban, Milojkovic; Kocic, Gordana; Radenkovic, Sonja; Pavlovic, Radmila; Cvetkovic, Tatjana; Deljanin-Ilic, Marina; Ilic, Stevan; Bobana, Milojkovic D; Djindjic, Boris; Stojanovic, Dijana; Sokolovic, Dusan; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleotide liberation and their metabolic rate of interconversion may be important in the development of hypertension and its renal consequences. In the present study, blood triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) breakdown pathway was evaluated in relation to uric acid concentration and xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) in patients with essential hypertension, patients with chronic renal diseases on dialysis, and control individuals. The pattern of nucleotide catabolism was significantly shifted toward catabolic compounds, including ADP, AMP, and uric acid in patients on dialysis program. A significant fall of ATP was more expressed in a group of patients on dialysis program, compared with the control value (p<0.001), while ADP and AMP were significantly increased in both groups of patients compared with control healthy individuals (p<0.001), together with their final degradation product, uric acid (p<0.001). The index of ATP/ADP and ATP/uric acid showed gradual significant fall in both the groups, compared with the control value (p<0.001), near five times in a group on dialysis. Total XOD was up-regulated significantly in a group with essential hypertension, more than in a group on dialysis. The activity of XO, which dominantly contributes reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, significantly increased in dialysis group, more than in a group with essential hypertension. In conclusion, the examination of the role of circulating purine nucleotides and uric acid in pathogenesis of hypertension and possible development of renal disease, together with XO role in ROS production, may help in modulating their liberation and ROS production in slowing progression from hypertension to renal failure.

  5. Studies by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies of Bonding Dynamics at the Graphene/Guanine Interface - A Proposal for High Mobility, Organic Graphene Field Effect Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2015-0034 Studies by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies of Bonding Dynamics at the Graphene/Guanine...April 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Studies by Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopies of Bonding Dynamics at the Graphene/Guanine Interface - A

  6. Polymerase recognition of 2-thio-iso-guanine·5-methyl-4-pyrimidinone (iGs·P)--A new DD/AA base pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Kye; Switzer, Christopher

    2016-02-15

    Polymerase specificity is reported for a previously unknown base pair with a non-standard DD/AA hydrogen bonding pattern: 2-thio-iso-guanine·5-methyl-4-pyrimidinone. Our findings suggest that atomic substitution may provide a solution for low fidelity previously associated with enzymatic copying of iso-guanine.

  7. Pathways of arachidonic acid peroxyl radical reactions and product formation with guanine radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Conor; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-02-01

    Peroxyl radicals were derived from the one-electron oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids by sulfate radicals that were generated by the photodissociation of peroxodisulfate anions in air-equilibrated aqueous solutions. Reactions of these peroxyl and neutral guanine radicals, also generated by oxidation with sulfate radicals, were investigated by laser kinetic spectroscopy, and the guanine oxidation products were identified by HPLC and mass spectrometry methods. Sulfate radicals rapidly oxidize arachidonic (ArAc), linoleic (LnAc), and palmitoleic (PmAc) acids with similar rate constants, (2-4) x 10 (9) M (-1) s (-1). The C-centered radicals derived from the oxidation of ArAc and LnAc include nonconjugated Rn(.) ( approximately 80%) and conjugated bis-allylic Rba(.) ( approximately 20%) radicals. The latter were detectable in the absence of oxygen by their prominent, narrow absorption band at 280 nm. The Rn(.) radicals of ArAc (containing three bis-allylic sites) transform to the Rba(.) radicals via an intramolecular H-atom abstraction [rate constant (7.5 +/- 0.7) x 10 (4) s (-1)]. In contrast, the Rn(.) radicals of LnAc that contain only one bis-allylic site do not transform intramolecularly to the Rba(.) radicals. In the case of PmAc, which contains only one double bond, the Rba(.) radicals are not observed. The Rn(.) radicals of PmAc rapidly combine with oxygen with a rate constant of (3.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The Rba(.) radicals of ArAc are less reactive and react with oxygen with a rate constant of (2.2 +/- 0.2) x 10 (8) M (-1) s (-1). The ArAc peroxyl radicals formed spontaneously eliminate superoxide radical anions [rate constant = (3.4 +/- 0.3) x 10 (4) M (-1) s (-1)]. The stable oxidative lesions derived from the 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetylguanosine or 2',3',5'-tri- O-acetyl-8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine radicals and their subsequent reactions with ArAc peroxyl radicals were also investigated. The major products found were the 2,5-diamino-4 H

  8. The guanine cation radical: investigation of deprotonation states by ESR and DFT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Becker, David; Sevilla, Michael D

    2006-11-30

    This work reports ESR studies that identify the favored site of deprotonation of the guanine cation radical (G*+) in an aqueous medium at 77 K. Using ESR and UV-visible spectroscopy, one-electron oxidized guanine is investigated in frozen aqueous D2O solutions of 2'-deoxyguanosine (dGuo) at low temperatures at various pHs at which the guanine cation radical, G*+ (pH 3-5), singly deprotonated species, G(-H)* (pH 7-9), and doubly deprotonated species, G(-2H)*- (pH > 11), are found. C-8-deuteration of dGuo to give 8-D-dGuo removes the major proton hyperfine coupling at C-8. This isolates the anisotropic nitrogen couplings for each of the three species and aids our analyses. These anisotropic nitrogen couplings were assigned to specific nitrogen sites by use of 15N-substituted derivatives at N1, N2, and N3 atoms in dGuo. Both ESR and UV-visible spectra are reported for each of the species: G*+, G(-H)*, and G(-2H)*-. The experimental anisotropic ESR hyperfine couplings are compared to those obtained from DFT calculations for the various tautomers of G(-H)*. Using the B3LYP/6-31G(d) method, the geometries and energies of G*+ and its singly deprotonated state in its two tautomeric forms, G(N1-H)* and G(N2-H)*, were investigated. In a nonhydrated state, G(N2-H)* is found to be more stable than G(N1-H)*, but on hydration with seven water molecules G(N1-H)* is found to be more stable than G(N2-H)*. The theoretically calculated hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs) of G*+, G(N1-H)*, and G(-2H)*- match the experimentally observed HFCCs best on hydration with seven or more waters. For G(-2H)*-, the hyperfine coupling constant (HFCC) at the exocyclic nitrogen atom (N2) is especially sensitive to the number of hydrating water molecules; good agreement with experiment is not obtained until nine or 10 waters of hydration are included.

  9. Hydroxyl radical (OH•) reaction with guanine in an aqueous environment: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anil; Pottiboyina, Venkata; Sevilla, Michael D

    2011-12-22

    The reaction of hydroxyl radical (OH(•)) with DNA accounts for about half of radiation-induced DNA damage in living systems. Previous literature reports point out that the reaction of OH(•) with DNA proceeds mainly through the addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds of the DNA bases. However, recently it has been reported that the principal reaction of OH(•) with dGuo (deoxyguanosine) is the direct hydrogen atom abstraction from its exocyclic amine group rather than addition of OH(•) to the C═C bonds. In the present work, these two reaction pathways of OH(•) attack on guanine (G) in the presence of water molecules (aqueous environment) are investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP method with 6-31G* and 6-31++G** basis sets. The calculations show that the initial addition of the OH(•) at C(4)═C(5) double bond of guanine is barrier free and the adduct radical (G-OH(•)) has only a small activation barrier of ca. 1-6 kcal/mol leading to the formation of a metastable ion-pair intermediate (G(•+)---OH(-)). The formation of ion-pair is a result of the highly oxidizing nature of the OH(•) in aqueous media. The resulting ion-pair (G(•+)---OH(-)) deprotonates to form H(2)O and neutral G radicals favoring G(N(1)-H)(•) with an activation barrier of ca. 5 kcal/mol. The overall process from the G(C(4))-OH(•) (adduct) to G(N(1)-H)(•) and water is found to be exothermic in nature by more than 13 kcal/mol. (G-OH(•)), (G(•+)---OH(-)), and G(N(1)-H)(•) were further characterized by the CAM-B3LYP calculations of their UV-vis spectra and good agreement between theory and experiment is achieved. Our calculations for the direct hydrogen abstraction pathway from N(1) and N(2) sites of guanine by the OH(•) show that this is also a competitive route to produce G(N(2)-H)(•), G(N(1)-H)(•) and H(2)O.

  10. Reduced Graphene Oxide/α-Cyclodextrin-Based Electrochemical Sensor: Characterization and Simultaneous Detection of Adenine, Guanine and Thymine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan ZOR

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene, the rising star of carbon nanomaterials, is a single layer of sp2-bonded carbon atoms patterned in a 2D honeycomb network. Thanks to its unique features, graphene has attracted enormous attention and it has arisen various applications in the fields of optical and electrochemical sensors. In the present work, reduced graphene oxide/alpha cyclodextrin (rGO/α-CD is proposed as a nanocomposite for individual and simultaneous detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. rGO/α-CD has been characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, AFM, HR-TEM and SEM techniques. Cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry techniques were utilized for detection of adenine, guanine and thymine. The limit of detection (LOD values for adenine, guanine and thymine were calculated to be 145.5, 38.9 and 52.9 nmol L-1, respectively. The results show that the developed sensor can be utilized for the determination of adenine, guanine and thymine in human serum, indicating its promising application in the analysis of real samples.

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein interacts with β5 subunit of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding protein

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    Chen Wei

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To isolate cellular proteins interacting with hepatitis B virus X protein (HBX, from HepG2 cells infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV. Results HBV particles were produced in culture medium of HepG2 cells transfected with the mammalian expression vector containing the linear HBV genome, as assessed by commercially available ELISA assay. A cDNA library was made from these cells exposed to HBV. From yeast two hybrid screening with HBX as bait, human guanine nucleotide binding protein β subunit 5L (GNβ5 was isolated from the cDNA library constructed in this study as a new HBX-interacting protein. The HBX-GNβ5 interaction was further supported by mammalian two hybrid assay. Conclusion The use of a cDNA library constructed from HBV-transfected HepG2 cells has resulted in the isolation of new cellular proteins interacting with HBX.

  12. INTRACELLULAR Leishmania amazonensis KILLING INDUCED BY THE GUANINE NUCLEOSIDE 8-BROMOGUANOSINE

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    GIORGIO Selma

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effect of 8-Bromoguanosine, an immunostimulatory compound, on the cytotoxicity of macrophages against Leishmania amazonensis in an in vitro system. The results showed that macrophages treated with 8-Bromoguanosine before or after infection are capable to reduce parasite load, as monitored by the number of amastigotes per macrophage and the percentage of infected cells (i.e. phagocytic index. Since 8-Bromoguanosine was not directly toxic to the promastigotes, it was concluded that the ribonucleoside induced macrophage activation. Presumably, 8-Bromoguanosine primed macrophages by inducing interferon alpha and beta which ultimately led to L. amazonensis amastigote killing. The results suggest that guanine ribonucleosides may be useful to treat infections with intracellular pathogens.

  13. Simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in ruminant bacterial pellets by ion-pair HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Moral, Pilar; Arín, María Jesús; Resines, José Antonio; Díez, María Teresa

    2005-11-05

    An ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection was used to measure adenine (A) and guanine (G) in lyophilized bacterial pellets from ruminants using allopurinol as internal standard. The separation was performed on a Symmetry C18 column and the detection was monitored at 280 nm. Calibration curves were found to be linear in the concentration range from 5 to 50 mg/l with correlation coefficients (r2)>0.999. Mean recoveries of A and G standards added to bacterial samples were 102.2 and 98.2, respectively. The method proposed yielded sharp, well-resolved peaks within 25 min and was successfully applied for the determination of A and G in bacterial pellets.

  14. Zizimin and Dock guanine nucleotide exchange factors in cell function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakes, Nicholl K; Veltman, Douwe M; Williams, Robin S B

    2013-01-01

    Zizimin proteins belong to the Dock (Dedicator of Cytokinesis) superfamily of Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) proteins. This family of proteins plays a role in the regulation of Rho family small GTPases. Together the Rho family of small GTPases and the Dock/Zizimin proteins play a vital role in a number of cell processes including cell migration, apoptosis, cell division and cell adhesion. Our recent studies of Zizimin proteins, using a simple biomedical model, the eukaryotic social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, have helped to elucidate the cellular role of these proteins. In this article, we discuss the domain structure of Zizimin proteins from an evolutionary viewpoint. We also compare what is currently known about the mammalian Zizimin proteins to that of related Dock proteins. Understanding the cellular functions of these proteins will provide a better insight into their role in cell signaling, and may help in treating disease pathology associated with mutations in Dock/Zizimin proteins.

  15. Circular dichroism anisotrophy of DNA with different modifications at N7 of guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavriev, S K; Minchenkova, L E; Vorlícková, M; Kolchinsky, A M; Volkenstein, M V; Ivanov, V I

    1979-09-27

    The complexex DNA-Ag1+, DNA-Cu1+, protonated DNA and DNA methylated at N7 of guanine were oriented by pumping the solutions through a multicapillary cell in the direction of a light beam. The CD components along the DNA axis, delta epsilon parallel, and normal to it, 2 delta epsilon perpendicular, were calculated from the CD spectra of the oriented samples by the method of Chung and Holzwarth, (1975) J. Mol. Biol. 92, 449--466. It was shown that in most cases, except that of the protonated DNA, the degree of orientation was only slightly less than that for pure DNA. This demonstrated the absence of aggregation and of appreciable denaturation. In all cases the modifications of DNA give rise to a negative component 2 delta epsilon perpendicular, whose magnitude increased as the extent of modification increased. From both the CD spectra of non-oriented samples and the absorption spectra, an inference is drawn that Ag1+ and Cu1+ are attached to the same site as CH3 groups i.e., to the N7 atom of guanine. Proton transfer along the H-bond from the N1 atom of G to the N3 atom of the complementary cytosine is suggested to be a result of the modifications, although the case of H+-DNA may differ from the others. Based on the CD spectra for the anisotropic components, delta epsilon parallel and 2 delta epsilon perpendicular, it is proposed that ligand binding is accompanied by winding of the DNA helix.

  16. Guanine holes are prominent targets for mutation in cancer and inherited disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Bacolla

    Full Text Available Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G • C bp in the context of all 64 5'-NGNN-3' motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials. Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease.

  17. Low-interferences Determination of the Antioxidant Capacity in Fruits Juices Based on Xanthine Oxidase and Mediated Amperometric Measurements in the Reduction Mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Radulescu, Maria-Cristina; Bucur, Bogdan; Radu, Gabriel Lucian

    2016-01-01

    A low-interferences enzymatic sensor for evaluating the antioxidant capacity was developed. Xanthine oxidase was used to produce superoxide radicals that spontaneously dismutate to hydrogen peroxide. Low xanthine concentrations were used to minimize the rapid dismutation of the superoxide radical before its fast reaction with antioxidants. The sensor operates in the reduction mode, and evaluations with low interferences of the antioxidant capacity are based on the detection of remaining hydrogen peroxide using Prussian blue electrodes at low potentials. The linear calibration graph is between 2 - 10 μM ascorbic acid. No interferences were observed from easily oxidisable substances including uric acid, which is produced in the enzymatic reaction or other substances usually found in foods. The method was used to evaluate the antioxidant capacity in different real juice samples.

  18. In vitro antioxidant, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of fractions from Cienfuegosia digitata Cav., Sida alba L. and Sida acuta Burn f. (Malvaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaté, K; Souza, A; Coulibaly, A Y; Meda, N T R; Kiendrebeogo, M; Lamien-Meda, A; Millogo-Rasolodimby, J; Lamidi, M; Nacoulma, O G

    2010-11-15

    In this study polyphenol content, antioxidant activity, lipoxygenase (LOX) and Xanthine Oxidase (XO) inhibitory effects of n-hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of aqueous acetone extracts from S. alba L., S. acuta Burn f and Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. were investigated. The total phenolics, flavonoids, flavonols and total tannins were determined by spectrophotometric methods using Folin-ciocalteu, AlCl3 reagents and tannic acid, respectively. The antioxidant potential was evaluated using three methods: inhibition of free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydramzyl (DPPH), ABTS radical cation decolorization assay and Iron (III) to iron (II) reduction activity (FRAP). For enzymatic activity, lipoxygenase and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities were used. This study shows a relationship between polyphenol contents, antioxidant and enzymatic activities. Present results showed that ethyl acetate and dichloromethane fractions elicit the highest polyphenol content, antioxidant and enzymatic activities.

  19. Investigation of base pairs containing oxidized guanine using ab initio method and ABEEMσπ polarizable force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cui; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Dongxia; Gong, Lidong; Yang, Zhongzhi

    2014-02-01

    The integrity of the genetic information is constantly threatened by oxidizing agents. Oxidized guanines have all been linked to different types of cancers. Theoretical approaches supplement the assorted experimental techniques, and bring new sight and opportunities to investigate the underlying microscopic mechanics. Unfortunately, there is no specific force field to DNA system including oxidized guanines. Taking high level ab initio calculations as benchmark, we developed the ABEEMσπ fluctuating charge force field, which uses multiple fluctuating charges per atom. And it was applied to study the energies, structures and mutations of base pairs containing oxidized guanines. The geometries were obtained in reference to other studies or using B3LYP/6-31+G* level optimization, which is more rational and timesaving among 24 quantum mechanical methods selected and tested by this work. The energies were determined at MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ level with BSSE corrections. Results show that the constructed potential function can accurately simulate the change of H-bond and the buckled angle formed by two base planes induced by oxidized guanine, and it provides reliable information of hydrogen bonding, stacking interaction and the mutation processes. The performance of ABEEMσπ polarizable force field in predicting the bond lengths, bond angles, dipole moments etc. is generally better than those of the common force fields. And the accuracy of ABEEMσπ PFF is close to that of the MP2 method. This shows that ABEEMσπ model is a reliable choice for further research of dynamics behavior of DNA fragment including oxidized guanine.

  20. De novo analysis of receptor binding affinity data of 8-ethenyl-xanthine antagonists to adenosine A1 and A2a receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalpiaz, A; Gessi, S; Varani, K; Borea, P A

    1997-05-01

    The receptor binding affinity data to adenosine A1 and A2a receptors of a wide series of 8-ethenyl-xanthine derivatives has been analyzed by means of the Free-Wilson model. The analysis of the individual group contributions (aij) shows the importance of the presence of an ethenyl moiety at position 8 on the xanthine ring for obtaining selective A2a antagonists. The different aij values of the substituents for the adenosine. A1 receptor do not correlate with the corresponding ones for the A2a receptor, indicating the possibility to obtain A1 and A2a selective compounds. The presence of aromatic substituents at the 8-ethenyl group, such as 3,5-(OCH3)2-phenyl, permits to obtain strongly A2a selective compounds (affinity ratio of up to 100); moreover, it appears that 8-ethenyl-xanthinic derivatives cannot have high selectivity for the adenosine A1 receptor (affinity ratio < or = 10).

  1. Bioactive Compounds, Antioxidant, Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory, Tyrosinase Inhibitory and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Selected Agro-Industrial By-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Karimi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of abundantly available agro-industrial by-products for their bioactive compounds and biological activities is beneficial in particular for the food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, rapeseed meal, cottonseed meal and soybean meal were investigated for the presence of bioactive compounds and antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities. Methanolic extracts of rapeseed meal showed significantly (P < 0.01 higher phenolics and flavonoids contents; and significantly (P < 0.01 higher DPPH and nitric oxide free radical scavenging activities when compared to that of cottonseed meal and soybean meal extracts. Ferric thiocyanate and thiobarbituric acid tests results showed rapeseed meal with the highest antioxidant activity (P < 0.01 followed by BHT, cotton seed meal and soybean meal. Rapeseed meal extract in xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory assays showed the lowest  IC50 values  followed by cottonseed and soybean meals. Anti-inflammatory assay using IFN-γ/LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells indicated rapeseed meal is a potent source of anti-inflammatory agent. Correlation analysis showed that phenolics and flavonoids were highly correlated to both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Rapeseed meal was found to be promising as a natural source of bioactive compounds with high antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities in contrast to cotton and soybean meals.

  2. Ultrafiltration liquid chromatography combined with high-speed countercurrent chromatography for screening and isolating potential α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitors from Cortex Phellodendri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sainan; Liu, Chunming; Guo, Liping; Zhang, Yuchi; Wang, Jing; Ma, Bing; Wang, Yueqi; Wang, Yumeng; Ren, Junqi; Yang, Xiaojing; Qin, Yao; Tang, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Cortex Phellodendri is a typical Chinese herb with a large number of alkaloids existing in all parts of it. The most common methods for screening and isolating alkaloids are mostly labor intensive and time consuming. In this study, a new assay based upon ultrafiltration liquid chromatography was developed for the rapid screening of ligands for α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase. The C. Phellodendri extract was found to contain two alkaloids with both α-glucosidase- and xanthine oxidase binding activities and one lactone with α-glucosidase-binding activity. Subsequently, with the help of high-speed countercurrent chromatography, the specific binding ligands including palmatine, berberine, and obaculactone with purities of 97.38, 96.12, and 96.08%, respectively, were successfully separated. An optimized low-toxicity two-phase solvent system composed of ethyl acetate/n-butanol/ethanol/water (3.5:1.7:0.5:5, v/v/v/v) was used to isolate the three compounds mentioned above from C. Phellodendri. The targeted compounds were identified by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. Therefore, ultrafiltration liquid chromatography combined with high-speed countercurrent chromatography is not only a powerful tool for screening and isolating α-glucosidase and xanthine oxidase inhibitors in complex samples but is also a useful platform for discovering bioactive compounds for the prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus and gout.

  3. Distinct Distribution of Purines in CM and CR Carbonaceous Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Smith, Karen E.; Martin, Mildred G.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites contain a diverse suite of organic molecules and delivered pre biotic organic compounds, including purines and pyrimidines, to the early Earth (and other planetary bodies), seeding it with the ingredients likely required for the first genetic material. We have investigated the distribution of nucleobases in six different CM and CR type carbonaceous chondrites, including fivc Antarctic meteorites never before analyzed for nucleobases. We employed a traditional formic acid extraction protocol and a recently developed solid phase extraction method to isolate nucleobases. We analyzed these extracts by high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV -MS/MS) targeting the five canonical RNAIDNA bases and hypoxanthine and xanthine. We detected parts-per-billion levels of nucleobases in both CM and CR meteorites. The relative abundances of the purines found in Antarctic CM and CR meteorites were clearly distinct from each other suggesting that these compounds are not terrestrial contaminants. One likely source of these purines is formation by HCN oligomerization (with other small molecules) during aqueous alteration inside the meteorite parent body. The detection of the purines adenine (A), guanine (0), hypoxanthine (HX), and xanthine (X) in carbonaceous meteorites indicates that these compounds should have been available on the early Earth prior to the origin of the first genetic material.

  4. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Chen, Ke-li; Zhang, Guo-li

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM) on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides might be quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD). SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (Cr) in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P < 0.01). The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD) level (P < 0.01). For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine. PMID:28250791

  5. Pharmacological Basis for Use of Selaginella moellendorffii in Gouty Arthritis: Antihyperuricemic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at evaluating the effects of Selaginella moellendorffii Hieron. (SM on gouty arthritis and getting an insight of the possible mechanisms. HPLC method was developed for chemical analysis. The paw oedema, the neutrophil accumulation, inflammatory mediators, lipid peroxidation, and histopathological changes of the joints were analyzed in gouty arthritis rat model, and the kidney injury and serum urate were detected in hyperuricemic mice. Pharmacokinetic result demonstrated that the main apigenin glycosides were almost quantitatively transformed into apigenin in the mammalian body. Among these compounds, the apigenin exhibited the strongest effect on xanthine oxidase (XOD. SM aqueous extract has proved to be active in reducing hyperuricemia in dose-dependent manner, and the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN and creatinine (Cr in high dose group were decreased significantly as compared with hyperuricemic control group (P<0.01. The high dose of SM extract could significantly prevent the paw swelling, reduce gouty joint inflammatory features, reduce the release of IL-1β and TNF-α, lower malondialdehyde (MDA and myeloperoxidase (MPO levels, and increase superoxide dismutase (SOD level (P<0.01. For the first time, this study provides a rational basis for the traditional use of SM aqueous extract against gout in folk medicine.

  6. Xanthine oxidase inhibition for the treatment of cardiovascular disease: an updated systematic review and meta‐analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierckx, Riet; Mohee, Kevin; Clark, Andrew L.; Cleland, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Previous studies have shown that xanthine oxidase inhibitors (XOI) might improve outcome for patients with cardiovascular disease. However, more evidence is required. Methods and results We published a meta‐analysis of trials conducted before 2014 examining the effects of XOI on mortality in patients with cardiovascular disease. At least two further trials (N = 323 patients) have since been published. Accordingly, we repeated our analysis after a further search for randomized controlled trials of XOI in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Databases. We identified eight relevant trials with 1031 patients. The average age of the patients was 61 years and 68% were men (one study did not report gender). There were 57 deaths in these eight trials, 26 in those assigned to XOI, and 31 in those assigned to the control. The updated meta‐analysis could not confirm a reduction in mortality for patients assigned to XOI compared with placebo (odds ratio 0.84) but 95% confidence intervals were wide (0.48–1.47). Conclusions This updated meta‐analysis does not suggest that XOI exert a large reduction in mortality but also cannot exclude the possibility of substantial harm or benefit. PMID:28217311

  7. Differential pulse and square-wave cathodic stripping voltammetry of xanthine and xanthosine at a mercury electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temerk, Y M; Kamal, M M; Ahmed, G A W; Ibrahim, H S M

    2003-08-01

    The surface activity of xanthine (Xan) and xanthosine (Xano) at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) was studied using out-of-phase ac and cyclic dc voltammetry. The results show that Xan and Xano were strongly adsorbed and chemically interacted with the charged mercury surface, which is the prerequisite step for applying the cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of such biologically important compounds. Differential pulse cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPCASV) and square-wave cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWCASV) were applied for the ultratrace determination of Xan and Xano compounds. Moreover, a rapid and sensitive controlled adsorptive accumulation of Cu(II) complexes of both compounds provided the basis of a direct stripping voltammetric determination of such compounds to submicromolar and nanomolar levels. Operational and solution conditions for the quantitative ultratrace determination of Xan and Xano were optimized in absence and presence of Cu(II). The calibration curve data were subjected to least-squares refinements. The effects of several types of inorganic and organic interfering species on the determination of Xan or Xano were considered.

  8. Purine nucleoside phosphorylase and xanthine oxidase activities in erythrocytes and plasma from marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Pérez-Milicua, Myrna Barjau; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal-Vertiz, Jaime A; de la Rosa, Alejandro; Vázquez-Medina, José P; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2014-05-01

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) and xanthine oxidase (XO) are key enzymes involved in the purine salvage pathway. PNP metabolizes purine bases to synthetize purine nucleotides whereas XO catalyzes the oxidation of purines to uric acid. In humans, PNP activity is reported to be high in erythrocytes and XO activity to be low in plasma; however, XO activity increases after ischemic events. XO activity in plasma of northern elephant seals has been reported during prolonged fasting and rest and voluntary associated apneas. The objective of this study was to analyze circulating PNP and XO activities in marine mammals adapted to tolerate repeated cycles of ischemia/reperfusion associated with diving (bottlenose dolphin, northern elephant seal) in comparison with semiaquatic (river otter) and terrestrial mammals (human, pig). PNP activities in plasma and erythrocytes, as well as XO activity in plasma, from all species were quantified by spectrophotometry. No clear relationship in circulating PNP or XO activity could be established between marine, semiaquatic and terrestrial mammals. Erythrocytes from bottlenose dolphins and humans are highly permeable to nucleosides and glucose, intraerythrocyte PNP activity may be related to a release of purine nucleotides from the liver. High-energy costs will probably mean a higher ATP degradation rate in river otters, as compared to northern elephant seals or dolphins. Lower erythrocyte PNP activity and elevated plasma XO activity in northern elephant seal could be associated with fasting and/or sleep- and dive-associated apneas.

  9. Teneligliptin Decreases Uric Acid Levels by Reducing Xanthine Dehydrogenase Expression in White Adipose Tissue of Male Wistar Rats

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    Chihiro Moriya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of teneligliptin on uric acid metabolism in male Wistar rats and 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The rats were fed with a normal chow diet (NCD or a 60% high-fat diet (HFD with or without teneligliptin for 4 weeks. The plasma uric acid level was not significantly different between the control and teneligliptin groups under the NCD condition. However, the plasma uric acid level was significantly decreased in the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared to the HFD-fed control rats. The expression levels of xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh mRNA in liver and epididymal adipose tissue of NCD-fed rats were not altered by teneligliptin treatment. On the other hand, Xdh expression was reduced significantly in the epididymal adipose tissue of the HFD-fed teneligliptin treated rats compared with that of HFD-fed control rats, whereas Xdh expression in liver did not change significantly in either group. Furthermore, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. DPP-4 treatment significantly increased Xdh expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. With DPP-4 pretreatment, teneligliptin significantly decreased Xdh mRNA expression compared to the DPP-4-treated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In conclusion, our studies suggest that teneligliptin reduces uric acid levels by suppressing Xdh expression in epididymal adipose tissue of obese subjects.

