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Sample records for hypothalamic area injection

  1. Efferent connections from the lateral hypothalamic region and the lateral preoptic area to the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, P J; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Mikkelsen, J D

    1994-01-01

    area within the lateral hypothalamic region that consistently innervated magnocellular perikarya of the PVN. Finally, all areas of the lateral hypothalamic region contributed substantially to fibres terminating in the perinuclear shell of the PVN. These results demonstrate that anatomically distinct...

  2. PS injection area

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    To the right is the PS ring viewed along the direction of the protons. At the left the injection line coming from the 50 MeV Linac 1 (bottom) and going towards the 800 MeV booster, or deflected to the right to be injected directly into straight section 16. The drumlike element behind the (blue) dipole magnet is a 'debuncher' (a 200 MHz cavity). See photos 7409014X and 7409009.

  3. ICV vs. VMH injection of leptin: comparative effects on hypothalamic gene expression.

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    Ambati, Suresh; Duan, Jiuhua; Choi, Yang-Ho; Hartzell, Diane L; Della-Fera, Mary Anne; Baile, Clifton A

    2009-01-23

    Leptin regulates feeding behavior and body weight by binding to its receptors localized in specific areas of the hypothalamus. Leptin injected twice daily for 4 days either into the right ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) or into the right lateral cerebral ventricle (ICV) and using Real-Time Taqman RT-PCR, mRNA expression levels of selected genes in the arcuate nucleus-median eminence (ARC-ME) complex were quantitatively measured. Expression of selected genes from the ipsi- vs. contralateral VMH areas in rats injected with leptin into the VMH was also compared. VMH injections of leptin increased ARC-ME mRNAs of proopiomelanocortin (POMC), 27.3% (p<0.05); gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABRD), 89.3% (p<0.01); and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), 57.7% (p<0.01); and decreased janus kinase 2 (JAK2), 44.4% (p<0.001); suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), 86.6% (p<0.001); signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), 46.8% (p<0.01); tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), 51.1% (p<0.001); prostaglandin E synthase (PTGES), 96.5% (p<0.001); tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), 47% (p<0.01); and secretin, 55.4% (p<0.001). Only GABRD, 76.6% (p<0.01) and SCT, 64.9% (p<0.01) were up-regulated in the hypothalamic ARC-ME of rats with ICV leptin injections. VMH injections of leptin induced identical reductions in expression levels of CART, SOCS3, PTGES, and TNF-alpha in both VMH areas; except TH mRNA, whose expression was lowered ipsilaterally. Food intake, body and fat pad weights and serum insulin and leptin were also decreased in rats given leptin through VMH. This study suggests that leptin either unilateral exposure through VMH or bilateral exposure through ICV injections induces divergent ARC-ME gene profiles.

  4. PS injection area

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    Looking against the direction of protons in the main ring (left): the beam coming from the linac 1 either goes to the booster (on the right) or is deflected towards the PS to be directly injected into section 26 (facing the camera). Also shown the start of the TT2 line, ejected from straight section 16 to go towards the ISR passing over the beam line from the linac. (see Photo Archive 7409009)

  5. Peripheral injection of ghrelin induces Fos expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus in rats

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    Kobelt, Peter; Wisser, Anna-Sophia; Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Inhoff, Tobias; Noetzel, Steffen; Veh, Rüdiger W.; Bannert, Norbert; van der Voort, Ivo; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Klapp, Burghard F.; Taché, Yvette; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2009-01-01

    Peripheral ghrelin has been shown to act as a gut–brain peptide exerting a potent orexigenic effect on food intake. The dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) is innervated by projections from other brain areas being part of the network of nuclei controlling energy homeostasis, among others NPY/AgRP-positive fibers arising from the arcuate nucleus (ARC). The aim of the study was to determine if peripherally administered ghrelin affects neuronal activity in the DMH, as assessed by Fos expression. The number of Fos positive neurons was determined in the DMH, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), ARC, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and in the area postrema(AP) in non-fasted Sprague–Dawley rats in response to intraperitoneally (ip) injected ghrelin (3 nmol/rat) or vehicle (0.15 M NaCl). Peripheral ghrelin induced a significant increase in the number of Fos-ir positive neurons/section compared with vehicle in the ARC (mean±SEM: 49±2 vs. 23±2 neurons/section, p=0.001), PVN (69±5 vs. 34±3, p=0.001), and DMH (142±5 vs. 83±5, p<0.001). Fos-ir positive neurons were mainly localized within the ventral part of the DMH. No change in Fos expression was observed in the VMH (53±8 vs. 48±6, p=0.581), NTS (42±2 vs.40±3, p=0.603), and in the AP (7±1 vs. 5±1, p=0.096). Additional double-labelling with anti-Fos and anti-AgRP revealed that Fos positive neurons in the DMH were encircled by a network of AgRP-ir positive fibers. These data indicate that peripheral ghrelin activates DMH neurons and that NPY-/AgRP-positive fibers may be involved in the response. PMID:18329635

  6. Brainstem projections of neurons located in various subdivisions of the dorsolateral hypothalamic area – an anterograde tract-tracing study

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    Rege Sugárka Papp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The projections from the dorsolateral hypothalamic area (DLH to the lower brainstem have been investigated by using biotinylated dextran amine (BDA, an anterograde tracer in rats. The DLH can be divided into 3 areas (dorsomedial hypothalamus, perifornical area, lateral hypothalamic area, and further subdivided into 8 subdivisions. After unilateral stereotaxic injections of BDA into individual DLH subdivisions, the correct sites of injections were controlled histologically, and the distribution patterns of BDA-positive fibers were mapped on serial sections between the hypothalamus and spinal cord in 22 rats. BDA-labeled fibers were observable over 100 different brainstem areas, nuclei or subdivisions. Injections into the 8 DLH subdivisions established distinct topographical patterns. In general, the density of labeled fibers was low in the lower brainstem. High density of fibers was seen only 4 of the 116 areas: in the lateral and ventrolateral parts of the periaqueductal gray, the Barrington’s and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei. All of the biogenic amine cell groups in the lower brainstem (9 noradrenaline, 3 adrenaline and 9 serotonin cell groups received labeled fibers, some of them from all, or at least 7 DLH subdivisions, mainly from perifornical and ventral lateral hypothalamic neurons. Some of the tegmental nuclei and nuclei of the reticular formation were widely innervated, although the density of the BDA-labeled fibers was generally low. No definitive descending BDA-positive pathway, but long-run solitaire BDA-labeled fibers were seen in the lower brainstem. These descending fibers joined some of the large tracts or fasciculi in the brainstem. The distribution pattern of BDA-positive fibers of DLH origin throughout the lower brainstem was comparable to patterns of previously published orexin- or melanin-concentrating hormone-immunoreactive fibers with somewhat differences.

  7. Intracisternally Injected L-Proline Activates Hypothalamic Supraoptic, but Not Paraventricular, Vasopressin-Expressing Neurons in Conscious Rats

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    Yumi Takemoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When injected into specific rat brain regions, the neurotransmitter candidate L-proline produces various cardiovascular changes through ionotropic excitatory amino acid receptors. The present study used an immunohistochemical double-labeling approach to determine whether intracisternally injected L-proline in freely moving rats, which increases blood pressure, activates hypothalamic vasopressin-expressing neurons and ventral medullary tyrosine-hydroxylase- (TH- containing neurons. Following injection of L-proline, the number of activated hypothalamic neurons that coexpressed vasopressin and c-Fos was much greater in the supraoptic nucleus (SON than in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN of rats with increased blood pressure. The number of activated TH-containing neurons was significantly greater following L-proline treatment than following control injections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF. These results clearly demonstrate that intracisternally injected L-proline activates hypothalamic supraoptic, but not paraventricular, vasopressin-expressing neurons and medullary TH-containing (A1/C1 neurons in freely moving rats.

  8. Regional haemodynamic effects of carbachol injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

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    Bachelard, H; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1994-06-01

    Carbachol was injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of conscious, unrestrained Long Evans rats, chronically instrumented with intravascular catheters and pulsed Doppler probes to assess changes in regional haemodynamics. Bilateral microinjections of carbachol (1 ng-1 microgram) produced increases in blood pressure, bradycardias and vasoconstrictions in renal, superior mesenteric and hindquarters vascular beds. In the presence of phentolamine, the bradycardic and hindquarters vasoconstrictor responses to carbachol were unchanged while the pressor response was smaller due to a reduction in the renal and the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction. In the presence of propranolol, the bradycardic response was reduced, but the pressor and renal vasoconstrictor responses were potentiated, whereas the superior mesenteric and hindquarter vasoconstrictions were not changed significantly. In the presence of phentolamine and propranolol, the heart rate and pressor responses, as well as the renal vasoconstriction, were unchanged, whereas the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction was reduced and the hindquarters vasoconstriction was potentiated. Together these results are consistent with an involvement of the sympathoadrenal system in the pressor response to carbachol injected into the PVN of untreated animals. They indicate that alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the superior mesenteric vascular bed is a particularly important component in that regard. In the presence of the vasopressin antagonist, d(CH2)5(Tyr(Et))DAVP, alone or in combination with phentolamine and propranolol, the pressor response to carbachol was substantially reduced, while the renal and superior mesenteric vasoconstrictor effects were completely abolished; the bradycardia was not significantly affected by this treatment. These results indicate an important involvement of vasopressin in the cardiovascular responses to carbachol injected into the PVN of untreated animals

  9. Distinct effects of leptin and a melanocortin receptor agonist injected into medial hypothalamic nuclei on glucose uptake in peripheral tissues.

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    Toda, Chitoku; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Lee, Suni; Yamato-Esaki, Maya; Fujino, Yusuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Okamoto, Shiki; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko

    2009-12-01

    The medial hypothalamus mediates leptin-induced glucose uptake in peripheral tissues, and brain melanocortin receptors (MCRs) mediate certain central effects of leptin. However, the contributions of the leptin receptor and MCRs in individual medial hypothalamic nuclei to regulation of peripheral glucose uptake have remained unclear. We examined the effects of an injection of leptin and the MCR agonist MT-II into medial hypothalamic nuclei on glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Leptin or MT-II was injected into the ventromedial (VMH), dorsomedial (DMH), arcuate nucleus (ARC), or paraventricular (PVH) hypothalamus or the lateral ventricle (intracerebroventricularly) in freely moving mice. The MCR antagonist SHU9119 was injected intracerebroventricularly. Glucose uptake was measured by the 2-[(3)H]deoxy-d-glucose method. Leptin injection into the VMH increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and heart, whereas that into the ARC increased glucose uptake in BAT, and that into the DMH or PVH had no effect. SHU9119 abolished these effects of leptin injected into the VMH. Injection of MT-II either into the VMH or intracerebroventricularly increased glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, BAT, and heart, whereas that into the PVH increased glucose uptake in BAT, and that into the DMH or ARC had no effect. The VMH mediates leptin- and MT-II-induced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, BAT, and heart. These effects of leptin are dependent on MCR activation. The leptin receptor in the ARC and MCR in the PVH regulate glucose uptake in BAT. Medial hypothalamic nuclei thus play distinct roles in leptin- and MT-II-induced glucose uptake in peripheral tissues.

