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Sample records for hypothetical nudix protein

  1. InvA protein is a Nudix hydrolase required for infection by pathogenic Leptospira in cell lines and animals.

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    Luo, Yihui; Liu, Yan; Sun, Dexter; Ojcius, David M; Zhao, Jinfang; Lin, Xuai; Wu, Dong; Zhang, Rongguang; Chen, Ming; Li, Lanjuan; Yan, Jie

    2011-10-21

    Leptospirosis caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira is a re-emerging zoonotic disease, which affects a wide variety of host species and is transmitted by contaminated water. The genomes of several pathogenic Leptospira species contain a gene named invA, which contains a Nudix domain. However, the function of this gene has never been characterized. Here, we demonstrated that the invA gene was highly conserved in protein sequence and present in all tested pathogenic Leptospira species. The recombinant InvA protein of pathogenic L. interrogans strain Lai hydrolyzed several specific dinucleoside oligophosphate substrates, reflecting the enzymatic activity of Nudix in Leptospira species. Pathogenic leptospires did not express this protein in media but temporarily expressed it at early stages (within 60 min) of infection of macrophages and nephric epithelial cells. Comparing with the wild type, the invA-deficient mutant displayed much lower infectivity and a significantly reduced survival rate in macrophages and nephric epithelial cells. Moreover, the invA-deficient leptospires presented an attenuated virulence in hamsters, caused mild histopathological damage, and were transmitted in lower numbers in the urine, compared with the wild-type strain. The invA revertant, made by complementing the invA-deficient mutant with the invA gene, reacquired virulence similar to the wild type in vitro and in vivo. The LD(50) in hamsters was 1000-fold higher for the invA-deficient mutant than for the invA revertant and wild type. These results demonstrate that the InvA protein is a Nudix hydrolase, and the invA gene is essential for virulence in pathogenic Leptospira species.

  2. The evolution of function within the Nudix homology clan.

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    Srouji, John R; Xu, Anting; Park, Annsea; Kirsch, Jack F; Brenner, Steven E

    2017-05-01

    The Nudix homology clan encompasses over 80,000 protein domains from all three domains of life, defined by homology to each other. Proteins with a domain from this clan fall into four general functional classes: pyrophosphohydrolases, isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases (IDIs), adenine/guanine mismatch-specific adenine glycosylases (A/G-specific adenine glycosylases), and nonenzymatic activities such as protein/protein interaction and transcriptional regulation. The largest group, pyrophosphohydrolases, encompasses more than 100 distinct hydrolase specificities. To understand the evolution of this vast number of activities, we assembled and analyzed experimental and structural data for 205 Nudix proteins collected from the literature. We corrected erroneous functions or provided more appropriate descriptions for 53 annotations described in the Gene Ontology Annotation database in this family, and propose 275 new experimentally-based annotations. We manually constructed a structure-guided sequence alignment of 78 Nudix proteins. Using the structural alignment as a seed, we then made an alignment of 347 "select" Nudix homology domains, curated from structurally determined, functionally characterized, or phylogenetically important Nudix domains. Based on our review of Nudix pyrophosphohydrolase structures and specificities, we further analyzed a loop region downstream of the Nudix hydrolase motif previously shown to contact the substrate molecule and possess known functional motifs. This loop region provides a potential structural basis for the functional radiation and evolution of substrate specificity within the hydrolase family. Finally, phylogenetic analyses of the 347 select protein domains and of the complete Nudix homology clan revealed general monophyly with regard to function and a few instances of probable homoplasy. Proteins 2017; 85:775-811. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. In Silico screening for functional candidates amongst hypothetical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desler, Claus; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Sanderhoff, May

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The definition of a hypothetical protein is a protein that is predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame, but for which there is no experimental evidence of translation. Hypothetical proteins constitute a substantial fraction of proteomes of human as well as of other...... strategy where eukaryotic hypothetical proteins are sorted according to two criteria that can be reliably identified in silico: the presence of subcellular targeting signals and presence of characterized protein domains. To validate the selection strategy we applied it on a database of human hypothetical......, defined as hypothetical in 2006, have later been characterized as mitochondrial. CONCLUSION: Among the total amount of human proteins hypothetical in 2006, 21% have later been experimentally characterized and 6% of those have been shown to have a role in a mitochondrial context. In contrast, among...

  4. In Silico screening for functional candidates amongst hypothetical proteins

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    Sanderhoff May

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The definition of a hypothetical protein is a protein that is predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame, but for which there is no experimental evidence of translation. Hypothetical proteins constitute a substantial fraction of proteomes of human as well as of other eukaryotes. With the general belief that the majority of hypothetical proteins are the product of pseudogenes, it is essential to have a tool with the ability of pinpointing the minority of hypothetical proteins with a high probability of being expressed. Results Here, we present an in silico selection strategy where eukaryotic hypothetical proteins are sorted according to two criteria that can be reliably identified in silico: the presence of subcellular targeting signals and presence of characterized protein domains. To validate the selection strategy we applied it on a database of human hypothetical proteins dating to 2006 and compared the proteins predicted to be expressed by our selecting strategy, with their status in 2008. For the comparison we focused on mitochondrial proteins, since considerable amounts of research have focused on this field in between 2006 and 2008. Therefore, many proteins, defined as hypothetical in 2006, have later been characterized as mitochondrial. Conclusion Among the total amount of human proteins hypothetical in 2006, 21% have later been experimentally characterized and 6% of those have been shown to have a role in a mitochondrial context. In contrast, among the selected hypothetical proteins from the 2006 dataset, predicted by our strategy to have a mitochondrial role, 53-62% have later been experimentally characterized, and 85% of these have actually been assigned a role in mitochondria by 2008. Therefore our in silico selection strategy can be used to select the most promising candidates for subsequent in vitro and in vivo analyses.

  5. Genome-wide screens for expressed hypothetical proteins

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    Madsen, Claus Desler; Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    A hypothetical protein (HP) is defined as a protein that is predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame, but for which there is no experimental evidence of translation. HPs constitute a substantial fraction of proteomes of human as well as of other organisms. With the general belief...

  6. Structural and Functional Annotation of Hypothetical Proteins of O139

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    Md. Saiful Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries threat of cholera is a significant health concern whenever water purification and sewage disposal systems are inadequate. Vibrio cholerae is one of the responsible bacteria involved in cholera disease. The complete genome sequence of V. cholerae deciphers the presence of various genes and hypothetical proteins whose function are not yet understood. Hence analyzing and annotating the structure and function of hypothetical proteins is important for understanding the V. cholerae. V. cholerae O139 is the most common and pathogenic bacterial strain among various V. cholerae strains. In this study sequence of six hypothetical proteins of V. cholerae O139 has been annotated from NCBI. Various computational tools and databases have been used to determine domain family, protein-protein interaction, solubility of protein, ligand binding sites etc. The three dimensional structure of two proteins were modeled and their ligand binding sites were identified. We have found domains and families of only one protein. The analysis revealed that these proteins might have antibiotic resistance activity, DNA breaking-rejoining activity, integrase enzyme activity, restriction endonuclease, etc. Structural prediction of these proteins and detection of binding sites from this study would indicate a potential target aiding docking studies for therapeutic designing against cholera.

  7. A Comprehensive Bioinformatics Analysis of the Nudix Superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana

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    D. Gunawardana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nudix enzymes are a superfamily with a conserved common reaction mechanism that provides the capacity for the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of metabolites. We used hidden Markov models based on Nudix sequences from the PFAM and PROSITE databases to identify Nudix hydrolases encoded by the Arabidopsis genome. 25 Nudix hydrolases were identified and classified into 11 individual families by pairwise sequence alignments. Intron phases were strikingly conserved in each family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all multimember families formed monophyletic clusters. Conserved familial sequence motifs were identified with the MEME motif analysis algorithm. One motif (motif 4 was found in three diverse families. All proteins containing motif 4 demonstrated a degree of preference for substrates containing an ADP moiety. We conclude that HMM model-based genome scanning and MEME motif analysis, respectively, can significantly improve the identification and assignment of function of new members of this mechanistically-diverse protein superfamily.

  8. Combining aptamers and in silico interaction studies to decipher the function of hypothetical proteins

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    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Burri, Harsha Vardhan Reddy; Heiskanen, Arto

    2014-01-01

    We present the potential role of aptamers in elucidating the function of hypothetical proteins, as well as the possibilities provided by bioinformatics for establishing a benchmark for aptamer-protein prediction methods. With these future perspectives, the role of hypothetical proteins as target ...

  9. Structure and functional annotation of hypothetical proteins having putative Rubisco activase function from Vitis vinifera.

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    Kumar, Suresh

    2015-01-01

    Rubisco is a very large, complex and one of the most abundant proteins in the world and comprises up to 50% of all soluble protein in plants. The activity of Rubisco, the enzyme that catalyzes CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis, is regulated by Rubisco activase (Rca). In the present study, we searched for hypothetical protein of Vitis vinifera which has putative Rubisco activase function. The Arabidopsis and tobacco Rubisco activase protein sequences were used as seed sequences to search against Vitis vinifera in UniprotKB database. The selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera were subjected to sequence, structural and functional annotation. Subcellular localization predictions suggested it to be cytoplasmic protein. Homology modelling was used to define the three-dimensional (3D) structure of selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera. Template search revealed that all the hypothetical proteins share more than 80% sequence identity with structure of green-type Rubisco activase from tobacco, indicating proteins are evolutionary conserved. The homology modelling was generated using SWISS-MODEL. Several quality assessment and validation parameters computed indicated that homology models are reliable. Further, functional annotation through PFAM, CATH, SUPERFAMILY, CDART suggested that selected hypothetical proteins of Vitis vinifera contain ATPase family associated with various cellular activities (AAA) and belong to the AAA+ super family of ring-shaped P-loop containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases. This study will lead to research in the optimization of the functionality of Rubisco which has large implication in the improvement of plant productivity and resource use efficiency.

  10. Structural Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori: An Approach to Estimate Functions of Unknown or Hypothetical Proteins

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    Bong-Jin Lee

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori have a unique ability to survive in extreme acidic environments and to colonize the gastric mucosa. It can cause diverse gastric diseases such as peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma, gastric cancer, etc. Based on genomic research of H. pylori, over 1600 genes have been functionally identified so far. However, H. pylori possess some genes that are uncharacterized since: (i the gene sequences are quite new; (ii the function of genes have not been characterized in any other bacterial systems; and (iii sometimes, the protein that is classified into a known protein based on the sequence homology shows some functional ambiguity, which raises questions about the function of the protein produced in H. pylori. Thus, there are still a lot of genes to be biologically or biochemically characterized to understand the whole picture of gene functions in the bacteria. In this regard, knowledge on the 3D structure of a protein, especially unknown or hypothetical protein, is frequently useful to elucidate the structure-function relationship of the uncharacterized gene product. That is, a structural comparison with known proteins provides valuable information to help predict the cellular functions of hypothetical proteins. Here, we show the 3D structures of some hypothetical proteins determined by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography as a part of the structural genomics of H. pylori. In addition, we show some successful approaches of elucidating the function of unknown proteins based on their structural information.

  11. LC-MS/MS based proteomic analysis and functional inference of hypothetical proteins in Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

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    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E; Gritsenko, Marina A; Moore, Ronald J; Nie, Lei; Scholten, Johannes C M; Petritis, Konstantinos; Strittmatter, Eric F; Camp, David G; Smith, Richard D; Brockman, Fred J

    2006-11-03

    High efficiency capillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to examine the proteins extracted from Desulfovibrio vulgaris cells across six treatment conditions. While our previous study provided a proteomic overview of the cellular metabolism based on proteins with known functions [W. Zhang, M.A. Gritsenko, R.J. Moore, D.E. Culley, L. Nie, K. Petritis, E.F. Strittmatter, D.G. Camp II, R.D. Smith, F.J. Brockman, A proteomic view of the metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris determined by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, Proteomics 6 (2006) 4286-4299], this study describes the global detection and functional inference for hypothetical D. vulgaris proteins. Using criteria that a given peptide of a protein is identified from at least two out of three independent LC-MS/MS measurements and that for any protein at least two different peptides are identified among the three measurements, 129 open reading frames (ORFs) originally annotated as hypothetical proteins were found to encode expressed proteins. Functional inference for the conserved hypothetical proteins was performed by a combination of several non-homology based methods: genomic context analysis, phylogenomic profiling, and analysis of a combination of experimental information, including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and cellular location of the proteins. Using this approach we were able to assign possible functions to 20 conserved hypothetical proteins. This study demonstrated that a combination of proteomics and bioinformatics methodologies can provide verification of the expression of hypothetical proteins and improve genome annotation.

  12. In Silico Structural and Functional Annotation of Hypothetical Proteins of Vibrio cholerae O139

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    Islam, Md. Saiful; Shahik, Shah Md.; Sohel, Md.; Patwary, Noman I. A.

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries threat of cholera is a significant health concern whenever water purification and sewage disposal systems are inadequate. Vibrio cholerae is one of the responsible bacteria involved in cholera disease. The complete genome sequence of V. cholerae deciphers the presence of various genes and hypothetical proteins whose function are not yet understood. Hence analyzing and annotating the structure and function of hypothetical proteins is important for understanding the V. cholerae. V. cholerae O139 is the most common and pathogenic bacterial strain among various V. cholerae strains. In this study sequence of six hypothetical proteins of V. cholerae O139 has been annotated from NCBI. Various computational tools and databases have been used to determine domain family, protein-protein interaction, solubility of protein, ligand binding sites etc. The three dimensional structure of two proteins were modeled and their ligand binding sites were identified. We have found domains and families of only one protein. The analysis revealed that these proteins might have antibiotic resistance activity, DNA breaking-rejoining activity, integrase enzyme activity, restriction endonuclease, etc. Structural prediction of these proteins and detection of binding sites from this study would indicate a potential target aiding docking studies for therapeutic designing against cholera. PMID:26175663

  13. Structural and functional analysis of hypothetical and conserved proteins of Clostridium tetani.

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    Enany, Shymaa

    2014-01-01

    The progress in biological technologies has led to rapid accumulation of microbial genomic sequences with a vast number of uncharacterized genes. Proteins encoded by these genes are usually uncharacterized, hypothetical, and/or conserved. In Clostridium tetani (C. tetani), these proteins constitute up to 50% of the expressed proteins. In this regard, understanding the functions and the structures of these proteins is crucially important, particularly in C. tetani, which is a medically important pathogen. Here, we used a variety of bioinformatics tools and databases to analyze 10 hypothetical and conserved proteins in C. tetani. We were able to provide a detailed overview of the functional contributions of some of these proteins in several cellular functions, including (1) evolving antibiotic resistance, (2) interaction with enzymes pathways, and (3) involvement in drug transportation. Among these candidates, we postulated the involvement of one of these hypothetical proteins in the pathogenic activity of tetanus. The structural and functional prediction of these proteins should serve in uncovering and better understanding the function of C. tetani cells to ultimately discover new possible drug targets.

  14. NMR Structure of the hypothetical protein encoded by the YjbJ gene from Escherichia coli

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    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack; Wu, Bin; Yee, Adelinda; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, Aled M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-06-01

    Here we describe the solution structure of YjbJ (gil418541) as part of a structural proteomics project on the feasibility of the high-throughput generation of samples from Escherichia coli for structural studies. YjbJ is a hypothetical protein from Escherichia coli protein of unknown function. It is conserved, showing significant sequence identity to four predicted prokaryotic proteins, also of unknown function (Figure 1A). These include gil16762921 from Salmonella enterica (S. typhi), gil17938413 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, gil16265654 from Sinorizhobium meliloti, and gil15599932 from Pseudomona aeruginosa. The structure of YjbJ reveals a new variation of a common motif (four-helix bundle) that could not be predicted from the protein sequence. Although the biochemical function is unknown, the existence of patterns of conserved residues on the protein surface suggest that the fold and function of all these proteins could be similar.

  15. Characterization and functional analysis of Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase.

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    Long, Shao Rong; Wang, Zhong Quan; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Ruo Dan; Qi, Xin; Liu, Pei; Ren, Hui Jun; Shi, Hai Ning; Cui, Jing

    2015-12-01

    Trichinella spiralis Nudix hydrolase (TsNd) was identified by screening a T7 phage display cDNA library from T. spiralis intestinal infective larvae (IIL), and vaccination of mice with recombinant TsNd protein (rTsNd) or TsNd DNA vaccine produced a partial protective immunity. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics and biological functions of TsNd in the process of invasion and development of T. spiralis larvae. Transcription and expression of TsNd gene at all developmental stages of T. spiralis were observed by qPCR and immunofluorescent test (IFT). The rTsNd had the Nd enzymatic activity to dGTP, NAD, NADP and CoA. Its kinetic properties on the preferred substrate dGTP were calculated, and the Vmax, Km, and kcat/Km values at pH 8.0 were 3.19 μM min(-1) μg(-1), 370 μM, and 144 s(-1) M(-1), respectively, in reaction matrix containing 5 mM Zn(2+) and 2 mM DTT. The rTsNd was active from 25 °C to 50 °C, with optimal activity at 37 °C. rTsNd was able to bind specifically to mouse intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and promoted the larval invasion of IECs, whereas anti-rTsNd antibodies inhibited the larval invasion of IECs in a dose-dependent manner. Anti-rTsNd antibodies could kill T. spiralis infective larvae by an ADCC-mediated mechanism. Our results showed that the rTsNd protein was able to interact with host IECs, had the Nudix hydrolasing activity and the enzymatic activity appeared to be essential indispensable for the T. spiralis larval invasion, development and survival in host.

  16. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

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    Ahmad Abu Turab Naqvi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP. This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein.

  17. Sequence Analysis of Hypothetical Proteins from Helicobacter pylori 26695 to Identify Potential Virulence Factors

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    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Anjum, Farah; Khan, Faez Iqbal; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that is responsible for gastritis in human. Its spiral flagellated body helps in locomotion and colonization in the host environment. It is capable of living in the highly acidic environment of the stomach with the help of acid adaptive genes. The genome of H. pylori 26695 strain contains 1,555 coding genes that encode 1,445 proteins. Out of these, 340 proteins are characterized as hypothetical proteins (HP). This study involves extensive analysis of the HPs using an established pipeline which comprises various bioinformatics tools and databases to find out probable functions of the HPs and identification of virulence factors. After extensive analysis of all the 340 HPs, we found that 104 HPs are showing characteristic similarities with the proteins with known functions. Thus, on the basis of such similarities, we assigned probable functions to 104 HPs with high confidence and precision. All the predicted HPs contain representative members of diverse functional classes of proteins such as enzymes, transporters, binding proteins, regulatory proteins, proteins involved in cellular processes and other proteins with miscellaneous functions. Therefore, we classified 104 HPs into aforementioned functional groups. During the virulence factors analysis of the HPs, we found 11 HPs are showing significant virulence. The identification of virulence proteins with the help their predicted functions may pave the way for drug target estimation and development of effective drug to counter the activity of that protein. PMID:27729842

  18. Structure of the hypothetical Mycoplasma protein, MPN555, suggestsa chaperone function

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    Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula; Aono, Shelly; Chen, Shengfeng; Yokota,Hisao; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2005-06-15

    The crystal structure of the hypothetical protein MPN555from Mycoplasma pneumoniae (gi pbar 1673958) has been determined to a resolution of 2.8 Angstrom using anomalous diffraction data at the Sepeak wavelength. Structure determination revealed a mostly alpha-helical protein with a three-lobed shape. The three lobes or fingers delineate a central binding groove and additional grooves between lobes 1 and 3, and between lobes 2 and 3. For one of the molecules in the asymmetric unit,the central binding pocket was filled with a peptide from the uncleaved N-terminal affinity tag. The MPN555 structure has structural homology to two bacterial chaperone proteins, SurA and trigger factor from Escherichia coli. The structural data and the homology to other chaperone for MPN555.

  19. Hypothetical Justifications

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    Bernd Lahno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A basic conviction in moral non-cognitivism is: only hypothetical norms may be justified. Hartmut Kliemt argues for a moderate variant: there are only hypothetical justifications of norms whether the norms are hypothetical or categorical in kind. In this paper the concept of 'hypothetical justification' is analyzed. It is argued that hypothetical justifications are not of the kind that we should look for in normative ethics.

  20. Conserved hypothetical BB0462 protein enhances the transcription activity of oppAV promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi BB0462 ORF encodes an unknown functional protein with 110 amino acids.A BLAST search in protein databases and the secondary structure being predicted by the program JUFO showed that the conserved hypothetical BB0462 protein was similar to the members of the YbaB protein family in both amino acid composition and protein structure.The co-transformation of BB0462 ORF and oppA upstream regulation DNA into E.coli host cells and β-galactosidase activity assay demonstrated that the BB0462 protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of the oppAV promoter,but does not affect those of oppAⅠ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ and Ⅳ promoters.Analysis of DNA retardation and competitive repression also confirmed that the BB0462 protein bound to the 409 bp upstream regulation DNA fragment close to the initiation codon of the oppAV gene.All data in our study suggested that the BB0462 protein was involved in the transcriptional regulation of the oppAV gene

  1. Bioinformatics and structural characterization of a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans: implication of antibiotic resistance.

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    Jie Nan

    Full Text Available As an oral bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus mutans has been known as the aetiologic agent of human dental caries. Among a total of 1960 identified proteins within the genome of this organism, there are about 500 without any known functions. One of these proteins, SMU.440, has very few homologs in the current protein databases and it does not fall into any protein functional families. Phylogenetic studies showed that SMU.440 is related to a particular ecological niche and conserved specifically in some oral pathogens, due to lateral gene transfer. The co-occurrence of a MarR protein within the same operon among these oral pathogens suggests that SMU.440 may be associated with antibiotic resistance. The structure determination of SMU.440 revealed that it shares the same fold and a similar pocket as polyketide cyclases, which indicated that it is very likely to bind some polyketide-like molecules. From the interlinking structural and bioinformatics studies, we have concluded that SMU.440 could be involved in polyketide-like antibiotic resistance, providing a better understanding of this hypothetical protein. Besides, the combination of multiple methods in this study can be used as a general approach for functional studies of a protein with unknown function.

  2. Identification of functional candidates amongst hypothetical proteins of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

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    Naqvi, Ahmad Abu Turab; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2015-01-01

    Syphilis is a globally occurring venereal disease, and its infection is propagated through sexual contact. The causative agent of syphilis, Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum, a Gram-negative sphirochaete, is an obligate human parasite. Genome of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum SS14 strain (RefSeq NC_010741.1) encodes 1,027 proteins, of which 444 proteins are known as hypothetical proteins (HPs), i.e., proteins of unknown functions. Here, we performed functional annotation of HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum using various database, domain architecture predictors, protein function annotators and clustering tools. We have analyzed the sequences of 444 HPs of T. pallidum ssp. pallidum and subsequently predicted the function of 207 HPs with a high level of confidence. However, functions of 237 HPs are predicted with less accuracy. We found various enzymes, transporters, binding proteins in the annotated group of HPs that may be possible molecular targets, facilitating for the survival of pathogen. Our comprehensive analysis helps to understand the mechanism of pathogenesis to provide many novel potential therapeutic interventions.

  3. Molecular Characterization and Immune Protection of a New Conserved Hypothetical Protein of Eimeria tenella.

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    Qi Zhai

    Full Text Available The genome sequences of Eimeria tenella have been sequenced, but >70% of these genes are currently categorized as having an unknown function or annotated as conserved hypothetical proteins, and few of them have been studied. In the present study, a conserved hypothetical protein gene of E. tenella, designated EtCHP559, was cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA 5'-ends (5'RACE based on the expressed sequence tag (EST. The 1746-bp full-length cDNA of EtCHP559 contained a 1224-bp open reading frame (ORF that encoded a 407-amino acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 46.04 kDa. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that EtCHP559 was expressed at higher levels in sporozoites than in the other developmental stages (unsporulated oocysts, sporulated oocysts and second generation merozoites. The ORF was inserted into pCold-TF to produce recombinant EtCHP559. Using western blotting, the recombinant protein was successfully recognized by rabbit serum against E. tenella sporozoites. Immunolocalization by using EtCHP559 antibody showed that EtCHP559 was mainly distributed on the parasite surface in free sporozoites and became concentrated in the anterior region after sporozoites were incubated in complete medium. The EtCHP559 became uniformly dispersed in immature and mature schizonts. Inhibition of EtCHP559 function using anti-rEtCHP559 polyclonal antibody reduced the ability of E. tenella sporozoites to invade host cells by >70%. Animal challenge experiments demonstrated that the recombinant EtCHP559 significantly increased the average body weight gain, reduced the oocyst outputs, alleviated cecal lesions of the infected chickens, and resulted in anticoccidial index >160 against E. tenella. These results suggest that EtCHP559 plays an important role in sporozoite invasion and could be an effective candidate for the development of a new vaccine against E. tenella.

  4. The Rickettsia prowazekii invasion gene homolog (invA) encodes a Nudix hydrolase active on adenosine (5')-pentaphospho-(5')-adenosine.

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    Gaywee, Jariyanart; Xu, WenLian; Radulovic, Suzana; Bessman, Maurice J; Azad, Abdu F

    2002-03-01

    The genomic sequence of Rickettsia prowazekii, the obligate intracellular bacterium responsible for epidemic typhus, reveals an uncharacterized invasion gene homolog (invA). The deduced protein of 18,752 Da contains a Nudix signature, the specific motif found in the Nudix hydrolase family. To characterize the function of InvA, the gene was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The expressed protein was purified to near homogeneity and subsequently tested for its enzymatic activity against a series of nucleoside diphosphate derivatives. The purified InvA exhibits hydrolytic activity toward dinucleoside oligophosphates (Np(n)N; n > or = 5), a group of cellular signaling molecules. At optimal pH 8.5, the enzyme actively degrades adenosine (5')-pentaphospho-(5')-adenosine into ATP and ADP with a K(m) of 0.1 mM and k(cat) of 1.9 s(-1). Guanosine (5')-pentaphospho-(5')-guanosine and adenosine-(5')-hexaphospho (5')-adenosine are also substrates. Similar to other Nudix hydrolases, InvA requires a divalent metal cation, Mg(2+) or Zn(2+), for optimal activity. These data suggest that the rickettsial invasion protein likely plays a role in controlling the concentration of stress-induced dinucleoside oligophosphates following bacterial invasion.

  5. Cloning and characterisation of hAps1 and hAps2, human diadenosine polyphosphate-metabolising Nudix hydrolases

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    Safrany Stephen T

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human genome contains at least 18 genes for Nudix hydrolase enzymes. Many have similar functions to one another. In order to understand their roles in cell physiology, these proteins must be characterised. Results We have characterised two novel human gene products, hAps1, encoded by the NUDT11 gene, and hAps2, encoded by the NUDT10 gene. These cytoplasmic proteins are members of the DIPP subfamily of Nudix hydrolases, and differ from each other by a single amino acid. Both metabolise diadenosine-polyphosphates and, weakly, diphosphoinositol polyphosphates. An apparent polymorphism of hAps1 has also been identified, which leads to the point mutation S39N. This has also been characterised. The favoured nucleotides were diadenosine 5',5"'-pentaphosphate (kcat/Km = 11, 8 and 16 × 103M-1s-1 respectively for hAps1, hAps1-39N and hAps2 and diadenosine 5',5"'-hexaphosphate (kcat/Km = 13, 14 and 11 × 103M-1s-1 respectively for hAps1, hAps1-39N and hAps2. Both hAps1 and hAps2 had pH optima of 8.5 and an absolute requirement for divalent cations, with manganese (II being favoured. Magnesium was not able to activate the enzymes. Therefore, these enzymes could be acutely regulated by manganese fluxes within the cell. Conclusions Recent gene duplication has generated the two Nudix genes, NUDT11 and NUDT10. We have characterised their gene products as the closely related Nudix hydrolases, hAps1 and hAps2. These two gene products complement the activity of previously described members of the DIPP family, and reinforce the concept that Ap5A and Ap6A act as intracellular messengers.

  6. Confirmation of the Expression of a Large Set of Conserved Hypothetical Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-01

    High-throughput “omic” technologies have allowed for a relatively rapid, yet comprehensive analysis of the global expression patterns within an organism in response to perturbations. In the current study, tryptic peptides were identified with high confidence from capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 26 chemostat cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under various conditions. Using at least one distinctive and a total of two total peptide identifications per protein, we detected the expression of 758 conserved hypothetical proteins. This included 359 such proteins previously described (Kolker et al, 2005) with an additional 399 reported herein for the first time. The latter 399 proteins ranged from 5.3 to 208.3 kDa, with 44 being of 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some conserved hypothetical proteins. Such proteins were found not only to be expressed, but 19 were only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby providing insight into potential functions. These findings also impact the genomic annotation for S. oneidensis MR-1 by confirming that these genes code for expressed proteins. Our results indicate that 399 proteins can now be upgraded from “conserved hypothetical protein” to “expressed protein in Shewanella,” 19 of which appeared to be expressed under specific culture conditions.

  7. In-silico prediction of dual function of DksA like hypothetical protein in V. cholerae O395 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Avirup; Katarkar, Atul; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2017-01-01

    Cholera, an acute infection of the small intestine, is caused by Vibrio cholerae. The present study identified a hypothetical protein in V. cholerae O395, which was predicted to be acquired through horizontal gene transfer the origin of which was found to be from a phage. Its expression was further confirmed by RT-PCR. Homology based 3D model of the hypothetical protein indicated DksA like homologue. Protein binding site of 3D-model revealed a deep cleft which may influence the dimer formation and interaction with ds-DNA molecule. Also, canonical function of direct interaction with RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme in complex with ppGpp suggests its dual role in the pathogenesis of cholera.

  8. In silico Sequence Analysis, Homology Modeling and Function Annotation of Ocimum basilicum Hypothetical Protein G1CT28_OCIBA

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    Sobia Idrees

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocimum basilicum is commonly known as sweet basil and belongs to the Lamiaceae Family. Ocimum basilicum has great therapeutic benefits and can be used for lowering blood pressure, as an antispasmodic as well as cleansing the blood. In the present study, subcellular localization prediction suggested that it is a cytoplasmic protein. We predicted the 3D structure of protein using homology modeling as 3D structure prediction approach. 3D structure of the protein was determined using Protein Structure Prediction Server (PS2 selecting MODELLER as 3D structure prediction method. Quality analysis of the model indicated that it is a reliable model. Furthermore, it was discovered that Ocimum basilicum hypothetical protein G1CT28_OCIBA is involved in two biological processes, oxidation reduction and metabolic process and the biochemical function of the protein is acting on the aldehyde or oxo group of donors, NAD or NADP as acceptor, catalytic activity and oxidoreductase.

  9. An in silico Approach for Structural and Functional Annotation of Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium Hypothetical Protein R_27

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    Arif Khan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever is a major cause of illness in most developing countries, including Bangladesh. In quest of new potential drug against Typhoid fever, the current study was designed to elucidate structural and functional details of S. typhi hypothetical protein (HP R_27. HP R_27 has the primary amino acid sequences available only. The structural annotation was determined by ProtParam, SOPMA, and CELLO. The three-dimensional (3D structure of HP R_27 predicted through homology modeling by using Phyre2. The 3D structure then refined and verified by ModRefiner, PROCHECK, ERRAT, QMEAN. The functional annotation was also performed by InterProScan, SMART, Pfam, NCBI-CDD and found Phospholipase D-like and DNA repair activity. Multiple sequence alignment also supported the existence of PLD-like domain and DNA repair protein domain in the selected hypothetical protein sequences. Finally, the cavity of drug binding was also identified to assist further molecular docking study and potent inhibitor identification. This in silico approach can be further utilized in molecular drug design for other clinically significant pathogens.

  10. Conserved hypothetical protein Rv1977 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains contains sequence polymorphisms and might be involved in ongoing immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi; Liu, Haican; Wang, Xuezhi; Li, Guilian; Qiu, Yan; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wan, Kanglin

    2015-01-01

    Host immune pressure and associated parasite immune evasion are key features of host-pathogen co-evolution. A previous study showed that human T cell epitopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are evolutionarily hyperconserved and thus it was deduced that M. tuberculosis lacks antigenic variation and immune evasion. Here, we selected 151 clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from China, amplified gene encoding Rv1977 and compared the sequences. The results showed that Rv1977, a conserved hypothetical protein, is not conserved in M. tuberculosis strains and there are polymorphisms existed in the protein. Some mutations, especially one frameshift mutation, occurred in the antigen Rv1977, which is uncommon in M.tb strains and may lead to the protein function altering. Mutations and deletion in the gene all affect one of three T cell epitopes and the changed T cell epitope contained more than one variable position, which may suggest ongoing immune evasion.

  11. Expression of Nudix hydrolase genes in barley under UV irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Sayuri; Sugimoto, Manabu; Kihara, Makoto

    Seed storage and cultivation should be necessary to self-supply foods when astronauts would stay and investigate during long-term space travel and habitation in the bases on the Moon and Mars. Thought the sunlight is the most importance to plants, both as the ultimate energy source and as an environmental signal regulating growth and development, UV presenting the sunlight can damage many aspects of plant processes at the physiological and DNA level. Especially UV-C, which is eliminated by the stratospheric ozone layer, is suspected to be extremely harmful and give a deadly injury to plants in space. However, the defense mechanism against UV-C irradiation damage in plant cells has not been clear. In this study, we investigated the expression of Nudix hydrolases, which defense plants from biotic / abiotic stress, in barley under UV irradiation. The genes encoding the amino acid sequences, which show homology to those of 28 kinds of Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis thaliana, were identified in the barley full-length cDNA library. BLAST analysis showed 14 kinds of barley genes (HvNUDX1-14), which encode the Nudix motif sequence. A phylogenetic tree showed that HvNUDX1, HvNUDX7, HvNUDX9 and HvNUDX11 belonged to the ADP-ribose pyrophosphohydrolase, ADP-sugar pyrophosphohydrolase, NAD(P)H pyrophosphohydrolase and FAD pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, respectively, HvNUDX3, HvNUDX6, and HvNUDX8 belonged to the Ap _{n}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX5 and HvNUDX14 belonged to the coenzyme A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies, HvNUDX12 and HvNUDX13 belonged to the Ap _{4}A pyrophosphohydrolase subfamilies. Induction of HvNUDX genes by UV-A (340nm), UV-B (312nm), and UV-C (260nm) were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The results showed that HvNUDX4 was induced by UV-A and UV-B, HvNUDX6 was induced by UV-B and UV-C, and HvNUDX7 and HvNUDX14 were induced by UV-C, significantly. Our results suggest that the response of HvNUDXs to UV irradiation is different by UV

  12. Bioinformatics and structural characterization of a hypothetical protein from Streptococcus mutans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nan, Jie; Brostromer, Erik; Liu, Xiang-Yu;

    2009-01-01

    As an oral bacterial pathogen, Streptococcus mutans has been known as the aetiologic agent of human dental caries. Among a total of 1960 identified proteins within the genome of this organism, there are about 500 without any known functions. One of these proteins, SMU.440, has very few homologs...

  13. Letter to the Editor: Solution Structure of the Hypothetical Protein MTH0637 from Methanobacterium Thermoautotrophicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Yi, Gs; Chang, Xiaoqing; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Edwards, A M.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2002-03-01

    After completion of the sequencing phase of the genome projects, attention has turned to determine the structure and function of all the proteins encoded by the newly sequenced genes. Structural proteomics projects are expected to answer basic questions about the conformational space available to proteins, and reveal information about pharmaceutical applications. The number of pharmaceutical targets is expected to increase dramatically in the post-genomic era, and detailed information about the structure of the proteins will facilitate the development of drugs against these potential targets (Brower, 2001).

  14. In silico identification and characterization of a hypothetical protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis EAI5 as a potential virulent factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Debdoot; Banerjee, Samiddha; Pailan, Santanu; Saha, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a life threatening disease caused by different strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is creating an alarming condition due to the emergence of increasing multi drug resistance (MDR) trait. In this study, in silico approach was used for the identification of a conserved novel virulent factor in Mycobacterium tuberculosis EAI5 (Accession no.CP006578) which can also act as potential therapeutic target. Systematic comparative search of genes that are common to strain EAI5 and other human pathogenic strains of M. tuberculosis enlisted 408 genes. These were absent in the non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis MC2155 and in the human genome. Among those genes, only the protein coding hypothetical genes (97 out of 408) and their corresponding products were selected for further exploration. Of these, 11 proteins were found to have notable conserved domains, of which one hypothetical protein (NCBI Acc No. AGQ35418.1) was selected for further in silico exploration which was found to have two functional domains, one having phosphatidylinositol specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) activity while the other short domain with weak lectin binding activity. As PI-PLC contributes virulence property in some pathogenic bacteria with a broad range of activities, different bioinformatic tools were used to explore its physicochemical and other important properties which indicated its secretary nature. This PI-PLC was previously not reported as drug/vaccine target to the best of our knowledge. Its predicted 3D structure can be explored for development of inhibitor for novel therapeutic strategies against MDR-TB.

  15. Seroreactivity and immunogenicity of Tp0965, a hypothetical membrane protein of Treponema pallidum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Fu-quan; ZHANG Jin-ping; SHANG Guang-dong; SHANG Shu-xian; GONG Kuang-long; WANG Qian-qiu

    2012-01-01

    Background Treponema pallidum (T.pallidum) subsp.pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis.Analysis of recombinant antigens of T.pallidum led to the identification of potential candidate antigens for vaccine development and syphilis serodiagnosis.Tp0965 was predicted to be a membrane fusion protein and was found to be reactive with infected human sera in previous studies,but the results were controversial.In this research,the antigenicity and immunoreactivity of recombinant protein Tp0965 were assessed.Methods T.pallidum subsp.pallidum (Nichols strain) was propagated and isolated and the genomic DNA was extracted.The Tp0965 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Then the recombinant protein Tp0965 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni-NTA) purification system.The reactivities of protein Tp0965 were examined by immunoblot analysis and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.The antisera against protein Tp0965 were obtained by immune rabbits and the immunogenicity of antisera were detected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.Results Recombinant protein Tp0965 was expressed successfully in vitro.Immunoblot assay showed that the recombinant protein Tp0965 could be recognized by human syphilitic sera of all stages.Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed there were only 4 of 74 human syphilitic sera that failed to show reactivity to recombinant antigen Tp0965,and lack of reactivity of Tp0965 to all 28 uninfected sera.A low titer of antiserum against Tp0965 in immune rabbits could be detected after the third time of immunization.Conclusions The recombinant antigen Tp0965 shows excellent sensitivity for the reactivity with sera from syphilitic individuals at all stages.The results also demonstrate a potential application for the serodiagnosis of syphilis.

  16. Analysis of multi-domain hypothetical proteins containing iron-sulphur clusters and fad ligands reveal rieske dioxygenase activity suggesting their plausible roles in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, Nitish; Nagendra, Holenarasipur Gundurao

    2012-01-01

    'Conserved hypothetical' proteins pose a challenge not just for functional genomics, but also to biology in general. As long as there are hundreds of conserved proteins with unknown function in model organisms such as Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, any discussion towards a 'complete' understanding of these biological systems will remain a wishful thinking. Insilico approaches exhibit great promise towards attempts that enable appreciating the plausible roles of these hypothetical proteins. Among the majority of genomic proteins, two-thirds in unicellular organisms and more than 80% in metazoa, are multi-domain proteins, created as a result of gene duplication events. Aromatic ring-hydroxylating dioxygenases, also called Rieske dioxygenases (RDOs), are class of multi-domain proteins that catalyze the initial step in microbial aerobic degradation of many aromatic compounds. Investigations here address the computational characterization of hypothetical proteins containing Ferredoxin and Flavodoxin signatures. Consensus sequence of each class of oxidoreductase was obtained by a phylogenetic analysis, involving clustering methods based on evolutionary relationship. A synthetic sequence was developed by combining the consensus, which was used as the basis to search for their homologs via BLAST. The exercise yielded 129 multidomain hypothetical proteins containing both 2Fe-2S (Ferredoxin) and FNR (Flavodoxin) domains. In the current study, 40 proteins with N-terminus 2Fe-2S domain and C-terminus FNR domain are characterized, through homology modelling and docking exercises which suggest dioxygenase activity indicating their plausible roles in degradation of aromatic moieties.

  17. Modulation of redox homeostasis under suboptimal conditions by Arabidopsis nudix hydrolase 7

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    Jambunathan Niranjani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nudix hydrolases play a key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis by hydrolyzing various nuceloside diphosphate derivatives and capped mRNAs. Several independent studies have demonstrated that Arabidopsis nudix hydrolase 7 (AtNUDT7 hydrolyzes NADH and ADP-ribose. Loss of function Atnudt7-1 mutant plants (SALK_046441 exhibit stunted growth, higher levels of reactive oxygen species, enhanced resistance to pathogens. However, using the same T-DNA line, two other groups reported that mutant plants do not exhibit any visible phenotypes. In this study we analyze plausible factors that account for differences in the observed phenotypes in Atnudt7. Secondly, we evaluate the biochemical and molecular consequences of increased NADH levels due to loss of function of AtNUDT7 in Arabidopsis. Results We identified a novel conditional phenotype of Atnudt7-1 knockout plants that was contingent upon nutrient composition of potting mix. In nutrient-rich Metro-Mix, there were no phenotypic differences between mutant and wild-type (WT plants. In the nutrient-poor mix (12 parts vermiculite: 3 parts Redi-earth and 1 part sand, mutant plants showed the characteristic stunted phenotype. Compared with WT plants, levels of glutathione, NAD+, NADH, and in turn NADH:NAD+ ratio were higher in Atnudt7-1 plants growing in 12:3:1 potting mix. Infiltrating NADH and ADP-ribose into WT leaves was sufficient to induce AtNUDT7 protein. Constitutive over-expression of AtNudt7 did not alter NADH levels or resistance to pathogens. Transcriptome analysis identified nearly 700 genes differentially expressed in the Atnudt7-1 mutant compared to WT plants grown in 12:3:1 potting mix. In the Atnudt7-1 mutant, genes associated with defense response, proteolytic activities, and systemic acquired resistance were upregulated, while gene ontologies for transcription and phytohormone signaling were downregulated. Conclusions Based on these observations, we conclude that the

  18. The conservation and application of three hypothetical protein coding gene for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum specimens.

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    Lianhua Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate and early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB is of major importance in the control of TB. One of the most important technical advances in diagnosis of tuberculosis is the development of nucleic acid amplification (NAA tests. However, the choice of the target sequence remains controversial in NAA tests. Recently, interesting alternatives have been found in hypothetical protein coding sequences from mycobacterial genome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To obtain rational biomarker for TB diagnosis, the conservation of three hypothetical genes was firstly evaluated in 714 mycobacterial strains. The results showed that SCAR1 (Sequenced Characterized Amplified Region based on Rv0264c coding gene showed the highest conservation (99.8% and SCAR2 based on Rv1508c gene showed the secondary high conservation (99.7% in M. tuberculosis (MTB strains. SCAR3 based on Rv2135c gene (3.2% and IS6110 (8% showed relatively high deletion rate in MTB strains. Secondly, three SCAR markers were evaluated in 307 clinical sputum from patients in whom TB was suspected or patients with diseases other than TB. The amplification of IS6110 and 16SrRNA sequences together with both clinical and bacteriological identification was as a protocol to evaluate the efficacy of SCAR markers. The sensitivities and specificities, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV of all NAA tests were higher than those of bacteriological detection. In four NAA tests, IS6110 and SCAR3 showed the highest PPV (100% and low NPV (70% and 68.8%, respectively, and SCAR1 and SCAR2 showed the relatively high PPV and NPV (97% and 82.6%, 95.6% and 88.8%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our result indicated that SCAR1 and SCAR2 with a high degree of sequence conservation represent efficient and promising alternatives as NAA test targets in identification of MTB. Moreover, the targets developed from this study may provide more alternative targets for the

  19. Hypothetical protein Avin_16040 as the S-layer protein of Azotobacter vinelandii and its involvement in plant root surface attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Pauline Woan Ying; Jong, Bor Chyan; Najimudin, Nazalan

    2015-11-01

    A proteomic analysis of a soil-dwelling, plant growth-promoting Azotobacter vinelandii strain showed the presence of a protein encoded by the hypothetical Avin_16040 gene when the bacterial cells were attached to the Oryza sativa root surface. An Avin_16040 deletion mutant demonstrated reduced cellular adherence to the root surface, surface hydrophobicity, and biofilm formation compared to those of the wild type. By atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis of the cell surface topography, the deletion mutant displayed a cell surface architectural pattern that was different from that of the wild type. Escherichia coli transformed with the wild-type Avin_16040 gene displayed on its cell surface organized motifs which looked like the S-layer monomers of A. vinelandii. The recombinant E. coli also demonstrated enhanced adhesion to the root surface.

  20. A novel member of the split betaalphabeta fold: Solution structure of the hypothetical protein YML108W from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Liao, Jack C C; Cort, John R; Yee, Adelinda; Kennedy, Michael A; Edwards, Aled M; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H

    2003-05-01

    As part of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium pilot project focused on small eukaryotic proteins and protein domains, we have determined the NMR structure of the protein encoded by ORF YML108W from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. YML108W belongs to one of the numerous structural proteomics targets whose biological function is unknown. Moreover, this protein does not have sequence similarity to any other protein. The NMR structure of YML108W consists of a four-stranded beta-sheet with strand order 2143 and two alpha-helices, with an overall topology of betabetaalphabetabetaalpha. Strand beta1 runs parallel to beta4, and beta2:beta1 and beta4:beta3 pairs are arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Although this fold belongs to the split betaalphabeta family, it appears to be unique among this family; it is a novel arrangement of secondary structure, thereby expanding the universe of protein folds.

  1. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Zhang, Xuejun; Kinch, Lisa; Leybourne, Matthew; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (Texas-D); (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2009-01-26

    The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0{angstrom} resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric 'lids' formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The six PII-like domains form two trimeric

  2. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

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    Leybourne Matthew

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. Results The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0Å resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric "lids" formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. Conclusion SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The

  3. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  4. Hypothetical constructs, hypothetical questions, and the expert witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Stanley L; Titcomb, Caroline; Sams, David M; Dickson, Kara; Benda, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Professor John Henry Wigmore in 1940 described the hypothetical question as an intolerable obstruction of truth. Since that time, the nature and application of the hypothetical question in the courtroom, as well as responses to this line of questioning during expert testimony, have been sources of controversy. Governed by legal philosophical foundations, the hypothetical construct addresses what there is, in a general sense, and what can or ought to be. Alexy (2004) has described the nature of legal philosophy as the epistemological question of what we can know. This article begins by examining the philosophical underpinnings, legal parameters, and teaching purposes of posing hypothetical queries. A social-psychological backdrop for the use of hypothetical questions is then discussed followed by a broader discussion of the hypothetical question's role in court procedures. This paper identifies hypothetical questions used in court as devices to elicit information, or as predictions that potentially change underlying factual interpretations of evidence. In particular, on cross examination hypothetical questions seek to make opposing experts assume facts that are incongruent with their conclusions or opinions. Sometimes in these situations, experts are led to re-evaluate opinions based on alternative understandings of events and behaviors. Thus, this paper's final aim is to explore a foundational understanding of hypothetical questions asked of expert witnesses with special reference to mental health issues. Options for responding to hypothetical questions on the stand are considered along the dimensions of assertiveness-passivity, compliance-resistance, and possible redefinitions of the hypothetical issues.

  5. The hypothetical protein 'All4779', and not the annotated 'Alr0088' and 'Alr7579' proteins, is the major typical single-stranded DNA binding protein of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirti, Anurag; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins are essential for all DNA-dependent cellular processes. Typical SSB proteins have an N-terminal Oligonucleotide-Binding (OB) fold, a Proline/Glycine rich region, followed by a C-terminal acidic tail. In the genome of the heterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as coding for SSB, but are truncated and have only the OB-fold. In silico analysis of whole genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 revealed the presence of another ORF 'all4779', annotated as a hypothetical protein, but having an N-terminal OB-fold, a P/G-rich region and a C-terminal acidic tail. Biochemical characterisation of all three purified recombinant proteins revealed that they exist either as monomer or dimer and bind ssDNA, but differently. The All4779 bound ssDNA in two binding modes i.e. (All4779)35 and (All4779)66 depending on salt concentration and with a binding affinity similar to that of Escherichia coli SSB. On the other hand, Alr0088 bound in a single binding mode of 50-mer and Alr7579 only to large stretches of ssDNA, suggesting that All4779, in all likelihood, is the major typical bacterial SSB in Anabaena. Overexpression of All4779 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 led to enhancement of tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses, such as γ-rays, UV-irradiation, desiccation and mitomycinC exposure. The tolerance appears to be a consequence of reduced DNA damage or efficient DNA repair due to increased availability of All4779. The ORF all4779 is proposed to be re-annotated as Anabaena ssb gene.

  6. The hypothetical protein 'All4779', and not the annotated 'Alr0088' and 'Alr7579' proteins, is the major typical single-stranded DNA binding protein of the cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. PCC7120.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Kirti

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB proteins are essential for all DNA-dependent cellular processes. Typical SSB proteins have an N-terminal Oligonucleotide-Binding (OB fold, a Proline/Glycine rich region, followed by a C-terminal acidic tail. In the genome of the heterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120, alr0088 and alr7579 are annotated as coding for SSB, but are truncated and have only the OB-fold. In silico analysis of whole genome of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 revealed the presence of another ORF 'all4779', annotated as a hypothetical protein, but having an N-terminal OB-fold, a P/G-rich region and a C-terminal acidic tail. Biochemical characterisation of all three purified recombinant proteins revealed that they exist either as monomer or dimer and bind ssDNA, but differently. The All4779 bound ssDNA in two binding modes i.e. (All477935 and (All477966 depending on salt concentration and with a binding affinity similar to that of Escherichia coli SSB. On the other hand, Alr0088 bound in a single binding mode of 50-mer and Alr7579 only to large stretches of ssDNA, suggesting that All4779, in all likelihood, is the major typical bacterial SSB in Anabaena. Overexpression of All4779 in Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120 led to enhancement of tolerance to DNA-damaging stresses, such as γ-rays, UV-irradiation, desiccation and mitomycinC exposure. The tolerance appears to be a consequence of reduced DNA damage or efficient DNA repair due to increased availability of All4779. The ORF all4779 is proposed to be re-annotated as Anabaena ssb gene.