  10. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  11. Highly Sensitive Bacteria Quantification Using Immunomagnetic Separation and Electrochemical Detection of Guanine-Labeled Secondary Beads

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    Harikrishnan Jayamohan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the ultra-sensitive indirect electrochemical detection of E. coli O157:H7 using antibody functionalized primary (magnetic beads for capture and polyguanine (polyG oligonucleotide functionalized secondary (polystyrene beads as an electrochemical tag. Vacuum filtration in combination with E. coli O157:H7 specific antibody modified magnetic beads were used for extraction of E. coli O157:H7 from 100 mL samples. The magnetic bead conjugated E. coli O157:H7 cells were then attached to polyG functionalized secondary beads to form a sandwich complex (magnetic bead/E. coli secondary bead. While the use of magnetic beads for immuno-based capture is well characterized, the use of oligonucleotide functionalized secondary beads helps combine amplification and potential multiplexing into the system. The antibody functionalized secondary beads can be easily modified with a different antibody to detect other pathogens from the same sample and enable potential multiplexing. The polyGs on the secondary beads enable signal amplification up to 10\\(^{8}\\ guanine tags per secondary bead (\\(7.5\\times10^{6}\\ biotin-FITC per secondary bead, 20 guanines per oligonucleotide bound to the target (E. coli. A single-stranded DNA probe functionalized reduced graphene oxide modified glassy carbon electrode was used to bind the polyGs on the secondary beads. Fluorescent imaging was performed to confirm the hybridization of the complex to the electrode surface. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV was used to quantify the amount of polyG involved in the hybridization event with tris(2,2'-bipyridineruthenium(II (Ru(bpy\\(_{3}^{2+}\\ as the mediator. The amount of polyG signal can be correlated to the amount of E. coli O157:H7 in the sample. The method was able to detect concentrations of E. coli O157:H7 down to 3 CFU/100 mL, which is 67 times lower than the most sensitive technique reported in literature. The signal to noise ratio for this work was 3

  12. Oxidation of guanine by carbonate radicals derived from photolysis of carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) complexes and the pH dependence of intrastrand DNA cross-links mediated by guanine radical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crean, Conor; Lee, Young Ae; Yun, Byeong Hwa; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Shafirovich, Vladimir

    2008-08-11

    The carbonate radical anion CO(3)(*-) is a decomposition product of nitrosoperoxycarbonate derived from the combination of carbon dioxide and peroxynitrite, an important biological byproduct of the inflammatory response. The selective oxidation of guanine in DNA by CO(3)(*-) radicals is known to yield spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and guanidinohydantoin (Gh) products, and also a novel intrastrand cross-linked product: 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC), featuring a linkage between guanine C8 (G*) and thymine N3 (T*) atoms in the oligonucleotide (Crean et al., Nucleic Acids Res. 2008, 36, 742-755). Involvement of the T-N3 (pK(a) of N3-H is 9.67) suggests that the formation of 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) might be pH-dependent. This hypothesis was tested by generating CO(3)(*-) radicals through the photodissociation of carbonatotetramminecobalt(III) complexes by steady-state UV irradiation, which allowed for studies of product yields in the pH 5.0-10.0 range. The yield of 5'-d(CCATCG*CT*ACC) at pH 10.0 is approximately 45 times greater than at pH 5.0; this is consistent with the proposed mechanism, which requires N3(H) thymine proton dissociation followed by nucleophilic addition to the C8 guanine radical.

  13. Dietary purines in vegetarian meat analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlik, Jaroslav; Plachy, Vladimir; Fernandez, Javier; Rada, Vojtech

    2010-11-01

    The meat alternatives market offers a wide range of products resembling meat in taste, flavour or texture but based on vegetable protein sources. These high protein-low purine foods may find application in a low purine or purine-free diet, which is sometimes suggested for subjects with increased serum urate levels, i.e. hyperuricaemia. We determined purine content (uric acid, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine) in 39 commercially available meat substitutes and evaluated them in relation to their protein content. Some of the products contained a comparable sum of adenine and hypoxanthine per protein as meat. Analysis of variance showed an influence of protein source used. Mycoprotein-based products had significantly higher contents (2264 mg kg(-1)) of adenine and hypoxanthine per kg of 100% protein than soybean-based products (1648 mg kg(-1)) or mixtures consisting of soybean protein and wheat protein (1239 mg kg(-1)). Protein-rich vegetable-based meat substitutes might be generally accepted as meat alternatives for individuals on special diets. The type of protein used to manufacture these products determines the total content of purines, which is relatively higher in the case of mycoprotein or soybean protein, while appearing lower in wheat protein and egg white-based products. These are therefore more suitable for dietary considerations in a low-purine diet for hyperuricaemic subjects. 2010 Society of Chemical Industry

  14. Determination of purine contents in different parts of pork and beef by high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Shengzhong; Zou, Lina; Zhang, Yannan; Zhang, Guangteng; Li, Xiaoxia; Li, Miaojing; Yang, Fenghua; Li, Chunmei; He, Yingjuan; Guan, Hongjun; Guo, Yupeng; Wang, Dong; Cui, Xinyu; Ye, Hongting; Liu, Fenghai; Pan, Hongzhi; Yang, Yuexin

    2015-03-01

    Determination of adenine, hypoxanthine, guanine and xanthine in different parts of pork and beef using high performance liquid chromatography was described. Chromatographic separation was carried out on Waters Atlantis T3 column (4.6 mm × 250 mm × 5 μm) with column temperature at 30 °C. The mobile phase contained 99% 10.0 mmol/L ammonium formate solution at pH 3.6 and 1.0% methanol. Chromatography was achieved at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min and detection wavelength at 254 nm. The results indicated that total purine amounts in pork rump and beef sirloin were higher than those in other parts (Ppurine bases were hypoxanthine and adenine, and hypoxanthine content was the most highest in all samples (Ppurine and uricogenic purine base, we suggest that excess consumption of them be avoid, whereas pork loin chop and beef rib eye are more suitable for a low-purine diet. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detection of Guanine and Adenine Using an Aminated Reduced Graphene Oxide Functional Membrane-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

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    Di Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new electrochemical sensor based on a Nafion, aminated reduced graphene oxide and chitosan functional membrane-modified glassy carbon electrode was proposed for the simultaneous detection of adenine and guanine. Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and electrochemical methods were utilized for the additional characterization of the membrane materials. The prepared electrode was utilized for the detection of guanine (G and adenine (A. The anodic peak currents to G and A were linear in the concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 120 μM and 0.2 to 110 μM, respectively. The detection limits were found to be 0.1 μM and 0.2 μM, respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode could also be used to determine G and A in calf thymus DNA.

  16. Synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogen organic compounds by a Fischer-Tropsch-like process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C. C.; Oro, J.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the formation of purines, pyrimidines, and other bases from CO, H2, and NH3 under conditions similar to those used in the Fischer-Tropsch process. It is found that industrial nickel/iron alloy catalyzes the synthesis of adenine, guanine, cytosine, and other nitrogenous compounds from mixtures of CO, H2, and NH3 at temperatures of about 600 C. Sufficient sample was accumulated to isolate as solid products adenine, guanine, and cytosine, which were identified by infrared spectrophotometry. In the absence of nickel/iron catalyst, at 650 C, or in the presence of this catalyst, at 450 C, no purines or pyrimidines were synthesized. These results confirm and extend some of the work reported by Kayatsu et al. (1968).

  17. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  18. Quantum-chemical study of interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulski, Damian; Szeląg, Małgorzata; Molski, Marcin

    2011-12-01

    Trans-resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin present in red wine and grapes, has gained considerable attention because of its antiproliferative, chemopreventive and proapoptotic activity against human cancer cells. The accurate quantum-chemical computations based on the density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation method (MP2) have been performed for the first time to study interactions of trans-resveratrol with guanine-thymine dinucleotide and DNA-derived nitrogenous bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine and thymine in vacuum and water medium. This compound is found to show high affinity to nitrogenous bases and guanine-thymine dinucleotide. The electrostatic interactions from intermolecular hydrogen bonding increase the stability of complexes studied. In particular, significantly strong hydrogen bonds between 4'-H atom of trans-resveratrol and imidazole nitrogen as well as carbonyl oxygen atoms of nucleobases studied stabilize these systems. The stabilization energies computed reveal that the negatively charged trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide complex is more energetically stable in water medium than in vacuum. MP2 method gives more reliable and significantly high values of stabilization energy of trans-resveratrol-dinucleotide, trans-resveratrol-guanine and trans-resveratrol-thymine complexes than B3LYP exchange-correlation functional because it takes into account London dispersion energy. According to the results, in the presence of trans-resveratrol the 3'-5' phosphodiester bond in dinucleotide can be cleaved and the proton from 4'-OH group of trans-resveratrol migrates to the 3'-O atom of dinucleotide. It is concluded that trans-resveratrol is able to break the DNA strand. Hence, the findings obtained help understand antiproliferative and anticancer properties of this polyphenol.

  19. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  20. Cap analog substrates reveal three clades of cap guanine-N2 methyltransferases with distinct methyl acceptor specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch, Delphine; Jankowska-Anyszka, Marzena; Stepinski, Janusz; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Shuman, Stewart

    2010-01-01

    The Tgs proteins are structurally homologous AdoMet-dependent eukaryal enzymes that methylate the N2 atom of 7-methyl guanosine nucleotides. They have an imputed role in the synthesis of the 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) RNA cap. Here we exploit a collection of cap-like substrates to probe the repertoire of three exemplary Tgs enzymes, from mammalian, protozoan, and viral sources, respectively. We find that human Tgs (hTgs1) is a bona fide TMG synthase adept at two separable transmethylation steps: (1) conversion of m(7)G to m(2,7)G, and (2) conversion of m(2,7)G to m(2,2,7)G. hTgs1 is unable to methylate G or m(2)G, signifying that both steps require an m(7)G cap. hTgs1 utilizes a broad range of m(7)G nucleotides, including mono-, di-, tri-, and tetraphosphate derivatives as well as cap dinucleotides with triphosphate or tetraphosphate bridges. In contrast, Giardia lamblia Tgs (GlaTgs2) exemplifies a different clade of guanine-N2 methyltransferase that synthesizes only a dimethylguanosine (DMG) cap structure and cannot per se convert DMG to TMG under any conditions tested. Methylation of benzyl(7)G and ethyl(7)G nucleotides by hTgs1 and GlaTgs2 underscored the importance of guanine N7 alkylation in providing a key pi-cation interaction in the methyl acceptor site. Mimivirus Tgs (MimiTgs) shares with the Giardia homolog the ability to catalyze only a single round of methyl addition at guanine-N2, but is distinguished by its capacity for guanine-N2 methylation in the absence of prior N7 methylation. The relaxed cap specificity of MimiTgs is revealed at alkaline pH. Our findings highlight both stark and subtle differences in acceptor specificity and reaction outcomes among Tgs family members.

  1. The experimental and theoretical gas phase acidities of adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil, thymine and halouracils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Edward C. M.; Herder, Charles; Chen, Edward S.

    2006-10-01

    The gas phase acidities GPA (Δ H (298) for deprotonation) of the most stable tautomers of adenine, guanine, cytosine, uracil and thymine are evaluated. New GPA are obtained from electron impact spectra and acid dissociation constants measured in dimethylsulfoxide for A, U and 5-FU. The average experimental GPA are: [N1 sbnd H] C 340(2); T 333(2); U 333(2); 5-FU 329(4); [N9 sbnd H] A 333(1); G 332(4); all in kcal/mol. Only cytosine is a weaker acid than HCl in the gas phase. The most acidic hydrogens in the nucleotides are replaced by the sugar in DNA and RNA. The experimental N3 sbnd H GPA are G 334(4); U 347(2), T 347(4), while the predicted N3 sbnd H 5-FU GPA is 343 kcal/mol. The NH sbnd H GPA are: C 346(4); A 352(2); G 336(4) (all in kcal/mol). These are supported by semi-empirical multiconfiguration configuration interaction calculations. The predicted C8 sbnd H acidities of G and A and the C6 sbnd H of T are about the same, 360(2) kcal/mol. The remaining CH acidities are 370-380 kcal/mol. The 5-halouracils are predicted to be more acidic than HCl.

  2. Molecular basis of RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT) activation by RAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dhaval; Petit, Alain-Pierre; Bueren-Calabuig, Juan A; Jansen, Chimed; Fletcher, Dan A; Peggie, Mark; Weidlich, Simone; Scullion, Paul; Pisliakov, Andrei V; Cowling, Victoria H

    2016-12-01

    Maturation and translation of mRNA in eukaryotes requires the addition of the 7-methylguanosine cap. In vertebrates, the cap methyltransferase, RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase (RNMT), has an activating subunit, RNMT-Activating Miniprotein (RAM). Here we report the first crystal structure of the human RNMT in complex with the activation domain of RAM. A relatively unstructured and negatively charged RAM binds to a positively charged surface groove on RNMT, distal to the active site. This results in stabilisation of a RNMT lobe structure which co-evolved with RAM and is required for RAM binding. Structure-guided mutagenesis and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that RAM stabilises the structure and positioning of the RNMT lobe and the adjacent α-helix hinge, resulting in optimal positioning of helix A which contacts substrates in the active site. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we observe that RAM increases the recruitment of the methyl donor, AdoMet (S-adenosyl methionine), to RNMT. Thus we report the mechanism by which RAM allosterically activates RNMT, allowing it to function as a molecular rheostat for mRNA cap methylation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor ARNO mediates the activation of ARF and phospholipase D by insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Sheng; Shome, Kuntala; Rojas, Raúl; Rizzo, Mark A; Vasudevan, Chandrasekaran; Fluharty, Eric; Santy, Lorraine C; Casanova, James E; Romero, Guillermo

    2003-01-01

    Background Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in many signaling pathways. In most systems, the activity of PLD is primarily regulated by the members of the ADP-Ribosylation Factor (ARF) family of GTPases, but the mechanism of activation of PLD and ARF by extracellular signals has not been fully established. Here we tested the hypothesis that ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs) of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by insulin. Results Wild type ARNO transiently transfected in HIRcB cells was translocated to the plasma membrane in an insulin-dependent manner and promoted the translocation of ARF to the membranes. ARNO mutants: ΔCC-ARNO and CC-ARNO were partially translocated to the membranes while ΔPH-ARNO and PH-ARNO could not be translocated to the membranes. Sec7 domain mutants of ARNO did not facilitate the ARF translocation. Overexpression of wild type ARNO significantly increased insulin-stimulated PLD activity, and mutations in the Sec7 and PH domains, or deletion of the PH or CC domains inhibited the effects of insulin. Conclusions Small ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by the insulin receptor. PMID:12969509

  4. How Does Guanine-Cytosine Base Pair Affect Excess-Electron Transfer in DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hsun; Fujitsuka, Mamoru; Majima, Tetsuro

    2015-06-25

    Charge transfer and proton transfer in DNA have attracted wide attention due to their relevance in biological processes and so on. Especially, excess-electron transfer (EET) in DNA has strong relation to DNA repair. However, our understanding on EET in DNA still remains limited. Herein, by using a strongly electron-donating photosensitizer, trimer of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (3E), and an electron acceptor, diphenylacetylene (DPA), two series of functionalized DNA oligomers were synthesized for investigation of EET dynamics in DNA. The transient absorption measurements during femtosecond laser flash photolysis showed that guanine:cytosine (G:C) base pair affects EET dynamics in DNA by two possible mechanisms: the excess-electron quenching by proton transfer with the complementary G after formation of C(•-) and the EET hindrance by inserting a G:C base pair as a potential barrier in consecutive thymines (T's). In the present paper, we provided useful information based on the direct kinetic measurements, which allowed us to discuss EET through oligonucleotides for the investigation of DNA damage/repair.

  5. Crystal Structure of a Replicative DNA Polymerase Bound to the Oxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Ye, Yu; Wallace, Susan S.; Burrows, Cynthia J.; Doubli, Sylvie (Vermont); (Utah)

    2010-04-12

    The oxidation of guanine generates one of the most common DNA lesions, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). The further oxidation of 8-oxoG can produce either guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in duplex DNA or spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) in nucleosides and ssDNA. Although Gh can be a strong block for replicative DNA polymerases such as RB69 DNA polymerase, this lesion is also mutagenic: DNA polymerases bypass Gh by preferentially incorporating a purine with a slight preference for adenine, which results in G {center_dot} C {yields} T {center_dot} A or G {center_dot} C {yields} C {center_dot} G transversions. The 2.15 {angstrom} crystal structure of the replicative RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with DNA containing Gh reveals that Gh is extrahelical and rotated toward the major groove. In this conformation Gh is no longer in position to serve as a templating base for the incorporation of an incoming nucleotide. This work also constitutes the first crystallographic structure of Gh, which is stabilized in the R configuration in the two polymerase/DNA complexes present in the crystal asymmetric unit. In contrast to 8-oxoG, Gh is found in a high syn conformation in the DNA duplex and therefore presents the same hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pattern as thymine, which explains the propensity of DNA polymerases to incorporate a purine opposite Gh when bypass occurs.

  6. The minimal autoinhibited unit of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor intersectin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Farid Ahmad

    Full Text Available Intersectin-1L is a member of the Dbl homology (DH domain guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF which control Rho-family GTPase signaling. Intersectin-1L is a GEF that is specific for Cdc42. It plays an important role in endocytosis, and is regulated by several partners including the actin regulator N-WASP. Intact intersectin-1L shows low Cdc42 exchange activity, although the isolated catalytic DH domain shows high activity. This finding suggests that the molecule is autoinhibited. To investigate the mechanism of autoinhibition we have constructed a series of domain deletions. We find that the five SH3 domains of intersectin are important for autoinhibition, with the fifth domain (SH3(E being sufficient for the bulk of the autoinhibitory effect. This SH3 domain appears to primarily interact with the DH domain. We have determined the crystal structure of the SH3(E-DH domain construct, which shows a domain swapped arrangement in which the SH3 from one monomer interacts with the DH domain of the other monomer. Analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration, however, show that under biochemical concentrations, the construct is fully monomeric. Thus we propose that the actual autoinhibited structure contains the related intramolecular SH3(E-DH interaction. We propose a model in which this intramolecular interaction may block or distort the GTPase binding region of the DH domain.

  7. How not to do kinetics: examples involving GTPases and guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) are crucial regulators of the action of GTPases in signal transduction and cellular regulation. Although their basic mechanism of action has been apparent for almost 20 years, there are still misconceptions concerning their properties, and these are confounded by superficial or incorrect interpretation of experimental results in individual cases. Here, an example is described in which an incorrect mechanism was derived because of an inadequate analysis of kinetic results. In a second example, a case is discussed where certain GTP analogs were erroneously described as being able to function as low molecular mass GEFs. In both cases, a lack of distinction between rates, rate constants, and apparent rate constants, together with a disregard of relative signal amplitudes, led to the misinterpretations. In a final example, it is shown how the lack of an appropriate kinetic investigation led to the false conclusion that a secreted protein from Legionella pneumophila can act not only as a GEF towards eukaryotic Rab1 but also as a factor that is able to actively dissociate the stable complex between Rab1 and GDP dissociation inhibitor.

  8. The Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor ARNO mediates the activation of ARF and phospholipase D by insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fluharty Eric

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipase D (PLD is involved in many signaling pathways. In most systems, the activity of PLD is primarily regulated by the members of the ADP-Ribosylation Factor (ARF family of GTPases, but the mechanism of activation of PLD and ARF by extracellular signals has not been fully established. Here we tested the hypothesis that ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by insulin. Results Wild type ARNO transiently transfected in HIRcB cells was translocated to the plasma membrane in an insulin-dependent manner and promoted the translocation of ARF to the membranes. ARNO mutants: ΔCC-ARNO and CC-ARNO were partially translocated to the membranes while ΔPH-ARNO and PH-ARNO could not be translocated to the membranes. Sec7 domain mutants of ARNO did not facilitate the ARF translocation. Overexpression of wild type ARNO significantly increased insulin-stimulated PLD activity, and mutations in the Sec7 and PH domains, or deletion of the PH or CC domains inhibited the effects of insulin. Conclusions Small ARF-GEFs of the cytohesin/ARNO family mediate the activation of ARF and PLD by the insulin receptor.

  9. Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 is a potential prognosis indicator of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Dong, Shuang; Hu, Jiangfeng; Duan, Bensong; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ruiyun; Zhou, Hongmei; Sheng, Haihui; Gao, Hengjun; Li, Shunlong; Zhang, Xianwen

    2015-01-01

    Guanine nucleotide binding protein-like 3 (GNL3) is a GIP-binding nuclear protein that has been reported to be involved in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, cellular senescence and tumorigenesis. This study aimed to investigate the expression level of GNL3 in gastric cancer and to evaluate the relationship between its expression and clinical variables and overall survival of gastric cancer patients. The expression level of GNL3 was examined in 89 human gastric cancer samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC) staining. GNL3 in gastric cancer tissues was significantly upregulated compared with paracancerous tissues. GNL3 expression in adjacent non-cancerous tissues was associated with sex and tumor size. Survival analyses showed that GNL3 expression in both gastric cancer and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were not related to overall survival. However, in the subgroup of patients with larger tumor size (≥ 6 cm), a close association was found between GNL3 expression in gastric cancer tissues and overall survival. GNL3-positive patients had a shorter survival than GNL3-negative patients. Our study suggests that GNL3 might play an important role in the progression of gastric cancer and serve as a biomarker for poor prognosis in gastric cancer patients.

  10. Characterization of leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) expression during murine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Shen, Tiansheng; Maghraby, Eman; Taya, Shinichiro; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Caligiuri, Michael A; Marcucci, Guido

    2003-12-01

    LARG (leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor, ARHGEF12) was originally identified as a fusion partner of the MLL gene at 11q23 in human acute myeloid leukemia. We have previously demonstrated that the LARG protein activates RhoA, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, by catalyzing the exchange of GTP for GDP. Experiments in Drosophila melanogaster have implicated RhoA and its regulators in a spectrum of developmental processes-including gastrulation, neurite outgrowth, and epidermal morphogenesis; however, the role of these genes during mammalian development is incompletely understood. Herein, we investigate the expression of the murine LARG homologue during embryogenesis and in adult animals, by a combination of mRNA in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical detection of the LARG protein. We observe that LARG transcript and protein are undetectable prior to embryonic day 14. Beginning at this stage, LARG is expressed in the skin, intestinal epithelium, and smooth muscle layers of the intestine, bronchi, and vasculature. This specific distribution is maintained at later stages of development and into adulthood. Finally, we demonstrate colocalization of the LARG protein with the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) receptor, suggesting a potential physiologic role for LARG as an activator of RhoA in response to IGF-1.

  11. Disruption of oligomerization induces nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of leukemia-associated rho Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabocka, Elda; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-10-01

    The rgsRhoGEFs comprise a subfamily of three guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which function in linking heterotrimeric G-proteins to the monomeric RhoGTPase. Here, we reveal the novel finding that oligomerization of leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) functions to prevent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and to retain LARG in the cytoplasm. We establish that oligomerization is mediated by a predicted coiled-coil sequence (amino acids 1507-1520) in the extreme C terminus of LARG and that substitution of isoleucines 1507/1510 with alanines disrupts homo-oligomerization and leads to nucleocytoplasmic shuttling via the CRM1 nuclear transport pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that induced dimerization of an otherwise nuclear monomeric LARG mutant promotes cytoplasmic localization. Furthermore, we establish that nuclear import of monomeric LARG is mediated by the nuclear localization sequence (29)PTDKKQK(35) in the extreme N terminus. We propose that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling provides a mechanism for spatially regulating the activity of LARG toward its cytoplasmic targets and potentially new nuclear targets.

  12. Rho guanine exchange factors in blood vessels: fine-tuners of angiogenesis and vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Kroll, Jens

    2013-05-15

    The angiogenic cascade is a multi-step process essential for embryogenesis and other physiological and pathological processes. Rho family GTPases are binary molecular switches and serve as master regulators of various basic cellular processes. Rho GTPases are known to exert important functions in angiogenesis and vascular physiology. These functions demand a tight and context-specific control of cellular processes requiring superordinate control by a multitude of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). GEFs display various features enabling them to fine-tune the actions of Rho GTPases in the vasculature: (1) GEFs regulate specific steps of the angiogenic cascade; (2) GEFs show a spatio-temporally specific expression pattern; (3) GEFs differentially regulate endothelial function depending on their subcellular location; (4) GEFs mediate crosstalk between complex signaling cascades and (5) GEFs themselves are regulated by another layer of interacting proteins. The aim of this review is to provide an overview about the role of GEFs in regulating angiogenesis and vascular function and to point out current limitations as well as clinical perspectives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ric-8A, a Gα protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor potentiates taste receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire J Fenech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Taste receptors for sweet, bitter and umami tastants are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. While much effort has been devoted to understanding G-protein-receptor interactions and identifying the components of the signalling cascade downstream of these receptors, at the level of the G-protein the modulation of receptor signal transduction remains relatively unexplored. In this regard a taste-specific regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS, RGS21, has recently been identified. To study whether guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs are involved in the transduction of the signal downstream of the taste GPCRs we investigated the expression of Ric-8A and Ric-8B in mouse taste cells and their interaction with G-protein subunits found in taste buds. Mammalian Ric-8 proteins were initially identified as potent GEFs for a range of Gα subunits and Ric-8B has recently been shown to amplify olfactory signal transduction. We find that both Ric-8A and Ric-8B are expressed in a large portion of taste bud cells and that most of these cells contain IP3R-3 a marker for sweet, umami and bitter taste receptor cells. Ric-8A interacts with Gα-gustducin and Gαi2 through which it amplifies the signal transduction of hTas2R16, a receptor for bitter compounds. Overall, these findings are consistent with a role for Ric-8 in mammalian taste signal transduction.

  14. ATRX promotes gene expression by facilitating transcriptional elongation through guanine-rich coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael A; Kernohan, Kristin D; Jiang, Yan; Bérubé, Nathalie G

    2015-04-01

    ATRX is a chromatin remodeling protein involved in deposition of the histone variant H3.3 at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin. It also influences the expression level of specific genes; however, deposition of H3.3 at transcribed genes is currently thought to occur independently of ATRX. We focused on a set of genes, including the autism susceptibility gene Neuroligin 4 (Nlgn4), that exhibit decreased expression in ATRX-null cells to investigate the mechanisms used by ATRX to promote gene transcription. Overall TERRA levels, as well as DNA methylation and histone modifications at ATRX target genes are not altered and thus cannot explain transcriptional dysregulation. We found that ATRX does not associate with the promoter of these genes, but rather binds within regions of the gene body corresponding to high H3.3 occupancy. These intragenic regions consist of guanine-rich DNA sequences predicted to form non-B DNA structures called G-quadruplexes during transcriptional elongation. We demonstrate that ATRX deficiency corresponds to reduced H3.3 incorporation and stalling of RNA polymerase II at these G-rich intragenic sites. These findings suggest that ATRX promotes the incorporation of histone H3.3 at particular transcribed genes and facilitates transcriptional elongation through G-rich sequences. The inability to transcribe genes such as Nlgn4 could cause deficits in neuronal connectivity and cognition associated with ATRX mutations in humans.

  15. Sequence-selective binding of phenazinium dyes phenosafranin and safranin O to guanine-cytosine deoxyribopolynucleotides: spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ishita; Hossain, Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2010-11-25

    The sequence selectivity of the DNA binding of the phenazinium dyes phenosafranin and safranin O have been investigated with four sequence-specific deoxyribopolynucleotides from spectroscopic and calorimetric studies. The alternating guanine-cytosine sequence selectivity of the dyes has been revealed from binding affinity values, circular dichroism, thermal melting, competition dialysis, and calorimetric results. The binding affinities of both the dyes to the polynucleotides were of the order of 10(5) M(-1), but the values were higher for the guanine-cytosine polynucleotides over adenine-thymine ones. Phenosafranin had a higher binding affinity compared to safranin O. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies revealed that the binding reactions were exothermic and favored by negative enthalpy and predominantly large positive entropy contributions in all cases except poly(dA)·poly(dT) where the profile was anomalous. Although charged, nonpolyelectrolytic contribution was revealed to be dominant to the free energy of binding. The negative heat capacity values obtained from the temperature dependence of enthalpy changes, which were higher for phenosafranin compared to safranin O, suggested significant hydrophobic contribution to the binding process. In aggregate, the data presents evidence for the alternating guanine-cytosine base pair selectivity of these phenazinium dyes and a stronger binding of phenosafranin over safranin O.

  16. Structural and energetic heterogeneities of canonical and oxidized central guanine triad of B-DNA telomeric fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cysewski, Piotr; Czeleń, Przemysław

    2009-06-01

    The intermolecular interaction energies in central guanine triad of telomeric B-DNA were estimated based on ab initio quantum chemistry calculations on the MP2/aDZ level of theory. The source of structural information was molecular dynamics simulation of both canonical (AGGGTT) and oxidized (AG8oxoGGTT) telomere units. Our calculations demonstrate that significant stiffness of central triad occurs if 8oxoG is present. The origin of such feature is mainly due to the increase of stacking interactions of 8oxoG with neighbouring guanine molecules and stronger hydrogen bonding formation of 8oxoG with cytosine if compared with canonical guanine. Another interesting observation is the context independence of stacking interactions of 8oxoG. Unlike to 5'-G2/G3-3' and 5'-G3/G4-3' sequences which are energetically different, 5'-G2/8oxoG3-3' and 5'-8oxoG3/G4-3' sequences are almost iso-energetic.

  17. Electrochemical biosensor based on silver nanoparticles-polydopamine-graphene nanocomposite for sensitive determination of adenine and guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jing; Wang, Lan; Wang, Hai-Bo; Gan, Tian; Wu, Ying-Ying; Li, Jing; Liu, Yan-Ming

    2013-09-30

    A multifunctional Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs)-polydopamine (Pdop)@graphene (Gr) composite was prepared by a simple and mild procedure. Gr was easily coated with Pdop at room temperature and then AgNPs was deposited by mildly stirring. The nanocomposite was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Guanine and adenine as model moleculars were employed to study their electrochemical responses at the Ag-Pdop@Gr composite modified electrode, which showed more favorable electron transfer kinetics than Gr modified glassy carbon and AgNPs modified glassy carbon electrodes. The Ag-Pdop@Gr modified electrode exhibited linear ranges of 0.04-50 μM and 0.02-40 μM with detection limits of 4.0 nM and 2.0 nM for guanine and adenine, respectively. The developed method was applied for simultaneous determination of trace-level adenine and guanine in fish sperm. The results demonstrated that the AgNPs-Pdop@Gr nanocomposite was a promising substrate for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetics of the interactions between yeast elongation factors 1A and 1Balpha, guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromadski, Kirill B; Schümmer, Tobias; Strømgaard, Anne

    2007-01-01

    The interactions of elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae with elongation factor 1Balpha (eEF1Balpha), guanine nucleotides, and aminoacyl-tRNA were studied kinetically by fluorescence stopped-flow. eEF1A has similar affinities for GDP and GTP, 0.4 and 1.1 microm, respectively....... Dissociation of nucleotides from eEF1A in the absence of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor is slow (about 0.1 s(-1)) and is accelerated by eEF1Balpha by 320-fold and 250-fold for GDP and GTP, respectively. The rate constant of eEF1Balpha binding to eEF1A (10(7)-10(8) M (-1) s(-1)) is independent...... of guanine nucleotides. At the concentrations of nucleotides and factors prevailing in the cell, the overall exchange rate is expected to be in the range of 6 s(-1), which is compatible with the rate of protein synthesis in the cell. eEF1A.GTP binds Phe-tRNA(Phe) with a K(d) of 3 nm, whereas eEF1A.GDP shows...