  10. Lateral Hypothalamic Control of the Ventral Tegmental Area: Reward Evaluation and the Driving of Motivated Behavior.

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    Tyree, Susan M; de Lecea, Luis

    2017-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) plays an important role in many motivated behaviors, sleep-wake states, food intake, drug-seeking, energy balance, etc. It is also home to a heterogeneous population of neurons that express and co-express multiple neuropeptides including hypocretin (Hcrt), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) and neurotensin (NT). These neurons project widely throughout the brain to areas such as the locus coeruleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Lateral hypothalamic projections to the VTA are believed to be important for driving behavior due to the involvement of dopaminergic reward circuitry. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge regarding the lateral hypothalamic connections to the VTA and the role they play in driving these behaviors.

  11. Lateral Hypothalamic Control of the Ventral Tegmental Area: Reward Evaluation and the Driving of Motivated Behavior

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    Susan M. Tyree

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The lateral hypothalamus (LH plays an important role in many motivated behaviors, sleep-wake states, food intake, drug-seeking, energy balance, etc. It is also home to a heterogeneous population of neurons that express and co-express multiple neuropeptides including hypocretin (Hcrt, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART and neurotensin (NT. These neurons project widely throughout the brain to areas such as the locus coeruleus, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the amygdala and the ventral tegmental area (VTA. Lateral hypothalamic projections to the VTA are believed to be important for driving behavior due to the involvement of dopaminergic reward circuitry. The purpose of this article is to review current knowledge regarding the lateral hypothalamic connections to the VTA and the role they play in driving these behaviors.

  12. The obesity-associated gene Negr1 regulates aspects of energy balance in rat hypothalamic areas.

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    Boender, Arjen J; van Gestel, Margriet A; Garner, Keith M; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Adan, Roger A H

    2014-07-01

    Neural growth regulator 1 (Negr1) is among the first common variants that have been associated with the regulation of body mass index. Using AAV technology directed to manipulate Negr1 expression in vivo, we find that decreased expression of Negr1 in periventricular hypothalamic areas leads to increases in body weight, presumably via increased food intake. Moreover, we observed that both increased and decreased levels of Negr1 lead to reduced locomotor activity and body temperature. In sum, our results provide further support for a role of hypothalamic expressed Negr1 in the regulation of energy balance. © 2014 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  13. Connections of the juxtaventromedial region of the lateral hypothalamic area in the male rat.

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    Joel D Hahn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary conservation of the hypothalamus attests to its critical role in the control of fundamental behaviors. However, our knowledge of hypothalamic connections is incomplete, particularly for the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA. Here we present the results of neuronal pathway-tracing experiments to investigate connections of the LHA juxtaventromedial region, which is parceled into dorsal (LHAjvd and ventral (LHAjvv zones. Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL, for outputs and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB, for inputs coinjections were targeted stereotaxically to the LHAjvd/v. RESULTS: LHAjvd/v connections overlapped highly but not uniformly. Major joint outputs included: Bed nuc. stria terminalis (BST, interfascicular nuc. (BSTif and BST anteromedial area, rostral lateral septal (LSr- and ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH nuc., and periaqueductal gray. Prominent joint LHAjvd/v input sources included: BSTif, BST principal nuc., LSr, VMH, anterior hypothalamic-, ventral premammillary-, and medial amygdalar nuc., and hippocampal formation (HPF field CA1. However, LHAjvd HPF retrograde labeling was markedly more abundant than from the LHAjvv; in the LSr this was reversed. Furthermore, robust LHAjvv (but not LHAjvd targets included posterior- and basomedial amygdalar nuc., whereas the midbrain reticular nuc. received a dense input from the LHAjvd alone. Our analyses indicate the existence of about 500 LHAjvd and LHAjvv connections with about 200 distinct regions of the cerebral cortex, cerebral nuclei, and cerebrospinal trunk. Several highly LHAjvd/v-connected regions have a prominent role in reproductive behavior. These findings contrast with those from our previous pathway-tracing studies of other LHA medial and perifornical tier regions, with different connectional behavioral relations. The emerging picture is of a highly differentiated LHA with extensive and far-reaching connections that point to a role as a central coordinator of behavioral

  14. Feed intake of gilts following intracerebroventicular injection of the novel hypothalamic RFamide (RFa) neuropeptide, 26RFa

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    RFamide (RFa) peptides have been implicated in a broad spectrum of biological processes including energy expenditure and feed intake. 26RFa is a recently discovered hypothalamic neuropeptide that altered the release of pituitary hormones and stimulated feed intake via a NPY-specific mechanism in rat...

  15. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

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    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats.

  16. Regional haemodynamic effects of noradrenaline injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats: possible mechanisms of action.

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    Bachelard, H; Harland, D; Gardiner, S M; Kemp, P A; Bennett, T

    1992-01-01

    The cardiovascular effects of noradrenaline bilaterally injected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Long-Evans rats and homozygous, vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. In Long-Evans rats, incremental doses of noradrenaline (0.01-10 nmol) caused dose-related increases in blood pressure and a substantial, dose-related, superior mesenteric vasoconstriction. These changes were accompanied by bradycardia and reductions in renal and hind-quarter vascular conductances. In Brattleboro rats, noradrenaline (10 nmol) had no effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or renal or superior mesenteric vascular conductances. However, there was a slight vasodilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters. In Long-Evans rats, intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine had no effect on the bradycardia but partly inhibited the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. These effects were associated with a smaller superior mesenteric vasoconstriction and an abolition of the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters. Combined intravenous pretreatment with phentolamine and propranolol had no effect on the heart rate or pressor responses to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei, but reduced the superior mesenteric vasoconstriction, potentiated the vasoconstriction in the hindquarters and eliminated the renal vasoconstriction. These results suggest that, in untreated Long-Evans rats, alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated constriction in the mesenteric vascular bed and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated dilatation in the vascular bed of the hindquarters have important influences on the pressor response to noradrenaline injected into the paraventricular nuclei. In the presence of the vasopressin V1-receptor antagonist, d(CH2)5[Tyr(Et)]DAVP, the pressor and heart rate responses to noradrenaline injected into the

  17. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Suppression and Iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome as a Complication of Epidural Steroid Injections

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    Joyce Leary

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidural steroid injections are well accepted as a treatment for radicular back pain in appropriate candidates. While overall incidence of systemic side effects has not been well established, at least five biochemically proven cases of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome have been reported as complications of epidural steroid treatment. We present an additional case of iatrogenic Cushing's Syndrome and adrenal suppression in a middle-aged woman who received three epidural steroid injections over a four-month period. We review this case in the context of previous cases and discuss diagnostic and management issues.

  18. Neuroanatomy of melanocortin-4 receptor pathway in the lateral hypothalamic area.

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    Cui, Huxing; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Gautron, Laurent; Funahashi, Hisayuki; Williams, Kevin W; Elmquist, Joel K; Lutter, Michael

    2012-12-15

    The central melanocortin system regulates body energy homeostasis including the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R). The lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) receives dense melanocortinergic inputs from the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and regulates multiple processes including food intake, reward behaviors, and autonomic function. By using a mouse line in which green fluorescent protein (GFP) is expressed under control of the MC4R gene promoter, we systemically investigated MC4R signaling in the LHA by combining double immunohistochemistry, electrophysiology, and retrograde tracing techniques. We found that LHA MC4R-GFP neurons coexpress neurotensin as well as the leptin receptor but do not coexpress other peptide neurotransmitters found in the LHA including orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, and nesfatin-1. Furthermore, electrophysiological recording demonstrated that leptin, but not the MC4R agonist melanotan II, hyperpolarizes the majority of LHA MC4R-GFP neurons in an ATP- sensitive potassium channel-dependent manner. Retrograde tracing revealed that LHA MC4R-GFP neurons do not project to the ventral tegmental area, dorsal raphe nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and spinal cord, and only limited number of neurons project to the nucleus of the solitary tract and parabrachial nucleus. Our findings provide new insights into MC4R signaling in the LHA and its potential implications in homeostatic regulation of body energy balance.

  19. Recruitment of hypothalamic orexin neurons after formalin injections in adult male rats exposed to a neonatal immune challenge

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    Erin Jane Campbell

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to early life physiological stressors, such as infection, is thought to contribute to the onset of psychopathology in adulthood. In animal models, injections of the bacterial immune challenge, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, during the neonatal period has been shown to alter both neuroendocrine function and behavioural pain responses in adulthood. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests a role for the lateral hypothalamic peptide orexin in stress and nociceptive processing. However, whether neonatal LPS exposure affects the reactivity of the orexin system to formalin-induced inflammatory pain in later life remains to be determined. Male Wistar rats (n=13 were exposed to either LPS or saline (0.05mg/kg, i.p on postnatal days (PND 3 and 5. On PND 80-97, all rats were exposed to a subcutaneous hindpaw injection of 2.25% formalin. Following behavioural testing, animals were perfused and brains processed for Fos-protein and orexin immunohistochemistry. Rats treated with LPS during the neonatal period exhibited decreased licking behaviours during the interphase of the formalin test, the period typically associated with the active inhibition of pain, and increased grooming responses to formalin in adulthood. Interestingly, these behavioural changes were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of Fos-positive orexin cells in the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamus in LPS-exposed animals. Similar increases in Fos-protein were also observed in stress and pain sensitive brain regions that receive orexinergic inputs. These findings highlight a potential role for orexin in the behavioural responses to pain and provide further evidence that early life stress can prime the circuitry responsible for these responses in adulthood.

  20. To Ingest or Rest? Specialized Roles of Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurons in Coordinating Energy Balance

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    Juliette A. Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH or orexins/hypocretins (OX are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders.

  1. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

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    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  2. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) can reverse AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and S6 kinase (P70S6K) activities induced by fluctuations in glucose levels in hypothalamic areas involved in feeding behaviour.