  7. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L David Kuykendall

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti strain 1021, a nitrogen-fixing, root-nodulating bacterial microsymbiont of alfalfa, has a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids including 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential 'accessory' genes for nitrogen fixation (nif, nodulation and host specificity (nod. A related bacterium, psyllid-vectored 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus,' is an obligate phytopathogen with a reduced genome that was previously analyzed for genes orthologous to genes on the S. meliloti circular chromosome. In general, proteins encoded by pSymA genes are more similar in sequence alignment to those encoded by S. meliloti chromosomal orthologs than to orthologous proteins encoded by genes carried on the 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' genome. Only two 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins were identified as having orthologous proteins encoded on pSymA but not also encoded on the chromosome of S. meliloti. These two orthologous gene pairs encode a Na(+/K+ antiporter (shared with intracellular pathogens of the family Bartonellacea and a Co++, Zn++ and Cd++ cation efflux protein that is shared with the phytopathogen Agrobacterium. Another shared protein, a redox-regulated K+ efflux pump may regulate cytoplasmic pH and homeostasis. The pSymA and 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' orthologs of the latter protein are more highly similar in amino acid alignment compared with the alignment of the pSymA-encoded protein with its S. meliloti chromosomal homolog. About 182 pSymA encoded proteins have sequence similarity (≤ E-10 with 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins, often present as multiple orthologs of single 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins. These proteins are involved with amino acid uptake, cell surface structure, chaperonins, electron transport, export of bioactive molecules, cellular homeostasis, regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and synthesis of amino acids and metabolic cofactors. The presence of multiple orthologs defies mutational

  8. Structure of the hypothetical protein Ton1535 from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 reveals unique structural properties by a left-handed helical turn in normal α-solenoid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jae-Hee; Kim, Yi-Seul; Rojvirija, Catleya; Cha, Hyung Jin; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Ha, Sung Chul

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of Ton1535, a hypothetical protein from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1, was determined at 2.3 Å resolution. With two antiparallel α-helices in a helix-turn-helix motif as a repeating unit, Ton1535 consists of right-handed coiled N- and C-terminal regions that are stacked together using helix bundles containing a left-handed helical turn. One left-handed helical turn in the right-handed coiled structure produces two unique structural properties. One is the presence of separated concave grooves rather than one continuous concave groove, and the other is the contribution of α-helices on the convex surfaces of the N-terminal region to the extended surface of the concave groove of the C-terminal region and vice versa.

  9. The Activation of Phytophthora Effector Avr3b by Plant Cyclophilin is Required for the Nudix Hydrolase Activity of Avr3b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Jing, Maofeng; Huang, Jie; Yang, Jin; Xia, Yeqiang; Kong, Liang; Ye, Wenwu; Xiong, Qin; Qiao, Yongli; Dong, Suomeng; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete an arsenal of effector proteins to impair host immunity. Some effectors possess enzymatic activities that can modify their host targets. Previously, we demonstrated that a Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector Avr3b acts as a Nudix hydrolase when expressed in planta; and this enzymatic activity is required for full virulence of P. sojae strain P6497 in soybean (Glycine max). Interestingly, recombinant Avr3b produced by E. coli does not have the hydrolase activity unless it was incubated with plant protein extracts. Here, we report the activation of Avr3b by a prolyl-peptidyl isomerase (PPIase), cyclophilin, in plant cells. Avr3b directly interacts with soybean cyclophilin GmCYP1, which activates the hydrolase activity of Avr3b in a PPIase activity-dependent manner. Avr3b contains a putative Glycine-Proline (GP) motif; which is known to confer cyclophilin-binding in other protein substrates. Substitution of the Proline (P132) in the putative GP motif impaired the interaction of Avr3b with GmCYP1; as a result, the mutant Avr3bP132A can no longer be activated by GmCYP1, and is also unable to promote Phytophthora infection. Avr3b elicits hypersensitive response (HR) in soybean cultivars producing the resistance protein Rps3b, but Avr3bP132A lost its ability to trigger HR. Furthermore, silencing of GmCYP1 rendered reduced cell death triggered by Avr3b, suggesting that GmCYP1-mediated Avr3b maturation is also required for Rps3b recognition. Finally, cyclophilins of Nicotiana benthamiana can also interact with Avr3b and activate its enzymatic activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that cyclophilin is a "helper" that activates the enzymatic activity of Avr3b after it is delivered into plant cells; as such, cyclophilin is required for the avirulence and virulence functions of Avr3b.

  10. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 518319094 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7103 MKSGYPKNNNAYIELLKGFPPRPITSHEEFVATQKVIDSLIDKKGQLTRDEQDYLNILGTIVYEYEEKQVKIPDIYGIDLLKALLSELNLSTKDLIPIFKTESHVSNVLNGKIDLTVEDISKLANFFKISPAAFVKK

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 504994187 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Microcoleus sp. PCC 7113 MLAISNELLSTALNSMKLSSPLKAQNQWPTFEDILQNLHAQGIYIHSEQLAEFMLGHGLPVHLRYVPAHLRSKAMEVNQNYQGDMVLEVEESNSPCWDFSWMENIQKPFIHDSLGDRTDWIEDIEQPSWDYSWMK

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 655829624 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. CC9616 MGETGGHCGSKPKRIAIGVAPLATISIGIVPMGVICIGVVPMGVVSIGVVAMGVINIAIVGMGLLAVGVNTMGVITAGPMSMGLIQIRSTTNPRYLAYPSKEQAEEQAEKIGCSGVHRMGDVYWMPCAEHPQ

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515863728 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Geminocystis herdmanii MNRINKLVSITSAIICSGITTITSQLPAVAGDVSPLCENLNMGTQILISTKEFNAAICDKYYIEPQSGCPMPLEYFYVGQSRKTGESIVLPASDVSTSNPFMRIYKAQNGNYTYQIASSGAYGGNSWTSLSVFNKGY

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515868907 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Nodosilinea nodulosa MRDIVSLIYTGFPAGVVGIVLLLFRVGIGVLFMRHGYPKLTHLKTWANSLNMPIFLCFLSALSMFAGGACLIL...GFLTPLASVAILGSMVVAVGQHIAQGKPFMARDPYLIPDGQYEGPSGKGEPPSWEKAFMYCLILMVLAVLGPGFASLDAVLFAP

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 518320325 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7103 MDYVHPFQMELHKLESMIVHVQYADIKEVDKTLASNDAVSTQAVGEEGGTKVSTRALGEEGGNILTTYAVGEEGGNILTTYAVGEEGGDKVTTQAVGEEGGTRVTTYAVGEEGGGRVTTKAVGEEGGSIIRR

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495548120 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1612:454 ... NUDIX hydrolase Cyanothece sp. CCY0110 MSTEKELPIYLQQNLFYRGRKFNFDVNKLRLPNGVEGNWECIRHPGGALAVPITKEG...QLVLVKQYRFAVEKRILEFPAGTLEVNEEADLTIKREIQEETGYEAKKWDYLGKFPLAPGYSDEYIYAFLAQELEKSEKPPEQDDDEDIEVFLMSFEEFEKAILSGKIIDGKTIASFFMAKLFLDKN

  18. Assessing Hypothetical Gravity Control Propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Millis, M G

    2006-01-01

    Gauging the benefits of hypothetical gravity control propulsion is difficult, but addressable. The major challenge is that such breakthroughs are still only notional concepts rather than being specific methods from which performance can be rigorously quantified. A recent assessment by Tajmar and Bertolami used the rocket equation to correct naive misconceptions, but a more fundamental analysis requires the use of energy as the basis for comparison. The energy of a rocket is compared to an idealized space drive for the following cases: Earth-to-orbit, interstellar transit, and levitation. The space drive uses 3.6 times less energy for Earth to orbit. For deep space travel, space drive energy scales as the square of delta-v, while rocket energy scales exponentially. This has the effect of rendering a space drive 150-orders-of-magnitude better than a 17,000-sec Specific Impulse rocket for sending a modest 5000 kg probe to traverse 5 light-years in 50 years. Indefinite levitation, which is impossible for a rocket...

  19. Structural and Kinetic Studies of the Human Nudix Hydrolase MTH1 Reveal the Mechanism for Its Broad Substrate Specificity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waz, Shaimaa; Nakamura, Teruya; Hirata, Keisuke; Koga-Ogawa, Yukari; Chirifu, Mami; Arimori, Takao; Tamada, Taro; Ikemizu, Shinji; Nakabeppu, Yusaku; Yamagata, Yuriko

    2017-01-01

    The human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1, human NUDT1) hydrolyzes oxidatively damaged nucleoside triphosphates and is the main enzyme responsible for nucleotide sanitization. hMTH1 recently has received attention as an anticancer target because hMTH1 blockade leads to accumulation of oxidized nucleotides in the cell, resulting in mutations and death of cancer cells. Unlike Escherichia coli MutT, which shows high substrate specificity for 8-oxoguanine nucleotides, hMTH1 has broad substrate specificity for oxidized nucleotides, including 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-oxo-dATP. However, the reason for this broad substrate specificity remains unclear. Here, we determined crystal structures of hMTH1 in complex with 8-oxo-dGTP or 2-oxo-dATP at neutral pH. These structures based on high quality data showed that the base moieties of two substrates are located on the similar but not the same position in the substrate binding pocket and adopt a different hydrogen-bonding pattern, and both triphosphate moieties bind to the hMTH1 Nudix motif (i.e. the hydrolase motif) similarly and align for the hydrolysis reaction. We also performed kinetic assays on the substrate-binding Asp-120 mutants (D120N and D120A), and determined their crystal structures in complex with the substrates. Analyses of bond lengths with high-resolution X-ray data and the relationship between the structure and enzymatic activity revealed that hMTH1 recognizes the different oxidized nucleotides via an exchange of the protonation state at two neighboring aspartate residues (Asp-119 and Asp-120) in its substrate binding pocket. To our knowledge, this mechanism of broad substrate recognition by enzymes has not been reported previously and may have relevance for anticancer drug development strategies targeting hMTH1. PMID:28035004

  20. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    Hypothetical bias in stated preference studies is an essential problem which reduces the validity of the obtained welfare estimates for non-market goods. In the attempt to mitigate hypothetical bias, a type of reminder known as Cheap Talk, has been applied in previous studies and found to overall...... eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  1. Characterization of mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase, a Nudix hydrolase encoded by the Nudt14 gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heyen, Candy A.; Tagliabracci, Vincent S.; Zhai, Lanmin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Roach, Peter J., E-mail: proach@iupui.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2009-12-25

    Recombinant mouse UDP-glucose pyrophosphatase (UGPPase), encoded by the Nudt14 gene, was produced in Escherichia coli and purified close to homogeneity. The enzyme catalyzed the conversion of [{beta}-{sup 32}P]UDP-glucose to [{sup 32}P]glucose-1-P and UMP, confirming that it hydrolyzed the pyrophosphate of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar to generate glucose-1-P and UMP. The enzyme was also active toward ADP-ribose. Activity is dependent on the presence of Mg{sup 2+} and was greatest at alkaline pH above 8. Kinetic analysis indicated a K{sub m} of {approx}4 mM for UDP-glucose and {approx}0.3 mM for ADP-ribose. Based on V{sub max}/K{sub m} values, the enzyme was {approx}20-fold more active toward ADP-ribose. UGPPase behaves as a dimer in solution and can be cross-linked to generate a species of M{sub r} 54,000 from a monomer of 30,000 as judged by SDS-PAGE. The dimerization was not affected by the presence of glucose-1-P or UDP-glucose. Using antibodies raised against the recombinant protein, Western analysis indicated that UGPPase was widely expressed in mouse tissues, including skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, heart, lung, fat, heart and pancreas with a lower level in brain. It was generally present as a doublet when analyzed by SDS-PAGE, suggesting the occurrence of some form of post-translational modification. Efforts to interconvert the species by adding or inhibiting phosphatase activity were unsuccessful, leaving the nature of the modification unknown. Sequence alignments and database searches revealed related proteins in species as distant as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans.

  2. UV hyper-resistance in Prochlorococcus MED4 results from a single base pair deletion just upstream of an operon encoding nudix hydrolase and photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburne, Marcia S; Holmbeck, Brianne M; Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Steen, Robert; Huang, Katherine; Kelly, Libusha; Coe, Allison; Waraska, Kristin; Gagne, Andrew; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to solar radiation can cause mortality in natural communities of pico-phytoplankton, both at the surface and to a depth of at least 30 m. DNA damage is a significant cause of death, mainly due to cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, which can be lethal if not repaired. While developing a UV mutagenesis protocol for the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus, we isolated a UV-hyper-resistant variant of high light-adapted strain MED4. The hyper-resistant strain was constitutively upregulated for expression of the mutT-phrB operon, encoding nudix hydrolase and photolyase, both of which are involved in repair of DNA damage that can be caused by UV light. Photolyase (PhrB) breaks pyrimidine dimers typically caused by UV exposure, using energy from visible light in the process known as photoreactivation. Nudix hydrolase (MutT) hydrolyses 8-oxo-dGTP, an aberrant form of GTP that results from oxidizing conditions, including UV radiation, thus impeding mispairing and mutagenesis by preventing incorporation of the aberrant form into DNA. These processes are error-free, in contrast to error-prone SOS dark repair systems that are widespread in bacteria. The UV-hyper-resistant strain contained only a single mutation: a 1 bp deletion in the intergenic region directly upstream of the mutT-phrB operon. Two subsequent enrichments for MED4 UV-hyper-resistant strains from MED4 wild-type cultures gave rise to strains containing this same 1 bp deletion, affirming its connection to the hyper-resistant phenotype. These results have implications for Prochlorococcus DNA repair mechanisms, genome stability and possibly lysogeny. PMID:20345942

  3. Reducing hypothetical bias in choice experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladenburg, Jacob; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Nielsen, Rasmus Christian Fejer

    eliminate some of the hypothetical bias. The present paper tests an addition to Cheap Talk, an Opt-Out Reminder. The Opt-Out Reminder is an objective short script presented prior to the choice sets, prompting the respondent to choose the opt-out alternative, if he/she finds the proposed policy generated...... alternatives in a choice set too expensive. The results suggest that adding an Opt-Out Reminder to Cheap Talk can in fact reduce hypothetical bias even further and reduces some of the ineffectiveness of CT in relation to the survey bid range and experienced respondents....

  4. Reactions to Hypothetical, Jealousy Producing Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gary L.

    1982-01-01

    Asked subjects (N=220) how they would feel about their mates' behavior in eight hypothetical situations designed to measure jealousy. Responses indicated that jealousy is likely to be a major issue. Sex role orientation is most consistently related to jealousy with sex role traditional subjects being the most jealous. (Author)

  5. Salicylic acid-independent ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 signaling in Arabidopsis immunity and cell death is regulated by the monooxygenase FMO1 and the Nudix hydrolase NUDT7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Michael; Gobbato, Enrico; Bednarek, Pawel; Debey, Svenja; Schultze, Joachim L; Bautor, Jaqueline; Parker, Jane E

    2006-04-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) controls defense activation and programmed cell death conditioned by intracellular Toll-related immune receptors that recognize specific pathogen effectors. EDS1 is also needed for basal resistance to invasive pathogens by restricting the progression of disease. In both responses, EDS1, assisted by its interacting partner, PHYTOALEXIN-DEFICIENT4 (PAD4), regulates accumulation of the phenolic defense molecule salicylic acid (SA) and other as yet unidentified signal intermediates. An Arabidopsis whole genome microarray experiment was designed to identify genes whose expression depends on EDS1 and PAD4, irrespective of local SA accumulation, and potential candidates of an SA-independent branch of EDS1 defense were found. We define two new immune regulators through analysis of corresponding Arabidopsis loss-of-function insertion mutants. FLAVIN-DEPENDENT MONOOXYGENASE1 (FMO1) positively regulates the EDS1 pathway, and one member (NUDT7) of a family of cytosolic Nudix hydrolases exerts negative control of EDS1 signaling. Analysis of fmo1 and nudt7 mutants alone or in combination with sid2-1, a mutation that severely depletes pathogen-induced SA production, points to SA-independent functions of FMO1 and NUDT7 in EDS1-conditioned disease resistance and cell death. We find instead that SA antagonizes initiation of cell death and stunting of growth in nudt7 mutants.

  6. Hypothetical conflict situations with friends and peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Danijela S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with age and sex differences in preferred strategies of conflict resolution in friendship and peer relationships. The study was conducted on the sample of 286 adolescents. Conflict resolution strategies have been investigated by the method of hypothetical conflict situations. For the purposes of this research, we have created an instrument consisting of 20 hypothetical situations, with the following subjects of conflict: breaking the agreement, non-compliance with opinion differences, provocations, dishonesty and stubbornness. Conflict resolution strategies we examined were giving in, withdrawal, competition and problem solving. The results have shown that problem solving is the dominant strategy of adolescents in conflict with friends, while in peer conflicts they more often opt for competition. Age differences are reflected in the fact that older adolescents are more likely to choose problem solving than younger, whereas younger adolescents are more likely to choose a retreat (withdrawal strategy than older. Girls are more prone to choosing problem solving than boys, who, on the other hand, tend to withdraw more than girls. Also, gender of the other person in the conflict is proved to be important - in conflict with male peers, adolescents choose competition to a greater extent and withdraw to a minor extent, compared to when they are in conflict with female peers. The results have practical implications as well. In programs for teaching constructive conflict resolution that are designed for younger adolescents there should be more emphasis on empowerment and training for assertive behaviour. In addition, when teaching about constructive conflict resolution strategies, it is important to consider the gender of adolescents as well as the gender of the person with whom they are in conflict.

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159477915 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5883 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_192655 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MSSSTLRAEAPEFYPSYMYAATEYYEAGSEEGITEEDLEELEALEAWVEQMAALDEMEREHLIATALSEAEPSQILEAEMRAMTHEEQEAAAASKRKGDARHRHHHKH ...

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 498160775 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10037:2105 ... hypothetical protein Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 MKSHHILTEIHLYHPPQSLGHLYLADSPQPGAQLEVAGQQYTVLERRHRYQLQANHYQLHHIALYVQPALSAINTMGSIGNENCEYNAHSALLRCAINPDGPCQDCVFFLPKTNLSPF

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159468287 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3411 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_171026, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii ASEFLAWYRRCKEQSPATTSGMRKLHEYH...AKYRLFWVPSASGAATSVPGAPYAMEFWYDAPSDTVVDGVAQLAAMSALPFTVSTGLAMQFDGQSASLSLMEAFREGEDGYLTFTRFVAGAQSPQEAEALAAAGVSSPHEAALFGSLSVTPSDAEVLPPPPPPPTPPTFEEK ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 226528824 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :5968 4577:5968 hypothetical protein Zea mays MLATTPAPASGVPPCRARPAVHGRRERTAGARSPAKLAPARRPSQPARRPLRGGLRLASARRPASVACSRLAWPSPARRFPARCGSLQRGKVGLAVGPHQAIDILGRVFPWRFRSYARSSPSEEDEEVTAL ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 493499550 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TLTNQSNMDFSGKNLSGTSFAAADARDANFEGADMSGTILTKATFLRTNLKGADFTKTFADRVLFDGADLTNAIFVEAIATSSSFGDTIITGADFSDAIIDRFQVKKMCKRADGINPVTGISTRESLGCRD ... ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. PCC 7335 MKVGLMKRELKALDKIASFVVGFCPKLSTLLKLASLLLIVFIWSTPVLAQDNTVDY

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427717181 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Cal7507_1892 Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MNGINKGRIFDPLVEPMQYPLELTFKFWALAPQISVVDSQGKLVFYVKQK...LFKLKEAITVFGDVEQSRPLYYIKADRIIDFSARYDFTDSQGNYLGGVKRRGLRSLWRARYDIFDGDVSILNIQEKNPWVKVADALFAEIPVLGMFTGYVFNPVYLVNRTDGSVVMRLEKIPSFLSRRFIIKAVDQISDREEQQLLLSLVMMLLLERNRG

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 495456740 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Moorea producens MSNIYVFHQGRGDSGWLWYNVFDGNEWVGDQQVPKTGMTGDPSAVVYNDLLYVFHQGRGDSGWLWYNVF...DGNDWAGDQEIGKTGITAGPSAVVYNDLLYVFHQGRGDSGWLWYNVFDGNEWAGDQEVPKTGITSSPSAVVYNDLLYVFHQGRGDSGWLWYNVFDGNEWAGDKEVRGT...GLTDDPDALVYNGQIYVFHEGRGDNGWVWCNIFDGNEWAGDHKIHKTGITAGPSAVVYNDQIYLLHQGRDDSGWMWCNVFDGSEWVGDEEVPKTGISEGPGAVLY

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159491002 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_127770 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MFPGMPAGPGGPGGAGAFDFSALQSALNDPSIKQMAEQIANDPSFKEIAKQMQESFGAMMGGMP...PPGGAPGGDARAAGALPGGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPAGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGMPGGMPGGMPGMMPGMMPPGFDPSKYMEAMQGMFQNP

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255606958 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 987:191 3988:191 conserved hypothetical protein, partial Ricinus communis MQDPSPQDALLENKVTGYMEKRERQMSSKVTSQWVPAVGREENTKGDLAEILVEIEHMEKDAHSSFSLVEGRRGLHAENGYQHSDEVINQKKESSVIGQQKE ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242040443 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 101 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_01g030970 Sorghum bicolor MAGAGEGGDELKLLGNLTSPFVLRVKLALSFKGLSYEYIAEDLQNKSNLLLSSNPVHKKVPVLIHKGEPIC...ESQVIVQYIDEAFQGTDGPSLLPADPYERAVARFWAAYVFDKLLPAWLQSFMGKTD

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242035287 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 101 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_01g031050 Sorghum bicolor MASGSEEKAAAVRVIGGWACPYAIRVFAALKLKGVEYEFLQEPAGR...KSELLLKSNPVYKKIPVLLHHGNPICESMIIIQYIDEVWASYQPAILPTDPYARANERFWAQYVDDKIAPAFLVLRGLTNG

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242037897 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 101 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_01g006000 Sorghum bicolor MAGEKKQGLQLLDFWVSPFGQRCRIALDEKGLPYEYLEQDDLLGNKSELLLHANPVHKKIPVLLHDGRPIC...ESLLIVQYLDEAFPATPPATRTRARFWADYVDKKLYDCGTRLWKLNGDGHAQARTE

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302838522 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :31 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_60851, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis LYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLYRSRLQERLYRPRLQEKLYRPRLQEKLYRPR...LQERLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQEKLYRPRLQEKLYRPRLQERLYRPRLQERLY ...

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427719495 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Cal7507_4279 Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MGFGYLAWDALFLQGSIDNQKPKIILFINRNNHMANLNSSHATKQLISGYCGIIFGSLGIHKFILGYAPEGFIMLVISVVGGSFTYGFTFLIMQLVGLVEGMIYLNKSHEEFVNTYFINKQGWF

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 494161200 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RGQWRRHRRRQEQLNASFGSARRFSHEEFLALPTEQKQLLMRVRHHHYLDYFDHLVADNPTIHATGDISPYYAQLHADRLRHIRRQLRRRGFTVKLIFLLRDPVDRIQ...45 ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. RS9917 MAADRIGVVTEKLFILGLGAQRAGTTWLHQQLNRCDAVDMGFTKEYNALVNPKASL

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357442357 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3137 3880:13137 hypothetical protein MTR_1g087730 Medicago truncatula MEGYGYGSDHGSFGSERRIEIVSGRSYGFSQSYYVGRSESTGEVTRASHDGAAPVAKPWSFNDAATKRRKRIARYKVYAVEGKVKATFRNGIRWIKHTCSRIVHGY ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 494157397 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. RS9916 MGSGLVLLHQRLSWIRRWLGVFPVWLGAVCSDCLYILPGQIDRCCMVAASGSNELLAVAVAETERWLRSPDHQQVMRFQLPREGDTSSLALMEVRSVMGGLPMLRWLTRQAAISTWTGCRQNGWSRCHPQW

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159465986 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available GRVQRLLVSDLTQAAAHLGIHVTQPFAPAACELEPDQVAAAAGDGDMVLARWQVCGRPVADEDSGLVALALALQLQEAADSYYAAALGPDFDTCPTRLSGLVAALEVVRAPGTAWECVTAAHLQPLTGPCSSVRVSAGASTVLVDDSSASGANST ... ...749 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_144820 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MCIQLVLRLAVTEAFGSKRPLLSPHRQSGGRARLDSGSC

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357469341 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :11150 3880:11150 hypothetical protein MTR_4g022090 Medicago truncatula MSLLVLKVQSSFFRSKAVPFLFQIQVSHFRWLKCTHVSYKSSESESKPRTTRQLNKHIFRFSLQSVRSKQKNFSDSSRTRRTQNPNRFQKVTNSSSFSVFRINSQRFV ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 518306979 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 ... hypothetical protein Prochlorococcus sp. W7 MKIVKKSRLILLILFCFSFNANFVKSYSEELTKLNLNEEINKGYLLIGIKQYLGREKNIFSQNRLLSFQTKKGSMLKIISSN...GLEYKAKKVDILFNKVPLETTLLIERLVSDPFASFESAKRASLPLEEKGFDPKITYPNDWEIWLPNRVKNLVNQNFKLKKISIEEEIVPFIDNEYISQKLDSITRISSN...LLRDFIFDKNNKYLGTKHYLFRWTKKISSNQIINLINEQNSSFQKDKTIDLKIIERGESGRVTKLEIRQSGRLEPLTLNKDDIRKYLKFLPSNLFIIDKLNDDFWVFTGGGFGHGVGLSQSGAIEMAKLGFNYERILGHYYEGTNITDFKSIKRWSYE

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159479288 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_105488, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PGSRDRDQGPGSRDRDQGQGPGTRDQGPGTRDRVQGPGSRDQGPGPRDRDQGPGTRDQGPGTRDRDQGPGSRDQGPGTRDRDQGQGPGTRDQGPGTRDQGPGTRD ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357465549 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 880:7291 hypothetical protein MTR_3g101880 Medicago truncatula MVNSTSTFHIPQFEGCFYILLNPRDSYDMMKHLLPSGYMGPSTSSFHAYIERPTFSHVHNFAKCKPLITIDQLLHRVQRIMHDNVMTHRFMNVVFTKIDFVIQKDLAVQLVACLPSIHV ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497475902 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 51 ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. BL107 MKRDGDCASNQKRIAIGVAPMGTIAIGIVPMGVISIGVVPMGVVSIGVVAMGVFNAAIVGMGLIAVGFNTMGVLTAGPMSMGLIQIRSTTNPRYLAYPSREQAEEQAAKLGCQGVHRMGDRYWMPCNEHPQ

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302837446 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:4777 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_74585 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MSAGVEARALFRAFLREGRRFPNYNIREYIQRRAKEGFQEAASITDITAVDALLQSGRQELEVVKRQSLVYRLYGRKVKNVLELDLAFKPGVKPGDMSA ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427737916 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Riv7116_4492 Rivularia sp. PCC 7116 MATQTNTTPEEELNQPQPQQAVNNTPPSDSSAGTEADTPAAGTETDAPAAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAGTEADTP...AAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAGTEADTPAAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAGTEADTPAAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAGTETDTPAAETETDTPAAGTEADTP

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242043558 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ISGILSSHRGPGRRFCIPRDYLENDARPAATLDAWLRSPALDGLQELDFHYGSTWSRLQHQGSLSPAHNESPESRVTNAWH...hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_02g008020 Sorghum bicolor MAASAALLRTKEGGRTQAIASRWRHIWSCAPLNIDLHDRPPIQRRIPLAR

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159468384 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3436 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_180911 Chlamydomonas reinhardtii MTTEEPLSCSKIRSWNITVYSFTLKGLPGCLEPSHSFWVKEREGEWGLKCLSETFSHELVENVPGREEVSNLLKKGGSSNKSQKGGWICCERNCFLCQHKKCQVLI ...

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 479129932 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2328 696747:2328 ... hypothetical protein Arthrospira platensis NIES-39 MSLIHLEKSVLTFHFKEMIEDGHGNHPLTWVGLGVLVLGPKLLPAITKISQTNTKTVSKPRLSSSRRREIPLSQWIAEAKERELPDSIYKPMIAEAFNHGNAHELSVMN

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427717921 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Cal7507_2660 Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MGHWQSSKFQAQRLKFRVPSSKFQVPSSKFQVPRLKAQVPRSEAQVPGSEADVPGSEAQVPSSEADVPGSEA...QVPSSEAQVPSSEADVPGSEAQVPGSEAQVPSSEAQVPSSEAQVPSSEAQVPSSKT

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159466577 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_180870, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii SPSAMAVDAGAGPAGGAMAAGVAAAPAVVGETVVGARAGPSGSGGVAGVDMADAGP...AGGAMAAGVAAAAAVAGETVVGARAGSSGSGGVAGVDMADAGPAGGAMTAGVAAAAAVVGETVVGARAGPSGSGGVAGVDMADAGPAGGAMAAATVAML ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 518327651 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available hypothetical protein Calothrix sp. PCC 7103 MLLHLGIPQTVQGQVTDLRTASAIGTASLGDRIYAFARGLGDNRIYHTSAADGQRFGRWVEMP...GGGLTNAAIASSSLGNRIYVFIKGMDNRIYHTSAEDGQAFGGWVEMPGGGLTNASIASASLGNRIYVFIRGMDNRIYHTSAEDGQPFGSWVEMPGGGTTNVPLGAASLGNRIYVFAKGIDDKRIYHTSAADGQPFGNWSVLR

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427711467 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 ... hypothetical protein Syn6312_0311 Synechococcus sp. PCC 6312 MANPNPFLPPKFLDSQFERLDDTEDKLSPQPLQVRVEMPVYQAVRAMGKHKTPWLRRVITEAAQRELMNPSPSEPIGGLDDVPKLGATTRPGDVAKALPVQKRRGRKPKGDSNE

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302852767 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_43342, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis GEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMRPRGEMWPRGEMRPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMW...PRGEMRPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMRPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMWPRGEMRPRGEMWPRG ...

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 497468512 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 313612:949 ... hypothetical protein Lyngbya sp. PCC 8106 MKNFLKLIQQTESMPPVINQQELSHRIRENAVHDLDSLCADFQHMQSVVKSIQRNYEAVLEENKQLKLMLKDLVKNCYCLPGNRCDRCQHILKSLLSKNTEERSSAVSDHQEIVEQLRKRQSRIKA

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 653017235 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 264:2718 ... hypothetical protein Leptolyngbya sp. PCC 6406 MSWYELPVPEGMPEGLVNIRLDLVQRDKALTGKQYRATTKDQFAAPGFTPNRDPNRAVNVVRMDFVIGSINMPRCLKQSRIKDVGHANGVRPGGQRGRGKWLMIAVHDLRTPISINMAKL

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159466610 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2419 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_123820, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii RVQCRLVDMPAPCLPPFLPTCPHKPRRIPMPCTDAH...ELVDMPAPCLPPFLPDNLPARAPQAPHAVTDAHECMQCRLVDMPAPCLPPFLPKCPHKPRRLPMPCTDAHECNMPAPCLPPFLPKCPHKPRRLPMPCTDAHECMQCRLVDMPAPCLPAFLPNCPHKPRRLPMPCTDAHECSAGW ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 428222362 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syn7502_02412 Synechococcus sp. PCC 7502 MKLTPYLFLTITVTAIIGTSVWQSSAQMNKMMNHNMDEMSMELGAADANLDLRFID...AMIPHHQGAVQMAKEALKKSKRPEIQKLATAIIKAQQEEIAQLQKWRKLWYPNMSSTPMAWHGEMGHMMTMSASQQKAMMMSMDLGAGDAKFDLRFIDAMIPHHEGALTMAQEALSKSKRPEIQKLAKAIITSQKAEIIEMQKWRKAWY

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255084297 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TLVKSKKLKNNVVHCPVKPIDLTSLCMSHDGRFEMLDALFEQYGDDIFVSNLAPMDSQHGSITMTVDGEVLPPFAKTVLKPGSKVQIGDEIYEVNRNVHAHA ... ... hypothetical protein MICPUN_106141 Micromonas sp. RCC299 MFTALTSIVPTRVALKTRTKPTHKVRSGVVAYTNWMLDGVGCSGARSDDS

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 554637619 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2386 1183438:2386 ... hypothetical protein GKIL_3310 Gloeobacter kilaueensis JS1 MSSHDVDRRLSDILDAASSIQQYTANLSELQFISGQQVVDAVNYNLIKIGEAVANLPEDFKEANPDIPWQAIKRTRNFITIVILWWTPASSGQQSGLICRNL

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 657935082 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NIDLTGVTFVAAEMRGANFQGSNLSNAILTKGILLRANLEGANLSYALVDRVTMDEANLKNAIFTEATLTSSRFYGADITGADFTDAIIDRYQVSLLCDRASGVNPVTGISTRESLGCR ...01 ... hypothetical protein [ Scytonema hofmanni] UTEX 2349 MKKILLRFLSLIVSLLLAALWIIFNPHPAFGQVNTINYSNMSLENRDFS

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78213804 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syncc9605_2296 Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MHRSLLLWIVAMACTTSSVGASQSWKRSLPLQEASQQAVTAANAVINQSGSEECLRGKFSNAILRLSNSCDVSGYSSTECELASKIAGQESKLSMSDMIATSETLLDLLGDSATSN

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855776 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70813, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis HLAPDGHVTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPD...GHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGPCSQARPPRYHHHRHLAPDGHVTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLTPDGHLT

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427719678 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Cal7507_4468 Calothrix sp. PCC 7507 MYSQQLRTAIYGFFKRSHHLQLNCIDLQLNCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLNCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCI...DLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQLSCIDLQSLNYPFLHFTDSFFVVMGTLKI

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 515518985 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Anabaena sp. PCC 7108 MKITLAATTILTLTLGVYTPKVTAAPKKTPKTFQEWCQQKASLPQETRRTVEALLKVTNTQNCSQANQTLSKLTELKLLGNQISDI...QPLSNLTNLTTLDLSENQISDIKPLSNLSNLTGISLFKNQISDIQPLSNLTNLTALVLAGNQISDIQPLSNLTKLNFLYLFKNQISNIKPLSNLSNLNLLYLSENQISDI...KPLSNLTNLTHIHISENQISDIKPLSNLTKLNYLNLWRNQISDIKPLSNLTNLTNLTNLTKLTKLNYLNLWKNQVSDIKPLSNLTNLTYLNLWENPIISKQCLFKDESICKF

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 219362807 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :3008 4577:3008 hypothetical protein Zea mays MPDAAVPWCSLLGPCPAPDYSSSSRRPLCLARIVVPLLPGFPYARARWRCPCSAWPRPPQST...TLLGHGRHAAPWFQLAILPARRSRPARPPTSLCATSSSSLFLQSVFLCWLAGFLLPAHPAHASPCVPCLRAARPSSQPWRRPKLLRVMCPAP

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159464769 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2354 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_114393, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PREPGPHQPRATKYPTPPTASHRSCPAPWASNSPSSPSPTPQLSQPALSHSSCPTPAVPCPLQPPRCSTPAVPLQLSLVPSSHPSCPTPVILWPVPTP ...

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516330315 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8:2913 ... hypothetical protein Oscillatoria sp. PCC 10802 MGRPDFENLHVYQLAEKMANEIWRIVKQWNEFAKDTIGKQIVRAADSVCANIAEGRGRYNGPENKRFVKIARGSLYETINWLRLAYARQLLTIEQVATLKPIIYELTPKLNAYLKSIGNRE

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 293337253 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 77:4785 hypothetical protein Zea mays MADVDVDANNEAEQRTRSEPGTSMSPSSEADDDTASSTPNESPARAFAGHTLEEPPRRRAPSRRSRPVRMLQSVCRSLPLLNPRCGRPMMQAGAC...RIAAPSSRPAAAAAAPSSDSSSSLLTQLIASSSFGGAASSRRRLTGTLFGYRDGRV

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255577163 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :6554 3988:6554 hypothetical protein RCOM_0753050 Ricinus communis MQLGNAFIAILLILILFCISIDFSVASAGLKQNFTIVISQSPWLKNVTENLPHP...VSPFNCGSCGNKCPWGVLCVYGMCGYAEPWPPWPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPHPPPKPPKPWPHRPPQSPPKPIKPWPHHPPKADHEPSQSAMGPSY ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 516258077 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 27:1807 ... hypothetical protein Geitlerinema sp. PCC 7105 MLTVASFLLAIGTCPTLSQQAQAAEIDRDNDAIAQGYEEDFDEEEFSEEDFDEEEFSEEDFDEEEFSEED...FDEEEFSEEDFDEEEFDEGFDEEEFDEGFDEEEFDEEEFSEEDFDEEEFEESFDEEFDEEEFSEEDFDGEFDEEEFSEEDFDEEEFEEEEFEN

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78183671 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syncc9902_0087 Synechococcus sp. CC9902 MKIKNNSMQRITSPLMHENVQLITDINLANRQKTQKINIVGNGP...NESTDSAMLYCLKKYIESKTSDPLNFRGSMNRAISIAYLMNYQCINIFGLDPSTPLSWYHEDERDKILQKEIVVTDYFNAWRDMRIKNLKEFDVRKSEFSLIKSLFYTIYVMNKLFKAKGLNIPKINIVTSDPIVINCCSFFCGDISNVSINRL

  18. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78185554 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syncc9902_1987 Synechococcus sp. CC9902 MAFYRFDPAMALCLESVLDELDAEGRPGLRNSLGLTWIRYSDAN...PEAGDGMGVSWNHQKPIYPASVVKLFYAVAAEQWLQRDLIPDSDELERALREMIADSSNDATGLVLDLLTGTTSGPMLHGEHWLMWQRQRHLVNEWLDTLVWPELELVNCC

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 78211893 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein Syncc9605_0341 Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MAFYRPDPAMAARLEAALDGLDAAGRPGLRNSLAITWVRYDDAAP...EAGQGSGAFWNQDRILYPASVVKLFYAVAVEQWLQRDLIPESDELQRAVRDMIADSSNDATGLVVDLLTGTTSGPALHGERWELWTQQRRLINGWLQSLAWPELEAVNCC

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 493165363 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :828 ... hypothetical protein Synechococcus sp. WH 5701 MAIRNSNSCGCEPGFVAGLALPRQRLTGLEDPSRPDAIWPFAWTVAKVHLPSEDSIALLINPPSARSQNQLHVHILQLRPAWRTALDTDTPVLPEGVAAIKLSHGTVTTADHDSIRAGWIAETQNW

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 428222259 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1655 ... hypothetical protein Syn7502_02289 Synechococcus sp. PCC 7502 MSKKNPSLDRKGVGQNLTTVRTNTTSNLIFHPSIDRLTSDTWTKPSSLLIDAFLADHDQLDLFPVQSFKPQIRSVGINPSCKHCGCKRGYLFKGKLLCCRCDRPVTGGSN

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302857194 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:658 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_108754 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MNDLRTLINKCARETFGGARGMEKSVKRDWWNEDCAAAWNDMMSFRKVVRDPVSGKLPDLHRTTWKAKHRAFKKARKAAIQEFEMEDMRRRIKDARFNPR ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297801276 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 81972:42 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_330283 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MFNYSVATNYYIMKLQKKQEERLQKMIEEEEIRMLRKEMVPKAQLMPFFDRPFLPQRSSRPLTMPKEPSFGNVHSTCWTCVFNNQHYLYHINHAHA ...

  4. Crystal structure of a hypothetical protein, TTHA0829 from Thermus thermophilus HB8, composed of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and aspartate-kinase chorismate-mutase tyrA (ACT) domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Makoto; Shibata, Naoki; Ishido-Nakai, Emi; Kanagawa, Mayumi; Iio, Yota; Komori, Hirofumi; Ueda, Yasufumi; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Higuchi, Yoshiki

    2016-05-01

    TTHA0829 from Thermus thermophilus HB8 has a molecular mass of 22,754 Da and is composed of 210 amino acid residues. The expression of TTHA0829 is remarkably elevated in the latter half of logarithmic growth phase. TTHA0829 can form either a tetrameric or dimeric structure, and main-chain folding provides an N-terminal cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) domain and a C-terminal aspartate-kinase chorismate-mutase tyrA (ACT) domain. Both CBS and ACT are regulatory domains to which a small ligand molecule can bind. The CBS domain is found in proteins from organisms belonging to all kingdoms and is observed frequently as two or four tandem copies. This domain is considered as a small intracellular module with a regulatory function and is typically found adjacent to the active (or functional) site of several enzymes and integral membrane proteins. The ACT domain comprises four β-strands and two α-helices in a βαββαβ motif typical of intracellular small molecule binding domains that help control metabolism, solute transport and signal transduction. We discuss the possible role of TTHA0829 based on its structure and expression pattern. The results imply that TTHA0829 acts as a cell-stress sensor or a metabolite acceptor.

  5. 古细菌-硫细菌蛋白AF1514的纯化及晶体生长研究%Study on Purification and Crystallization of Hypothetical Protein AF1514 from Archeoglobus fulgidus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帕孜来提·拜合提; 刘志杰; 阿不都拉·阿巴斯

    2008-01-01

    本研究将AF1514蛋白的重组基因转化到大肠杆菌(E.coli BL21)并通过在12℃条件下的诱导表达产生了大量的目的蛋白.用镍柱亲和层析和分子筛Superdex-75凝胶过滤层析的两步蛋白纯化方法进一步纯化蛋白AF1514后,获得纯度较高的蛋白(纯度>95%).纯化的母体蛋白和甲基化处理后的蛋白衍生物分别用悬滴汽相扩散法在16℃结晶.初步筛选所用的400多种结晶条件中,适合晶体生长的条件只有3种,其中最佳晶体生长条件溶液的成分包含0.1mol/L醋酸钠,pH 5.0,0.1mol/L氯化钠和8%~14%(W/V)2-甲基2,4-戊二醇.蛋白晶体属于四方晶系,初步X-射线衍射分辨率为2.09A°.%Archeoglobus fulgidus DSM 4304 genome was transformed and overproduced in Escherichia coli(E.coli BL21)at 12℃and the protein was purified to 95%purity by Ni2+-affinity colunm and Superdex-75 gel filtration.Crystals ative and methylated proteins were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at 16℃under three conditions among the wide range of screened conditions(>400),but principally from the solution containing 0.1mol/L sodium acetate pH 5.0,0.1mol/L sodium chloride,and 8%~14%(W/V)2-methyl-2,4-dipentaneol (MPD).The crystal is tetragonal in shape and diffraction data to 2.09A° are detected by X-ray detector.

  6. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2008-10-27

    Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

  7. Preschool Children's Judgments about Hypothetical and Actual Transgressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, Judith G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined three and four year olds' judgments about transgressions. Children judged moral transgressions to be more serious, punishable, and wrong than conventional transgressions; hypothetical transgressions to be more wrong independent of rules than actual transgressions; and hypothetical moral transgressions to be more independent of rules than…

  8. Functional characterization of a Nudix hydrolase AtNUDX8 upon pathogen attack indicates a positive role in plant immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Pedro Fonseca

    Full Text Available Nudix hydrolases comprise a large gene family of twenty nine members in Arabidopsis, each containing a conserved motif capable of hydrolyzing specific substrates like ADP-glucose and NADH. Until now only two members of this family, AtNUDX6 and AtNUDX7, have been shown to be involved in plant immunity. RPP4 is a resistance gene from a multigene family that confers resistance to downy mildew. A time course expression profiling after Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis inoculation in both wild-type (WT and the rpp4 mutant was carried out to identify differentially expressed genes in RPP4-mediated resistance. AtNUDX8 was one of several differentially expressed, downregulated genes identified. A T-DNA knockout mutant (KO-nudx8 was obtained from a Salk T-DNA insertion collection, which exhibited abolished AtNUDX8 expression. The KO-nudx8 mutant was infected separately from the oomycete pathogen Hpa and the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326. The mutant displayed a significantly enhanced disease susceptibility to both pathogens when compared with the WT control. We observed a small, stunted phenotype for KO-nudx8 mutant plants when grown over a 12/12 hour photoperiod but not over a 16/8 hour photoperiod. AtNUDX8 expression peaked at 8 hours after the lights were turned on and this expression was significantly repressed four-fold by salicylic acid (SA. The expression of three pathogen-responsive thioredoxins (TRX-h2, TRX-h3 and TRX-h5 were downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant when compared with the WT. Furthermore, KO-nudx8 plants like the npr1 mutant, displayed SA hypersensitivity. Expression of a key SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 was repressed at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant suggesting that AtNUDX8 is involved in SA signaling in plants. Similarly, NPR1 and PR1 transcript levels were also downregulated at specific time points in the KO-nudx8 mutant. This study shows that AtNUDX8 is involved in

  9. Comparing hypothetical versus non-hypothetical methods for measuring willingness to pay in a food context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Martínez-Carrasco

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Choosing a valid procedure to measure willingness to pay (WTP is crucial for designating optimum price policies or for evaluating the demand for new products. This study compares two methods for obtaining WTP in a food context: a random nth price auction and an open-ended contingent valuation (CV question. Participants were regular salad tomato buyers of Alicante and they were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments. The products about which they would show their WTP were traditional tomato varieties. Both treatments were divided into three stages: in the first stage the only available information was a reference price for the tomatoes. In stages 2 and 3 we revealed the local origin and the organic grown of the tomatoes respectively. Our results show that in the auction the percentage of participants willing to pay the same or more than the reference price was between 20 and 30%. In the CV method this percentage was between 40 and 65%. The mean WTP in the auction, considering the whole of the individuals, was situated between 1.90 and 2.13 €/kg. These same results obtained through the CV were situated between 2.54 and 3.21 €/kg. The results confirmed the findings of previous papers in which the hypothetical bias of CV was clarified because it yields higher values for WTP than the auction, especially when referring to the number of individuals willing to pay more. Additionally, hedonic price models were estimated for the prices obtained by both methods with the result that in all the models, WTP was directly related to the price paid for the latest purchase of tomatoes.

  10. Comparing hypothetical versus non-hypothetical methods for measuring willingness to pay in a food context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Carrasco, L.; Brugarolas, M.; Martínez-Poveda, A.; Ruiz-Martínez, J.J.

    2015-07-01

    Choosing a valid procedure to measure willingness to pay (WTP) is crucial for designating optimum price policies or for evaluating the demand for new products. This study compares two methods for obtaining WTP in a food context: a random nth price auction and an open-ended contingent valuation (CV) question. Participants were regular salad tomato buyers of Alicante and they were randomly assigned to one of the two treatments. The products about which they would show their WTP were traditional tomato varieties. Both treatments were divided into three stages: in the first stage the only available information was a reference price for the tomatoes. In stages 2 and 3 we revealed the local origin and the organic grown of the tomatoes respectively. Our results show that in the auction the percentage of participants willing to pay the same or more than the reference price was between 20 and 30%. In the CV method this percentage was between 40 and 65%. The mean WTP in the auction, considering the whole of the individuals, was situated between 1.90 and 2.13 €/kg. These same results obtained through the CV were situated between 2.54 and 3.21 €/kg. The results confirmed the findings of previous papers in which the hypothetical bias of CV was clarified because it yields higher values for WTP than the auction, especially when referring to the number of individuals willing to pay more. Additionally, hedonic price models were estimated for the prices obtained by both methods with the result that in all the models, WTP was directly related to the price paid for the latest purchase of tomatoes. (Author)

  11. Lexical exponents of hypothetical modality in Polish and Lithuanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Roszko

    2015-11-01

    To analyse both the languages there is used the method of theoretical contrastive studies, which the most important features are: (1 orienting the studies from the content grounds to the formal grounds, (2 using a semantic interlanguage as tertium comparationis. First of all, the content of hypothetical modality and its definition and paraphrase is given here. Next, the gradational character of this category is discussed. There are distinguished six groups of lexemes expressing the corresponding degrees of hypothetical modality — from a shadow of uncertainty (minimal degree of probability to an almost complete certainty (maximum degree of probability. The experimental Polish-Lithuanian corpus is widely applied in the studies.

  12. Preferences for Physically Disabled Counselors in Hypothetical Counseling Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David C.; Frederickson, William A.

    1975-01-01

    The preferences of 320 undergraduate students for one of three disabled counselors or for a nondisabled counselor on each of Brabham and Thoreson's 20 hypothetical counseling situations were obtained. Significant counselor preferences existed for 18 of the 20 situations, and when categorized by sex, significant counselor preferences existed for 4…

  13. The Chandrasekhar's Equation for Two-Dimensional Hypothetical White Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    De, Sanchari

    2014-01-01

    In this article we have extended the original work of Chandrasekhar on the structure of white dwarfs to the two-dimensional case. Although such two-dimensional stellar objects are hypothetical in nature, we strongly believe that the work presented in this article may be prescribed as Master of Science level class problem for the students in physics.

  14. Scaffolding for Argumentation in Hypothetical and Theoretical Biology Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wan-Yun; Lin, Yu-Ren; She, Hsiao-Ching

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of online argumentation scaffolding on students' argumentation involving hypothetical and theoretical biological concepts. Two types of scaffolding were developed in order to improve student argumentation: continuous scaffolding and withdraw scaffolding. A quasi-experimental design was used with four…

  15. Hypothetical Markets: Educational Application of Ronald Dworkin's "Sovereign Virtue"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider, in principle and at the most general level, a particular possible approach to educational policy-making. This approach involves an education-specific application of the notion of hypothetical markets first developed in Ronald Dworkin's book "Sovereign Virtue: The theory and practice of equality" (2000).…

  16. A Hypothetical Learning Trajectory for Conceptualizing Matrices as Linear Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews-Larson, Christine; Wawro, Megan; Zandieh, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a hypothetical learning trajectory (HLT) aimed at supporting students in developing flexible ways of reasoning about matrices as linear transformations in the context of introductory linear algebra. In our HLT, we highlight the integral role of the instructor in this development. Our HLT is based on the "Italicizing…

  17. Substance Abuse Counselors and Moral Reasoning: Hypothetical and Authentic Dilemmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, Shari M.