  19. Nitrate decreases xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated nitrite reductase activity and attenuates vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célio Damacena-Angelis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrite and nitrate restore deficient endogenous nitric oxide (NO production as they are converted back to NO, and therefore complement the classic enzymatic NO synthesis. Circulating nitrate and nitrite must cross membrane barriers to produce their effects and increased nitrate concentrations may attenuate the nitrite influx into cells, decreasing NO generation from nitrite. Moreover, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR mediates NO formation from nitrite and nitrate. However, no study has examined whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated NO generation from nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrate attenuates the vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite either by interfering with nitrite influx into vascular tissue, or by competing with nitrite for XOR, thus inhibiting XOR-mediated NO generation. We used two independent vascular function assays in rats (aortic ring preparations and isolated mesenteric arterial bed perfusion to examine the effects of sodium nitrate on the concentration-dependent responses to sodium nitrite. Both assays showed that nitrate attenuated the vascular responses to nitrite. Conversely, the aortic responses to the NO donor DETANONOate were not affected by sodium nitrate. Further confirming these results, we found that nitrate attenuated the acute blood pressure lowering effects of increasing doses of nitrite infused intravenously in freely moving rats. The possibility that nitrate could compete with nitrite and decrease nitrite influx into cells was tested by measuring the accumulation of nitrogen-15-labeled nitrite (15N-nitrite by aortic rings using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS. Nitrate exerted no effect on aortic accumulation of 15N-nitrite. Next, we used chemiluminescence-based NO detection to examine whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate significantly shifted the Michaelis Menten saturation curve to the right, with a 3-fold increase in

  20. Dispelling dogma and misconceptions regarding the most pharmacologically targetable source of reactive species in inflammatory disease, xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Eric E

    2015-08-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), the molybdoflavin enzyme responsible for the terminal steps of purine degradation in humans, is also recognized as a significant source of reactive species contributory to inflammatory disease. In animal models and clinical studies, inhibition of XOR has resulted in diminution of symptoms and enhancement of function in a number of pathologies including heart failure, diabetes, sickle cell anemia, hypertension and ischemia-reperfusion injury. For decades, XOR involvement in pathologic processes has been established by salutary outcomes attained from treatment with the XOR inhibitor allopurinol. This has served to frame a working dogma that elevation of XOR-specific activity is associated with enhanced rates of reactive species generation that mediate negative outcomes. While adherence to this narrowly focused practice of designating elevated XOR activity to be "bad" has produced some benefit, it has also led to significant underdevelopment of the processes mediating XOR regulation, identification of alternative reactants and products as well as micro-environmental factors that alter enzymatic activity. This is exemplified by recent reports: (1) identifying XOR as a nitrite reductase and thus a source of beneficial nitric oxide ((•)NO) under in vivo conditions similar to those where XOR inhibition has been assumed an optimal treatment choice, (2) describing XOR-derived uric acid (UA) as a critical pro-inflammatory mediator in vascular and metabolic disease and (3) ascribing an antioxidant/protective role for XOR-derived UA. When taken together, these proposed and countervailing functions of XOR affirm the need for a more comprehensive evaluation of product formation as well as the factors that govern product identity. As such, this review will critically evaluate XOR-catalyzed oxidant, (•)NO and UA formation as well as identify factors that mediate their production, inhibition and the resultant impact on inflammatory disease.

  1. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol prevents skeletal muscle atrophy: role of p38 MAPKinase and E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Derbre

    Full Text Available Alterations in muscle play an important role in common diseases and conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during hindlimb unloading due, at least in part, to the activation of xanthine oxidase (XO. The major aim of this study was to determine the mechanism by which XO activation causes unloading-induced muscle atrophy in rats, and its possible prevention by allopurinol, a well-known inhibitor of this enzyme. For this purpose we studied one of the main redox sensitive signalling cascades involved in skeletal muscle atrophy i.e. p38 MAPKinase, and the expression of two well known muscle specific E3 ubiquitin ligases involved in proteolysis, the Muscle atrophy F-Box (MAFbx; also known as atrogin-1 and Muscle RING (Really Interesting New Gene Finger-1 (MuRF-1. We found that hindlimb unloading induced a significant increase in XO activity and in the protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes CuZnSOD and Catalase in skeletal muscle. The most relevant new fact reported in this paper is that inhibition of XO with allopurinol, a drug widely used in clinical practice, prevents soleus muscle atrophy by ~20% after hindlimb unloading. This was associated with the inhibition of the p38 MAPK-MAFbx pathway. Our data suggest that XO was involved in the loss of muscle mass via the activation of the p38MAPK-MAFbx pathway in unloaded muscle atrophy. Thus, allopurinol may have clinical benefits to combat skeletal muscle atrophy in bedridden, astronauts, sarcopenic, and cachexic patients.

  2. Contribution of xanthine oxidoreductase to mammary epithelial and breast cancer cell differentiation in part modulates inhibitor of differentiation-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Mehdi A; Monks, Jenifer; Farabaugh, Susan M; Wright, Richard M

    2011-09-01

    Loss of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been linked to aggressive breast cancer in vivo and to breast cancer cell aggressiveness in vitro. In the present study, we hypothesized that the contribution of XOR to the development of the normal mammary gland may underlie its capacity to modulate breast cancer. We contrasted in vitro and in vivo developmental systems by differentiation marker and microarray analyses. Human breast cancer microarray was used for clinical outcome studies. The role of XOR in differentiation and proliferation was examined in human breast cancer cells and in a mouse xenograft model. Our data show that XOR was required for functional differentiation of mammary epithelial cells both in vitro and in vivo. Poor XOR expression was observed in a mouse ErbB2 breast cancer model, and pharmacologic inhibition of XOR increased breast cancer tumor burden in mouse xenograft. mRNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer revealed that low XOR expression was significantly associated with time to tumor relapse. The opposing expression of XOR and inhibitor of differentiation-1 (Id1) during HC11 differentiation and mammary gland development suggested a potential functional relationship. While overexpression of Id1 inhibited HC11 differentiation and XOR expression, XOR itself modulated expression of Id1 in differentiating HC11 cells. Overexpression of XOR both inhibited Id1-induced proliferation and -stimulated differentiation of Heregulin-β1-treated human breast cancer cells. These results show that XOR is an important functional component of differentiation whose diminished expression contributes to breast cancer aggressiveness, and they support XOR as both a breast cancer biomarker and a target for pharmacologic activation in therapeutic management of aggressive breast cancer.

  3. HZE ⁵⁶Fe-ion irradiation induces endothelial dysfunction in rat aorta: role of xanthine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Kevin G; Lim, Hyun Kyo; Kim, Jae Hyung; Oh, Young; Attarzadeh, David O; Sevinc, Baris; Kuo, Maggie M; Shoukas, Artin A; Vazquez, Marcelo E; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2011-10-01

    Ionizing radiation has been implicated in the development of significant cardiovascular complications. Since radiation exposure is associated with space exploration, astronauts are potentially at increased risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. This study investigated the effect of high atomic number, high-energy (HZE) iron-ion radiation on vascular and endothelial function as a model of space radiation. Rats were exposed to a single whole-body dose of iron-ion radiation at doses of 0, 0.5 or 1 Gy. In vivo aortic stiffness and ex vivo aortic tension responses were measured 6 and 8 months after exposure as indicators of chronic vascular injury. Rats exposed to 1 Gy iron ions demonstrated significantly increased aortic stiffness, as measured by pulse wave velocity. Aortic rings from irradiated rats exhibited impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation consistent with endothelial dysfunction. Acute xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibition or reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging restored endothelial-dependent responses to normal. In addition, XO activity was significantly elevated in rat aorta 4 months after whole-body irradiation. Furthermore, XO inhibition, initiated immediately after radiation exposure and continued until euthanasia, completely inhibited radiation-dependent XO activation. ROS production was elevated after 1 Gy irradiation while production of nitric oxide (NO) was significantly impaired. XO inhibition restored NO and ROS production. Finally, dietary XO inhibition preserved normal endothelial function and vascular stiffness after radiation exposure. These results demonstrate that radiation induced XO-dependent ROS production and nitroso-redox imbalance, leading to chronic vascular dysfunction. As a result, XO is a potential target for radioprotection. Enhancing the understanding of vascular radiation injury could lead to the development of effective methods to ameliorate radiation-induced vascular damage.

  4. Identification of aflatoxin M1-N7-guanine in liver and urine of tree shrews and rats following administration of aflatoxin B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, Patricia A; Yu, Xiang; Johnson, Jesse K; Nathasingh, Christopher K; Groopman, John D; Kensler, Thomas W; Roebuck, Bill D

    2003-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)) and concurrent infection with hepatitis B lead to a multiplicative risk of developing liver cancer. This chemical-viral interaction can be recapitulated in the tree shrew (Tupia belangeri chinensis). As an initial characterization of this model, the metabolism of AFB(1) in tree shrews has been examined and compared to a sensitive bioassay species, the rat. Utilizing LC/MS/MS, an unreported product, aflatoxin M(1)-N(7)-guanine (AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine), was detected in urine and hepatic DNA samples 24 h after administration of 400 microg/kg AFB(1). In hepatic DNA isolated from tree shrews, AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine was the predominant adduct, 0.74 +/- 0.14 pmol/mg DNA, as compared to 0.37 +/- 0.07 pmol/mg DNA of AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine. Conversely, in rat liver, 6.56 +/- 2.41 pmol/mg DNA of AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine and 0.42 +/- 0.13 pmol/mg DNA of AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine were detected. Rats excreted 1.00 +/- 0.21 pmol AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine and 0.29 +/- 0.10 pmol AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine as compared to 0.60 +/- 0.12 pmol AFB(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine and 0.69 +/- 0.16 pmol AFM(1)-N(7)-guanine/mg creatinine excreted by the tree shrew. Furthermore, tree shrew urine contained 40 times more of the hydroxylated metabolite, AFM(1), than was excreted by rats. In vitro experiments confirmed this difference in oxidative metabolism. Hepatic microsomes isolated from tree shrews failed to produce aflatoxin Q(1) or aflatoxin P(1) but formed a significantly greater amount of AFM(1) than rat microsomes. Bioassays indicated that the tree shrew was considerably more resistant than the rat to AFB(1) hepatocarcinogenesis, which may reflect the significant differences in metabolic profiles of the two species.

  5. Theoretical Studies on the Interaction between Metal Cations and Cytosine, Guanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ya-Ying; ZHOU Li-Xin; WAN Hua-Ping

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of tetra- and hexa-coordinated compounds of cytosine(C) and guanine(G) with metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ have been calculated by using the B3LYP/6-31G method at the 6-31G(d, p) basis set, while the remaining coordination bonds are saturated by water molecules ((H2O)4).All geometries were optimized without symmetry restrictions.Comparing the interaction energies we obtained the orders of selectivity of C and G for the above metal ions as follows: aCu2+>aNi2+>aZn2+>aMg2+>bCu2+>aMn2+>bZn2+>bNi2+ and aCu2+> aNi2+>aZn2+>aMg2+>bCu2+>aMn2+>bZn2+>bNi2, respectively (a, b represent tetra- and hexa-coordinated, respectively), which are in good agreement with the experimental facts.Interaction energies of complexes provide a comparatively reliable quantification of the selectivity of dimethyl phosphate anion for the studied metal ions.In addition, the influence of coordination number and coordination structure on the interaction energy and the variation of ionic energy were discussed sufficiently.After analyzing the interaction energies of two kinds of complexes, the "mutual selectivity"as well as the nature of the interaction between metal ions and ligands was revealed.

  6. Complex conformational heterogeneity of the highly flexible O6-benzyl-guanine DNA adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Katie A; Wetmore, Stacey D

    2014-07-21

    The conformational preference of the O6-benzyl-guanine (BzG) adduct was computationally examined using nucleoside, nucleotide, and DNA models, which provided critical information about the potential mutagenic consequences and toxicity of the BzG adduct in our cells. Substantial conformational flexibility of the BzG moiety, including rotation of the bulky group with respect to the base and the internal conformation of the bulk moiety, is seen in the nucleoside and nucleotide models. This large conformational flexibility suggests the conformation adopted by BzG is dependent on the local environment of the BzG adduct. Upon incorporation of the adduct into the DNA helix, the BzG conformational flexibility is maintained. The range of BzG conformations adopted in DNA likely arises due to a combination of the long and flexible (-CH2-) linker, the small adduct size, and the lack of discrete interactions between the bulky moiety and G. Because of the conformational flexibility of the adduct, many DNA conformations are observed for BzG adducted DNA, including those not previously reported in the literature, and thus, a modified nomenclature for adducted DNA conformations is presented. Furthermore, the preferred conformation of BzG adducted DNA is greatly dependent on a number of factors, including the pairing nucleotide, the discrete interactions in the helix, and the solvation of the benzyl moiety. These factors in turn lead to a complicated mutagenic and toxic profile that may invoke pairing with natural C, mispairs, or deletion mutations, which is supported by previously reported experimental biochemical studies. Despite this complex mutagenic profile, pairing with C leads to the most stable helical structure, which is the first combined structural and energetic explanation for experimental studies reporting a higher rate of C incorporation than any other nucleobase upon BzG replication.

  7. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor RIC8 regulates conidial germination through Gα proteins in Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J Eaton

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is essential for normal hyphal growth in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have previously demonstrated that the non-receptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor RIC8 acts upstream of the Gα proteins GNA-1 and GNA-3 to regulate hyphal extension. Here we demonstrate that regulation of hyphal extension results at least in part, from an important role in control of asexual spore (conidia germination. Loss of GNA-3 leads to a drastic reduction in conidial germination, which is exacerbated in the absence of GNA-1. Mutation of RIC8 leads to a reduction in germination similar to that in the Δgna-1, Δgna-3 double mutant, suggesting that RIC8 regulates conidial germination through both GNA-1 and GNA-3. Support for a more significant role for GNA-3 is indicated by the observation that expression of a GTPase-deficient, constitutively active gna-3 allele in the Δric8 mutant leads to a significant increase in conidial germination. Localization of the three Gα proteins during conidial germination was probed through analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins. Functional TagRFP fusions of each of the three Gα subunits were constructed through insertion of TagRFP in a conserved loop region of the Gα subunits. The results demonstrated that GNA-1 localizes to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, and also to septa throughout conidial germination. GNA-2 and GNA-3 localize to both the plasma membrane and vacuoles during early germination, but are then found in intracellular vacuoles later during hyphal outgrowth.

  8. Haploinsufficiency of the Sec7 guanine nucleotide exchange factor gea1 impairs septation in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Eckler

    Full Text Available Membrane trafficking is essential to eukaryotic life and is controlled by a complex network of proteins that regulate movement of proteins and lipids between organelles. The GBF1/GEA family of Guanine nucleotide Exchange Factors (GEFs regulates trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi by catalyzing the exchange of GDP for GTP on ADP Ribosylation Factors (Arfs. Activated Arfs recruit coat protein complex 1 (COP-I to form vesicles that ferry cargo between these organelles. To further explore the function of the GBF1/GEA family, we have characterized a fission yeast mutant lacking one copy of the essential gene gea1 (gea1+/-, the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ortholog of GBF1. The haploinsufficient gea1+/- strain was shown to be sensitive to the GBF1 inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA and was rescued from BFA sensitivity by gea1p overexpression. No overt defects in localization of arf1p or arf6p were observed in gea1+/- cells, but the fission yeast homolog of the COP-I cargo sac1 was mislocalized, consistent with impaired COP-I trafficking. Although Golgi morphology appeared normal, a slight increase in vacuolar size was observed in the gea1+/- mutant strain. Importantly, gea1+/- cells exhibited dramatic cytokinesis-related defects, including disorganized contractile rings, an increased septation index, and alterations in septum morphology. Septation defects appear to result from altered secretion of enzymes required for septum dynamics, as decreased secretion of eng1p, a β-glucanase required for septum breakdown, was observed in gea1+/- cells, and overexpression of eng1p suppressed the increased septation phenotype. These observations implicate gea1 in regulation of septum breakdown and establish S. pombe as a model system to explore GBF1/GEA function in cytokinesis.

  9. Small-molecule inhibitors targeting G-protein-coupled Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Xun; Marchioni, Fillipo; Evelyn, Chris R; Sipes, Nisha; Zhou, Xuan; Seibel, William; Wortman, Matthew; Zheng, Yi

    2013-02-19

    The G-protein-mediated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)-Rho GTPase signaling axis has been implicated in human pathophysiology and is a potential therapeutic target. By virtual screening of chemicals that fit into a surface groove of the DH-PH domain of LARG, a G-protein-regulated Rho GEF involved in RhoA activation, and subsequent validations in biochemical assays, we have identified a class of chemical inhibitors represented by Y16 that are active in specifically inhibiting LARG binding to RhoA. Y16 binds to the junction site of the DH-PH domains of LARG with a ∼80 nM K(d) and suppresses LARG catalyzed RhoA activation dose dependently. It is active in blocking the interaction of LARG and related G-protein-coupled Rho GEFs with RhoA without a detectable effect on other DBL family Rho GEFs, Rho effectors, or a RhoGAP. In cells, Y16 selectively inhibits serum-induced RhoA activity and RhoA-mediated signaling, effects that can be rescued by a constitutively active RhoA or ROCK mutant. By suppressing RhoA activity, Y16 inhibits mammary sphere formation of MCF7 breast cancer cells but does not affect the nontransforming MCF10A cells. Significantly, Y16 works synergistically with Rhosin/G04, a Rho GTPase activation site inhibitor, in inhibiting LARG-RhoA interaction, RhoA activation, and RhoA-mediated signaling functions. Thus, our studies show that Rho GEFs can serve as selective targets of small chemicals and present a strategy of dual inhibition of the enzyme-substrate pair of GEF-RhoA at their binding interface that leads to enhanced efficacy and specificity.

  10. Activation of JNK by Epac is independent of its activity as a Rap guanine nucleotide exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochbaum, Daniel; Tanos, Tamara; Ribeiro-Neto, Fernando; Altschuler, Daniel; Coso, Omar A

    2003-09-05

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their associated GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) are key regulatory elements in the signal transduction machinery that relays information from the extracellular environment into specific intracellular responses. Among them, the MAPK cascades represent ubiquitous downstream effector pathways. We have previously described that, analogous to the Ras-dependent activation of the Erk-1/2 pathway, members of the Rho family of small G-proteins activate the JNK cascade when GTP is loaded by their corresponding GEFs. Searching for novel regulators of JNK activity we have identified Epac (exchange protein activated by cAMP) as a strong activator of JNK-1. Epac is a member of a growing family of GEFs that specifically display exchange activity on the Rap subfamily of Ras small G-proteins. We report here that while Epac activates the JNK severalfold, a constitutively active (G12V) mutant of Rap1b does not, suggesting that Rap-GTP is not sufficient to transduce Epac-dependent JNK activation. Moreover, Epac signaling to the JNKs was not blocked by inactivation of endogenous Rap, suggesting that Rap activation is not necessary for this response. Consistent with these observations, domain deletion mutant analysis shows that the catalytic GEF domain is dispensable for Epac-mediated activation of JNK. These studies identified a region overlapping the Ras exchange motif domain as critical for JNK activation. Consistent with this, an isolated Ras exchange motif domain from Epac is sufficient to activate JNK. We conclude that Epac signals to the JNK cascade through a new mechanism that does not involve its canonical catalytic action, i.e. Rap-specific GDP/GTP exchange. This represents not only a novel way to activate the JNKs but also a yet undescribed mechanism of downstream signaling by Epac.

  11. Catching Functional Modes and Structural Communication in Dbl Family Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Francesco; Felline, Angelo; Fanelli, Francesca

    2015-09-28

    Computational approaches such as Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Elastic Network Model-Normal Mode Analysis (ENM-NMA) are proving to be of great value in investigating relevant biological problems linked to slow motions with no demand in computer power. In this study, these approaches have been coupled to the graph theory-based Protein Structure Network (PSN) analysis to dissect functional dynamics and structural communication in the Dbl family of Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs). They are multidomain proteins whose common structural feature is a DH-PH tandem domain deputed to the GEF activity that makes them play a central role in cell and cancer biology. While their common GEF action is accomplished by the DH domain, their regulatory mechanisms are highly variegate and depend on the PH and the additional domains as well as on interacting proteins. Major evolutionary-driven deformations as inferred from PCA concern the α6 helix of DH that dictates the orientation of the PH domain. Such deformations seem to depend on the mechanisms adopted by the GEF to prevent Rho binding, i.e. functional specialization linked to autoinhibition. In line with PCA, ENM-NMA indicates α6 and the linked PH domain as the portions of the tandem domain holding almost the totality of intrinsic and functional dynamics, with the α6/β1 junction acting as a hinge point for the collective motions of PH. In contrast, the DH domain holds a static scaffolding and hub behavior, with structural communication playing a central role in the regulatory actions by other domains/proteins. Possible allosteric communication pathways involving essentially DH were indeed found in those RhoGEFs acting as effectors of small or heterotrimeric RasGTPases. The employed methodology is suitable for deciphering structure/dynamics relationships in large sets of homologous or analogous proteins.

  12. A simple HPLC method for determining the purine content of beer and beer-like alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Yasuda, Makoto; Inazawa, Katsunori; Ota, Tatsuhiro; Yamaoka, Noriko; Mawatari, Ken-ichi; Nakagomi, Kazuya; Kaneko, Kiyoko

    2013-01-01

    Several methods for quantifying the purine content in food and drink have been described using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We have developed an improved HPLC method that is based on a method reported by Kaneko et al. and that is more sensitive yet simple, and suitable for determining the purine content of beer and beer-like alcoholic beverages. Quantitative HPLC separation was performed on a Shodex Asahi Pak GS-320HQ column with an isocratic elution of 150 mmol/L sodium phosphate buffer (H(3)PO(4)/NaH(2)PO(4) = 20:100 (v/v)). The retention times for the four analytes, namely, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine and xanthine, were 19.9, 25.0, 29.3 and 43.0 min, respectively. The resolution was good, and there was no excessive interference from the other compounds in the beverages at these retention times. Furthermore, the detection limit for all the analytes was improved to less than 0.0075 mg/L, and all the calibration curves showed good linearity (r(2) > 0.999) between 0.013 and 10 mg/L for adenine and guanine, and between 0.025 and 10 mg/L for hypoxanthine and xanthine. The pretreatment was simplified by removing some procedures and optimizing the perchloric acid hydrolysis and the enzymatic peak-shift assay. We reduced the sample dilution rate by almost 50%, and the time spent on pretreatment from 4 days to only 180 min. The recovery of the analytes from spiked samples was 94.8 - 103.8%. This method may be useful for evaluating quantitative and qualitative differences in the purine content of beer and beer-like alcoholic beverages.

  13. Induction of xanthine oxidase activity, endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase activation by sodium metabisulfite in rat liver and their attenuation by Ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercan, Sevim; Kencebay, Ceren; Basaranlar, Goksun; Derin, Narin; Aslan, Mutay

    2015-02-01

    Sodium metabisulfite is used as a preservative in many food preparations but can oxidize to sulfite radicals initiating molecular oxidation. Ghrelin is a peptide hormone primarily produced in the stomach and has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. This study was performed to elucidate the effect of ghrelin on sulfite-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and caspase activation in rat peripheral organs. Xanthine oxidase (XO), xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) enzyme activities, ER stress markers [phosphorylated PKR-like ER kinase (pPERK); C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP)], caspase-3, -8, -9 activities, nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) levels were determined in liver, heart and kidney of rats treated with sodium metabisulfite and/or ghrelin for 5 weeks. Sodium metabisulfite treatment significantly elevated XO activity, induced expression of GRP78, CHOP and increased caspase-3, -8 and -9 activities in liver but had no significant effect in heart and kidney. Ghrelin treatment decreased XO activity to baseline levels and attenuated ER stress and caspase activation in liver tissue of sodium metabisulfite treated rats. In conclusion, metabolism of sodium metabisulfite in liver tissue increased XO activity, induced ER stress and caused caspase activation which was attenuated by ghrelin treatment. Ghrelin's hepatoprotective effect could be through modulation of XO activity.

  14. A comparative study of AutoDock and PMF scoring performances, and SAR of 2-substituted pyrazolotriazolopyrimidines and 4-substituted pyrazolopyrimidines as potent xanthine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hamed I; Fujita, Takayuki; Akaho, Eiichi; Nagamatsu, Tomohisa

    2010-01-01

    4-Alkylidenehydrazino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines, 4-arylmethylidenehydrazino-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines, and 2-substituted 7H-pyrazolo[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo-[1,5-c]-pyrimidines as potential xanthine oxidase inhibitors were docked into the active site of the bovine milk xanthine dehydrogenase using two scoring functions involved in AutoDock 3.05 and the CAChe 6.1.10. The correlation coefficiency obtained between the AutoDock binding energy and IC(50) of the inhibitors was better than that obtained by the CAChe-PMF docking score. Many ligands exhibited one to four hydrogen bonds within the active site, where the detected hydrogen bonds by CAChe was identified quantitatively in the docked conformation by using MOPAC 2002. These ligands were docked into a long, narrow channel of the enzyme leading to the molybdopterin active moiety, with hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction between the planar aromatic moiety of the ligand and the enzyme. Furthermore, SAR among inhibitors was investigated, which revealed that the oxo group of pyrazolopyrimidine analogs is essential for its activity and the tricyclic derivatives are shown to be more potent than bicyclic ones. The mode of interaction of the docked inhibitors was described in details.

  15. Plasma from hemorrhaged mice activates CREB and increases cytokine expression in lung mononuclear cells through a xanthine oxidase-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkar, R; Abraham, E

    1996-02-01

    Hemorrhage rapidly increases plasma xanthine oxidase levels as well as the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines in the lungs. To determine the role of circulating xanthine oxidase (XO), as well as other plasma factors, in affecting pulmonary cytokine expression, we conducted studies in which plasma from hemorrhaged mice was transferred into unhemorrhaged recipient mice. Administration of posthemorrhage plasma to recipient mice increased the levels of mRNA for interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) in lung mononuclear cells. No enhancement of mRNA levels for these cytokines was found in the lungs of mice given allopurinol-treated posthemorrhage plasma or fed a tungsten-enriched, XO-depleting diet prior to transfer of posthemorrhage plasma. Among the nuclear transcriptional regulatory factors examined, only the cyclic AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) was activated in nuclear extracts from lung mononuclear cells of mice that were given posthemorrhage plasma. No activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B), nuclear factor interleukin 6 (NF-IL6), activating protein-1 (AP-1), or serum protein-1 (SP-1) was found. These results suggest that the mechanism for hemorrhage-induced increases in pulmonary cytokine expression is by activation of the enhancer CREB through a tissue XO-dependent pathway initiated by plasma-borne mediators.

  16. Streptomyces coelicolor XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp that controls expression of genes encoding xanthine dehydrogenase to promote purine salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapragasam, Smitha; Grove, Anne

    2016-05-01

    The gene encoding Streptomyces coelicolor xanthine dehydrogenase regulator (XdhR) is divergently oriented from xdhABC, which encodes xanthine dehydrogenase (Xdh). Xdh is required for purine salvage pathways. XdhR was previously shown to repress xdhABC expression. We show that XdhR binds the xdhABC-xdhR intergenic region with high affinity (Kd ∼ 0.5 nM). DNaseI footprinting reveals that this complex formation corresponds to XdhR binding the xdhR gene promoter at two adjacent sites; at higher protein concentrations, protection expands to a region that overlaps the transcriptional and translational start sites of xdhABC. While substrates for Xdh have little effect on DNA binding, GTP and ppGpp dissociate the DNA-XdhR complex. Progression of cells to stationary phase, a condition associated with increased (p)ppGpp production, leads to elevated xdhB expression; in contrast, inhibition of Xdh by allopurinol results in xdhB repression. We propose that XdhR is a direct target of (p)ppGpp, and that expression of xdhABC is upregulated during the stringent response to promote purine salvage pathways, maintain GTP homeostasis and ensure continued (p)ppGpp synthesis. During exponential phase growth, basal levels of xdhABC expression may be achieved by GTP serving as a lower-affinity XdhR ligand.

  17. In vivo formation of N7-guanine DNA adduct by safrole 2',3'-oxide in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li-Ching; Chiang, Su-Yin; Lin, Ming-Huan; Chung, Wen-Sheng; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2012-09-18

    Safrole, a naturally occurring product derived from spices and herbs, has been shown to be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma in rodents. Safrole 2',3'-oxide (SFO), an electrophilic metabolite of safrole, was shown to react with DNA bases to form detectable DNA adducts in vitro, but not detected in vivo. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the formation of N7-(3-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine (N7γ-SFO-Gua) resulting from the reaction of SFO with the most nucleophilic site of guanine in vitro and in vivo with a newly developed isotope-dilution high performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) method. N7γ-SFO-Gua and [(15)N(5)]-N7-(3-benzo[1,3]dioxol-5-yl-2-hydroxypropyl)guanine ([(15)N(5)]-N7γ-SFO-Gua) were first synthesized, purified, and characterized. The HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method was developed to measure N7γ-SFO-Gua in calf thymus DNA treated with 60 μmol of SFO for 72 h and in urine samples of mice treated with a single dose of SFO (30 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally). In calf thymus DNA, the level of N7γ-SFO-Gua was 2670 adducts per 10(6)nucleotides. In urine of SFO-treated mice, the levels of N7γ-SFO-Gua were 1.02±0.14 ng/mg creatinine (n=4) on day 1, 0.73±0.68 ng/mg creatinine (n=4) on day 2, and below the limit of quantitation on day 3. These results suggest that SFO can cause in vivo formation of N7γ-SFO-Gua, which may then be rapidly depurinated from the DNA backbone and excreted through urine.