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    Hurtado-Carneiro, Verónica; Sanz, Carmen; Roncero, Isabel; Vazquez, Patricia; Blazquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2012-04-01

    The anorexigenic peptide, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), reduces glucose metabolism in the human hypothalamus and brain stem. The brain activity of metabolic sensors such as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) responds to changes in glucose levels. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target, p70S6 kinase (p70S6K), integrate nutrient and hormonal signals. The hypothalamic mTOR/p70S6K pathway has been implicated in the control of feeding and the regulation of energy balances. Therefore, we investigated the coordinated effects of glucose and GLP-1 on the expression and activity of AMPK and p70S6K in the areas involved in the control of feeding. The effect of GLP-1 on the expression and activities of AMPK and p70S6K was studied in hypothalamic slice explants exposed to low- and high-glucose concentrations by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and by the quantification of active-phosphorylated protein levels by immunoblot. In vivo, the effects of exendin-4 on hypothalamic AMPK and p70S6K activation were analysed in male obese Zucker and lean controls 1 h after exendin-4 injection to rats fasted for 48 h or after re-feeding for 2-4 h. High-glucose levels decreased the expression of Ampk in the lateral hypothalamus and treatment with GLP-1 reversed this effect. GLP-1 treatment inhibited the activities of AMPK and p70S6K when the activation of these protein kinases was maximum in both the ventromedial and lateral hypothalamic areas. Furthermore, in vivo s.c. administration of exendin-4 modulated AMPK and p70S6K activities in those areas, in both fasted and re-fed obese Zucker and lean control rats.

  3. Hypothalamic dysfunction

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    ... common causes of hypothalamic dysfunction are surgery, traumatic brain injury, tumors, and radiation. Other causes include: Anorexia nervosa or bulimia Bleeding Genetic disorders that cause iron ...

  4. Opposing roles of the nucleus accumbens and anterior lateral hypothalamic area in the control of sexual behaviour in the male rat.

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    Kippin, Tod E; Sotiropoulos, Veneta; Badih, Julia; Pfaus, James G

    2004-02-01

    Opposing roles have been implicated for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and anterior portion of the lateral hypothalamic area (aLHA) in the regulation of sexual behaviour in male rats based on in vivo neurochemical correlates. The present study provides functional evidence supporting this hypothesis by examining the effects of lesions to these structures on copulation, noncontact erection and receptive female preference. Sexually naïve male Long-Evans rats received either bilateral 1.0- micro L injections of NMDA (10 micro g/ micro L/side) or vehicle (shams) into either the aLHA or the NAc. During repeated tests of copulation most of the sham-lesioned males, but few of the aLHA-lesioned and NAc-lesioned males, copulated to ejaculation. Most of the NAc-lesioned males also failed to intromit, whereas the majority of the aLHA-lesioned males intromitted repeatedly. During exposure to an inaccessible receptive female behind a wire-mesh screen, aLHA-lesioned males displayed facilitation of noncontact erections, whereas NAc-lesioned males displayed impaired noncontact erections. Conversely, during simultaneous exposure to inaccessible receptive and nonreceptive females in different compartments, all males spent more time in the proximity of the receptive female. These findings indicate that the aLHA plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of sexual arousal and an excitatory role in the regulation of ejaculation. Conversely, the NAc plays an excitatory role in the regulation in sexual arousal.

  5. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  6. Lateral hypothalamic area orexin-A influence the firing activity of gastric distension-sensitive neurons and gastric motility in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Heling; Luan, Xiao; Guo, Feifei; Sun, Xiangrong; Gong, Yanling; Xu, Luo

    2016-06-01

    The orexins system consists of two G-protein coupled receptors (the orexin-1 and the orexin-2 receptor) and two neuropeptides, orexin-A and orexin-B. Orexin-A is an excitatory neuropeptide that regulates arousal, wakefulness and appetite. Recent studies have shown that orexin-A may promote gastric motility. We aim to explore the effects of orexin-A on the gastric -distension (GD) sensitive neurons and gastric motility in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), and the possible regulation by the paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Extracellular single unit discharges were recorded and the gastric motility was monitored by administration of orexin-A into the LHA and electrical stimulation of the PVN. There were GD neurons in the LHA, and administration of orexin-A to the LHA could increase the firing rate of both GD-excitatory (GD-E) and GD-inhibited (GD-I) neurons. The gastric motility was significantly enhanced by injection of orexin-A into the LHA with a dose dependent manner, which could be completely abolished by pre-treatment with orexin-A receptor antagonist SB334867. Electrical stimulation of the PVN could significantly increase the firing rate of GD neurons responsive to orexin-A in the LHA as well as promote gastric motility of rats. However, those effects could be partly blocked by pre-treatment with SB334867 in the LHA. It is suggested that orexin-A plays an important role in promoting gastric motility via LHA. The PVN may be involved in regulation of LHA on gastric motility.

  7. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  8. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  9. Effects of ghrelin on Kisspeptin mRNA expression in the hypothalamic medial preoptic area and pulsatile luteinising hormone secretion in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Sarah; Li, Xiao Feng; Kinsey-Jones, James; O'Byrne, Kevin

    2009-08-28

    The orexigenic gut peptide ghrelin negatively modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Hyperghrelinaemia results during negative energy balance, a state often associated with delayed puberty and disrupted fertility, whilst exogenous ghrelin suppresses pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion. The recent identification of kisspeptin (Kiss1) and its G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)54 (Kiss1r) as an essential component of the HPG axis controlling gonadotrophin secretion raises the possibility that kisspeptin-Kiss1r signalling may play a critical role in the transduction of ghrelin-induced suppression of LH. Ovariectomised oestrogen-replaced rats were implanted with intravenous catheters and blood samples collected for detection of LH pulses prior to and after intravenous administration of ghrelin (3nM/250 microl) or saline (250 microl) during ad libitum feeding or after overnight fasting. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to determine Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA levels in brain punches of the key hypothalamic sites regulating gonadotrophin secretion, the medial preoptic area (mPOA) and arcuate nucleus (ARC), collected 6h following administration of ghrelin. Ghrelin significantly lowered LH pulse frequency in fed rats, an effect significantly enhanced by food deprivation. Fasting, ghrelin or their combination down-regulated Kiss1, without affecting Kiss1r, expression in the mPOA, and affected the expression of neither in the ARC. Considering the pivotal role for kisspeptin signalling in the activation of the HPG axis, the ability of ghrelin to down-regulate Kiss1 expression in mPOA may be a contributing factor in ghrelin-related suppression of pulsatile LH secretion.

  10. Stabilization of class-B broad-area lasers emission by external optical injection

    CERN Document Server

    Pakhomov, A V

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically examine the effect of external optical injection on the spatio-temporal dynamics of class-B broad-area lasers. We demonstrate that optical injection can efficiently stabilize the intrinsic transverse instabilities in such lasers associated with both the boundaries of the pumping area and with the bulk nonlinearities of the active medium. Stabilizing action of optical injection is shown to be closely related to the suppression of inherent relaxation oscillations behavior.

  11. Intraperitoneal injection of neuropeptide Y (NPY) alters neurotrophin rat hypothalamic levels: Implications for NPY potential role in stress-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfo, Francesca; De Bartolo, Paola; Tirassa, Paola; Croce, Nicoletta; Caltagirone, Carlo; Petrosini, Laura; Angelucci, Francesco

    2011-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36-amino acid peptide which exerts several regulatory actions within peripheral and central nervous systems. Among NPY actions preclinical and clinical data have suggested that the anxiolytic and antidepressant actions of NPY may be related to its antagonist action on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are proteins involved in the growth, survival and function of neurons. In addition to this, a possible role of neurotrophins, particularly BDNF, in HPA axis hyperactivation has been proposed. To characterize the effect of NPY on the production of neurotrophins in the hypothalamus we exposed young adult rats to NPY intraperitoneal administration for three consecutive days and then evaluated BDNF and NGF synthesis in this brain region. We found that NPY treatment decreased BDNF and increased NGF production in the hypothalamus. Given the role of neurotrophins in the hypothalamus, these findings, although preliminary, provide evidence for a role of NPY as inhibitor of HPA axis and support the idea that NPY might be involved in pathologies characterized by HPA axis dysfunctions.

  12. Characterization of Solids Collected from H-Area Injection Wells and Injection Tank Chemistry from both F- and H-Area Water Treatment Units (WTUs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-04-15

    This study suggests that a strong poitential exists for both chemical and biological fouling of the injection wells at the F- and H Area remediation systems. To further the potential, an evaluation of WTU process chemistry, characterization of the natural groundwater geochemistry, and analysis of microbiological activity should be performed. This report summarizes the results.

  13. A study of earthquakes induced by water injection in the Changning salt mine area, SW China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Yang, Pengtao; Zhang, Zhiwei

    2017-04-01

    The features of earthquakes induced by water injection in the Changning salt mine area of China were analyzed using the pore pressure diffusion method. The relationships between maximum magnitude, cumulative seismic moment, and cumulative water loss volume were investigated. Results show that increased seismic activities near the Changning salt mine in recent years are closely related to water injection during salt mining. High-pressure water injection over a long period of time caused water to diffuse into rock cracks, which increased pore pressure on faults and induced ruptures. Injection-induced earthquakes were located below the injection sites, mainly aligned NW-SE, with most occurring southeast of the mine area. Such a distribution indicates that seismic activities were affected by anticline structures in the Changning area. Based on pore pressure diffusion considerations, the diffusion coefficient was estimated to be ∼0.15 m2/s, with a slightly lower value west of the injection site than to the east. A semi-logarithmic linear relationship was found between cumulative seismic moment and cumulative water loss volume, while maximum magnitude increased with increasing volume of cumulative water loss. This study may provide reference material for analysis of injection-induced earthquakes and evaluation of the danger of earthquakes induced by water injection.