    2009-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the assumption that the level of moral reasoning (Defining Issues Test; J. R. Rest, 1986) used in solving hypothetical and authentic dilemmas is similar for substance abuse counselors (N = 188). The statistical analyses used were paired-sample t tests, Pearson product-moment correlation, and simultaneous multiple…

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302840219 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5423 3068:5423 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_117895, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MARRGSAPSTAAVGPRVASGPR...PDAALVRREAEEAAAAPPSRHGLAAGSVNARAAQPFSGLFNTFGSGGGAAGGGGGGRPNGGSGTAAAASGPRRITSGRPGSGRGPQLLPPGGDHSSTSTAGGGPPS ...

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 158334112 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 218 329726:1218 ... hypothetical protein AM1_0928 Acaryochloris marina MBIC11017 MGRAVIKFSSEDCGICHKMSFYDQKVTEELGLEFIDVKMQDTTTYRKYRKILLTQYPDKSEMGWPTYIICDSPDTEFSILGEVKGGHPKGEFRSRLQAVLGAA

  20. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 186683700 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 737:2344 ... hypothetical protein Npun_R3552 Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 MSLAVIKFSSEECGICHKMSFYDKKVAEELGLEFIDVKMQDTTAYRKYRKILLTQYPDKSEMGWPTYIICNSPEGEFQIVGEVKGGHPKGEFRSRLQEVLDSTGNQN

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 647668022 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :605 ... hypothetical protein Prochlorococcus sp. scB245a_518A17 MNNLFLERNCLISANKLYRWSLSYRISKSKKEIIFIGLNPSLSD...EVFLDNTTKKIIKISKNNNYGKVKLINLFALISSKPEKLFKHKNPVGYRNNNHIYKNLKHWSENKNCDLWLGWGNKGKFLNRNKRISKKIMQYNSIRKNNFDNPLGPLLIKKTIKDNPIHPLYCSDNSILKAVKTI

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297840863 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 89:1469 81972:1469 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_893879 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MVHYLQGSFFYEQVTKT...ENSDMKFPFLLASVECFSQDLGVHAYSAIALLELGKLIGSVSFYRKALNNAKEGLSFIASFGGLRLSEENTKSNLENVVLVAESMIPKLQGRVRSDSDTAAAESMIQAADTMKFFSVFFLW ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302839916 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:1666 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_92089 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MAASTWGEYLGKTGWEKIPCIPAYPQTCIPAYLHTCIPAYLHTCIPAYLHTCI...PAYLHTCIPAYLHTCIPAYLHIPAHTCIQVAKRVLILLAEALSKAKDYASHSKTPPRAGRTYLGTQQLYQVM ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302830610 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:915 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_79257 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MEDHTRPVLSLSVANGKLFSGSYDYTIKVWD...LQTLQKIRTLTGHNDAVRALALADGKLFSGSYDSTVRVWDENTLQCLEVLKGHTGPVRTLVHCRNNMFSGSYDRTVKVWDAETLQCLKTLEGHDDNVRVLAVGDRHMY...SGSWDKTIRVWSLSTLECVRMLEGHTEAVLALAVGNNVLVSGSYDTTVRFWDANSNYRCVRKCDGHDDAVRVLAAADGRVFSGSYDGTIGIW ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357491269 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ASHHHFTEQLEVMNTRLNQQQHHVDARDANLQTLLDECHETLVTILAVVLQTRQPDPPPPPISSGIPSPSGTTQPTYTQPVQNTIISYTNHHPYCNFWRKREKTREQENQEGERPPIINTKVRVRLTFSNFKWYDSETGFNTR ... ...78 3877:11178 3880:11178 hypothetical protein MTR_5g074060 Medicago truncatula MPPKPAKTSSKDLEEALQATEQRLENSIT

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 86607326 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein CYA_2718 Synechococcus sp. JA-3-3Ab MNGQDRLDRVEQLLAQAAEQTAANSREIQELRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRE...SHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRE...SHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRESHAELSEQNAARSREIEQLRQAIRE

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357488083 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 77:1790 3880:1790 hypothetical protein MTR_5g048250 Medicago truncatula MVRRGKSLKTQEVTEILGAKLKLWLGLLLIEVENLILSVKLWSCHDVGPTCHDFDQDSSLSDPGKIVPRWKTNVPRCCQTRNLKNAIFFDPIVSKLIPKCREFILTI ...

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 124026528 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :1477 ... hypothetical protein NATL1_18231 Prochlorococcus marinus str. NATL1A MKQPNQARIRQAWRKIVDGLMLEGKLKGHKFSDSKYILYSMRSTFIEDHLLKGTDIFLLARVSGHSVKTLMDTYERMDILERAKELTDIDYGKRKNVPQIINLFEE

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302856447 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_71439, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MLADRICSQIAYGTCLQTVYACIMQMHAHMYNISH...ISYIAYRILHIAYRILHIAYRISHIAYCILHIAYCISHIPYRCIWHIAYCILHIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYCILHIAYCISHIAY ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302842451 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_93481 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRICITYRISYIAYRILHIAYRILHIAYRILHIAYCISHIAYCISH...IAYCILHIAYCILHIAYRILHIAYCISHIAAYGISHITYRISHIANCMHIAAYRISLHIAAYCISHIHICIYAHI ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302842580 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_62920, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis CILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYRILHIAYRISHIAYCISH...IAYCISHIACRISHIAYCISHIAYRILHIPYRCIWHIAYHIPHIAYRKLHAYRCISHIAAYRCILHIAYTYMHICTYTKHKT ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302857466 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_71945 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRICLHIAYVCISHIAYRICACLHIAISHIIHIAYRILPIAYCISHIAYCISH...IAYCILHIAYCISHIAYRISHIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAAYGILHIAYAYRSQHSIA ...

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302837846 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_90903 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MQMHIVYCISHIAYCILHIAYRILHIAYCISHIAYRILHIAYCILHIAYCISH...VAYCISHIPYRCIWHIARISHTAYRIPQITYRCISHIAAYRCILHITYTYMYIYAHI ...

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855806 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_35996, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis HIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYCILHIAYCISH...IAYCVSHIAYRILHIAYRILHIAYRILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYRISHIAYCISHPYRCIWHIAY ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302837844 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_60268, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis CILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCISHIAYRISH...ITYRILHIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYRISHIPYPISHIPYHCIWHIAYHIPHIAYRKLHIAAYRISLHIAAYCISHIHICIYAHNET ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302848645 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_96833 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRICITYRTYRILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYRISHIAYCISHIAYRISHIAAYGISH...IAYCISHIAYRISHIAYRILHIAYCILHIAYRISHIPYRCIWHIAYHIPHIAHRKLHIAAYRISLHIAPYCISHIHICIYAHI ...

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855635 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_100737 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MYNISHIVYCISHIAYCISHIAYRISHIAYRILHIAYCISHIAYCISHIAYCISH...IAYRISHIPYRCTISLHMAYRISHTARISHIANCISLHIAYCILHIAYCISHIAYPISLHHIAAYGISHITYRTHIAYRKLHIAAYRISLHIAAYCISHIHICIYAHI ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302853005 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 068:309 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_99209 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MQMHAHTYNISHIVYCISHIAYCISHIAYRISHIAYRISH...IVYRVSHIAYRILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYCILHIAYRISHIAAYMAYRISHTAYRISQIAYRCISHIAAYRCILHITYMHIIYAHI ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302846750 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:1228 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_95759 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRHGEDTSRHRGNEQKAPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPS...LPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPFLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPFLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSLPPSPPPSLPPSLPACP ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302853557 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 3068:1430 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_69247, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis DPPSDWEADPPGDWEVDPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPGDWEADPPS...DWEADPPGDWEADPPGDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPGDWEADPPSDWEADPPGDWEADPPGDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPGDWEADPPSDWEGRHP ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302846527 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 3068:1430 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_65149, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis DPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPTIGRLIPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPS...DWKADPPSDWEGDPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPP ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302836407 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available VSAQDVESRNSNKPRPPKAPEAPQPPSPQPPSPKPPRQPKAPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSRPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPS...PKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKPPKHPKAPEQPTAPKQP...8:155 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_90121 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MTRLAASSSPHRAMTSRLVLLAVVAVLCLMAPQG

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302847044 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 3068:1430 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_37371, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PSELEADPPSEWEADPPSELEADPPSELEADPPSELGADPPS...ELEADPPSELEADPPSELEADPPSELEADPPSGLEADPPSELEADPPSELEADPPSESEADPP ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302836401 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8:155 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_90115 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MTRLAASSSPHRAMTSRLVLLAVVAVLCLMASQGVNAQIIIVEGTAEKSPPPKAPQPPS...PQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPQPPSPKPPSPKPPSPPSPKPPSPKPPSPKAPY

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302836413 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8:154 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_90125 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MTSRLVLLAVVAVLCLMAPQGATAAGQTTGIEER...FTWNATWDSWDKALASILKKKSPPPSPQPPSPRPPRPSRPPPSPRPPPSPPPPSLPAPPPPSPSPPPPSPPPPSPLPPSPPPPSPFPPSPPPPSPLPPSPPPPSPPKS...SRLISKPNKWKSSATSSQQDPLHQSLLSRDSVPGTDLKAQENDIELEAKLSPASHAATITIRNSDDGKEPSPPSPPTSPSPPSPPNSPPQPNPPSPPNPPSPPS...PPNPPSPPSPPNPPSPPSPPKAPKSPFAPNAPGKEYEQFKKKKWMYIISNSKYSYEGADYFCQSKGYILVPYYGKYKKDHQDAAYSACYMSGKGCWLWDSEEGSCPYVDPKGDGEAYEGDCNDKNYAFCYRGWGEKKKQP ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302831395 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 3068:1430 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_56839, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis DPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPS...DWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWGADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWEADPPSDWKADLPSDWKADPPSD ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242081261 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8:552 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_07g015180 Sorghum bicolor MGTVAPHVLIVDDTFVDRLVASRVLKSCNIQVTIVEGPKQALDFLDVENDVKLILTDYCMPGMTGYDLL...MEVKESPKLNHIPVVIMSSDNIPERIQKCLAARAKEYIIKPIKVADVHRIFSYI ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302846807 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6811 3068:6811 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_37529, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPP...GPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIYLRRTAPPGPPHIHLRRTAPPGPCPP ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357470125 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 77:7477 3880:7477 hypothetical protein MTR_4g029370 Medicago truncatula MEMGCWFEDNIQRKVGNGVDSFFRKNPWLGEIPLSVRFPRLFEMSVNSWMMVADMFSLGWGEGGEGRLGFGGEVCWRRMSWDRVTLAQGSSSEGFFISLVTLPEQVTYKR ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302842712 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4547 3068:4547 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_63044 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRVQEKGRGGSKPEEKSRSGGRGGK...CTAKSRSGGRGGKCTAKRSRWQQAQRRRAAAAAGEGNAPQKGRGGSKPEEKSRSGGRGGKCTAKRRRSGGREGKCTAKRSRWQQAQRRRAAAAAREGNAPQKGRGGSKPEEK...SRSGGRGGKCTAKSRSGGRGGKCTAKRSRWQQAQRRRAAAAAGEGNARQKGRGGSKPEEKSRSGGRGGKCTAKRSRWQQAQRRRAAAAAGEGNAPQKGRGGSKPRGEEPQRRPGREMHDKN ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357442719 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3284 3880:3284 hypothetical protein MTR_1g090070 Medicago truncatula MAEIKLHGSWYSPFTLRVVWTLNLKGIPYDSIEEDHFNRTPQLLQYNPIHKKTPVLVHDGKPIC...ESMIIVEYIDEIWPQNSLLPADPYARAQARFWVKYIDDMFSAIRAFHRSIIKGEER

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 428770572 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :1681 755178:1681 ... hypothetical protein Cyan10605_2232 Cyanobacterium aponinum PCC 10605 MTKLVVLNLGAGNLNDGF...PHIIARLRANQGTIEQQFVGSLPPAPELENLNHQWQSLYYALHQRFDVAKRRLRLFEVETQEMTNVSVVTFQELCQEDVIYKYQKKLKEIMDNYMINIDNK

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 427702014 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 292564:660 ... hypothetical protein Cyagr_0707 Cyanobium gracile PCC 6307 MTETPSSTPDPVATTPEAKTPAPKANPPAPEDKPFEVFVPELLLPALVKEIEAYGGPAP...ELTFEQGAMPVVGADCWMVKGRLPGERRFWLCFTRPDISSAKTIALTEGAGSPSLLESFLIDEKKMTLSLLVSRVVQRLNGQKWLGPN

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 647680444 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :36 ... hypothetical protein, partial Prochlorococcus sp. scB241_526B22 VYSSHLNNQRELIVTSESTRESINLAKYLTDNGVVKYSAYWCPNCLNQSELFGKQAYRELNVVECARDGINSQTQLCIDKKIKGFPTGEINGALILGVLSLKELSKLTGFKN

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357500425 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7:5879 3880:5879 hypothetical protein MTR_6g086110 Medicago truncatula MSRSESVSQRRCCSSVFMFIGVRRRRSGKKGKIGDNVYISRLSLTPSSDTRIPFIFQRRQFSIFVCFVMTINKNQGQSRKQVAISRVTSMSGLKILLIDEDGLCMW ...

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357515265 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 78 3877:20978 3880:20978 hypothetical protein MTR_8g040060 Medicago truncatula MNYISSLPSIIVVFPGLKDLRISQYEGLQSPKEDKKWELLPQRMSLSDETPFGLCMHLQEMGEIPPNLETFFAIWCTSLKDLKLDVEFEYQGLHVTH ...

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255579068 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5259 3987:5259 3988:5259 conserved hypothetical protein Ricinus communis MYLSVFRSILWVVVFVQKENNIGAYVGSLGLNYLR...NFSWIICEQNVMDSSPGTTDYGLSADMRREGYVALSVMLLAHAILLGRKQIWVMMSRVMKNGKRRIPVKVSQIVIRMMKKKVEEGCLKDNEDEK ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302830920 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 058 3068:3058 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_87241 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MPNPLAEMELLGFWGLKLVATVTDCHMSDSGRVMTAFVFKVVSYRNEAAST...LAEMELLGFWGLKLVATVTDCHMSDSGRVMTAFVFKVVSYRNEAASTMLTPEPLPESLEYLQAQVERALDERRELERVMWA...AREGRGGPSMLSCKQLETIELSTMGEAAELEVKRALEAITVVQYSMPNPLAEMELLGFWGLKLVATVTDCHMSDSGRVMTAFVFKVVSYRNEAASTMLTPEPLPESLEYLQAQVERALDERRELERVMWAAREGRGGPSMLSCKQLETIELSTMGEAAELEVKRALEEMFH ...

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 434397108 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 6 ... hypothetical protein Sta7437_0543 Stanieria cyanosphaera PCC 7437 MNKFLFLAKILLVLIVIAFAQTNNHWTIAEANSLPSLV...PAPSLQTEQPVKENISEPTTLPLEIQNAVLEDISKRTSKNVATFRIAEAEKRTWSDGCLDLSEPNQFCTQVLTPGWQVIVTDGESKWVYHTNSSGNLVKLAK

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302834010 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 883 3068:1883 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_58297, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PALPRTALPSAAPPSPAPPSAAPPSPAPPSAAPPSPAPPS...AAPPSPAPPSAAPPSPKPPSTADSGPPSCPYTRPPDQPAPPRFPPFPPRFATPGPGPPTSLHAPSHHPPFPFHLPSLLPSCAFPS

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302857690 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 56 3068:8556 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_72041 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MCSPRSLLTCMCSPRSLLTCMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLACMCSPRS...LLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLTCMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLACMCSPRS...LLACMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLACMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRSLLARMCSPRPVRFFTQRNTDCDNTCVSVENVAL ...

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302840846 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:1999 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_92503 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGIWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMW...GVDGMWGVDGIWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGIWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGIWGVDGMWGVDGMWGVDGMRV ...

  3. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 307155026 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 610 ... hypothetical protein Cyan7822_5254 Cyanothece sp. PCC 7822 MSHSSPNPLNDYGEEFEQDLAKAEQALEKLKQRYALILEQSQ...RQAELHEQRSLSEQAWQNHPTPELEVELRQIEAQIQELQLTLESALLSSDDLKRLFWQGLRSGLLSELFWQIVRFGGIGIIIGWILKSCSK

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302857788 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5109 3068:5109 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_39472, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PSGNPFGEPPSGNPLRGTPSGNPFGNPPPSG...NPLREPPPPLRGTPSGTPPFGEPPSGNPFREPLRGTLFGNPFGEPLRGTPSGNLFGEPFREPLRGTPSGNPFGEPLRGTPSGNPFGEPLRGTP ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855728 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3068:1908 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_100778 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREREAREMEAREREAREMEARE...MEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREMEAREREVREREAREMEAREMEAKEMEAREMEARERECPCDRRLYSYFGQCSGPPKTCSVPR ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 159465962 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 086 hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_181561, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PCLGITCGLYETCESGSCVYHDPCAGVTCGTNEYCEGGVCIYRDPC...DGVQCSEQNFQCRDGSCVYVDPCEGVSCPENFNVCQNGICVFVDPCTTYVQCGPNQGCLNGLCIDNPDPCINVVCFNAGEVCVEGACVNLGDVCQRTTCAADEHCEAGICLPNDPC...QNIVCTGAYEQCVDGTCTYVDPCAGVVCGTNEYCEGGSCIYQDPCLGITCGLYETCESGSCVYHDPC...AGVACGTNEYCEGGACIYRDPCDGVQCSEQNFQCRDGSCVYVDPCEGVSCPENFNVCQNGICVFVDPCTTYVQCGPNQGCLNGLCIDNPDPCINVVCYNAGEVCVEGACVNLGKNDLGWLE ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255574678 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WSLPWPFKSFTPALNIACYDTCYNLCMSPPYNAGSTLNSCKDQCTPACSAQEVSKKPGINARKTFEPVLVTIVEDGIIC ... ...235880:9351 3987:9351 3988:9351 conserved hypothetical protein Ricinus communis MVQKGKVTTTLILISMLVMFSSLEVGES

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357497683 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3877:63 3880:63 hypothetical protein MTR_6g042410 Medicago truncatula MNVTLLFPPPLHTEEVPFPPPFFPVPPPPKTDEILTNLVNLVQHQNNRLEHVVDNQINILMKVYTKSEGSYGNKRCEMSMEVDGNALVPTNRRKGSGRPPDDLDRENSS ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302831251 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3162 3068:3162 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_87297 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MNSSWMYRWYDDRWPDATSNASLNSAAGQQLLRALQEAQAQQAQTIAQ...QAQTIAQQAQIIAQLQATIAQRAQIIAQLQATIAQLQRDIKALQVAQQAPRWRGLLRLFSCC ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302856240 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 904 3068:2904 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_37223, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis HPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHPSMGPPGPFESHARHPSM...GPPGPFQSHPRHPSMGPPGPIQSHPRHPSMGPPGPFQSHARHPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHP ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302854046 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 904 3068:2904 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_69561, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MGPPGPFESHARHPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHPSM...GPPGPFESHARHPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHPSMGPPGPIQSHPRHPSMGPPGPFQSHARHPSMGPPGPFQSHPRHPSKGPPGPFQSHPRHP ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302836858 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 68:159 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_90367 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MPGSQSSKGLGLRLAPYWLSVWCCSNFPECSRRSAADRRHRPSQLRHLAP...SGPSNRAPGAAVEPVASLGHLRWSPHRGLPHLAPVAASTTSHSSGPSDSASSTSRSISKMEVATVGGGCFWCVEACYNMLQ

  13. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 124026108 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 555:800 ... hypothetical protein NATL1_14011 Prochlorococcus marinus str. NATL1A MAKVSDLLFKVNIEIDQVQKSFDCKSDQTVLEAAADANIELPSSCLVGMCCTCAAFLKEGLVDMEAMGLKSELQEQGYVLLCQAYPKSDLKIVANQFDAVWDQR

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302857651 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :8553 3068:8553 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_39527, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTL...WEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNPLGTLWEPFGNP ...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242057513 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :7394 4558:7394 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_03g020074, partial Sorghum bicolor LSSCLLRRSSHPALSSAQKKKQKRSILAPRTPCPAP...PSLPRPRSSRAGLHRAFTLTRPLPQRQRRRLLATRSVTASHRVLRHLATRAPLPFHPQRRPLPLPAPRRPTQILDSPPHPRRCPAPISSASPTPGSGSSAQRPTATPA

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302841890 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 777 3068:5777 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_47984, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis TCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNT...EAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCCNTEAGAATCC ...

  17. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 657199825 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 037:19 ... hypothetical protein Acaryochloris sp. CCMEE 5410 MAELPPDIGQLRHVQIIYLVGNSLQTLPPEIGQLKQLKTLNLSGGNLNRLPPEI...GQLSNLQSLNLYKNQLRTLPPEIGQLKQLQRLDIRNNRLSALPPEIGGLQNLKRLTLHHNQLKTLPPEIGELKNLQKLAVDYNQLHRLPVEIGQLENLVSLG...LPYNKLKHLPVSIGQLNNLQVLGLNFNQLTHLPPEISQLHRLEVLSLTSNKLQRFPTEIIHLTNLEVLHLGASPESLAFSVQFHLKEEYATTFNQVSSLPPEI...GQLTQLQDLNLGSCTLLNLPPEIGQLVNLQMLGLSNNGLMSVPHEIGRLANLQGLELSYNQLKSLPPELKALTRLEYLNLSNNPLPAEVMKQHQQ

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357468687 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36 3877:11136 3880:11136 hypothetical protein MTR_4g015240 Medicago truncatula MNNTEKSNNGRKQDYGFIIIINININISEFLRGMMLTNKEAMIINDNKQKRPRVSGDSNCVTLQPLTNYSFVNNAAANVAFEMTEKTFKNPFFPVDFDTY ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242083872 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :9473 4558:9473 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_08g018835, partial Sorghum bicolor CTMAGTYLPVAAFLLATAVVAILAATSAVPVAAAAAHKYNGRMVIIRAPG...ARVLDVDDSTGGALNRWQQRRRLVEDEVAPELGGLLGAGDGRGIGYSAFDRNRPVCLHGCAQPGQHYTRPCAASHYCPNTGPPRHARAVH ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 203760 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... 38832:3226 ... 296587:2970 ... hypothetical protein MICPUN_113408 Micromonas sp. RCC299 MHPPLTLENHPLCRDVVIALKRCHRDASWWGRSFGACNEQKWALDQCLKKQKLFKARANAEKAREERDRLRRRVEKYGHATVNGEFKGK

  1. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 86609468 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... hypothetical protein CYB_2019 Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3B'a(2-13) MTTHFPQFALNFATGSASFSLSPEAAQQWHKALQILLERLKIRSRQQPQEPVEFRYPTEDFSLEMFCNPNIWAGPHAAKVLVTLKTKVLRLSTEVEFSRLQEDLSQYLESLT

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357486857 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2 3880:1732 hypothetical protein MTR_5g039920 Medicago truncatula MGGAQMRQKQLQQSDLSSSSMYNDDVRELPCWCPRICVVRTA...NTVNNPGRPFYACPLHKIRCSELMGGARMSKNNYNNRYLSSSSMYNDDVRELPCWCPRICVVRTANTVNNPGRPFYASEELGYFKNNGVGHGRNARLMEKPNDRGREEVWRARLMDKVDCVGK ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 242039983 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :5312 4558:5312 hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_01g026880 Sorghum bicolor MASQTTKMLALVAALLALSTIATATANCLQNIPHVMGMT...VMDPCMQSCMMQQPLAMVMMGMTAMDPCMQSCMMQQPLAMVISSPSLMMRMNSMVSCVQSCMTQQAFSIGGSSLSK

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302854914 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 68:852 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_32673, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis CAFNCASKCMSNCALSCTLKRASNRGLSCALDSMDRCASNCTLQCASNC...VHCTLQCASNCVVRCTLNCALNCMFNCMSSCVVGCASKCASRRMSNCAVRCRKCFAICP ...

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302837842 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 68:591 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_60384 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MNKTASQNAVQPTRTTLDKHCTVQCASNCVVWC...TLNCALNCMFNCTSSCVVGCALKCASRRMSNCAVRCSQCFAICALNPCCVTPAAVQCGTHCTLQCASNCVVQCTLNCTLNCTSNCMSSCVMGCALNRASQRMSNCAHCTLQCASNCVVQCTLNCTLNCTSNC...MSSCVMGCALNRASQRMSNCAVLCGQCLSICAFNRGAVRCAAVRCGAVRGPK ...

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302852125 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 68:591 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_68365, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis ASICAFNCAVRCAFNCALNCASNCASNC...AFNCMLRCALNCALNCTFNCMSSRVVGCPLKRASRRMSNCAVRCSAHCTLQCASNCVVRCTLNCALNCMFNCMSSCVVGCASKCASRRMSNCAVRCRKCFAICPLNPYQNETALRALSTRS ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255556065 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 235880:6754 3987:6754 3988:6754 conserved hypothetical protein Ricinus communis MPKEICPRGIRGINSRLLIAHRDSRSQYRLQMPKEICPANGRKLLQEETSNEDCYRGDISIGCKSCRLKYILQEKRNFMPKDIRFVAKMKSSVKYKENK ...

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302830706 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 98 3068:2998 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_103166 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MSHHQSLAAGHARVLANSSLTCSRFVRGRRVCHQTQPTSLRCRHQLDRFAL...LASANEPITSASNGAVLDKRSGRMTYKPLSYGEMVNDAVDSVVSAIGDNLKWLEVEFPALPTNVDGYKGSSDLFIDSNTQLAL

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 297802688 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 59689:2369 81972:2369 hypothetical protein ARALYDRAFT_913121 Arabidopsis lyrata subsp. lyrata MNSTCWSSQQRVNGIGLTCHVALLFCTGHPRLSPRPTKLKKTLVEKRALLSTEGGSSRRHQASNKPNADPQNLHRRQPPQSLIK ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302846405 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8:397 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_95610 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRDEIASTKRSAWHSTCWTSSSTNEHVTELDAKF...SMLPADKVEAMRAATDFQNYPEFARAFPKCENAWHSTCWTSSSTNEHVTELDAKFSMLPADKVEAMRAATDFQNYPEFARAFPKCENGRIAPYGCNRDPQQSRFRLDP

  11. ERPs reveal sensitivity to hypothetical contexts in spoken discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Veena D; Drury, John E; Molnar, Monika; Phillips, Natalie A; Baum, Shari; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2010-08-04

    We used event-related potentials to examine the interaction between two dimensions of discourse comprehension: (i) referential dependencies across sentences (e.g. between the pronoun 'it' and its antecedent 'a novel' in: 'John is reading a novel. It ends quite abruptly'), and (ii) the distinction between reference to events/situations and entities/individuals in the real/actual world versus in hypothetical possible worlds. Cross-sentential referential dependencies are disrupted when the antecedent for a pronoun is embedded in a sentence introducing hypothetical entities (e.g. 'John is considering writing a novel. It ends quite abruptly'). An earlier event-related potential reading study showed such disruptions yielded a P600-like frontal positivity. Here we replicate this effect using auditorily presented sentences and discuss the implications for our understanding of discourse-level language processing.

  12. ATOME : a blackboard architecture with temporal and hypothetical reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Laasri, Hassan; Maitre, Brigitte; Mondot, Thierry; Charpillet, François; Haton, Jean-Paul

    1988-01-01

    To cope with high level AI-based applications as signal understanding, process control or decision making, an AI system must take into account various knowledge sources and reasoning schemes. In this paper, we propose a blackboard-based architecture which achieves opportunism and efficiency while controlling multiple knowledge sources. In addition it integrates temporal and hypothetical reasoning to deal with applications evolving in time, and manipulating noisy or errorfull information.

  13. Processing counterfactual and hypothetical conditionals: an fMRI investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakova, Eugenia; Aichhorn, Markus; Schurz, Matthias; Kronbichler, Martin; Perner, Josef

    2013-05-15

    Counterfactual thinking is ubiquitous in everyday life and an important aspect of cognition and emotion. Although counterfactual thought has been argued to differ from processing factual or hypothetical information, imaging data which elucidate these differences on a neural level are still scarce. We investigated the neural correlates of processing counterfactual sentences under visual and aural presentation. We compared conditionals in subjunctive mood which explicitly contradicted previously presented facts (i.e. counterfactuals) to conditionals framed in indicative mood which did not contradict factual world knowledge and thus conveyed a hypothetical supposition. Our results show activation in right occipital cortex (cuneus) and right basal ganglia (caudate nucleus) during counterfactual sentence processing. Importantly the occipital activation is not only present under visual presentation but also with purely auditory stimulus presentation, precluding a visual processing artifact. Thus our results can be interpreted as reflecting the fact that counterfactual conditionals pragmatically imply the relevance of keeping in mind both factual and supposed information whereas the hypothetical conditionals imply that real world information is irrelevant for processing the conditional and can be omitted. The need to sustain representations of factual and suppositional events during counterfactual sentence processing requires increased mental imagery and integration efforts. Our findings are compatible with predictions based on mental model theory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. On hypothetical bias and calibration in cost-benefit studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljas, B; Blumenschein, K

    2000-05-01

    Despite a sound foundation in economic welfare theory, willingness to pay (WTP) has not been used as a measure of benefits in economic evaluations of health and health care to the same extent as in other fields. Some have suggested that this is due to non-economists' reluctance to placing dollar values on the benefits of health care. However, another potential reason could be uncertainties about the validity of the WTP measure. In this paper, we outline the bias problems with the WTP method, and specifically focus on hypothetical bias; i.e. whether the WTP from hypothetical elicitation methods overstates the real WTP or not. This is done by examining the literature in this field, with emphasis on economic experiments where there is a greater possibility for comparison. The findings are that hypothetical WTP in general significantly overestimates real WTP, but that calibration methods to reduce or eliminate this difference are currently being developed. We conclude that while the area is still very much under development, there seem to be reasons to view the use of cost-benefit analysis as a reasonable alternative to the more common cost-effectiveness analysis.

  15. Hypothetical contractarianism and the disclosure requirement problem in informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cust, Kenneth F T

    1991-01-01

    Two of the more deeply problematic issues surrounding the doctrine of informed consent are providing a justification for the practice of informed consent and providing an account of the nature and amount of information that must be disclosed in order for informed consent to take place. This paper is concerned with the latter problem, the problem of disclosure requirements, but it deals with this problem in a novel way; it approaches the problem by asking what fully informed and fully rational agents would agree to under certain hypothetical conditions. In general terms I juxtapose the hypothetical contractarianism found in Rawls' A Theory of Justice with that found in Gauthier's Morals By Agreement and ask what their respective hypothetical contractors would agree to with respect to choosing a particular standard of disclosure to govern the practice of informed consent. In more specific terms a contrast is made between what a Rawlsian agent behind a veil of ignorance would choose as compared to what, in Gauthier's terms, an ideal actor making an Archimedean choice would choose. The idea of an Archimedean point, and the subsequent choice made from that point, although technically identified by Rawls, originated with Archimedes of Syracuse.

  16. Demand Curves for Hypothetical Cocaine in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Natalie R.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Drug purchasing tasks have been successfully used to examine demand for hypothetical consumption of abused drugs including heroin, nicotine, and alcohol. In these tasks drug users make hypothetical choices whether to buy drugs, and if so, at what quantity, at various potential prices. These tasks allow for behavioral economic assessment of that drug's intensity of demand (preferred level of consumption at extremely low prices) and demand elasticity (sensitivity of consumption to price), among other metrics. However, a purchasing task for cocaine in cocaine-dependent individuals has not been investigated. Objectives This study examined a novel Cocaine Purchasing Task and the relation between resulting demand metrics and self-reported cocaine use data. Methods Participants completed a questionnaire assessing hypothetical purchases of cocaine units at prices ranging from $0.01 to $1,000. Demand curves were generated from responses on the Cocaine Purchasing Task. Correlations compared metrics from the demand curve to measures of real-world cocaine use. Results Group and individual data were well modeled by a demand curve function. The validity of the Cocaine Purchasing Task was supported by a significant correlation between the demand curve metrics of demand intensity and Omax (determined from Cocaine Purchasing Task data) and self-reported measures of cocaine use. Partial correlations revealed that after controlling for demand intensity, demand elasticity and the related measure, Pmax, were significantly correlated with real-world cocaine use. Conclusions Results indicate that the Cocaine Purchasing Task produces orderly demand curve data, and that these data relate to real-world measures of cocaine use. PMID:24217899

  17. Demand curves for hypothetical cocaine in cocaine-dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Natalie R; Johnson, Matthew W

    2014-03-01

    Drug purchasing tasks have been successfully used to examine demand for hypothetical consumption of abused drugs including heroin, nicotine, and alcohol. In these tasks, drug users make hypothetical choices whether to buy drugs, and if so, at what quantity, at various potential prices. These tasks allow for behavioral economic assessment of that drug's intensity of demand (preferred level of consumption at extremely low prices) and demand elasticity (sensitivity of consumption to price), among other metrics. However, a purchasing task for cocaine in cocaine-dependent individuals has not been investigated. This study examined a novel Cocaine Purchasing Task and the relation between resulting demand metrics and self-reported cocaine use data. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing hypothetical purchases of cocaine units at prices ranging from $0.01 to $1,000. Demand curves were generated from responses on the Cocaine Purchasing Task. Correlations compared metrics from the demand curve to measures of real-world cocaine use. Group and individual data were well modeled by a demand curve function. The validity of the Cocaine Purchasing Task was supported by a significant correlation between the demand curve metrics of demand intensity and O max (determined from Cocaine Purchasing Task data) and self-reported measures of cocaine use. Partial correlations revealed that after controlling for demand intensity, demand elasticity and the related measure, P max, were significantly correlated with real-world cocaine use. Results indicate that the Cocaine Purchasing Task produces orderly demand curve data, and that these data relate to real-world measures of cocaine use.

  18. Constraints on hypothetical counterexamples to the Casas-Alvero conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Laterveer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Casas-Alvero conjecture states: if a complex univariate polynomial has a common root with each of its derivatives, then it has a unique root. We show that hypothetical counterexamples must have at least 5 different roots. The first case where the conjecture is not known is in degree 12. We study the case of degree 12, and more generally degree p+1, where p is a prime number. While we don't come closing to solving the conjecture in degree 12, we present several further constraints that counterexamples would have to satisfy.

  19. Search for the hypothetical $\\pi$ -> $\\mu$ + x decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bilger, R; Denig, A; Föhl, K; Hautle, P; Kluge, W; Konter, J A; Kurz, G; Mango, S; Schapler, D; Schonleber, F; Siodlaczek, U; Van den Brandt, B; Wagner, G J; Wieser, R

    1995-01-01

    The KARMEN collaboration has reported the possible observation of a hitherto unknown neutral and weakly interacting particle x, which is produced in the decay pi -> mu + x with a mass m(x) = 33.9 MeV. We have searched for this hypothetical decay branch by studying muons from pion decay in flight with the LEPS spectrometer at the piE3 channel at PSI and find branching ratios BR(pi- to mu- anti-x) 2e-8 derived in a recent theoretical paper our result would leave only a narrow region for the existence of x if it is a heavy neutrino.

  20. Consequences of a hypothetical incident for different sectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Garion, C; Jimenez, J M; Parma, V; Perin, A; Schmidt, R; Tavian, L; Tock, J P; van Weelderen, R

    2011-01-01

    During the 2009 long shutdown, the LHC machine has been partially consolidated by adding safety relief devices in order to better protect the cryostats against large helium release and consequently to mitigate the risks of collateral damages. After recalling the present relief valve implementation and other mitigations related to the collateral damages, this paper describes the damage process of a hypothetical incident, presents its consequences for the different sectors and for beam energies up to 5 TeV with emphasis on the induced downtime.

  1. Estimating Potential Effects of Hypothetical Oil Spills on Polar Bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Durner, G.M.; McDonald, T.L.; Johnson, W.R.

    2006-01-01

    Much is known about the transport and fate of oil spilled into the sea and its toxicity to exposed wildlife. Previously, however, there has been no way to quantify the probability that wildlife dispersed over the seascape would be exposed to spilled oil. Polar bears, the apical predator of the arctic, are widely dispersed near the continental shelves of the Arctic Ocean, an area also undergoing considerable hydrocarbon exploration and development. We used 15,308 satellite locations from 194 radiocollared polar bears to estimate the probability that polar bears could be exposed to hypothetical oil spills. We used a true 2 dimensional Gausian kernel density estimator, to estimate the number of bears likely to occur in each 1.00 km2 cell of a grid superimposed over near shore areas surrounding 2 oil production facilities: the existing Northstar oil production facility, and the proposed offshore site for the Liberty production facility. We estimated the standard errors of bear numbers per cell with bootstrapping. Simulated oil spill footprints for September and October, the times during which we hypothesized effects of an oil-spill would be worst, were estimated using real wind and current data collected between 1980 and 1996. We used ARC/Info software to calculate overlap (numbers of bears oiled) between simulated oil-spill footprints and polar bear grid-cell values. Numbers of bears potentially oiled by a hypothetical 5912 barrel spill (the largest spill thought probable from a pipeline breach) ranged from 0 to 27 polar bears for September open water conditions, and from 0 to 74 polar bears in October mixed ice conditions. Median numbers oiled by the 5912 barrel hypothetical spill from the Liberty simulation in September and October were 1 and 3 bears, equivalent values for the Northstar simulation were 3 and 11 bears. In October, 75% of trajectories from the 5912 barrel simulated spill at Liberty oiled 9 or fewer bears while 75% of the trajectories affected 20 or

  2. Effects of hypothetical improvised nuclear detonation on the electrical infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Christopher L.; Eubank, Stephen; Evrenosoglu, C. Yaman; Marathe, Achla; Marathe, Madhav V.; Phadke, Arun; Thorp, James; Vullikanti, Anil [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States). Network Dynamics and Simulation Science Lab.

    2013-07-01

    We study the impacts of a hypothetical improvised nuclear detonation (IND) on the electrical infrastructure and its cascading effects on other urban inter-dependent infrastructures of a major metropolitan area in the US. We synthesize open source information, expert knowledge, commercial software and Google Earth data to derive a realistic electrical transmission and distribution network spanning the region. A dynamic analysis of the geo-located grid is carried out to determine the cause of malfunction of components, and their short-term and long-term effect on the stability of the grid. Finally a detailed estimate of the cost of damage to the major components of the infrastructure is provided.

  3. Elusive but not hypothetical: axillary meristems in Wollemia nobilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Geoffrey E

    2012-01-01

    The branches of Wollemia nobilis are unbranched; however, it has been noted that new branches can form from the distal end of damaged ones, and branches can grow from axillary structures once a terminal strobilus has fallen. Tomlinson and Huggett (2011, Annals of Botany 107: 909-916) have recently investigated the formation of these reiterative branches and stated in the title of their paper that 'Partial shoot reiteration in Wollemia nobilis (Araucariaceae) does not arise from "axillary meristems"'. They go on to state 'Further research may reveal the presence of these elusive, but still only hypothetical, axillary meristems'. In this Viewpoint, I argue that Tomlinson and Huggett do not refer to previously published information that indicates that axillary meristems are present in Wollemia nobilis branch leaf axils, and that their anatomical methods were probably not optimal for locating and examining these minute structures. Thus, whilst I would agree that the axillary meristems in branch leaf axils of Wollemia nobilis are elusive, I contend that they are not hypothetical.

  4. On the hypothetical utilization of atmospheric potential energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frisius

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric potential energy is typically divided into an available and a nonavailable part. In this article a hypothetical utilization of a fraction of the nonavailable potential energy is described. This part stems from the water vapor that can be converted into the liquid phase. An energy gain results when the potential energy of the condensate relative to a reference height exceeds the energy necessary to condensate the water vapor. It is shown that this can be the case in a saturated atmosphere without convective available potential energy. Finally, simulations with the numerical cloud model HURMOD are performed to estimate the usability of the device in practice. Indeed, a positive energy output results in a simulation with immediate gathering of the condensate. On the contrary, potential energy gained falls significantly short of the necessary energy for forming the condensate when a realistic cloud microphysical scheme allowing re-evaporation of condensate is applied. Taken together it can be concluded that, a utilization of atmospheric potential energy is hypothetically possible but the practical realization is probably not feasible.

  5. Further tests of entreaties to avoid hypothetical bias in referendum contingent valuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Brown; Icek Ajzen; Daniel Hrubes

    2003-01-01

    Over-estimation of willingness to pay in contingent markets has been attributed largely to hypothetical bias. One promising approach for avoiding hypothetical bias is to tell respondents enough about such bias that they self-correct for it. A script designed for this purpose by Cummings and Taylor was used in hypothetical referenda that differed in payment amount. In...

  6. The multiple roles of hypothetical gene BPSS1356 in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hokchai Yam

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is an opportunistic pathogen and the causative agent of melioidosis. It is able to adapt to harsh environments and can live intracellularly in its infected hosts. In this study, identification of transcriptional factors that associate with the β' subunit (RpoC of RNA polymerase was performed. The N-terminal region of this subunit is known to trigger promoter melting when associated with a sigma factor. A pull-down assay using histidine-tagged B. pseudomallei RpoC N-terminal region as bait showed that a hypothetical protein BPSS1356 was one of the proteins bound. This hypothetical protein is conserved in all B. pseudomallei strains and present only in the Burkholderia genus. A BPSS1356 deletion mutant was generated to investigate its biological function. The mutant strain exhibited reduced biofilm formation and a lower cell density during the stationary phase of growth in LB medium. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that the ΔBPSS1356 mutant cells had a shrunken cytoplasm indicative of cell plasmolysis and a rougher surface when compared to the wild type. An RNA microarray result showed that a total of 63 genes were transcriptionally affected by the BPSS1356 deletion with fold change values of higher than 4. The expression of a group of genes encoding membrane located transporters was concurrently down-regulated in ΔBPSS1356 mutant. Amongst the affected genes, the putative ion transportation genes were the most severely suppressed. Deprivation of BPSS1356 also down-regulated the transcriptions of genes for the arginine deiminase system, glycerol metabolism, type III secretion system cluster 2, cytochrome bd oxidase and arsenic resistance. It is therefore obvious that BPSS1356 plays a multiple regulatory roles on many genes.

  7. A Theory on the Ventilation over Hypothetical Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Ho; Ng, Chi-To; Wong, Colman C. C.

    2013-04-01

    Urban roughness is one of the major factors affecting the flows and turbulence structures in the bottom of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Whereas, our understanding of their relation is limited. In this paper, we attempt to examine the interaction among aerodynamic resistance (friction factor f), ventilation (air exchange rate ACH), and pollutant removal (pollutant removal rate PCH). Using the method of characteristic, analytical solution shows that the turbulent ventilation of a hypothetical urban area is directly proportional to the square root of friction factor (ACH? f1-2) regardless of the building geometry. Next, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) sensitivity tests are performed to verify the theory. In addition to the commonly employed rectangular building models, seven types of urban roughness elements, in the form of idealized building models, are tested. As a pilot study, the building models are of the same height so a roof level is easily defined across the entire hypothetical urban areas. Two configurations of passive scalar sources, ground-level-only (vehicular emission) and all-solid-boundary (heat dissipation), are employed to contrast their transport behaviors. To look into the mechanism of ventilation and pollutant removal, the ACH and PCH are partitioned into their respective mean and turbulent components. The CFD results show that both the ventilation and pollutant removal are mainly attributed to their turbulent components (over 60%). Moreover, the ACH″ and f1-2 calculation from the CFD results agree very well with the analytical solution (correlation coefficient over 0.9). However, the pollutant and heat exhibit different removal behaviors so simple estimates using friction factor have not yet arrived. Because of the substantial aged air removal by ACH″ and its linear relation with f1-2, it is proposed to use friction factor, which can be determined by wind tunnel experiments or mathematical modeling, as a

  8. Radiological Consequence Analyses Following a Hypothetical Severe Accident in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Juyub; Kim, Juyoul [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In order to reflect the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, a simulator which is named NANAS (Northeast Asia Nuclear Accident Simulator) for overseas nuclear accident has been developed. It is composed of three modules: source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion prediction and dose assessment. For the source-term estimation module, the representative reactor types were selected as CPR1000, BWR5 and BWR6 for China, Japan and Taiwan, respectively. Considering the design characteristics of each reactor type, the source-term estimation module simulates the transient of design basis accident and severe accident. The atmospheric dispersion prediction module analyzes the transport and dispersion of radioactive materials and prints out the air and ground concentration. Using the concentration result, the dose assessment module calculates effective dose and thyroid dose in the Korean Peninsula region. In this study, a hypothetical severe accident in Japan was simulated to demonstrate the function of NANAS. As a result, the radiological consequence to Korea was estimated from the accident. PC-based nuclear accident simulator, NANAS, has been developed. NANAS contains three modules: source-term estimation, atmospheric dispersion prediction and dose assessment. The source-term estimation module simulates a nuclear accident for the representative reactor types in China, Japan and Taiwan. Since the maximum calculation speed is 16 times than real time, it is possible to estimate the source-term release swiftly in case of the emergency. The atmospheric dispersion prediction module analyzes the transport and dispersion of radioactive materials in wide range including the Northeast Asia. Final results of the dose assessment module are a map projection and time chart of effective dose and thyroid dose. A hypothetical accident in Japan was simulated by NANAS. The radioactive materials were released during the first 24 hours and the source

  9. Disability and marginal utility of income: evidence from hypothetical choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tengstam, Sven

    2014-03-01

    It is often assumed that disability reduces the marginal utility of income. In this article, individuals' marginal utility of income in two states-(i) paralyzed in both legs from birth and (ii) not mobility impaired at all-is measured through hypothetical choices between imagined lotteries behind a so-called veil of ignorance. The outcomes of the lotteries include both income and disability status. It is found that most people have higher marginal utility when paralyzed than when not mobility impaired at all. The two marginal utilities are evaluated at the same levels of income. Having personal experience of mobility impairment and supporting the Left Party, the Social Democratic Party, the Green Party, or the Liberal Party are associated with having a higher marginal utility when paralyzed. The results suggest that more than full insurance of income losses connected to being disabled is optimal. The results further suggest that, given a utilitarian social welfare function, resources should be transferred to rather than from disabled people. Finally, if the transfers are not large enough to smooth out the marginal utilities of the disabled and the nondisabled, distributional weights based on disability status should be used in cost-benefit analysis.

  10. Comprehensive computerized medical imaging: interim hypothetical economic evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Rebecca N.; Fisher, Paul D.; Nosil, Josip

    1990-08-01

    The 422-bed Victoria General Hospital (VGH) and Siemens Electric Limited have since 1983 been piloting the implementation of comprehensive computerized medical imaging, including digital acquisition of diagnostic images, in British Columbia. Although full PACS is not yet in place at VGH, experience to date habeen used to project annual cost figures (including capital replacement) for a fully-computerized department. The resulting economic evaluation has been labelled hypothetical to emphasize that some key cost components were estimated rather than observed; this paper presents updated cost figures based on recent revisions to proposed departmental equipment configuration which raised the cost of conventional imaging equipment by 0.3 million* and lowered the cost of computerized imaging equipment by 0.8 million. Compared with conventional diagnostic imaging, computerized imaging appears to raise overall annual costs at VGH by nearly 0.7 million, or 11.6%; this is more favourable than the previous results, which indicated extra annual costs of 1 million (16.9%). Sensitivity analysis still indicates that all reasonable changes in the underlying assumptions result in higher costs for computerized imaging than for conventional imaging. Computerized imaging offers lower radiation exposure to patients, shorter waiting times, and other potential advantages, but as yet the price of obtaining these benefits remains substantial.

  11. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E.; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K.; Hauser, Brad G.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Snurr, Randall Q.

    2012-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  12. Large-scale screening of hypothetical metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, Christopher E; Leaf, Michael; Lee, Chang Yeon; Farha, Omar K; Hauser, Brad G; Hupp, Joseph T; Snurr, Randall Q

    2011-11-06

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous materials constructed from modular molecular building blocks, typically metal clusters and organic linkers. These can, in principle, be assembled to form an almost unlimited number of MOFs, yet materials reported to date represent only a tiny fraction of the possible combinations. Here, we demonstrate a computational approach to generate all conceivable MOFs from a given chemical library of building blocks (based on the structures of known MOFs) and rapidly screen them to find the best candidates for a specific application. From a library of 102 building blocks we generated 137,953 hypothetical MOFs and for each one calculated the pore-size distribution, surface area and methane-storage capacity. We identified over 300 MOFs with a predicted methane-storage capacity better than that of any known material, and this approach also revealed structure-property relationships. Methyl-functionalized MOFs were frequently top performers, so we selected one such promising MOF and experimentally confirmed its predicted capacity.