  18. Electron attachment to the guanine-cytosine nucleic acid base pair and the effects of monohydration and proton transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashutosh; Jaeger, Heather M; Compaan, Katherine R; Schaefer, Henry F

    2012-05-17

    The guanine-cytosine (GC) radical anion and its interaction with a single water molecule is studied using ab initio and density functional methods. Z-averaged second-order perturbation theory (ZAPT2) was applied to GC radical anion for the first time. Predicted spin densities show that the radical character is localized on cytosine. The Watson-Crick monohydrated GC anion is compared to neutral GC·H2O, as well as to the proton-transferred analogue on the basis of structural and energetic properties. In all three systems, local minima are identified that correspond to water positioned in the major and minor grooves of macromolecular DNA. On the anionic surface, two novel structures have water positioned above or below the GC plane. On the neutral and anionic surfaces, the global minimum can be described as water interacting with the minor groove. These structures are predicted to have hydration energies of 9.7 and 11.8 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Upon interbase proton-transfer (PT), the anionic global minimum has water positioned in the major groove, and the hydration energy increases to 13.4 kcal mol(-1). PT GC·H2O(•-) has distonic character; the radical character resides on cytosine, while the negative charge is localized on guanine. The effects of proton transfer are further investigated through the computed adiabatic electron affinities (AEA) of GC and monohydrated GC, and the vertical detachment energies (VDE) of the corresponding anions. Monohydration increases the AEAs and VDEs by only 0.1 eV, while proton-transfer increases the VDEs substantially (0.8 eV). The molecular charge distribution of monohydrated guanine-cytosine radical anion depends heavily on interbase proton transfer.

  19. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joonghoon Park

    Full Text Available Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG. Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-2ME than (+2ME group (p < 0.05. This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05 and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001. Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-2ME (p < 0.01. Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative

  20. The electrochemical reduction of the purines guanine and adenine at platinum electrodes in several room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanoni, Maria Valnice Boldrin, E-mail: boldrinv@iq.unesp.br [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Sao Paulo State, Araraquara, R. Prof. Francisco Degni, CP 355, 14801-970, SP (Brazil); Rogers, Emma I. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Hardacre, Christopher, E-mail: c.hardacre@qub.ac.uk [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering/QUILL, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Compton, Richard G., E-mail: richard.compton@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-05

    The reduction of guanine was studied by microelectrode voltammetry in the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-hexyltriethylammonium bis (trifluoromethanesulfonyl) imide [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorosphosphate [C{sub 4}mim][PF{sub 6}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(Tf){sub 2}], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide [C{sub 4}mim][N(Tf){sub 2}], N-butyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium dicyanamide [C{sub 4}mpyrr][N(NC){sub 2}] and tris(P-hexyl)-tetradecylphosphonium trifluorotris(pentafluoroethyl)phosphate [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] on a platinum microelectrode. In [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], but not in the other ionic liquids studied, guanine reduction involves a one-electron, diffusion-controlled process at very negative potential to produce an unstable radical anion, which is thought to undergo a dimerization reaction, probably after proton abstraction from the cation of the ionic liquid. The rate of this subsequent reaction depends on the nature of the ionic liquid, and it is faster in the ionic liquid [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP], in which the formation of the resulting dimer can be voltammetrically monitored at less negative potentials than required for the reduction of the parent molecule. Adenine showed similar behaviour to guanine but the pyrimidines thymine and cytosine did not; thymine was not reduced at potentials less negative than required for solvent (RTIL) decomposition while only a poorly defined wave was seen for cytosine. The possibility for proton abstraction from the cation in [N{sub 6,2,2,2}][NTf{sub 2}] and [P{sub 14,6,6,6}][FAP] is noted and this is thought to aid the electrochemical dimerization process. The resulting rapid reaction is thought to shift the reduction potentials for guanine and adenine to lower values than observed in RTILs where the scope for proton abstraction is not present. Such shifts are

  1. Trp(56) of rac1 specifies interaction with a subset of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y; Xing, J; Streuli, M; Leto, T L; Zheng, Y

    2001-12-14

    Signaling specificity of Rho GTPase pathways is achieved in part by selective interaction between members of the Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and their Rho GTPase substrates. For example, Trio, GEF-H1, and Tiam1 are a subset of GEFs that specifically activate Rac1 but not the closely related Cdc42. The Rac1 specificity of these GEFs appears to be governed by Rac1-GEF binding interaction. To understand the detailed mechanism underlying the GEF specificity issue, we have analyzed a panel of chimeras made between Rac1 and Cdc42 and examined a series of point mutants of Rac1 made at the switch I, switch II, and beta(2)/beta(3) regions for their ability to interact with and to be activated by the GEFs. The results reveal that Rac1 residues of both the switch I and switch II regions are involved in GEF docking and GEF-mediated nucleotide disruption, because mutation of Asp(38), Asn(39), Gln(61), Tyr(64), or Arg(66)/Leu(67) into Ala results in the loss of GEF binding, whereas mutation at Tyr(32), Asp(65), or Leu(70)/Ser(71) leads to the loss of GEF catalysis while retaining the binding capability. The region between amino acids 53-72 of Rac1 is required for specific recognition and activation by the GEFs, and Trp(56) in beta(3) appears to be the critical determinant. Introduction of Trp(56) to Cdc42 renders it fully responsive to the Rac-specific GEF in vitro and in cells. Further, a polypeptide derived from the beta(3) region of Rac1 including the Trp(56) residue serves as a specific inhibitor for Rac1 interaction with the GEFs. Taken together, these results indicate that Trp(56) is the necessary and sufficient determinant of Rac1 for discrimination by the subset of Rac1-specific GEFs and suggest that a compound mimicking Trp(56) action could be explored as an interfering reagent specifically targeting Rac1 activation.

  2. Preparation of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode by microwave irradiation and its application for the determination of adenine and guanine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbaspour, Abdolkarim, E-mail: abbaspour@chem.susc.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghaffarinejad, Ali [Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Fars 71456-85464 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    In this study, microwave irradiation was used for the fast preparation (min) of a sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (MW-CNCE). For confirmation of the preparation of the ceramic by MW irradiation, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscopy images of the produced ceramic were compared with those of conventional ceramic (which is produced by drying the ceramic in air for 48 h). The electrochemical behavior of MW-CNCE in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, L-cysteine, adenine and guanine was compared with that of a conventional sol-gel-derived carbon nanotube ceramic electrode (CNCE). In all systems, similar peak potentials and lower background currents were obtained with respect to CNCE. Finally, the MW-CNCE was used for the simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine using differential pulse voltammetry. The linear ranges of 0.1-10 and 0.1-20 muM were obtained for adenine and guanine, respectively. These results are comparable with some modified electrodes that have recently been reported for the determination of adenine and guanine, with the advantage that the proposed electrode did not contain modifier. In addition, the proposed electrode was successfully used for the oxidation of adenine and guanine in DNA, and the detection limit for this measurement was 0.05 mug mL{sup -1} DNA.

  3. The Role of Aspartic Acid 143 in E. coli tRNA-Guanine Transglycosylase: Insights from Mutagenesis Studies and Computational Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Katherine Abold; Tan, Xiao-Jian; Nonekowski, Susanne T.; Garcia, George A.; Carlson, Heather A.

    2005-01-01

    tRNA guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is a tRNA-modifying enzyme which catalyzes the posttranscriptional exchange of guanine in position 34 of tRNAY,H,N,D with the modified base queuine in eukaryotes or its precursor, preQ1 base, in eubacteria. Thus, TGT must recognize the guanine in tRNA and the free base queuine or preQ1 to catalyze this exchange. The crystal structure of Zymomonas mobilis TGT with preQ1 bound suggests that a key aspartate is critically involved in substrate recognition. To explore this, a series of site-directed mutants of D143 in Escherichia coli TGT were made and characterized to investigate heterocyclic substrate recognition. Our data confirm that D143 has significant impact on KM of guanine; however, the trend in the KM data (D143A D143A > D143N > D143S > D143T appears to be directly related to the degree of hydrogen bonding available to guanine in the binding site. PMID:15951383

  4. Comparison of human erythrocyte purine nucleotide metabolism and blood purine and pyrimidine degradation product concentrations before and after acute exercise in trained and sedentary subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzinska, Wioleta; Suska, M; Lubkowska, A; Jakubowska, K; Olszewska, M; Safranow, K; Chlubek, D

    2017-04-21

    This study aimed at evaluating the concentration of erythrocyte purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP) in trained and sedentary subjects before and after maximal physical exercise together with measuring the activity of purine metabolism enzymes as well as the concentration of purine (hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid) and pyrimidine (uridine) degradation products in blood. The study included 15 male elite rowers [mean age 24.3 ± 2.56 years; maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) 52.8 ± 4.54 mL/kg/min; endurance and strength training 8.2 ± 0.33 h per week for 6.4 ± 2.52 years] and 15 sedentary control subjects (mean age 23.1 ± 3.41 years; VO2max 43.2 ± 5.20 mL/kg/min). Progressive incremental exercise testing until refusal to continue exercising was conducted on a bicycle ergometer. The concentrations of ATP, ADP, AMP, IMP and the activities of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT), hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase (PRPP-S) were determined in erythrocytes. The concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and uridine were determined in the whole blood before exercise, after exercise, and 30 min after exercise testing. The study demonstrated a significantly higher concentration of ATP in the erythrocytes of trained subjects which, in part, may be explained by higher metabolic activity on the purine re-synthesis pathway (significantly higher PRPP-S, APRT and HGPRT activities). The ATP concentration, just as the ATP/ADP ratio, as well as an exercise-induced increase in this ratio, correlates with the VO2max level in these subjects which allows them to be considered as the important factors characterising physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Maximal physical exercise in the group of trained subjects results not only in a lower post-exercise increase in the concentration of hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid but also in that of uridine. This indicates the possibility of

  5. Higher order structural effects stabilizing the reverse watson-crick guanine-cytosine base pair in functional RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Chawla, Mohit

    2013-10-10

    The G:C reverse Watson-Crick (W:W trans) base pair, also known as Levitt base pair in the context of tRNAs, is a structurally and functionally important base pair that contributes to tertiary interactions joining distant domains in functional RNA molecules and also participates in metabolite binding in riboswitches. We previously indicated that the isolated G:C W:W trans base pair is a rather unstable geometry, and that dicationic metal binding to the Guanine base or posttranscriptional modification of the Guanine can increase its stability. Herein, we extend our survey and report on other H-bonding interactions that can increase the stability of this base pair. To this aim, we performed a bioinformatics search of the PDB to locate all the occurencies of G:C trans base pairs. Interestingly, 66% of the G:C trans base pairs in the PDB are engaged in additional H-bonding interactions with other bases, the RNA backbone or structured water molecules. High level quantum mechanical calculations on a data set of representative crystal structures were performed to shed light on the structural stability and energetics of the various crystallographic motifs. This analysis was extended to the binding of the preQ1 metabolite to a preQ1-II riboswitch. 2013 The Author(s).

  6. Constructing a novel 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine electrochemical sensor and application in evaluating the oxidative damages of DNA and guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhipan; Liu, Xiuhui; Liu, Yuelin; Wu, Guofan; Lu, Xiaoquan

    2016-12-15

    8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is commonly identified as a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage. In this work, a novel and facile 8-OHdG sensor was developed based on the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). It exhibited good electrochemical responses toward the oxidation of 8-OHdG, and the linear ranges were 5.63×10(-8)-6.08×10(-6)M and 6.08×10(-6)-1.64×10(-5)M, with the detection limit of 1.88×10(-8)M (S/N=3). Moreover, the fabricated sensor was applied for the determination of 8-OHdG generated from damaged DNA and guanine, respectively, and the oxidation currents of 8-OHdG increased along with the damaged DNA and guanine within certain concentrations. These results could be used to evaluate the DNA damage, and provide useful information on diagnosing diseases caused by mutation and deficiency of the immunity system.

  7. Rotation of Guanine Amino Groups in G-Quadruplexes: A Probe for Local Structure and Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Michael; Winnerdy, Fernaldo Richtia; Heddi, Brahim; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2017-08-22

    Nucleic acids are dynamic molecules whose functions may depend on their conformational fluctuations and local motions. In particular, amino groups are dynamic components of nucleic acids that participate in the formation of various secondary structures such as G-quadruplexes. Here, we present a cost-efficient NMR method to quantify the rotational dynamics of guanine amino groups in G-quadruplex nucleic acids. An isolated spectrum of amino protons from a specific tetrad-bound guanine can be extracted from the nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy spectrum based on the close proximity between the intra-residue imino and amino protons. We apply the method in different structural contexts of G-quadruplexes and their complexes. Our results highlight the role of stacking and hydrogen-bond interactions in restraining amino-group rotation. The measurement of the rotation rate of individual amino groups could give insight into the dynamic processes occurring at specific locations within G-quadruplex nucleic acids, providing valuable probes for local structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Crystal Structure of Cdc42 in Complex with Collybisin II, a Gephyrin-Interacting Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang,S.; Kim, E.; Connelly, J.; Nassar, N.; Kirsch, J.; WinkingSchwartz, G.; Schindelin, H.

    2006-01-01

    The synaptic localization of ion channel receptors is essential for efficient synaptic transmission and the precise regulation of diverse neuronal functions. In the central nervous system, ion channel receptors reside in the postsynaptic membrane where they are juxtaposed to presynaptic terminals. For proper function, these ion channels have to be anchored to the cytoskeleton, and in the case of the inhibitory glycine and {gamma}-amino-butyric acid type A (GABA{sub A}) receptors this interaction is mediated by a gephyrin centered scaffold. Highlighting its central role in this receptor anchoring scaffold, gephyrin interacts with a number of proteins, including the neurospecific guanine nucleotide exchange factor collybistin. Collybistin belongs to the Dbl family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, occurs in multiple splice variants, and is specific for Cdc42, a small GTPase belonging to the Rho family. The 2.3 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of the Cdc42--collybistin II complex reveals a novel conformation of the switch I region of Cdc42. It also provides the first direct observation of structural changes in the relative orientation of the Dbl-homology domain and the pleckstrin-homology domain in the same Dbl family protein. Biochemical data indicate that gephyrin negatively regulates collybistin activity.

  9. ARHGEF7 (Beta-PIX acts as guanine nucleotide exchange factor for leucine-rich repeat kinase 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Haebig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations within the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease. The multidomain protein LRRK2 exhibits overall low GTPase and kinase activity in vitro. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that the rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF7 and the small GTPase CDC42 are interacting with LRRK2 in vitro and in vivo. GTPase activity of full-length LRRK2 increases in the presence of recombinant ARHGEF7. Interestingly, LRRK2 phosphorylates ARHGEF7 in vitro at previously unknown phosphorylation sites. We provide evidence that ARHGEF7 might act as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for LRRK2 and that R1441C mutant LRRK2 with reduced GTP hydrolysis activity also shows reduced binding to ARHGEF7. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Downstream effects of phosphorylation of ARHGEF7 through LRRK2 could be (i a feedback control mechanism for LRRK2 activity as well as (ii an impact of LRRK2 on actin cytoskeleton regulation. A newly identified familial mutation N1437S, localized within the GTPase domain of LRRK2, further underlines the importance of the GTPase domain of LRRK2 in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

  10. Iodide transporter NIS regulates cancer cell motility and invasiveness by interacting with the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoste, Claire; Hervé, Julie; Bou Nader, Myriam; Dos Santos, Alexandre; Moniaux, Nicolas; Valogne, Yannick; Montjean, Rodrick; Dorseuil, Olivier; Samuel, Didier; Cassio, Doris; Portulano, Carla; Carrasco, Nancy; Bréchot, Christian; Faivre, Jamila

    2012-11-01

    A number of solute carrier (SLC) proteins are subject to changes in expression and activity during carcinogenesis. Whether these changes play a role in carcinogenesis is unclear, except for some nutrients and ion carriers whose deregulation ensures the necessary reprogramming of energy metabolism in cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the functional role in tumor progression of the sodium/iodide symporter (NIS; aka SLC5A5), which is upregulated and mislocalized in many human carcinomas. Notably, we found that NIS enhanced cell migration and invasion without ion transport being involved. These functions were mediated by NIS binding to leukemia-associated RhoA guanine exchange factor, a Rho guanine exchange factor that activates the small GTPase RhoA. Sequestering NIS in intracellular organelles or impairing its targeting to the cell surface (as observed in many cancers) led to a further increase in cell motility and invasiveness. In sum, our results established NIS as a carrier protein that interacts with a major cell signaling hub to facilitate tumor cell locomotion and invasion.

  11. Conformational change upon ligand binding and dynamics of the PDZ domain from leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiangxin; Zhang, Jiahai; Yang, Yinshan; Huang, Hongda; Shen, Weiqun; Hu, Qi; Wang, Xingsheng; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2008-06-01

    Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) is a RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that can activate RhoA. The PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1 homology) domain of LARG interacts with membrane receptors, which can relay extracellular signals to RhoA signal transduction pathways. Until now there is no structural and dynamic information about these interactions. Here we report the NMR structures of the LARG PDZ in the apo form and in complex with the plexin-B1 C-terminal octapeptide. Unobservable resonances of the residues in betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops in apo state were observed in the complex state. A distinct region of the binding groove in the LARG PDZ was found to undergo conformational change compared with other PDZs. Analysis of the (15)N relaxation data using reduced spectral density mapping shows that the apo LARG PDZ (especially its ligand-binding groove) is flexible and exhibits internal motions on both picosecond to nanosecond and microsecond to millisecond timescales. Mutagenesis and thermodynamic studies indicate that the conformation of the betaB/betaC and betaE/alphaB loops affects the PDZ-peptide interaction. It is suggested that the conformational flexibility could facilitate the change of structures upon ligand binding.

  12. Quadruplexes of human telomere dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} sequences containing guanine abasic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skolakova, Petra; Bednarova, Klara; Vorlickova, Michaela [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, CZ-612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Sagi, Janos, E-mail: jans@rimstonelab.com [Rimstone Laboratory, RLI, 29 Lancaster Way, Cheshire, CT 06410 (United States)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of a guanine base does not hinder the formation of G-quadruplex of human telomere sequence. {yields} Each depurination strongly destabilizes the quadruplex of dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} in NaCl and KCl. {yields} Conformational change of the abasic analogs of dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} is inhibited in KCl. {yields} The effects abasic sites may affect telomere-end structures in vivo. -- Abstract: This study was performed to evaluate how the loss of a guanine base affects the structure and stability of the three-tetrad G-quadruplex of 5'-dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3}, the basic quadruplex-forming unit of the human telomere DNA. None of the 12 possible abasic sites hindered the formation of quadruplexes, but all reduced the thermodynamic stability of the parent quadruplex in both NaCl and KCl. The base loss did not change the Na{sup +}-stabilized intramolecular antiparallel architecture, based on CD spectra, but held up the conformational change induced in dG{sub 3}(TTAG{sub 3}){sub 3} in physiological concentration of KCl. The reduced stability and the inhibited conformational transitions observed here in vitro for the first time may predict that unrepaired abasic sites in G-quadruplexes could lead to changes in the chromosome's terminal protection in vivo.

  13. 一种复合萃取物对黄嘌呤氧化酶抑制作用研究%Study on Inhibition of Xanthine Oxidase of An Extractive Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玲; 陈旅翼; 李赫宇

    2015-01-01

    一种复合萃取物主要由葡萄皮、葡萄籽、红酒萃取物及人参、枸杞萃取物组成,针对该复合物抑制黄嘌呤氧化酶的体外活性开展了研究,发现该复合物为黄嘌呤氧化酶(xanthine oxidase,XO)竞争性抑制剂,其Ki值为53.0μg,IC50为56.86μg/mL.%An extractive complex contains the extraction of grape skin,grape seed,red wine,ginseng and wolfberry.The complex inhibition in vitro activity of xanthine oxidase conducted research and found that the complex is a xanthine oxidase (xanthine oxidase,XO) competitive inhibitor with Ki values of 53.0μg and IC50 56.86μg/mL.

  14. Study the effect of kidney stones on serum xanthine oxidase, ecto-5ʹ-nucleotidase activity and E3 SUMO-protein ligase NSE2 (NSMCE2 in Malaysian individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Yusof

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: The present study suggests that the increase in serum of xanthine oxidase,ecto-5ʹ-nucleotidase activities E3 small ubiquitin-like modifier-protein ligase NSE2 concentration can be used as biomarkers for diagnosis of kidney damage in patients with kidney stone, also in developments of change DNA damage and inflammation disorders in these patients.

  15. Phytochemical Composition, Antioxidant and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activities of Amaranthus cruentus L. and Amaranthus hybridus L. Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne F. Millogo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a preliminary assessment of the nutraceutical value of Amaranthus cruentus (A. cruentus and Amaranthus hybridus (A. hybridus, two food plant species found in Burkina Faso. Hydroacetonic (HAE, methanolic (ME, and aqueous extracts (AE from the aerial parts were screened for in vitro antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. Phytochemical analyses revealed the presence of polyphenols, tannins, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins and betalains. Hydroacetonic extracts have shown the most diversity for secondary metabolites. The TLC analyses of flavonoids from HAE extracts showed the presence of rutin and other unidentified compounds. The phenolic compound contents of the HAE, ME and AE extracts were determined using the Folin–Ciocalteu method and ranged from 7.55 to 10.18 mg Gallic acid equivalent GAE/100 mg. Tannins, flavonoids, and flavonols ranged from 2.83 to 10.17 mg tannic acid equivalent (TAE/100 mg, 0.37 to 7.06 mg quercetin equivalent (QE /100 mg, and 0.09 to 1.31 mg QE/100 mg, respectively. The betacyanin contents were 40.42 and 6.35 mg Amaranthin Equivalent/100 g aerial parts (dry weight in A. cruentus and A. hybridus, respectively. Free-radical scavenging activity expressed as IC50 (DPPH method and iron reducing power (FRAP method ranged from 56 to 423 µg/mL and from 2.26 to 2.56 mmol AAE/g, respectively. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities of extracts of A. cruentus and A. hybridus were 3.18% and 38.22%, respectively. The A. hybridus extract showed the best antioxidant and xanthine oxidase inhibition activities. The results indicated that the phytochemical contents of the two species justify their traditional uses as nutraceutical food plants.

  16. Catalytic activity of the mouse guanine nucleotide exchanger mSOS is activated by Fyn tyrosine protein kinase and the T-cell antigen receptor in T cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    mSOS, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, is a positive regulator of Ras. Fyn tyrosine protein kinase is a potential mediator in T-cell antigen receptor signal transduction in subsets of T cells. We investigated the functional and physical interaction between mSOS and Fyn in T-cell hybridoma cells. Stimulation of the T-cell antigen receptor induced the activation of guanine nucleotide exchange activity in mSOS immunoprecipitates. Overexpression of Fyn mutants with an activated kinase mutati...

  17. Comparison of static and dynamic methods of treatment of anharmonicity for the vibrational study of isolated and aqueous forms of guanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thicoipe, Sandrine; Carbonniere, Philippe; Pouchan, Claude

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical study provides the anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers of isolated and aqueous guanine. They were performed at the DFT B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory using two different ways for the treatment of anharmonicity: time-independent (VPT2) and time-dependent (molecular dynamics) approaches. The wavenumbers obtained are compared to experimental data for isolated and aqueous forms: the VPT2 approach is slightly better than MD, especially for the determination of stretching and wagging (NH) motions. Finally, the structural model of solvatation used for aqueous guanine which combines an explicit solvent model with a polarizable continuum model (PCM) was validated.

  18. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajtcam.v10i2.18 E-mail: hkshin@kiom.re.kr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJTCAM

    injury and assessed antioxidant acitivity in damaged gastric tissue. ... the vehicle, and the absolute-ethanol group (EtOH group) received absolute ... used for detection of superoxide radicals generated by xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine.

  19. A highly specific and sensitive electroanalytical strategy for microRNAs based on amplified silver deposition by the synergic TiO2 photocatalysis and guanine photoreduction using charge-neutral probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Li, Shuying; Dong, Minmin; Zhang, Liyan; Qiao, Yuchun; Jiang, Yao; Qi, Wei; Wang, Hua

    2015-11-18

    TiO2 photocatalysis and guanine photoreduction were synergically combined for amplifying silver deposition for the electroanalysis of short-chain microRNAs with guanine bases using charge-neutral probes. It could allow for the highly specific and sensitive detection of microRNAs in the blood as well as the identification of their mutant levels.

  20. Molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of xanthine and its methyl derivatives (caffeine and theobromine) by ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucun, Fatih; Sağlam, Adnan; Güçlü, Vesile

    2007-06-01

    The molecular structures, vibrational frequencies and corresponding vibrational assignments of xanthine and its methyl derivatives (caffeine and theobromine) have been calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with 6-31G(d, p) basis set level. The calculations were utilized to the CS symmetries of the molecules. The obtained vibrational frequencies and optimised geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles) were seen to be well agreement with the experimental data. The used scale factors which have been obtained the ratio of the frequency values of the strongest peaks in the calculated and experimental spectra seem to cause the gained vibrations well corresponding to the experimental ones. Theoretical infrared intensities and Raman activities are also reported.

  1. Discovery of xanthine oxidase inhibitors and/or α-glucosidase inhibitors by carboxyalkyl derivatization based on the flavonoid of apigenin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhuo-Ran; Fan, Shi-Yong; Shi, Wei-Guo; Zhong, Bo-Hua

    2015-07-15

    Three series of apigenin derivatives have been prepared by coupling the carboxyl alkyl group to 4'-, 5- or 7-hydroxyl groups of apigenin respectively. Preliminary biological evaluation in vitro revealed that xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity was improved by modifications at 4'-position and decreased by similar modifications at 5-, 7-positions while α-glucosidase inhibitory activity was maintained by modifications at 5-, 7-positions but lost by modifications at 4'-position. Administration (ip) of 7e markedly lowered serum uric acid levels in potassium oxonate induced hyperuricemic mouse model and administration (p.o.) of 11d or 11e effectively suppressed the elevation of serum glucose in the oral sucrose tolerance test in mice, while apigenin were not significantly effective in both tests.

  2. A xanthine derivative denbufylline inhibits negative inotropic response to verapamil in guinea pig ventricular papillary muscles, independent of its phosphodiesterase inhibitory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, F; Ohmae, S; Takagi, K; Miyamoto, K

    1995-11-01

    A phosphodiesterase (PDE) III inhibitor, amrinone, inhibited both the negative inotropic actions of verapamil and nicardipine in guinea pig ventricular papillary muscle; this effect was canceled by the protein kinase A inhibitor H-89. The PDE IV inhibitor 1,3-di-n-butyl-7-(2'-oxopropyl)xanthine (denbufylline), which elicited a negative inotropic action by itself, attenuated the action of verapamil up to 10 microM, without any interaction with nicardipine. The attenuation by denbufylline was not influenced by H-89. This suggests that in the ventricular papillary muscle, denbufylline acts on some verapamil-sensitive site(s) in the membrane and interferes with the calcium channel function without involvement of its PDE inhibitory activity.

  3. Highly sensitive sensor for picomolar detection of insulin at physiological pH, using GC electrode modified with guanine and electrodeposited nickel oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, Abdollah; Noorbakhash, Abdollah; Sharifi, Ensieh; Semnani, Abolfazl

    2008-12-01

    The electrochemical behavior of insulin at glassy carbon (GC) electrode modified with nickel oxide nanoparticles and guanine was investigated. Cyclic voltammetry technique has been used for electrodeposition of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiOx) and immobilization of guanine on the surface GC electrode. In comparison to glassy carbon electrode modified with nickel oxide nanoparticles and bare GC electrode modified with adsorbed guanine, the guanine/nickel oxide nanoparticles/modified GC electrode exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the oxidation of insulin in physiological pH solutions at reduced overpotential. The modified electrode was applied for insulin detection using cyclic voltammetry or hydrodynamic amperometry techniques. It was found that the calibration curve was linear up to 4muM with a detection limit of 22pM and sensitivity of 100.9pA/pM under the optimized condition for hydrodynamic amperometry using a rotating disk modified electrode. In comparison to other electrochemical insulin sensors, this sensor shows many advantages such as simple preparation method without using any special electron transfer mediator or specific reagent, high sensitivity, excellent catalytic activity at physiological pH values, short response time, long-term stability and remarkable antifouling property toward insulin and its oxidation product. Additionally, it is promising for the monitoring of insulin in chromatographic effluents.

  4. Two-step enzymatic synthesis of guanine arabionside%两步酶法合成阿糖鸟苷

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏晓琨; 丁庆豹; 欧伶; 张鹭; 王昌禄

    2008-01-01

    The chemical synthesis of Guanine arabinoside (ara-G) is extremely complex, time-consuming, and seriously polluted. A two-step enzymatic synthesis process was developed to acquire ara-G easily. 2,6-Diaminopurine arabinoside (ara-DA) was first synthesized with purine nucleoside phosphorylase and pyrimidine nucleoside phos-phorylase produced by Enterobacter aerogenes DGW-07. The conversion yield of ara-DA could reach above 90% when the reaction liquid contained 30 mmol·L-1 uracil arabinoside as arabinose donor, 10 mmol·L-1 2,6-diaminopurine as arabinose acceptor in pH 7.0 20 mmol·L-1 phosphate buffer, and reacted at 60℃ for 48h. Then, ara-DA was effectively transformed into ara-G with adenylate deaminase produced by Aspergillus oryzae DAW-01. The total process had no complex separation and purification.