  14. Lateral hypothalamic area deep brain stimulation for refractory obesity: a pilot study with preliminary data on safety, body weight, and energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Donald M; Tomycz, Nestor D; Bailes, Julian; de Jonge, Lilian; Lecoultre, Virgile; Wilent, Bryan; Alcindor, Dunbar; Prostko, E Richard; Cheng, Boyle C; Angle, Cynthia; Cantella, Diane; Whiting, Benjamin B; Mizes, J Scott; Finnis, Kirk W; Ravussin, Eric; Oh, Michael Y

    2013-07-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) has been suggested as a potential treatment for intractable obesity. The authors present the 2-year safety results as well as early efficacy and metabolic effects in 3 patients undergoing bilateral LHA DBS in the first study of this approach in humans. Three patients meeting strict criteria for intractable obesity, including failed bariatric surgery, underwent bilateral implantation of LHA DBS electrodes as part of an institutional review board- and FDA-approved pilot study. The primary focus of the study was safety; however, the authors also received approval to collect data on early efficacy including weight change and energy metabolism. No serious adverse effects, including detrimental psychological consequences, were observed with continuous LHA DBS after a mean follow-up of 35 months (range 30-39 months). Three-dimensional nonlinear transformation of postoperative imaging superimposed onto brain atlas anatomy was used to confirm and study DBS contact proximity to the LHA. No significant weight loss trends were seen when DBS was programmed using standard settings derived from movement disorder DBS surgery. However, promising weight loss trends have been observed when monopolar DBS stimulation has been applied via specific contacts found to increase the resting metabolic rate measured in a respiratory chamber. Deep brain stimulation of the LHA may be applied safely to humans with intractable obesity. Early evidence for some weight loss under metabolically optimized settings provides the first "proof of principle" for this novel antiobesity strategy. A larger follow-up study focused on efficacy along with a more rigorous metabolic analysis is planned to further explore the benefits and therapeutic mechanism behind this investigational therapy.

  15. Moxonidine and rilmenidine injected into the medial septal area reduces the salivation induced by pilocarpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Wilson Abrão; de Arruda Camargo, Luis Antonio; Simões, Silvio; Saad, William Abrão; Guarda, Renata Saad; Guarda, Ismael Francisco Mota Siqueira

    2004-05-31

    We determined the effects of moxonidine and rilmenidine 20 nmol (alpha(2)-adrenergic and imidazoline receptor agonists) injected into the medial septal area (MSA) on the pilocarpine-induced salivation, when injected intraperitoneally (i.p.), of male Holtzman rats weighing 250-300 g, with stainless-steel cannula implanted into the MSA. The rats were anesthetized with zoletil 50 mg kg(-1) b.wt. (tiletamine chloridrate 125.0 mg and zolazepan chloridrate 125.0 mg) into quadriceps muscle intramuscularly (IM), saliva was collected using pre-weighed small cotton balls inserted in the animal's mouth. The pre-treatment with moxonidine injected into the MSA reduced the salivation induced by pilocarpine (1 mg kg(-1)) injected i.p. (12+/-3 mg min(-1)) vs. control (99+/-9 mg min(-1)). The pre-treatment with rilmenidine 40 nmol also reduced the salivation induce by pilocarpine injected i.p. (20+/-5 mg min(-1)) vs. control (94+/-7 mg min(-1)). Idazoxan 40 nmol (imidazoline receptor antagonist) injected into the MSA previous to moxonidine and rilmenidine partially blocked the effect of moxonidine and totally blocked the rilmenidine effect in pilocarpine-induced salivation injected i.p. (60+/-8 and 95+/-10 mg min(-1), respectively). Yohimbine 40 nmol (alpha(2)-adrenergic receptor antagonist) injected into the MSA previously to moxonidine and rilmenidine partially blocked the moxonidine effect but produced no change on the rilmenidine effect on i.p. pilocarpine-induced salivation (70+/-6 and 24+/-6 mg min(-1), respectively). Injection of these alpha(2)-adrenergic and imidazoline agonists and antagonists agents i.p. produced no change on i.p. pilocarpine-induced salivation. These results show that central, but not peripheral, injection of alpha(2)-adrenergic and imidazoline agonists' agents inhibit pilocarpine-induced salivation. Idazoxan, an imidazoline receptor antagonist, totally inhibits the rilmenidine effect and partially inhibits the moxonidine effect on pilocarpine

  16. Radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering using seasonally varying injection areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Anton; Korhonen, Hannele; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Kokkola, Harri

    2017-06-01

    Stratospheric sulfur injections have often been suggested as a cost-effective geoengineering method to prevent or slow down global warming. In geoengineering studies, these injections are commonly targeted to the Equator, where the yearly mean intensity of the solar radiation is the highest and from where the aerosols disperse globally due to the Brewer-Dobson Circulation. However, compensating for greenhouse gas-induced zonal warming by reducing solar radiation would require a relatively larger radiative forcing to the mid- and high latitudes and a lower forcing to the low latitudes than what is achieved by continuous equatorial injections. In this study we employ alternative aerosol injection scenarios to investigate if the resulting radiative forcing can be targeted to be zonally more uniform without decreasing the global the mean radiative forcing of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering. We used a global aerosol-climate model together with an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur injection scenarios with different injection areas. According to our simulations, varying the SO2 injection area seasonally would result in a similar global mean cooling effect as injecting SO2 to the Equator, but with a more uniform zonal distribution of shortwave radiative forcing. Compared to the case of equatorial injections, in the seasonally varying injection scenario where the maximum sulfur production from injected SO2 followed the maximum of solar radiation, the shortwave radiative forcing decreased by 27 % over the Equator (the latitudes between 20° N and 20° S) and increased by 15 % over higher latitudes. Compared to the continuous injections to the Equator, in summer months the radiative forcing was increased by 17 and 14 % and in winter months decreased by 14 and 16 % in Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively. However, these forcings do not translate into as large changes in temperatures. The changes in forcing

  17. Radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering using seasonally varying injection areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Laakso

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric sulfur injections have often been suggested as a cost-effective geoengineering method to prevent or slow down global warming. In geoengineering studies, these injections are commonly targeted to the Equator, where the yearly mean intensity of the solar radiation is the highest and from where the aerosols disperse globally due to the Brewer–Dobson Circulation. However, compensating for greenhouse gas-induced zonal warming by reducing solar radiation would require a relatively larger radiative forcing to the mid- and high latitudes and a lower forcing to the low latitudes than what is achieved by continuous equatorial injections. In this study we employ alternative aerosol injection scenarios to investigate if the resulting radiative forcing can be targeted to be zonally more uniform without decreasing the global the mean radiative forcing of stratospheric sulfur geoengineering. We used a global aerosol–climate model together with an Earth system model to study the radiative and climate effects of stratospheric sulfur injection scenarios with different injection areas. According to our simulations, varying the SO2 injection area seasonally would result in a similar global mean cooling effect as injecting SO2 to the Equator, but with a more uniform zonal distribution of shortwave radiative forcing. Compared to the case of equatorial injections, in the seasonally varying injection scenario where the maximum sulfur production from injected SO2 followed the maximum of solar radiation, the shortwave radiative forcing decreased by 27 % over the Equator (the latitudes between 20° N and 20° S and increased by 15 % over higher latitudes. Compared to the continuous injections to the Equator, in summer months the radiative forcing was increased by 17 and 14 % and in winter months decreased by 14 and 16 % in Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively. However, these forcings do not translate into as large changes in

  18. Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2007-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

  19. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Silvia; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L; Núñez, Angel; Garzón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins), mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus (contributing to wakefulness) and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) nucleus (contributing to REM sleep). Anatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC, and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  20. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eNunez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins, mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC nucleus (contributing to wakefulness and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO nucleus (contributing to REM sleepAnatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  1. Experimentally Measured Interfacial Area during Gas Injection into Saturated Porous Media: An Air Sparging Analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane H., Bromhal, Grant

    2010-01-01

    The amount of interfacial area (awn) between air and subsurface liquids during air-sparging can limit the rate of site remediation. Lateral movement within porous media could be encountered during air-sparging operations when air moves along the bottom of a low-permeability lens. This study was conducted to directly measure the amount of awn between air and water flowing within a bench-scale porous flow cell during the lateral movement of air along the upper edge of the cell during air injections into an initially water-saturated flow cell. Four different cell orientations were used to evaluate the effect of air injection rates and porous media geometries on the amount of awn between fluids. Air was injected at flow rates that varied by three orders of magnitude, and for each flow cellover this range of injection rates little change in awn was noted. A wider variation in awn was observed when air moved through different regions for the different flow cell orientations. These results are in good agreement with the experimental findings of Waduge et al. (2007), who performed experiments in a larger sand-pack flow cell, and determined that air-sparging efficiency is nearly independent of flow rate but highly dependent on the porous structure. By directly measuring the awn, and showing that awn does not vary greatly with changes in injection rate, we show that the lack of improvement to remediation rates is because there is a weak dependence of the awn on the air injection rate.

  2. Bariatric surgery in hypothalamic obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eBingham

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Craniopharyngiomas (CP are epithelial neoplasms generally found in the area of the pituitary and hypothalamus. Despite benign histology, these tumors and/or their treatment often result in significant, debilitating disorders of endocrine, neurological, behavioral, and metabolic systems. Severe obesity is observed in a high percentage of patients with CP resulting in significant comorbidities and negatively impacting quality of life. Obesity occurs as a result of hypothalamic damage and disruption of normal homeostatic mechanisms regulating energy balance. Such pathological weight gain, termed hypothalamic obesity (HyOb, is often severe and refractory to therapy.Unfortunately, neither lifestyle intervention nor pharmacotherapy has proven truly effective in the treatment of CP-HyOb. Given the limited choices and poor results of these treatments, several groups have examined bariatric surgery as a treatment alternative for patients with CP-HyOb. While a large body of evidence exists supporting the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of exogenous obesity and its comorbidities, its role in the treatment of HyOb has yet to be well defined. To date, the existing literature on bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb is largely limited to case reports and series with short term follow-up. Here we review the current reports on the use of bariatric surgery in the treatment of CP-HyOb. We also compare these results to those reported for other populations of HyOb, including Prader-Willi Syndrome and patients with melanocortin signaling defects. While initial reports of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb are promising, their limited scope makes it difficult to draw any substantial conclusions as to the long term safety and efficacy of bariatric surgery in CP-HyOb. There continues to be a need for more robust, controlled, prospective trials with long term follow-up in order to better define the role of bariatric surgery in the treatment of all types of hypothalamic

  3. Interpretation and modeling of a subsurface injection test, 200 East Area, Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Lu, A.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-01

    A tracer experiment was conducted in 1980 and 1981 in the unsaturated zone in the southeast portion of the Hanford 200 East Area near the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility. The field design consisted of a central injection well with 32 monitoring wells within an 8-m radius. Water containing radioactive and other tracers was injected weekly during the experiment. The unique features of the experiment were the documented control of the inputs, the experiment`s three-dimensional nature, the in-situ measurement of radioactive tracers, and the use of multiple injections. The spacing of the test wells provided reasonable lag distribution for spatial correlation analysis. Preliminary analyses indicated spatial correlation on the order of 400 to 500 cm in the vertical direction. Previous researchers found that two-dimensional axisymmetric modeling of moisture content generally underpredicts lateral spreading and overpredicts vertical movement of the injected water. Incorporation of anisotropic hydraulic properties resulted in the best model predictions. Three-dimensional modeling incorporated the geologic heterogeneity of discontinuous layers and lenses of sediment apparent in the site geology. Model results were compared statistically with measured experimental data and indicate reasonably good agreement with vertical and lateral field moisture distributions.