  13. Adolescents' explicit and implicit evaluations of hypothetical and actual peers with different bullying participant roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, J Loes; Lansu, Tessa A M; Cillessen, Antonius H N

    2017-07-01

    This study examined how adolescents evaluate bullying at three levels of specificity: (a) the general concept of bullying, (b) hypothetical peers in different bullying participant roles, and (c) actual peers in different bullying participant roles. Participants were 163 predominantly ethnic majority adolescents in The Netherlands (58% girls; Mage=16.34years, SD=0.79). For the hypothetical peers, we examined adolescents' explicit evaluations as well as their implicit evaluations. Adolescents evaluated the general concept of bullying negatively. Adolescents' explicit evaluations of hypothetical and actual peers in the bullying roles depended on their own role, but adolescents' implicit evaluations of hypothetical peers did not. Adolescents' explicit evaluations of hypothetical peers and actual peers were different. Hypothetical bullies were evaluated negatively by all classmates, whereas hypothetical victims were evaluated relatively positively compared with the other roles. However, when adolescents evaluated their actual classmates, the differences between bullies and the other roles were smaller, whereas victims were evaluated the most negatively of all roles. Further research should take into account that adolescents' evaluations of hypothetical peers differ from their evaluations of actual peers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. 47 CFR 69.608 - Carrier Common Line hypothetical net balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carrier Common Line hypothetical net balance. 69.608 Section 69.608 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER... net balance. The hypothetical net balance shall be equal to a Carrier Common Line revenue...

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302800056 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rffii MQTCLRSTTGGKSFFQVESTRESFATLLKSCARANDLATGRALHFEILHSDHNGDKLLDELLLQMYGKCGSVEDARLLFNRFPETDLVAWTTVLIWHARGGR...3:1869 3244:1869 3245:1869 3246:1869 88036:1869 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_115235 Selaginella moellendo

  16. Protein (Viridiplantae): 613798 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 601 3688:1895 ... 238069:1895 ... 3689:1895 ... 3694:1895 ... hypothetical protein POPTR_0005s01830g Populus trichocarpa MARIFRGNETQANTDRIVGAHGYMSPEYAMEGLFSIKSDVFSFGLLVLEIVSAGASSVTNVTITAIDAR

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255595521 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 4 235880:12154 3987:12154 3988:12154 conserved hypothetical protein Ricinus communis MEPTLRLRKISSRLGLVEVPAGC...GVGESFLLGWMLSLNGQGASCHLHAYSEGVRSTAPASHIYSSIILIEGPSEIGRTGPGREQHRSGNSPTRRSKAISDMEKMKLT ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302783875 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :3143 3244:3143 3245:3143 3246:3143 88036:3143 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_19889, partial Selaginella moellendorffii FRGVRKRPWGKFAAEIRDPWKKRRIWLGTFDTAEEAAEAYDNANRSMRGANAVTNFATPA ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302787983 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available :3143 3244:3143 3245:3143 3246:3143 88036:3143 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_59974, partial Selaginella moellendorffii HFRGVRKRPWGKFAAEIRDPWKKRRIWLGTFDTAEEAAEAYDNANRSMRGANAVTNF ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108116 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_48545, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis LQAYAICKHMRSA...SVCALQAYGMCKRMRSASICDVQAYALCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICNQMRSASIL

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108115 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_48554, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis VQAYAICKHMRSA...SVCALQAYGMCKRMQSASICDVQAYALCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICNQMRSASIL

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108097 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70912 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SICDLQAYVICKHIPYAICKHTPYAICKHMPYAICKHIPLCDLQAYAIMRSASICNYAIGKHMPLCDLQAYAICDLQAYTICDLQAYAICDLQAYAICKHMRSA...SICDLQAYMICKHIICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICDLQAYAICKHMPYAICKHMPYAICKHMRSASICNLQAYAICDLQAYVICKHT

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108084 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70645, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SICHIRCASICDLQAYATSDVQAYAICKHMPDAICKHMPHSMCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHLPDTICKHMPHSMCKHMRSA...SICDLQAYAICKHMPSASICQMRSASICHIRCASICDLQAYARCDLQAYATFDVQTYAICKHLRSASICDLQAYAICKHMPHSMCKH

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108101 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_81968 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...RICDLQAYAICDLQAYAKCKHLPNASICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMRYAICKHMHYAHMRSASICHLQAYAICDLQAYAICDLQAYAICELQAYAICAIYAICKHMRSA...SICNMQVYAICKHMRSASRCTYAICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMCCILLNHNWMVASEDTDLEEFHPLK

  5. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108104 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_71475 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...GICHMLAYAICKHMPYAICKHMPLCDLQAYAIMRSSSICHYAICKHMQSASICHMFAYAICKHMPYAICKHMPCAICKHMPYAICGHMRSASICHMLAYAI...CKHMPYAICKHMPLTICKHMPLCDQQAYAICKHMPYVCICDLQAYAIMRSAGICDLQAYAIMLSAGICDLQAYVICLHMRSASICHMRSASICH

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108089 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70544 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SICHYTICKHMPYAICKHMRSASICHYAICKHMPYAICKHIPYAICEHMPYATCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMRSHMPYAICKHMRSASICHYAICKHMPYAICKHIPYAICEHMPYATCKHMRS...ASICDLQAYAICKHIRSASICDLQAYAICKHMPSVICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICDLQACAICKHMRSTSICHYAICKHMPSCHLQAYAIMRSASISHYAICKHMPSCDLQAYAIMRSASICHYAICKHMPL

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108090 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_62437, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SICHIRCASICELQAYAICKHVRSASICDRQAYAICKHMPDTICKHMPHSMCKHMRSASICQIRPASICHIRCASICDLQAYATCKHMRAAS...ICDRQAYAICKHMPDAICKHMPHSMCKHMRSASICQMRSASICHIRCASICDLQAYARCDLQAYAICKHMRSASICQIRCASICDL

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108099 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70990, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SICDLQAYAICKHLGCASICDAQAYAIWKHMRSASICDLQVYALCKHIGCASVCDLQAYAIICDLQAYAICKHMRCASICALQAYAICKHMRYYMRSA...SICDLQAYATCKHMPYAICKHMPYAICKHMPYAICKHMPYAICKHMRSASICHMRSASICDLQAYAICDLQAYAMLCLLCLL

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255597448 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 235880:12448 3987:12448 3988:12448 conserved hypothetical protein Ricinus communis MDEKKLFENFQLTFGRMISPFEIEDIQKWIHEDNMPIEVVNLALREAV...ENNKISWKYINKILVDWYKSGDTTVEKVRDRLQRFDDSKKQRSVTTSNVPSWSNPDYKEPDLKEFALGSMDGIEDGSGDF ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 232868 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3051:4703 ... 3052:4703 ... 3055:4703 ... hypothetical protein CHLREDRAFT_120274, partial Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PPGCRCSSAPPGCRC...SSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCSSAPPGCRCS

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855320 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7:8434 3068:8434 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_34874, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis APGCIGHRGVLGTGVYWVPGCIG...YRGVLGTGVYWVPGCIGCRGVLGTGVYWVPGCIGYRSVLGTGVYWAPGCIGYRGVLGTGVYWAPGCIGHRGILGTGVYWVPGCIGHRGVLGTGVYWVPGCIGYRGVLGTGVYWVP ...

  12. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302838304 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 614 3068:1614 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_91172 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMG...RGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMG...RGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMG...RGWRLAAGLEAGAAEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAAEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGTVEPLLEMG...RGWRLAAGLEAETVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWHLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWRLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMGRGWCLAAGLEAGAVEPLLEMG

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 407197 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0 147369:600 ... 147429:4988 ... 4557:6314 ... 4558:6314 ... hypothetical protein SORBIDRAFT_07g012211, partial Sorghum bicolor MGLRADLALDVGLLHSLRKARQPGGVTRLVSCAEDQLPSYRGLRIGHTLQIPSFSRHPRTGDWFR

  14. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302841988 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 5795 3068:5795 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_93289 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MSAIWDLFRHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKTGEEAIP...QLRRESKALSAAWNLFRHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKTGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWNLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRES...KALSAAWNLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWNLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKMGEEAIP...QLRRESKALSAAWDLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWDLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRARRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWDL...FGHPDSTAAAVHVRVRRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWDLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRVRRTIAGDKMGEEAIPQLRRESKALSAAWDLFGHPDSTAAAVHVRVRRTIAGDKMGEEAIP

  15. Protein (Viridiplantae): 358346306 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 163742:13597 3877:13597 3880:13597 hypothetical protein MTR_077s0021 Medicago truncatula MPHVHQSEVKASAQKAPLHIRPVRPRTPPSASPENEPHHHAAEATQYQAAPAQYQAAHDDPHTDAADTHQTDTTEAETPENDRPDHAPVHTL ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 661275970 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 0:1114 ... hypothetical protein, partial Prochlorococcus sp. scB241_527L22 NDTDIASNASNISSNTTNITSNDTDISSLQSLIS...TKSGTTTTTRIGNSTQNILEIGPTNNPATINQTGISISGSNLIKKDSDGNIHIGKNSFVIGDDVLSGAHPIWAEDENDNKIPLNVYGSDLQVNGVSIQNQIDNNSSSITTNSTNISSN

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302824246 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available la moellendorffii QARRLENEIDAKLASFGRPDQSGEDCEAEIERLLKQLQQINSSMQSLMSAIGSDIVSHTLARHLNISHEFLSQEFKRKRAIAKDNREHAE...3243:6945 3244:6945 3245:6945 3246:6945 88036:6945 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_137579, partial Selaginel

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302812313 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available la moellendorffii QARRLENEIDAKLASFGRPDQSGEDCEAEIERLLKQLQQINSSMQSLMSAIGSDIVSHTLARHLNISHEFLSQEFKRKRAIAKDNREHAE...3243:6945 3244:6945 3245:6945 3246:6945 88036:6945 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_126835, partial Selaginel

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357498705 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 163742:19453 3877:19453 3880:19453 hypothetical protein MTR_6g060530 Medicago truncatula MLLRVFSLWPNNGHPLCASVEDAHDPNMSQTNFLYTGCGPLTFLSHNLNFSRQGKIKWKFQPKIRLVNWRLLRQEWPDAVYGNDKGFWEKE ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855141 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7:8412 3068:8412 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_84766, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis SLSLSSSLSLSSFSLSSFSLSSLSLSLSSSLSLSSSLS...LSLSLSLSLSSCLSSSPSLSSLSLSSSSLSLSLSSFSLSSSLSLSSLSLSSLSLSSLSL ...

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357508087 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available LLFVEMHRSDKVQLQFGLPLDIPEEPSCMQKYHDMDLRRQPETSSALKFPKKFKCGKISIPPLKNEDSSGLTTHPNKSAESPTWL ... ... 163742:15062 3877:15062 3880:15062 hypothetical protein MTR_7g082100 Medicago truncatula MDDTACMGGYDSLETAEH

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302829907 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 25 3068:2725 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_32173, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis TQRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTLRAMPA...MTLRAMLEMTQRAKPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAKPAMTLRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTLRAMPA...MTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAMPAMTLRAMPAMTQRAMPAMTLRAMPA...MTQRAKPVMTLRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTLRAMPAMTQRAKPAMTQRAMPAMTQRAMPAMTQ ...

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855917 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7:8473 3068:8473 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_36132, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis GGCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMT...SGKEVTRRDASSAGGCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMTSGKEVTRRDDSSAGGCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMTSGKEVTRRDDSSAGGCITRGDAAAVVAAFGGTRMT...SGKKVTRRDDSSAGGCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMTSGKEVTRRDASSAGSCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMTSGKEVTRRDASSAGGCITRGDAAAAVAAFGGTRMTSGKEVTRREDDSSAGGCITRGDAAAVVASFCGTRMTSGKEVT ...

  4. Protein (Viridiplantae): 709989 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MEDTRSVASFMDSTSSKIQQLQRAFAELESQRAVTLNLKWKELEEHFHGLERSLKRRFHELEDQEKEYETKTRKAQELLE...9:547 3700:547 ... 980083:705 ... 3718:286 ... 81985:286 ... hypothetical protein CARUB_v10026179mg Capsella rubella

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 33862119 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 9:1168 59919:1168 hypothetical protein PMM1563 Prochlorococcus marinus subsp. pastoris str. CCMP1986 MGEAKRRKSLGLPPKQKNTKSKSDESPRIFDWLPLTINQRDSLMKMSIKASWYGIGGLVILWVIVRFIGPAAGWWTPADSL

  6. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357490965 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3742:13978 3877:13978 3880:13978 hypothetical protein MTR_5g072080 Medicago truncatula MAKTMKNEDGMVVVGGLQCSMRLEQLNFDERGLGKEMQKKVDEEIKTLVENDVKVRHWSMFFFMGSDLFDNTGIVYPLNYHTLQVAGITPLIN ...

  7. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302848042 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7084 3068:7084 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_65943, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis LNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQR...LGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHWHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQR...LGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQR...LGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHRLHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQR...LGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCLHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQRLGPTGHCPHLNQR

  8. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357480979 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 163742:17721 3877:17721 3880:17721 hypothetical protein MTR_5g006880 Medicago truncatula MSTPAQPAGENTEPISAHVLMRSSRVTGQSGNGFFGRIDSGGEFKHHPEKFQKQSKTREESRSESQYINQQKLATESWDLRRKRKGK ...

  9. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357472359 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 42:16750 3877:16750 3880:16750 hypothetical protein MTR_4g060620 Medicago truncatula MQSMLNLRATHGVPLCLSGITNPLALSKEMADHDRRRKDMRKQRSVHANQEKGAQSQRKNDFVEMKGDDDLEDLDEILHQLSFTYLTGLSAKAA ...

  10. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357448693 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 163742:14047 3877:14047 3880:14047 hypothetical protein MTR_2g032590 Medicago truncatula MAMIELKKVLVIMFMIIIMLVVVQLCDTTQSKIVDESCAIERFACRAECLITCAGFDNCLEGCFEHCLMCSRNAYADIDCLIHVDDLQQY ...

  11. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302816282 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3:2934 3244:2934 3245:2934 3246:2934 88036:2934 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_19757, partial Selaginella moellendorffii KGNKDGLECAVCLCKYEEREILRLLPKCKHAFHVDCVDTWLGSHSTCPLCRSHV ...

  12. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 434385771 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 2:1223 1173020:1223 ... hypothetical protein Cha6605_1730 Chamaesiphon minutus PCC 6605 MRTATPNLLILTVQTDTNNITG...TAIDADILVNFAVANTEVNQRLFVPEAQLVVTGKFRLGKQLATIGILISSVVVIVSIPAPASAEIADSAVATGAESSTDVKSVVEPEIAAVDVESSAPSTTQPAQSQTRAQKAAATRAAKKAKTKAESVPC

  13. Protein (Viridiplantae): 255623465 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7 235880:14877 3987:14877 3988:14877 conserved hypothetical protein, partial Ricinus communis LRAAALRPLRRRLIHHRLGGRGARTTQAHDL...LLGSADHAGLVVELKQLGADREEAAGHAGVDPFAQAHQIDADSLQFAHDLQQVDDVSREGVQAG

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 268140 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_377988.1 1117:4828 1118:1654 1129:2889 316279:1632 hypothetical protein Syncc990...QWLQRDLIPDSDELERALREMIADSSNDATGLVLDLLTGTTSGPMLHGEHWLMWQRQRHLVNEWLDTLVWPELELVNCCQKTWGDGPFGREKAFYGNDNANRNALTTA

  15. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 354150 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_376105.1 1117:15183 1118:15390 1129:7873 316279:127 hypothetical protein Syncc99...RAISIAYLMNYQCINIFGLDPSTPLSWYHEDERDKILQKEIVVTDYFNAWRDMRIKNLKEFDVRKSEFSLIKSLFYTIYVMNKLFKAKGLNIPKINIVTSDPIVINCCSFFCGDISNVSINRL ...

  16. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 268136 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_380672.1 1117:4828 1118:1654 1129:2889 110662:356 hypothetical protein Syncc9605...WLQRDLIPESDELQRAVRDMIADSSNDATGLVVDLLTGTTSGPALHGERWELWTQQRRLINGWLQSLAWPELEAVNCCQKTWGDGPYGREKMFYGADNSNRNGLSTAA

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302855576 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 7:8457 3068:8457 hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_70683 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MYVCIGGGNLGEGRKEVKRVKRSAKGQKGWGVLGQVCWGRC...AGAGVLGQVCWGRCAGAGVLGQVCWGRCVGAGVLGQVCWGRCVGAGVLGQVCWGRCAGAGVLGQVCWGRCAGAGVLGQVCWGRCVGAGVLGQVCWGRCAGAGVLGQVCWGRC...AGAGVLGQVCWGRCVGAGVLGQVCWGRCAGAGVLGQVCWVRCVCVCGSMCQVKTSL ...

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302785031 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3:3112 3244:3112 3245:3112 3246:3112 88036:3112 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_101273 Selaginella moellendorffii MQAPGDPKSDQSVVECAICLTELEEAIVRVLPSCNHVFHRSCIDLWLSCNTTCPICRRDLVANHRS ...

  19. Protein (Viridiplantae): 302807935 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3:3112 3244:3112 3245:3112 3246:3112 88036:3112 hypothetical protein SELMODRAFT_122663 Selaginella moellendorffii MQAPGDPKSAQSVVECAICLTRLKEAIVRVLPGCNHVFHRSCIDLWLSCNTTCPICRHDLVANHRS ...

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 188576 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 65:1947 ... 3066:1947 ... 3067:1947 ... 3068:1947 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_62572, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis PPSSVTHTRI...PPSSVTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHSRIPPSSGTHSRIPPPSGTHTRIPPPSGTHTRIPPSSVTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIP...PSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPSSGTHTRIPPLGRLLLTAAKQHT

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 357492795 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 163742:18935 3877:18935 3880:18935 hypothetical protein MTR_5g083180 Medicago truncatula MTKEKEKREKNPKNRAQPGASSLKTDFNSDGGACQKVTSNLEERPSLAKKYAQWLPSRSTCWKEMLRICSFNPKIITNKEAHTCIRE ...

  2. 布氏锥虫未知CCCH-型锌指蛋白TbZC3H8功能特性的初步分析%Characterization of the hypothetical CCCH-type zinc-finger protein TbZC3H8 in Trypanosoma brucei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷霁卿; 刘罗根; 郭学敏

    2013-01-01

    Objective To characterize the properties and functions of putative zinc-finger protein TbZC3H8 in Trypanosoma brucei.Methods Sequence analysis and motifs/domains prediction were performed through the protein database searches.An inducible RNAi cell line was generated to study the effect of TbZC3H8 repression on cell viability,and the RNAi knockdown efficiency was estimated by RT-QPCR and Western blot.The cell line ectopically expressing C-terminal mycTAP tagged TbZC3H8 was generated and used to identify the composition of TbZC3H8 protein complexes through the combination of tandem affinity purification and mass spectrometric analysis.Subcellular localization of the TbZC3H8 protein was determined by immunofluorescence microscopy.Results The CCCH zinc-finger motif of TbZC3H8 is highly conserved in kinetoplastid parasites.Repression of TbZC3H8 by RNAi resulted in the growth inhibition.The TbZC3H8 protein complex was found to contain both unknown proteins and RNA-binding proteins.TbZC3H8 was found to localize in the cytoplasm and the expression level was not changed upon the heat shock and serum starvation.Conclusion TbZC3H8 is essential for the growth of T.brucei.The binding of ZC3H8 with RNA-binding proteins suggested that ZC3H8 might play a role in RNA processing and metabolism.%目的 通过RNAi和蛋白复合物鉴定来初步分析布氏锥虫未知锌指蛋白TbZC3H8的特性及功能.方法 运用蛋白数据库和分析软件对TbZC3H8进行序列分析和结构域预测;构建RNAi诱导表达细胞株分析TbZC3H8经RNAi敲低后对锥虫生长的影响,并通过RT-QPCR和Western blot检测RNAi干扰效率;构建异位融合表达myc-TAP标签的TbZC3H8细胞株,采用串联亲和纯化合并质谱鉴定其蛋白复合物组成;采用免疫荧光分析蛋白定位.结果 TbZC3H8的CCCH结构域在动基体原虫中高度保守;RNAi下调TbZC3H8后明显抑制了锥虫复制;TbZC3H8蛋白复合物中包含多种未知蛋白

  3. The gene expression data of Mycobacterium tuberculosis based on Affymetrix gene chips provide insight into regulatory and hypothetical genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Liu Casey S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis remains a leading infectious disease with global public health threat. Its control and management have been complicated by multi-drug resistance and latent infection, which prompts scientists to find new and more effective drugs. With the completion of the genome sequence of the etiologic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is now feasible to search for new drug targets by sieving through a large number of gene products and conduct genome-scale experiments based on microarray technology. However, the full potential of genome-wide microarray analysis in configuring interrelationships among all genes in M. tuberculosis has yet to be realized. To date, it is only possible to assign a function to 52% of proteins predicted in the genome. Results We conducted a functional-genomics study using the high-resolution Affymetrix oligonucleotide GeneChip. Approximately one-half of the genes were found to be always expressed, including more than 100 predicted conserved hypotheticals, in the genome of M. tuberculosis during the log phase of in vitro growth. The gene expression profiles were analyzed and visualized through cluster analysis to epitomize the full details of genomic behavior. Broad patterns derived from genome-wide expression experiments in this study have provided insight into the interrelationships among genes in the basic cellular processes of M. tuberculosis. Conclusion Our results have confirmed several known gene clusters in energy production, information pathways, and lipid metabolism, and also hinted at potential roles of hypothetical and regulatory proteins.

  4. [Science in the crosshairs of enlightenment. Significance of hypothetical thinking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    To further the enlightenment primarily or even only by means of science was the hope of most representatives of the movement of the enlightenment which gave its name to a whole period of European cultural history. Only a few of its representatives, like Montesquieu and Rousseau, doubted for good reasons, whether and how the goals of the enlightenment can be reached at all by the means of science alone. In his Discours préliminaires to the Encyclopédie D'Alembert still wanted to limit science proper to the narrower field of those kinds of research which were strictly based on observations and calculations alone. In this way he remained committed to Descartes' ideal method of receiving authentic knowledge only by deduction from evident axioms or fundamental theorems. Pascal's casual discovery of the calculation of probabilities allowed to apply mathematics on the hidden laws of the apparent casualties of the human life world. Bacon's project of empirical science as a rational and methodological art of conducting experiments could replace the methodological ideal of science more geometrico. Lichtenberg's refined sensibility for the subjunctive linguistic forms of hypothetical thinking indicates a new understanding of inventing and testing hypotheses as the two most important methods of the experimental sciences when compared to the formal sciences of logic and mathematics. Whoever is studying the history of science of modern times in the cross wire of the enlightenment, will realize soon that science has always been in need of being illuminated about its own chances, risks and side effects. The project of enlightenment through science had to be complemented by the project of an enlightenment about science right from its beginning. Because of the implicit risks and side effects the project of enlightenment has to be enlightenment despite of science and because of science. On the one hand, as a special form of human practice the sciences are directed towards

  5. MODFLOW-NWT model of a hypothetical stream-aquifer system to assess capture map bias

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A MODFLOW-NWT (version 1.0.9) model of a hypothetical stream-aquifer system is presented for the evaluation and characterization of capture map bias. The...

  6. Explaining the discrepancy between intentions and actions: the case of hypothetical bias in contingent valuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajzen, Icek; Brown, Thomas C; Carvajal, Franklin

    2004-09-01

    An experiment was designed to account for intention-behavior discrepancies by applying the theory of planned behavior to contingent valuation. College students (N = 160) voted in hypothetical and real payment referenda to contribute $8 to a scholarship fund. Overestimates of willingness to pay in the hypothetical referendum could not be attributed to moderately favorable latent dispositions. Instead, this hypothetical bias was explained by activation of more favorable beliefs and attitudes in the context of a hypothetical rather than a real referendum. A corrective entreaty was found to eliminate this bias by bringing beliefs, attitudes, and intentions in line with those in the real payment situation. As a result, the theory of planned behavior produced more accurate prediction of real payment when participants were exposed to the corrective entreaty.

  7. Detection and Mitigation of Hypothetical Bias in Contingent Valuation With An Application To Curbside Recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Aadland, David; Caplan, Arthur J.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we use a unique curbside-recycling data set to test the effectiveness of "cheap talk" and "preference uncertainty" in mitigating hypothetical bias in contingent valuation. The sample includes two types of households-those located in communities with curbside recycling programs (mandatory or voluntary) and those in communities without curbside recycling. Using stated and revealed preference data, detect significant hypothetical bias. Cheap talk and preference-uncertainty control...

  8. Mitigating Hypothetical Bias in Stated Preference Data: Evidence from Sports Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    John Whitehead; Melissa S. Weddell; Pete Groothuis

    2014-01-01

    One of the major criticisms of stated preference data is hypothetical bias. Using a unique data set of both stated and actual behavior we test for hypothetical bias of stated preference survey responses. We consider whether respondents tend to overstate their participatory sporting event behavior ex ante when compared to their actual behavior at different registration fees. We find that behavioral intentions accurately predicts actual behavior at a middle level of respondent certainty, over p...

  9. Proceedings of the Conference on Hypothetical Reasoning, 23-24 August 2014, Tübingen

    OpenAIRE

    Piecha, Thomas; Schroeder-Heister, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Hypothetical reasoning or reasoning under assumptions is a key concept of logic, philosophy of science and mathematics. The Conference on Hypothetical Reasoning focussed on its logical aspects, such as assumption-based calculi and their proof theory, logical consequence from a proof-theoretic or model-theoretic point of view, logics of conditionals, proof systems, structure of assumption-based proofs, hypotheses in proof-theoretic semantics, notions of implication, substructural logics, hy...

  10. Contribution of sponge genes to unravel the genome of the hypothetical ancestor of Metazoa (Urmetazoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Schröder, H C; Skorokhod, A; Bünz, C; Müller, I M; Grebenjuk, V A

    2001-10-03

    Recently the term Urmetazoa, as the hypothetical metazoan ancestor, was introduced to highlight the finding that all metazoan phyla including the Porifera (sponges) are derived from one common ancestor. Sponges as the evolutionarily oldest, still extant phylum, are provided with a complex network of structural and functional molecules. Analyses of sponge genomes from Demospongiae (Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium), Calcarea (Sycon raphanus) and Hexactinellida (Aphrocallistes vastus) have contributed also to the reconstruction of the evolutionary position of Metazoa with respect to Fungi. Furthermore, these analyses have provided evidence that the characteristic evolutionary novelties of Metazoa, such as the extracellular matrix molecules, the cell surface receptors, the nervous signal transduction molecules as well as the immune molecule existing in Porifera, share high sequence and in some aspects also functional similarities to related polypeptides found in other metazoan phyla. During the transition to Metazoa new domains occurred; as one example, the formation of the death domain from the ankyrin is outlined. In parallel, domanial proteins have been formed, such as the receptor tyrosine kinases. The metazoan essentials have been defined by analyzing and comparing the sponge sequences with the related sequences from the metazoans Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The data revealed that those sponge molecules grouped to cell adhesion cell recognition proteins are predominantly found in Protostomia and Deuterostomia while they are missing in Fungi and Viridiplantae. Moreover, evidence is presented allowing the conclusion that the sponge molecules are more closely related to the corresponding molecules from H. sapiens than to those of C. elegans or D. melanogaster. Especially surprising was the finding that the Demospongiae are provided with elements of

  11. Steeper delay and probability discounting of potentially real versus hypothetical cigarettes (but not money) among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ryan M; Lawyer, Steven R

    2014-10-01

    There is a strong relationship between drug use and the tendency to discount the value of outcomes as a function of their delay and probability. Most discounting researchers use hypothetical monetary outcomes to establish discounting patterns among human subjects, who tend to discount the value of hypothetical money and real money similarily. However, no research to date has examined whether hypothetical non-monetary outcomes are discounted similarly to real non-monetary outcomes. In this study, smokers were assigned randomly to complete delay and probability discounting tasks for money and cigarettes that were either potentially real (n=33) or hypothetical (n=31). Consistent with previous research, smokers discounted the value of hypothetical and potentially real money similarly. However, smokers evidenced steeper rates of discounting for potentially real cigarettes in both delay and probability discounting. These findings suggest domain-specific discounting patterns in which potentially real and hypothetical outcomes may be synonymous in the context of monetary outcomes, but not in the context of non-monetary outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The hypothetical world of CoMFA and model validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oprea, T.I. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    CoMFA is a technique used to establish the three-dimensional similarity of molecular structures, in relationship to a target property. Because the risk of chance correlation is high, validation is required for all CoMFA models. The following validation steps should be performed: the choice of alignment rules (superimposition and conformer criteria) has to use experimental data when available, or different (alternate) hypotheses; statistical methods (e.g., cross-validation with randomized groups), have to emphasize simplicity, robustness, predictivity and explanatory power. When several CoMFA-QSAR models on similar targets and/or structures are available, qualitative lateral validation can be applied. This meta-analysis for CoMFA models offers a broader perspective on the similarities and differences between compared biological targets, with potential applications in rational drug design [e.g., selectivity, efficacy] and environmental toxicology. Examples that focus on validation of CoMFA models include the following steroid-binding proteins: aromatase, the estrogen and the androgen receptors, a monoclonal antibody against progesterone and two steroid binding globulins.

  13. Identification of a Hypothetical Protein from Podospora anserina as a Nitroalkane Oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tormos, Jose R.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Daubner, S. Colette; Hart, P. John; Fitzpatrick, Paul F. (Texas-HSC); (St. Mary)

    2010-08-23

    The flavoprotein nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of primary and secondary nitroalkanes to their respective aldehydes and ketones. Structurally, the enzyme is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. To date no enzymes other than that from F. oxysporum have been annotated as NAOs. To identify additional potential NAOs, the available database was searched for enzymes in which the active site residues Asp402, Arg409, and Ser276 were conserved. Of the several fungal enzymes identified in this fashion, PODANSg2158 from Podospora anserina was selected for expression and characterization. The recombinant enzyme is a flavoprotein with activity on nitroalkanes comparable to the F. oxysporum NAO, although the substrate specificity is somewhat different. Asp399, Arg406, and Ser273 in PODANSg2158 correspond to the active site triad in F. oxysporum NAO. The k{sub cat}/K{sub M}-pH profile with nitroethane shows a pK{sub a} of 5.9 that is assigned to Asp399 as the active site base. Mutation of Asp399 to asparagine decreases the k{sub cat}/K{sub M} value for nitroethane over 2 orders of magnitude. The R406K and S373A mutations decrease this kinetic parameter by 64- and 3-fold, respectively. The structure of PODANSg2158 has been determined at a resolution of 2.0 {angstrom}, confirming its identification as an NAO.

  14. The effect of the solemn oath script in hypothetical choice experiment survey: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magistris, de T.; Pascucci, S.

    2014-01-01

    We test the effect of the solemn oath (HO) in Hypothetical CE Survey (CE). We conducted CE surveys with three treatments: (1) CE without a cognitive task, (2) CE with a CT script, and (3) CE with a HO. Results generally suggest lower WTPs values with the HO, than without the HO script.

  15. An Assessment of the Hypothetical Impact of Drug Abuse on Combat Capability. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    25 I .4 Jill 1.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAt BIURIA OF gMANI£ IWOI) A LEVEL AD SAI-80-113-WA AN ASSESSMENT OF THE HYPOTHETICAL IMPACTo OF...potential loss of unit effectiveness in each of these units. The resulting measure of unit effectiveness provides a powerful analy- tic tool for comparing

  16. Developing a Hypothetical Multi-Dimensional Learning Progression for the Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Shawn Y.; Delgado, Cesar; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    We describe efforts toward the development of a hypothetical learning progression (HLP) for the growth of grade 7-14 students' models of the structure, behavior and properties of matter, as it relates to nanoscale science and engineering (NSE). This multi-dimensional HLP, based on empirical research and standards documents, describes how students…

  17. Can a Repeated Opt-Out Reminder remove hypothetical bias in discrete choice experiments?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Mohammed Hussen; Olsen, Søren Bøye

    Recent papers have suggested that use of a so-called Repeated Opt-Out Reminder (ROOR) might mitigate hypothetical bias in stated Discrete Choice Experiments (DCE), but evidence so far has only been circumstantial. We provide the first comprehensive test of whether a ROOR can actually mitigate...

  18. What We Say and What We Do: The Relationship between Real and Hypothetical Moral Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    FeldmanHall, Oriel; Mobbs, Dean; Evans, Davy; Hiscox, Lucy; Navrady, Lauren; Dalgleish, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Moral ideals are strongly ingrained within society and individuals alike, but actual moral choices are profoundly influenced by tangible rewards and consequences. Across two studies we show that real moral decisions can dramatically contradict moral choices made in hypothetical scenarios (Study 1). However, by systematically enhancing the…

  19. The impact of arbitrarily applicable relational responding on evaluative learning about hypothetical money and shock outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Simon; Molet, Mikael; Davies, Lynette

    2017-08-01

    Evaluative learning comprises changes in preferences after co-occurrences between conditioned stimuli (CSs) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) of affective value. Co-occurrences may involve relational responding. Two experiments examined the impact of arbitrary relational responding on evaluative preferences for hypothetical money and shock outcomes. In Experiment 1, participants were trained to make arbitrary relational responses by placing CSs of the same size but different colours into boxes and were then instructed that these CSs represented different intensities of hypothetical USs (money or shock). Liking ratings of the CSs were altered in accordance with the underlying bigger/smaller than relations. A reversal of preference was also observed: the CS associated with the smallest hypothetical shock was rated more positively than the CS associated with the smallest amount of hypothetical money. In Experiment 2, procedures from Relational Frame Theory (RFT) established a relational network of more than/less than relations consisting of five CSs (A-B-C-D-E). Overall, evaluative preferences were altered, but not reversed, depending on (a) how stimuli had been related to one another during the learning phase and (b) whether those stimuli referred to money or shocks. The contribution of RFT to evaluative learning research is discussed.

  20. Understanding Solitude: Young Children's Attitudes and Responses toward Hypothetical Socially Withdrawn Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Robert J.; Girardi, Alberta; Findlay, Leanne C.; Frohlick, Sherri L.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to explore young children's attitudes and responses to different forms of social withdrawal by eliciting responses to hypothetical vignettes. Participants included 137 children (49 boys, 88 girls) in kindergarten and grade 1 classes (M[subscript age] = 75.94 months, SD = 9.03) in Ottawa, Canada. Parents rated…

  1. fMRI evidence of a hot-cold empathy gapin hypothetical and real aversive choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Jeong Kang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical bias is the common finding that hypothetical monetary values for goods are higher than real values. We extend this research to the domain of bads such as consumer and household choices made to avoid aversive outcomes (e.g., insurance. Previous evidence of hot-cold empathy gaps suggest food disgust is likely to be strongly underestimated in hypothetical (cold choice. Depending on relative underestimation of food disgust and pain of spending, the hypothetical bias for aversive bads can go in the typical direction for goods, disappear, or reverse in sign. We find that the bias is reversed in sign—subjects pay more to avoid bads when choice is real. fMRI shows that real choice more strongly activates striatum and medial prefrontal cortex (reward regions and shows distinct activity in insula and amygdala (disgust and fear regions. The neural findings suggest ways to exogeneously manipulate or record brain activity in order to create better forecasts of actual consumer choice.

  2. Consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Sellafield - Predicted impacts on the environment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoerring, H.; Liland, A.

    2010-12-15

    This report deals with the environmental consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Sellafield. The investigation is limited to the terrestrial environment, and focus on animals grazing natural pastures, plus wild berries and fungi. Only 137Cs is considered. The predicted consequences are severe, in particular for mutton and goat milk production. (Author)

  3. Physicians' willingness to grant requests for assistance in dying for children: a study of hypothetical cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrakking, A.M.; Heide, van der A.; Looman, C.W.; Delden, van J.J.M.; Philipsen, B.D.; Maas, van der P.J.; Wal, van der G.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the willingness of Dutch physicians to use potentially life-shortening or lethal drugs for severely ill children. STUDY DESIGN: We asked 63 pediatricians about their approach to 10 hypothetical cases of children with cancer. The age of the child (15, 11, or 6 years), the child's

  4. Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Food Service Resources Additional Resources About FAQ Contact Protein Protein is found throughout the body—in muscle, ... the heart and respiratory system, and death. All Protein Isn’t Alike Protein is built from building ...

  5. Cost-effectiveness models for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : cross-model comparison of hypothetical treatment scenarios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Martine; Feenstra, Talitha L; Asukai, Yumi; Borg, Sixten; Hansen, Ryan N; Jansson, Sven-Arne; Samyshkin, Yevgeniy; Wacker, Margarethe; Briggs, Andrew H; Lloyd, Adam; Sullivan, Sean D; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare different chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cost-effectiveness models with respect to structure and input parameters and to cross-validate the models by running the same hypothetical treatment scenarios. METHODS: COPD modeling groups simulated four hypothetical inte

  6. Retro-information in Wheeler-Feynman Universe Model: Applications Over an Hypothetical Concept in Quantum Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquet, Philippe; Joly, Véronique

    1998-01-01

    Twisting the non-locality concept in quantum mechanics we introduce the hypothetical concept of retro-information. We analyse the effect of paradoxal coupling on source of retro-information in order to quantify the new means of computing that could be derived from such an hypothetical concept.

  7. Is Silence Golden? Elementary School Teachers' Strategies and Beliefs regarding Hypothetical Shy/Quiet and Exuberant/Talkative Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, Robert J.; Hughes, Kathleen; Bosacki, Sandra; Rose-Krasnor, Linda

    2011-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to examine elementary teachers' strategies, attitudes, and beliefs regarding hypothetical shy (i.e., quiet), exuberant (i.e., overly talkative), and average (i.e., typical) children. We explored whether these strategies and beliefs varied as a function of the gender of the hypothetical child as well as…

  8. The marginal willingness-to-pay for attributes of a hypothetical HIV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Michael P; Newman, Peter A; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Scarpa, Riccardo

    2013-08-12

    This paper estimates the marginal willingness-to-pay for attributes of a hypothetical HIV vaccine using discrete choice modeling. We use primary data from 326 respondents from Bangkok and Chiang Mai, Thailand, in 2008-2009, selected using purposive, venue-based sampling across two strata. Participants completed a structured questionnaire and full rank discrete choice modeling task administered using computer-assisted personal interviewing. The choice experiment was used to rank eight hypothetical HIV vaccine scenarios, with each scenario comprising seven attributes (including cost) each of which had two levels. The data were analyzed in two alternative specifications: (1) best-worst; and (2) full-rank, using logit likelihood functions estimated with custom routines in Gauss matrix programming language. In the full-rank specification, all vaccine attributes are significant predictors of probability of vaccine choice. The biomedical attributes of the hypothetical HIV vaccine (efficacy, absence of VISP, absence of side effects, and duration of effect) are the most important attributes for HIV vaccine choice. On average respondents are more than twice as likely to accept a vaccine with 99% efficacy, than a vaccine with 50% efficacy. This translates to a willingness to pay US$383 more for a high efficacy vaccine compared with the low efficacy vaccine. Knowledge of the relative importance of determinants of HIV vaccine acceptability is important to ensure the success of future vaccination programs. Future acceptability studies of hypothetical HIV vaccines should use more finely grained biomedical attributes, and could also improve the external validity of results by including more levels of the cost attribute.

  9. The Ability of Children With Language Impairment to Dissemble Emotions in Hypothetical Scenarios and Natural Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Bonnie; Fujiki, Martin; Hurst, Noel Quist; Jones, Emily Rowberry; Spackman, Matthew P

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the ability of children with language impairment (LI) to dissemble (hide) emotional reactions when socially appropriate to do so. Twenty-two children with LI and their typically developing peers (7;1-10;11 [years;months]) participated in two tasks. First, participants were presented with hypothetical scenarios in which the main character was exposed to situations that would require dissembling an emotional reaction for social purposes (e.g., receiving a disappointing gift from a grandparent). In the second task, children were presented with four naturally occurring opportunities to dissemble emotion (e.g., receiving a disappointing reward for taking part in the study). Although the ability to dissemble emotion was still emerging in children in both groups, typically developing children judged that dissemblance was appropriate significantly more often than did children with LI in the hypothetical scenarios. In naturalistic scenarios, there was little difference between groups in low-cost scenarios (those in which the child had nothing to lose by hiding emotion). In the high-cost scenario (hiding emotion meant accepting a disappointing prize), more typically developing children concealed their disappointment than did children with LI. These differences neared statistical significance (p = .058). Children with typically developing language showed a greater ability to dissemble in hypothetical scenarios. In naturalistic scenarios, performance was more nuanced. In low-cost scenarios, there was little difference between groups. In the high-cost scenario, typically developing children tended to dissemble more often than did children with LI.

  10. Parent and medical professional willingness to enroll children in a hypothetical pediatric optic neuritis treatment trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy eWaldman

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial and subsequent studies have had a tremendous impact on the treatment and prognosis of optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis in adults. The results of these studies have been extrapolated to children; however, pediatric data are sparse. Using the method of prospective preference assessment, the willingness of parents and medical professionals to enroll children in a hypothetical Pediatric Optic Neuritis Treatment Trial was assessed using a mock consent form and questionnaire. A 3-arm trial was proposed: 1 intravenous corticosteroids, 2 high-dose oral corticosteroids, and 3 an oral placebo. The forms were completed by 198 parents and 49 physicians. After reviewing the hypothetical scenario, trial design, risks and benefits, and alternatives to the study, 21% of parents would enroll their children in the trial whereas 98% of medical professionals would enroll their patients. With medical professional recommendation, 43% of parents would enroll their children. The manner in which this hypothetical trial was presented to parents, specifically with respect to the recommendation of their child’s health care team, influenced a parent’s willingness to participate.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Evacuation Speed in Hypothetical NPP Accident by Earthquake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-yeop; Lim, Ho-Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Effective emergency response in emergency situation of nuclear power plant (NPP) can make consequences be different therefore it is regarded important when establishing an emergency response plan and assessing the risk of hypothetical NPP accident. Situation of emergency response can be totally changed when NPP accident caused by earthquake or tsunami is considered due to the failure of roads and buildings by the disaster. In this study evacuation speed has been focused among above various factors and reasonable evacuation speed in earthquake scenario has been investigated. Finally, sensitivity analysis of evacuation speed in hypothetical NPP accident by earthquake has been performed in this study. Evacuation scenario can be entirely different in the situation of seismic hazard and the sensitivity analysis of evacuation speed in hypothetical NPP accident by earthquake has been performed in this study. Various references were investigated and earthquake evacuation model has been developed considering that evacuees may convert their evacuation method from using a vehicle to walking when they face the difficulty of using a vehicle due to intense traffic jam, failure of buildings and roads, and etc. The population dose within 5 km / 30 km have been found to be increased in earthquake situation due to decreased evacuation speed and become 1.5 - 2 times in the severest earthquake evacuation scenario set up in this study. It is not agreed that using same emergency response model which is used for normal evacuation situations when performing level 3 probabilistic safety assessment for earthquake and tsunami event. Investigation of data and sensitivity analysis for constructing differentiated emergency response model in the event of seismic hazard has been carried out in this study.

  12. Comparison of the hypothetical 57Co brachytherapy source with the 192Ir source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Rostami, Atefeh; Khosroabadi, Mohsen; Khademi, Sara; Knaup, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study The 57Co radioisotope has recently been proposed as a hypothetical brachytherapy source due to its high specific activity, appropriate half-life (272 days) and medium energy photons (114.17 keV on average). In this study, Task Group No. 43 dosimetric parameters were calculated and reported for a hypothetical 57Co source. Material and methods A hypothetical 57Co source was simulated in MCNPX, consisting of an active cylinder with 3.5 mm length and 0.6 mm radius encapsulated in a stainless steel capsule. Three photon energies were utilized (136 keV [10.68%], 122 keV [85.60%], 14 keV [9.16%]) for the 57Co source. Air kerma strength, dose rate constant, radial dose function, anisotropy function, and isodose curves for the source were calculated and compared to the corresponding data for a 192Ir source. Results The results are presented as tables and figures. Air kerma strength per 1 mCi activity for the 57Co source was 0.46 cGyh–1 cm 2 mCi–1. The dose rate constant for the 57Co source was determined to be 1.215 cGyh–1U–1. The radial dose function for the 57Co source has an increasing trend due to multiple scattering of low energy photons. The anisotropy function for the 57Co source at various distances from the source is more isotropic than the 192Ir source. Conclusions The 57Co source has advantages over 192Ir due to its lower energy photons, longer half-life, higher dose rate constant and more isotropic anisotropic function. However, the 192Ir source has a higher initial air kerma strength and more uniform radial dose function. These properties make 57Co a suitable source for use in brachytherapy applications. PMID:27688731

  13. [Study on willingness to participate and willingness to pay for hypothetical industrial injury insurance scheme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan; Dong, Hengjin; Duan, Shengnan; Liu, Xiaofang; Ye, Chiyu; You, Hua; Hu, Huimei; Wang, Linhao; Zhang, Xing; Wang, Jing

    2014-10-01

    To investigate workers' willingness to participate and wiliness to pay for a hypothetical industrial injury insurance scheme, to analyze the influential factors, and to provide information for policy making of the government. Multistage cluster sampling was used to select subjects: In the first stage, 9 small, medium, orlarge enterprises were selected fromthree cities (counties) in Zhejiang province, China, according to the level of economic development, transportation convenience, and cooperation of government agencies; in the second stage, several workshops were randomly selected from each of the 9 enterprises. Face-to-face interviews among all workers in the workshops were conducted by trained interviewers using a pre-designed questionnaire. It was found that 73.87% (2095) of all workers were willing to participate in the hypothetical work injury insurance scheme and to pay 2.21% of monthly wage (51.77 yuan) on average, and more than half of the workers were willing to pay less than 1%of monthly wage (35 yuan). Of the 741 workers who were not willing to participate, 327 thought that the premium should be borne by the state or enterprises, instead of individuals, and others were not willing to participate because of low income, unstable job, or poor understanding of the hypothetical industrial injury insurance scheme. Logistic regression analysis showed that workers with higher education levels, longer length of services, longer weekly working time, or more knowledge of occupational diseases showed higher willingness to participate in the scheme; workers who were exposed to physical hazards, had health records, or had participated in the existing medical insurance or industrial injury insurance were more willing to participate. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that with increasing average monthly wage, weekly working time, and self?health evaluation, the proportion of workers with willingness to pay increased; however, with increasing work intensity and

  14. The Use of the Lexical Exponents of Hypothetical Modality in Polish and Lithuanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Roszko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Use of the Lexical Exponents of Hypothetical Modality in Polish and Lithuanian In this article the author focuses on the issue of hypothetical modality[1] in Polish and Lithuanian. A list of the basic exponents of hypothetical modality in both languages is presented. However, the focus is mainly placed on the lexical exponents. On the basis of one of the six groups, which describes a high degree of probability (H5, the differences between the use of the lexical exponents in both languages are examined. In the study, multilingual corpora resources, including The Polish-Lithuanian parallel corpus Clarin-PL., are utilized. [1] [In the academic literature, for the notion described herein, the term of epistemic modality is also used.  Nevertheless, in this paper I will continue to use the term of hypotheticality, which I borrowed from the studies on modality, conducted in Polish-Bulgarian cooperation (Slavic Institute of Polish Academy of Sciences and Institute for Bulgarian Language of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences.]   O użyciu wykładników leksykalnych modalności hipotetycznej w językach polskim i litewskim W artykule autorka porusza zagadnienie modalności hipotetycznej[1]  w językach polskim i litewskim. Przedstawia wykaz podstawowych wykładników modalności hipotetycznej w obu językach. Główną uwagę skupia jednak na wykładnikach leksykalnych. Na przykładzie jednej z sześciu grup, opisującej wysoki stopień prawdopodobieństwa (H5, omawia różnice użycia wykładników leksykalnych w obu językach. W badaniach wykorzystuje wielojęzyczne zasoby korpusowe, w tym Polsko-litewski korpus równoległy Clarin-PL. [1] [W literaturze przedmiotu na oznaczenie opisywanych tu treści stosowany jest również termin epistemiczności. Niemniej jednak w tej pracy autorka pozostaje przy terminie hipotetyczności, który zapożycza z badań nad modalnością, prowadzonych we współpracy polsko-bułgarskiej (Instytut Slawistyki PAN i

  15. A study on the recriticality possibilities of fast reactor cores after a hypothetical core meltdown accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Byung Chan; Han, Do Hee; Kim, Young Cheol

    1997-04-01

    The preliminary and parametric sensitivity study on recriticality risk of fast reactor cores after a hypothetical total core meltdown accident was performed. Only the neutronic aspects of the accident was considered for this study, independent of the accident scenario. Estimation was made for the quantities of molten fuel which must be ejected out of the core in order to assure a sub-critical state. Diverse parameters were examined: molten pool type (homogenized or stratified), fuel temperature, conditions of the reactor core, core size (small or large), and fuel type (oxide, nitride, metal) (author). 7 refs.

  16. Ab-initio Study of Known and Hypothetical Metal-Organic Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Nicholson, Don M.