  5. Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) links heterotrimeric G proteins of the G(12) family to Rho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, S; Chikumi, H; Gutkind, J S

    2000-11-24

    A putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), termed leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), was recently identified upon fusion to the coding sequence of the MLL gene in acute myeloid leukemia. Although the function of LARG is still unknown, it exhibits a number of structural domains suggestive of a role in signal transduction, including a PDZ domain, a LH/RGS domain, and a Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology domain. Here, we show that LARG can activate Rho in vivo. Furthermore, we present evidence that LARG is an integral component of a novel biochemical route whereby G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and heterotrimeric G proteins of the G alpha(12) family stimulate Rho-dependent signaling pathways.

  6. Spectroscopic (UV/VIS, Raman) and Electrophoresis Study of Cytosine-Guanine Oligonucleotide DNA Influenced by Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemian, Seyedeh Maryam; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Boon Tong, Goh; Abdul Rahman, Saadah

    2016-01-01

    Studying the effect of a magnetic field on oligonucleotide DNA can provide a novel DNA manipulation technique for potential application in bioengineering and medicine. In this work, the optical and electrochemical response of a 100 bases oligonucleotides DNA, cytosine-guanine (CG100), is investigated via exposure to different magnetic fields (250, 500, 750, and 1000 mT). As a result of the optical response of CG100 to the magnetic field, the ultra-violet-visible spectrum indicated a slight variation in the band gap of CG100 of about 0.3 eV. Raman spectroscopy showed a significant deviation in hydrogen and phosphate bonds' vibration after exposure to the magnetic field. Oligonucleotide DNA mobility was investigated in the external electric field using the gel electrophoresis technique, which revealed a small decrease in the migration of CG100 after exposure to the magnetic field.

  7. Influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein in primary hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Wu; Qiang Fu; Xinhua Wang; Jianhua Zhao; Liwei Liu; Shirong Tang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pharmacological action of opioid drugs is related to signal transduction of inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein.OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively and qualitatively analyze the influence of morphine on levels of type Ⅱ inhibitory guanine nucleotide binding protein (Gi2 protein) in primary cultured hippocampal neurons at different time points.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized controlled study, which was performed at the Department of Neurobiology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University of Chinese PLA between September 2002 and March 2004.MATERIALS: Cerebral hippocampal neurons were obtained from newborn SD rats at 1-2 days of age. Biotin-antibody Ⅱ-avidin fluorescein isothiocyanate (Avidin-FITC) was purchased from Sigma Company (USA) and the Gi2 protein polyclonal antibody from Santa Cruz Biochemistry Company (USA).METHODS: Seven days after culture, mature hippocampal neurons were randomly divided into six groups: 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups, and a blank control group. Neurons in the morphine groups Received morphine (10μmol/L), which could cause alterations of G-protein mRNA and cAMP expression in the prefrontal cortex. Neurons in the blank control group were given the same volume of saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Gi2 protein levels were detected by an immunofluorescence technique, and were analyzed by the image analytic system with the use of green fluorescence intensity.RESULTS: Gi2 protein levels in hippocampal neurons gradually decreased in the 4-, 8-, 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups. In particular, Gi2 protein levels in the 16-, 24-, and 48-hour morphine groups were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.05-0.01).CONCLUSION: Morphine may decrease Gi2 protein level in primary hippocampal neurons, and the decreasing trend is positively related to morphine-induced time.

  8. Enhanced Molecular Recognition between Nucleobases and Guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) by Surfactant Aggregates in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhang; Wang, Dong; Cao, Meiwen; Han, Yuchun; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2015-07-15

    Only specific base pairs on DNA can bind with each other through hydrogen bonds, which is called the Watson-Crick (W/C) pairing rule. However, without the constraint of DNA chains, the nucleobases in bulk aqueous solution usually do not follow the W/C pairing rule anymore because of the strong competitive effect of water and the multi-interaction edges of nucleobases. The present work applied surfactant aggregates noncovalently functionalized by nucleotide to enhance the recognition between nucleobases without DNA chains in aqueous solution, and it revealed the effects of their self-assembling ability and morphologies on the recognition. The cationic ammonium monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric surfactants DTAB, 12-3-12, and 12-3-12-3-12 were chosen. The surfactants with guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) form micelles, vesicles, and fingerprint-like and plate-like aggregates bearing the hydrogen-bonding sites of GMP, respectively. The binding parameters of these aggregates with adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine(C) indicate that the surfactants can promote W/C recognitions in aqueous solution when they form vesicles (GMP/DTAB) or plate-like aggregates (GMP/12-3-12) with proper molecular packing compactness, which not only provide hydrophobic environments but also shield non-W/C recognition edges. However, the GMP/12-3-12 micelles with loose molecular packing, the GMP/12-3-12 fingerprint-like aggregates where the hydrogen bond sites of GMP are occupied by itself, and the GMP/12-3-12-3-12 vesicles with too strong self-assembling ability cannot promote W/C recognition. This work provides insight into how to design self-assemblies with the performance of enhanced molecule recognition.

  9. Fluorescence properties of 8-(2-pyridyl)guanine "2PyG" as compared to 2-aminopurine in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Anaëlle; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2011-09-05

    Because of their environment-sensitive fluorescence quantum yields, base analogues such as 2-aminopurine (2AP), 6-methylisoxanthopterin (6-MI), and 3-methylisoxanthopterin (3-MI) are widely used in nucleic-acid folding and catalysis assays. Emissions from these guanine mimics are quenched by base-stacking interactions and collisions with purine residues. Fluorescent base analogues that remain highly emissive in folded nucleic acids can provide sensitive means to differentiate DNA/RNA structures by participating in energy transfer from proximal ensembles of unmodified nucleobases. The development of new, highly emissive guanine mimics capable of proper base stacking and base-pairing interactions is an important prerequisite to this approach. Here we report a comparison of the most commonly used probe, 2-aminopurine (2AP), to 8-(2-pyridyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (2PyG). The photophysical properties of these purine derivatives are very different. 2PyG exhibits enhanced fluorescence quantum yields upon its incorporation into folded nucleic acids--approximately 50-fold brighter fluorescence intensity than 2AP in the context of duplex DNA. Due to its bright fluorescence and compatibility with proper DNA folding, 2PyG can be used to accurately quantify energy-transfer efficiencies, whereas 2AP is much less sensitive to structure-specific trends in energy transfer. When using nucleoside monomers, Stern-Volmer plots of 2AP fluorescence revealed upward curvature of F(0) /F upon titration of guanosine monophoshate (GMP), whereas 2PyG exhibited unusual downward curvature of F(0) /F that resulted in a recovery of fluorescence at high GMP concentrations. These results are consistent with the trends observed for 2PyG- and 2AP-containing oligonucleotides, and furthermore suggest that solutions containing high concentrations of GMP can, in some ways, mimic the high local nucleobase densities of folded nucleic acids.

  10. Guanine-nucleotide exchange on ribosome-bound elongation factor G initiates the translocation of tRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehrenberg Måns

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the translation of mRNA into polypeptide, elongation factor G (EF-G catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site of the ribosome. According to the 'classical' model, EF-G in the GTP-bound form promotes translocation, while hydrolysis of the bound GTP promotes dissociation of the factor from the post-translocation ribosome. According to a more recent model, EF-G operates like a 'motor protein' and drives translocation of the peptidyl-tRNA after GTP hydrolysis. In both the classical and motor protein models, GDP-to-GTP exchange is assumed to occur spontaneously on 'free' EF-G even in the absence of a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF. Results We have made a number of findings that challenge both models. First, free EF-G in the cell is likely to be in the GDP-bound form. Second, the ribosome acts as the GEF for EF-G. Third, after guanine-nucleotide exchange, EF-G in the GTP-bound form moves the tRNA2-mRNA complex to an intermediate translocation state in which the mRNA is partially translocated. Fourth, subsequent accommodation of the tRNA2-mRNA complex in the post-translocation state requires GTP hydrolysis. Conclusion These results, in conjunction with previously published cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the ribosome in various functional states, suggest a novel mechanism for translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome by EF-G. Our observations suggest that the ribosome is a universal guanosine-nucleotide exchange factor for EF-G as previously shown for the class-II peptide-release factor 3.

  11. Guanine-nucleotide exchange on ribosome-bound elongation factor G initiates the translocation of tRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavialov, Andrey V; Hauryliuk, Vasili V; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Background During the translation of mRNA into polypeptide, elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site of the ribosome. According to the 'classical' model, EF-G in the GTP-bound form promotes translocation, while hydrolysis of the bound GTP promotes dissociation of the factor from the post-translocation ribosome. According to a more recent model, EF-G operates like a 'motor protein' and drives translocation of the peptidyl-tRNA after GTP hydrolysis. In both the classical and motor protein models, GDP-to-GTP exchange is assumed to occur spontaneously on 'free' EF-G even in the absence of a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Results We have made a number of findings that challenge both models. First, free EF-G in the cell is likely to be in the GDP-bound form. Second, the ribosome acts as the GEF for EF-G. Third, after guanine-nucleotide exchange, EF-G in the GTP-bound form moves the tRNA2-mRNA complex to an intermediate translocation state in which the mRNA is partially translocated. Fourth, subsequent accommodation of the tRNA2-mRNA complex in the post-translocation state requires GTP hydrolysis. Conclusion These results, in conjunction with previously published cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the ribosome in various functional states, suggest a novel mechanism for translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome by EF-G. Our observations suggest that the ribosome is a universal guanosine-nucleotide exchange factor for EF-G as previously shown for the class-II peptide-release factor 3. PMID:15985150

  12. Performance characteristics of guanine incorporated PVDF-HFP/PEO polymer blend electrolytes with binary iodide salts for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil, R. A.; Theerthagiri, J.; Madhavan, J.; Arof, A. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have investigated the influence of guanine as an organic dopant in dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) based on poly(vinylidinefluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)/polyethylene oxide (PEO) polymer blend electrolyte along with binary iodide salts (potassium iodide (KI) and tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI)) and iodine (I2). The PVDF-HFP/KI + TBAI/I2, PVDF-HFP/PEO/KI + TBAI/I2 and guanine incorporated PVDF-HFP/PEO/KI + TBAI/I2 electrolytes were prepared by solution casting technique using DMF as solvent. The PVDF-HFP/KI + TBAI/I2 electrolyte showed an ionic conductivity value of 9.99 × 10-5 Scm-1, whereas, it was found to be increased to 4.53 × 10-5 Scm-1 when PEO was blended with PVDF-HFP/KI + TBAI/I2 electrolyte. However, a maximum ionic conductivity value of 3.67 × 10-4 Scm-1 was obtained for guanine incorporated PVDF-HFP/PEO/KI + TBAI/I2 blend electrolyte. The photovoltaic properties of all these polymer electrolytes in DSSCs were characterized. As a consequence, the power conversion efficiency of the guanine incorporated PVDF-HFP/PEO/KI + TBAI/I2 electrolyte based DSSC was significantly improved to 4.98% compared with PVDF-HFP/PEO/KI + TBAI/I2 electrolyte based DSSC (2.46%). These results revealed that the guanine can be an effective organic dopant to enhance the performance of DSSCs.

  13. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2, was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH 4 . Cu II (3 and Zn II (4 complexes of (2 were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5 and (6. All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu II atom, while the Sn IV atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5 with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5 exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N 7 position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k obs , values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5 with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5 in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E pa and E pc values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5 with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E 1/2 has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II and Cu(I complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  14. New Dihydro OO'Bis(Salicylidene) 2,2' Aminobenzothiazolyl Borate Complexes: Kinetic and Voltammetric Studies of Dimethyltin Copper Complex with Guanine, Adenine, and Calf Thymus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Mohani, Bhawana; Parveen, Shamima

    2006-01-01

    The newly synthesized ligand, dihydro OO'bis(salicylidene) 2,2' aminobenzothiazolyl borate (2), was derived from the reaction of Schiff base of 2-aminobenzothiazole and salicylaldehyde with KBH(4). Cu(II) (3) and Zn(II) (4) complexes of (2) were synthesized and further metallated with dimethyltindichloride to yield heterobimetallic complexes (5) and (6). All complexes have been thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, and IR, NMR, EPR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy and conductance measurements. The spectroscopic data support square planar environment around the Cu(II) atom, while the Sn(IV) atom acquires pentacoordinate geometry. The interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA was studied by spectrophotometric, electrochemical, and kinetic methods. The absorption spectra of complex (5) exhibit a remarkable "hyperchromic effect" in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA. Indicative of strong binding of the complex to calf thymus DNA preferentially binds through N(7) position of guanine base, while the adenine shows binding to a lesser extent. The kinetic data were obtained from the rate constants, k(obs), values under pseudo-first-order conditions. Cyclic voltammetry was employed to study the interaction of complex (5) with guanine, adenine, and calf thymus DNA. The CV of complex (5) in the absence and in the presence of guanine and calf thymus DNA altered drastically, with a positive shift in formal peak potential E(pa) and E(pc) values and a significant increase in peak current. The positive shift in formal potentials with increase in peak current favours strong interaction of complex (5) with calf thymus DNA. The net shift in E(1/2) has been used to estimate the ratio of equilibrium constants for the binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I) complexes to calf thymus DNA.

  15. A simple method for quantification of allopurinol and oxipurinol in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.K.; Nijdam, L.C.; van Roon, E.N.; Movig, K.L.; Jansen, T.L.; Brouwers, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Allopurinol is a uric acid lowering drug used in the treatment of gout and the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome. Allopurinol and its active metabolite oxipurinol inhibit xanthine oxidase, which forms uric acid from xanthine and hypoxanthine. Therapeutic drug monitoring is an important

  16. A simple method for quantification of allopurinol and oxipurinol in human serum by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, M.K.; Nijdam, L.C.; van Roon, E.N.; Movig, K.L.; Jansen, T.L.; Brouwers, J.R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Allopurinol is a uric acid lowering drug used in the treatment of gout and the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome. Allopurinol and its active metabolite oxipurinol inhibit xanthine oxidase, which forms uric acid from xanthine and hypoxanthine. Therapeutic drug monitoring is an important

  17. Voltammetric and electrochemical gravimetric selective detection of interactions between Tl(I) and guanine and the influence on activity of DNA drug-intercalators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Mackiewicz, Marcin; Matysiak, Edyta; Krasnodebska-Ostrega, Beata; Stojek, Zbigniew

    2013-03-15

    The interactions of Tl(I), a well known toxic species, with selected oligonucleotides were examined. The oligonucleotide sequences selected for the investigation were taken from gene hOGG1 responsible for repairing of DNA damage. Cyclic voltammetry was particularly useful, since nitrogen N-7 in guanine can be electrooxidized while its binding with Tl(I) leads to the loss of electroactivity. So, this selected interaction could be quantitatively used in drawing Scatchard's plot and calculating the binding constants and the number of active sites in guanine molecules occupied by one metal ion. Further, we have shown that the presence of Tl(I) leads to a decrease in activity of doxorubicin (DOX), a popular anticancer drug, vs. DNA. The obtained circular dichroism (CD) spectra and the measurements with an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) led to a conclusion that in the presence of monovalent thallium cations the DNA double helix was neither damaged/oxidized nor its conformation changed substantially.

  18. Multiscale QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Study on the First Steps of Guanine-Damage by Free Hydroxyl Radicals in Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Abolfath, Ramin M; Rajnarayanam, R; Brabec, Thomas; Kodym, Reinhard; Papiez, Lech

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the damage of DNA bases from hydrogen abstraction by free OH radicals is of particular importance to reveal the effect of hydroxyl radicals produced by the secondary effect of radiation. Previous studies address the problem with truncated DNA bases as ab-initio quantum simulation required to study such electronic spin dependent processes are computationally expensive. Here, for the first time, we employ a multiscale and hybrid Quantum-Mechanical-Molecular-Mechanical simulation to study the interaction of OH radicals with guanine-deoxyribose-phosphate DNA molecular unit in the presence of water where all the water molecules and the deoxyribose-phosphate fragment are treated with the simplistic classical Molecular-Mechanical scheme. Our result illustrates that the presence of water strongly alters the hydrogen-abstraction reaction as the hydrogen bonding of OH radicals with water restricts the relative orientation of the OH-radicals with respective to the the DNA base (here guanine). This results ...

  19. A Theoretical Study of the Binding of [Re6Se8(OH2(H2O4] Rhenium Clusters to DNA Purine Base Guanine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Alvarado-Soto

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hexanuclear rhenium complexes are promising candidates for use as antitumor drugs. However, to date, there has been no investigation into the nature of their binding to DNA. In this study, density functional theory (DFT was used to examine the binding of [Re6Se8(OH2(H2O4] to the DNA purine base guanine. The geometrical structures of cluster-guanine adducts in water were modeled at the zero order regular approximation (ZORA-PW91 level. Calculating the bond energies allowed us to compare the cis and trans forms of the cluster, and a possible manners of interaction between [Re6Se8(OH2(H2O3] clusters and DNA was obtained and explained.

  20. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Pandolfo Feoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome.

  1. Acute kidney injury observed during phase 1 clinical trials of a novel xanthine oxidase/URAT1 dual inhibitor PF-06743649.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Pinky; Gurrell, Rachel; Kirby, Simon; Sudworth, Maria; Loudon, Peter T

    2016-08-01

    The objective of these clinical studies was to assess the safety and urate lowering activity of a novel urate transporter 1 (URAT1)/ xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor PF-06743649 in healthy subjects and gout patients. Escalating doses of PF-06743649 or placebo were given to healthy young subjects, healthy elderly subjects and gout patients. Serum uric acid (sUA) and urinary pharmacodynamic markers were assayed, and safety was assessed by collection of adverse events and assessment of safety labs, ECGs and vital signs. Administration of PF-06743649 led to rapid decrease in sUA in all cohorts; in gout patients, a change from baseline of 69 % was observed for the 40 mg dose. Urinary and serum biomarkers were consistent with inhibition of both URAT1 and XO. Although dosing was otherwise well tolerated, two subjects experienced serious adverse events of acute kidney injury. Both subjects exhibited increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen in the first 3 days post first dose and were hospitalised. One subject exhibited oliguria for the first 24 h. Both subjects made a complete recovery with minimal intervention. PF-06743649 was effective at rapidly lowering sUA, but further development was terminated for an identified renal safety risk.

  2. Interleukin-1 beta-induced nitric oxide production from isolated rat islets is modulated by D-glucose and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, H U; Mauricio, D; Karlsen, Allan Ertman

    1996-01-01

    Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D-glucose-mediated modula......Interleukin-1 beta has been proposed to cause selective beta-cell destruction via the induction of nitric oxide synthesis. The cytotoxic effect of interleukin-1 beta is modulated by the concentration of D-glucose in the medium. The aim of this study was to investigate if D...... effects on acute insulin release was found at high (28 mmol/l) concentrations of D-glucose, and blocking nitrite production by the L-arginine analog aminoguanidine, which selectively inhibits the cytokine-inducible nitric oxide synthase, did not result in protection against the inhibitory action...... that could be reproduced by the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP. Addition of 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine resulted in a threefold reduction in the mRNA level of interleukin-1 beta-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase. We conclude that interleukin-1 beta-induced islet nitric oxide synthesis is augmented by D...

  3. Mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic modeling of salvianolic acid A effects on plasma xanthine oxidase activity and uric acid levels in acute myocardial infarction rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haidong; Li, Xi; Zhang, Wenting; Liu, Yao; Wang, Shijun; Liu, Xiaoquan; He, Hua

    2017-03-01

    1. Salvianolic acid A (SalA) was found to attenuate plasma uric acid (UA) concentration and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in acute myocardial infraction (AMI) rats, which was characterized with developed mechanism-based pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) model. 2. AMI was induced in rats by coronary artery ligation. Surviving AMI rats received a single intravenous dose of 5 mg/kg of SalA and normal saline. The plasma SalA concentrations were determined by HPLC-MS/MS method. The plasma UA concentrations were determined by HPLC method and plasma XO activity were measured spectrophotometrically. An integrated mathematical model characterized the relationship between plasma UA and SalA. 3. Pharmacokinetics was described using two-compartment model for SalA with linear metabolic process. In post-AMI rats, XO activity and UA concentrations were increased, while SalA dosing palliated this increase. These effects were well captured by using two series of transduction models, simulating the delay of inhibition on XO driven by SalA and UA elevation resulted from the multiple factors, respectively. 4. The effect was well described by the developed PK-PD model, indicating that SalA can exert cardiovascular protective effects by decreasing elevated plasma UA levels induced by AMI.

  4. Crystal Structure and Inhibitory Activity against Xanthine Oxidase of Bis(μ2-chloro)-chloro-(μ-N,N'-(2-pyridylmethylene)Furanmethanoamine Copper(Ⅱ)Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Rui-Qin; SHI Da-Hua; SHI Lei; ZHU Hai-Liang

    2008-01-01

    A chloro-bridged dinuclear copper(Ⅱ) complex with ligand 2-pyridylme-thylene-furfurylamine has been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction,and its inhibitory activity on xanthine oxidase(XO)Was also evaluated.It crystallizes in the triclinic system,space group P-1 with a=8.0441(16),b=8.5663(17),c=10.060(2)(A),α=77.52(3),β=72.04(3),γ=70.12(3)°,V=615.3(2)(A)3,Z=1,Dc=1.731 g/cm3,F(000)=322,the final R=0.0401 and wR=0.0934 for 1971 observed reflections with Ⅰ>2σ(Ⅰ).X-ray analysis reveals that the Cu(Ⅱ)cation is five-coordinated by two N atoms of Schiff base and three C1 anions.The C-H…Cl intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonds connect the molecules to form a three-dimensional network.Tilis copper(Ⅱ) complex shows more potent inhibitory activity against XO with Ⅰ C50=3.48/μM than the standard inhibitor allopurinol.

  5. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies on Quercus acuta Thunb. (Fagaceae Extract: Active Constituents, Serum Uric Acid Suppression, and Xanthine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Soo Yoon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quercus acuta Thunb. (Fagaceae (QA is cultivated as a dietary and ornamental plant in China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. It has been widely used as the main ingredient of acorn tofu, a traditional food in China and South Korea. The aim of this study was to determine in vitro and in vivo xanthine oxidase (XO inhibitory and antihyperuricemic activities of an ethyl acetate extract of QA leaf (QALE and identify its active phytochemicals using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS and liquid chromatography (LC systems. The QALE was found to possess potent in vitro antioxidant and XO inhibitory activities. In vivo study using hyperuricemic mice induced with potassium oxonate demonstrated that the QALE could inhibit hepatic XO activity at a relatively low oral dose (50 mg/kg and significantly alleviate hyperuricemia to a similar extent as allopurinol. Several active compounds including vitamin E known to possess XO inhibitory activity were identified from the QALE. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that reports the active constituents and antihyperuricemic effect of QA, suggesting that it is feasible to use QALE as a food therapy or alternative medicine for alleviating hyperuricemia and gout.

  6. Pleurotus ostreatus, an edible mushroom, enhances glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, ascorbate peroxidase and reduces xanthine dehydrogenase in major organs of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Geraldine, Pitchairaj; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran

    2014-05-01

    Aging is now considered to be associated with an elevation in oxidative damage to macromolecules and enhanced levels of inflammation. Therefore, inhibition of age-related oxidative stress by natural supplement is an important study. To investigate whether the treatment with Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.: Fr) Kumm, (Pleurotaceae) can ameliorate oxidative damage in aged rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of six each: group 1, normal young rats; group 2, normal aged untreated rats; group 3, normal aged rats treated with P. ostreatus (200 mg/kg body wt administered intraperitoneally for 21 days). On the 22nd day, rats were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver, kidneys, heart and brain were removed from each rat for the biochemical and isozyme analyses of the antioxidant enzymes glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), ascorbate peroxidase (Apx) and xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). An elevated activity of XDH was observed in the liver (G2:13.72 ± 4.1 versus G1: 7.57 ± 1.15; p ostreatus to aged rats resulted in decreased XDH and increased G6PDH and Apx activities in liver, kidneys, heart and brain. Interestingly, analyses of isozyme pattern of these enzymes are support the results obtained from the spectrophotometric determinations. These results suggest that an extract of P. ostreatus can protect the age-related oxidative damage in major organs of Wistar rats by enhancing the antioxidant enzymes G6PDH and Apx and by reducing XDH.

  7. In vitro Inhibition of Acetyl Cholinesterase, Lipoxygenase, Xanthine Oxidase and Antibacterial Activities of Five Indigofera (Fabaceae Aqueous Acetone Extracts from Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.E. Lamien

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the inhibition of oxidative stress related enzymes of aqueous acetone extracts, as well as antibacterial activity from five Indigofera species well-known medicinal plant from Burkina. Also are investigated in this study the potential contribution of tannins and of flavonol in these activities Particularly, aqueous acetone extracts were investigated for their Lipoxygenase (LOX, Xanthine Oxidase (XO and Acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibitions that are implied in inflammation, gout and Alzheimer’s etiology diseases. Interestingly, I. macrocalyx which had the highest flavonol content (of all showed more inhibition against LOX and XO (51.16 and 77.33% respectively. Our study showed a significant correlation between XO inhibition and total flavonol content (R2 = 0.9052. AChE was low sensible to all extracts. In contrast, the extracts were rich in tannin compounds especially in I. tinctoria extract. And results of the in vitro antibacterial activities of these extracts against five bacteria showed that all bacteria were sensible to all extracts particularly S. typhimurium and B. cereus. Our results suggest that the five studied species prove to be good sources of inhibition of the three enzymes involved in oxidative stress and also to have some antibacterial properties. That is what probably explains their uses in folk medicine, singularly, in the treatment of gout, dysentery and anti-inflammatory diseases.

  8. Organic compounds present in airborne particles stimulate superoxide production and DNA fragmentation: role of NOX and xanthine oxidase in animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Iván Tavera; Silva, Guillermo Benjamín; Carreras, Hebe Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter trigger the production of reactive oxygen species. However, most of the studies dealing with oxidative damage of airborne particles focus on the effects of individual compounds and not real mixtures. In order to study the enzymatic superoxide production resulting from the exposition to a complex mixture, we derived organic extracts from airborne particles collected daily in an urban area and exposed kidney, liver, and heart mammal tissues. After that, we measured DNA damage employing the comet assay. We observed that in every tissue, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were involved in O2 (-) production when they were exposed to the organic extracts, as the lucigenin's chemiluminescence decays when enzymes were inhibited. The same trend was observed with the percentage of cells with comets, since DNA damage was higher when they were exposed to same experimental conditions. Our data allow us to hypothesize that these enzymes play an important role in the oxidative stress produced by PAHs and that there is a mechanism involving them in the O2 (-)generation.

  9. Caffeine affects the biological responses of human hematopoietic cells of myeloid lineage via downregulation of the mTOR pathway and xanthine oxidase activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abooali, Maryam; Yasinska, Inna M.; Casely-Hayford, Maxwell A.; Berger, Steffen M.; Fasler-Kan, Elizaveta; Sumbayev, Vadim V.

    2015-01-01

    Correction of human myeloid cell function is crucial for the prevention of inflammatory and allergic reactions as well as leukaemia progression. Caffeine, a naturally occurring food component, is known to display anti-inflammatory effects which have previously been ascribed largely to its inhibitory actions on phosphodiesterase. However, more recent studies suggest an additional role in affecting the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a master regulator of myeloid cell translational pathways, although detailed molecular events underlying its mode of action have not been elucidated. Here, we report the cellular uptake of caffeine, without metabolisation, by healthy and malignant hematopoietic myeloid cells including monocytes, basophils and primary acute myeloid leukaemia mononuclear blasts. Unmodified caffeine downregulated mTOR signalling, which affected glycolysis and the release of pro-inflammatory/pro-angiogenic cytokines as well as other inflammatory mediators. In monocytes, the effects of caffeine were potentiated by its ability to inhibit xanthine oxidase, an enzyme which plays a central role in human purine catabolism by generating uric acid. In basophils, caffeine also increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels which further enhanced its inhibitory action on mTOR. These results demonstrate an important mode of pharmacological action of caffeine with potentially wide-ranging therapeutic impact for treating non-infectious disorders of the human immune system, where it could be applied directly to inflammatory cells. PMID:26384306

  10. Molecular cloning of Ras cDNA from Penaeus japonicus (Crustacea, decapoda): geranylgeranylation and guanine nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C F; Chuang, N N

    1998-12-11

    A cDNA was isolated from the shrimp Penaeus japonicus by homology cloning. The shrimp hepatopancreas cDNA encodes a 187-residue polypeptide whose predicted amino acid sequence shares 85% homology with mammalian K-Ras 4B protein and demonstrates identity in the guanine nucleotide binding domains. Expression of the shrimp cDNA in Escherichia coli yielded a 21-kDa polypeptide with a positive reactivity towards the monoclonal antibodies against mammalian Ras. The GTP binding of the shrimp ras-encoded fusion protein was approximated to be 30000units/mg of protein, whereas the binding for GDP was 5000units/mg of protein. Fluorography analysis demonstrated that the prenylation of both shrimp Ras GDP and shrimp Ras GTP by protein geranylgeranyltransferase I of shrimp Penaeus japonicus exceeded the shrimp Ras nucleotide-free form by 10-fold, and fourfold, respectively; that is, the shrimp protein geranylgeranyltransferase I prefers to react with the shrimp ras-encoded p25 fusion protein in the GDP-bound form.