  4. Suppression of tritium retention in remote areas of ITER by nonperturbative reactive gas injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F L; Ferreira, J A; Ramos, A; van Rooij, G; Westerhout, J; Al, R; Rapp, J; Drenik, A; Mozetic, M

    2010-10-22

    A technique based on reactive gas injection in the afterglow region of the divertor plasma is proposed for the suppression of tritium-carbon codeposits in remote areas of ITER when operated with carbon-based divertor targets. Experiments in a divertor simulator plasma device indicate that a 4  nm/min deposition can be suppressed by addition of 1  Pa·m³ s⁻¹ ammonia flow at 10 cm from the plasma. These results bolster the concept of nonperturbative scavenger injection for tritium inventory control in carbon-based fusion plasma devices, thus paving the way for ITER operation in the active phase under a carbon-dominated, plasma facing component background.

  5. Protecting Coastal Areas from Flooding by Injecting Solids into the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanovich, L. N.; Murdoch, L.

    2008-12-01

    Subsidence and sea level rise conspire to increase the risk of flooding in coastal cities throughout the world, and these processes were key contributors to the devastation of New Orleans by hurricane Katrina. Constructing levees and placing fill to raise ground elevations are currently the main options for reducing flooding risks in coastal areas, and both of these options have drawbacks. We suggest that hydromechanical injection of solid compounds suspended in liquid can be used to lift the ground surface and thereby expand the options for protecting such coastal cities as New Orleans, Venice, and Shanghai from flooding. These techniques are broadly related to hydraulic fracturing and compensation grouting, where solid compounds are injected as slurries and cause upward displacements at the ground surface. The equipment and logistics required for hydromechanical solid injection and ground lifting are readily available from current geotechnical and petroleum operations. Hydraulic fractures are routinely created in the upper tens of meters of sediments, where they are filled with a wide range of different proppants for environmental applications. At shallow depths, many of these fractures are sub-parallel to the ground surface and lift their overburden by a few mm to cm, although lifting is not the objective of these fractures. Much larger, vertical displacements, of the order of several meters, could be created in low-cohesion sediments over areas as large as square kilometers. This would be achieved as a result of multiple injections. Injecting solid particulates provides the benefits of a permanent displacement supported by the solids. We have demonstrated that hydraulic fractures will lift the ground surface at shallow depths in Texas near the Sabine River, where the geological setting is generally similar to that of New Orleans (and where, incidentally, hurricane Rita landed in 2005). In these regions, the soft surficial sediments are underlain by relatively

  6. In Situ Redox Manipulation Field Injection Test Report - Hanford 100-H Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fruchter, J.S.; Amonette, J.E.; Cole, C.R. [and others

    1996-11-01

    This report presents results of an In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) Field Injection Withdrawal Test performed at the 100-H Area of the US. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in Washington State in Fiscal Year 1996 by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The test is part of the overall ISRM project, the purpose of which is to determine the potential for remediating contaminated groundwater with a technology based on in situ manipulation of subsurface reduction-oxidation (redox) conditions. The ISRM technology would be used to treat subsurface contaminants in groundwater zones at DOE sites.

  7. RESEARCH ON DISTURBANCE PROPERTIES OF SUSPENSIONS NEAR THE INJECTION AREA OF MOVING JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The equation of the suspension-gas non-streamwise complexdisturbance velocity ratio near the injection area of moving jet was theoretically derived by using a phase-coupled model and stability theory.Then the ratio curves were obtained by the finite difference method based on the asymptotic method and the Euler conservative difference scheme.Analysis of the curves yielded conclusions on the disturbance properties of suspensions and effects of the natures of the flow-field and the properties of the suspensions on the suspensions' ability to track the disturbed gas flow are presented in this paper.

  8. Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Mauricio D; Thaler, Joshua P

    2015-10-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis are recently discovered mechanisms that may contribute to obesity pathogenesis. Current research in this area suggests that investigation of these central nervous system responses may provide opportunities to develop new weight loss treatments. In rodents, hypothalamic inflammation and gliosis occur rapidly with high-fat diet consumption prior to significant weight gain. In addition, sensitivity or resistance to diet-induced obesity in rodents generally correlates with the presence or absence of hypothalamic inflammation and reactive gliosis (brain response to injury). Moreover, functional interventions that increase or decrease inflammation in neurons and glia correspondingly alter diet-associated weight gain. However, some conflicting data have recently emerged that question the contribution of hypothalamic inflammation to obesity pathogenesis. Nevertheless, several studies have detected gliosis and disrupted connectivity in obese humans, highlighting the potential translational importance of this mechanism. There is growing evidence that obesity is associated with brain inflammation in humans, particularly in the hypothalamus where its presence may disrupt body weight control and glucose homeostasis. More work is needed to determine whether this response is common in human obesity and to what extent it can be manipulated for therapeutic benefit.

  9. Hypothalamic obesity in children: pathophysiology to clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Belma; Bereket, Abdullah

    2015-05-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a complex neuroendocrine disorder caused by damage to the hypothalamus, which results in disruption of energy regulation. The key hypothalamic areas of energy regulation are the ARC (arcuate nucleus), the VMH (ventromedial hypothalamus), the PVN (paraventriculer nuclei) and the LHA (lateral hypothalamic area). These pathways can be disrupted mechanically by hypothalamic tumors, neurosurgery, inflammatory disorders, radiotherapy and trauma or functionally as such seen in genetic diseases. Rapid weight gain and severe obesity are the most striking features of HyOb and caused by hyperphagia, reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR) and decreased physical activity. HyOb is usually unresponsive to diet and exercise. Although, GLP-1 and its anologs seem to be a new agent, there is still no curative treatment. Thus, prevention is of prime importance and the clinicians should be alert and vigilant in patients at risk for development of HyOb.

  10. Expansion of radiofrequency ablation volume by saturated NaCl saline injection in the area of vaporization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, A; Ishizaka, H; Awata, S; Shiraishi, A; Hirasawa, S; Tatezawa, T; Kano, M; Shimodaira, K; Taketomi-Takahashi, A; Tsushima, Y; Endo, K

    2009-01-01

    Vaporization around the radiofrequency (RF) electrode after RF application (RFA) limits the RF ablation area. To determine whether saturated saline injected into the area of vaporization after initial RFA extends ablation area after further RFA. RFA was performed in 18 ex vivo porcine livers and four in vivo rabbit erector spinae muscles. An RF electrode was used to ablate an area with 40W of parallel current for 15 min. The ablation margin was determined using a thermocouple, and the radius of the ablated area was measured. After RF electrode removal, saturated saline was infused through a percutaneous ethanol injection needle into the site of the original RFA in 11 liver samples and two erector spinae muscles. Three minutes later, RFA was resumed for 15 min. The remaining seven control liver samples and two spinae muscles received RFA without saline injection. The radius of the final ablated area was then measured. In the ex vivo study, injection of saturated saline significantly decreased tissue impedance (87.7+/-9.4 to 51.1+/-9.7 Omega, P+/-3.0 to 25.0+/-3.6 mm, Pvaporization around the RF electrode, followed by additional RFA, caused concentric expansion of the final ablation area, facilitating more efficient tumor ablation.

  11. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  12. Medical therapy of hypothalamic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werder, K. von; Mueller, O.A. (Muenchen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Medizinische Klinik 1)

    1985-01-01

    Hormonal disturbances caused by hypothalamic pathology can be treated effectively by target hormone replacement in the case of failure of glandotropic hormone secretion. Hyposomatotropism in children has to be substituted by parenteral administration of growth hormone. In addition gonadotropins respectively gonadotropin releasing factor have to be given in order to restore fertility in hypothalamic hypogonadism. Posterior pituitary failure can be adequately replaced by administration of analogues of antidiuretic hormone. Hypothalamic pathology causing hypersecretion of anterior pituitary hormones may also be accessable to medical treatment. This pertains particularly to hyperprolactinemia and precocious puberty. However, there is no medical therapy so far for hypothalamic disturbances leading to veterative dysfunction like disturbances of temperature regulation and control of thirst and polyphagia. In this situation symptomatic correction of the abnormality represents the only possibility to keep these patients alive.

  13. [Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stárka, Luboslav; Dušková, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea (FHA) besides pregnancy and syndrome of polycystic ovary is one of the most common causes of secondary amenorrhea. FHA results from the aberrations in pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion, which in turn causes impairment of the gonadotropins (follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone). FHA is a form of the defence of organism in situations where life functions are more important than reproductive function. FHA is reversible; it can be normalized after ceasing the stress situation. There are three types of FHA: weight loss related, stress-related, and exercise-related amenorrhea. The final consequences are complex hormonal changes manifested by profound hypoestrogenism. Additionally, these patients present mild hypercortisolemia, low serum insulin levels, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and low total triiodothyronine. Women health in this disorder is disturbed in several aspects including the skeletal system, cardiovascular system, and mental problems. Patients manifest a decrease in bone mass density, which is related to an increase in fracture risk. Therefore, osteopenia and osteoporosis are the main long-term complications of FHA. Cardiovascular complications include endothelial dysfunction and abnormal changes in the lipid profile. FHA patients present significantly higher depression and anxiety and also sexual problems compared to healthy subjects.

  14. [Hypothalamic dysfunction in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Sande-Lee, Simone; Velloso, Licio A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity, defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation that may impair life quality, is one of the major public health problems worldwide. It results from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. The control of energy balance in animals and humans is performed by the central nervous system (CNS) by means of neuroendocrine connections, in which circulating peripheral hormones, such as leptin and insulin, provide signals to specialized neurons of the hypothalamus reflecting body fat stores, and induce appropriate responses to maintain the stability of these stores. The majority of obesity cases are associated with central resistance to both leptin and insulin actions. In experimental animals, high-fat diets can induce an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus, which impairs leptin and insulin intracellular signaling pathways, and results in hyperphagia, decreased energy expenditure and, ultimately, obesity. Recent evidence obtained from neuroimaging studies and assessment of inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid of obese subjects suggests that similar alterations may be also present in humans. In this review, we briefly present the mechanisms involved with the loss of homeostatic control of energy balance in animal models of obesity, and the current evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction in obese humans.