    2004-03-01

    Rosi et al. [1] have found that microporous Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOF) materials are candidates for hydrogen storage applications. In particular, MOF-5 was found to adsorb hydrogen up to 4.5 weight percent at 78 kelvin and 1.0 weight percent at room temperature and pressure of 20 bar. We use ab-initio techniques to investigate hydrogen adsorption, stability, and the electronic properties of known and hypothetical Metal-Organic Frameworks. [1] N.L. Rosi, J. Eckert, M. Eddaoudi, D.T. Vodak, J. Kim, M. O'Keeffe, and O.M. Yaghi

  17. Protein (Viridiplantae): 7789 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3646:3627 3688:10495 ... 238069:10495 ... 3689:10495 ... 3694:10495 ... hypothetical protein POPTR_0015s11720g Populus trichocarpa MEGGNGNEV...EREEDDSVSDILQDRFRLSAISIAENEAKKNGVEISEPITSCIADLALNYTEQLAK

  18. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108083 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:326 ... 3066:326 ... 3067:326 ... 3068:326 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_71629 Volvox carteri f. nagariensis MRSA...SVCDLQAYAICKHMPDAICKHMPHSMCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMPDAICKHMPHPMCKHMRSASICQMRSASICHIRCASI...CDLQAYATSDVQAYAICKHMPDAICKHMPHSMCKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHMRSASICDLQAYAICKHLPDTICKHMPHSMCKHMRSA...SICDLQAYAICKHMPSASICQMRSASICHIRCASICDLQAYARCDLQAYATFDVQTYAICKHLRSASICDLQAYAICKHMPHSMCKHMRYASLCDLQAYAICKQMQSSVTLQ

  19. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 248539 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available echocystis sp. PCC 6803 MIMSVCLPWLARCRRFLIVSLAFAMLLLGIWGTLPFSLSDHGTAIAALEDDRYDGNIFVVYAGNGSLVPPRLNLRESFERKLPV...NP_440139.1 1117:4619 1118:2464 1142:1432 1148:352 hypothetical protein slr1796 Syn

  20. Protein (Viridiplantae): 108128 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 065:363 ... 3066:363 ... 3067:363 ... 3068:363 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_66661, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis HEASCRRHVASCR...RHAASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHEASCRRHEASCRRHEASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHEASCRRHVASCRRHAPSCRRQAPSCR...RHVASCRRHVASCRRHEASCRRHEASCRRHEASCRRHVASCRRHEASCRRHVASCRWHVASCRRHVASCRRHVASCRRHVASCR...WHEASCRRHVASCRWHAPSCRRHVASCRRQAPSCRRHEASCRRKSHHAPSL

  1. Protein (Viridiplantae): 798474 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 3065:3176 ... 3066:3176 ... 3067:3176 ... 3068:3176 ... hypothetical protein VOLCADRAFT_56561, partial Volvox carteri f. nagariensis HCG...RRGFGYHCGRRGFGYHCLSGRRRLGYHCGRRGFGYHCGRRGFGYHCLSGRRRLGYHCGRRGFGYHCGRRGFGYHCLSGHRRLGYHWLSGRRGFGYHCG...RRGFGYHCLSGRRRLGYHCGRRGFGYHCGRRRLGYHCGRRRLGYHCGRRGFGYHCGRRGFGYHCGRRGFGYHCLSGRRRLGYHWLSGRRRLGYHWLSG

  2. Protein (Viridiplantae): 583556 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 8 3744:2515 3745:2515 ... 171637:492 721805:4831 ... 3754:4831 ... 3760:3380 ... hypothetical protein PRUPE_ppa008794...mg Prunus persica MATVRMIDIAVNFTDGMFKGIYNGKQCHVSDIATVLSRAWTAGVDRIIVTGGSLEESKEALTI

  3. Protein (Viridiplantae): 583581 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 11743 3803:11743 ... 3814:11743 ... 163735:3911 ... 3883:6308 ... 3885:6308 ... hypothetical protein PHAVU_001G196500g Phaseolus vulgaris MAGIRMID...IAVNLTDGMFKGIYHGKQCHVSDIATVLNRAWAAGVTRIIVTGGSLEESREALAIA

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 57440 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ocystis sp. PCC 6803 MDRSPLMPSSTTYINTFLEKINPMAKHILVVCKACGAKAENDNSNSPTDGICLLNKLQELHQRWVRKDELKIETTSCLCICDRPCAIAYVGTHKPTYLFGDLDPINGGKDLISAAELYLDSEDGMVPAYKLPEGLRSCRVARIPPAP ... ...NP_439932.1 1117:1048 1118:6889 1142:7 1148:134 hypothetical protein slr1493 Synech

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 4662 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_10226172.1 1117:95 1118:7914 1125:1918 1160279:169 conserved hypothetical protei...n Microcystis sp. T1-4 MARYSCSYFVGISPHQTGFLYDDILSLGEFEIIKRRPDVLLLSEVPNDALFPQLVKVELFIHPPTSSELQIDLLVKNHELPLRTNNRCRQFFQSIHQIITNNYQGQSLTRITA ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 414147 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_382476.1 1117:24844 1118:6844 1129:2356 110662:1764 hypothetical protein Syncc96...05_2182 Synechococcus sp. CC9605 MPGGFGAASDQSPCPCGGGVYRNCCGPLHRGDQRADTAEQLMRSRYSAFARGEIDYLLATNPEPDVPEQQRRRSLERSCRQTRWLGLTVLAISAGGPRDLEGTVQFEAHYRGGVLKETSLFQRRDGADDGPWLYLGALHLEG ...

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 354162 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YP_377940.1 1117:15190 1118:15399 1129:7886 316279:1587 hypothetical protein Syncc9...902_1939 Synechococcus sp. CC9902 MRQIQFGMRVNCFGRSVLNCASSLKSLKNSNCCWSFPAGRIDGLVSWLNNYKSMPSNISELVSRDFESHHIVHE

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 31887 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NP_897625.1 1117:581 1118:602 1129:221 84588:1309 hypothetical protein SYNW1532 Syn...echococcus sp. WH 8102 MMPIPFLLLLAAWLGVGTVQGGAWCDDQQAGIGSYDPQRSEIALCTERIRSKGRSIDEVVRHELFHAVQHLFGRDGRSFLNDSQITVLVHRFMDDREVMAVISLYPSDEINSELEARLMSRLVPNEVIGGALLAGRLVQQAPQQGPIGSLRAYLLGD ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 82648 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ZP_09784085.1 1117:1558 1150:4752 35823:1779 376219:1082 conserved hypothetical protein (fragm...ent part 2) Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 MSDLNLKIVPFDEPQAHIAGMLRPITKPLGLSLGDQACLGLGLVLNQPVITADRQWSQLNLNLEFRVIR ...

  10. Evaluating the impacts of farmers' behaviors on a hypothetical agricultural water market based on double auction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Erhu; Cai, Ximing; Brozović, Nicholas; Minsker, Barbara

    2017-05-01

    Agricultural water markets are considered effective instruments to mitigate the impacts of water scarcity and to increase crop production. However, previous studies have limited understanding of how farmers' behaviors affect the performance of water markets. This study develops an agent-based model to explicitly incorporate farmers' behaviors, namely irrigation behavior (represented by farmers' sensitivity to soil water deficit λ) and bidding behavior (represented by farmers' rent seeking μ and learning rate β), in a hypothetical water market based on a double auction. The model is applied to the Guadalupe River Basin in Texas to simulate a hypothetical agricultural water market under various hydrological conditions. It is found that the joint impacts of the behavioral parameters on the water market are strong and complex. In particular, among the three behavioral parameters, λ affects the water market potential and its impacts on the performance of the water market are significant under most scenarios. The impacts of μ or β on the performance of the water market depend on the other two parameters. The water market could significantly increase crop production only when the following conditions are satisfied: (1) λ is small and (2) μ is small and/or β is large. The first condition requires efficient irrigation scheduling, and the second requires well-developed water market institutions that provide incentives to bid true valuation of water permits.

  11. Women's Behavioral Responses to the Threat of a Hypothetical Date Rape Stimulus: A Qualitative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, RaeAnn E; Brouwer, Amanda M; Wendorf, Angela R; Cahill, Shawn P

    2016-05-01

    One in four college women experience sexual assault on campus; yet, campuses rarely provide the in-depth self-defense programs needed to reduce sexual assault risk. Further, little is known about the range of possible behaviors elicited by sexual assault threat stimuli besides assertion. To fill this gap, the aim of the current study was to explore qualitative themes in women's intended behavioral responses to a hypothetical sexual assault threat, date rape, by using a laboratory-controlled threat. College women (N = 139) were randomly assigned to one of four different levels of sexual assault threat presented via an audio-recorded vignette. Participants articulated how they would hypothetically respond to the experimentally assigned threat. Responses were blinded and analyzed using Consensual Qualitative Research methodology. Six major themes emerged: assertion, compliance/acceptance, conditional decision making, avoidance, expressions of discomfort, and allusion to future contact. Although almost all participants described assertion, a number of non-assertive responses were described that are not currently recognized in the literature. These non-assertive responses, including compliance/acceptance, conditional decision making, and avoidance, may represent unique behavioral response styles and likely reflect the complex psychological process of behavioral response to threat. The variety of themes found illustrates the great range of behavioral responses to threat. This broad range is not currently well represented or measured in the literature and better understanding of these responses can inform future interventions, advocacy efforts, and policies focused on sexual assault.

  12. Evaluation of the Thermal Response of the 5-DHLWaste Package-Hypothetical Fire Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.W. Moore

    2001-11-03

    The purpose of this calculation is to determine the thermal response of the 5-defense high level waste (DHLW)/Department of Energy (DOE) codisposal waste package (WP) to the hypothetical fire accident. The objective is to calculate the temperature response of the DHLW glass to the hypothetical short-term fire defined in 10 CFR 71, Section 73(c)(4), Reference 1. The scope of the calculation includes evaluation of the accident with the waste package above ground, at the Yucca Mountain surface facility. The scope is intended to cover a DHLW WP. This WP is loaded with DHLW canisters containing glass from the Savannah River Site (SRS) and a DOE canister containing Training, Research, and Isotope General Atomics (TRIGA) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The information provided by the sketches attached to this calculation is that for the potential design of the type of WP considered in this calculation. In addition to the nominal design configuration thermal load case, the effects of varying the central DOE canister and DHLW thermal loads are determined. Also, the effects of varying values of the flame and WP outer surface emissivities are evaluated.

  13. OPPORTUNITY COSTS OF REWARD DELAYS AND THE DISCOUNTING OF HYPOTHETICAL MONEY AND CIGARETTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patrick S.; Herrmann, Evan S.; Johnson, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are reported to discount delayed rewards at lower rates than nonhumans. However, nonhumans are studied in tasks that restrict reinforcement during delays, whereas humans are typically studied in tasks that do not restrict reinforcement during delays. In nonhuman tasks, the opportunity cost of restricted reinforcement during delays may increase delay discounting rates. The present within-subjects study used online crowdsourcing (Amazon Mechanical Turk, or MTurk) to assess the discounting of hypothetical delayed money (and cigarettes in smokers) under four hypothetical framing conditions differing in the availability of reinforcement during delays. At one extreme, participants were free to leave their computer without returning, and engage in any behavior during reward delays (modeling typical human tasks). At the opposite extreme, participants were required to stay at their computer and engage in little other behavior during reward delays (modeling typical nonhuman tasks). Discounting rates increased as an orderly function of opportunity cost. Results also indicated predominantly hyperbolic discounting, the “magnitude effect,” steeper discounting of cigarettes than money, and positive correlations between discounting rates of these commodities. This is the first study to test the effects of opportunity costs on discounting, and suggests that procedural differences may partially account for observed species differences in discounting. PMID:25388973

  14. Potential radiological exposure rates resulting from hypothetical dome failure at Tank W-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The main plant area at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contains 12 buried Gunite tanks that were used for the storage and transfer of liquid radioactive waste. Although the tanks are no longer in use, they are known to contain some residual contaminated sludges and liquids. In the event of an accidental tank dome failure, however unlikely, the liquids, sludges, and radioactive contaminants within the tank walls themselves could create radiation fields and result in above-background exposures to workers nearby. This Technical Memorandum documents a series of calculations to estimate potential radiological exposure rates and total exposures to workers in the event of a hypothetical collapse of a Gunite tank dome. Calculations were performed specifically for tank W-10 because it contains the largest radioactivity inventory (approximately half of the total activity) of all the Gunite tanks. These calculations focus only on external, direct gamma exposures for prescribed, hypothetical exposure scenarios and do not address other possible tank failure modes or routes of exposure. The calculations were performed with established, point-kernel gamma ray modeling codes.

  15. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in LMFBRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chuang [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: lch98@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Zhang Xiong [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lu Mingwan [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2005-03-01

    To ensure safety, it is necessary to assess the integrity of a reactor vessel of liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) under HCDA. Several important problems for a fluid-structural interaction analysis of HCDA are discussed in the present paper. Various loading models of hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) are compared and the polytropic processes of idea gas (PPIG) law is recommended. In order to define a limited total energy release, a '5% truncation criterion' is suggested. The relationship of initial pressure of gas bubble and the total energy release is given. To track the moving interfaces and to avoid the severe mesh distortion an arbitrary Lagrangrian-Eulerian (ALE) approach is adopted in the finite element modeling (FEM) analysis. Liquid separation and splash from a free surface are discussed. By using an elasticity solution under locally uniform pressure, two simplified analytical solutions for 3D and axi-symmetric case of the liquid impact pressure on roof slab are derived. An axi-symmetric finite elements code FRHCDA for fluid-structure interaction analysis of hypothetical core disruptive accident in LMFBR is developed. The CONT benchmark problem is calculated. The numerical results agree well with those from published papers.

  16. Physicians' willingness to grant requests for assistance in dying for children: a study of hypothetical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrakking, Astrid M; van der Heide, Agnes; Looman, Caspar W N; van Delden, Johannes J M; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D; van der Maas, Paul J; van der Wal, Gerrit

    2005-05-01

    To study the willingness of Dutch physicians to use potentially life-shortening or lethal drugs for severely ill children. We asked 63 pediatricians about their approach to 10 hypothetical cases of children with cancer. The age of the child (15, 11, or 6 years), the child's (explicit) request, and the opinion of the parents varied. Two hypothetical cases were also presented to 125 general practitioners and 208 clinical specialists. Most pediatricians were willing to increase morphine in all cases. A total of 48% to 60% of pediatricians were willing to use lethal drugs in children at the child's request, when the parents agreed; when parents requested ending of life of their unconscious child, 37% to 42% of pediatricians were willing; 13% to 28% of pediatricians were willing when parents did not agree with their child's request. General practitioners and clinical specialists were as willing as pediatricians to use lethal drugs at the child's request, but less willing to grant a request of parents for their unconscious child. Many Dutch pediatricians are willing to use potentially life-shortening or lethal drugs for children. The legal limit of 12 years, as the age under which voluntary euthanasia is forbidden, is not fully supported by Dutch physicians.

  17. Relationship between cooperation in an iterated prisoner's dilemma game and the discounting of hypothetical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Richard; Johnson, Matthew W; Bickel, Warren K

    2005-08-01

    A number of authors have proposed that preference for a larger, delayed reward in delay discounting is similar to cooperation in a repeated prisoner's dilemma game versus tit-for-tat. This proposal was examined by correlating delay-discounting (Experiment 1) and probability-discounting (Experiment 2) rates for hypothetical monetary gains and losses with performance in a repeated prisoner's dilemma game. Correlations between rate of delay discounting (discounting parameters and area under the curve) and proportion of cooperation in the repeated prisoner's dilemma game versus tit-for-tat were significant across three magnitudes, and correlations were generally higher with discounting for losses than with that for gains. As was expected, correlations between rate of delay discounting and performance versus a random strategy in the prisoner's dilemma game were not significant. Correlations between rate of probability-discounting and cooperation rate in a repeated prisoner's dilemma game versus neither a tit-for-tat nor a random strategy were significant.

  18. Hypothetical Outcome Plots Outperform Error Bars and Violin Plots for Inferences about Reliability of Variable Ordering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Hullman

    Full Text Available Many visual depictions of probability distributions, such as error bars, are difficult for users to accurately interpret. We present and study an alternative representation, Hypothetical Outcome Plots (HOPs, that animates a finite set of individual draws. In contrast to the statistical background required to interpret many static representations of distributions, HOPs require relatively little background knowledge to interpret. Instead, HOPs enables viewers to infer properties of the distribution using mental processes like counting and integration. We conducted an experiment comparing HOPs to error bars and violin plots. With HOPs, people made much more accurate judgments about plots of two and three quantities. Accuracy was similar with all three representations for most questions about distributions of a single quantity.

  19. Positive versus negative framing of a hypothetical infant immunization: the influence of involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, R J; Jalleh, G

    2000-02-01

    Framing studies dealing with health messages show mixed results, although a tendency in favor of negative framing. Involvement has been hypothesized to account for these conflicting results. The authors selected a realistic issue (immunization of infants) deemed high or low involving depending on the respondent's circumstances: women with an infant or who were pregnant or intending to get pregnant in the next 12 months were deemed to be high involved; women in none of these categories were deemed to be low involved. A convenience sample of adult women was presented with a hypothetical "new" immunization that protected infants against respiratory complaints such as bronchitis and pneumonia Side effects (the common flu) were framed positively (90% chance of no side effects) or negatively (10% chance of side effects). The authors found positive framing to be superior for low-involved respondents, but there was no framing effect for high-involved respondents.

  20. Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

  1. Casimir Effect as a Test for Thermal Corrections and Hypothetical Long-Range Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E; López, D; Mostepanenko, V M

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a precise experimental determination of the Casimir pressure between two gold-coated parallel plates by means of a micromachined oscillator. In contrast to all previous experiments on the Casimir effect, where a small relative error (varying from 1% to 15%) was achieved only at the shortest separation, our smallest experimental error ($\\sim 0.5$%) is achieved over a wide separation range from 170 nm to 300 nm at 95% confidence. We have formulated a rigorous metrological procedure for the comparison of experiment and theory without resorting to the previously used root-mean-square deviation, which has been criticized in the literature. This enables us to discriminate among different competing theories of the thermal Casimir force, and to resolve a thermodynamic puzzle arising from the application of Lifshitz theory to real metals. Our results lead to a more rigorous approach for obtaining constraints on hypothetical long-range interactions predicted by extra-dimensional physics and other exte...

  2. Comparison of hypothetical and experienced EQ-5D valuations: relative weights of the five dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand-Hendriksen, K.; Augestad, L. A.; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar;

    2012-01-01

    Survey and on HH ratings from the US EQ-5D valuation study conducted in 2001. We then compared patterns in the relative magnitudes of coefficients that corresponded to the five dimensions. Results In the HH model, self-care and pain/discomfort were the most important dimensions, while usual activities......Purpose EQ-5D tariffs are typically based on general population valuations studies, but whether valuations of experienced health (EH) or hypothetical health (HH) are more appropriate is disputed. Previous comparisons of valuations of EH and HH have focused on absolute differences in dimension......-specific regression coefficients. We examined differences in the relative importance attributed to the EQ-5D dimensions between EH and HH valuations of EQ-5D states in the United States. Methods We used the regression model from the US EQ-5D valuation study on EH ratings from the 2000-2003 Medical Expenditure Panel...

  3. Assessment of Loads and Performance of a Containment in a Hypothetical Accident (ALPHA). Facility design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamano, Norihiro; Maruyama, Yu; Kudo, Tamotsu; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Ito, Hideo; Komori, Keiichi; Sonobe, Hisao; Sugimoto, Jun [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-06-01

    In the ALPHA (Assessment of Loads and Performance of Containment in Hypothetical Accident) program, several tests have been performed to quantitatively evaluate loads to and performance of a containment vessel during a severe accident of a light water reactor. The ALPHA program focuses on investigating leak behavior through the containment vessel, fuel-coolant interaction, molten core-concrete interaction and FP aerosol behavior, which are generally recognized as significant phenomena considered to occur in the containment. In designing the experimental facility, it was considered to simulate appropriately the phenomena mentioned above, and to cover experimental conditions not covered by previous works involving high pressure and temperature. Experiments from the viewpoint of accident management were also included in the scope. The present report describes design specifications, dimensions, instrumentation of the ALPHA facility based on the specific test objectives and procedures. (author)

  4. Hypothetical superparamagnetic magnetometer in a pigeon's upper beak probably does not work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandačka, Petr; Alexa, Petr; Pištora, Jaromír; Trojková, Jana

    2013-04-01

    We reanalysed the role of superparamagnetic magnetite clusters observed in a pigeon's upper beak to decide if this matter can be a component of some sort of pigeon magnetometer for Earth orientation. We investigated the mutual interaction of the magnetite clusters induced by the geomagnetic field. The force sensitivity of the hypothetical magnetometer in a pigeon's upper beak was estimated considering the previously presented threshold magnetic sensitivity of pigeons, measured in electrophysiological and behavioural investigations. The typical intercluster magnetic force seems to be 10(-19)N well above the threshold magnetic sensitivity. To strengthen our results, we measured the magnetic susceptibility of superparamagnetic magnetite using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Finally we performed theoretical kinematic analysis of the motion of magnetite clusters in cell plasma. The results indicate that magnetite clusters, constituted by superparamagnetic nanoparticles and observed in a pigeon's upper beak, may not be a component of a measuring system providing the magnetic map.

  5. Signal coverage approach to the detection probability of hypothetical extraterrestrial emitters in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Claudio

    2017-04-01

    The lack of evidence for the existence of extraterrestrial life, even the simplest forms of animal life, makes it is difficult to decide whether the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) is more a high-risk, high-payoff endeavor than a futile attempt. Here we insist that even if extraterrestrial civilizations do exist and communicate, the likelihood of detecting their signals crucially depends on whether the Earth lies within a region of the galaxy covered by such signals. By considering possible populations of independent emitters in the galaxy, we build a statistical model of the domain covered by hypothetical extraterrestrial signals to derive the detection probability that the Earth is within such a domain. We show that for general distributions of the signal longevity and directionality, the mean number of detectable emitters is less than one even for detection probabilities as large as 50%, regardless of the number of emitters in the galaxy.

  6. Hypothetical Outcome Plots Outperform Error Bars and Violin Plots for Inferences about Reliability of Variable Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Resnick, Paul; Adar, Eytan

    2015-01-01

    Many visual depictions of probability distributions, such as error bars, are difficult for users to accurately interpret. We present and study an alternative representation, Hypothetical Outcome Plots (HOPs), that animates a finite set of individual draws. In contrast to the statistical background required to interpret many static representations of distributions, HOPs require relatively little background knowledge to interpret. Instead, HOPs enables viewers to infer properties of the distribution using mental processes like counting and integration. We conducted an experiment comparing HOPs to error bars and violin plots. With HOPs, people made much more accurate judgments about plots of two and three quantities. Accuracy was similar with all three representations for most questions about distributions of a single quantity. PMID:26571487

  7. Numerical interpretation of the MARA 8 experiment simulating a hypothetical core disruptive accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. E-mail: mfrobbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M.; Cariou, Y

    2003-03-01

    In the case of a hypothetical core disruptive accident (HCDA) in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), it is assumed that the core of the nuclear reactor has melted partially and that the chemical interaction between the molten fuel and the liquid sodium has created a high-pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the reactor vessel, thus endangering the safety of the nuclear plant. The experimental test MARA 8 simulates the explosive phenomenon in a mock-up included in a flexible vessel with a flexible roof. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test and a comparison of the computed results with the experimental results and previous numerical ones.

  8. Performance assessment for a hypothetical low-level waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.S.; Rohe, M.J.; Ritter, P.D. [and others

    1997-01-01

    Disposing of low-level waste (LLW) is a concern for many states throughout the United States. A common disposal method is below-grade concrete vaults. Performance assessment analyses make predictions of contaminant release, transport, ingestion, inhalation, or other routes of exposure, and the resulting doses for various disposal methods such as the below-grade concrete vaults. Numerous assumptions are required to simplify the processes associated with the disposal facility to make predictions feasible. In general, these assumptions are made conservatively so as to underestimate the performance of the facility. The objective of this report is to describe the methodology used in conducting a performance assessment for a hypothetical waste facility located in the northeastern United States using real data as much as possible. This report consists of the following: (a) a description of the disposal facility and site, (b) methods used to analyze performance of the facility, (c) the results of the analysis, and (d) the conclusions of this study.

  9. A new drug design strategy: Killing drug resistant bacteria by deactivating their hypothetical genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tit-Yee; Kuo, Jimmy

    2016-10-01

    Despite that a bacterial genome is complicated by large numbers of horizontally transferred (HT) genes and function unknown hypothetical (FUN) genes, the Genic-Transcriptional-Stop-Signals-Ratio (TSSR) of a genome shows that HT and FUN genes are complementary to all other genes in the genome. When HT or certain FUN genes are omitted from the Escherichia coli K-12 genome, its Genomic-TSSR value becomes totally incomparable to other E. coli strains. The Genic-TSSR correlation tree of a pathogen shows that some FUN genes would form a unique cluster. Removing these genes by site-specific mutation or gene-knockout should lead to the demise of this pathogen.

  10. On a hypothetical generational relationship between HCN and constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschenmoser, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Encouraged by observations made on the course of reactions the HCN-tetramer can undergo with acetaldehyde, I delineate a constitutional and potentially generational relationship between HCN and those constituents of the reductive citric acid cycle that are direct precursors of amino acids in contemporary metabolism. In this context, the robustness postulate of classical prebiotic chemistry is questioned, and, by an analysis of the (hypothetical) reaction-tree of a stepwise hydrolysis of the HCN-tetramer, it is shown how such a non-robust chemical reaction platform could harbor the potential for the emergence of autocatalytic cycles. It is concluded that the chemistry of HCN should be revisited by focussing on its non-robust parts in order to demonstrate its full potential as one of the possible roots of prebiotic self-organizing chemical processes.

  11. Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

  12. Signs of hypothetical flora on the planet venus: Revision of the TV experiment data (1975-1982)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksanfomality, L. V.; Selivanov, A. S.; Gektin, Yu. M.; Avanesov, G. A.

    2016-05-01

    Unique archive data from investigations of the surface of Venus performed with television cameras on the VENERA missions in 1975 and 1982 were reprocessed with up-to-date techniques, which substantially improved their level of detail. Numerous objects exhibiting a complex regular structure and presumably very slow motions (in the case of hypothetical fauna) have been found. The objects are noticeable in size and may testify to the existence of life. This paper reviews the results of searching for and identifying hypothetical objects of Venusian flora. The detected and identified hypothetical objects considerably exhaust the corresponding potential of the television images. It is concluded that, to investigate the surface of Venus, a new special mission, much more sophisticated than the VENERA missions (1975-1982), should be urgently carried out.

  13. Behavioral Economics of Cigarette Purchase Tasks: Within-Subject Comparison of Real, Potentially Real, and Hypothetical Cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, A George; Franck, Christopher T; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; Bickel, Warren K

    2016-05-01

    Hypothetical rewards are commonly used in studies of laboratory-based tobacco demand. However, behavioral economic demand procedures require confirmation that the behavior elicited from real and hypothetical reward types are equivalent, and that results attained from these procedures are comparable to other accepted tasks, such as the hypothetical purchase task. Nineteen smokers were asked to purchase 1 week's worth of cigarettes that they would consume over the following week either at one price that incrementally increased across four weekly sessions ("real" sessions) or four prices in a single session ("potentially real" session), one of which was randomly chosen to be actualized. At each session, participants also completed a hypothetical cigarette purchase task. After each week, participants reported the number of cigarettes they actually smoked. Demand was found to be equivalent under both the real and potentially real reward conditions but statistically different from the demand captured in the hypothetical purchase task. However, the amounts purchased at specific prices in the hypothetical purchase task were significantly correlated with the amount purchased at comparable prices in the other two tasks (except for the highest price examined in both tasks of $1.00 per cigarette). Number of cigarettes consumed that were obtained outside of the study was correlated with study cigarette price. Combined, these results suggest that purchasing behavior during potentially real sessions (1) was not functionally different from real sessions, (2) imposes fewer costs to the experimenter, and (3) has high levels of both internal and external validity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. An Efficient Method to Design Premature End-of-Life Trajectories: A Hypothetical Alternate Fate for Cassini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, Mar; Senent, Juan

    2015-01-01

    What would happen if, hypothetically, the highly successful Cassini mission were to end prematurely due to lack of propellant or sudden subsystem failure? A solid plan to quickly produce a solution for any given scenario, regardless of where the spacecraft is along its reference path, must be in place to safely dispose of the spacecraft and meet all planetary protection requirements. As a contingency plan for this hypothetical situation, a method to design viable high-fidelity terminating trajectories based on a hybrid approach that exploits two-body and three-body flyby transfers combined with a numerical optimization scheme is detailed in this paper.

  15. Simulations of a hypothetical temperature control structure at Detroit Dam on the North Santiam River, northwestern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccola, Norman L.; Stonewall, Adam J.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    Water temperature models of Detroit Lake, Big Cliff Lake, and the North Santiam River in northwestern Oregon were used to assess the potential for a hypothetical structure with variable intake elevations and an internal connection to power turbines at Detroit Dam (scenario SlidingWeir) to release more natural, pre-dam temperatures year round. This hypothetical structure improved outflow temperature control from Detroit Dam while meeting minimum dry-season release rates and lake levels specified by the rule curve specified for Detroit Lake.

  16. Investigating a Hypothetical Semiconductor Laser Bar Using a Laser Diode Simulation/Emulation Tool Using Random Levels of Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Amuzuvi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Barlase, a semiconductor laser diode emulation tool, is used to emulate the by-emitter degradation of high power semiconductor laser diodes. Barlase is a software that uses a LabView control interface. We have demonstrated how Barlase works using a hypothetical laser diode bar (multiple emitters to validate the usefulness of the tool. A scenario using the hypothetical bar was investigated to demonstrate Barlase as follows: random low-level of defects distributed across the bar. The results of the simulation show the successful implementation of Barlase in the by-emitter analysis of laser diodes.

  17. Ground-Water Capture Zone Delineation of Hypothetical Systems: Methodology Comparison and Real-World Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, J. A.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.

    2003-12-01

    A capture zone is the aquifer volume through which ground-water flows to a pumping well over a given time of travel. Determining a well's capture zone aids in water-supply management by creating an awareness of the water source. This helps ensure sustainable pumping operations and outlines areas where protection from contamination is critical. We are delineating the capture zones of hypothetical conceptual models that resemble the Fairbanks, Alaska floodplain both in aquifer parameters and boundary conditions. We begin with a very simple hydrogeologic system and gradually add complexity such as heterogeneity, anisotropy, multiple wells, and zones of permafrost. Commonly-used delineation methods are applied to each case. These include calculated fixed-radius, analytical and numerical models. The calculated fixed-radius method uses a mathematical equation with several simplifying assumptions. Analytical techniques employ a series of equations that likewise assume simple conditions, although to a lesser degree than the fixed-radius method. Our chosen numerical model is MODFLOW-2000, which offers a particle-tracking package (MODPATH) for delineating recharge areas. The delineations are overlayed for each conceptual model in order to compare the capture zones produced by the different methods. Contrasts between capture zones increase with the complexity of the hydrogeology. Simpler methods are restricted by their underlying assumptions. When methods can no longer account for complexities in the conceptual model, the resulting delineations remain similar to those of simpler models. Meanwhile, the zones generated by more sophisticated methods are able to change with changes to the conceptual model. Hence, the simpler methods now lack accuracy and credibility. We have found that these simpler techniques tend to overestimate the capture zone. Water-supply managers must consider such inaccuracies when evaluating the costs of each method. In addition to comparing delineation

  18. "Hypothetical machines": the science fiction dreams of Cold War social science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemov, Rebecca

    2010-06-01

    The introspectometer was a "hypothetical machine" Robert K. Merton introduced in the course of a 1956 how-to manual describing an actual research technique, the focused interview. This technique, in turn, formed the basis of wartime morale research and consumer behavior studies as well as perhaps the most ubiquitous social science tool, the focus group. This essay explores a new perspective on Cold War social science made possible by comparing two kinds of apparatuses: one real, the other imaginary. Even as Merton explored the nightmare potential of such machines, he suggested that the clear aim of social science was to build them or their functional equivalent: recording machines to access a person's experiential stream of reality, with the ability to turn this stream into real-time data. In this way, the introspectometer marks and symbolizes a broader entry during the Cold War of science-fiction-style aspirations into methodological prescriptions and procedural manuals. This essay considers the growth of the genre of methodological visions and revisions, painstakingly argued and absorbed, but punctuated by sci-fi aims to transform "the human" and build newly penetrating machines. It also considers the place of the nearly real-, and the artificial "near-substitute" as part of an experimental urge that animated these sciences.

  19. Hypothetical biotechnology companies: A role-playing student centered activity for undergraduate science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuck, Jo-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Science students leaving undergraduate programs are entering the biotechnology industry where they are presented with issues which require integration of science content. Students find this difficult as through-out their studies, most content is limited to a single subdiscipline (e.g., biochemistry, immunology). In addition, students need knowledge of the ethical, economic, and legal frame work in which the industry operates. This article presents an approach to deliver these outcomes in a collaborative and active learning modality which promotes deep learning. In the model, groups of final year undergraduate students form hypothetical biotechnology companies and identify real issues of interest to industry, make integrative team decisions, use professional level technology, and develop appropriate communication skills. The final successful teaching paradigm was based on self reflection, observation, and student feedback to ensure appropriate attainment of content, group work skills and increased confidence in professional decision-making. It is these outcomes which will facilitate life long learning skills, a major outcome applicable for all tertiary education.

  20. Testing the feasibility of a hypothetical whaling-conservation permit market in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Abbott, Joshua K; Fenichel, Eli P; Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Perrings, Charles; Gerber, Leah

    2017-02-24

    A "cap and trade" style system for managing whale harvests represents a potentially useful approach to resolve the current gridlock in international whale management. The establishment of whale permit markets, open to both whalers and conservationists, could reveal the strength of conservation demand. However, while much is known about demand for whale-based products there is uncertainty about demand for conservation and the willingness of conservation interests to engage in the market. This makes it difficult to predict the outcome of a hypothetical whale permit market. As a thought experiment, we develop a bioeconomic model to evaluate the influence of economic uncertainty about demand for whale conservation or harvest. We use simulations over a wide range of parameterizations of whaling and conservation demands to examine the potential ecological consequences of the establishment of a whale permit market in Norwegian waters under bounded (but substantial) economic uncertainty. We find that while a whale conservation market has the potential to yield a wide range of conservation and harvest outcomes, the most likely outcomes are those in which conservationists buy all whale permits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Features of Hypothetical Plasma Phase Transition in Interiors of Saturn and Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Ukrainets, Artem

    2013-01-01

    Anomalous features for hypothetical Plasma Phase Transitions (PPT), which is expected to occur in mixed hydrogen-helium plasma in interior of Jupiter and Saturn, are under discussion. The characteristics of the Coulomb and density corrections (the so-called non-ideality corrections) are reconstructed for hydrogen-helium plasma in the vicinity of phase coexistence boundary of this PPT in version of Saumon and Chabrier, using tabular data for hydrogen-helium EOS of Saumon, Chabrier and VanHorn and some general thermodynamic relations. Two previously unknown characteristics of the studied PPT have been estimated based on these results: (i) -- the jump of the electrostatic potential across the phase boundary of PPT (Galvani potential), and (ii) -- the scale of non-congruency for this PPT (the differences in chemical composition of the coexisting hydrogen-helium phases), which could be expected in H2/He mixture at typical parameters of plasma in interior of Jupiter and Saturn. While the first effect -- the potenti...

  2. Economic impacts of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic : a cross-sectional analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Braeton J.; Shaneyfelt, Calvin R.

    2010-06-01

    A NISAC study on the economic effects of a hypothetical H1N1 pandemic was done in order to assess the differential impacts at the state and industry levels given changes in absenteeism, mortality, and consumer spending rates. Part of the analysis was to determine if there were any direct relationships between pandemic impacts and gross domestic product (GDP) losses. Multiple regression analysis was used because it shows very clearly which predictors are significant in their impact on GDP. GDP impact data taken from the REMI PI+ (Regional Economic Models, Inc., Policy Insight +) model was used to serve as the response variable. NISAC economists selected the average absenteeism rate, mortality rate, and consumer spending categories as the predictor variables. Two outliers were found in the data: Nevada and Washington, DC. The analysis was done twice, with the outliers removed for the second analysis. The second set of regressions yielded a cleaner model, but for the purposes of this study, the analysts deemed it not as useful because particular interest was placed on determining the differential impacts to states. Hospitals and accommodation were found to be the most important predictors of percentage change in GDP among the consumer spending variables.

  3. Hydrologic effects of hypothetical earthquake-caused floods below Jackson Lake, northwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, W.R.; Keefer, T.N.; Rankl, J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Jackson Lake, located in Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, is in an area of seismic instability. There is a possibility of flooding in the Snake River downstream from Jackson Lake Dam in the event of a severe earthquake. Hypothetical floods were routed 38 miles (61 kilometers) downstream from the dam for three cases: (1) Instantaneous destruction of the dam outlet structure, (2) instantaneous destruction of the entire dam, and (3) for waves overtopping the dam without failure of the dam. In each case, a full reservoir was assumed. Hydrographs for outflow from the reservoir for the two cases of dam failure were developed utilizing an accelerated discharge due to the travel of a negative wave through the reservoir, and Muskingum storage routing. For the case of waves overtopping the dam, a 10-foot (3-meter) wave was assumed to be propagated from the upstream end of the reservori. A multiple-linearization technique was used to route the flow through the reach. The model was calibrated from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow records. Most extensive flooding and largest water velocities would occur if the entire dam were destroyed; floods for the other two cases were smaller. An inundation map was prepared from channel conveyance curves and profiles of the water surface. (Woodard-USGS)

  4. Radioactive particulate release associated with the DOT specification 6M container under hypothetical accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.M.; Raney, P.J.

    1986-02-01

    A testing program was conducted to determine the leakage of depleted uranium dioxide powder (DUO) from the inner containment components of the US Department of Transportation's (DOT) specification 6M container under hypothetical accident conditions. Depleted uranium dioxide was selected as a surrogate for plutonium oxide because of the similarities in the powder characteristics, density and particle size, and because of the special handling and special facilities required for plutonium oxide. The DUO was packaged inside food pack cans in three different configurations inside the 2R vessel of the 6M container. The amount of DUO powder leakage ranged from none detectable (<2 x 10/sup -7/ g) to a high of 1 x 10/sup -3/ g. The combination of gravity, vibration and pressure produced the highest leakage of DUO. Containers that had hermetic seals (leak rates <6 x 10/sup -4/ atm cc/min) did not leak any detectable amount (<2 x 10/sup -7/ g) of DUO under the test conditions. Impact forces had no effect on the leakage of particles with the packaging configurations used. 23 refs., 24 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Summary of four release consequence analyses for hypothetical nuclear waste repositories in salt and granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, C.R.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-12-01

    Release consequence methology developed under the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) program has now been applied to four hypothetical repository sites. This paper summarizes the results of these four studies in order to demonstrate that the far-field methodology developed under the AEGIS program offers a practical approach to the post-closure safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories sited in deep continental geologic formations. The four studies are briefly described and compared according to the following general categories: physical description of the repository (size, inventory, emplacement depth); geologic and hydrologic description of the site and the conceptual hydrologic model for the site; description of release scenario; hydrologic model implementation and results; engineered barriers and leach rate modeling; transport model implementation and results; and dose model implementation and results. These studies indicate the following: numerical modeling is a practical approach to post-closure safety assessment analysis for nuclear waste repositories; near-field modeling capability needs improvement to permit assessment of the consequences of human intrusion and pumping well scenarios; engineered barrier systems can be useful in mitigating consequences for postulated release scenarios that short-circuit the geohydrologic system; geohydrologic systems separating a repository from the natural biosphere discharge sites act to mitigate the consequences of postulated breaches in containment; and engineered barriers of types other than the containment or absorptive type may be useful.

  6. Modelling wet deposition in simulations of volcanic ash dispersion from hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Richard A.; Potts, Rodney J.; Wain, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The statistical impact of including the process of wet deposition in dispersion model predictions of the movement of volcanic ash is assessed. Based on hypothetical eruptions of Merapi, Indonesia, sets of dispersion model simulations were generated, each containing four simulations per day over a period of three years, to provide results based on a wide range of atmospheric conditions. While on average dry sedimentation removes approximately 10% of the volcanic ash from the atmosphere during the first 24 h, wet deposition removes an additional 30% during seasons with highest rainfall (December and January) but only an additional 1% during August and September. The majority of the wet removal is due to in-cloud rather than below-cloud collection of volcanic ash particles. The largest uncertainties in the amount of volcanic ash removed by the process of wet deposition result from the choice of user-defined parameters used to compute the scavenging coefficient, and from the definition of the cloud top height. Errors in the precipitation field provided by the numerical weather prediction model utilised here have relatively less impact.

  7. Process design and economic analysis of a hypothetical bioethanol production plant using carob pod as feedstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Segado, S; Lozano, L J; de Los Ríos, A P; Hernández-Fernández, F J; Godínez, C; Juan, D

    2012-01-01

    A process for the production of ethanol from carob (Ceratonia siliqua) pods was designed and an economic analysis was carried out for a hypothetical plant. The plant was assumed to perform an aqueous extraction of sugars from the pods followed by fermentation and distillation to produce ethanol. The total fixed capital investment for a base case process with a capacity to transform 68,000 t/year carob pod was calculated as 39.61 millon euros (€) with a minimum bioethanol production cost of 0.51 €/L and an internal rate of return of 7%. The plant was found to be profitable at carob pod prices lower than 0.188 €/kg. An increase in the transformation capacity of the plant from 33,880 to 135,450 t/year was calculated to result in an increase in the internal rate of return from 5.50% to 13.61%. The obtained results show that carob pod is a promising alternative source for bioethanol production.

  8. Spacecraft Mission Design for the Mitigation of the 2017 PDC Hypothetical Asteroid Threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, Brent W.; Sarli, Bruno V.; Lyzhoft, Josh; Chodas, Paul W.; Englander, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed mission design analysis results for the 2017 Planetary Defense Conference (PDC) Hypothetical Asteroid Impact Scenario, documented at https:cneos.jpl.nasa.govpdcspdc17. The mission design includes campaigns for both reconnaissance (flyby or rendezvous) of the asteroid (to characterize it and the nature of the threat it poses to Earth) and mitigation of the asteroid, via kinetic impactor deflection, nuclear explosive device (NED) deflection, or NED disruption. Relevant scenario parameters are varied to assess the sensitivity of the design outcome, such as asteroid bulk density, asteroid diameter, momentum enhancement factor, spacecraft launch vehicle, and mitigation system type. Different trajectory types are evaluated in the mission design process from purely ballistic to those involving optimal midcourse maneuvers, planetary gravity assists, and/or low-thrust solar electric propulsion. The trajectory optimization is targeted around peak deflection points that were found through a novel linear numerical technique method. The optimization process includes constrain parameters, such as Earth departure date, launch declination, spacecraft, asteroid relative velocity and solar phase angle, spacecraft dry mass, minimum/maximum spacecraft distances from Sun and Earth, and Earth-spacecraft communications line of sight. Results show that one of the best options for the 2017 PDC deflection is solar electric propelled rendezvous mission with a single spacecraft using NED for the deflection.

  9. The hypothetical ancestral animal. the Urmetazoa: telomerase activity in sponges (Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISABEL M. MÜLLER

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Sponges (Porifera represent the lowest metazoan phylum, characterized by a pronounced plasticity in the determination of cell lineages, and they are the closest related taxon to the hypothetical ancestral animal, the Urmetazoa, from which the metazoan lineages diverged. In a first approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms controlling the switch from the cell lineage with a putative indefinite growth capacity to senescent, somatic cells, the activity of the telomerase as an indicator for immortality has been determined. The studies were performed with the marine demosponges Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium, in vivo with tissue but also in vitro using the primmorph system. Primmorphs are formed from dissociated cells which have retained their proliferation potency. It was found that the activity of telomerase in tissue of both sponges is high. Based on this and additional findings it is assumed that the separation of the senescent sponge cell lineage from the immortal germ-/somatic cell lineage is triggered by the loss of contact to cell adhesion factors. First evidence is included which suggests that the final progress of the senescent, telomerase-negative cells to cell death is caused by apoptosis.

  10. The labelling and reporting of euthanasia by Belgian physicians: a study of hypothetical cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smets, Tinne; Cohen, Joachim; Bilsen, Johan; Van Wesemael, Yanna; Rurup, Mette L; Deliens, Luc

    2012-02-01

    Belgium legalized euthanasia in 2002. Physicians must report each euthanasia case to the Federal Control and Evaluation Committee. This study examines which end-of-life decisions (ELDs) Belgian physicians label 'euthanasia', which ELDs they think should be reported and the physician characteristics associated with correct labelling of euthanasia cases, the awareness that they should be reported and the reporting of them. Five hypothetical cases of ELDs: intensified pain alleviation, palliative/terminal sedation, euthanasia with neuromuscular relaxants, euthanasia with morphine and life-ending without patient request were presented in a cross-sectional survey of 914 physicians in Belgium in 2009. About 19% of physicians did not label a euthanasia case with neuromuscular relaxants 'euthanasia', 27% did not know that it should be reported. Most physicians labelled a euthanasia case with morphine 'intensification of pain and symptom treatment' (39%) or 'palliative/terminal sedation' (37%); 21% of physicians labelled this case 'euthanasia'. Cases describing other ELDs were sometimes also labelled 'euthanasia'. Factors associated with a higher likelihood of labelling a euthanasia case correctly were: living in Flanders, being informed about the euthanasia law and having a positive attitude towards societal control over euthanasia. Whether a physician correctly labelled the euthanasia cases strongly determined their reporting knowledge and intentions. There is no consensus among physicians about the labelling of euthanasia and other ELDs, and about which cases must be reported. Mislabelling of ELDs could impede societal control over euthanasia. The provision of better information to physicians appears to be necessary.

  11. Public acceptance of a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine in Aceh, Indonesia: A hospital-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harapan Harapan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the acceptance towards a hypothetical Ebola virus vaccine (EVV and associated factors in a non-affected country, Indonesia. Methods: A hospital-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in four regencies of Aceh, Indonesia. A set of pre-tested questionnaires was used to obtain information on acceptance towards EVV and a range of explanatory variables. Associations between EVV acceptance and explanatory variables were tested using multi-steps logistic regression analysis and the Spearman's rank correlation. Results: Participants who had knowledge on Ebola virus disease (EVD were 45.3% (192/424 and none of the participants achieved 80% correct answers on the knowledge regarding to EVD. About 73% of participants expressed their willingness to receive the EVV. Education attainment, occupation, monthly income, have heard regarding to EVD previously, socioeconomic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were associated significantly with acceptance towards EVV in univariate analysis (P < 0.05. In the final multivariate model, socio-economic level, attitude towards vaccination practice and knowledge regarding to EVD were the independent explanatory variables for EVV acceptance. Conclusions: The knowledge of EVD was low, but this minimally affected the acceptance towards EVV. However, to facilitate optimal uptake of EVV, dissemination of vaccine-related information prior to its introduction is required.

  12. An Application of Graphical Approach to Construct Multiple Testing Procedure in a Hypothetical Phase III Design

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    Naitee eTing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many multiple testing procedures (MTP have been developed in recent years. Among these new procedures, the graphical approach is flexible and easy to communicate with non-statisticians. A hypothetical Phase III clinical trial design is introduced in this manuscript to demonstrate how graphical approach can be applied in clinical product development. In this design, an active comparator is used. It is thought that this test drug under development could potentially be superior to this comparator. For comparison of efficacy, the primary endpoint is well established and widely accepted by regulatory agencies. However, an important secondary endpoint based on Phase II findings looks very promising. The target dose may have a good opportunity to deliver superiority to the comparator. Furthermore, a lower dose is included in case the target dose may demonstrate potential safety concerns. This Phase III study is designed as a non-inferiority trial with two doses, and two endpoints. This manuscript will illustrate how graphical approach is applied to this design in handling multiple testing issues.

  13. Environmental sustainability comparison of a hypothetical pneumatic waste collection system and a door-to-door system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punkkinen, Henna; Merta, Elina; Teerioja, Nea; Moliis, Katja; Kuvaja, Eveliina

    2012-10-01

    Waste collection is one of the life cycle phases that influence the environmental sustainability of waste management. Pneumatic waste collection systems represent a new way of arranging waste collection in densely populated urban areas. However, limited information is available on the environmental impacts of this system. In this study, we compare the environmental sustainability of conventional door-to-door waste collection with its hypothetical pneumatic alternative. Furthermore, we analyse whether the size of the hypothetical pneumatic system, or the number of waste fractions included, have an impact on the results. Environmental loads are calculated for a hypothetical pneumatic waste collection system modelled on an existing dense urban area in Helsinki, Finland, and the results are compared to those of the prevailing, container-based, door-to-door waste collection system. The evaluation method used is the life-cycle inventory (LCI). In this study, we report the atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), SO(2) and NO(x). The results indicate that replacing the prevailing system with stationary pneumatic waste collection in an existing urban infrastructure would increase total air emissions. Locally, in the waste collection area, emissions would nonetheless diminish, as collection traffic decreases. While the electricity consumption of the hypothetical pneumatic system and the origin of electricity have a significant bearing on the results, emissions due to manufacturing the system's components prove decisive. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of disclosing hypothetical genetic test results for salt sensitivity on salt restriction behavior

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    Takeshima T

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Taro Takeshima,1,2 Masanobu Okayama,1 Masanori Harada,3 Ryusuke Ae,4 Eiji Kajii1 1Division of Community and Family Medicine, Center for Community Medicine, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan; 2Department of Healthcare Epidemiology, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine and Public Health, Kyoto, Japan; 3Department for Support of Rural Medicine, Yamaguchi Grand Medical Center, Yamaguchi, Japan; 4Department of General Internal Medicine, Hamasaka Public Hospital, Mikata, Japan Background: A few studies have explored the effects of disclosure of genetic testing results on chronic disease predisposition. However, these effects remain unclear in cases of hypertension. Reducing salt intake is an important nonpharmacological intervention for hypertension. We investigated the effects of genetic testing for salt sensitivity on salt restriction behavior using hypothetical genetic testing results. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-completed questionnaire. We enrolled consecutive outpatients who visited primary care clinics and small hospitals between September and December 2009 in Japan. We recorded the patients’ baseline characteristics and data regarding their salt restriction behavior, defined as reducing salt intake before and after disclosure of hypothetical salt sensitivity genetic test results. Behavioral stage was assessed according to the five-stage transtheoretical model. After dividing subjects into salt restriction and no salt restriction groups, we compared their behavioral changes following positive and negative test results and analyzed the association between the respondents’ characteristics and their behavioral changes. Results: We analyzed 1562 participants with a mean age of 58 years. In the no salt restriction group, which included patients at the precontemplation, contemplation, and preparation stages, 58.7% stated that their behavioral stage progressed after a positive test result, although 29

  15. RELAP5 analyses of two hypothetical flow reversal events for the advanced neutron source reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents RELAP5 results of two hypothetical, low flow transients analyzed as part of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor safety program. The reactor design features four independent coolant loops (three active and one in standby), each containing a main curculation pump (with battery powered pony motor), heat exchanger, an accumulator, and a check valve. The first transient assumes one of these pumps fails, and additionally, that the check valve in that loop remains stuck in the open position. This accident is considered extremely unlikely. Flow reverses in this loop, reducing the core flow because much of the coolant is diverted from the intact loops back through the failed loop. The second transient examines a 102-mm-diam instantaneous pipe break near the core inlet (the worst break location). A break is assumed to occur 90 s after a total loss-of-offsite power. Core flow reversal occurs because accumulator injection overpowers the diminishing pump flow. Safety margins are evaluated against four thermal limits: T{sub wall}=T{sub sat}, incipient boiling, onset of significant void, and critical heat flux. For the first transient, the results show that these limits are not exceeded (at a 95% non-exceedance probability level) if the pony motor battery lasts 30 minutes (the present design value). For the second transient, the results show that the closest approach of the fuel surface temperature to the local saturation temperature during core flow reversal is about 39{degrees}C. Therefore the fuel remains cool during this transient. Although this work is done specifically for the ANSR geometry and operating conditions, the general conclusions may be applicable to other highly subcooled reactor systems.