  11. Comparative analysis of urinary N7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine for ethylene oxide- and non-exposed workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Chun Jean; Wu, Chia-Fang; Shih, Wei-Chung; Chen, Ming-Feng; Chen, Chang-Yuh; Chien, Yeh-Chung; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Chiang, Su-Yin; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2011-05-10

    Ethylene oxide (EO), a direct alkylating agent and a carcinogen, can attack the nucleophilic sites of DNA bases to form a variety of DNA adducts. The most abundant adduct, N7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine (N7-HEG), can be depurinated spontaneously or enzymatically from DNA backbone to form abasic sites. Molecular dosimetry of the excised N7-HEG in urine can serve as an EO exposure and potential risk-associated biomarker. This study was to analyze N7-HEG in urine collected from 89 EO-exposed and 48 nonexposed hospital workers and 20 exposed and 10 nonexposed factory workers by using our newly developed on-line solid-phase extraction isotope-dilution LC-MS/MS method. Statistical analysis of data shows that the exposed factory workers excreted significantly greater concentrations of N7-HEG than both the nonexposed factory workers and hospital workers. Multiple linear regression analysis reveals that the EO-exposed factory workers had a significantly greater post-shift urinary N7-HEG than their nonexposed coworkers and hospital workers. These results demonstrate that analysis of urinary N7-HEG can serve as a biomarker of EO exposure for future molecular epidemiology studies to better understand the role of the EO-induced DNA adduct formation in EO carcinogenicity and certainly for routine surveillance of occupational EO exposure for the study of potential health impacts on workers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav2 is a negative regulator of parathyroid hormone receptor/Gq signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami-Nemini, Alexander; Gohla, Antje; Urlaub, Henning; Lohse, Martin J; Klenk, Christoph

    2012-08-01

    The parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) is a class B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that mediates the endocrine and paracrine effects of parathyroid hormone and related peptides through the activation of phospholipase Cβ-, adenylyl cyclase-, mitogen-activated protein kinase-, and β-arrestin-initiated signaling pathways. It is currently not clear how specificity among these downstream signaling pathways is achieved. A possible mechanism involves adaptor proteins that affect receptor/effector coupling. In a proteomic screen with the PTHR C terminus, we identified vav2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases, as a PTHR-interacting protein. The core domains of vav2 bound to the intracellular domains of the PTHR independent of receptor activation. In addition, vav2 specifically interacted with activated Gα(q) but not with Gα(s) subunits, and it competed with PTHR for coupling to Gα(q). Consistent with its specific interaction with Gα(q), vav2 impaired G(q)-mediated inositol phosphate generation but not G(s)-mediated cAMP generation. This inhibition of G(q) signaling was specific for PTHR signaling, compared with other G(q)-coupled GPCRs. Moreover, the benefit for PTHR-mediated inositol phosphate generation in the absence of vav2 required the ezrin binding domain of Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger regulatory factor 1. Our results show that a RhoA GEF can specifically interact with a GPCR and modulate its G protein signaling specificity.

  13. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

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    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  14. RINL, guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rab5-subfamily, is involved in the EphA8-degradation pathway with odin.

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    Hiroaki Kajiho

    Full Text Available The Rab family of small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases plays a vital role in membrane trafficking. Its active GTP-bound state is driven by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs. Ras and Rab interactor (or Ras interaction/interference-like (RINL, which contains a conserved VPS9 domain critical for GEF action, was recently identified as a new Rab5 subfamily GEF in vitro. However, its detailed function and interacting molecules have not yet been fully elucidated. Here we found that RINL has GEF activity for the Rab5 subfamily proteins by measuring their GTP-bound forms in cultured cells. We also found that RINL interacts with odin, a member of the ankyrin-repeat and sterile-alpha motif (SAM domain-containing (Anks protein family. In addition, the Eph tyrosine kinase receptor EphA8 formed a ternary complex with both RINL and odin. Interestingly, RINL expression in cultured cells reduced EphA8 levels in a manner dependent on both its GEF activity and interaction with odin. In addition, knockdown of RINL increased EphA8 level in HeLa cells. Our findings suggest that RINL, as a GEF for Rab5 subfamily, is implicated in the EphA8-degradation pathway via its interaction with odin.

  15. DPT tautomerisation of the wobble guanine·thymine DNA base mispair is not mutagenic: QM and QTAIM arguments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovarets', Ol'ha O; Zhurakivsky, Roman O; Hovorun, Dmytro M

    2015-01-01

    We have shown for the first time, connecting QM methods with QTAIM analysis and using the methodology of the sweeps of the energetical, electron-topological and geometrical parameters, that the tautomerisation of the wobble guanine·thymine (wG·T) DNA base mispair into the wG(*)·T(*) base mispair induced by the double proton transfer (DPT), which undergoes a concerted asynchronous pathway, is not mutagenic. The wG·T → wG(*)·T(*) DPT tautomerisation does not result in the transition of the G base into its mutagenic tautomeric form G(*) able to mispair with the T base within the Watson-Crick base pairing scheme. This observation is explained by the so-called quantum protection of the wG·T DNA base mispair from its mutagenic tautomerisation - the dynamical non-stability of the tautomerised wG(*)·T(*) base mispair and significantly negative value of the Gibbs free energy of activation for the reverse reaction of the wG·T → wG(*)·T(*) DPT tautomerisation.

  16. Evidence that Natural Selection is the Primary Cause of the Guanine-cytosine Content Variation in Rice Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Shi; Xiyin Wang; Zhe Li; Qihui Zhu; Ji Yang; Song Ge; Jingchu Luo

    2007-01-01

    Cereal genes are classified into two distinct classes according to the guanine-cytosine (GC) content at the third codon sites (GC3). Natural selection and mutation bias have been proposed to affect the GC content. However, there has been controversy about the cause of GC variation. Here, we characterized the GC content of 1 092 paralogs and other single-copy genes in the duplicated chromosomal regions of the rice genome (ssp. indica) and classified the paralogs into GC3-rich and GC3-poor groups. By referring to out-group sequences from Arabidopsis and maize, we confirmed that the average synonymous substitution rate of the GC3-rich genes is significantly lower than that of the GC3-poor genes. Furthermore,we explored the other possible factors corresponding to the GC variation including the length of coding sequences, the number of exons in each gene, the number of genes in each family, the location of genes on chromosomes and the protein functions. Consequently, we propose that natural selection rather than mutation bias was the primary cause of the GC variation.

  17. A new rapid amplification of cDNA ends method for extremely guanine plus cytosine-rich genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xianzong; Jarvis, Donald L

    2006-09-15

    Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) is widely used to determine the 5'- and 3'-terminal nucleotide sequences of genes. Many different RACE methods have been developed to meet various requirements, but none addresses the difficult problems that arise when trying to isolate the ends of extremely guanine plus cytosine (GC)-rich genes. In this study, we found that we were unable to isolate the correct 5' or 3' end of an insect gene, which appeared to include extremely GC-rich sequences, using current RACE methods. Thus, we developed a new RACE method that can be used for this purpose. This new method entails first-strand cDNA synthesis at 70 degrees C with Thermo-X reverse transcriptase in the presence of homoectoine, followed by a polymerase chain reaction with 98 degrees C denaturation steps and Phusion DNA polymerase in the presence of 1M betaine and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The use of these conditions yielded 5'- and 3'-RACE products that were approximately 80% GC over 213 and 162bp, respectively, and included shorter internal regions of 82 to 89% GC.

  18. A High-Throughput Assay for Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Based on the Transcreener GDP Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichman, Melvin; Schabdach, Amanda; Kumar, Meera; Zielinski, Tom; Donover, Preston S; Laury-Kleintop, Lisa D; Lowery, Robert G

    2015-12-01

    Ras homologous (Rho) family GTPases act as molecular switches controlling cell growth, movement, and gene expression by cycling between inactive guanosine diphosphate (GDP)- and active guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound conformations. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) positively regulate Rho GTPases by accelerating GDP dissociation to allow formation of the active, GTP-bound complex. Rho proteins are directly involved in cancer pathways, especially cell migration and invasion, and inhibiting GEFs holds potential as a therapeutic strategy to diminish Rho-dependent oncogenesis. Methods for measuring GEF activity suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) are limited. We developed a simple, generic biochemical assay method for measuring GEF activity based on the fact that GDP dissociation is generally the rate-limiting step in the Rho GTPase catalytic cycle, and thus addition of a GEF causes an increase in steady-state GTPase activity. We used the Transcreener GDP Assay, which relies on selective immunodetection of GDP, to measure the GEF-dependent stimulation of steady-state GTP hydrolysis by small GTPases using Dbs (Dbl's big sister) as a GEF for Cdc42, RhoA, and RhoB. The assay is well suited for HTS, with a homogenous format and far red fluorescence polarization (FP) readout, and it should be broadly applicable to diverse Rho GEF/GTPase pairs. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  19. Identification of a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf3, the yeast orthologue of mammalian Arf6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K Gillingham

    Full Text Available Small G proteins of the Arf and Rab families are fundamental to the organisation and activity of intracellular membranes. One of the most well characterised of these G proteins is mammalian Arf6, a protein that participates in many cellular processes including endocytosis, actin remodelling and cell adhesion. Exchange of GDP for GTP on Arf6 is performed by a variety of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, principally of the cytohesin (PSCD and EFA6 (PSD families. In this paper we describe the characterisation of a GEF for the yeast orthologue of Arf6, Arf3, which we have named Yel1 (yeast EFA6-like-1 using yeast genetics, fluorescence microscopy and in vitro nucleotide exchange assays. Yel1 appears structurally related to the EFA6 family of GEFs, having an N-terminal Sec7 domain and C-terminal PH and coiled-coil domains. We find that Yel1 is constitutively targeted to regions of polarised growth in yeast, where it co-localises with Arf3. Moreover the Sec7 domain of Yel1 is required for its membrane targeting and for that of Arf3. Finally we show that the isolated Yel1 Sec7 domain strongly stimulates nucleotide exchange activity specifically on Arf3 in vitro.

  20. Electrochemical estrogen screen method based on the electrochemical behavior of MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinlian; Song, Jia; Bi, Sheng; Zhou, Shi; Cui, Jiwen; Liu, Jiguang; Wu, Dongmei

    2016-08-05

    It was an urgent task to develop quick, cheap and accurate estrogen screen method for evaluating the estrogen effect of the booming chemicals. In this study, the voltammetric behavior between the estrogen-free and normal fragmented MCF-7 cell suspensions were compared, and the electrochemical signal (about 0.68V attributed by xanthine and guanine) of the estrogen-free fragmented MCF-7 cell suspension was obviously lower than that of the normal one. The electrochemistry detection of ex-secretion purines showed that the ability of ex-secretion purines of cells sharp decreased due to the removing of endogenous estrogen. The results indicated that the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells was related to the level of intracellular estrogen. When the level of intracellular estrogen was down-regulated, the concentrations of the xanthine and hypoxanthine decreased, which led to the electrochemical signal of MCF-7 cells fall. Based on the electrochemical signal, the electrochemical estrogen screen method was established. The estrogen effect of estradiol, nonylphenol and bisphenol A was evaluated with the electrochemical method, and the result was accordant with that of MTT assay. The electrochemical estrogen screen method was simple, quickly, cheap, objective, and it exploits a new way for the evaluation of estrogenic effects of chemicals.

  1. Escherichia coli gpt gene provides dominant selection for vaccinia virus open reading frame expression vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, F G; Moss, B

    1988-06-01

    Mycophenolic acid, an inhibitor of purine metabolism, was shown to block the replication of vaccinia virus in normal cell lines. This observation led to the development of a dominant one-step plaque selection system, based on expression of the Escherichia coli gpt gene, for the isolation of recombinant vaccinia viruses. Synthesis of xanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enabled only the recombinant viruses to form large plaques in a selective medium containing mycophenolic acid, xanthine, and hypoxanthine. To utilize the selection system efficiently, we constructed a series of plasmids that contain the E. coli gpt gene and allow insertion of foreign genes into multiple unique restriction endonuclease sites in all three reading frames between the translation initiation codon of a strong late promoter and synthetic translation termination sequences. The selection-expression cassette is flanked by vaccinia virus DNA that directs homologous recombination into the virus genome. The new vectors allow high-level expression of complete or partial open reading frames and rapid construction of recombinant viruses by facilitating the cloning steps and by simplifying their isolation. The system was tested by cloning the E. coli beta-galactosidase gene; in 24 h, this enzyme accounted for approximately 3.5% of the total infected-cell protein.

  2. Effect of ionic strength and cationic DNA affinity binders on the DNA sequence selective alkylation of guanine N7-positions by nitrogen mustards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartley, J.A.; Forrow, S.M.; Souhami, R.L. (Univ. College and Middlesex School of Medicine, London (England))

    1990-03-27

    Large variations in alkylation intensities exist among guanines in a DNA sequence following treatment with chemotherapeutic alkylating agents such as nitrogen mustards, and the substituent attached to the reactive group can impose a distinct sequence preference for reaction. In order to understand further the structural and electrostatic factors which determine the sequence selectivity of alkylation reactions, the effect of increase ionic strength, the intercalator ethidium bromide, AT-specific minor groove binders distamycin A and netropsin, and the polyamine spermine on guanine N7-alkylation by L-phenylalanine mustard (L-Pam), uracil mustard (UM), and quinacrine mustard (QM) was investigated with a modification of the guanine-specific chemical cleavage technique for DNA sequencing. The result differed with both the nitrogen mustard and the cationic agent used. The effect, which resulted in both enhancement and suppression of alkylation sites, was most striking in the case of netropsin and distamycin A, which differed from each other. DNA footprinting indicated that selective binding to AT sequences in the minor groove of DNA can have long-range effects on the alkylation pattern of DNA in the major groove.

  3. Mammalian Mon2/Ysl2 regulates endosome-to-Golgi trafficking but possesses no guanine nucleotide exchange activity toward Arl1 GTPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Divyanshu; Boh, Boon Kim; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Li; Cornvik, Tobias Carl; Hong, Wanjin; Lu, Lei

    2013-11-01

    Arl1 is a member of Arf family small GTPases that is essential for the organization and function of Golgi complex. Mon2/Ysl2, which shares significant homology with Sec7 family Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, was poorly characterized in mammalian cells. Here, we report the first in depth characterization of mammalian Mon2. We found that Mon2 localized to trans-Golgi network which was dependent on both its N and C termini. The depletion of Mon2 did not affect the Golgi localized or cellular active form of Arl1. Furthermore, our in vitro assay demonstrated that recombinant Mon2 did not promote guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. Therefore, our results suggest that Mon2 could be neither necessary nor sufficient for the guanine nucleotide exchange of Arl1. We demonstrated that Mon2 was involved in endosome-to-Golgi trafficking as its depletion accelerated the delivery of furin and CI-M6PR to Golgi after endocytosis.

  4. Purine metabolism in response to hypoxic conditions associated with breath-hold diving and exercise in erythrocytes and plasma from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo Velasco-Martínez, Iris; Hernández-Camacho, Claudia J; Méndez-Rodríguez, Lía C; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In mammalian tissues under hypoxic conditions, ATP degradation results in accumulation of purine metabolites. During exercise, muscle energetic demand increases and oxygen consumption can exceed its supply. During breath-hold diving, oxygen supply is reduced and, although oxygen utilization is regulated by bradycardia (low heart rate) and peripheral vasoconstriction, tissues with low blood flow (ischemia) may become hypoxic. The goal of this study was to evaluate potential differences in the circulating levels of purine metabolism components between diving and exercise in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Blood samples were taken from captive dolphins following a swimming routine (n=8) and after a 2min dive (n=8). Activity of enzymes involved in purine metabolism (hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT), inosine monophosphate deshydrogenase (IMPDH), xanthine oxidase (XO), purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP)), and purine metabolite (hypoxanthine (HX), xanthine (X), uric acid (UA), inosine monophosphate (IMP), inosine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)), adenosine, adenosine monophosphate (AMP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine diphosphate (GDP), guanosine triphosphate (GTP)) concentrations were quantified in erythrocyte and plasma samples. Enzymatic activity and purine metabolite concentrations involved in purine synthesis and degradation, were not significantly different between diving and exercise. Plasma adenosine concentration was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.03); this may be related to dive-induced ischemia. In erythrocytes, HGPRT activity was higher after diving than exercise (p=0.007), suggesting an increased capacity for purine recycling and ATP synthesis from IMP in ischemic tissues of bottlenose dolphins during diving. Purine recycling and physiological adaptations may maintain the ATP concentrations in bottlenose dolphins after diving and exercise.

  5. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase 2 function and expression in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient rat B103 neuroblastoma cells as model for Lesch-Nyhan disease: BODIPY-forskolin as pharmacological tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinast, Liz; von der Ohe, Juliane; Burhenne, Heike; Seifert, Roland

    2012-07-01

    Hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) deficiency results in Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND). The link between the HPRT defect and the self-injurious behavior in LND is still unknown. HPRT-deficient rat B103 neuroblastoma cells serve as a model system for LND. In B103 cell membranes, HPRT deficiency is associated with a decrease of basal and guanosine triphosphate-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity (Pinto and Seifert, J Neurochem 96:454-459, 2006). Since recombinant AC2 possesses a high basal activity, we tested the hypothesis that AC2 function and expression is impaired in HPRT deficiency. We examined AC regulation in B103 cell membranes, cAMP accumulation in intact B103 cells, AC isoform expression, and performed morphological studies. As most important pharmacological tool, we used 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene forskolin (BODIPY-FS) that inhibits recombinant AC2 but activates ACs 1 and 5 (Erdorf et al., Biochem Pharmacol 82:1673-1681, 2011). In B103 control membranes, BODIPY-FS reduced catalysis, but in HPRT(-) membranes, BODIPY-FS was rather stimulatory. 2'(3')-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl) (MANT)-nucleoside 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphates inhibit recombinant ACs 1 and 5 more potently than AC2. In B103 control membranes, MANT-guanosine 5'-[γ-thio]triphosphate inhibited catalysis in control membranes less potently than in HPRT(-) membranes. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that in HPRT deficiency, AC2 was virtually absent. In contrast, AC5 was up-regulated. Forskolin (FS) and BODIPY-FS induced cell clustering and rounding and neurite extension in B103 cells. The effects of FS and BODIPY-FS were much more prominent in control than in HPRT(-) cells, indicative for a differentiation defect in HPRT deficiency. Neither FS nor BODIPY-FS significantly changed cAMP concentrations in intact B103 cells. Collectively, our data show that HPRT deficiency in B103 cells is associated with impaired AC2 function and expression and reduced sensitivity to

  6. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liao; Sanjai Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells.

  7. Determination of endogenous and exogenously derived N7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine adducts in ethylene oxide-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Debbie A; Jones, Donald J L; Lamb, John H; Tompkins, Elaine M; Farmer, Peter B; Brown, Karen

    2007-02-01

    Ethylene oxide (EO) is one of the most widely used intermediates in the chemical industry. It is also formed endogenously as a result of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of ethylene, which is ubiquitous in the environment. Additionally, ethylene is generated in vivo during normal physiological processes such as methionine oxidation and lipid peroxidation; therefore, humans are continually exposed to EO. EO is classed by the IARC as carcinogenic to humans and reacts with DNA, primarily forming N7-(2-hydroxyethyl)guanine adducts (N7-HEG), which can be used as biomarkers of exposure and potential cancer risk. To assess the risks to humans associated with occupational exposure to low EO concentrations, it is necessary to establish the relative contribution of DNA damage arising from endogenous and exogenously derived EO. Using a newly developed highly sensitive LC-MS/MS assay with selected reaction monitoring that offers a limit of detection of 0.1 fmol of N7-HEG on column, we have established background levels of N7-HEG (1.1-3.5 adducts/10(8) nucleotides) in tissues of rats. Following intraperitoneal administration of a single dose or three daily doses of EO (0.01-1.0 mg/kg), N7-HEG adducts generally increased with dose, except at the lowest concentration where total N7-HEG levels were no different to that detected in control animals, indicating that any increase was negligible as compared to the endogenous damage already present. In the 3 day study, the kinetics of adduct removal were also investigated and in comparing N7-HEG formation in the two studies, DNA damage did not appear to accumulate with repeated administration.

  8. Overexpression of GEFT, a Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factor, predicts poor prognosis in patients with rhabdomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chao; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Shugang; Li, Hongan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xie, Yuwen; Li, Bingcheng; Cui, Xiaobin; Chen, Yunzhao; Zhang, Wenjie; Li, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is one of the most common soft-tissue sarcomas in children and adolescents with poor prognosis. Yet, there is lack of effective prognostic biomarkers for RMS. The present study, therefore, aimed to explore potential biomarkers for RMS based on our previous findings using array comparative genomic hybridization. We investigated guanine nucleotide exchange factor, GEFT, at expression level in 45 RMS patients and 36 normal striated muscle controls using immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. The expression rate of GEFT in RMS samples (42/45, 93.33%) was significantly higher (Prate of GEFT in RMS (31/45, 68.89%) was also significantly higher (P<0.05) than that in normal controls (0/36, 0.00%). Increased expression of GEFT correlated significantly with advanced disease stages (stages III/IV) (P=0.001), lymph node metastasis (P=0.019), and distant metastasis (P=0.004), respectively, in RMS patients. In addition, RMS patients having overexpressed GEFT experienced worse overall survival (OS) than those having low levels of GEFT (P=0.001). GEFT overexpression was determined to be an independent prognostic factor for poor OS in RMS patients (hazard ratio: 3.491, 95% confidence interval: 1.121-10.871, P=0.004). In conclusion, these observations provide the first evidence of GEFT overexpression in RMS and its correlations with disease aggressiveness and metastasis. These findings suggest that GEFT may serve as a promising biomarker predicting poor prognosis in RMS patients, thus implying its potential as a therapeutic target.

  9. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders.

  10. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  11. The Tiam1 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor is Auto-inhibited by its Pleckstrin Homology Coiled-Coil Extension Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Gakhar, Lokesh; Bain, Fletcher E; Spies, Maria; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2017-09-07

    T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) is a Dbl-family guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that specifically activates the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 in response to upstream signals, thereby regulating cellular processes including cell adhesion and migration. Tiam1 contains multiple domains, including an N-terminal Pleckstrin homology coiled-coiled extension (PHn-CC-Ex) and catalytic Dbl-homology and C-terminal Pleckstrin homology (DH-PHc) domain. Previous studies indicate that larger fragments of Tiam1, such the region encompassing the N-terminal to C-terminal Pleckstrin homology domains (PHn-PHc) are auto-inhibited. However, the domains in this region responsible for inhibition remain unknown. Here, we show that the PHn-CC-Ex domain inhibits Tiam1 GEF activity by directly interacting with the catalytic DH-PHc domain, preventing Rac1 binding and activation. Enzyme kinetics experiments suggested that Tiam1 is auto-inhibited through occlusion of the catalytic site, rather than by allostery. Small angle X-ray scattering and ensemble modeling yielded models of the PHn-PHc fragment that indicate it is in equilibrium between open and closed conformational states. Finally, single-molecule experiments support a model in which conformational sampling between the open and closed states of Tiam1 contributes to Rac1 dissociation. Our results highlight the role of the PHn-CC-Ex domain in Tiam1 GEF regulation, and suggest a combinatorial model for GEF inhibition and activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  12. In vitro xanthine oxidase and albumin denaturation inhibition assay of Barringtonia racemosa L. and total phenolic content analysis for potential anti-inflammatory use in gouty arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Nurul Izzati; Sidik, Norrizah Jaafar; Awal, Asmah; Adam, Nurul Athirah Mohamad; Rezali, Nur Inani

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities and total phenolic content (TPC) of methanolic extracts of infloresence axes, endosperms, leaves, and pericarps of Barringtonia racemosa L. Methods: The anti-inflammatory study was conducted by assessing the potential through xanthine oxidase (XO) and albumin denaturation inhibition assays. Meanwhile, the TPC in the extracts were assessed by Folin-Ciocalteu assay. Results: In the XO inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract was found to exert the highest inhibition capacity at 0.1% (w/v) with 59.54 ± 0.001% inhibition followed by leaves (58.82 ± 0.001%), pericarps (57.99 ± 0.003%), and endosperms (57.20 ± 0.003%) extracts. Similarly in the albumin denaturation inhibition assay, the infloresence axes extract had shown the greatest inhibition capacity with 70.58 ± 0.004% inhibition followed by endosperms (66.80 ± 0.024%), leaves (65.29 ± 0.006%), and pericarps extracts (43.33 ± 0.002%). Meanwhile, for TPC analysis, leaves extract was found to have the highest phenolic content (53.94 ± 0.000 mg gallic acid equivalent [GAE]/g DW) followed by infloresence axes (31.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), endosperms (22.63 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW), and the least was found in pericarps (15.54 ± 0.001 mg GAE/g DW). Conclusion: The results indeed verified the in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of B. racemosa and supported its potential to be used in alleviating gouty arthritis and XO-related diseases. PMID:27757263

  13. IFN-γ regulates xanthine oxidase-mediated iNOS-independent oxidative stress in maneb- and paraquat-treated rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deepali; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Chetna

    2017-03-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) provoke oxidative stress-mediated cell damage. Role of xanthine oxidase (XO) in oxidative stress and its association with nitric oxide (NO)/NO synthase (NOS) have been widely reported. While inducible NOS (iNOS) is implicated in MB+PQ-induced toxicity in rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), role of XO and its alliance with iNOS have not yet been established. The study investigated the role of XO in MB+PQ-induced oxidative stress in rat PMNs and its regulation by iNOS and inflammatory cytokines. MB+PQ-augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS), superoxide, nitro-tyrosine, lipid peroxidation (LPO), and nitrite levels along with the catalytic activity of iNOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and XO. XO inhibitor, allopurinol (AP), alleviated MB+PQ-induced changes except nitrite content and iNOS activity. Conversely, an iNOS inhibitor, aminoguanidine, mitigated MB+PQ-induced LPO, nitrite, iNOS, and nitro-tyrosine levels; however, no change was observed in ROS, SOD, and XO. Nuclear factor-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, pentoxyfylline, and an anti-inflammatory agent, dexamethasone, attenuated MB+PQ-induced increase in XO, superoxide, and ROS with parallel reduction in the expression of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in rat PMNs. Exogenous IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-1β enhanced superoxide, ROS, and XO in the PMNs of control and MB+PQ-treated rats; however, IFN- γ was found to be the most potent inducer. Moreover, AP ameliorated cytokine-induced free radical generation and restored XO activity towards normalcy. The results thus demonstrate that XO mediates oxidative stress in MB+PQ-treated rat PMNs via iNOS-independent but cytokine (predominantly IFN-γ)-dependent mechanism.

  14. Molecular docking analysis of selected Clinacanthus nutans constituents as xanthine oxidase, nitric oxide synthase, human neutrophil elastase, matrix metalloproteinase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 9 and squalene synthase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishnan Narayanaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f. Lindau has gained popularity among Malaysians as a traditional plant for anti-inflammatory activity. Objective: This prompted us to carry out the present study on a selected 11 constituents of C. nutans which are clinacoside A–C, cycloclinacoside A1, shaftoside, vitexin, orientin, isovitexin, isoorientin, lupeol and β-sitosterol. Materials and Methods: Selected 11 constituents of C. nutans were evaluated on the docking behavior of xanthine oxidase (XO, nitric oxide synthase (NOS, human neutrophil elastase (HNE, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP 2 and 9, and squalene synthase (SQS using Discovery Studio Version 3.1. Also, molecular physicochemical, bioactivity, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET, and toxicity prediction by computer assisted technology analyzes were also carried out. Results: The molecular physicochemical analysis revealed that four ligands, namely clinacoside A–C and cycloclinacoside A1 showed nil violations and complied with Lipinski's rule of five. As for the analysis of bioactivity, all the 11 selected constituents of C. nutans exhibited active score (>0 toward enzyme inhibitors descriptor. ADMET analysis showed that the ligands except orientin and isoorientin were predicted to have Cytochrome P4502D6 inhibition effect. Docking studies and binding free energy calculations revealed that clinacoside B exhibited the least binding energy for the target enzymes except for XO and SQS. Isovitexin and isoorientin showed the potentials in the docking and binding with all of the six targeted enzymes, whereas vitexin and orientin docked and bound with only NOS and HNE. Conclusion: This present study has paved a new insight in understanding these 11 C. nutans ligands as potential inhibitors against XO, NOS, HNE, MMP 2, MMP 9, and SQS.

  15. Kinetic study on the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by extracts from two selected Algerian plants traditionally used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berboucha, Meriem; Ayouni, Karima; Atmani, Dina; Atmani, Djebbar; Benboubetra, Mustapha

    2010-08-01

    In order to further understand and assess the validity of herbal medicine, we investigated the potential inhibitory effect of various extracts from Fraxinus angustifolia and Pistacia lentiscus, two plants used traditionally in Algeria against several inflammatory diseases such as rheumatism, arthritis, and gout, on purified bovine milk xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. The total phenolic contents of the leaves and bark of F. angustifolia and the leaves and seeds of P. lentiscus were estimated. P. lentiscus aqueous fractions from hexane and chloroform extractions and F. angustifolia aqueous fraction from ethyl acetate extraction inhibited XO activity by 72.74 +/- 2.63% (50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)] = 27.52 microg/mL), 68.97 +/- 3.89% (IC(50) = 42.46 microg/mL) and 53.92 +/- 3.17% (IC(50) = 58.84 mmicroug/mL), respectively, at 100 microg/mL, compared to that of reference drug, allopurinol (98.18% [IC(50) = 6.34 microg/mL]). Moreover, at a concentration of 50 microg/mL, both P. lentiscus extracts showed inhibition rates higher than 50%. F. angustifolia leaf extracts showed only mild inhibition. Lineweaver-Burk analysis showed that the inhibitory activity exerted by F. angustifolia bark aqueous extract and P. lentiscus aqueous extracts is of mixed type, whereas the leaf extracts from F. angustifolia inhibited XO noncompetitively. Positive correlations were established between XO inhibition and total phenols (r = 0.89) and flavonoids (r = 0.93) for P. lentiscus and with total phenols (r = 0.72) and tannins (r = 0.54) for F. angustifolia. Our findings suggest that the therapeutic use of these plants may be due to the observed XO inhibition, thereby supporting their use in traditional folk medicine against inflammatory-related diseases, in particular, gout.