  15. Muscarinic Receptors Types 1 and 2 in the Preoptic-Anterior Hypothalamic Areas Regulate Ovulation Unequally in the Rat Oestrous Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadira L. López-Ramírez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic receptors types 1 (m1AChR and 2 (m2AChR in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamus areas (POA-AHA were counted, and the effects of blocking these receptors on spontaneous ovulation were analysed throughout the rat oestrous cycle. Rats in each phase of the oestrous cycle were assigned to the following experiments: (1 an immunohistochemical study of the number of cells expressing m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA and (2 analysis of the effects of the unilateral blockade of the m1AChR (pirenzepine, PZP or m2AChR (methoctramine, MTC on either side of the POA-AHA on the ovulation rate. The number of m2AChR-immunoreactive cells was significantly higher at 09:00 h on each day of the oestrous cycle in the POA-AHA region, while no changes in the expression profile of m1AChR protein were observed. The ovulation rate in rats treated with PZP on the oestrous day was lower than that in the vehicle group. Animals treated on dioestrous-1 with PZP or MTC had a higher ovulation rate than those in the vehicle group. In contrast, on dioestrous-2, the MTC treatment decreased the ovulation rate. These results suggest that m1AChR or m2AChR in the POA-AHA could participate in the regulation of spontaneous ovulation in rats.

  16. Gelastic epilepsy: Beyond hypothalamic hamartomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Uribe-San-Martin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gelastic epilepsy or laughing seizures have been historically related to children with hypothalamic hamartomas. We report three adult patients who had gelastic epilepsy, defined as the presence of seizures with a prominent laugh component, including brain imaging, surface/invasive electroencephalography, positron emission tomography, and medical/surgical outcomes. None of the patients had hamartoma or other hypothalamic lesion. Two patients were classified as having refractory epilepsy (one had biopsy-proven neurocysticercosis and the other one hippocampal sclerosis and temporal cortical dysplasia. The third patient had no lesion on MRI and had complete control with carbamazepine. Both lesional patients underwent resective surgery, one with complete seizure control and the other one with poor outcome. Although hypothalamic hamartomas should always be ruled out in patients with gelastic epilepsy, laughing seizures can also arise from frontal and temporal lobe foci, which can be surgically removed. In addition, we present the first case of gelastic epilepsy due to neurocysticercosis.

  17. Ustekinumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do not inject into an area where the skin is tender, bruised, red, or hard or where you have scars or stretch marks.Your doctor or pharmacist will ... injection.you should know that ustekinumab injection may decrease your ability ... new or changing skin lesions, minor infections (such as open cuts or ...

  18. Studies of Helicity Injection in a Spheromak Formed by a Large Area Planar Coaxial Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Bellan, Paul; Pracko, Steven

    2000-10-01

    A new planar coaxial gun has been constructed in order to study the process of helicity injection during spheromak formation. Improvements in helicity injection, a key method for poloidal field sustainment in spheromaks, would increase the attractiveness of the spheromak configuration as a fusion energy scheme. The goal of this research is to create simple, well-defined experiments allowing the details of helicity injection to be resolved and better understood. The design of the new gun, which was motivated by insights gained from ongoing solar prominence experiments [Bellan and Hansen, Phys. Plasmas 5, 1991 (1998)], involves large planar electrodes with a low field solenoid, in contrast to smaller cylindrical guns with high field solenoids commonly in existence. More efficient spheromak formation and better ``λ-matching'' should be possible in the new setup. The formation and dynamical evolution of twisted flux tubes will be studied using a variety of optical and probe diagnostics, including (1) visible light photography using a pair of fast, gated intensified CCD cameras, (2) local magnetic field measurements using an array of small pickup coils, (3) density and electron temperature measurements using a triple Langmuir probe, and (4) measurements of local ion distribution functions using laser-induced fluorescence. Details of the new gun design and initial experimental results will be presented.

  19. Experimental study of solvent-based emulsion injection to enhance heavy oil recovery in Alaska North Slope area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, F.; Mamora, D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This study examined the feasibility of using a chemical enhanced oil recovery method to overcome some of the technical challenges associated with thermal recovery in the Alaska North Slope (ANS). This paper described the second stage research of an experimental study on nano-particle and surfactant-stabilized solvent-based emulsions for the ANS area. Four successful core flood experiments were performed using heavy ANS oil. The runs included water flooding followed by emulsion flooding; and pure emulsion injection core flooding. The injection rate and core flooding temperature remained constant and only 1 PV micro-emulsion was injected after breakthrough under water flooding or emulsion flooding. Oil recovery increased by 26.4 percent from 56.2 percent original oil in place (OOIP) with waterflooding to 82.6 percent OOIP with injection of emulsion following water flooding. Oil recovery was slightly higher with pure emulsion flooding, at 85.8 percent OOIP. The study showed that low permeability generally resulted in a higher shear rate, which is favourable for in-situ emulsification and higher displacement efficiency. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 20 figs.

  20. [Changes in the cholecystokinin-synthetizing hypothalamic system during experimental diabetes mellitus in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, A V; Kolesnik, Iu M; Trzhetsinskiĭ, S D; Orlovskiĭ, M A

    1998-01-01

    The investigation was performed in 96 Wistar rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by single injection of 50 mg/kg of streptozotocin. Cholecystokinin (CCK) synthesizing neurons were identified in hypothalamic structures using indirect immunofluorescence. In latent period of diabetes (2 wks) number of CCK--immunopositive neurons increases, especially in paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, while in ventrolateral subnucleus of arcuate nucleus and parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus areas occupied by immunoreactive material in neurons and their CCK content are reduced. By the end of wk 5 of the disease increase in number of CCK immunopositive neurons was registered only in medial parvicellular subnucleus of paraventricular nucleus whereas in other structures their number was reduced. The administration of CCK to intact animals causes increase of insulin content in endocrinocytes of pancreatic islets, but does not affect the level of hypoglycemia. The administration of the peptide to animals with diabetes leads to destruction of pancreatic islets, decline in endocrinocyte number and insulin content and marked hypoglycemia. Thus, the data obtained indicate the significant role of hypothalamic peptidergic system and CCK in regulation of beta-endocrinocyte function.

  1. A Genetic Screen Identifies Hypothalamic Fgf15 as a Regulator of Glucagon Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Picard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia, which restores normal blood glucose levels to ensure sufficient provision of glucose to the brain, is critical for survival. To discover underlying brain regulatory systems, we performed a genetic screen in recombinant inbred mice for quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling glucagon secretion in response to neuroglucopenia. We identified a QTL on the distal part of chromosome 7 and combined this genetic information with transcriptomic analysis of hypothalami. This revealed Fgf15 as the strongest candidate to control the glucagon response. Fgf15 was expressed by neurons of the dorsomedial hypothalamus and the perifornical area. Intracerebroventricular injection of FGF19, the human ortholog of Fgf15, reduced activation by neuroglucopenia of dorsal vagal complex neurons, of the parasympathetic nerve, and lowered glucagon secretion. In contrast, silencing Fgf15 in the dorsomedial hypothalamus increased neuroglucopenia-induced glucagon secretion. These data identify hypothalamic Fgf15 as a regulator of glucagon secretion.

  2. Area 2: Inexpensive Monitoring and Uncertainty Assessment of CO2 Plume Migration using Injection Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Sanjay [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-09-30

    In-depth understanding of the long-term fate of CO₂ in the subsurface requires study and analysis of the reservoir formation, the overlaying caprock formation, and adjacent faults. Because there is significant uncertainty in predicting the location and extent of geologic heterogeneity that can impact the future migration of CO₂ in the subsurface, there is a need to develop algorithms that can reliably quantify this uncertainty in plume migration. This project is focused on the development of a model selection algorithm that refines an initial suite of subsurface models representing the prior uncertainty to create a posterior set of subsurface models that reflect injection performance consistent with that observed. Such posterior models can be used to represent uncertainty in the future migration of the CO₂ plume. Because only injection data is required, the method provides a very inexpensive method to map the migration of the plume and the associated uncertainty in migration paths. The model selection method developed as part of this project mainly consists of assessing the connectivity/dynamic characteristics of a large prior ensemble of models, grouping the models on the basis of their expected dynamic response, selecting the subgroup of models that most closely yield dynamic response closest to the observed dynamic data, and finally quantifying the uncertainty in plume migration using the selected subset of models. The main accomplishment of the project is the development of a software module within the SGEMS earth modeling software package that implements the model selection methodology. This software module was subsequently applied to analyze CO₂ plume migration in two field projects – the In Salah CO₂ Injection project in Algeria and CO₂ injection into the Utsira formation in Norway. These applications of the software revealed that the proxies developed in this project for quickly assessing the dynamic characteristics of the reservoir were

  3. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie M King

    Full Text Available Proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  4. Relative number and distribution of murine hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons innervating distinct target sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Connie M; Hentges, Shane T

    2011-01-01

    Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons send projections widely throughout the brain consistent with their role in regulating numerous homeostatic processes and mediating analgesia and reward. Recent data suggest that POMC neurons located in the rostral and caudal extents of the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus may mediate selective actions, however it is not clear if POMC neurons in these regions of the arcuate nucleus innervate specific target sites. In the present study, fluorescent microspheres and cholera toxin B were used to retrogradely label POMC neurons in POMC-DsRed transgenic mice. The number and location of POMC cells projecting to the supraoptic nucleus, periaqueductal gray, ventral tegmental area, paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamic nucleus, amygdala and the dosal vagal complex was determined. Tracer injected unilaterally labeled POMC neurons in both sides of the arcuate nucleus. While the total number of retrogradely labeled cells in the arcuate nucleus varied by injection site, less than 10% of POMC neurons were labeled with tracer injected into any target area. Limited target sites appear to be preferentially innervated by POMC neurons that reside in the rostral or caudal extremes of the arcuate nucleus, whereas the majority of target sites are innervated by diffusely distributed POMC neurons. The modest number of cells projecting to each target site indicates that relatively few POMC neurons may mediate potent and specific physiologic responses and therefore disturbed signaling in a very few POMC neurons may have significant consequences.

  5. HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROHORMONES AND IMMUNE RESPONSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Luis eQuintanar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone, Corticotropin-releasing hormone and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone. In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed.

  6. Experimental Plan: Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection 300 Area Uranium Plume Treatability Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2006-09-20

    This Test Plan describes a laboratory-testing program to be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the 300-FF-5 Feasibility Study (FS). The objective of the proposed treatability test is to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium contaminated groundwater in situ. This study will be used to: (1) Develop implementation cost estimates; (2) Identify implementation challenges; and (3) Investigate the technology's ability to meet remedial objectives These activities will be conducted in parallel with a limited field investigation, which is currently underway to more accurately define the vertical extent of uranium in the vadose zone, and in the capillary fringe zone laterally throughout the plume. The treatability test will establish the viability of the method and, along with characterization data from the limited field investigation, will provide the means for determining how best to implement the technology in the field. By conducting the treatability work in parallel with the ongoing Limited Field Investigation, the resulting Feasibility Study (FS) will provide proven, site-specific information for evaluating polyphosphate addition and selecting a suitable remediation strategy for the uranium plume within the FS time frame at an overall cost savings.