  16. Phototaxic foraging of the archaepaddler, a hypothetical deep-sea species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, R J; van de Grind, W A

    1998-01-01

    An autonomous agent (animat, hypothetical animal), called the (archae) paddler, is simulated in sufficient detail to regard its simulated aquatic locomotion (paddling) as physically possible. The paddler is supposed to be a model of an animal that might exist, although it is perfectly possible to view it as a model of a robot that might be built. The agent is assumed to navigate in a simulated deep-sea environment, where it forages for autoluminescent prey. It uses a biologically inspired phototaxic foraging strategy, while paddling in a layer just above the bottom. The advantage of this living space is that the navigation problem--and hence our model--is essentially two-dimensional. Moreover, the deep-sea environment is physically simple (and hence easy to simulate): no significant currents, constant temperature, completely dark. A foraging performance metric is developed that circumvents the necessity to solve the traveling salesman problem. A parametric simulation study then quantifies the influence of habitat factors, such as the density of prey, and body geometry (e.g., placement, direction and directional selectivity of the eyes) on foraging success. Adequate performance proves to require a specific body geometry adapted to the habitat characteristics. In general, performance degrades gracefully for modest changes of the geometric and habitat parameters, indicating that we work in a stable region of "design space." The parameters have to strike a compromise between, on the one hand, to "see" as many targets at the same time as possible. One important conclusion is that simple reflex-based navigation can be surprisingly efficient. Additionally, performance in a global task (foraging) depends strongly on local parameters such as visual direction tuning, position of the eyes and paddles, and so forth. Behavior and habitat "mold" the body, and the body geometry strongly influences performance. The resulting platform enables further testing of foraging strategies

  17. Neonatal nurses' response to a hypothetical premature birth situation: What if it was my baby?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2016-12-09

    Evolving technology and scientific advancement have increased the chances of survival of the extremely premature baby; however, such survival can be associated with some severe long-term morbidities. The research investigates the caregiving and ethical dilemmas faced by neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies (defined as ≤24 weeks' gestation). This article explores the issues arising for neonatal nurses when they considered the philosophical question of 'what if it was me and my baby', or what they believed they would do in the hypothetical situation of going into premature labour and delivering an extremely premature baby. Data were collected via a questionnaire to Australian neonatal nurses and semi-structured interviews with 24 neonatal nurses in New South Wales, Australia. Relevant ethical approvals have been obtained by the researchers. A qualitative approach was used to analyse the data. The theme 'imagined futures' was generated which comprised three sub-themes: 'choice is important', 'not subjecting their own baby to treatment' and 'nurses and outcome predictions'. The results offer an important and unique understanding into the perceptions of nursing staff who care for extremely premature babies and their family, see them go home and witness their evolving outcomes. The results show that previous clinical and personal experiences led the nurses in the study to choose to have the belief that if in a similar situation, they would choose not to have their own baby resuscitated and subjected to the very treatment that they provide to other babies. The theme 'imagined futures' offers an overall understanding of how neonatal nurses imagine what the life of the extremely premature baby and his or her family will be like after discharge from neonatal intensive care. The nurses' past experience has led them to believe that they would not want this life for themselves and their baby, if they were to deliver at 24 weeks' gestation or less. © The

  18. Increasing membrane interactions of local anaesthetics as hypothetic mechanism for their cardiotoxicity enhanced by myocardial ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hironori; Mizogami, Maki; Shigemi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    While myocardial ischaemia enhances the cardiotoxicity of local anaesthetics, the pharmacological background remains unclear. Cardiolipin (CL) localized in mitochondrial membranes is possibly the site of cardiotoxic action of local anaesthetics and peroxynitrite is produced by cardiac ischaemia and reperfusion. We verified the hypothetic mechanism that local anaesthetics may interact with CL-containing biomembranes to change the membrane biophysical property and their membrane interactions may be increased by peroxynitrite. Biomimetic membranes were prepared with different phospholipids and cholesterol of varying compositions. The membrane preparations were reacted with peroxynitrite of pathologically relevant concentrations and local anaesthetics (bupivacaine and lidocaine) of a cardiotoxic concentration separately or in combination. Changes in membrane fluidity were determined by measuring fluorescence polarization. Peroxynitrite decreased the fluidity of biomimetic membranes at 0.1-10 μM with the relative potency being CL>1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoylphosphatidylcholine>1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-constituting membranes, indicating the lipid peroxidation-induced membrane rigidification determined by the unsaturation degree of membrane lipids. When treated with 0.1-10 μM peroxynitrite, biomimetic membranes were more rigid with elevating the CL content from 0% to 30 mol%, suggesting that CL is a primary target of peroxynitrite. Bupivacaine and lidocaine fluidized at 200 μM biomimetic membranes containing 10 mol% CL and their effects were increased by pre-treating the membranes with 0.1 and 1 μM peroxynitrite. Cardiotoxic bupivacaine and lidocaine increasingly interact with CL-containing mitochondria model membranes which are relatively rigidified by peroxynitrite. Such an increasing membrane interaction may be, at least in part, responsible for the local anaesthetic cardiotoxicity enhanced by myocardial ischaemia.

  19. Role of gender norms and group identification on hypothetical and experimental pain tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Gregory J; Schwegler, Andria F; Theodore, Brian R; Fuchs, Perry N

    2007-05-01

    Previous research indicates that men typically tolerate more pain in experimental settings than women. One likely explanation for these group differences in pain tolerance is conformity to traditional, gender group social norms (i.e., the ideal man is masculine and tolerates more pain; the ideal woman is feminine and tolerates less pain). According to self-categorization theory, norms guide behavior to the degree that group members adopt the group identity. Therefore, high-identifying men are expected to conform to gender norms and tolerate more pain than high-identifying women who conform to different gender norms as a guide for their behavior. We conducted two studies to investigate whether gender group identification moderates individuals' conformity to pain tolerance and reporting norms. In the first study, participants indicated their gender identification and expected tolerance of a hypothetical painful stimulus. As anticipated, high-identifying men reported significantly greater pain tolerance than high-identifying women. No differences existed between low-identifying men and women. To determine if self-reported pain tolerance in a role-playing scenario corresponds to actual pain tolerance in an experimental setting, the second study examined pain tolerance to a noxious stimulus induced by electrical stimulation of the index finger. The experimental outcome revealed that high-identifying men tolerated more painful stimulation than high-identifying women. Further, high-identifying men tolerated more pain than low-identifying men. These results highlight the influence of social norms on behavior and suggest the need to further explore the role of norms in pain reporting behaviors.

  20. Soil carbon sequestration, carbon markets, and conservation agriculture practices: A hypothetical examination in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timoteo E. Simone

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Payments for Environmental Services (PES are relatively novel mechanisms whereby the adoption of sustainable management practices by a stakeholder is rewarded by incentives linked to external markets. Adoption of PES for conservation agricultural practices (CAPS by smallholder farmers may provide opportunities to increase household income or cover the technology costs of adoption if the carbon sequestration benefits of CAPS are quantifiable, adoption rates are accelerated and maintained, a mechanism exists whereby carbon sequestration services can be compensated, and carbon offset exchange markets are viable. This research suggests a methodology to examine a PES market for carbon offsets generated by the adoption of CAPS by farmers in Mozambique. Assuming a cumulative adoption of 60% over a 20-year period, revenue from PES market participation to CA adopters was two times higher than revenue earned when disadoption occurred midway through the simulation. Lower adoption targets are associated with higher per household returns when fertilizer rates typical to the region are increased. Establishing and maintaining a sustainable PES system in the study region would require significant investment in time and resources. The lack of on-the-ground institutions or local support for such a program would also challenge successful implementation. Finally, the programs where participant success depends on external markets, such as the hypothetical one suggested here, are subject to the ebb and flow of foreign demand for carbon offsets. Addressing these three broad constraints to a PES/CAPS program in the region would require grass-roots driven policy initiatives with buy-in at multiple social, economic, and political levels.

  1. Plutonium Worlds. Fast Breeders, Systems Analysis and Computer Simulation in the Age of Hypotheticality

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    Sebastian Vehlken

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the media history of one of the hallmark civil nuclear energy programs in Western Germany – the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR technology. Promoted as a kind of perpetuum mobile of the Atomic Age, the "German Manhattan Project" not only imported big science thinking. In its context, nuclear technology was also put forth as an avantgarde of scientific inquiry, dealing with the most complex and critical technological endeavors. In the face of the risks of nuclear technology, German physicist Wolf Häfele thus announced a novel epistemology of "hypotheticality". In a context where traditional experimental engineering strategies became inappropiate, he called for the application of advanced media technologies: Computer Simulations (CS and Systems Analysis (SA generated computerized spaces for the production of knowledge. In the course of the German Fast Breeder program, such methods had a twofold impact. One the one hand, Häfele emphazised – as the "father of the German Fast Breeder" – the utilization of CS for the actual planning and construction of the novel reactor type. On the other, namely as the director of the department of Energy Systems at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA, Häfele advised SA-based projections of energy consumption. These computerized scenarios provided the rationale for the conception of Fast Breeder programs as viable and necessary alternative energy sources in the first place. By focusing on the role of the involved CS techniques, the paper thus investigates the intertwined systems thinking of nuclear facilities’s planning and construction and the design of large-scale energy consumption and production scenarios in the 1970s and 1980s, as well as their conceptual afterlives in our contemporary era of computer simulation.

  2. Hypothetical influence of non-indexed Spanish journals on the impact factor of radiological journals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miguel-Dasit, Alberto [MR Section, La Plana de Vila-Real Hospital, Castellon (Spain); Aleixandre, Rafael [Institute of History of Science and Documentation Lopez Pinero, University of Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Valderrama, Juan C. [Institute of History of Science and Documentation Lopez Pinero, University of Valencia-CSIC, Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Department of Radiology, MR Section, Dr. Peset University Hospital, Avenida Gaspar Aguilar 90, E-46017 Valencia (Spain)]. E-mail: marti_lui@gva.es; Sanfeliu, Pilar [Cardenal Herrera-CEU University, Alfara, Valencia (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the hypothetical changes in the 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals included in the Science Citation Index-Journal Citation Reports by also counting cites proceeding from 73 Spanish journals on different medical specialties. Also, to estimate the possible impact factor of the official Spanish radiology journal, Radiologia, not included in this database. Materials and methods: A modified 2001 impact factor of 52 radiological journals and Radiologia was obtained by adding the number of cites in 1999 and 2000 from the medical Spanish journals. Data were obtained by consulting the 2001 edition of the Journal Citation Reports in the 'Web of Science' database. Results: The 16,985 bibliographical references were analysed (232 of them to radiological journals). The journal with the largest increase in its 2001 impact factor (from 1.83 to 1.90) was Radiologic Clinics of North America. European Journal of Radiology was the European journal with the highest increase (from 1.084 to 1.110) in the difference between the 2001 modified and original impact factor. The modified 2001 impact factor of the 34 American journals was statistically higher (P = 0.016) than that of the 18 European journals (1.64 versus 0.93). Differences between the 2001 modified and original impact factor were slightly higher in the American journals (no statistically significant difference). The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was 0.056. Discussion: Differences between the 2001 original and modified impact factor were small, but larger in the American journals. The 2001 impact factor of Radiologia was modest, although similar to other publications included in the Journal Citation Reports.

  3. Expression and functional identification of the hypothetical adhesin P32 from Mycoplasma genitalium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN BO LI; YI MOU WU; WEN BO ZHANG; MIN JUN YU

    2006-01-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is the main causative agent for non-gonococcal and non-chlamydial urethritis. P32 is the putative surface-exposed membrane protein of M. genitalium and it has substaintial identity in amino acid sequence with adhesin protein P30 from M. pneumoniae. Since M. pneumoniae mutants lacking P30 protein is defective in cytadherence, P32 protein has been proposed to be an essential adhesin implicated in the adherence of M. genitalium to host cells. The prokaryotic expression vector pET-30 ( + )/p32 was constructed in the present study, and the recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli and purified under denaturing condition. As demonstrated by the immunoblotting analysis, the recombinant protein could react with rabbit antisera against M. genitalium, and adherence inhibition assays were performed with antisera against this recombinant protein. It was demonstrated that P32 protein apperared to be an adhesion protein of M. genitalium, thus providing the experimental basis for better understanding of the pathogenesis of M. genitalium infection and for the development of the related vaccines against the infection.

  4. A hypothetical model of crossing Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus through its host midgut physical barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cheng

    Full Text Available Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV is a primary pathogen of silkworm (B. mori that causes severe economic losses each year. However, the molecular mechanisms of silkworm-BmNPV interactions, especially the silkworm proteins that can interact with the virus, are still largely unknown. In this study, the total and membrane proteins of silkworm midguts were displayed using one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. A virus overlay assay was used to detect B. mori proteins that specifically bind to BmNPV particles. Twelve proteins were located and identified using mass spectrometry, and the different expression of the corresponding genes in BmNPV susceptible and resistant silkworm strains also indicated their involvement in BmNPV infection. The 12 proteins are grouped based on their potential roles in viral infection, for example, endocytosis, intracellular transportation, and host responses. Based on these results, we hypothesize the following: I vacuolar ATP synthase catalytic subunit A and subunit B may be implicated in the process of the membrane fusion of virus and the release of the nucleocapsid into cytoplasm; II actin, enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase are cytoskeleton associated proteins and may play an important role in BmNPV intracellular transportation; III mitochondrial prohibitin complex protein 2, ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein, calreticulin, regucalcin-like isoform X1 and 60 kDa heat shock protein are involved in cell apoptosis regulation during BmNPV infection in larvae midguts; IV ribosomal P0 may be associated with BmNPV infection by regulating gene expression of BmNPV; V arginine kinase has a role in the antiviral activities against BmNPV. Our work should prove informative by providing multiple protein targets and a novel direction to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between silkworms and BmNPV.

  5. Side effects and accounting aspects of hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean iron fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oschlies

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent suggestions to slow down the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide have included ocean fertilization by addition of the micronutrient iron to Southern Ocean surface waters, where a number of natural and artificial iron fertilization experiments have shown that low ambient iron concentrations limit phytoplankton growth. Using a coupled carbon-climate model with the marine biology's response to iron addition calibrated against data from natural iron fertilization experiments, we examine biogeochemical side effects of a hypothetical large-scale Southern Ocean Iron Fertilization (OIF that need to be considered when attempting to account for possible OIF-induced carbon offsets. In agreement with earlier studies our model simulates an OIF-induced increase in local air-sea CO2 fluxes by about 73 GtC over a 100-year period, which amounts to about 48% of the OIF-induced increase in organic carbon export out of the fertilized area. Offsetting CO2 return fluxes outside the region and after stopping the fertilization at 1, 7, 10, 50, and 100 years are quantified for a typical accounting period of 100 years. For continuous Southern Ocean iron fertilization, the CO2 return flux outside the fertilized area cancels about 20% of the fertilization-induced CO2 air-sea flux within the fertilized area on a 100-yr timescale. This "leakage" effect has a radiative impact more than twice as large as the simulated enhancement of marine N2O emissions. Other side effects not yet discussed in terms of accounting schemes include a decrease in Southern Ocean oxygen levels and a simultaneous shrinking of tropical suboxic areas, and accelerated ocean acidification in the entire water column in the Southern Ocean at the expense of reduced globally-averaged surface-water acidification. A prudent approach to account for the OIF-induced carbon sequestration would account for global air-sea CO2 fluxes rather

  6. Consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Sellafield - Predicted impacts on the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoerring, H.; Ytre-Eide, M.A.; Liland, A.

    2010-12-15

    This report describes the possible environmental consequences for Norway due to a hypothetical accident at the Sellafield complex in the UK. The scenario considered involves an explosion and fire at the B215 facility resulting in a 1 % release of the total HAL (Highly Active liquor) inventory of radioactive waste with a subsequent air transport and deposition in Norway. Air transport modelling is based on real meteorological data from October 2008 with wind direction towards Norway and heavy precipitation. This weather is considered to be quite representative as typical seasonal weather. Based on this weather scenario, the estimated fallout in Norway will be approx 17 P Bq of caesium-137 which is 7 times higher than the fallout from the Chernobyl accident. The modelled radioactive contamination is linked with data on transfer to the food chain and statistics on production and hunting to assess the consequences for foodstuffs. The investigation has been limited to the terrestrial environment, focussing on wild berries, fungi, and animals grazing unimproved pastures (i.e. various types of game, reindeer, sheep and goats). The predicted consequences are severe - especially in connection to sheep and goat production. Up to 80 % of the lambs in Norway could be exceeding the food intervention levels for radiocaesium the first years after the fallout, with 30-40 % likely to be above for many years. There will, consequently, be a need for extensive countermeasures in large areas for years or even decades involving several hundred thousand animals each year. Large consequences are also expected for reindeer husbandry - the first year in particular due to the time of fallout which is just prior to winter slaughter. The consequences will be most sever for reindeer herding in middle and southern parts of Norway, but problems may reach as far north as Finnmark where we find the majority of Norwegian reindeer production. The consequences for game will mostly depend on the

  7. Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis: A Hypothetical Application to the Waas Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilroy, Kristin; Mens, Marjolein; Haasnoot, Marjolijn; Jeuken, Ad

    2016-04-01

    More frequent and intense hydrologic events under climate change are expected to enhance water security and flood risk management challenges worldwide. Traditional planning approaches must be adapted to address climate change and develop solutions with an appropriate level of robustness and flexibility. The Climate Risk Informed Decision Analysis (CRIDA) method is a novel planning approach embodying a suite of complementary methods, including decision scaling and adaptation pathways. Decision scaling offers a bottom-up approach to assess risk and tailors the complexity of the analysis to the problem at hand and the available capacity. Through adaptation pathway,s an array of future strategies towards climate robustness are developed, ranging in flexibility and immediacy of investments. Flexible pathways include transfer points to other strategies to ensure that the system can be adapted if future conditions vary from those expected. CRIDA combines these two approaches in a stakeholder driven process which guides decision makers through the planning and decision process, taking into account how the confidence in the available science, the consequences in the system, and the capacity of institutions should influence strategy selection. In this presentation, we will explain the CRIDA method and compare it to existing planning processes, such as the US Army Corps of Engineers Principles and Guidelines as well as Integrated Water Resources Management Planning. Then, we will apply the approach to a hypothetical case study for the Waas Region, a large downstream river basin facing rapid development threatened by increased flood risks. Through the case study, we will demonstrate how a stakeholder driven process can be used to evaluate system robustness to climate change; develop adaptation pathways for multiple objectives and criteria; and illustrate how varying levels of confidence, consequences, and capacity would play a role in the decision making process, specifically

  8. Simulation of a hypothetical core disruptive accident in the mars test-facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F.; Lepareux, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    In France, a large experimental programme MARA/MARS was undertaken in the 80's to estimate the mechanical consequences of an HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) and to validate the SIRIUS computer code used at that time for the numerical simulations. At the end of the 80's, it was preferred to add a HCDA sodium-bubble-argon tri-component constitutive law to the general ALE fast dynamics finite element CASTEM-PLEXUS code rather than going on developing and using the specialized SIRIUS code. The experimental results of the MARA programme were used in the 90's to validate and qualify the CASTEM-PLEXUS code. A first series of computations of the tests MARA 8, MARA 10 and MARS was realised. The simulations showed a rather good agreement between the experimental and computed results for the MARA 8 and MARA 10 tests - even if there were some discrepancies - but the prediction of the MARS structure displacements and strains was overestimated. This conservatism was supposed to come from the fact that several MARS non axisymmetric structures like core elements, pumps and heat exchangers were not represented in the CASTEM-PLEXUS model. These structures, acting as porous barriers, had a protective effect on the mock-up containment by absorbing energy and slowing down the fluid impacting the containment. For these reasons, we developed in CASTEM-PLEXUS a new HCDA constitutive law taking into account the presence of the internal structures (without meshing them) by means of an equivalent porosity method. In other respects, the process used for dealing with the fluid-structure coupling in CASTEM-PLEXUS was improved. Thus a second series of simulations of the tests MARA8 and MARA10 was realised. A simulation of the test MARS was carried out too with the same simplified representation of the peripheral structures as in order to estimate the improvement provided by the new fluid-structure coupling. This paper presents a third numerical simulation of the MARS

  9. Springfield Processing Plant* (A Hypothetical Facility) SPP, Entry Control Point and Vehicle Gate Access Control Post Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Gregory A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This hypothetical order provides the requirements and instructions for the Springfield Processing Plant (SPP) Vehicle Gate and Entry Control Point (ECP) in the perimeter access building. The purpose of this post is to prevent the theft, sabotage or diversion of nuclear material (NM), control access and exit at the protected area, and to respond to emergencies according the SPP Guard Force (GF) Contingency Plan and as directed by a Guard Force Supervisor.

  10. Statistical equivalence and test-retest reliability of delay and probability discounting using real and hypothetical rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matusiewicz, Alexis K; Carter, Anne E; Landes, Reid D; Yi, Richard

    2013-11-01

    Delay discounting (DD) and probability discounting (PD) refer to the reduction in the subjective value of outcomes as a function of delay and uncertainty, respectively. Elevated measures of discounting are associated with a variety of maladaptive behaviors, and confidence in the validity of these measures is imperative. The present research examined (1) the statistical equivalence of discounting measures when rewards were hypothetical or real, and (2) their 1-week reliability. While previous research has partially explored these issues using the low threshold of nonsignificant difference, the present study fully addressed this issue using the more-compelling threshold of statistical equivalence. DD and PD measures were collected from 28 healthy adults using real and hypothetical $50 rewards during each of two experimental sessions, one week apart. Analyses using area-under-the-curve measures revealed a general pattern of statistical equivalence, indicating equivalence of real/hypothetical conditions as well as 1-week reliability. Exceptions are identified and discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of environmental public exposure from a hypothetical nuclear accident for Unit-1 Bushehr nuclear power plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, M; Ghasemi, M; Amrollahi, R; Khamooshi, C; Parsouzi, Z

    2013-05-01

    Unit-1 of the Bushehr nuclear power plant (BNPP-1) is a VVER-type reactor with 1,000-MWe power constructed near Bushehr city at the coast of the Persian Gulf, Iran. The reactor has been recently operational to near its full power. The radiological impact of nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents is of public concern, and the assessment of radiological consequences of any hypothetical nuclear accident on public exposure is vital. The hypothetical accident scenario considered in this paper is a design-basis accident, that is, a primary coolant leakage to the secondary circuit. This scenario was selected in order to compare and verify the results obtained in the present paper with those reported in the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR 2007) of the BNPP-1 and to develop a well-proven methodology that can be used to study other and more severe hypothetical accident scenarios for this reactor. In the present study, the version 2.01 of the PC COSYMA code was applied. In the early phase of the accidental releases, effective doses (from external and internal exposures) as well as individual and collective doses (due to the late phase of accidental releases) were evaluated. The surrounding area of the BNPP-1 within a radius of 80 km was subdivided into seven concentric rings and 16 sectors, and distribution of population and agricultural products was calculated for this grid. The results show that during the first year following the modeled hypothetical accident, the effective doses do not exceed the limit of 5 mSv, for the considered distances from the BNPP-1. The results obtained in this study are in good agreement with those in the FSAR-2007 report. The agreement obtained is in light of many inherent uncertainties and variables existing in the two modeling procedures applied and proves that the methodology applied here can also be used to model other severe hypothetical accident scenarios of the BNPP-1 such as a small and large break in the reactor coolant system as well

  12. Assessment of possible allergenicity of hypothetical ORFs in common food crops using current bioinformatic guidelines and its implications for the safety assessment of GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gregory J; Zhang, Shiping; Mirsky, Henry P; Cressman, Robert F; Cong, Bin; Ladics, Gregory S; Zhong, Cathy X

    2012-10-01

    Before a genetically modified (GM) crop can be commercialized it must pass through a rigorous regulatory process to verify that it is safe for human and animal consumption, and to the environment. One particular area of focus is the potential introduction of a known or cross-reactive allergen not previously present within the crop. The assessment of possible allergenicity uses the guidelines outlined by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and World Health Organization's (WHO) Codex Alimentarius Commission (Codex) to evaluate all newly expressed proteins. Some regulatory authorities have broadened the scope of the assessment to include all DNA reading frames between stop codons across the insert and spanning the insert/genomic DNA junctions. To investigate the utility of this bioinformatic assessment, all naturally occurring stop-to-stop frames in the non-transgenic genomes of maize, rice, and soybean, as well as the human genome, were compared against the AllergenOnline (www.allergenonline.org) database using the Codex criteria. We discovered thousands of frames that exceeded the Codex defined threshold for potential cross-reactivity suggesting that evaluating hypothetical ORFs (stop-to-stop frames) has questionable value for making decisions on the safety of GM crops.

  13. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effects of Victimization History and Sexual Attitudes on Women's Hypothetical Sexual Assault Scripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiting, Kari A; Yeater, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-01

    This study examined qualitatively the effects of a sexual victimization history and sexual attitudes on 247 undergraduate women's written accounts of a hypothetical sexual assault. More severe victimization history was associated with script characteristics of greater alcohol use, knowing the man longer, and the context of a party. Greater endorsement of positive attitudes toward casual sex was related to script characteristics of greater alcohol use, acquiescing to the man, and not knowing the man as long. Finally, a more recent sexual assault was associated with script characteristics of having just met the man, the context of a party or date, and acquiescing to the man.

  14. An approach for estimating the radiological significance of a hypothetical major nuclear accident over long distance transboundary scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitrakos, D., E-mail: dimitris.mitrakos@eeae.gr; Potiriadis, C.; Housiadas, C.

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Actions may be warranted after a major nuclear accident even at long distances. • Distance may not be the decisive parameter for longer term radiological impact. • Remote impact may vary orders of magnitude depending on the meteorological conditions. • The potential impact can be assessed using computationally inexpensive calculations. - Abstract: After the Fukushima accident important initiatives were taken in European level to enhance the nuclear safety level of the existing and planned nuclear reactors, such as the so-called nuclear “stress-tests” and the amendment of the Nuclear Safety Directive. A recent work of HERCA and WENRA focused on the need for a more consistent and harmonized response in a transboundary context in case of a hypothetical major nuclear accident in Europe. Such an accident, although very improbable, cannot be totally excluded and so, should be considered in emergency preparedness arrangements among the various European countries. In case of a hypothetical severe Fukushima-like accident in Europe, the role of the neighboring countries may be important, since the authorities should be able to provide information and advice to the government and the public, but also can contribute to the overall assessment of the situation be their own means. In this work we assess the radiological significance of a hypothetical major nuclear accident for distances longer than 300 km that are not typically covered by the internationally accepted emergency planning zones. The approach is simple and computationally inexpensive, since it is based on the calculation of only a few release scenarios at dates selected within a whole year on the basis of bounding the deposition levels at long distances in relation to the occurrence of precipitation. From the calculated results it is evident that distance is not the only decisive parameter in estimating the potential radiological significance of a severe nuclear accident. The hypothetical

  15. Potential consequences in Norway after a hypothetical accident at Leningrad nuclear power plant. Potential release, fallout and predicted impacts on the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalbandyan, A.; Ytre-Eide, M.A.; Thoerring, H.; Liland, A.; Bartnicki, J.; Balonov, M.

    2012-06-15

    The report describes different hypothetical accident scenarios at the Leningrad nuclear power plant for both RBMK and VVER-1200 reactors. The estimated release is combined with different meteorological scenarios to predict possible fallout of radioactive substances in Norway. For a hypothetical catastrophic accident at an RBMK reactor combined with a meteorological worst case scenario, the consequences in Norway could be considerable. Foodstuffs in many regions would be contaminated above the food intervention levels for radioactive cesium in Norway. (Author)

  16. Deduction Theorem and Hypothetical Syllogism Rule on Fuzzy Logic System%模糊逻辑系统中的演绎定理和HS规则

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓斌; 邓书显

    2005-01-01

    Cancelled the first axiom L1) or the third axiom L3) of the classical formal logic system we established two kinds of quasi-formal deductive system, LG*-Rand LG*, respectively. In LG*-R we proved that neither the deduction theorem nor the hypothetical syllogism (HS) rule held but a deduction theorem and an HS rule are obtained in a weak sense. We also proved that both the deduction theorem and the hypothetical syllogism(HS)rule hold in LG*.

  17. Hypothetical mode of action of earthworm extract with hepatoprotective and antioxidant properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariappan BALAMURUGAN; Kasi PARTHASARATHI; Lalpet Souri RANGANATHAN; Edwin L. COOPER

    2008-01-01

    The hepatoprotective potential of earthworm extract (EE) (Lampito mauritii, Kinberg) was evaluated against paracetamol-induced liver injury in Wistar albino rat, in comparison with silymarin, the standard hepatoprotective drug. We observed a reduction in liver antioxidants, such as glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx),and catalase (CAT) and in serum total protein, and an increase in serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), serum aspertate aminotranferase (AST), serum alanine aminotranferase (ALT), bilirubin and liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) due to liver injury in the paracetamol-administered rats (2 g/kg). On the contrary, increased activities of liver GSH, SOD, GPx,CAT and serum total protein level, and decrease in the contents of serum ALP, AST, ALT, bilirubin and liver TBARS were observed in rats administered with different doses of EE (100, 200 and 300 mg/kg), which are similar to the activities of hepatoprotective drug silymarin (150 mg/kg). The mode of action of EE as evidenced by the above parameters may suggest that EE, on the one hand, prevents the formation of the reactive oxygen groups, or scavenges these groups, thereby preventing the damage on the hepatic cells, and, on the other hand, modulates the genes responsible for synthesis of antioxidant enzymes such as GPx, CAT and SOD in liver tissue and decreases the serum enzymatic activities such as ALP, AST and ALT.

  18. Personality and Behavior in Social Dilemmas: Testing the Situational Strength Hypothesis and the Role of Hypothetical Versus Real Incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, José H

    2016-02-01

    Previous research aimed at testing the situational strength hypothesis suffers from serious limitations regarding the conceptualization of strength. In order to overcome these limitations, the present study attempts to test the situational strength hypothesis based on the operationalization of strength as reinforcement contingencies. One dispositional factor of proven effect on cooperative behavior, social value orientation (SVO), was used as a predictor of behavior in four social dilemmas with varying degree of situational strength. The moderating role of incentive condition (hypothetical vs. real) on the relationship between SVO and behavior was also tested. One hundred undergraduates were presented with the four social dilemmas and the Social Value Orientation Scale. One-half of the sample played the social dilemmas using real incentives, whereas the other half used hypothetical incentives. Results supported the situational strength hypothesis in that no behavioral variability and no effect of SVO on behavior were found in the strongest situation. However, situational strength did not moderate the effect of SVO on behavior in situations where behavior showed variability. No moderating effect was found for incentive condition either. The implications of these results for personality theory and assessment are discussed.

  19. Hypothetical scenario exercises to improve planning and readiness for drinking water quality management during extreme weather events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deere, Daniel; Leusch, Frederic D L; Humpage, Andrew; Cunliffe, David; Khan, Stuart J

    2017-03-15

    Two hypothetical scenario exercises were designed and conducted to reflect the increasingly extreme weather-related challenges faced by water utilities as the global climate changes. The first event was based on an extreme flood scenario. The second scenario involved a combination of weather events, including a wild forest fire ('bushfire') followed by runoff due to significant rainfall. For each scenario, a panel of diverse personnel from water utilities and relevant agencies (e.g. health departments) formed a hypothetical water utility and associated regulatory body to manage water quality following the simulated extreme weather event. A larger audience participated by asking questions and contributing key insights. Participants were confronted with unanticipated developments as the simulated scenarios unfolded, introduced by a facilitator. Participants were presented with information that may have challenged their conventional experiences regarding operational procedures in order to identify limitations in current procedures, assumptions, and readily available information. The process worked toward the identification of a list of specific key lessons for each event. At the conclusion of each simulation a facilitated discussion was used to establish key lessons of value to water utilities in preparing them for similar future extreme events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual differences in the use of the response scale determine valuations of hypothetical health states: an empirical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerding Willem-Jan

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent, including age, on valuation scores of hypothetical health states remain inconclusive. Therefore, we analyzed data from a study designed to discriminate between the effects of respondents' age and time preference on valuations of health states to gain insight in the contribution of individual response patterns to the variance in valuation scores. Methods A total of 212 respondents from three age groups valued the same six hypothetical health states using three different methods: a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS and two variants of the Time trade-off (TTO. Analyses included a generalizability study, principal components analysis, and cluster analysis. Results Valuation scores differed significantly, but not systematically, between valuation methods. A total of 36.8% of variance was explained by health states, 1.6% by the elicitation method, and 0.2% by age group. Individual differences in the use of the response scales (e.g. a tendency to give either high or low TTO scores, or a high or low scoring tendency on the VAS were the main source of remaining variance. These response patterns were not related to age or other identifiable respondent characteristics. Conclusion Individual response patterns in this study were more important determinants of TTO or VAS valuations of health states than age or other respondent characteristics measured. Further valuation research should focus on explaining individual response patterns as a possible key to understanding the determinants of health state valuations.

  1. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YOR059C, YGL053W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YOR059C - Hypothetical protein Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait ...nce, a motif involved in COPII binding; forms a complex with Prp9p in the ER; member of DUP240 gene family Row...s with this prey as prey (1) Rows with this prey as bait (0) 5 6 3 4 0 0 0 0 0 ...- - - - - 0 0 5 - Show YOR059C Bait ORF YOR059C Bait gene name - Bait description Hypothetical protein Rows ...with this bait as bait Rows with this bait as bait (1) Rows with this bait as prey Rows with this bait as pr

  2. [Hypothetical link between endometriosis and xenobiotics-associated genetically modified food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aris, A; Paris, K

    2010-12-01

    Endometriosis is an oestrogen-dependent inflammatory disease affecting 10 % of reproductive-aged women. Often accompanied by chronic pelvic pain and infertility, endometriosis rigorously interferes with women's quality of life. Although the pathophysiology of endometriosis remains unclear, a growing body of evidence points to the implication of environmental toxicants. Over the last decade, an increase in the incidence of endometriosis has been reported and coincides with the introduction of genetically modified foods in our diet. Even though assessments of genetically modified food risk have not indicated any hazard on human health, xenobiotics-associated genetically modified food, such as pesticides residues and xenoproteins, could be harmful in the long-term. The "low-dose hypothesis", accumulation and biotransformation of pesticides-associated genetically modified food and the multiplied toxicity of pesticides-formulation adjuvants support this hypothesis. This review summarizes toxic effects (in vitro and on animal models) of some xenobiotics-associated genetically modified food, such as glyphosate and Cry1Ab protein, and extrapolates on their potential role in the pathophysiology of endometriosis. Their roles as immune toxicants, pro-oxidants, endocrine disruptors and epigenetic modulators are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. A Novel Inositol Pyrophosphate Phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Siw14 PROTEIN SELECTIVELY CLEAVES THE β-PHOSPHATE FROM 5-DIPHOSPHOINOSITOL PENTAKISPHOSPHATE (5PP-IP5).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steidle, Elizabeth A; Chong, Lucy S; Wu, Mingxuan; Crooke, Elliott; Fiedler, Dorothea; Resnick, Adam C; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2016-03-25

    Inositol pyrophosphates are high energy signaling molecules involved in cellular processes, such as energetic metabolism, telomere maintenance, stress responses, and vesicle trafficking, and can mediate protein phosphorylation. Although the inositol kinases underlying inositol pyrophosphate biosynthesis are well characterized, the phosphatases that selectively regulate their cellular pools are not fully described. The diphosphoinositol phosphate phosphohydrolase enzymes of the Nudix protein family have been demonstrated to dephosphorylate inositol pyrophosphates; however, theSaccharomyces cerevisiaehomolog Ddp1 prefers inorganic polyphosphate over inositol pyrophosphates. We identified a novel phosphatase of the recently discovered atypical dual specificity phosphatase family as a physiological inositol pyrophosphate phosphatase. Purified recombinant Siw14 hydrolyzes the β-phosphate from 5-diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (5PP-IP5or IP7)in vitro. In vivo,siw14Δ yeast mutants possess increased IP7levels, whereas heterologousSIW14overexpression eliminates IP7from cells. IP7levels increased proportionately whensiw14Δ was combined withddp1Δ orvip1Δ, indicating independent activity by the enzymes encoded by these genes. We conclude that Siw14 is a physiological phosphatase that modulates inositol pyrophosphate metabolism by dephosphorylating the IP7isoform 5PP-IP5to IP6.

  4. Hydrogeology, ground-water quality, and the possible effects of a hypothetical radioactive water spill, Plainsboro Township, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J.C.; Spitz, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    Princeton University, under contract to the Department of Energy , maintains a Tokamak fusion test reactor in New Jersey. The U.S. Geological Survey investigated groundwater flow and estimated the effects of a hypothetical spill of radioactive water at the site on the local groundwater system. The study included test drilling; aquifer testing; measurement of water levels, infiltration capacity, and stream discharge; and a simulation of the hypothetical spill. The Triassic Stockton Formation-a water supply aquifer composed primarily of jointed siltstone and sandstone-underlies the site. The aquifer is confined by overlying weathered bedrock and underlying unjointed rock. Weathered bedrock is overlain by unconsolidated, partially saturated material which ranges from 6 to 39 ft in thickness. Groundwater recharge is by lateral flow into the study area, stream leakage, and precipitation. Discharge is by pumpage, evapotranspiration, stream inflow, and lateral flow out of the study area. Transmissivity of the aquifer is about 1,740 sq ft/day, and the storage coefficient is about 0.0002. The average linear velocity of groundwater at the site ranges from 100 to 270 ft/yr depending on location and time of year. The velocity over a large part of the site is controlled by on-site pumpage. Groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for common ions, trace metals, and tritium. The analyses reported no concentrations of common ions or trace metals which exceeded the criteria for drinking water standards recommended by the EPA, except for some instances of moderately high concentrations of iron and manganese. Iron and manganese are common in groundwater and surface water in the area and are not indicative of an on-site source of contamination. Tritium concentrations in the collected samples were also considered representative of background levels and were well below the maximum concentration permitted by the EPA. The fate of spilled radioactive water after a hypothetical

  5. 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' proteins orthologous with pSymA-encoded proteins of Sinorhizobium meliloti: hypothetical roles in plant host interation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A nitrogen-fixing alfalfa-nodulating microsymbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, has a genome consisting of a 3.5 Mbp circular chromosome and two megaplasmids totaling 3.0 Mbp, one a 1.3 Mbp pSymA carrying nonessential ‘accessory’ genes including nif, nod and others involved in plant interaction. Predict...

  6. Hypothetical granulin-like molecule from Fasciola hepatica identified by bioinformatics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicado, Claudia; Marcos, Luis A; Zimic, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    Fasciola hepatica is considered an emergent human pathogen, causing liver fibrosis or cirrhosis, conditions that are known to be direct causes of cancer. Some parasites have been categorized by WHO as carcinogenic agents such as Opisthorchis viverrini, a relative of F. hepatica. Although these two parasites are from the same class (Trematoda), the role of F. hepatica in carcinogenesis is unclear. We hypothesized that F. hepatica might share some features with O. viverrini and to be responsible to induce proliferation of host cells. We analyzed the recently released genome of F. hepatica looking for a gene coding a granulin-like growth factor, a protein secreted by O. viverrini (Ov-GRN-1), which is a potent stimulator of proliferation of host cells. Using computational biology tools, we identified a granulin-like molecule in F. hepatica, here termed FhGLM, which has high sequence identity level to Ov-GRN-1 and human progranulin. We found evidence of an upstream promoter compatible with the expression of FhGLM. The FhGLM architecture showed to have five granulin domains, one of them, the domain 3, was homologue to Ov-GRN-1 and human GRNC. The structure of the FhGLM granulin domain 3 resulted to have the overall folding of its homologue the human GRNC. Our findings show the presence of a homologue of a potent modulator of cell growth in F. hepatica that might have, as other granulins, a proliferative action on host cells during fascioliasis. Future experimental assays to demonstrate the presence of FhGLM in F. hepatica are needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  7. Structural properties of hypothetical CeBa2Cu3O7 compound from LSDA+DMFT calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łuszczek Maciej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The hypothetical stoichiometric CeBa2Cu3O7 (Ce123 compound, which has not been synthesized as a single phase yet, was studied by the density functional theory (DFT. We utilized a method which merges the local spin density approximation (LSDA with the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT to account for the electronic correlations. The LSDA+DMFT calculations were performed in the high-temperature range. The particular emphasis was put on the pressure-induced changes in the electronic band structure related to strongly correlated 4f states. The computational results indicate the occurrence of a large negative volumetric thermal expansion coefficient near T = 500 K and a trace of a low-volume isostructural metastable state at high temperatures.

  8. Investigating a Hypothetical Semiconductor Laser Bar with a Damaged Single Emitter Using a Laser Diode Simulation/Emulation Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.K. Amuzuvi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrates the use of Barlase, a semiconductor laser diode emulation tool, to emulate the by-emitter degradation of high power semiconductor laser diodes.Barlase is software that uses a LabView control interface. In this study, a hypothetical laser diode bar (multiple emitters was used to investigate a damaged single emitter randomly located in the bar and its behavior analyzed within the bar. It should however, be noted that, this scenario is valid for devices at the start of the aging process only. When all other relevant effects that affect the performance of laser diodes bars are allowed to interact over time, high levels of defects can also play important role in the degradation process. The results of this simulation scenario show the successful implementation of Barlase in the by-emitter analysis of laser diodes.

  9. Cues of High and Low Body Weight Negatively Influence Adults' Perceptions and Ratings in the Hypothetical Adoption Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Volk

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Infant and child facial cues influence perceptions and ratings in the Hypothetical Adoption Paradigm as well as actual parental care. A previous study demonstrated that infant and child facial cues of low body weight negatively influenced adults' ratings. The current study sought to replicate and expand on those results by presenting adults with normal faces as well as faces that were digitally altered to display high or low body weight. Cues of abnormal body weight significantly, and negatively, influenced adults’ ratings of adoption preference, health, and cuteness. Effect sizes were larger for cues of high body weight. Thus, infant and child facial cues of abnormal body weight may represent a relative risk factor to the quality of adult care obtained by children with abnormal body weight.

  10. Assessment in marine environment for a hypothetic nuclear accident based on the database of tidal harmonic constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byung-Il; Periáñez, Raúl; Park, Kihyun; Kim, In-Gyu; Suh, Kyung-Suk

    2014-10-15

    The eleven nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and a well-planned plant in the east coast of China generally use seawater for reactor cooling. In this study, an oceanic dispersion assessment system based on a database of tidal harmonic constants is developed. This system can calculate the tidal current without a large computational cost, and it is possible to calculate real-time predictions of pollutant dispersions in the ocean. Calculated amplitudes and phases have maximum errors of 10% and 20% with observations, respectively. A number of hypothetical simulations were performed according to varying of the release starting time and duration of pollutant for the six nuclear sites in China. The developed system requires a computational time of one hour for one month of real-time forecasting in Linux OS. Thus, it can use to evaluate rapidly the dispersion characteristics of the pollutants released into the sea from a nuclear accident.

  11. Pediatrician’s cough and cold medication prescription for hypothetical cases – A cross-sectional multi-centric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Chandelia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Concerns over inappropriate use of cough and cold medication (CCM in children have been raised. In addition to being ineffective, these are now considered toxic for young children. Despite this fact studies from some regions have shown high use of these medications by physicians. However data on pediatricians and from India are negligible. Aim: To study the burden and patterns of cough and cold medications use by pediatricians for hypothetical cases. Methods: In this cross-sectional study; 172 pediatricians of various hospitals of Delhi and Haryana were enrolled from February 15 to March 15, 2012. They were contacted personally by authors and asked to write their prescriptions for two hypothetical case scenarios [having cough and cold] of two different age groups; (1 less than 2 years and (2 2–5 years. We made two categories as recommendations exist for children less than 2 years while recommendations for the second category are underway. Results were summarized as percentages, counts and; presented in tables and figures. Chi square test was used to establish association between categorical variables of subgroups. Results: Response rate was 93%. The most used CCM was antihistaminics (82% and systemic sympathomimetics (48%. The use of CCM was significantly less in teaching hospitals as compared to non-teaching (77% vs. 95%; p-value – 0.025. However there was no statistical difference in the practice of post graduates and more senior pediatricians (p value-0.895. No difference in CCM use in two age groups {(82% (less than 2 years vs. 85% (2–5 years; p-value – 0.531} was observed. Conclusion: Overall use of CCM is still high irrespective of patient age, pediatrician’s seniority or hospital setting. Efforts should be made to create awareness among the pediatricians regarding cautious use of these medications.

  12. Does message framing predict willingness to participate in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial: an application of Prospect Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeli, Michael; Kafaar, Zuhayr; Kagee, Ashraf; Swartz, Leslie; Bullemor-Day, Philippa

    2013-01-01

    It is vital that enough participants are willing to participate in clinical trials to test HIV vaccines adequately. It is, therefore, necessary to explore what affects peoples' willingness to participate (WTP) in such trials. Studies have only examined individual factors associated with WTP and not the effect of messages about trial participation on potential participants (e.g., whether losses or gains are emphasized, or whether the outcome is certain or uncertain). This study explores whether the effects of message framing on WTP in a hypothetical HIV vaccine trial are consistent with Prospect Theory. This theory suggests that people are fundamentally risk averse and that (1) under conditions of low risk and high certainty, gain-framed messages will be influential (2) under conditions of high risk and low certainty, loss-framed messages will be influential. This cross-sectional study recruited 283 HIV-negative students from a South African university who were given a questionnaire that contained matched certain gain-framed, certain loss-framed, uncertain gain-framed, and uncertain loss-framed statements based on common barriers and facilitators of WTP. Participants were asked to rate how likely each statement was to result in their participation in a hypothetical preventative HIV vaccine trial. Consistent with Prospect Theory predictions, for certain outcomes, gain-framed messages were more likely to result in WTP than loss-framed messages. Inconsistent with predictions, loss-framed message were not more likely to be related to WTP for uncertain outcomes than gain-framed messages. Older students were less likely to express their WTP across the different message frames. Recruitment for HIV vaccine trials should pay attention to how messages about the trial are presented to potential participants.

  13. Response to Hypothetical Social Scenarios in Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury Who Present Inappropriate Social Behavior: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ouellette

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Very little research thus far has examined the decision making that underlies inappropriate social behavior (ISB post-TBI (traumatic brain injury. Objectives: To verify the usefulness of a new instrument, the Social Responding Task, for investigating whether, in social decision making, individuals with TBI, who present inappropriate social behavior (ISB, have difficulty anticipating their own feelings of embarrassment and others’ angry reactions following an ISB. Methods: Seven subjects with TBI presenting with inappropriate social behavior (TBI-ISB, 10 presenting with appropriate social behavior (TBI-ASB, and 15 healthy controls were given 12 hypothetical scenarios three times, each time ending with a different behavioral response. Subjects were asked to gauge the likelihood of their displaying the behavior in that situation (part A and of it being followed by an angry reaction from the other or by feelings of embarrassment in themselves (part B. Results: TBI-ISB subjects scored higher than TBI-ASB and healthy controls on a scale of likelihood of displaying an ISB. Results regarding expectations of angry reactions from others and feelings of embarrassment after an ISB were similar among groups. Negative correlations between endorsement of an inappropriate behavior and anticipation of negative emotional consequences were significant for both TBI-ASB and control subjects, but not for TBI-ISB subjects. Conclusions: Results suggest that the TBI-ISB participants were likely to endorse an ISB despite being able to anticipate a negative emotional response in themselves or others, suggesting that there were other explanations for their poor behavior. A self-reported likely response to hypothetical social scenarios can be a useful approach for studying the neurocognitive processes behind the poor choices of individuals with TBI-ISB, but the task needs further validation studies. A comprehensive discussion follows on the underlying

  14. A UDP-X diphosphatase from Streptococcus pneumoniae hydrolyzes precursors of peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

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    Krisna C Duong-Ly

    Full Text Available The gene for a Nudix enzyme (SP_1669 was found to code for a UDP-X diphosphatase. The SP_1669 gene is localized among genes encoding proteins that participate in cell division in Streptococcus pneumoniae. One of these genes, MurF, encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the last step of the Mur pathway of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Mur pathway substrates are all derived from UDP-glucosamine and all are potential Nudix substrates. We showed that UDP-X diphosphatase can hydrolyze the Mur pathway substrates UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid and UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine. The 1.39 Å resolution crystal structure of this enzyme shows that it folds as an asymmetric homodimer with two distinct active sites, each containing elements of the conserved Nudix box sequence. In addition to its Nudix catalytic activity, the enzyme has a 3'5' RNA exonuclease activity. We propose that the structural asymmetry in UDP-X diphosphatase facilitates the recognition of these two distinct classes of substrates, Nudix substrates and RNA. UDP-X diphosphatase is a prototype of a new family of Nudix enzymes with unique structural characteristics: two monomers, each consisting of an N-terminal helix bundle domain and a C-terminal Nudix domain, form an asymmetric dimer with two distinct active sites. These enzymes function to hydrolyze bacterial cell wall precursors and degrade RNA.