  16. Xanthine oxidase contributes to preconditioning's preservation of left ventricular developed pressure in isolated rat heart: developed pressure may not be an appropriate end-point for studies of preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelpi, Ricardo J; Morales, Celina; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M

    2002-01-01

    Studies of preconditioning frequently use the isolated rat heart model in which recovery of post-ischemic function is the end-point. However, function following an episode of ischemia/reperfusion represents a composite of both stunning, which is related to free radical production and is not attenuated by preconditioning, and tissue salvage, the primary effect of preconditioning. Brief ischemia/reperfusion is also known to diminish adenosine release during subsequent ischemia by a mechanism independent of preconditioning's anti-infarct effect. Reduced purine release would diminish generation of free radicals by xanthine oxidase in rat heart and thus produce less stunning. In this paradigm preserved post-ischemic function in rat heart might look similar to salvage by preconditioning, but its mechanism would be quite different and not be relevant to the xanthine oxidase-deficient human heart. This hypothesis was tested in isolated rat hearts. Control or ischemically preconditioned hearts were subjected to 30 min of global ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion, either in the presence or absence of 25 micromol/l allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase. In non-preconditioned hearts allopurinol increased left ventricular developed pressure after 60 min of reperfusion from 26 +/- 5 mmHg in control hearts to 47 +/- 7 mmHg, whereas developed pressure in preconditioned hearts following reperfusion was 59 +/- 5 mmHg and was unaffected by allopurinol. Developed pressure in non-preconditioned hearts treated with allopurinol was midway between that for untreated control and preconditioned hearts suggesting that at least 50% of the recovery of developed pressure in preconditioned hearts may be related to free radical-induced stunning. In xanthine oxidase-deficient rabbit hearts, return of function was not different between non-preconditioned and preconditioned hearts. Therefore, post-ischemic developed pressure in the rat is significantly affected by purine-dependent stunning

  17. Delineation of the motor disorder of Lesch-Nyhan disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jinnah, H.A.; Visser, J.E.; Harris, J.C.; Verdu, A.; Larovere, L.; Ceballos-Picot, I.; Gonzalez-Alegre, P.; Neychev, V.; Torres, R.J.; Dulac, O.; Desguerre, I.; Schretlen, D.J.; Robey, K.L.; Barabas, G.; Bloem, B.R.; Nyhan, W.L.; Kremer, R.; Eddey, G.E.; Puig, J.G.; Reich, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND) is caused by deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT). Affected individuals exhibit over-production of uric acid, along with a characteristic neurobehavioural syndrome that includes mental retardation, recurrent

  18. Investigation of specificity determinants in bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase reveals queuine, the substrate of its eucaryotic counterpart, as inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Biela

    Full Text Available Bacterial tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (Tgt catalyses the exchange of the genetically encoded guanine at the wobble position of tRNAs(His,Tyr,Asp,Asn by the premodified base preQ1, which is further converted to queuine at the tRNA level. As eucaryotes are not able to synthesise queuine de novo but acquire it through their diet, eucaryotic Tgt directly inserts the hypermodified base into the wobble position of the tRNAs mentioned above. Bacterial Tgt is required for the efficient pathogenicity of Shigella sp, the causative agent of bacillary dysentery and, hence, it constitutes a putative target for the rational design of anti-Shigellosis compounds. Since mammalian Tgt is known to be indirectly essential to the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine, it is necessary to create substances which only inhibit bacterial but not eucaryotic Tgt. Therefore, it seems of utmost importance to study selectivity-determining features within both types of proteins. Homology models of Caenorhabditis elegans Tgt and human Tgt suggest that the replacement of Cys158 and Val233 in bacterial Tgt (Zymomonas mobilis Tgt numbering by valine and accordingly glycine in eucaryotic Tgt largely accounts for the different substrate specificities. In the present study we have created mutated variants of Z. mobilis Tgt in order to investigate the impact of a Cys158Val and a Val233Gly exchange on catalytic activity and substrate specificity. Using enzyme kinetics and X-ray crystallography, we gained evidence that the Cys158Val mutation reduces the affinity to preQ1 while leaving the affinity to guanine unaffected. The Val233Gly exchange leads to an enlarged substrate binding pocket, that is necessary to accommodate queuine in a conformation compatible with the intermediately covalently bound tRNA molecule. Contrary to our expectations, we found that a priori queuine is recognised by the binding pocket of bacterial Tgt without, however, being used as a substrate.

  19. Regulation of formyl peptide receptor binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes. Use of monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins to discriminate among different states of the receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feltner, D.E.; Marasco, W.A.

    1989-06-01

    The regulation by monovalent cations, guanine nucleotides, and bacterial toxins of (3H)FMLP binding to rabbit neutrophil plasma membranes was studied by using dissociation techniques to identify regulatory effects on separate receptor states. Under conditions of low receptor occupancy (1 nM (3H)FMLP) and in both Na+ and K+ buffers, dissociation is heterogenous, displaying two distinct, statistically significant off rates. (3H)FMLP binding was enhanced by substituting other monovalent cations for Na+. In particular, enhanced binding in the presence of K+ relative to Na+ was caused by additional binding to both rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors. Three receptor dissociation rates, two of which appear to correspond to the two affinity states detected in equilibrium binding studies, were defined by specific GTP and pertussis toxin (PT) treatments. Neither GTP, nor PT or cholera toxins (CT) had an effect on the rate of dissociation of (3H)FMLP from the rapidly dissociating form of the receptor. Both 100 microM GTP and PT treatments increased the percentage of rapidly dissociating receptors, correspondingly decreasing the percentage of slowly dissociating receptors. The observed changes in the rapidly and slowly dissociating receptors after GTP, PT, and CT treatments were caused by an absolute decrease in the amount of binding to the slowly dissociating receptors. However, complete inhibition of slowly dissociating receptor binding by GTP, PT, or both was never observed. Both GTP and PT treatments, but not CT treatment, increased by two-fold the rate of dissociation of 1 nM (3H)FMLP from the slowly dissociating form of the receptor, resulting in a third dissociation rate. Thus, slowly dissociating receptors comprise two different receptor states, a G protein-associated guanine nucleotide and PT-sensitive state and a guanine nucleotide-insensitive state.

  20. Mechanism of repair of acrolein- and malondialdehyde-derived exocyclic guanine adducts by the α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II) dioxygenase AlkB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vipender; Fedeles, Bogdan I; Li, Deyu; Delaney, James C; Kozekov, Ivan D; Kozekova, Albena; Marnett, Lawrence J; Rizzo, Carmelo J; Essigmann, John M

    2014-09-15

    The structurally related exocyclic guanine adducts α-hydroxypropano-dG (α-OH-PdG), γ-hydroxypropano-dG (γ-OH-PdG), and M1dG are formed when DNA is exposed to the reactive aldehydes acrolein and malondialdehyde (MDA). These lesions are believed to form the basis for the observed cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of acrolein and MDA. In an effort to understand the enzymatic pathways and chemical mechanisms that are involved in the repair of acrolein- and MDA-induced DNA damage, we investigated the ability of the DNA repair enzyme AlkB, an α-ketoglutarate/Fe(II) dependent dioxygenase, to process α-OH-PdG, γ-OH-PdG, and M1dG in both single- and double-stranded DNA contexts. By monitoring the repair reactions using quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometry, it was established that AlkB can oxidatively dealkylate γ-OH-PdG most efficiently, followed by M1dG and α-OH-PdG. The AlkB repair mechanism involved multiple intermediates and complex, overlapping repair pathways. For example, the three exocyclic guanine adducts were shown to be in equilibrium with open-ring aldehydic forms, which were trapped using (pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) or NaBH4. AlkB repaired the trapped open-ring form of γ-OH-PdG but not the trapped open-ring of α-OH-PdG. Taken together, this study provides a detailed mechanism by which three-carbon bridge exocyclic guanine adducts can be processed by AlkB and suggests an important role for the AlkB family of dioxygenases in protecting against the deleterious biological consequences of acrolein and MDA.

  1. A comparative density functional theory study of guanine chemisorption on Al{sub 12}N{sub 12}, Al{sub 12}P{sub 12}, B{sub 12}N{sub 12}, and B{sub 12}P{sub 12} nano-cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokuhi Rad, Ali, E-mail: a.shokuhi@gmail.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ayub, Khurshid [Department of Chemistry, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, University Road, Tobe Camp, 22060 Abbottabad (Pakistan)

    2016-07-05

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed for adsorption of guanine (a nucleobase) on the surface of Al{sub 12}N{sub 12} (AlN), Al{sub 12}P{sub 12} (AlP), B{sub 12}N{sub 12} (BN), and B{sub 12}P{sub 12} (BP) nano-cages. The interaction of guanine with nano-cages is highly exothermic (chemisorption), and the adsorption energies are in order of AlN > AlP > BN > BP. Although AlN has the highest adsorption energy; however, BN and BP show more changes in electronic property upon adsorption of guanine. The results of charge analysis, density of states (DOSs), and frontier molecular orbital, confirm a distinguished orbital hybridization upon adsorption of guanine, which suggest potential application of BN as biochemical adsorbent for guanine. - Highlights: • The adsorption energies are in order of AlN > AlP > BN > BP upon adsorption of guanine. • BN and BP show more changes in electronic property upon adsorption of guanine. • Distinguished orbital hybridization upon adsorption of guanine. • The strongest interaction energy of guanine was obtained for AlN.

  2. Serine34 phosphorylation of RHO guanine dissociation inhibitor (RHOGDI{alpha}) links signaling from conventional protein kinase C to RHO GTPase in cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dovas, Athanassios; Choi, Youngsil; Yoneda, Atsuko

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) is an essential serine/threonine kinase regulating many signaling networks. At cell adhesion sites, PKCalpha can impact the actin cytoskeleton through its influence on RhoGTPases but the intermediate steps are not well known. One important regulator of Rho......GTPase function is the multifunctional guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor RhoGDIalpha that sequesters several related RhoGTPases in an inactive form, but may also target them through interactions with actin-associated proteins. Here it is demonstrated that PKCalpha phosphorylates RhoGDIalpha on serine 34...

  3. Reversal of a Single Base-Pair Step Controls Guanine Photo-Oxidation by an Intercalating Ruthenium(II) Dipyridophenazine Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Páraic M; Poynton, Fergus E; Hall, James P; Sazanovich, Igor V; Towrie, Michael; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur; Quinn, Susan J; Cardin, Christine J; Kelly, John M

    2015-07-13

    Small changes in DNA sequence can often have major biological effects. Here the rates and yields of guanine photo-oxidation by Λ-[Ru(TAP)2(dppz)](2+) have been compared in 5'-{CCGGATCCGG}2 and 5'-{CCGGTACCGG}2 using pico/nanosecond transient visible and time-resolved IR (TRIR) spectroscopy. The inefficiency of electron transfer in the TA sequence is consistent with the 5'-TA-3' versus 5'-AT-3' binding preference predicted by X-ray crystallography. The TRIR spectra also reveal the differences in binding sites in the two oligonucleotides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Bioactive compounds from Carissa opaca roots and xanthine oxidase and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of their methanolic extract and its fractions in different solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsha Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carissa opaca is known for its many ethnomedicinal uses. There was a need to study its bioactivities and identify its phytochemicals. Objective: The objective was to isolate and identify phytochemicals from roots of C. opaca and to evaluate xanthine oxidase (XO and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of their methanolic extract and its fractions. Materials and Methods: Methanolic extract of finely divided powder of roots of C. opaca was obtained by cold maceration, followed by its fractionation to obtain hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanolic, and aqueous fractions. Phytochemicals screening was done by standard protocols. XO and alpha-amylase inhibitory activities of the methanolic extract and its fractions were studied. The most active ethyl acetate fraction was subjected to the column and thin layer chromatography to isolate its compounds, which were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography comparison. Results: Methanolic extract displayed significant activity against both the enzymes with IC 50 of 156.0 mg/mL and 5.6 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Ethyl acetate fraction showed highest activity against both the enzymes with IC 50 of 129 mg/mL and 4.9 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Chloroform fraction had IC 50 of 154.2 mg/mL and 5.5 mg/mL for XO and alpha-amylase, respectively. Aqueous fraction exhibited significant efficacy against alpha-amylase (IC 50 5.0 mg/mL. Hexane fraction showed good activity against alpha-amylase in a dose-dependent manner but exhibited opposite trend against XO. The compounds isolated from ethyl acetate fraction included limonene, vanillin, lupeol, rutin, quercetin, b-sitosterol, Vitamin E, 2-hydroxyacetophenone, naphthalenone, 2,3,3-trimethyl-2-(3-methylbuta-1,3-dienyl-6-methylenecyclohexanone, and 2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, mono(2-ethylhexyl ester. Conclusions: Moderately polar phytochemicals of C. opaca roots

  5. Mechanism and substrate specificity of tRNA-guanine transglycosylases (TGTs): tRNA-modifying enzymes from the three different kingdoms of life share a common catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengl, Bernhard; Reuter, Klaus; Klebe, Gerhard

    2005-11-01

    Transfer RNA-guanine transglycosylases (TGTs) are evolutionarily ancient enzymes, present in all kingdoms of life, catalyzing guanine exchange within their cognate tRNAs by modified 7-deazaguanine bases. Although distinct bases are incorporated into tRNA at different positions in a kingdom-specific manner, the catalytic subunits of TGTs are structurally well conserved. This review provides insight into the sequential steps along the reaction pathway, substrate specificity, and conformational adaptions of the binding pockets by comparison of TGT crystal structures in complex with RNA substrates of a eubacterial and an archaebacterial species. Substrate-binding modes indicate an evolutionarily conserved base-exchange mechanism with a conserved aspartate serving as a nucleophile through covalent binding to C1' of the guanosine ribose moiety in an intermediate state. A second conserved aspartate seems to control the spatial rearrangement of the ribose ring along the reaction pathway and supposedly operates as a general acid/base. Water molecules inside the binding pocket accommodating interaction sites subsequently occupied by polar atoms of substrates help to elucidate substrate-recognition and substrate-specificity features. This emphasizes the role of water molecules as general probes to map binding-site properties for structure-based drug design. Additionally, substrate-bound crystal structures allow the extraction of valuable information about the classification of the TGT superfamily into a subdivision of presumably homologous superfamilies adopting the triose-phosphate isomerase type barrel fold with a standard phosphate-binding motif.

  6. Specific and nonspecific metal ion-nucleotide interactions at aqueous/solid interfaces functionalized with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Joseph G; Malin, Jessica N; Jordan, David S; Morales, Esmeralda; Geiger, Franz M

    2011-03-02

    This article reports nonlinear optical measurements that quantify, for the first time directly and without labels, how many Mg(2+) cations are bound to DNA 21-mers covalently linked to fused silica/water interfaces maintained at pH 7 and 10 mM NaCl, and what the thermodynamics are of these interactions. The overall interaction of Mg(2+) with adenine, thymine, guanine, and cytosine is found to involve -10.0 ± 0.3, -11.2 ± 0.3, -14.0 ± 0.4, and -14.9 ± 0.4 kJ/mol, and nonspecific interactions with the phosphate and sugar backbone are found to contribute -21.0 ± 0.6 kJ/mol for each Mg(2+) ion bound. The specific and nonspecific contributions to the interaction energy of Mg(2+) with oligonucleotide single strands is found to be additive, which suggests that within the uncertainty of these surface-specific experiments, the Mg(2+) ions are evenly distributed over the oligomers and not isolated to the most strongly binding nucleobase. The nucleobases adenine and thymine are found to bind only three Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide, while the bases cytosine and guanine are found to bind eleven Mg(2+) ions per 21-mer oligonucleotide.

  7. The glycine brace: a component of Rab, Rho, and Ran GTPases associated with hinge regions of guanine- and phosphate-binding loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuwald Andrew F

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ras-like GTPases function as on-off switches in intracellular signalling pathways and include the Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran, Ras, Arf, Sar and Gα families. How these families have evolutionarily diverged from each other at the sequence level provides clues to underlying mechanisms associated with their functional specialization. Results Bayesian analysis of divergent patterns within a multiple alignment of Ras-like GTPase sequences identifies a structural component, termed here the glycine brace, as the feature that most distinguishes Rab, Rho/Rac, Ran and (to some degree Ras family GTPases from other Ras-like GTPases. The glycine brace consists of four residues: An aromatic residue that forms a stabilizing CH-π interaction with a conserved glycine at the start of the guanine-binding loop; a second aromatic residue, which is nearly always a tryptophan, that likewise forms stabilizing CH-π and NH-π interactions with a glycine at the start of the phosphate-binding P-loop; and two other residues (typically an aspartate and a serine or threonine that, together with a conserved buried water molecule, form a network of interactions connecting the two aromatic residues. Conclusion It is proposed that the two glycine residues function as hinges and that the glycine brace influences guanine nucleotide binding and release by interacting with these hinges.

  8. Identification of the Structural Features of Guanine Derivatives as MGMT Inhibitors Using 3D-QSAR Modeling Combined with Molecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, which plays an important role in inducing drug resistance against alkylating agents that modify the O6 position of guanine in DNA, is an attractive target for anti-tumor chemotherapy. A series of MGMT inhibitors have been synthesized over the past decades to improve the chemotherapeutic effects of O6-alkylating agents. In the present study, we performed a three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR study on 97 guanine derivatives as MGMT inhibitors using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA methods. Three different alignment methods (ligand-based, DFT optimization-based and docking-based alignment were employed to develop reliable 3D-QSAR models. Statistical parameters derived from the models using the above three alignment methods showed that the ligand-based CoMFA (Qcv2 = 0.672 and Rncv2 = 0.997 and CoMSIA (Qcv2 = 0.703 and Rncv2 = 0.946 models were better than the other two alignment methods-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The two ligand-based models were further confirmed by an external test-set validation and a Y-randomization examination. The ligand-based CoMFA model (Qext2 = 0.691, Rpred2 = 0.738 and slope k = 0.91 was observed with acceptable external test-set validation values rather than the CoMSIA model (Qext2 = 0.307, Rpred2 = 0.4 and slope k = 0.719. Docking studies were carried out to predict the binding modes of the inhibitors with MGMT. The results indicated that the obtained binding interactions were consistent with the 3D contour maps. Overall, the combined results of the 3D-QSAR and the docking obtained in this study provide an insight into the understanding of the interactions between guanine derivatives and MGMT protein, which will assist in designing novel MGMT inhibitors with desired activity.

  9. Identification of the Structural Features of Guanine Derivatives as MGMT Inhibitors Using 3D-QSAR Modeling Combined with Molecular Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guohui; Fan, Tengjiao; Zhang, Na; Ren, Ting; Zhao, Lijiao; Zhong, Rugang

    2016-06-23

    DNA repair enzyme O⁶-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), which plays an important role in inducing drug resistance against alkylating agents that modify the O⁶ position of guanine in DNA, is an attractive target for anti-tumor chemotherapy. A series of MGMT inhibitors have been synthesized over the past decades to improve the chemotherapeutic effects of O⁶-alkylating agents. In the present study, we performed a three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study on 97 guanine derivatives as MGMT inhibitors using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods. Three different alignment methods (ligand-based, DFT optimization-based and docking-based alignment) were employed to develop reliable 3D-QSAR models. Statistical parameters derived from the models using the above three alignment methods showed that the ligand-based CoMFA (Qcv² = 0.672 and Rncv² = 0.997) and CoMSIA (Qcv² = 0.703 and Rncv² = 0.946) models were better than the other two alignment methods-based CoMFA and CoMSIA models. The two ligand-based models were further confirmed by an external test-set validation and a Y-randomization examination. The ligand-based CoMFA model (Qext² = 0.691, Rpred² = 0.738 and slope k = 0.91) was observed with acceptable external test-set validation values rather than the CoMSIA model (Qext² = 0.307, Rpred² = 0.4 and slope k = 0.719). Docking studies were carried out to predict the binding modes of the inhibitors with MGMT. The results indicated that the obtained binding interactions were consistent with the 3D contour maps. Overall, the combined results of the 3D-QSAR and the docking obtained in this study provide an insight into the understanding of the interactions between guanine derivatives and MGMT protein, which will assist in designing novel MGMT inhibitors with desired activity.

  10. Computational Studies of the Binding of Ligands to the Guanine Riboswitch Aptamer%鸟嘌呤核糖开关识别配体小分子

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马爱静; 扈国栋; 王吉华

    2016-01-01

    The Guanine Riboswitch is genetic regulatory element found in the non translation region loca‐ted of mRNA .It can be directly combined with organic metabolites to induces conformational changes to control gene expression .Recognition of them has highly specificity and selectivity .In this work ,we stud‐ied the nature of the Guanine Riboswitch and ligands by molecular dynamics simulation .Then ,the calcu‐lation of the relative binding free energy of them by Thermodynamic Integration .The study found that the binding pocket of Riboswitch form Waston -Crick base pairs with ligand and we learned that the affinities are different when the binding of different ligands to Riboswitch .These data indicate a more complicated relationship between the 6-position of the ligand and the RNA and The 2-position of the purine ligand is essential for the recognition .As an ideal target of new drugs ,the Guanine Riboswitch has an important role in the design and development of new drugs .%鸟嘌呤核糖开关是一类位于m RN A 的非翻译区,可直接结合有机代谢物,通过调整自身构象变化从而调控基因表达的m RN A元件。鸟嘌呤核糖开关识别配体具有高度特异性和选择性。用动力学模拟的方法,研究鸟嘌呤核糖开关特异识别配体小分子的本质和用热力学积分算法计算核糖开关与配体分子的相对结合自由能。研究发现,核糖开关的结合口袋与配体通过氢键形式相互作用,不同配体与核糖开关结合的亲和力不同。嘌呤配体2-号位对核糖开关的结合必不可少,6-号位对核糖开关的结合关系复杂。

  11. Development of a new HPLC method using fluorescence detection without derivatization for determining purine nucleoside phosphorylase activity in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Patricia; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Buccella, Silvana; Rossini, Margherita; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Ciccarelli, Renata; Marzo, Matteo; Marzo, Antonio; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco

    2016-01-15

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) activity is involved in cell survival and function, since PNP is a key enzyme in the purine metabolic pathway where it catalyzes the phosphorolysis of the nucleosides to the corresponding nucleobases. Its dysfunction has been found in relevant pathological conditions (such as inflammation and cancer), so the detection of PNP activity in plasma could represent an attractive marker for early diagnosis or assessment of disease progression. Thus the aim of this study was to develop a simple, fast and sensitive HPLC method for the determination of PNP activity in plasma. The separation was achieved on a Phenomenex Kinetex PFP column using 0.1% formic acid in water and methanol as mobile phases in gradient elution mode at a flow rate of 1ml/min and purine compounds were detected using UV absorption and fluorescence. The analysis was fast since the run was achieved within 13min. This method improved the separation of the different purines, allowing the UV-based quantification of the natural PNP substrates (inosine and guanosine) or products (hypoxanthine and guanine) and its subsequent metabolic products (xanthine and uric acid) with a good precision and accuracy. The most interesting innovation is the simultaneous use of a fluorescence detector (excitation/emission wavelength of 260/375nm) that allowed the quantification of guanosine and guanine without derivatization. Compared with UV, the fluorescence detection improved the sensitivity for guanine detection by about 10-fold and abolished almost completely the baseline noise due to the presence of plasma in the enzymatic reaction mixture. Thus, the validated method allowed an excellent evaluation of PNP activity in plasma which could be useful as an indicator of several pathological conditions.

  12. Reverse Transcription Past Products of Guanine Oxidation in RNA Leads to Insertion of A and C opposite 8-Oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine and A and G opposite 5-Guanidinohydantoin and Spiroiminodihydantoin Diastereomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenko, Anton; Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2017-09-26

    Reactive oxygen species, both endogenous and exogenous, can damage nucleobases of RNA and DNA. Among the nucleobases, guanine has the lowest redox potential, making it a major target of oxidation. Although RNA is more prone to oxidation than DNA is, oxidation of guanine in RNA has been studied to a significantly lesser extent. One of the reasons for this is that many tools that were previously developed to study oxidation of DNA cannot be used on RNA. In the study presented here, the lack of a method for seeking sites of modification in RNA where oxidation occurs is addressed. For this purpose, reverse transcription of RNA containing major products of guanine oxidation was used. Extension of a DNA primer annealed to an RNA template containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG), 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh), or the R and S diastereomers of spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) was studied under standing start conditions. SuperScript III reverse transcriptase is capable of bypassing these lesions in RNA inserting predominantly A opposite OG, predominantly G opposite Gh, and almost an equal mixture of A and G opposite the Sp diastereomers. These data should allow RNA sequencing of guanine oxidation products by following characteristic mutation signatures formed by the reverse transcriptase during primer elongation past G oxidation sites in the template RNA strand.

  13. From lin-Benzoguanines to lin-Benzohypoxanthines as Ligands for Zymomonas mobilis tRNA-Guanine Transglycosylase: Replacement of Protein-Ligand Hydrogen Bonding by Importing Water Clusters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barandun, L.J.; Immekus, F.; Kohler, P.C.; Tonazzi, S.; Wagner, B.; Wendelspiess, S.; Ritschel, T.; Heine, A.; Kansy, M.; Klebe, G.; Diederich, F.

    2012-01-01

    The foodborne illness shigellosis is caused by Shigella bacteria that secrete the highly cytotoxic Shiga toxin, which is also formed by the closely related enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). It has been shown that tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is essential for the pathogenicity of Shig

  14. The Bipartite Rac1 Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Engulfment and Cell Motility 1/Dedicator of Cytokinesis 180 (Elmo1/Dock180) Protects Endothelial Cells from Apoptosis in Blood Vessel Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaeker, Kathrin; Bartsch, Susanne; Patry, Christian; Stoll, Sandra J.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Wieland, Thomas; Kroll, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Engulfment and cell motility 1/dedicator of cytokinesis 180 (Elmol/Dock180) is a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the monomeric GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Racl). Elmol/Dock180 regulates Racl activity in a specific spatiotemporal manner in endothelial cells

  15. 氮掺杂石墨烯修饰电极的制备及对鸟嘌呤的电催化氧化%Fabrication of N-doped Graphene-modified Electrode and Its Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Guanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑波

    2012-01-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) was synthesized by thermal annealing at high temperature. The electrocatalytic oxidation of guanine at the NG-modified glass carbon electrode(GCE) was investigated. The effects of pH value, scanning rate and guanine concentration were discussed. The results showed that the oxidation process of guanine at the NG/GCE was an irreversible process and the adsorption of guanine at the modified electrode surface was increased. The modified electrode had an obvious electrocatalytic activity on guanine and decreased the oxidation potential of guanine. In a phosphate buffer solution(pH = 7. 0),the oxidation peak current of guanine and its concentration had a linear relationship in a range of 5. OX 1CTS-1. OX 10~1mol/L at the modified electrode and the detection limit was of 1.0X10~6mol/L.%采用高温热退火方法制备了氮掺杂的石墨烯,并制备了氮掺杂石墨烯修饰玻碳电极(NG/GCE),研究其对鸟嘌呤的电催化氧化作用.实验考察了溶液pH值、扫速、鸟嘌呤浓度的影响.结果表明,鸟嘌呤在NG/GCE上的氧化是不可逆过程,修饰电极可以增强鸟嘌呤在电极表面的吸附,对鸟嘌呤具有很好的电催化氧化性能,降低了鸟嘌呤氧化电位.在pH=7.0的磷酸盐缓冲溶液中检测鸟嘌呤,其氧化峰电流在5.0×10-6~1.0×10-4 mol/L浓度范围内呈良好的线性关系,检出限(3σ)为1.0×10-6 mol/L.

  16. Theoretical calculation of the NMR spin-spin coupling constants and the NMR shifts allow distinguishability between the specific direct and the water-mediated binding of a divalent metal cation to guanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sychrovský, Vladimír; Sponer, Jirí; Hobza, Pavel

    2004-01-21

    The calculated intermolecular and intramolecular indirect NMR spin-spin coupling constants and NMR shifts were used for the discrimination between the inner-shell and the outer-shell binding motif of hydrated divalent cations Mg(2+) or Zn(2+) with a guanine base. The intermolecular coupling constants (1)J(X,O6) and (1)J(X,N7) (X = Mg(2+), Zn(2+)) can be unambiguously assigned to the specific inner-shell binding motif of the hydrated cation either with oxygen O6 or with nitrogen N7 of guanine. The calculated coupling constants (1)J(Mg,O6) and (1)J(Zn,O6) were 6.2 and -17.5 Hz, respectively, for the inner-shell complex of cation directly interacting with oxygen O6 of guanine. For the inner-shell coordination of the cation at nitrogen N7, the calculated coupling constants (1)J(Mg,N7) and (1)J(Zn,N7) were 5.6 and -36.5 Hz, respectively. When the binding of the cation is water-mediated, the coupling constant is zero. To obtain reliable shifts in NMR parameters, hydrated guanine was utilized as the reference state. The calculated change of NMR spin-spin coupling constants due to the hydration and coordination of the cation with guanine is caused mainly by the variation of Fermi-contact coupling contribution while the variation of diamagnetic spin-orbit, paramagnetic spin-orbit, and spin-dipolar coupling contributions is small. The change of s-character of guanine sigma bonding, sigma antibonding, and lone pair orbitals upon the hydration and cation coordination (calculated using the Natural Bond Orbital analysis) correlates with the variation of the Fermi-contact term. The calculated NMR shifts delta(N7) of -15.3 and -12.2 ppm upon the coordination of Mg(2+) and Zn(2+) ion are similar to the NMR shift of 19.6 ppm toward the high field measured by Tanaka for N7 of guanine upon the coordination of the Cd(2+) cation (Tanaka, Y.; Kojima, C.; Morita, E. H.; Kasai. Y.; Yamasaki, K.; Ono, A.; Kainosho, M.; Taira, K. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 4595-4601). The present data

  17. The brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein, BIG2, regulates the constitutive release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Aminul; Shen, Xiaoyan; Hiroi, Toyoko; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Levine, Stewart J

    2007-03-30

    The type I, 55-kDa tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR1) is released from cells to the extracellular space where it can bind and modulate TNF bioactivity. Extracellular TNFR1 release occurs by two distinct pathways: the inducible proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains and the constitutive release of full-length TNFR1 in exosome-like vesicles. Regulation of both TNFR1 release pathways appears to involve the trafficking of cytoplasmic TNFR1 vesicles. Vesicular trafficking is controlled by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are active in the GTP-bound state and inactive when bound to GDP. ARF activation is enhanced by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors that catalyze replacement of GDP by GTP. We investigated whether the brefeldin A (BFA)-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange proteins, BIG1 and/or BIG2, are required for TNFR1 release from human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Effects of specific RNA interference (RNAi) showed that BIG2, but not BIG1, regulated the release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles, whereas neither BIG2 nor BIG1 was required for the IL-1beta-induced proteolytic cleavage of TNFR1 ectodomains. BIG2 co-localized with TNFR1 in diffusely distributed cytoplasmic vesicles, and the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 was disrupted by BFA. Consistent with the preferential activation of class I ARFs by BIG2, ARF1 and ARF3 participated in the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles in a nonredundant and additive fashion. We conclude that the association between BIG2 and TNFR1 selectively regulates the extracellular release of TNFR1 exosome-like vesicles from human vascular endothelial cells via an ARF1- and ARF3-dependent mechanism.