  7. Appraisal of potential for injection-well recharge of the Hueco bolson with treated sewage effluent : preliminary study at the northeast El Paso area, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, Sergio; Weeks, Edwin P.; White, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of El Paso and the Texas Department of Water Resources, made a preliminary study of specific factors related to recharging the Hueco bolson in the northeast El Paso area with treated sewage effluent. The city is interested in the location and spacing of injection wells relative to (1) maintaining the injected effluent in the aquifer for a predetermined amount of time (residence time) before it is pumped out, (2) recovery by pumping of as much of the injected effluent as possible, and (3) the long-term effects of injection on water-level declines.

  8. Hypothalamic inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase stimulates hepatic counter-regulatory response independent of AMPK activation in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypothalamic AMPK acts as a cell energy sensor and can modulate food intake, glucose homeostasis, and fatty acid biosynthesis. Intrahypothalamic fatty acid injection is known to suppress liver glucose production, mainly by activation of hypothalamic ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP channels. Since all models employed seem to involve malonyl-CoA biosynthesis, we hypothesized that acetyl-CoA carboxylase can modulate the counter-regulatory response independent of nutrient availability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study employing immunoblot, real-time PCR, ELISA, and biochemical measurements, we showed that reduction of the hypothalamic expression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase by antisense oligonucleotide after intraventricular injection increased food intake and NPY mRNA, and diminished the expression of CART, CRH, and TRH mRNA. Additionally, as in fasted rats, in antisense oligonucleotide-treated rats, serum glucagon and ketone bodies increased, while the levels of serum insulin and hepatic glycogen diminished. The reduction of hypothalamic acetyl-CoA carboxylase also increased PEPCK expression, AMPK phosphorylation, and glucose production in the liver. Interestingly, these effects were observed without modification of hypothalamic AMPK phosphorylation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Hypothalamic ACC inhibition can activate hepatic counter-regulatory response independent of hypothalamic AMPK activation.

  9. Lateral hypothalamic circuits for feeding and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Garret D; Wise, Roy A

    2016-02-01

    In experiments conducted over 60 years ago, the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) was identified as a critical neuroanatomical substrate for motivated behavior. Electrical stimulation of the LHA induces voracious feeding even in well-fed animals. In the absence of food, animals will work tirelessly, often lever-pressing thousands of times per hour, for electrical stimulation at the same site that provokes feeding, drinking and other species-typical motivated behaviors. Here we review the classic findings from electrical stimulation studies and integrate them with more recent work that has used contemporary circuit-based approaches to study the LHA. We identify specific anatomically and molecularly defined LHA elements that integrate diverse information arising from cortical, extended amygdala and basal forebrain networks to ultimately generate a highly specified and invigorated behavioral state conveyed via LHA projections to downstream reward and feeding-specific circuits.

  10. Role of Hypothalamic VGF in Energy Balance and Metabolic Adaption to Environmental Enrichment in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglesong, Grant D; Huang, Wei; Liu, Xianglan; Slater, Andrew M; Siu, Jason; Yildiz, Vedat; Salton, Stephen R J; Cao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE), a housing condition providing complex physical, social, and cognitive stimulation, leads to improved metabolic health and resistance to diet-induced obesity and cancer. One underlying mechanism is the activation of the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis with hypothalamic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as the key mediator. VGF, a peptide precursor particularly abundant in the hypothalamus, was up-regulated by EE. Overexpressing BDNF or acute injection of BDNF protein to the hypothalamus up-regulated VGF, whereas suppressing BDNF signaling down-regulated VGF expression. Moreover, hypothalamic VGF expression was regulated by leptin, melanocortin receptor agonist, and food deprivation mostly paralleled to BDNF expression. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of Cre recombinase to floxed VGF mice specifically decreased VGF expression in the hypothalamus. In contrast to the lean and hypermetabolic phenotype of homozygous germline VGF knockout mice, specific knockdown of hypothalamic VGF in male adult mice led to increased adiposity, decreased core body temperature, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance, as well as disturbance of molecular features of brown and white adipose tissues without effects on food intake. However, VGF knockdown failed to block the EE-induced BDNF up-regulation or decrease of adiposity indicating a minor role of VGF in the hypothalamic-sympathoneural-adipocyte axis. Taken together, our results suggest hypothalamic VGF responds to environmental demands and plays an important role in energy balance and glycemic control likely acting in the melanocortin pathway downstream of BDNF.

  11. Hypothalamic neuronal histamine modulates febrile response but not anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Seiichi; Itateyama, Emi; Oka, Kyoko; Masaki, Takayuki; Sakata, Toshiie; Yoshimatsu, Hironobu

    2005-05-01

    This study examined the contribution of hypothalamic neuronal histamine (HA) to the anorectic and febrile responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an exogenous pyrogen, and the endogenous pyrogens interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Intraperitoneal (ip) injection of LPS, IL-1beta, or TNF-alpha suppressed 24-hr cumulative food intake and increased rectal temperature in rats. To analyze the histaminergic contribution, rats were pretreated with intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of 2.44 mmol/kg or ip injection of 244 mmol/kg of alpha-fluoromethylhistidine (FMH), a suicide inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), to deplete neural HA. The depletion of neural HA augmented the febrile response to ip injection of LPS and IL-1beta and alleviated the anorectic response to ip injection of IL-1beta. However, the depletion of neural HA did not modify the LPS-induced anorectic response or TNF-alpha-induced febrile and anorectic responses. Consistent with these results, the rate of hypothalamic HA turnover, assessed by the accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), was elevated with ip injections of LPS and IL-1beta, but unaffected by TNF-alpha at equivalent doses. This suggests that (i) LPS and IL-1beta activate hypothalamic neural HA turnover; (ii) hypothalamic neural HA suppresses the LPS- and IL-1beta-induced febrile responses and accelerates the IL-1beta-induced anorectic response; and (iii) TNF-alpha modulates the febrile and anorectic responses via a neural HA-independent pathway. Therefore, hypothalamic neural HA is involved in the IL-1beta-dominant pathway, rather than the TNF-alpha-dominant pathway, preceding the systemic inflammatory response induced by exogenous pyrogens, such as LPS. Further research on this is needed.

  12. Projection patterns of lateral hypothalamic, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neurons to the dorsal raphe and/or the locus coeruleus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ye S; Lee, Hyun S

    2013-02-04

    The present study was designed to reveal the projection patterns of lateral hypothalamic (LH), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) neurons to the dorsal raphe (DR) and/or the locus coeruleus (LC) in the rat. After the injection of Red or Green Retrobeads into the DR or LC, LH sections were immunostained for CART and/or melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH). First, CART-immunoreactive axon terminals formed close appositions to the DR (or LC) neuronal profiles. Second, a subpopulation of CART neurons containing MCH projected to the monoaminergic nuclei; the majority of labeled neurons were observed in the dorsal hypothalamic area, the dorsal part of the posterior hypothalamic area, and the zona incerta. Cells were also observed in the perifornical part of the LH, the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, the peduncular and the magnocellular parts of the LH. Of the total population of DR (or LC)-projecting cells, CART/MCH co-containing neurons were 9.5% ± 1.6% (or 10.8% ± 1.3% for LC). Finally, a subset of CART (or MCH) neurons provided divergent axon collaterals to the DR and the LC. Of the entire CART (or MCH) cell population, 3.9% ± 0.8% (or 5.6% ± 1.0% for MCH) sent axon collaterals to the DR/LC. CART/MCH co-containing neurons projecting to the DR or LC might be involved in the feeding-related regulation of arousal, stress-related responses, and emotional behaviors. Thus, CART (or MCH) cells that send divergent axon collaterals to the DR/LC might have a simultaneous (and possibly more efficient) way to exert their specific influences on the aminergic nuclei.

  13. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JH LEE; SB YOO; JY KIM; JY LEE; BT KIM; K PARK; JW JAHNG

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) – chronic stress experience inearly life – affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague–Dawley pups wereseparated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1–14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH).NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and thenfood intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes,phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B(PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Westernblot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS.Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levelsof the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggestthat neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increasedexpressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  14. Early life stress experience may blunt hypothalamic leptin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J H; Yoo, S B; Kim, J Y; Lee, J Y; Kim, B T; Park, K; Jahng, J W

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether neonatal maternal separation (MS) - chronic stress experience in early life - affects the anorectic efficacy of leptin in the offspring at adolescence. Sprague-Dawley pups were separated from the dam daily for 3 h during postnatal day 1-14 or left undisturbed as non-handled controls (NH). NH and MS male pups received an intraperitoneal leptin (100 μg/kg) or saline on postnatal day (PND) 28, and then food intake and body weight gain were recorded. The hypothalamic levels of leptin-signalling-related genes, phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (pSTAT3) and protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) were examined at 40 min after a single injection of leptin on PND 39 by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Leptin-induced suppressions in food intake and weight gain was observed in NH pups, but not in MS. Leptin increased pSTAT3 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of NH pups, but not of MS. Interestingly, basal levels of the hypothalamic PTP1B and pSTAT3 were increased in MS pups compared with NH controls. The results suggest that neonatal MS experience may blunt the anorectic efficacy of leptin later in life, possibly in relation with increased expressions of PTP1B and/or pSTAT3 in the hypothalamus.

  15. Effect of Nourishing “Yin”-Removing “Fire” Chinese Herbal Mixture on Hypothalamic NKB/NK3R Expression in Female Precocious Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiran Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The present study aims to investigate the effects of nourishing “Yin”-removing “Fire” Chinese herb mixture on the hypothalamic NKB/NK3R expression in female precocious model rats. Materials and Methods. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal (N, central precocious puberty (CPP model (M, CPP fed with Chinese herbal mixture (CHM, and CPP fed with normal saline (MS. Rats on postnatal day 5 were given a single subcutaneous injection of 300 μg to establish CPP model rats. Rats of CHM and MS groups were continuously administered with nourishing “Yin”-removing “Fire” Chinese herb mixture or saline since postnatal day 15. The expressions of hypothalamic NKB/NK3R were detected by means of real-time PCR, western blot, and immunofluorescence histochemistry. Results. The day of vaginal opening and establishment of two regular estrous cycles were delayed in the CHM group compared with M and MS groups. The expression of hypothalamic NKB/NK3R mRNA and protein in the arcuate nucleus (ARC and medial preoptic (MPO area were decreased significantly in the CHM group compared with the M and MS groups on the day of onset-puberty. Conclusions. These results indicate that the NKB/NK3R signaling pathway might be involved in the effect of herbal mixture treatment on CPP.