  15. HIERARCHIC SKELETAL ORGANIZATION - A FACTOR REGULATING THE STRUCTURE OF FATIGUE INJURIES. PART II. HYPOTHETICAL MODEL OF FORMATION AND DISTRUPTION OF BONDS BETWEEN CRYSTALLITE ASSOCIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avrunin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors discuss the questions concerning local structural-temporal changes in skeletal mineralization degree, local hyper-mineralization, the role of the spatial gradient of skeletal mineralization in forces distribution during locomotion, microstructural distribution of crystallite associations, ultrastructural mineral matrix transformation in the process of its formation. Hypothetical mechanisms of joining crystallite associations into a unified mineral complex are suggested; a hypothetical spatial structure of junction formation between the nearest crystallite associations is described, as well as a supposed schema of mineral massif destruction and restoration of disrupted connections.

  16. Determinants of physician empathy during medical education: hypothetical conclusions from an exploratory qualitative survey of practicing physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Empathy is an outcome-relevant physician characteristic and thus a crucial component of high-quality communication in health care. However, the factors that promote and inhibit the development of empathy during medical education have not been extensively researched. Also, currently there is no explicit research on the perspective of practicing physicians on the subject. Therefore the aim of our study was to explore physicians’ views of the positive and negative influences on the development of empathy during their medical education, as well as in their everyday work as physicians. Method We administered a written Qualitative Short Survey to 63 physicians in seven specialties. They were able to respond anonymously. Our open-ended question was: “What educational content in the course of your studies and/or your specialist training had a positive or negative effect on your empathy?” We analyzed the data using thematic content analysis following Mayring’s approach. Results Forty-two physicians took part in our survey. All together, they mentioned 68 specific factors (37 positive, 29 negative, 2 neutral) from which six themes emerged: 1. In general, medical education does not promote the development of empathy. 2. Recognizing the psycho-social dimensions of care fosters empathy. 3. Interactions with patients in medical practice promote empathy. 4. Physicians’ active self-development through reflective practice helps the development of empathy. 5. Interactions with colleagues can both promote and inhibit empathy through their role modeling of empathic and non-empathic behavior. 6. Stress, time pressure, and adverse working conditions are detrimental to empathy development. Conclusions Our results provide an overview of what might influence the development of clinical empathy, as well as hypothetical conclusions about how to promote it. Reflective practice seems to be lacking in current medical curricula and could be incorporated. Raising physicians

  17. Trans-Atlantic tsunamis: Simulations of the 1755 Lisbon and of hypothetical Puerto Rico trench earthquake tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, R.; ten Brink, U. S.; Lin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The great Lisbon earthquake of November 1, 1755 with an estimated moment magnitude of 8.5-9.0, was the most destructive earthquake in European history. Run-ups from a trans-oceanic tsunami were reported in the Caribbean, Brazil and Newfoundland, but there were no reports along the U.S. East Coast. Previous attempts to characterize the 1755 Lisbon earthquake source utilized geophysical surveys and modeling of the near-field earthquake intensity and near-field tsunami run-up. Here we attempt to constrain the source parameters using the far-field tsunami effects because trans-oceanic tsunami run-ups are less influenced by near source bathymetry and are unaffected by triggered submarine landslides at the source. Our far- and near-field tsunami simulations based on relative amplitude comparison, limit the earthquake source area to a region located south of Gorringe Bank in the center of Horseshoe Plain. This location contrasts with previously suggested sources such as the Marqués de Pombal and Gulf of Cadiz faults, which are farther to the east. Based on relative wave amplitude and polarity, the earthquake was likely a thrust event on a fault striking about 345 deg. and dipping to the ENE which is almost perpendicular to the trend of Gorringe Bank. Gorringe Bank, the Madeira-Tore Rise (MTR), and the Azores appear to have acted as topographic scatterers for tsunami energy, shielding most of the U.S. East Coast (with the exception of Florida) from the 1755 Lisbon tsunami. By contrast, sources located west of the MTR or in the Gulf of Cadiz could potentially affect the southeastern coast of the U.S. The Azores-Iberia plate boundary west of the MTR is characterized by strike-slip faults, which are less likely to generate tsunamis, but the Gulf of Cadiz may have thrust faults. Simulations of a hypothetical M8.9 tsunamigenic earthquake in the Puerto Rico trench were conducted to investigate its possible effect on coastal Europe. The recorded history of Western Europe extends

  18. Flood hazards along the Toutle and Cowlitz rivers, Washington, from a hypothetical failure of Castle Lake blockage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Antonius; Orzol, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    A recent evaluation of groundwater and material in the blockage impounding Castle Lake shows that the blockage is potentially unstable against failure from piping due to heave and internal erosion when groundwater levels are seasonally high. There is also a remote possibility that a 6.8 or greater magnitude earthquake could occur in the Castle Lake area when groundwater levels are critically high. If this situation occurs, the debris blockage that confines Castle Lake could breach from successive slope failure with liquefaction of a portion of the blockage. A dam-break computer model was used to simulate discharge through a hypothetical breach in the Castle Lake blockage that could be caused by failure by heave, internal erosion, or liquefaction. Approximately 18,500 acre-ft of stored water would be released from an assumed breach that fully developed to a 1,000-ft width over a 15-minute time period. The resulting flood, incorporating 3.4 x 10 to the 6th power cu yd of the debris blockage, would reach a peak magnitude of 1,500,000 cu ft/s (cubic feet per second). The flood is also assumed to incorporate an additional 137x10 to the 6th power cu yd of saturated debris material from downstream deposits. Flow is considered to be hyperconcentrated with sediment throughout the course of the flood. The hypothetical hyperconcentrated flow is routed downstream, superimposed on normal winter flood flows by use of a one-dimensional unsteady-state numerical streamflow simulation model. From a starting magnitude of 1,500,000 cu ft/s, the peak increases to 2,100,000 cu ft/s at N-1 Dam (12 mi downstream) and attenuates to 1,200,000 cu ft/s at Kid Valley (25 mi downstream) , to 100,000 cu ft/s at Longview and the confluence of the Columbia River (65 mi downstream). From time of breach, the flood peak would take 2.2 hr to reach Toutle, 3.8 hr to reach Castle Rock, and 8.5 hr to reach Longview. Communities of Toutle , Castle Rock, Kelso, and Longview would experience extreme to

  19. A putative RNA-interference-based immune system in prokaryotes: computational analysis of the predicted enzymatic machinery, functional analogies with eukaryotic RNAi, and hypothetical mechanisms of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Yuri I

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All archaeal and many bacterial genomes contain Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindrome Repeats (CRISPR and variable arrays of the CRISPR-associated (cas genes that have been previously implicated in a novel form of DNA repair on the basis of comparative analysis of their protein product sequences. However, the proximity of CRISPR and cas genes strongly suggests that they have related functions which is hard to reconcile with the repair hypothesis. Results The protein sequences of the numerous cas gene products were classified into ~25 distinct protein families; several new functional and structural predictions are described. Comparative-genomic analysis of CRISPR and cas genes leads to the hypothesis that the CRISPR-Cas system (CASS is a mechanism of defense against invading phages and plasmids that functions analogously to the eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi systems. Specific functional analogies are drawn between several components of CASS and proteins involved in eukaryotic RNAi, including the double-stranded RNA-specific helicase-nuclease (dicer, the endonuclease cleaving target mRNAs (slicer, and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. However, none of the CASS components is orthologous to its apparent eukaryotic functional counterpart. It is proposed that unique inserts of CRISPR, some of which are homologous to fragments of bacteriophage and plasmid genes, function as prokaryotic siRNAs (psiRNA, by base-pairing with the target mRNAs and promoting their degradation or translation shutdown. Specific hypothetical schemes are developed for the functioning of the predicted prokaryotic siRNA system and for the formation of new CRISPR units with unique inserts encoding psiRNA conferring immunity to the respective newly encountered phages or plasmids. The unique inserts in CRISPR show virtually no similarity even between closely related bacterial strains which suggests their rapid turnover, on evolutionary scale

  20. Calculation of isodose curves from initial neutron radiation of a hypothetical nuclear explosion using Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Marcos P.C.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Andrade, Edson R., E-mail: rebello@ime.eb.br, E-mail: daltongirao@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Ademir X., E-mail: ademir@nuclear.ufrj.br [Corrdenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Egenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear explosions are usually described in terms of its total yield and associated shock wave, thermal radiation and nuclear radiation effects. The nuclear radiation produced in such events has several components, consisting mainly of alpha and beta particles, neutrinos, X-rays, neutrons and gamma rays. For practical purposes, the radiation from a nuclear explosion is divided into {sup i}nitial nuclear radiation{sup ,} referring to what is issued within one minute after the detonation, and 'residual nuclear radiation' covering everything else. The initial nuclear radiation can also be split between 'instantaneous or 'prompt' radiation, which involves neutrons and gamma rays from fission and from interactions between neutrons and nuclei of surrounding materials, and 'delayed' radiation, comprising emissions from the decay of fission products and from interactions of neutrons with nuclei of the air. This work aims at presenting isodose curves calculations at ground level by Monte Carlo simulation, allowing risk assessment and consequences modeling in radiation protection context. The isodose curves are related to neutrons produced by the prompt nuclear radiation from a hypothetical nuclear explosion with a total yield of 20 KT. Neutron fluency and emission spectrum were based on data available in the literature. Doses were calculated in the form of ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons H*(10){sub n}{sup -}. (author)

  1. Factors associated with attitude and hypothetical behaviour regarding brain death and organ transplantation: comparison between medical and other university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohwaki, Kazuhiro; Yano, Eiji; Shirouzu, Makiko; Kobayashi, Aya; Nakagomi, Tadayoshi; Tamura, Akira

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the factors, including knowledge, that determine an individual's attitudes and behaviours regarding brain death and organ transplantation using questionnaires among medical and other university students. A total of 522 students (388 medical and 134 other) answered a questionnaire. The survey included the individual's knowledge about brain death, attitudes towards brain death and organ transplantation, and hypothetical behaviours assuming their willingness to donate their own or their family's organs. Medical students were more likely to have knowledge about brain death and to accept brain death and organ transplantation compared with other students, while there was no difference in their willingness to donate their own or their family's organs. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the effects of various factors on the attitudes and behaviours. In both medical and other students, confidence in brain-death diagnosis by doctors was independently associated with their willingness to donate their own organs after the adjustment for other factors, including knowledge (odds ratio [OR], 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15 to 2.97 and OR, 4.97; 95% CI, 1.01 to 24.39, respectively). An increase in knowledge may cause positive attitudes towards brain death and organ transplant. Meanwhile, reducing uncertainty about the brain-death diagnostic process might have a beneficial effect on the willingness to donate organs.

  2. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2016-04-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other's altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14-17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents' statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents' statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation.

  3. Improving environmental assessments by integrating Species Sensitivity Distributions into environmental modeling: examples with two hypothetical oil spills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Mearns, Alan J

    2015-04-15

    A three dimensional (3D) trajectory model was used to simulate oil mass balance and environmental concentrations of two 795,000 L hypothetical oil spills modeled under physical and chemical dispersion scenarios. Species Sensitivity Distributions (SSD) for Total Hydrocarbon Concentrations (THCs) were developed, and Hazard Concentrations (HC) used as levels of concern. Potential consequences to entrained water column organisms were characterized by comparing model outputs with SSDs, and obtaining the proportion of species affected (PSA) and areas with oil concentrations exceeding HC5s (Area ⩾ HC5). Under the physically-dispersed oil scenario ⩽ 77% of the oil remains on the water surface and strands on shorelines, while with the chemically-dispersed oil scenario ⩽ 67% of the oil is entrained in the water column. For every 10% increase in chemical dispersion effectiveness, the average PSA and Area ⩾ HC5 increases (range: 0.01-0.06 and 0.50-2.9 km(2), respectively), while shoreline oiling decreases (⩽ 2919 L/km). Integrating SSDs into modeling may improve understanding of scales of potential impacts to water column organisms, while providing net environmental benefit comparison of oil spill response options.

  4. Heat propagation in and around the deep repository. Thermal calculations applied to three hypothetical sites: Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ageskog, L.; Jansson, Patrik [VBB Anlaeggning AB (Sweden)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to demonstrate the modelling of the thermal process in and around the deep repository for spent fuel. The model was developed in the general finite element program ANSYS and applied to the three hypothetical sites Aberg, Beberg and Ceberg included in the SR 97 analyse system. The canister emplacement in the repository was analysed based on certain criteria regarding the temperature on the canister surface. This was done with consideration to natural deviations in various thermal parameters as well as to the risk of a gap opening up between the canister surface and the bentonite buffer. The consequence of the latter was analysed separately as part of the study. The heat load in the model was applied stepwise, followingan assumed time schedule for the actual deposition work. The calculations were extended to 1,000 years after the commencement of the deposition work. The outcome of the calculation is presented as coloured prints of isotherms in and around the repository at certain time intervals.

  5. A 3-dimensional numerical simulation of the atmospheric injection of aerosols by a hypothetical basaltic fissure eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripoli, Gregory J.; Thompson, Starley L.

    1988-01-01

    Researchers simulated the atmospheric response to a hypothetical basaltic fissure eruption using heating rates based on the Roza flow eruption. The simulation employs the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Model (RAMS) with scavenging effects. The numerical model is a three-dimensional non-hydrostatic time-split compressible cloud/mesoscale model. Explicit microphysics include prediction of cloud, rain, crystal, and hail precipitation types. Nucleation and phoretic scavenging are predicted assuming that the pollutant makes an effective cloud droplet nucleus. Smoke is carried as a passive tracer. Long and short wave radiation heating tendencies, including the effects of the smoke, are parameterized. The longwave emission by the lava surface is neglected in the parameterization and included as an explicit heating term instead. A regional scale domain of 100 x 100 km in the horizontal and 22 km high is used. The horizontal grid spacing is taken to be 2 km and the vertical spacing is taken to be 0.75 km. The initial atmospheric state is taken to be horizontally homogenous and based on the standard atmospheric sounding. The fissure is assumed to be 90 km long and oriented in a zig/zag pattern.

  6. Analysis of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident in a Konvoi type NPP by GASFLOW and COCOSYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, Stefan; Royl, Peter [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Band, Sebastian [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    The 3D computational fluid dynamics code GASFLOW and the German containment code system COCOSYS, which is based on a lumped-parameter approach, are used to simulate the hydrogen-air-steam distribution and hydrogen mitigation in a Konvoi type nuclear power plant in a postulated hypothetical core melt accident. A break in a coolant loop and the subsequent loss of the coolant causes a strong heat-up of the core. As a consequence hydrogen is produced by oxidation of cladding tubes. The residual steam and the produced hydrogen are released into the containment through the break in the coolant loop. Without suitable counter measures, sensitive mixtures can build up with a combustion potential which could threaten the integrity of the containment. A model of a Konvoi type nuclear power plant which is equipped with passive autocatalytic recombiners is used to simulate such accident scenario. COCOSYS allows comprehensive simulation of all relevant processes of severe accidents, whereas GASFLOW is primarily designed to simulate the distribution of steam and hydrogen within the containment. This paper presents the comparison of GASFLOW and COCOSYS simulation results for the in-vessel phase of the selected accident. (orig.)

  7. Paediatric biobanks: opinions, feelings and attitudes of parents towards the specimen donation of their sick children to a hypothetical biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Locatelli, Federica; Strazzer, Sandra; Borgatti, Renato; D'angelo, Grazia; Lenzi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years, the storing of biological materials from children for research purposes in biobanks has become the subject of an intense debate in the scientific and ethical communities on a global level. Paediatric biobanks are an important resource for the development of translational research. At the same time, paediatric biobanks are ethically 'sensitive' due to the unique issues they raise. In this study, we explore opinions, feelings and attitudes of parents towards the specimen donation of their sick children to a hypothetical biobank. According to a qualitative methodology based on focus groups, we analysed parents' views, perceptions and inclinations towards typical ethical, legal and social aspects of paediatric biobanks such as proxy consent, minor assent, privacy protection and return of results. Our study confirms the need for specific policies dedicated to paediatric biobanks by highlighting how the nature of the disease affecting children may influence the parents' opinions and decisions towards the enrolment of their children in biobank-based research studies.

  8. Hypothetical operation model for the multi-bed system of the Tritium plant based on the scheduling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Uk, E-mail: eslee@dongguk.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Min Ho; Yun, Sei-Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148-gil Kwahak-ro, Yusong-gu, Daejon 34133 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Euy Soo [Department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering, Dongguk University, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, In-Beum [Department of Chemical Engineering and Graduate School of Engineering Mastership, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kun-Hong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We introduce a mathematical model for the multi-bed storage system in the tritium plant. • We obtain details of operation by solving the model. • The model assesses diverse operation scenarios with respect to risk. - Abstract: In this paper, we describe our hypothetical operation model (HOM) for the multi-bed system of the storage and delivery system (SDS) of the ITER tritium plant. The multi-bed system consists of multiple getter beds (i.e., for batch operation) and buffer vessels (i.e., for continuous operation). Our newly developed HOM is formulated as a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model and has been extensively investigated to optimize chemical and petrochemical production planning and scheduling. Our model determines the timing, duration, and size of tasks corresponding to each set of equipment. Further, inventory levels for each set of equipment are calculated. Our proposed model considers the operation of one cycle of one set of getter beds and is implemented and assessed as a case study problem.

  9. Numerical simulation of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident in a small-scale model of a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. E-mail: robbe@aquilon.cea.frmfrobbe@cea.fr; Lepareux, M.; Treille, E.; Cariou, Y

    2003-08-01

    In the case of a Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident (HCDA) in a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor, it is assumed that the core of the nuclear reactor has melted partially and that the chemical interaction between molten fuel and liquid sodium has created a high-pressure gas bubble in the core. The violent expansion of this bubble loads and deforms the reactor vessel and the internal structures, thus endangering the safety of the nuclear plant. The MARA 10 experimental test simulates a HCDA in a 1/30-scale mock-up schematising a reactor block. In the mock-up, the liquid sodium cooling the reactor core is replaced by water and the argon blanket laying below the reactor roof is simulated by an air blanket. The explosion is triggered by an explosive charge. This paper presents a numerical simulation of the test with the EUROPLEXUS code and an analysis of the computed results. In particular, the evolution of the fluid flows and the deformations of the internal and external structures are analysed in detail. Finally, the current computed results are compared with the experimental ones and with previous numerical results computed with the SIRIUS and CASTEM-PLEXUS codes.

  10. What would you say? Genetic counseling graduate students' and counselors' hypothetical responses to patient requested self-disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlinger-Grosse, Krista; Veach, Patricia McCarthy; MacFarlane, Ian M

    2013-08-01

    Genetic counselor self-disclosure is a complex behavior that lacks extensive characterization. In particular, data are limited about genetic counselors' responses when patients ask them to self-disclose. Accordingly, this study investigated genetic counseling students' (n = 114) and practicing genetic counselors' (n = 123) responses to two hypothetical scenarios in which a female prenatal patient requests self-disclosure. Scenarios were identical except for a final patient question: "Have you ever had an amniocentesis?" or "What would you do if you were me?" Imagining themselves as the counselor, participants wrote a response for each scenario and then explained their response. Differences in disclosure frequency for students vs. counselors and disclosure question were assessed, and themes in participant responses and explanations were extracted via content and thematic analysis methods. Chi-square analyses indicated no significant differences in frequency of student versus counselor disclosure. Self-disclosure was significantly higher for, "Have you ever had an amniocentesis?" (78.5 %) than for, "What would you do if you were me?" (53.2 %) (p < .001). Types of self-disclosures included personal, professional, and mixed disclosures. Prevalent explanations for disclosure and non-disclosure responses included: remain patient focused and support/empower the patient. Additional findings, practice and training implications, and research recommendations are presented.

  11. Early cost-utility analysis of general and cerebrospinal fluid-specific Alzheimer's disease biomarkers for hypothetical disease-modifying treatment decision in mild cognitive impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handels, Ron L. H.; Joore, Manuela A.; Tran-Duy, An; Wimo, Anders; Wolfs, Claire A. G.; Verhey, Frans R. J.; Severens, Johan L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The study aimed to determine the room for improvement of a perfect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker and the societal incremental net monetary benefit of CSF in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) assuming a hypothetical disease-modifying Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment.

  12. Attributions of Responsibility in a Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) Vignette among Respondents with CSA Histories: The Role of Abuse Similarity to a Hypothetical Victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Hilary G.; Zinzow, Heidi M.; Burns, Erin E.; Jackson, Joan L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggests that similarity to a victim may influence attributions of responsibility in hypothetical child sexual abuse scenarios. One aspect of similarity receiving mixed support in the literature is respondent child sexual abuse history. Using a sample of 1,345 college women, the present study examined child sexual abuse history,…

  13. Attributions of Responsibility in a Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) Vignette among Respondents with CSA Histories: The Role of Abuse Similarity to a Hypothetical Victim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Hilary G.; Zinzow, Heidi M.; Burns, Erin E.; Jackson, Joan L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research suggests that similarity to a victim may influence attributions of responsibility in hypothetical child sexual abuse scenarios. One aspect of similarity receiving mixed support in the literature is respondent child sexual abuse history. Using a sample of 1,345 college women, the present study examined child sexual abuse history,…

  14. The Impact of Resources for Clinical Surveillance on the Control of a Hypothetical Foot-and-Mouth Disease Epidemic in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess whether current surveillance capacity is sufficient to fulfill EU and Danish regulations to control a hypothetical foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic in Denmark, and whether enlarging the protection and/or surveillance zones could minimize economic...

  15. Do children do what they say? Responses to hypothetical and real-life social problems in children with mild intellectual disabilities and behaviour problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M; Bijman, ER; Lamberix, ICW; Wijnroks, L; de Castro, BO; Vermeer, A; Matthys, W

    2005-01-01

    Background Most research on children's social problem-solving skills is based on responses to hypothetical vignettes. Just how these responses relate to actual behaviour in real-life social situations is, however, unclear, particularly for children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID). Method I

  16. Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Ueno

    2008-11-01

    .Keywords: inflammatory acidosis, local anesthetic failure, membrane lipid interaction, hypothetic mechanism, inflammatory peroxynitrite

  17. Estimates of immediate effects on world markets of a hypothetical disruption to Russia’s supply of six mineral commodities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safirova, Elena; Barry, James J.; Hastorun, Sinan; Matos, Grecia R.; Perez, Alberto Alexander; Bedinger, George M.; Bray, E. Lee; Jasinski, Stephen M.; Kuck, Peter H.; Loferski, Patricia J.

    2017-05-18

    The potential immediate effects of a hypothetical shock to Russia’s supply of selected mineral commodities on the world market and on individual countries were determined and monetized (in 2014 U.S. dollars). The mineral commodities considered were aluminum (refined primary), nickel (refined primary), palladium (refined) and platinum (refined), potash, and titanium (mill products), and the regions and countries of primary interest were the United States, the European Union (EU–28), and China. The shock is assumed to have infinite duration, but only the immediate effects, those limited by a 1-year period, are considered.A methodology for computing and monetizing the potential impacts was developed. Then the data pertaining to all six mineral commodities were collected and the most likely effects were computed. Because of the uncertainties associated with some of the data, sensitivity analyses were conducted to confirm the validity of the results.Results indicate that the impact on the United States arising from a shock to Russia’s supply, in terms of the value of net exports, would range from a gain of \\$336 million for titanium mill products to a loss of \\$237 million for potash; thus, the overall effect of a supply shock is likely to be quite modest. The study also demonstrates that, taken alone, Russia’s share in the world production of a particular commodity is not necessarily indicative of the size of potential impacts resulting from a supply shock; other factors, such as prices, domestic production, and the structure of international commodity flows were found to be important as well.

  18. Hypothetical Rectal Microbicide Acceptability and Factors Influencing It among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Tianjin, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Zhang

    Full Text Available To measure potential acceptability of rectal microbicides and to explore factors likely to affect their acceptability among men who have sex with men (MSM.Cross-sectional and retrospective surveys were conducted in this study. A questionnaire and a scale were used to measure the acceptability score for physical and functional characteristics of hypothetical rectal microbicides. We also evaluated the involvement of other factors such as sexual behaviors, social context, etc.MSMs we interviewed showed a high acceptability to rectal microbicides, indicated by the mean acceptability score of 2.92 (SD, 0.54, scale of 1-4. The results also suggested that microbicides were preferred in a cream form that can moisten and lubricate the rectum, prevent HIV infection and go unnoticed by their partners. Multivariate analysis showed that the microbicides acceptability varied significantly by education level (β = 0.135; P = 0.028, having casual partners (β = 0.174; P = 0.007, frequency of lubricant use (β = 0.134; P = 0.031, history of HIV test (β = 0.129; P = 0.036, willingness to use lubricant (β = 0.126; P = 0.045, locus of control by partners regarding STI infection (β = 0.168; P = 0.009.A positive response to rectal microbicides among MSMs was found in our study, suggesting that rectal microbicides might have a potential market in MSMs and they might play an important role in HIV/STIs prevention as a supplement. Further studies may be considered to combine the acceptability study with clinical research together to understand the true feelings of MSMs when they use the products.

  19. Feasibility Analysis and Simulation of Integrated Renewable Energy System for Power Generation: A Hypothetical Study of Rural Health Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Anayochukwu Ani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the feasibility analysis and study of integrated renewable energy (IRE using solar photovoltaic (PV and wind turbine (WT system in a hypothetical study of rural health clinic in Borno State, Nigeria. Electrical power consumption and metrology data (such as solar radiation and wind speed were used for designing and analyzing the integrated renewable energy system. The health clinic facility energy consumption is 19 kWh/day with a 3.4 kW peak demand load. The metrological data was collected from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA website and used to analyze the performance of electrical generation system using HOMER program. The simulation and optimization results show that the optimal integrated renewable energy system configuration consists of 5 kW PV array, BWC Excel-R 7.5 kW DC wind turbine, 24 unit Surrette 6CS25P battery cycle charging, and a 19 kW AC/DC converter and that the PV power can generate electricity at 9,138 kWh/year while the wind turbine system can generate electricity at 7,490 kWh/year, giving the total electrical generation of the system as 16,628 kWh/year. This would be suitable for deployment of 100% clean energy for uninterruptable power performance in the health clinic. The economics analysis result found that the integrated renewable system has total NPC of 137,139 US Dollar. The results of this research show that, with a low energy health facility, it is possible to meet the entire annual energy demand of a health clinic solely through a stand-alone integrated renewable PV/wind energy supply.

  20. Modelling fate and effects of toxicologically relevant hydrocarbon fractions following hypothetical oil spills in a marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    St-Amand, A.; Mazzocco, P.; Stephenson, M. [Stantec Consulting Ltd., Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Numerical oil spill models have generally focused on the transport and fate of oil following a spill through processes such as advection, evaporation, spreading dissolution, dispersion, emulsification, biodegradation and sedimentation. These models provide information regarding the trajectory, location and size of the oil slick, as well as the location where the slick will touch shorelines. The models normally treat the spilled hydrocarbon as a single product or group of representative compounds which is not very useful in evaluating toxicological risks to aquatic biota. For that reason, Stantec developed a model that simultaneously evaluates the likely fate and co-toxicity of toxicologically relevant hydrocarbon compounds and fractions in water following an oil spill in a marine environment. Compounds currently considered in the model include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, BTEX compounds, (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes) and the Canada-Wide Standard hydrocarbon fractions. The fate of these hydrocarbons in the marine environment was simulated using a mass-balance compartment approach in which specific states of the oil and relevant environmental media were considered. At each time step following the hydrocarbon release, the model updated physical properties such as the density and viscosity of the spilled mixtures. When predicting the fate of the mixture, environmental conditions such as wind speed and wave height were taken into account to determine whether droplets of the spilled product remained entrained in the water column or if they resurfaced and possibly emulsified. Two hypothetical spill scenarios were investigated based on assumed spill volumes, assumed product compositions representing a distilled product and crude oil, and assumed environmental and meteorological conditions. The key outputs of the model were the dissolved concentrations of toxicologically relevant hydrocarbon compounds and fractions in the water

  1. A study on the overall economic risks of a hypothetical severe accident in nuclear power plant using the delphi method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Han Ki; Kim, Joo Yeon; Lee, Jai Ki [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Potential economic impact of a hypothetical severe accident at a nuclear power plant(Uljin units 3/4) was estimated by applying the delphi method, which is based on the expert judgements and opinions, in the process of quantifying uncertain factor. For the purpose of this study, it is assumed that the radioactive plume directs the inland direction. Since the economic risk can be divided into direct costs and indirect effects and more uncertainties are involved in the latter, the direct costs were estimated first and the indirect effects were then estimated by applying a weighting factor to the direct cost. The delphi method however subjects to risk of distortion or discrimination of variables because of the human behavior pattern. A mathematical approach based on the Bayesian inferences was employed for data processing to improve the delphi results. For this task, a model for data processing was developed. One-dimensional Monte Carlo analysis was applied to get a distribution of values of the weighting factor. The mean and median values of the weighting factor for the indirect effects appeared to be 2.59 and 2.08, respectively. These values are higher than the value suggested by OECD/NEA, 1.25. Some factors such as small territory and public attitude sensitive to radiation could affect the judgement of panel. Then the parameters of the model for estimating the direct costs were classified as U- and V-types, and two-dimensional Monte Carlo analysis was applied to quantify the overall economic risk. The resulting median of the overall economic risk was about 3.9% of the Gross Domestic Products (GDP) of Korea in 2006. When the cost of electricity loss, the highest direct cost, was not taken into account, the overall economic risk was reduced to 2.2% of GDP. This assessment can be used as a reference for justifying the radiological emergency planning and preparedness.

  2. Large scale experiments simulating hydrogen distribution in a spent fuel pool building during a hypothetical fuel uncovery accident scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mignot, Guillaume; Paranjape, Sidharth; Paladino, Domenico; Jaeckel, Bernd; Rydl, Adolf [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-08-15

    Following the Fukushima accident and its extended station blackout, attention was brought to the importance of the spent fuel pools' (SFPs) behavior in case of a prolonged loss of the cooling system. Since then, many analytical works have been performed to estimate the timing of hypothetical fuel uncovery for various SFP types. Experimentally, however, little was done to investigate issues related to the formation of a flammable gas mixture, distribution, and stratification in the SFP building itself and to some extent assess the capability for the code to correctly predict it. This paper presents the main outcomes of the Experiments on Spent Fuel Pool (ESFP) project carried out under the auspices of Swissnuclear (Framework 2012–2013) in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. It consists of an experimental investigation focused on hydrogen concentration build-up into a SFP building during a predefined scaled scenario for different venting positions. Tests follow a two-phase scenario. Initially steam is released to mimic the boiling of the pool followed by a helium/steam mixture release to simulate the deterioration of the oxidizing spent fuel. Results shows that while the SFP building would mainly be inerted by the presence of a high concentration of steam, the volume located below the level of the pool in adjacent rooms would maintain a high air content. The interface of the two-gas mixture presents the highest risk of flammability. Additionally, it was observed that the gas mixture could become stagnant leading locally to high hydrogen concentration while steam condenses. Overall, the experiments provide relevant information for the potentially hazardous gas distribution formed in the SFP building and hints on accident management and on eventual retrofitting measures to be implemented in the SFP building.

  3. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  4. Long term contaminant migration and impacts from uranium mill tailings. Comparison of computer models using a hypothetical dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camus, H. [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Working Group of BIOMOVS II was initiated in Vienna in 1991 with the primary objective of comparing models which can be used to assess the long term impact of radioactive releases from uranium mill tailings, involving multiple pathways, multiple contaminants and multiple environmental receptors. A secondary objective was to examine how these models can be used to assess the fate of stable toxic elements. This is an interim report of the Working Group describing: development of a basic scenario describing a tailings system; application of models in deterministic calculations of contaminant concentrations in biosphere media, and related radiation doses, contaminant intakes and health risks; comparison of model results and review of the modelling. A hypothetical scenario has been developed for contaminant releases from a uranium mill tailings facility. The assumptions for the tailings facility and its environs have been chosen to facilitate the evaluation of potentially important processes incorporated into models. The site description is therefore idealised and does not represent any particular facility or type of facility. Atmospheric and groundwater release source terms have been chosen to facilitate comparison of models and should not be considered realistic. The time and effort taken over derivation of the scenario description and the associated preliminary modelling has been an important and valuable learning exercise. It also reflects the importance of gaining a clear picture of what is being modelled so that comparisons of model results are meaningful. Work within the exercise has contributed to new model development and to improvements and extensions to existing models. The scenario is a simplified description of a real facility and the releases which might occur. No allowance has been made for engineered features on the tailings disposal system which might reduce releases. The source terms have been chosen so as to test the models

  5. Modelling the impact of a hypothetical sub-Plinian eruption at La Soufrière of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, R.; Komorowski, J.-C.; Saito, K.; Brown, A.; Pomonis, A.; Toyos, G.; Baxter, P.

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes the development and application of an impact model for a future hypothetical sub-Plinian eruption of La Soufrière of Guadeloupe. The model was designed to assess the impact from either a single or multiple eruption scenarios, each defined in terms of a map of the intensity of three volcanic hazards; volcanogenic earthquake, tephra fallout and pyroclastic density currents. The impact from the three hazards can be assessed independently or alternatively the joint impact of the three hazards can be assessed. The outputs that are produced from the model are; the number of buildings with collapsed roofs, and the number of fatal and non-fatal casualties. Two versions of the impact model were developed, one that uses a spreadsheet and another that is implemented using a Geographical Information System (GIS). Both versions use the same types of hazard inputs and vulnerability functions to derive the number of building collapses and casualties, but have different spatial resolution of the final outputs. The spreadsheet version aggregates the results at a zone level defined specifically for this project whereas the GIS was designed to produce results using 250 m grid-squares. The outputs from the two versions, when using the same eruption scenario, produced somewhat different results, highlighting the importance of defining the appropriate spatial resolution. The vulnerability functions were developed using data on the building stock that was collected by a local survey, in which data on the form of construction, condition, location and types of openings and the variation of these parameters across the affected area were collected. The vulnerability functions incorporated new assessments of fire risks induced by pyroclastic density currents. The model was applied to La Soufrière using a range of input hazard scenarios based on reconstruction of the most recent sub-Plinian magmatic eruption which occurred in 1530 AD. A sensitivity analysis of the model

  6. Environmental Performance of Hypothetical Canadian Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Processes Using Life-Cycle Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakkana Piewkhaow

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The methodology of life-cycle assessment was applied in order to evaluate the environmental performance of a hypothetical Saskatchewan lignite-fueled Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC electricity generation, with and without pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2 capture from a full life-cycle perspective. The emphasis here is placed on environmental performance associated with air contaminants of the comparison between IGCC systems (with and without CO2 capture and a competing lignite pulverized coal-fired electricity generating station in order to reveal which technology offers the most positive environmental effects. Moreover, ambient air pollutant modeling was also conducted by using American Meteorological Society/Environmental Protection Agency Regulatory Model (AERMOD air dispersion modeling to determine the ground-level concentration of pollutants emitted from four different electricity generating stations. This study assumes that all stations are located close to Estevan. The results showed a significant reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions and acidification potential by applying both post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture processes. The GHG emissions were found to have reduced by 27%–86%, and IGCC systems were found to compare favorably to pulverized coal systems. However, in other environmental impact categories, there are multiple environmental trade-offs depending on the capture technology used. In the case of post-combustion capture, it was observed that the environmental impact category of eutrophication potential, summer smog, and ozone depletion increased due to the application of the CO2 capture process and the surface mining coal operation. IGCC systems, on the other hand, showed the same tendency as the conventional coal-fired electricity generation systems, but to a lesser degree. This is because the IGCC system is a cleaner technology that produces lower pollutant emission levels than the electricity

  7. Worst case meteorological scenario for Norway in case of hypothetical accident related to recovery of the Russian submarine K-27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnicki, J.; Klein, H. [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Aas (Norway); Amundsen, I.; Hosseini, A. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Aas (Norway); Haakenstad, H. [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo (Norway); Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B. [Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Aas (Norway); Centre for Environmental Radioactivity, Aas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    This study is a part of a comprehensive Norwegian project led by Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority assessing risks related to a potential salvaging and decommissioning of the Russian nuclear submarine, K-27. In September 1981, the K-27 submarine was scuttled at shallow waters in the outer part of Stepovogo Bay, situated at the north-eastern coast of Novaya Zemlya. One of the scenarios that are included in the assessment is the lifting of the submarine to the surface and the subsequent transport to the Murmansk area for decommissioning. Thus, the risk of a criticality accident as a consequence of lifting and transport event cannot be ignored. A hypothetical accident might pose a serious threat to Norwegian territories and has to be considered from different perspectives. Here, we focus on the worst case meteorological scenario for Norway, but the same approach can be applied for other Scandinavian countries and Russia. As a first step, a large database with meteorological data has been prepared for the period of thirty years (1980-2010). These meteorological data are available in the 1000 km x 1000 km domain which includes both the entire Norwegian territory and the region of Novaya Zemlya. The spatial resolution of the meteorological data is 11 km and temporal 3 hours. The vertical structure includes 40 layers. The most important meteorological elements are the 3-D velocity field, the surface precipitation field and the 3-D temperature field. The second step is the development of the source terms for potential accidents which can be used by the dispersion model SNAP (Severe Nuclear Accident Program). Three locations for potential accidents with subsequent releases of radioactivity to the environment are assumed: 1) at the present location of K-27, 2) transport on the route to Murmansk and 3) in the Murmansk region. In the third step, the SNAP model will be run with meteorological data starting every 6. hour of each day during the 30 years period. As a result

  8. Screen for localized proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay H Russell

    Full Text Available Precise localization of individual proteins is required for processes such as motility, chemotaxis, cell-cycle progression, and cell division in bacteria, but the number of proteins that are localized in bacterial species is not known. A screen based on transposon mutagenesis and fluorescence activated cell sorting was devised to identify large numbers of localized proteins, and employed in Caulobacter crescentus. From a sample of the clones isolated in the screen, eleven proteins with no previously characterized localization in C. crescentus were identified, including six hypothetical proteins. The localized hypothetical proteins included one protein that was localized in a helix-like structure, and two proteins for which the localization changed as a function of the cell cycle, suggesting that complex three-dimensional patterns and cell cycle-dependent localization are likely to be common in bacteria. Other mutants produced localized fusion proteins even though the transposon has inserted near the 5' end of a gene, demonstrating that short peptides can contain sufficient information to localize bacterial proteins. The screen described here could be used in most bacterial species.

  9. Within-population diversity of koala Chlamydophila pecorum at ompA VD1-VD3 and the ORF663 hypothetical gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, D P; Beninati, T; Meek, M; Irish, J; Griffith, J E

    2012-05-04

    Infection of koalas by Chlamydophila pecorum is very common and causes significant morbidity, infertility and mortality. Fundamental to management of the disease is an understanding of the importance of multi-serotype infection or pathogen virulence in pathogenesis; these may need consideration in plans involving koala movement, vaccination, or disease risk assessment. Here we describe diversity of ompA VD1-3, and ORF663 hypothetical gene tandem repeat regions, in a single population of koalas with diverse disease outcomes. We PCR amplified and sequenced 72 partial ompA segments and amplified 25 tandem repeat segments (ORF663 hypothetical gene) from C. pecorum obtained from 62 koalas. Although several ompA genotypes were identified nationally, only one ompA genotype existed within the population studied, indicating that severe chlamydial disease occurs commonly in free-ranging koalas in the absence of infection by multiple MOMP serotypes of C. pecorum. In contrast, variation in tandem repeats within the ORF663 hypothetical gene was very high, approaching the entire range reported for pathogenic and non-pathogenic C. pecorum of European ruminants; providing an impetus for further investigation of this as a potential virulence trait.

  10. A study on integrity of LMFBR secondary cooling system to hypothetical tube failure propagation in the steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihisa Shindo; Kazuo Haga [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) Kamiya-cho MT Bldg., 4-3-20 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0001 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    -LT code also developed in ANL. In this preliminary work event trees have been prepared to make clear the scenario from the initial small-scale leak to the severest large-scale leak due to the tube failure propagation in SG. The probability of failures of leak detectors, nickel membrane-type hydrogen detectors in sodium and pressure gauges that observe the cover gas pressure of SG (EV: evaporator and SH: superheater), is considered in the event trees. On the other hand, rupture disks in SH and EV were assumed to have the normal function in leak detection and reaction products release. In some cases, water/steam blow valves to mitigate leak propagation were assumed hypothetically to fail after the plant trip, and the water and steam remained in SG are not released. A relation between the maximum leak rate resulting from the tube failure propagation and the probability of its occurrence was obtained tentatively from these considerations. Then, the effect of pressure generated by the sodium-water reaction was evaluated to the structural integrity of the secondary cooling system components. (authors)

  11. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of 137Cs generated from Nuclear Spent Fuel under Hypothetic Accidental Condition in the BNPP Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongkuk; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yook, Daesik; Kim, Sung Il; Lee, Byung Soo

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the results of atmosphere dispersion modeling using CALPUFF code that are based on computational simulation to evaluate the environmental characteristics of the Barakah nuclear power plant (BNPP) in west area of UAE. According to meteorological data analysis (2012~2013), the winds from the north(7.68%) and west(9.05%) including NNW(41.63%), NW(28.55%), and WNW(6.31%) winds accounted for more than 90% of the wind directions. East(0.2%) and south(0.6%) direction wind, including ESE(0.31%), SE(0.38%), and SSE(0.38%) were rarely distributed during the simulation period. Seasonal effects were not showed. However, a discrepancy in the tendency between daytime and night-time was observed. Approximately 87% of the wind speed was distributed below 5.4m/s (17%, 47% and 23% between the speeds of 0.5-1.8m/s 1.8-3.3m/s and 3.3-5.4m/s, respectively) during the annual period. Seasonal wind speed distribution results presented very similar pattern of annual distribution. Wind speed distribution of day and night, on the other hand, had a discrepancy with annual modeling results than seasonal distribution in some sections. The results for high wind speed (more than 10.8m/s) showed that this wind blew from the west. This high wind speed is known locally as the 'Shamal', which occurs rarely, lasting one or two days with the strongest winds experienced in association with gust fronts and thunderstorms. Six variations of cesium-137 (137Cs) dispersion test were simulated under hypothetic severe accidental condition. The 137Cs dispersion was strongly influenced by the direction and speed of the main wind. From the test cases, east-south area of the BNPP site was mainly influenced by 137Cs dispersion. A virtual receptor was set and calculated for observation of the 137Cs movement and accumulation. Surface roughness tests were performed for the analysis of topographic conditions. According to the surface condition, there are various surface roughness length. Four types

  12. 真实和虚拟金钱奖赏影响风险决策行为*%Real or Hypothetical Monetary Rewards Modulates Risk Taking Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐四华; 方卓; 饶恒毅

    2013-01-01

    Understanding human risk taking and decision making behavior poses a major challenge for psychological and economical research during the last decades. Although real or hypothetical monetary rewards are commonly used as reinforcers in previous studies, it remains controversial whether real and hypothetical rewards have the same effects to motivate risk taking and decision making behavior. The recently developed balloon analogue risk task (BART) is a laboratory-based risk taking paradigm and offers an ecologically valid model for objective measurement of risk taking propensity and behavior. In the present study, the authors used the BART paradigm in two experiments to compare the effects of real and hypothetical monetary rewards on risk taking behavior. We predicted that compared with hypothetical monetary reward, real monetary rewards will show stronger impacts on the risk taking behavior during the BART task. In Experiment 1, forty-four healthy young adults completed both real money and hypothetical monetary versions of the BART task, in which they were required to sequentially inflate a virtual balloon that can either grow larger or explode. The order of two tasks was counter-balanced between subjects. Paired t-tests and one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were conducted to compare the effects of real and hypothetical monetary rewards on the BART risk taking behavior, including the mean adjusted number of balloon inflations, the number of balloon explosions, and the number of balloon inflations after positive or negative feedbacks. Experiment 2 added a variable of reward magnitude and used a 2 (authenticity: real, hypothetical) × 2 (magnitude:small, large) factorial design. Thirty healthy young adults completed the experiment 2. The results from Experiment 1 showed that during the real monetary reward BART condition, subjects stopped inflating balloons earlier and were more risk averse for the current balloon trial if they lost the last balloon (i.e., the

  13. Annotation and Curation of Uncharacterized proteins- Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johny eIjaq

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical Proteins are the proteins that are predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame (ORF, constituting a substantial fraction of proteomes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Genome projects have led to the identification of many therapeutic targets, the putative function of the protein and their interactions. In this review we have enlisted various methods. Annotation linked to structural and functional prediction of hypothetical proteins assist in the discovery of new structures and functions serving as markers and pharmacological targets for drug designing, discovery and screening. Mass spectrometry is an analytical technique for validating protein characterisation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS is an efficient analytical method. Microarrays and Protein expression profiles help understanding the biological systems through a systems-wide study of proteins and their interactions with other proteins and non-proteinaceous molecules to control complex processes in cells and tissues and even whole organism. Next generation sequencing technology accelerates multiple areas of genomics research.

  14. Case study of the effects of hypothetical nuclear power plant accident to the northern food chain of lichen-reindeer-man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaenen, A.P.; Solatie, D. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Paatero, J. [Finnish Meteorological Institute (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    There are plans to open a new nuclear power plant in Northern Finland at Pyhaejoki. The currently planned reactor type is AES 2006 built by Rosenergoatom. The power output of the AES 2006 is 1200 MWe. In a hypothetical reactor accident at Pyhaejoki large amounts of radioactivity would be released to the environment in Northern Europe. With suitable wind conditions the contaminants would contaminate large areas in the Euro-Arctic region in Northern Scandinavia and in Kola Peninsula. Northern parts of Scandinavia belongs to the sub-arctic region where reindeer herding is an important livelihood for the local and for the indigenous Sami people. As a results of the CEEPRA-project ('Collaboration Network on Environmental Radiation Protection and Research') funded by the EU's Kolarctic ENPI CBC program estimated a possible fallout to Finnish Lapland from a hypothetical nuclear power plant accident occurring at the planned site. Lichen-reindeer-man food chain is an important food chain to the people living in Lapland from traditional and from economical point of views. The food chain is known to enrich radioactive contaminants efficiently. In case of nuclear fallout this food chain would be one of the primary sources of {sup 137}Cs into the inhabitants in Northern regions. The food chain has been well-studied where studies began in the 1960's and was intensified after the Chernobyl accident. This study concentrates on the effects caused by the hypothetical accident, occurring at the planned Pyhaejoki power plant, to the lichen-reindeer-man food chain. The transfer of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs to the reindeer meat and possible doses to the man will be estimated. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  15. Trans-oceanic transport of {sup 137}Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident and impact of hypothetical Fukushima-like events of future nuclear plants in Southern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wai, Ka-Ming, E-mail: bhkmwai@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Geological and Mining Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Yu, Peter K.N. [Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-03-01

    A Lagrangian model was adopted to assess the potential impact of {sup 137}Cs released from hypothetical Fukushima-like accidents occurring on three potential nuclear power plant sites in Southern China in the near future (planned within 10 years) in four different seasons. The maximum surface (0–500 m) {sup 137}Cs air concentrations would be reached 10 Bq m{sup −3} near the source, comparable to the Fukushima case. In January, Southeast Asian countries would be mostly affected by the radioactive plume due to the effects of winter monsoon. In April, the impact would be mainly on Southern and Northern China. Debris of radioactive plume (∼ 1 mBq m{sup −3}) would carry out long-range transport to North America. The area of influence would be the smallest in July due to the frequent and intense wet removal events by trough of low pressure and tropical cyclone. The maximum worst-case areas of influence were 2382000, 2327000, 517000 and 1395000 km{sup 2} in January, April, July and October, respectively. Prior to the above calculations, the model was employed to simulate the trans-oceanic transport of {sup 137}Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Observed and modeled {sup 137}Cs concentrations were comparable. Sensitivity runs were performed to optimize the wet scavenging parameterization. The adoption of higher-resolution (1° × 1°) meteorological fields improved the prediction. The computed large-scale plume transport pattern over the Pacific Ocean was compared with that reported in the literature. - Highlights: • A Lagrangian model was used to predict the dispersion of {sup 137}Cs from plant accident. • Observed and modeled {sup 137}Cs concentrations were comparable for the Fukushima accident. • The maximum surface concentrations could reach 10 Bq m{sup −3} for the hypothetical case. • The hypothetical radiative plumes could impact E/SE Asia and N. America.

  16. Solution of Einstein's Geometrical Gravitational Field Equations Exterior to Astrophysically Real or Hypothetical Time Varying Distributions of Mass within Regions of Spherical Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chifu E. N.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present a profound and complete analytical solution to Einstein's gravitational field equations exterior to astrophysically real or hypothetical time varying distributions of mass or pressure within regions of spherical geometry. The single arbitrary function $f$ in our proposed exterior metric tensor and constructed field equations makes our method unique, mathematically less combersome and astrophysically satisfactory. The obtained solution of Einstein's gravitational field equations tends out to be a generalization of Newton's gravitational scalar potential exterior to the spherical mass or pressure distribution under consideration.

  17. The reminiscence bump without memories: The distribution of imagined word-cued and important autobiographical memories in a hypothetical 70-year-old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan Mark; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    of autobiographical memories per se, most notably factors that aid in their encoding or retention, by asking students to generate imagined word-cued and imagined ‘most important’ autobiographical memories of a hypothetical, prototypical 70-year-old of their own culture and gender. We compared the distribution...... of these fictional memories with the distributions of actual word-cued and most important autobiographical memories in a sample of 61–70-year-olds. We found a striking similarity between the temporal distributions of the imagined memories and the actual memories. These results suggest that the reminiscence bump...