  18. N,N,O and N,O,N Meridional cis Coordination of Two Guanines to Copper(II) by d(CGCGCG)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohner, Melanie; Medina-Molner, Alfredo; Spingler, Bernhard

    2016-06-20

    Many research groups study the generation of supramolecular n-dimensional arrays by combining metals with DNA building blocks. Most of the time, the natural nucleobases are modified to obtain higher-affinity metal binding sites. Using unmodified nucleobases avoids a potentially difficult synthesis; however, they have the possible disadvantage of a less defined and/or weaker coordination mode of the metal. Structural studies on the behavior of copper(II) as a linking metal and guanine as the natural ligand for metals in unmodified DNA are reported. Previously, the ability of mono- and dinuclear metal complexes to induce Z-DNA has been explored [Medina-Molner, A.; Spingler, B. Chem. Commun. 2012, 48, 1961; Medina-Molner, A.; Rohner, M.; Pandiarajan, D.; Spingler, B. Dalton Trans. 2015, 44, 3664]. Herein, X-ray crystallographic studies of the structures resulting from the combination of copper(II) ions with DNA hexamers of the general sequence d(CG)3 are presented. Three different packing motifs were observed in three crystal structures with resolutions ranging from 2.15 to 1.45 Å. The motifs are dependent upon other cations being present and/or the crystallization conditions. The first examples of intramolecular O6,N7-chelates of a neutral purine nucleobase to copper(II) were obtained as well as the first meridional N,N,O and N,O,N coordination modes of two guanines to copper(II). The fascinating coordination chemistry of copper(II) complexes generated by the Z-DNA oligonucleotides and the differences to simple nucleobases complexes with copper(II) are discussed in detail.

  19. Effects of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and its Flavonol Constituents, Kaempferol and Quercetin, on Serum Uric Acid Levels, Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Aactivity inOxonate-Induced Hyperuricemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Seid Ali; Mohammad Shahi, Majid; Mahboob, Soltan-Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Increased serum uric acid is known to be a major risk related to the development of several oxidative stress diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of parsley, quercetin and kaempferol on serum uric acid levels, liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration) in normal and oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into ten equal groups; including 5 normal groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol) and 5 hyperuricemic groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol). Parsley (5 g/Kg), quercetin (5 mg/Kg), kaempferol (5 mg/Kg) and allopurinol (5 mg/Kg) were administrated to the corresponding groups by oral gavage once a day for 2 weeks. The results showed that parsley and its flavonol did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced the serum uric acid levels of hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner. All treatments significantly inhibited liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Parsley, kaempferol and quercetin treatment led also to a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and decrease in malondialdehyde concentration in hyperuricemic rats. Although the hypouricemic effect of allopurinol was much higher than that of parsley and its flavonol constituents, it could not significantly change oxidative stress biomarkers. These features of parsley and its flavonols make them as a possible alternative for allopurinol, or at least in combination therapy to minimize the side effects of allopurinol to treat hyperuricemia and oxidative stress diseases.

  20. The auto-inhibitory state of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5/TIM can be relieved by targeting its SH3 domain with rationally designed peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ping; Tan, De-Li; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lv, Feng-Lin; Wu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The short isoform of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF5 is known as TIM, which plays diverse roles in, for example, tumorigenesis, neuronal development and Src-induced podosome formation through the activation of its substrates, the Rho family of GTPases. The activation is auto-inhibited by a putative helix N-terminal to the DH domain of TIM, which is stabilized by the intramolecular interaction of C-terminal SH3 domain with a poly-proline sequence between the putative helix and the DH domain. In this study, we systematically investigated the structural basis, energetic landscape and biological implication underlying TIM auto-inhibition by using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy analysis. The computational study revealed that the binding of SH3 domain to poly-proline sequence is the prerequisite for the stabilization of TIM auto-inhibition. Thus, it is suggested that targeting SH3 domain with competitors of the poly-proline sequence would be a promising strategy to relieve the auto-inhibitory state of TIM. In this consideration, we rationally designed a number of peptide aptamers for competitively inhibiting the SH3 domain based on modeled TIM structure and computationally generated data. Peptide binding test and guanine nucleotide exchange analysis solidified that these designed peptides can both bind to the SH3 domain potently and activate TIM-catalyzed RhoA exchange reaction effectively. Interestingly, a positive correlation between the peptide affinity and induced exchange activity was observed. In addition, separate mutation of three conserved residues Pro49, Pro52 and Lys54 - they are required for peptide recognition by SH3 domain -- in a designed peptide to Ala would completely abolish the capability of this peptide activating TIM. All these come together to suggest an intrinsic relationship between peptide binding to SH3 domain and the activation of TIM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de

  1. A miniaturized electrochemical toxicity biosensor based on graphene oxide quantum dots/carboxylated carbon nanotubes for assessment of priority pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaolin; Wu, Guanlan; Lu, Nan [School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117 (China); Yuan, Xing, E-mail: yuanx@nenu.edu.cn [School of Environment, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130117 (China); Li, Baikun, E-mail: baikun@engr.uconn.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Graphene oxide quantum dots/carboxylated carbon nanotubes hybrid was developed. • The cytotoxicity detection vessel was miniaturized to the 96-well plate. • The electrochemical behavior of HepG2 cell was investigated for the first time. • The mixture signal of adenine and hypoxanthine was separated successfully. • The biosensor was used to assess the toxicity of heavy metals and phenols. - Abstract: The study presented a sensitive and miniaturized cell-based electrochemical biosensor to assess the toxicity of priority pollutants in the aquatic environment. Human hepatoma (HepG2) cells were used as the biological recognition agent to measure the changes of electrochemical signals and reflect the cell viability. The graphene oxide quantum dots/carboxylated carbon nanotubes hybrid was developed in a facile and green way. Based on the hybrid composite modified pencil graphite electrode, the cell culture and detection vessel was miniaturized to a 96-well plate instead of the traditional culture dish. In addition, three sensitive electrochemical signals attributed to guanine/xanthine, adenine, and hypoxanthine were detected simultaneously. The biosensor was used to evaluate the toxicity of six priority pollutants, including Cd, Hg, Pb, 2,4-dinitrophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol. The 24 h IC{sub 50} values obtained by the electrochemical biosensor were lower than those of conventional MTT assay, suggesting the enhanced sensitivity of the electrochemical assay towards heavy metals and phenols. This platform enables the label-free and sensitive detection of cell physiological status with multi-parameters and constitutes a promising approach for toxicity detection of pollutants. It makes possible for automatical and high-throughput analysis on nucleotide catabolism, which may be critical for life science and toxicology.

  2. MS-CASPT2 study of hole transfer in guanine-indole complexes using the generalized Mulliken-Hush method: effective two-state treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butchosa, C; Simon, S; Blancafort, L; Voityuk, A

    2012-07-12

    Because hole transfer from nucleobases to amino acid residues in DNA-protein complexes can prevent oxidative damage of DNA in living cells, computational modeling of the process is of high interest. We performed MS-CASPT2 calculations of several model structures of π-stacked guanine and indole and derived electron-transfer (ET) parameters for these systems using the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) method. We show that the two-state model commonly applied to treat thermal ET between adjacent donor and acceptor is of limited use for the considered systems because of the small gap between the ground and first excited states in the indole radical cation. The ET parameters obtained within the two-state GMH scheme can deviate significantly from the corresponding matrix elements of the two-state effective Hamiltonian based on the GMH treatment of three adiabatic states. The computed values of diabatic energies and electronic couplings provide benchmarks to assess the performance of less sophisticated computational methods.

  3. Activation of guanine-{beta}-D-arabinofuranoside and deoxyguanosine to triphosphates by a common pathway blocks T lymphoblasts at different checkpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leanza, Luigi; Miazzi, Cristina; Ferraro, Paola; Reichard, Peter; Bianchi, Vera, E-mail: vbianchi@bio.unipd.it

    2010-12-10

    The deoxyguanosine (GdR) analog guanine-ss-D-arabinofuranoside (araG) has a specific toxicity for T lymphocytes. Also GdR is toxic for T lymphocytes, provided its degradation by purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) is prevented, by genetic loss of PNP or by enzyme inhibitors. The toxicity of both nucleosides requires their phosphorylation to triphosphates, indicating involvement of DNA replication. In cultured cells we found by isotope-flow experiments with labeled araG a rapid accumulation and turnover of araG phosphates regulated by cytosolic and mitochondrial kinases and deoxynucleotidases. At equilibrium their partition between cytosol and mitochondria depended on the substrate saturation kinetics and cellular abundance of the kinases leading to higher araGTP concentrations in mitochondria. dGTP interfered with the allosteric regulation of ribonucleotide reduction, led to highly imbalanced dNTP pools with gradual inhibition of DNA synthesis and cell-cycle arrest at the G1-S boundary. AraGTP had no effect on ribonucleotide reduction. AraG was in minute amounts incorporated into nuclear DNA and stopped DNA synthesis arresting cells in S-phase. Both nucleosides eventually induced caspases and led to apoptosis. We used high, clinically relevant concentrations of araG, toxic for nuclear DNA synthesis. Our experiments do not exclude an effect on mitochondrial DNA at low araG concentrations when phosphorylation occurs mainly in mitochondria.

  4. Assessment of roles for the Rho-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI) Ly-GDI in platelet function: a spatial systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Anh T P; Thierheimer, Marisa L D; Babur, Özgün; Rocheleau, Anne D; Huang, Tao; Pang, Jiaqing; Rigg, Rachel A; Mitrugno, Annachiara; Theodorescu, Dan; Burchard, Julja; Nan, Xiaolin; Demir, Emek; McCarty, Owen J T; Aslan, Joseph E

    2017-02-01

    Upon activation at sites of vascular injury, platelets undergo morphological alterations essential to hemostasis via cytoskeletal reorganizations driven by the Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA. Here we investigate roles for Rho-specific guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor proteins (RhoGDIs) in platelet function. We find that platelets express two RhoGDI family members, RhoGDI and Ly-GDI. While RhoGDI localizes throughout platelets in a granule-like manner, Ly-GDI shows an asymmetric, polarized localization that largely overlaps with Rac1 and Cdc42 as well as microtubules and protein kinase C (PKC) in platelets adherent to fibrinogen. Antibody interference and platelet spreading experiments suggest a specific role for Ly-GDI in platelet function. Intracellular signaling studies based on interactome and pathways analyses also support a regulatory role for Ly-GDI, which is phosphorylated at PKC substrate motifs in a PKC-dependent manner in response to the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein (GP)VI-specific agonist collagen-related peptide. Additionally, PKC inhibition diffuses the polarized organization of Ly-GDI in spread platelets relative to its colocalization with Rac1 and Cdc42. Together our results suggest a role for Ly-GDI in the localized regulation of Rho GTPases in platelets and hypothesize a link between the PKC and Rho GTPase signaling systems in platelet function.

  5. Fine-Tuning of the Actin Cytoskeleton and Cell Adhesion During Drosophila Development by the Unconventional Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Myoblast City and Sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biersmith, Bridget; Wang, Zong-Heng; Geisbrecht, Erika R

    2015-06-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Dock proteins function as unconventional guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Upon binding to engulfment and cell motility (ELMO) proteins, Dock-ELMO complexes activate the Rho family of small GTPases to mediate a diverse array of biological processes, including cell motility, apoptotic cell clearance, and axon guidance. Overlapping expression patterns and functional redundancy among the 11 vertebrate Dock family members, which are subdivided into four families (Dock A, B, C, and D), complicate genetic analysis. In both vertebrate and invertebrate systems, the actin dynamics regulator, Rac, is the target GTPase of the Dock-A subfamily. However, it remains unclear whether Rac or Rap1 are the in vivo downstream GTPases of the Dock-B subfamily. Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent genetic model organism for understanding Dock protein function as its genome encodes one ortholog per subfamily: Myoblast city (Mbc; Dock A) and Sponge (Spg; Dock B). Here we show that the roles of Spg and Mbc are not redundant in the Drosophila somatic muscle or the dorsal vessel. Moreover, we confirm the in vivo role of Mbc upstream of Rac and provide evidence that Spg functions in concert with Rap1, possibly to regulate aspects of cell adhesion. Together these data show that Mbc and Spg can have different downstream GTPase targets. Our findings predict that the ability to regulate downstream GTPases is dependent on cellular context and allows for the fine-tuning of actin cytoskeletal or cell adhesion events in biological processes that undergo cell morphogenesis.

  6. Determination of guanine and adenine by high-performance liquid chromatography with a self-fabricated wall-jet/thin-layer electrochemical detector at a glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yaping; Yan, Hongling; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive wall-jet/thin-layer amperometric electrochemical detector (ECD) coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for simultaneous determination of guanine (G) and adenine (A). The analytes were detected at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the HPLC-ECD calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.997) under optimized conditions. Limits of detection for G and A are 0.6 nM and 1.4 nM (S/N=3), respectively, which are lower than those obtained with an UV-vis detector and a commercial electrochemical detector. We have successfully applied this HPLC-ECD to assess the contents of G and A in hydrochloric acid-digested calf thymus double-stranded DNA. In addition, we compared in detail the analysis of G and A by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and by the HPLC-ECD system on both bare GCE and electroreduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified GCE. We found that the adsorption of G and A on the electrode surfaces can vary their anodic CV peaks and the competitive adsorption of G and A on the limited sites of the electrode surfaces can cause crosstalk effects on their anodic CV peak signals, but the HPLC-ECD system is insensitive to such electrode-adsorption and can give more reliable analytical results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Replacement of water molecules in a phosphate binding site by furanoside-appended lin-benzoguanine ligands of tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandun, Luzi J; Ehrmann, Frederik R; Zimmerli, Daniel; Immekus, Florian; Giroud, Maude; Grünenfelder, Claudio; Schweizer, W Bernd; Bernet, Bruno; Betz, Michael; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard; Diederich, François

    2015-01-02

    The enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase has been identified as a drug target for the foodborne illness shigellosis. A key challenge in structure-based design for this enzyme is the filling of the polar ribose-34 pocket. Herein, we describe a novel series of ligands consisting of furanoside-appended lin-benzoguanines. They were designed to replace a conserved water cluster and differ by the functional groups at C(2) and C(3) of the furanosyl moiety being either OH or OMe. The unfavorable desolvation of Asp102 and Asp280, which are located close to the ribose-34 pocket, had a significant impact on binding affinity. While the enzyme has tRNA as its natural substrate, X-ray co-crystal structures revealed that the furanosyl moieties of the ligands are not accommodated in the tRNA ribose-34 site, but at the location of the adjacent phosphate group. A remarkable similarity of the position of the oxygen atoms in these two structures suggests furanosides as a potential phosphate isoster. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Plexin B regulates Rho through the guanine nucleotide exchange factors leukemia-associated Rho GEF (LARG) and PDZ-RhoGEF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Valerie; Vazquez-Prado, Jose; Gutkind, J Silvio

    2002-11-08

    Plexins represent a novel family of transmembrane receptors that transduce attractive and repulsive signals mediated by the axon-guiding molecules semaphorins. Emerging evidence implicates Rho GTPases in these biological events. However, Plexins lack any known catalytic activity in their conserved cytoplasmic tails, and how they transduce signals from semaphorins to Rho is still unknown. Here we show that Plexin B2 associates directly with two members of a recently identified family of Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rho, PDZ-RhoGEF, and Leukemia-associated Rho GEF (LARG). This physical interaction is mediated by their PDZ domains and a PDZ-binding motif found only in Plexins of the B family. In addition, we show that ligand-induced dimerization of Plexin B is sufficient to stimulate endogenous RhoA potently and to induce the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. Moreover, overexpression of the PDZ domain of PDZ-RhoGEF but not its regulator of G protein signaling domain prevents cell rounding and neurite retraction of differentiated PC12 cells induced by activation of endogenous Plexin B1 by semaphorin 4D. The association of Plexins with LARG and PDZ-RhoGEF thus provides a direct molecular mechanism by which semaphorins acting on Plexin B can control Rho, thereby regulating the actin-cytoskeleton during axonal guidance and cell migration.

  9. The RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor, LARG, mediates ICAM-1-dependent mechanotransduction in endothelial cells to stimulate transendothelial migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessey-Morillon, Elizabeth C; Osborne, Lukas D; Monaghan-Benson, Elizabeth; Guilluy, Christophe; O'Brien, E Timothy; Superfine, Richard; Burridge, Keith

    2014-04-01

    RhoA-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements in endothelial cells (ECs) play an active role in leukocyte transendothelial cell migration (TEM), a normal physiological process in which leukocytes cross the endothelium to enter the underlying tissue. Although much has been learned about RhoA signaling pathways downstream from ICAM-1 in ECs, little is known about the consequences of the tractional forces that leukocytes generate on ECs as they migrate over the surface before TEM. We have found that after applying mechanical forces to ICAM-1 clusters, there is an increase in cellular stiffening and enhanced RhoA signaling compared with ICAM-1 clustering alone. We have identified that leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG), also known as Rho GEF 12 (ARHGEF12) acts downstream of clustered ICAM-1 to increase RhoA activity, and that this pathway is further enhanced by mechanical force on ICAM-1. Depletion of LARG decreases leukocyte crawling and inhibits TEM. To our knowledge, this is the first report of endothelial LARG regulating leukocyte behavior and EC stiffening in response to tractional forces generated by leukocytes.

  10. Essential role for vav Guanine nucleotide exchange factors in brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced dendritic spine growth and synapse plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Carly F; Dietz, Karen C; Varela, Juan A; Wood, Cody B; Zirlin, Benjamin C; Leverich, Leah S; Greene, Robert W; Cowan, Christopher W

    2011-08-31

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, TrkB, regulate a wide range of cellular processes, including dendritic spine formation and functional synapse plasticity. However, the signaling mechanisms that link BDNF-activated TrkB to F-actin remodeling enzymes and dendritic spine morphological plasticity remain poorly understood. We report here that BDNF/TrkB signaling in neurons activates the Vav family of Rac/RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factors through a novel TrkB-dependent mechanism. We find that Vav is required for BDNF-stimulated Rac-GTP production in cortical and hippocampal neurons. Vav is partially enriched at excitatory synapses in the postnatal hippocampus but does not appear to be required for normal dendritic spine density. Rather, we observe significant reductions in both BDNF-induced, rapid, dendritic spine head growth and in CA3-CA1 theta burst-stimulated long-term potentiation in Vav-deficient mouse hippocampal slices, suggesting that Vav-dependent regulation of dendritic spine morphological plasticity facilitates normal functional synapse plasticity.

  11. Multi-level Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of Ring Opening Process of Guanine Damage by Hydroxyl Radical in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Qiong; Niu, Meixing; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-08-10

    Combining multi-level quantum mechanics theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water model, we investigated the ring opening process of guanine damage by hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution. The detailed, atomic-level ring-opening mechanism along the reaction pathway was revealed in aqueous solution at the CCSD(T)/MM levels of theory. The potentials of mean force in aqueous solution were calculated at both the DFT/MM and CCSD(T)/MM levels of the theory. Our study found that the aqueous solution has a significant effect on this reaction in solution. In particular, by comparing the geometries of the stationary points between in gas phase and in aqueous solution, we found that the aqueous solution has a tremendous impact on the torsion angles much more than on the bond lengths and bending angles. Our calculated free-energy barrier height 31.6 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T)/MM level of theory agrees well with the one obtained based on gas-phase reaction profile and free energies of solvation. In addition, the reaction path in gas phase was also mapped using multi-level quantum mechanics theories, which shows a reaction barrier at 19.2 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T) level of theory, agreeing very well with a recent ab initio calculation result at 20.8 kcal/mol.

  12. Role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor in Akt2-mediated plasma membrane translocation of GLUT4 in insulin-stimulated skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Naoto; Nihata, Yuma; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Aiba, Atsu; Satoh, Takaya

    2014-11-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 plays a key role in insulin-promoted glucose uptake mediated by the GLUT4 glucose transporter in skeletal muscle. Our recent studies have demonstrated that the serine/threonine protein kinase Akt2 is critically involved in insulin-dependent Rac1 activation. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation in mouse skeletal muscle and cultured myocytes. Constitutively activated FLJ00068 induced GLUT4 translocation in a Rac1-dependent and Akt2-independent manner in L6 myocytes. On the other hand, knockdown of FLJ00068 significantly reduced constitutively activated Akt2-triggered GLUT4 translocation. Furthermore, Rac1 activation and GLUT4 translocation induced by constitutively activated phosphoinositide 3-kinase were inhibited by knockdown of FLJ00068. In mouse gastrocnemius muscle, constitutively activated FLJ00068 actually induced GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma. GLUT4 translocation by constitutively activated FLJ00068 was totally abolished in rac1 knockout mouse gastrocnemius muscle. Additionally, we were successful in detecting the activation of Rac1 following the expression of constitutively activated FLJ00068 in gastrocnemius muscle by immunofluorescence microscopy using an activation-specific probe. Collectively, these results strongly support the notion that FLJ00068 regulates Rac1 downstream of Akt2, leading to the stimulation of glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

  13. GDP-bound and nucleotide-free intermediates of the guanine nucleotide exchange in the Rab5·Vps9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejima, Tamami; Ihara, Kentaro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ito, Emi; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2010-11-19

    Many GTPases regulate intracellular transport and signaling in eukaryotes. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of their GDP for GTP. Here we present crystallographic and biochemical studies of a GEF reaction with four crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7, a plant homolog of Rab5 GTPase, in complex with its GEF, VPS9a, in the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms, as well as a complex with aminophosphonic acid-guanylate ester and ARA7·VPS9a(D185N) with GDP. Upon complex formation with ARA7, VPS9 wedges into the interswitch region of ARA7, inhibiting the coordination of Mg(2+) and decreasing the stability of GDP binding. The aspartate finger of VPS9a recognizes GDP β-phosphate directly and pulls the P-loop lysine of ARA7 away from GDP β-phosphate toward switch II to further destabilize GDP for its release during the transition from the GDP-bound to nucleotide-free intermediates in the nucleotide exchange reaction.

  14. GDP-bound and Nucleotide-free Intermediates of the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange in the Rab5·Vps9 System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uejima, Tamami; Ihara, Kentaro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Ito, Emi; Sunada, Mariko; Ueda, Takashi; Nakano, Akihiko; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2010-01-01

    Many GTPases regulate intracellular transport and signaling in eukaryotes. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate GTPases by catalyzing the exchange of their GDP for GTP. Here we present crystallographic and biochemical studies of a GEF reaction with four crystal structures of Arabidopsis thaliana ARA7, a plant homolog of Rab5 GTPase, in complex with its GEF, VPS9a, in the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound forms, as well as a complex with aminophosphonic acid-guanylate ester and ARA7·VPS9a(D185N) with GDP. Upon complex formation with ARA7, VPS9 wedges into the interswitch region of ARA7, inhibiting the coordination of Mg2+ and decreasing the stability of GDP binding. The aspartate finger of VPS9a recognizes GDP β-phosphate directly and pulls the P-loop lysine of ARA7 away from GDP β-phosphate toward switch II to further destabilize GDP for its release during the transition from the GDP-bound to nucleotide-free intermediates in the nucleotide exchange reaction. PMID:20833725

  15. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  16. Dock6, a Dock-C subfamily guanine nucleotide exchanger, has the dual specificity for Rac1 and Cdc42 and regulates neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Sanbe, Atsushi; Tanoue, Akito

    2007-02-15

    Small GTPases of the Rho family, Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, are critical regulators of the changes in the actin cytoskeleton. Rho GTPases are typically activated by Dbl-homology (DH)-domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Recent genetic and biochemical studies revealed a new type of GEF for the Rho GTPases. This family is composed of 11 genes, designated as Dock1 to Dock11, and is structurally divided into four classes Dock-A, -B, -C, and -D. Dock-A and -B subfamilies are typically GEFs specific for Rac1, while the Dock-D subfamily is specific for Cdc42. Here we show that Dock6, a member of the Dock-C subfamily, exchanges GDP for GTP for Rac1 and Cdc42 in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we find that, in mouse N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, expression of Dock6 is increased following differentiation. Transfection of the catalytic Dock Homology Region-2 (DHR-2) domain of Dock6 promotes neurite outgrowth mediated by Rac1 and Cdc42. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous Dock6 by small interference RNA reduces activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 and neurite outgrowth. Taken together, these results suggest that Dock6 differs from all of the identified Dock180-related proteins, in that it is the GEF specific for both Rac1 and Cdc42 and may be one of physiological regulators of neurite outgrowth.

  17. Stuty on the Inclusion Interaction of Two Anticancer Xanthines and β-Cyclodextrin's Derivatives by Competitive UV-Vis Spectrophtometric Method%竞争光度法研究两种抗癌嘌呤类药物与β-环糊精衍生物的包合作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞伟; 朱媛; 杨芸芸; 张爱萍; 孙体健

    2009-01-01

    The competitive OV-Vis spectrophtometric method was applied to study the inclusion interaction and determine the inclusion constant of β-CD derivatives with two anticancer xanthines with phenolphthalein as a spectral probe in aqueous buffer solution (pH= 10. 38) at room temperature, determine the inclusion constants of 6-MP, BAN and β-Cyclodextrin (β-CD)'s derivatives,β-CD's derivatives can include two anticancer xanthines to form the inclusion compounds. The different inclusion stability constants of β-CD's derivatives encapsulating two anticancer xanthines were given.%利用酚酞作为光谱探针,竞争光度法研究了β-环糊精衍生物在室温下,pH=10.38的缓冲液中与硫唑嘌呤和巯嘌呤的包合性能.固定β-环糊精衍生物和酚酞的浓度,随着硫唑嘌呤和巯嘌呤两种药物浓度增大,酚酞的紫外吸收增加,表明β-环糊精衍生物与两种嘌呤类药物形成包合物并得出了包合常数.

  18. The sugar ring of the nucleoside is required for productive substrate positioning in the active site of human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK): implications for the development of dCK-activated acyclic guanine analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Saugata; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2010-01-01

    The low toxicity of acyclovir (ACV) is mainly due to the fact that human nucleoside kinases have undetectable phosphorylation rates with this acyclic guanine analog. In contrast, herpes virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) readily activates ACV. We wanted to understand why human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK), which is related to HSV1-TK and phosphorylates deoxyguanosine, does not accept acyclic guanine analogs as substrates. Therefore, we crystallized dCK in complex with ACV at the nucleoside phosphoryl acceptor site, and UDP at the phosphoryl donor site. The structure reveals that while ACV does bind at the dCK active site, it does so adopting a non-productive conformation. Despite binding ACV, the enzyme remains in the open, inactive state. In comparison to ACV binding to HSV1-TK, in dCK the nucleoside base adopts a different orientation related by about a 60 degree rotation. Our analysis suggests that dCK would phosphorylate acyclic guanine analogs if they can induce a similar rotation. PMID:20684612

  19. UVolution and PROCESS: compared photochemistry in low Earth orbit and in the laboratory of prebiotic organic compounds related to small bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Hervé; Guan, Yuan Yong; Macari, Frederique; Jerome, Murielle; Philippon, Carole; Cloix, Megane; Coll, Patrice; Fray, Nicolas; Szopa, Cyril; Raulin, Francois

    UVolution is an experiment which has been selected by ESA to be flown during 12 days in September 2007, in low Earth orbit on a BIOPAN module outside the Russian space capsule FOTON M3, before being brought back to Earth. PROCESS, is a similar experiment which has been exposed outside the International Space Station during 18 months in 2008-2009. With these experiments, more than 100 organic samples, among them some chosen for their relevance to astrochemistry and astrobiology questions related to comets and meteorites (glycine, ade-nine, guanine, xanthine, hypoxanthine, urea, HCN and C3O2 polymer), were exposed to the space environment. The main goal of this experiment was to study the influence of the solar vacuum Ultra Violet flux (λ<190 nm), which is difficult to reproduce in the laboratory. The re-sults derived from space exposures (photodissociation rates) have been compared to laboratory simulations using a microwave powered H2/He UV lamp as an energy source. We will present, compare and discuss the space and laboratory set of values, and discuss the implication of these measurements in the frame of the studies of the organic content of the small bodies of the Solar System.

  20. Cerebrospinal fluid purine metabolite and neuron-specific enolase concentrations after febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Núñez, A; Cid, E; Rodríguez-García, J; Camiña, F; Rodríguez-Segade, S; Castro-Gago, M

    2000-10-01

    If febrile seizures cause significant compromise of neuronal metabolism (whether permanent or reversible), this should be reflected in an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and/or adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown products. In the present study, AMP, IMP, inosine, adenosine, guanosine, adenine, guanine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and NSE concentrations were determined in the cerebrospinal fluid of 90 children 1 h after febrile seizure (73 simple febrile seizures (SFS); 17 complex febrile seizures (CFS)), and in a control group of 160 children. There was no statistically significant difference between the SFS group and the control group for any of the substances determined, suggesting that SFS neither significantly depletes neuronal ATP concentration, nor significantly increases NSE concentration; thus, SFS do not appear to constitute a threat to neuronal integrity. However, patients with CFS showed significantly lower IMP concentrations and significantly higher adenine concentrations than controls, and significantly higher AMP concentrations than SFS patients; these results suggest that CFS may affect energy metabolism in the brain. However, NSE concentrations were normal in the cerebrospinal fluid of both SFS and CFS patients, suggesting that neither type of seizure causes significant neuronal damage, at least early after the seizure.

  1. Isolation of Purines and Pyrimidines from the Murchison Meteorite Using Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D. P.; Bada, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of life on Earth, and possibly on other planets such as Mars, would have required the presence of liquid water and a continuous supply of prebiotic organic compounds. The exogenous delivery of organic m