  18. MODFLOW-NWT, MODPATH, and MT3DMS models used to study of hypothetical horizontal water-supply well design for New Hampshire and surrounding regions: U.S. Geological Survey data release

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A series of three-dimensional, hypothetical, groundwater models (MODFLOW-NWT) were developed to investigate the effects of a variety of factors on the flow of...

  19. Proteomic and genomic analysis reveals novel Campylobacter jejuni outer membrane proteins and potential heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Eleanor; Sherry, Aileen; Inglis, Neil F; Lainson, Alex; Jyothi, Dushyanth; Yaga, Raja; Manson, Erin; Imrie, Lisa; Everest, Paul; Smith, David G E

    2014-09-01

    Gram-negative bacterial outer membrane proteins play important roles in the interaction of bacteria with their environment including nutrient acquisition, adhesion and invasion, and antibiotic resistance. In this study we identified 47 proteins within the Sarkosyl-insoluble fraction of Campylobacter jejuni 81-176, using LC-ESI-MS/MS. Comparative analysis of outer membrane protein sequences was visualised to reveal protein distribution within a panel of Campylobacter spp., identifying several C. jejuni-specific proteins. Smith-Waterman analyses of C. jejuni homologues revealed high sequence conservation amongst a number of hypothetical proteins, sequence heterogeneity of other proteins and several proteins which are absent in a proportion of strains.

  20. Children's Perceptions of Hypothetical Peers With Undesirable Characteristics: Role of the Peers' Desire to Change, Source of Effort to Change, and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Mark A; Sonnentag, Tammy L; Wadian, Taylor W; Jones, Tucker L; Langley, Courtney A

    2015-01-01

    The present study, involving sixth- to eighth-grade students, is an extension of a prior investigation (Barnett, Livengood, Sonnentag, Barlett, & Witham, 2010) that examined children's perceptions of hypothetical peers with various undesirable characteristics. Results indicate that children's perceptions of hypothetical peers with an undesirable characteristic are influenced by the peers' desire to change, the source of effort to change, and the peers' success or failure in changing the characteristic. The children anticipated responding more favorably to peers who were successful in overcoming an undesirable characteristic than peers who were unsuccessful. Regardless of the peers' outcome, the children anticipated responding more favorably to peers who tried to change than peers who relied on the effort of adult authorities to motivate change. The children perceived successful peers as experiencing more positive affect than their unsuccessful counterparts, especially if the success was presented as a fulfillment of the peers' desire to change their undesirable characteristic. Finally, the children's ratings reflected the belief that, among peers who failed to change their undesirable characteristic, lacking the desire to change increases the relative likelihood that the characteristic will be permanent.

  1. Constraining the r-mode saturation amplitude from a hypothetical detection of r-mode gravitational waves from a newborn neutron star - sensitivity study

    CERN Document Server

    Mytidis, Antonis; Whiting, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This paper consists of two related parts: In the first part we derive an expression of the moment of inertia (MOI) of a neutron star as a function of observables from a hypothetical r-mode gravitational wave detection. For a given r-mode detection we show how the value of the MOI of a neutron star constrains the equation of state (EOS) of the matter in the core of the neutron star. Subsequently, for each candidate EOS, we derive a possible value of the saturation amplitude, \\alpha, of the r-mode oscillations on the neutron star. Additionally, we argue that a r-mode detection will provide clues about the cooling rate mechanism of the neutron star. The above physics that can be derived from a hypothetical r-mode detection constitute our motivation for the second part of the paper. In that part we present a detection strategy to efficiently search for r-modes in gravitational-wave data. R-mode signals were injected into simulated noise colored with the advanced LIGO (aLIGO) and Einstein Telescope (ET) sensitivit...

  2. The Effects of the Hypothetical Putative Confession and Negatively Valenced Yes/No Questions on Maltreated and Nonmaltreated Children's Disclosure of a Minor Transgression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Stacia N; McWilliams, Kelly; Lyon, Thomas D

    2016-10-17

    This study examined the effects of the hypothetical putative confession (telling children "What if I said that [the suspect] told me everything that happened and he said he wants you to tell the truth?") and negatively valenced yes/no questions varying in their explicitness ("Did the [toy] break?" vs. "Did something bad happen to the [toy]?") on two hundred and six 4- to 9-year-old maltreated and nonmaltreated children's reports, half of whom had experienced toy breakage and had been admonished to keep the breakage a secret. The hypothetical putative confession increased the likelihood that children disclosed breakage without increasing false reports. The yes/no questions elicited additional disclosures of breakage but also some false reports. The less explicit questions (referencing "something bad") were as effective in eliciting true reports as the questions explicitly referencing breakage. Pairing affirmative answers to the yes/no questions with recall questions asking for elaboration allowed for better discrimination between true and false reports. The results suggest promising avenues for interviewers seeking to increase true disclosures without increasing false reports.

  3. SOCIAL RESPONSES IN HYPOTHETICAL SITUATIONS OF INTERPERSONAL TENSION, OF A GROUP OF CHILDREN INSTITUTIONALIZED FOR PHYSICAL ABUSE, AND A GROUP OF NON-ABUSED CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR REY

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation had two objectives: a to compare the number of punitive and not punitive socialresponses reported toward three hypothetical situations of interpersonal tension, by a group of 39institutionalized for physical abuse children and girls, with that informed by a group of 34 not abusedchildren and girls inscribed to an educational institution, and b to compare the number of punitive andnot punitive responses that the physically abused children and girls referred in this situations. All thechildren had between eight and twelve age-years, among second and quarter educational degree and lowsocioeconomic levels. The three hypothetical situations of interpersonal tension were presented verballywith the support of six sheets (three for each sex and their responses were gathered in a quantitative waythrough the content analysis. The application of the test U of Mann Whitney didn’t throw significantdifferences among the two groups. Nevertheless, it was found a significant difference at intra-grouplevel, in accordance with the test of Wicolxon.

  4. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins in Eimeria tenella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlee, Intan Azlinda; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2015-09-01

    Eimeria tenella is a protozoan parasite that causes coccidiosis, an economically important disease in the poultry industry. The characterization of proteins that are secreted by parasites have been shown to play important roles in parasite invasion and are considered to be potential control agents. In this study, 775 proteins potentially secreted by E. tenella were identified. These proteins were further filtered to remove mitochondrial proteins. Out of 763 putative secreted proteins, 259 proteins possess transmembrane domains while another 150 proteins have GPI (Glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchors. Homology search revealed that 315 and 448 proteins have matches with known and hypothetical proteins in the database, respectively. Within this data set, previously characterized secretory proteins such as micronemes, rhoptry kinases and dense granules were detected.

  5. Sulfur activation-related extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cheng-gui; ZHANG Rui-yong; XIA Jin-lan; ZHANG Qian; NIE Zhen-yuan

    2008-01-01

    The fractions of the extracellular proteins of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on two different energy substrates,elemental sulfur and ferrous sulfate,were selectively prepared with hot water treatment and distinctly shown by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.Some protein spots with apparently higher abundance in sulfur energy substrate than in ferrous sulfate energy substrate were identified by using MALDI-TOF/TOF.Based on peptide mass fingerprints and bioinformatical analysis,the extracellular proteins were classified according to their functions as conjugal transfer protein,pilin,vacJ lipoprotein,polysaccharide deacetylase family protein,Ser/Thr protein phosphatase family protein and hypothetical proteins.Several extracellular proteins were found abundant in thiol groups and with CXXC functional motif,these proteins may be directly involved in the sulfur activation by use of their thiol group (Pr-SH) to bond the elemental sulfur.

  6. Structural and Function Prediction of Musa acuminata subsp. Malaccensis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Munir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical proteins (HPs are the proteins whose presence has been anticipated, yet in vivo function has not been built up. Illustrating the structural and functional privileged insights of these HPs might likewise prompt a superior comprehension of the protein-protein associations or networks in diverse types of life. Bananas (Musa acuminata spp., including sweet and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister grouped to the all-around considered Poales, which incorporate oats. Bananas are crucial for nourishment security in numerous tropical and subtropical nations and the most prominent organic product in industrialized nations. In the present study, the hypothetical protein of M. acuminata (Banana was chosen for analysis and modeling by distinctive bioinformatics apparatuses and databases. As indicated by primary and secondary structure analysis, XP_009393594.1 is a stable hydrophobic protein containing a noteworthy extent of α-helices; Homology modeling was done utilizing SWISS-MODEL server where the templates identity with XP_009393594.1 protein was less which demonstrated novelty of our protein. Ab initio strategy was conducted to produce its 3D structure. A few evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters determined the generated protein model as stable with genuinely great quality. Functional analysis was completed by ProtFun 2.2, and KEGG (KAAS, recommended that the hypothetical protein is a transcription factor with cytoplasmic domain as zinc finger. The protein was observed to be vital for translation process, involved in metabolism, signaling and cellular processes, genetic information processing and Zinc ion binding. It is suggested that further test approval would help to anticipate the structures and functions of other uncharacterized proteins of different plants and living being.

  7. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution of a novel human gap junction-forming protein, connexin-31.9. Interaction with zona occludens protein-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Peter A; Beahm, Derek L; Giepmans, Ben N G; Baruch, Amos; Hall, James E; Kumar, Nalin M

    2002-01-01

    A novel human connexin gene (GJA11) was cloned from a genomic library. The open reading frame encoded a hypothetical protein of 294 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 31,933, hence referred to as connexin-31.9 (Cx31.9) or alpha 11 connexin. A clone in GenBank containing the Cx31.

  8. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution of a novel human gap junction-forming protein, connexin-31.9. Interaction with zona occludens protein-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Peter A; Beahm, Derek L; Giepmans, Ben N G; Baruch, Amos; Hall, James E; Kumar, Nalin M

    2002-01-01

    A novel human connexin gene (GJA11) was cloned from a genomic library. The open reading frame encoded a hypothetical protein of 294 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 31,933, hence referred to as connexin-31.9 (Cx31.9) or alpha 11 connexin. A clone in GenBank containing the Cx31.

  9. PROTEIN SYNTHESIS GAME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.Q. Carvalho

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical explanation of biological concepts, associated with the use of teaching games andmodels, intensify the comprehension and increase students interest, stimulating them to participateactively on the teaching-learning process. The sta of dissemination from Centro de BiotecnologiaMolecular Estrutural (CBME, in partnership with the Centro de Divulgac~ao Cientca e Cultural(CDCC, presents, in this work, a new educational resource denoted: Protein Synthesis Game. Theapproach of the game involves the cytological aspects of protein synthesis, directed to high schoolstudents. Students are presented to day-by-day facts related to the function of a given protein in thehuman body. Such task leads players to the goal of solving out a problem through synthesizing aspecied protein. The game comprises: (1 a board illustrated with the transversal section of animalcell, with its main structures and organelles and sequences of hypothetical genes; (2 cards with thedescription of steps and other structures required for protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells; (3 piecesrepresenting nucleotides, polynucleotides, ribosome, amino acids, and polypeptide chains. In order toplay the game, students take cards that sequentially permit them to acquire the necessary pieces forproduction of the protein described in each objective. Players must move the pieces on the board andsimulate the steps of protein synthesis. The dynamic of the game allows students to easily comprehendprocesses of transcription and translation. This game was presented to dierent groups of high schoolteachers and students. Their judgments have been heard and indicated points to be improved, whichhelped us with the game development. Furthermore, the opinions colleted were always favorable forthe application of this game as a teaching resource in classrooms.

  10. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  11. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic-simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. Volume 2: results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, M.G.; Petrie, G.M.; Baldwin, A.J.; Craig, R.G.

    1982-06-01

    This report contains the input data and computer results for the Geologic Simulation Model. This model is described in detail in the following report: Petrie, G.M., et. al. 1981. Geologic Simulation Model for a Hypothetical Site in the Columbia Plateau, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington. The Geologic Simulation Model is a quasi-deterministic process-response model which simulates, for a million years into the future, the development of the geologic and hydrologic systems of the ground-water basin containing the Pasco Basin. Effects of natural processes on the ground-water hydrologic system are modeled principally by rate equations. The combined effects and synergistic interactions of different processes are approximated by linear superposition of their effects during discrete time intervals in a stepwise-integration approach.

  12. College students' social reactions to the victim in a hypothetical sexual assault scenario: the role of victim and perpetrator alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untied, Amy S; Orchowski, Lindsay M; Mastroleo, Nadine; Gidycz, Christine A

    2012-01-01

    College students' responses to a hypothetical sexual assault scenario involving alcohol use by the victim and/or perpetrator were examined (N = 295). Participants reported on victim/perpetrator responsibility, the extent to which the scenario would be considered rape, and their likelihood of providing positive or negative responses to the victim. Compared to women, men indicated that they would provide more negative and less positive social reactions to the victim, were less likely to identify the scenario as rape, and endorsed less perpetrator responsibility. When the victim was drinking, participants endorsed greater victim responsibility and lower perpetrator responsibility for the assault. Participants indicated that they would provide the victim with less emotional support when only the perpetrator was drinking, compared to when both the individuals were drinking.

  13. A univariate analysis of variance design for multiple-choice feeding-preference experiments: A hypothetical example with fruit-eating birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrinaga, Asier R.

    2010-01-01

    I consider statistical problems in the analysis of multiple-choice food-preference experiments, and propose a univariate analysis of variance design for experiments of this type. I present an example experimental design, for a hypothetical comparison of fruit colour preferences between two frugivorous bird species. In each fictitious trial, four trays each containing a known weight of artificial fruits (red, blue, black, or green) are introduced into the cage, while four equivalent trays are left outside the cage, to control for tray weight loss due to other factors (notably desiccation). The proposed univariate approach allows data from such designs to be analysed with adequate power and no major violations of statistical assumptions. Nevertheless, there is no single "best" approach for experiments of this type: the best analysis in each case will depend on the particular aims and nature of the experiments.

  14. HYPOTHETIC FIVE-DIMESION SPACE OF BASIC FACTORS EXTRACTED FROM THE FACTOR ANLYSIS OF CERTAIN NUMBERS OF MORPHOLOGIC, MOBILE AND MANIFEST MOBILE VARIABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Šekeljić

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This research was made on sample of 183 schoolboys and school girls attending the fourth grade of the elementary school. It was conducted in order to examine the possibilities of the adoption of an alternative curriculum which contains the elemements of basket ball game. After an experimental treatament, the effects of the teaching were estmated in these segments of antropological space: antropometrical, mobile and manifest mobile space concerning the basic elements of basketball technique. It was applicated the method of canonic corelated analysis which means that there were determined statistically important coefficient of correlation based on certain number of prmal and basic vectors of morphological, mobile and manifest mobile variables. According to the results of the research we can expect that five-dimension hypothetic model should present some kind of base for an eventual progress: methods of Teaching Physical Education, cibernetic navigation of the training technology such as the selection of the pupils who are able to play basketball.

  15. Characterization of the B-1023 furnace for use in hypothetical thermal accident testing of shipping containers in accordance with 10 CFR, Part 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    The B-1023 furnace, located in Building 9204-4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Tennessee, is used for hypothetical thermal accident (HTA) testing of shipping containers that carry radioactive materials, in accordance with 10 CFR, Pt. 71.73(c)(3). This code requires a specific radiant (and convective) thermal environment during HTA tests. Experiments were performed to determine the furnace surface temperatures during these tests, which thus determine the radiant thermal environment. Several conclusions drawn from these experiments are presented. It is possible to perform conforming HTA tests in this furnace if a specific test routine is carefully followed. Recommendations concerning the procedure to be used during future tests are made.

  16. Characterization of the universal stress protein F from atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and its prevalence in Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Cristiane S; Torres, Alfredo G; Caravelli, Andressa; Silva, Anderson; Polatto, Juliana M; Piazza, Roxane M F

    2016-12-01

    Atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) are heterogeneous strains in terms of serotypes, adherence patterns and the presence of novel virulence factors. This heterogeneity is intriguing, promoting studies trying to characterize these novel proteins and to better comprehend this pathotype group. In a previous study analyzing low-molecular mass proteomes of four representative aEPEC strains of three different adhesion phenotypes, we classified proteins according to their annotated function, with most of them being involved in metabolism and transport; while some of them were classified as hypothetical proteins. The majority of the hypothetical proteins were homologue products of genes identified in the genome of enterohemorrhagic E. coli. One of the hypothetical proteins was annotated as Z2335, with orthologue in EPEC, and by bioinformatics analysis, this protein was revealed to be the universal stress protein F (UspF). Thus, herein we successfully obtained a recombinant UspF protein from aEPEC, which is a α/β, ATP-binding protein involved in stress response, with comparable protein production among the four studied strains, but showing noteworthy differences when cultivated in different stress conditions, also present in other enterobacterial species, such as Shigella sonnei and Citrobacter freundii. Furthermore, our results confirm that the Usp protein superfamily encompasses a conserved group of proteins involved in stress resistance in aEPEC and other Enterobacteriaceae.

  17. Characterisation and expression analysis of trophozoite and cyst proteins of Acanthamoeba spp. isolated from Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Himansu Sekhar; Satpathy, Gita

    2016-01-01

    The study was carried out to characterise and analyze the expression pattern of proteins of infective trophozoite and cyst forms of Acanthamoeba spp. isolated from an amoebic keratitis patient. Protein was isolated from the trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba spp. isolates and subjected to SDS PAGE, 2D PAGE analysis where a large number of protein bands and protein spots were observed. Four prominent protein spots i.e. 2 from trophozoites and 2 from cysts that appeared more intense compared to the corresponding spots in other corresponding gel were excised from the 2D PAGE gels and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS assay and Mascot search software. Protein spots from trophozoites were identified as "hypothetical protein ACA1" and "eukaryotic porin protein" and those from cysts were identified as "chaperone protein DnaK" and "chaperonin protein" respectively. Proteomic results of 4 proteins were further validated by reverse genomics using quantitative real time PCR assay which showed a 1388 fold and 4.35 fold increase in expression of "hypothetical protein ACA1" gene and "eukaryotic porin protein" gene respectively in trophozoites compared to cysts and a 15 fold and 12.36 fold increase in expression of "chaperone protein DnaK" gene and "chaperonin protein" gene respectively in cysts compared to trophozoites. "Hypothetical protein ACA1" of trophozoites, whose function is unknown might have some important role in the parasite division and pathogenicty of Acanthamoeba spp. which needs further study. As trophozoites are the active and feeding form of Acanthamoeba spp., "eukaryotic porin" proteins may have some important role in efflux of toxic metabolites and exudates from interior of cell to outside along with some role in pathogenicity. Similarly proteins such as "chaperone protein DnaK" and "chaperonin protein" which belongs to group of heat shock proteins may have a role in folding of cyst specific proteins in cyst which needs further study.

  18. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  19. A Simulation Study on Hypothetical Ebola Virus Transmission in India Using Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler (STEM: A Way towards Precision Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkaprabha Sau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Precision public health is a state-of-the-art concept in public health research and its application in health care. Application of information technology in field of epidemiology paves the way to its transformation to digital epidemiology. A geospatial epidemiological model was simulated to estimate the spread of Ebola virus disease after a hypothetical outbreak in India. Methods. It was a simulation study based on SEIR (Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered compartmental model. Simulation was done in Spatiotemporal Epidemiological Modeler (STEM. Epidemiological profile of Ebola virus, that transmitted throughout the Sierra Leon in 2014–2016, was fitted into the SEIR deterministic compartment model designed for India. Result. Spatiotemporal distribution of EVD exposed, infectious, and recovered population at 4-month interval represented by different figures. It is estimated that if no intervention is taken to stop the spread, within 2 years, almost half of the country will be effected by EVD and cumulative number of exposed individuals, infectious persons, and deaths will be 106947760, 30651674, and 18391005, respectively. Conclusion. Precision public health may play the key role to achieve the health related targets in the Sustainable Development Goals. Policy makers, public health specialists, and data scientists need to put their hands together to make precision public health a reality.

  20. A comparative radiological assessment of five European biosphere systems in the context of potential contamination of well water from the hypothetical disposal of radioactive waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olyslaegers, G; Zeevaert, T; Pinedo, P; Simon, I; Pröhl, G; Kowe, R; Chen, Q; Mobbs, S; Bergström, U; Hallberg, B; Katona, T; Eged, K; Kanyar, B

    2005-12-01

    In the framework of the BioMoSA project for the development of biosphere assessment models for radioactive waste disposal the Reference Biosphere Methodology developed in the IAEA programme BIOMASS was applied to five locations, situated in different European countries. Specific biosphere models were applied to assess the hypothetical contamination of a range of agricultural and environmental pathways and the dose to individuals, following contamination of well water. The results of these site-specific models developed by the different BioMoSA partners, and the individual normalised dose to the exposure groups were compared against each other. Ingestion of drinking water, fruit and vegetables were found to be among the most important pathways for almost all radionuclides. Stochastic calculations revealed that consumption habits, transfer factors, irrigation rates and distribution coefficients (Kd(s)) were the most important parameters that influence the end results. Variations in the confidence intervals were found to be higher for sorbing elements (e.g. (36)Cl, (237)Np, (99)Tc, (238)U, (129)I) than for mobile elements (e.g. (226)Ra, (79)Se, (135)Cs, (231)Pa, (239)Pu). The influence of daughter products, for which the distribution into the biosphere was calculated individually, was also shown to be important. This paper gives a brief overview of the deterministic and stochastic modelling results and the parameter sensitivity. A screening methodology was introduced to identify the most important pathways, simplify a generic biosphere tool and refine the existing models.

  1. Study on optimal model of hypothetical work injury insurance scheme%理论工伤保险的优化模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶驰宇; 董恒进; 吴媛; 段胜楠; 刘小方; 尤华; 胡慧美; 王林浩; 张菁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore an optimal model of hypothetical work injury insurance scheme,which is in line with the wishes of workers,based on the problems in the implementation of work injury insurance in China and to provide useful information for relevant policy makers.Methods Multistage cluster sampling was used to select subjects:first,9 small,medium,and large enterprises were selected from three cities (counties) in Zhejiang Province,China according to the economic development,transportation,and cooperation; then,31 workshops were randomly selected from the 9 enterprises.Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained interviewers using a pre-designed questionnaire among all workers in the 31 workshops.Results After optimization of hypothetical work injury insurance scheme,the willingness to participate in the scheme increased from 73.87% to 80.96%; the average willingness to pay for the scheme increased from 2.21% (51.77 yuan) to 2.38% of monthly wage (54.93 Yuan); the median willingness to pay for the scheme increased from 1% to 1.2% of monthly wage,but decreased from 35 yuan to 30 yuan.The optimal model of hypothetical work injury insurance scheme covers all national and provincial statutory occupational diseases and work accidents,as well as consultations about occupational diseases.The scheme is supposed to be implemented worldwide by the National Social Security Department,without regional differences.The premium is borne by the state,enterprises,and individuals,and an independent insurance fund is kept in the lifetime personal account for each of insured individuals.The premium is not refunded in any event.Compensation for occupational diseases or work accidents is unrelated to the enterprises of the insured workers but related to the length of insurance.The insurance becomes effective one year after enrollment,while it is put into effect immediately after the occupational disease or accident occurs.Conclusion The optimal model of hypothetical

  2. Trans-oceanic transport of 137Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident and impact of hypothetical Fukushima-like events of future nuclear plants in Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wai, Ka-Ming; Yu, Peter K N

    2015-03-01

    A Lagrangian model was adopted to assess the potential impact of (137)Cs released from hypothetical Fukushima-like accidents occurring on three potential nuclear power plant sites in Southern China in the near future (planned within 10 years) in four different seasons. The maximum surface (0-500 m) (137)Cs air concentrations would be reached 10 Bq m(-3) near the source, comparable to the Fukushima case. In January, Southeast Asian countries would be mostly affected by the radioactive plume due to the effects of winter monsoon. In April, the impact would be mainly on Southern and Northern China. Debris of radioactive plume (~1 mBq m(-3)) would carry out long-range transport to North America. The area of influence would be the smallest in July due to the frequent and intense wet removal events by trough of low pressure and tropical cyclone. The maximum worst-case areas of influence were 2382000, 2327000, 517000 and 1395000 km(2) in January, April, July and October, respectively. Prior to the above calculations, the model was employed to simulate the trans-oceanic transport of (137)Cs from the Fukushima nuclear accident. Observed and modeled (137)Cs concentrations were comparable. Sensitivity runs were performed to optimize the wet scavenging parameterization. The adoption of higher-resolution (1° × 1°) meteorological fields improved the prediction. The computed large-scale plume transport pattern over the Pacific Ocean was compared with that reported in the literature.

  3. A quantitative approach to study indirect effects among disease proteins in the human protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordán Ferenc

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology makes it possible to study larger and more intricate systems than before, so it is now possible to look at the molecular basis of several diseases in parallel. Analyzing the interaction network of proteins in the cell can be the key to understand how complex processes lead to diseases. Novel tools in network analysis provide the possibility to quantify the key interacting proteins in large networks as well as proteins that connect them. Here we suggest a new method to study the relationships between topology and functionality of the protein-protein interaction network, by identifying key mediator proteins possibly maintaining indirect relationships among proteins causing various diseases. Results Based on the i2d and OMIM databases, we have constructed (i a network of proteins causing five selected diseases (DP, disease proteins plus their interacting partners (IP, non-disease proteins, the DPIP network and (ii a protein network showing only these IPs and their interactions, the IP network. The five investigated diseases were (1 various cancers, (2 heart diseases, (3 obesity, (4 diabetes and (5 autism. We have quantified the number and strength of IP-mediated indirect effects between the five groups of disease proteins and hypothetically identified the most important mediator proteins linking heart disease to obesity or diabetes in the IP network. The results present the relationship between mediator role and centrality, as well as between mediator role and functional properties of these proteins. Conclusions We show that a protein which plays an important indirect mediator role between two diseases is not necessarily a hub in the PPI network. This may suggest that, even if hub proteins and disease proteins are trivially of great interest, mediators may also deserve more attention, especially if disease-disease associations are to be understood. Identifying the hubs may not be sufficient to understand

  4. A simulation study of dispersion of air borne radionuclides from a nuclear power plant under a hypothetical accidental scenario at a tropical coastal site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, C. V.; Venkatesan, R.

    Meteorological condition in coastal regions is diurnally variable and spatially heterogeneous due to complex topography, land-sea interface, etc. A wide range of dispersion conditions is possible on a given day in the coastal regions. In case of inadvertent accidental situations, though unlikely, it would be necessary to examine the potentially severe case among different dynamically occurring local atmospheric conditions for dispersion and its range of impact around a nuclear power plant for safety analysis. In this context, dispersion of air borne radioactive effluents during a hypothetical accidental scenario from a proposed prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) at an Indian coastal site, Kalpakkam, is simulated using a 3-D meso-scale atmospheric model MM5 and a random walk particle dispersion model FLEXPART. A simulation carried out for a typical summer day predicted the development of land-sea breeze circulation and thermal internal boundary layer (TIBL) formation, which have been confirmed by meteorological observations. Analysis of dose distribution shows that the maximum dose for releases from a 100 m stack occurs at two places within 4 km distance during sea breeze/TIBL fumigation hours. Maximum dose also occurred during nighttime stable conditions. Results indicate that, on the day of present study, the highest concentrations occurred during periods of TIBL fumigation rather than during stable atmospheric conditions. Further, the area of impact (plume width at the surface) spreads up to a down wind distance of 4 km during fumigation condition. Simulation over a range of 25 km has shown turning of plume at the incidence of sea breeze circulation and two different dispersion patterns across the sea breeze front. These results are significant in comparison to the expected pattern shown by Gaussian plume model used for routine analysis.

  5. Zeolitic polyoxometalates metal organic frameworks (Z-POMOF) with imidazole ligands and epsilon-Keggin ions as building blocks; computational evaluation of hypothetical polymorphs and a synthesis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Albelo, L Marleny; Ruiz-Salvador, A Rabdel; Lewis, Dewi W; Gómez, Ariel; Mialane, Pierre; Marrot, Jérome; Dolbecq, Anne; Sampieri, Alvaro; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline

    2010-08-14

    We investigate here a new family of zeolitic Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) based on imidazole (im) as the ligand and epsilon-type Keggin PolyOxoMetalates (POMs) as building units. The POM used in this study is the epsilon-{PMo(12)O(40)} Keggin isomer capped by four Zn(ii) ions (noted epsilon-Zn) in tetrahedral coordination. We describe here our methods to first construct and then evaluate the stability of hypothetical 3-D POMOFs possessing a tetrahedral network, typified by dense silica polymorphs and zeotypes and referred here to as Z-POMOFs. We use the analogy between the connectivity of silicon ion in dense minerals or zeolites and the epsilon-Zn, using imidazolate ligands to mimic the role of oxygen atoms in zeolites. Handling the epsilon-Keggin and imidazole as the constitutive building-blocks, a selection of 40 polymorphs were constructed and their relative stabilities computed. Among these Z-POMOFs, the cristobalite-like and zni-structure were identified as the most stable candidates. In parallel, we have attempted to synthesize Z-POMOF structures with epsilon-Zn POMs, synthesized in situ under hydrothermal conditions, and imidazole ligands. We present our first experimental result, the extended material [NBu(4)][PMo(V)(8)Mo(VI)(4)O(37)(OH)(3)Zn(4)(im)(Him)], named epsilon(im)(2). The structure of the hybrid framework is built by the connection of dimerized epsilon-Zn POMs to imidazole ligands in two directions. The obtaining of the first POMOF based on imidazole ligand is an encouraging step towards the synthesis of a new family of POMOFs.

  6. Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: application to liquid argon and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald P; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2004-12-08

    The hypothetical scanning (HS) method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte Carlo or molecular dynamics techniques. With HS applied to a fluid, each configuration i of the sample is reconstructed by gradually placing the molecules in their positions at i using transition probabilities (TPs). At each step of the process the system is divided into two parts, the already treated molecules (the "past"), which are fixed, and the as yet unspecified (mobile) "future" molecules. Obtaining the TP exactly requires calculating partition functions over all positions of the future molecules in the presence of the frozen past, thus it is customary to invoke various approximations to best represent these quantities. In a recent publication [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101, 9235 (2004)] we developed a version of HS called complete HSMC, where each TP is calculated from an MC simulation involving all of the future molecules (the complete future); the method was applied very successfully to Lennard-Jones systems (liquid argon) and a box of TIP3P water molecules. In its basic implementation the method provides lower and upper bounds for F, where the latter can be evaluated only for relatively small systems. Here we introduce a new expression for an upper bound, which can be evaluated for larger systems. We also propose a new exact expression for F and verify its effectiveness. These free energy functionals lead to significantly improved accuracy (as applied to the liquid systems above) which is comparable to our thermodynamic integration results. We formalize and discuss theoretical aspects of HSMC that have not been addressed in previous studies. Additionally, several functionals are developed and shown to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration.

  7. The interaction of /sup 125/I-insulin with cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes: quantitative analysis by the hypothetical grain method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, J.Y.; Carpentier, J.L.; Van Obberghen, E.; Blackett, N.M.; Grunfeld, C.; Gorden, P.; Orci, L.

    1983-07-01

    The murine 3T3-L1 fibroblast under appropriate incubation conditions differentiates into an adipocyte phenotype. This 3T3-L1 adipocyte exhibits many of the morphologic, biochemical, and insulin-responsive features of the normal rodent adipocyte. Using quantitative electron microscopic (EM) autoradiography we find that, when /sup 125/I-insulin is incubated with 3T3-L1 adipocytes, the ligand at early times of incubation localizes to the plasma membrane of the cell preferentially to microvilli and coated pits. When the incubation is continued at 37 degrees C, /sup 125/I-insulin is internalized by the cells and preferential binding to the villous surface is lost. With the internalization of the ligand, two intracellular structures become labeled, as determined by the method of hypothetical grain analysis. These include large clear, presumably endocytotic, vesicles and multivesicular bodies. Over the first hour of incubation the labeling of these structures increases in parallel, but in the second hour they diverge: the labeling of multivesicular bodies and other lysosomal forms continuing to increase and the labeling of large clear vesicles decreasing. At 3 hours limited but significant labeling occurs in small Golgi-related vesicles that have the typical distribution of GERL. The distinct morphologic features of this cell make it ideal for a quantitative morphologic analysis and allow for an unambiguous view of the sequence of events involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis of a polypeptide hormone. These events are likely to be representative of the processing of insulin by the mature rodent adipocyte.

  8. Probable hydrologic effects of a hypothetical failure of Mackay Dam on the Big Lost River Valley from Mackay, Idaho to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druffel, Leroy; Stiltner, Gloria J.; Keefer, Thomas N.

    1979-01-01

    Mackay Dam is an irrigation reservoir on the Big Lost River, Idaho, approximately 7.2 kilometers northwest of Mackay, Idaho. Consequences of possible rupture of the dam have long concerned the residents of the river valley. The presence of reactors and of a management complex for nuclear wastes on the reservation of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), near the river , give additional cause for concern over the consequences of a rupture of Mackay Dam. The objective of this report is to calculate and route the flood wave resulting from the hypothetical failure of Mackay Dam downstream to the INEL. Both a full and a 50 percent partial breach of this dam are investigated. Two techniques are used to develop the dam-break model. The method of characteristics is used to propagate the shock wave after the dam fails. The linear implicit finite-difference solution is used to route the flood wave after the shock wave has dissipated. The time of travel of the flood wave, duration of flooding, and magnitude of the flood are determined for eight selected sites from Mackay Dam, Idaho, through the INEL diversion. At 4.2 kilometers above the INEL diversion, peak discharges of 1,550.2 and 1,275 cubic meters per second and peak flood elevations of 1,550.3 and 1,550.2 meters were calculated for the full and partial breach, respectively. Flood discharges and flood peaks were not compared for the area downstream of the diversion because of the lack of detailed flood plain geometry. (Kosco-USGS)

  9. Cell polarity proteins and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Xiao, Xiang; Lui, Wing-Yee; Lee, Will M; Mruk, Dolores; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-11-01

    When the cross-section of a seminiferous tubule from an adult rat testes is examined microscopically, Sertoli cells and germ cells in the seminiferous epithelium are notably polarized cells. For instance, Sertoli cell nuclei are found near the basement membrane. On the other hand, tight junction (TJ), basal ectoplasmic specialization (basal ES, a testis-specific actin-rich anchoring junction), gap junction (GJ) and desmosome that constitute the blood-testis barrier (BTB) are also located near the basement membrane. The BTB, in turn, divides the epithelium into the basal and the adluminal (apical) compartments. Within the epithelium, undifferentiated spermatogonia and preleptotene spermatocytes restrictively reside in the basal compartment whereas spermatocytes and post-meiotic spermatids reside in the adluminal compartment. Furthermore, the heads of elongating/elongated spermatids point toward the basement membrane with their elongating tails toward the tubule lumen. However, the involvement of polarity proteins in this unique cellular organization, in particular the underlying molecular mechanism(s) by which polarity proteins confer cellular polarity in the seminiferous epithelium is virtually unknown until recent years. Herein, we discuss latest findings regarding the role of different polarity protein complexes or modules and how these protein complexes are working in concert to modulate Sertoli cell and spermatid polarity. These findings also illustrate polarity proteins exert their effects through the actin-based cytoskeleton mediated by actin binding and regulatory proteins, which in turn modulate adhesion protein complexes at the cell-cell interface since TJ, basal ES and GJ utilize F-actin for attachment. We also propose a hypothetical model which illustrates the antagonistic effects of these polarity proteins. This in turn provides a unique mechanism to modulate junction remodeling in the testis to support germ cell transport across the epithelium in

  10. Identification and characterization of Euphorbia nivulia latex proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgujar, Shamkant B; Mahajan, Raghunath T

    2014-03-01

    The protein profile of latex of Euphorbia nivulia Buch.-Ham. is established. Three new proteins viz., Nivulian-I, II and III have been purified to homogeneity from the latex. The relative molecular masses of Nivulian-I, II and III are 31,486.985, 43,670.846 and 52,803.470 Da respectively. Nivulian-I is a simple type of protein while Nivulian-II and III are glycoproteins. Peptide mass fingerprint analysis revealed peptides of these proteins match with Tubulin alpha-1 chain of Eleusine indica, Maturase K of Banksia quercifolia and hypothetical protein of Zea mays respectively. Tryptic digestion profile of Nivulian-I, II and III, infer the exclusive nature of latex origin proteins and may be new and are additive molecules in the dictionaries of phytoproteins or botany. This is the first of its kind, regarding characterization and validation of Nivulian-I, II and III with respect to peptide sequencing.

  11. Simulation of broad-band strong ground motion for a hypothetical Mw 7.1 earthquake on the Enriquillo Fault in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, Roby; Mavroeidis, George P.; Calais, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The devastating 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake demonstrated the need to improve mitigation and preparedness for future seismic events in the region. Previous studies have shown that the earthquake did not occur on the Enriquillo Fault, the main plate boundary fault running through the heavily populated Port-au-Prince region, but on the nearby and previously unknown transpressional Léogâne Fault. Slip on that fault has increased stresses on the segment of Enriquillo Fault to the east of Léogâne, which terminates in the ˜3-million-inhabitant capital city of Port-au-Prince. In this study, we investigate ground shaking in the vicinity of Port-au-Prince, if a hypothetical rupture similar to the 2010 Haiti earthquake occurred on that segment of the Enriquillo Fault. We use a finite element method and assumptions on regional tectonic stress to simulate the low-frequency ground motion components using dynamic rupture propagation for a 52-km-long segment. We consider eight scenarios by varying parameters such as hypocentre location, initial shear stress and fault dip. The high-frequency ground motion components are simulated using the specific barrier model in the context of the stochastic modeling approach. The broad-band ground motion synthetics are subsequently obtained by combining the low-frequency components from the dynamic rupture simulation with the high-frequency components from the stochastic simulation using matched filtering at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. Results show that rupture on a vertical Enriquillo Fault generates larger horizontal permanent displacements in Léogâne and Port-au-Prince than rupture on a south-dipping Enriquillo Fault. The mean horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA), computed at several sites of interest throughout Port-au-Prince, has a value of ˜0.45 g, whereas the maximum horizontal PGA in Port-au-Prince is ˜0.60 g. Even though we only consider a limited number of rupture scenarios, our results suggest more intense ground

  12. Numerical tsunami simulations in the western Pacific Ocean and East China Sea from hypothetical M 9 earthquakes along the Nankai trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Tomoya; Satake, Kenji; Furumura, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    We carried out tsunami numerical simulations in the western Pacific Ocean and East China Sea in order to examine the behavior of massive tsunami outside Japan from the hypothetical M 9 tsunami source models along the Nankai Trough proposed by the Cabinet Office of Japanese government (2012). The distribution of MTHs (maximum tsunami heights for 24 h after the earthquakes) on the east coast of China, the east coast of the Philippine Islands, and north coast of the New Guinea Island show peaks with approximately 1.0-1.7 m,4.0-7.0 m,4.0-5.0 m, respectively. They are significantly higher than that from the 1707 Ho'ei earthquake (M 8.7), the largest earthquake along the Nankai trough in recent Japanese history. Moreover, the MTH distributions vary with the location of the huge slip(s) in the tsunami source models although the three coasts are far from the Nankai trough. Huge slip(s) in the Nankai segment mainly contributes to the MTHs, while huge slip(s) or splay faulting in the Tokai segment hardly affects the MTHs. The tsunami source model was developed for responding to the unexpected occurrence of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake, with 11 models along the Nanakai trough, and simulated MTHs along the Pacific coasts of the western Japan from these models exceed 10 m, with a maximum height of 34.4 m. Tsunami propagation was computed by the finite-difference method of the non-liner long-wave equations with the Corioli's force and bottom friction (Satake, 1995) in the area of 115-155 ° E and 8° S-40° N. Because water depth of the East China Sea is shallower than 200 m, the tsunami propagation is likely to be affected by the ocean bottom fiction. The 30 arc-seconds gridded bathymetry data provided by the General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO-2014) are used. For long propagation of tsunami we simulated tsunamis for 24 hours after the earthquakes. This study was supported by the"New disaster mitigation research project on Mega thrust earthquakes around Nankai

  13. Low frequency (<1Hz) Large Magnitude Earthquake Simulations in Central Mexico: the 1985 Michoacan Earthquake and Hypothetical Rupture in the Guerrero Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez Guzman, L.; Contreras Ruíz Esparza, M.; Aguirre Gonzalez, J. J.; Alcántara Noasco, L.; Quiroz Ramírez, A.

    2012-12-01

    We present the analysis of simulations at low frequency (Valley of Mexico. Mexico's destructive earthquake history bolsters the need for a better understanding regarding the seismic hazard and risk of the region. The Mw=8.0 1985 Michoacan earthquake is among the largest natural disasters that Mexico has faced in the last decades; more than 5000 people died and thousands of structures were damaged (Reinoso and Ordaz, 1999). Thus, estimates on the effects of similar or larger magnitude earthquakes on today's population and infrastructure are important. Moreover, Singh and Mortera (1991) suggest that earthquakes of magnitude 8.1 to 8.4 could take place in the so-called Guerrero Gap, an area adjacent to the region responsible for the 1985 earthquake. In order to improve previous estimations of the ground motion (e.g. Furumura and Singh, 2002) and lay the groundwork for a numerical simulation of a hypothetical Guerrero Gap scenario, we recast the 1985 Michoacan earthquake. We used the inversion by Mendoza and Hartzell (1989) and a 3D velocity model built on the basis of recent investigations in the area, which include a velocity structure of the Valley of Mexico constrained by geotechnical and reflection experiments, and noise tomography, receiver functions, and gravity-based regional models. Our synthetic seismograms were computed using the octree-based finite element tool-chain Hercules (Tu et al., 2006), and are valid up to a frequency of 1 Hz, considering realistic velocities in the Valley of Mexico ( >60 m/s in the very shallow subsurface). We evaluated the model's ability to reproduce the available records using the goodness-of-fit analysis proposed by Mayhew and Olsen (2010). Once the reliablilty of the model was established, we estimated the effects of a large magnitude earthquake in Central Mexico. We built a kinematic rupture for a Mw=8.4 earthquake with the method of Liu et al. (2006) for the Guerrero Gap and computed the ground motion. We summarized our

  14. Expressed proteins of Herbaspirillum seropedicae in maize (DKB240) roots-bacteria interaction revealed using proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Cibele Santos; Amaral, Fernanda Plucani; Bueno, Jessica Cavalheiro Ferreira; Scariot, Mirella Christine; Valentim-Neto, Pedro Alexandre; Arisi, Ana Carolina Maisonnave

    2014-11-01

    Several molecular tools have been used to clarify the basis of plant-bacteria interaction; however, the mechanism behind the association is still unclear. In this study, we used a proteomic approach to investigate the root proteome of Zea mays (cv. DKB240) inoculated with Herbaspirillum seropedicae strain SmR1 grown in vitro and harvested 7 days after inoculation. Eighteen differentially accumulated proteins were observed in root samples, ten of which were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprint. Among the identified proteins, we observed three proteins present exclusively in inoculated root samples and six upregulated proteins and one downregulated protein relative to control. Differentially expressed maize proteins were identified as hypothetical protein ZEAMMB73_483204, hypothetical protein ZEAMMB73_269466, and tubulin beta-7 chain. The following were identified as H. seropedicae proteins: peroxiredoxin protein, EF-Tu elongation factor protein, cation transport ATPase, NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase, dinitrogenase reductase, and type III secretion ATP synthase. Our results presented the first evidence of type III secretion ATP synthase expression during H. seropedicae-maize root interaction.

  15. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers....... The biophysical and structural investigations of PPIs consequently demand hybrid approaches, implementing orthogonal methods and strategies for global data analysis. Currently, impressive developments in hardware and software within several methodologies define a new era for the biostructural community. Data can...

  16. Inventory of programs. Calculation of the isotope inventory after a hypothetical accident at the Cofrentes Nuclear power; Calculo del inventario isotopico despues de un hipotetico accidente en la Central Nuclear de Cofrentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albendea, M.

    2014-07-01

    Iberdrola is developing a new application to calculate the inventory of radiological material, then of a hypothetical accident, with the name of inventory. This application allows you to calculate the inventory isotopic, analysers and accurate thermal of all or part of the nucleus of the plant of Cofrentes, even of any single element, based on its history of irradiation and specific periods of decay, since the reactor at any time after the shutdown. (Author)

  17. Willingness to Know the Cause of Death and Hypothetical Acceptability of the Minimally Invasive Autopsy in Six Diverse African and Asian Settings: A Mixed Methods Socio-Behavioural Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maixenchs, Maria; Anselmo, Rui; Zielinski-Gutiérrez, Emily; Odhiambo, Frank O.; Akello, Clarah; Zaidi, S. Shujaat H.; Soofi, Sajid Bashir; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Diarra, Kounandji; Djitèye, Mahamane; Dembélé, Roukiatou; Sow, Samba; Minsoko, Pamela Cathérine Angoissa; Agnandji, Selidji Todagbe; Ismail, Mamudo R.; Carrilho, Carla; Ordi, Jaume; Menéndez, Clara; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    Background The minimally invasive autopsy (MIA) is being investigated as an alternative to complete diagnostic autopsies for cause of death (CoD) investigation. Before potential implementation of the MIA in settings where post-mortem procedures are unusual, a thorough assessment of its feasibility and acceptability is essential. Methods and Findings We conducted a socio-behavioural study at the community level to understand local attitudes and perceptions related to death and the hypothetical feasibility and acceptability of conducting MIAs in six distinct settings in Gabon, Kenya, Mali, Mozambique, and Pakistan. A total of 504 interviews (135 key informants, 175 health providers [including formal health professionals and traditional or informal health providers], and 194 relatives of deceased people) were conducted. The constructs “willingness to know the CoD” and “hypothetical acceptability of MIAs” were quantified and analysed using the framework analysis approach to compare the occurrence of themes related to acceptability across participants. Overall, 75% (379/504) of the participants would be willing to know the CoD of a relative. The overall hypothetical acceptability of MIA on a relative was 73% (366/504). The idea of the MIA was acceptable because of its perceived simplicity and rapidity and particularly for not “mutilating” the body. Further, MIAs were believed to help prevent infectious diseases, address hereditary diseases, clarify the CoD, and avoid witchcraft accusations and conflicts within families. The main concerns regarding the procedure included the potential breach of confidentiality on the CoD, the misperception of organ removal, and the incompatibility with some religious beliefs. Formal health professionals were concerned about possible contradictions between the MIA findings and the clinical pre-mortem diagnoses. Acceptability of the MIA was equally high among Christian and Islamic communities. However, in the two predominantly

  18. Optimized distance-dependent atom-pair-based potential DOOP for protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Myong-Ho; Krull, Florian; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2015-05-01

    The DOcking decoy-based Optimized Potential (DOOP) energy function for protein structure prediction is based on empirical distance-dependent atom-pair interactions. To optimize the atom-pair interactions, native protein structures are decomposed into polypeptide chain segments that correspond to structural motives involving complete secondary structure elements. They constitute near native ligand-receptor systems (or just pairs). Thus, a total of 8609 ligand-receptor systems were prepared from 954 selected proteins. For each of these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems, 1000 evenly sampled docking decoys with 0-10 Å interface root-mean-square-deviation (iRMSD) were generated with a method used before for protein-protein docking. A neural network-based optimization method was applied to derive the optimized energy parameters using these decoys so that the energy function mimics the funnel-like energy landscape for the interaction between these hypothetical ligand-receptor systems. Thus, our method hierarchically models the overall funnel-like energy landscape of native protein structures. The resulting energy function was tested on several commonly used decoy sets for native protein structure recognition and compared with other statistical potentials. In combination with a torsion potential term which describes the local conformational preference, the atom-pair-based potential outperforms other reported statistical energy functions in correct ranking of native protein structures for a variety of decoy sets. This is especially the case for the most challenging ROSETTA decoy set, although it does not take into account side chain orientation-dependence explicitly. The DOOP energy function for protein structure prediction, the underlying database of protein structures with hypothetical ligand-receptor systems and their decoys are freely available at http://agknapp.chemie.fu-berlin.de/doop/.

  19. GenBank blastx search result: AK104831 [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AK104831 001-042-A04 AF157797.1 Pseudomonas sp. R9 transposon Tn1404 hypothetical protein D, hypothetica...l protein C, hypothetical protein B, hypothetical protein E, hypothetical protein F, sulfate permease, hypotheti...cal protein G, and hypothetical protein H genes, complete cds.|BCT BCT 1e-16 +3 ...

  20. Examining a hypothetical quantitative model for better approximation of culprit coronary artery and site of stenosis on 99mTc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sushanta; Sen, Srabani; Das, Debasis; Basu, Sandip

    2016-10-01

    A hypothetical quantitative model of analyzing gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is proposed and examined for the feasibility of its use as a predictor of diseased coronary artery and approximating the site of stenosis to determine whether it could serve as a useful noninvasive complement for coronary angiography. The extent and severity of perfusion defects on rest gated myocardial perfusion imaging SPECT-images were assessed on a five-point scale in a standard 17-segment model and total perfusion deficit was quantified by automated software. The first step was to locate the diseased coronary artery using a quantitative method: for this, the score of each segment belonging to a particular coronary artery was determined using a systematic presumptive approach. After determination of specific coronary artery segments, the scores of the contiguous segments in three short axis slices (apical, middle, and basal) were summed for six subdivisions (anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, anteroseptal, and inferoseptal). The site of stenosis was determined from (a) the initial approximation of the involved segments with a defect score of 2-4 and (b) subsequent calculation of the defect score of each of the six subdivisions and allocating the site through a preassigned number for each coronary artery. For each coronary artery, only the subdivision with the highest defect score was considered. Proximal, middle, and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD) were considered to be represented when the summed value of a subdivision within a particular arterial territory was more than or equal to 7, between 5 and 7, 5 and 3, respectively. For the left circumflex and right coronary artery, summed scores (of respective subdivisions) of more than or equal to 5 and between 3 and 5 were preassigned to proximal and distal stenosis, respectively. The results were then correlated with the coronary angiographic data. On coronary angiography, proximal LAD occlusion