  16. Identification of limiting case between DBA and SBDBA (CL break area sensitivity): A new model for the boron injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Gonzalez, R., E-mail: r.gonzalez@ing.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122 San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy); Petruzzi, A., E-mail: a.petruzzi@ing.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122 San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy); D’Auria, F., E-mail: f.dauria@ing.unipi.it [San Piero a Grado Nuclear Research Group (GRNSPG), University of Pisa, Via Livornese 1291, 56122 San Piero a Grado, Pisa (Italy); Mazzantini, O., E-mail: mazzantini@na-sa.com.ar [Nucleo-electrica Argentina Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Atucha-2 is a Siemens-designed Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) reactor under construction in the Republic of Argentina. Its geometrical complexity and peculiarity (e.g. oblique Control Rods, Positive Void coefficient) required a developed and validated complex three dimensional (3D) neutron kinetics (NK) coupled thermal hydraulic (TH) model. Reactor shut-down is obtained by oblique CRs and, during accidental conditions, by an emergency shut-down system (JDJ) injecting a highly concentrated boron solution (boron clouds) in the moderator tank. The boron clouds reconstruction is obtained using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) CFX code calculation. A complete Large Break Loss Of Coolant Accident (LBLOCA) calculation implies the application of the RELAP5-3D{sup ©} system code. Within the framework of the third Agreement “Nucleoelèctrica Argentina-Sociedad Anonima (NA-SA) – University of Pisa/GRNSPG” (Contract, 2009), a new RELAP5-3D control system for the boron injection system was developed and implemented in the validated coupled RELAP5-3D/NESTLE model of the Atucha 2 NPP. The aim of this activity is to find out the limiting case (maximum break area size) for the Peak Cladding Temperature for LOCAs under fixed boundary conditions.

  17. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T; Smith, Thor E; Williams, John H; Degnan, James R

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  18. Time series geophysical monitoring of permanganate injections and in situ chemical oxidation of PCE, OU1 area, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, Philip T.; Smith, Thor E.; Williams, John H.; Degnan, James R.

    2012-05-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) treatment with sodium permanganate, an electrically conductive oxidant, provides a strong electrical signal for tracking of injectate transport using time series geophysical surveys including direct current (DC) resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) methods. Effective remediation is dependent upon placing the oxidant in close contact with the contaminated aquifer. Therefore, monitoring tools that provide enhanced tracking capability of the injectate offer considerable benefit to guide subsequent ISCO injections. Time-series geophysical surveys were performed at a superfund site in New Hampshire, USA over a one-year period to identify temporal changes in the bulk electrical conductivity of a tetrachloroethylene (PCE; also called tetrachloroethene) contaminated, glacially deposited aquifer due to the injection of sodium permanganate. The ISCO treatment involved a series of pulse injections of sodium permanganate from multiple injection wells within a contained area of the aquifer. After the initial injection, the permanganate was allowed to disperse under ambient groundwater velocities. Time series geophysical surveys identified the downward sinking and pooling of the sodium permanganate atop of the underlying till or bedrock surface caused by density-driven flow, and the limited horizontal spread of the sodium permanganate in the shallow parts of the aquifer during this injection period. When coupled with conventional monitoring, the surveys allowed for an assessment of ISCO treatment effectiveness in targeting the PCE plume and helped target areas for subsequent treatment.

  19. Community characteristics associated with HIV risk among injection drug users in the San Francisco Bay Area: a multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluthenthal, Ricky N; Do, D Phuong; Finch, Brian; Martinez, Alexis; Edlin, Brian R; Kral, Alex H

    2007-09-01

    Community characteristics have been associated with racial and ethnic health disparities for a wide range of ailments and conditions. Previous research has found that rates of AIDS cases among injection drug users (IDUs) vary by community characteristics. However, few studies have examined whether community characteristics are associated with HIV risk behaviors among IDUs. To address this gap in the literature, we examined the associations between census-tract-level community characteristics and injection-related and sex-related HIV risk behaviors among IDUs in the San Francisco Bay Area. Individual HIV risk behaviors were collected from 4,956 IDUs between 1998 and 2002. Using 2000 US census data, we constructed four census-level community measures: percent African American, percent male unemployment, percent of households that receive public assistance, and median household income. All community variables were measured continuously. Multilevel modeling was used to determine if community characteristics were associated with recent (in the last 6 months) receptive and distributive syringe sharing, multiple sex partners, and unprotected sex risk while controlling for potential individual-level confounders. In bivariate analysis, most of the census-tract-level community characteristics were significantly associated with injection-related HIV risk, while no community characteristics were associated with sex-related risk. However, results from multivariate multilevel models indicate that only percent African American in a census tract was associated with receptive [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.89, 0.99] and distributive syringe sharing (AOR = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.92, 0.99), net of individual-level characteristics. Accounting for individual-level factors in the multivariate model in the sex-related risk models revealed a significant inverse relationship between percent African American and propensity to engage in unprotected sex (AOR = 0

  20. Interim Report: Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection - 300 Area Uranium Plume Treatability Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wellman, Dawn M.; Pierce, Eric M.; Richards, Emily L.; Butler, Bart C.; Parker, Kent E.; Glovack, Julia N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Baum, Steven R.; Clayton, Eric T.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.

    2007-07-31

    This report presents results from bench-scale treatability studies conducted under site-specific conditions to optimize the polyphosphate amendment for implementation of a field-scale technology demonstration to treat aqueous uranium within the 300 Area aquifer of the Hanford site. The general treatability testing approach consists of conducting studies with site sediment and under site conditions, in order to develop an effective chemical formulation for the polyphosphate amendments and evaluate the transport properties of these amendments under site conditions. Phosphorus-31 (31P) NMR was utilized to determine the effects of Hanford groundwater and sediment on the degradation of inorganic phosphates. Static batch tests were conducted to optimize the composition of the polyphosphate formulation for the precipitation of apatite and autunite, as well as to quantify the kinetics, loading and stability of apatite as a long-term sorbent for uranium. Dynamic column tests were used to further optimize the polyphosphate formulation for emplacement within the subsurface and the formation of autunite and apatite. In addition, dynamic testing quantified the stability of autunite and apatite under relevant site conditions. Results of this investigation provide valuable information for designing a full-scale remediation of uranium in the 300 aquifer.

  1. Tigecycline Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in a person who was not in the hospital), skin infections, and infections of the abdomen (area between the ... that developed in people who were in a hospital or foot infections in people who have diabetes. Tigecycline injection is ...

  2. Acute hypothalamic suppression significantly affects trabecular bone but not cortical bone following recovery and ovariectomy surgery in a rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa R. Yingling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis is “a pediatric disease with geriatric consequences.” Bone morphology and tissue quality co-adapt during ontogeny for sufficient bone stiffness. Altered bone morphology from hypothalamic amenorrhea, a risk factor for low bone mass in women, may affect bone strength later in life. Our purpose was to determine if altered morphology following hypothalamic suppression during development affects cortical bone strength and trabecular bone volume (BV/TV at maturity.Methods. Female rats (25 days old were assigned to a control (C group (n = 45 that received saline injections (.2 cc or an experimental group (GnRH-a (n = 45 that received gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist injections (.24 mg per dose for 25 days. Fifteen animals from each group were sacrificed immediately after the injection protocol at Day 50 (C, GnRH-a. The remaining animals recovered for 135 days and a subset of each group was sacrificed at Day 185 ((C-R (n = 15 and (G-R (n = 15. The remaining animals had an ovariectomy surgery (OVX at 185 days of age and were sacrificed 40 days later (C-OVX (n = 15 and (G-OVX (n = 15. After sacrifice femurs were mechanically tested and scanned using micro CT. Serum C-terminal telopeptides (CTX and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 were measured. Two-way ANOVA (2 groups (GnRH-a and Control X 3 time points (Injection Protocol, Recovery, post-OVX was computed.Results. GnRH-a injections suppressed uterine weights (72% and increased CTX levels by 59%. Bone stiffness was greater in the GnRH-a groups compared to C. Ash content and cortical bone area were similar between groups at all time points. Polar moment of inertia, a measure of bone architecture, was 15% larger in the GnRH-a group and remained larger than C (19% following recovery. Both the polar moment of inertia and cortical area increased linearly with the increases in body weight. Following the injection protocol, trabecular BV/TV was 31% lower in the Gn

  3. Parasubthalamic and calbindin nuclei in the posterior lateral hypothalamus are the major hypothalamic targets for projections from the central and anterior basomedial nuclei of the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Marie; Chometton, Sandrine; Peterschmitt, Yvan; Fellmann, Dominique; Risold, Pierre-Yves

    2017-03-03

    The parasubthalamic nucleus (PSTN) and the ventrally adjacent calbindin nucleus (CbN) form a nuclear complex in the posterior lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), recently characterized as connected with the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA). The aim of the present work is to analyze in detail the projections from the amygdala into the PSTN/CbN, also focusing on pathways into the LHA. After fluorogold injections into the PSTN/CbN, the medial part of the CEA (CEAm) appears to be the main supplier of projections from the CEA. Other amygdalar nuclei contribute to the innervation of the PSTN/CbN complex, including the anterior part of the basomedial nucleus (BMAa). Injections of the anterograde tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL), into the CEAm and BMAa revealed that projections from the CEAm follow two pathways into the LHA: a dorsal pathway formed by axons that also innervate the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, the anterior perifornical LHA and the PSTN, and a ventral pathway that runs laterally adjacent to the ventrolateral hypothalamic tract (vlt) and ends in the CbN. By contrast, the BMAa and other telencephalic structures, such as the fundus striatum project to the CbN via the ventral pathway. Confirming the microscopic observation, a semi-quantitative analysis of the density of these projections showed that the PSTN and the CbN are the major hypothalamic targets for the projections from the CEAm and the BMAa, respectively. PSTN and CbN receive these projections through distinct dorsal and ventral routes in the LHA. The ventral pathway forms a differentiated tract, named here the ventrolateral amygdalo-hypothalamic tract (vlah), that is distinct from, but runs adjacent to, the vlt. Both the vlt and the vlah had been previously described as forming an olfactory path into the LHA. These results help to better characterize the CbN within the PSTN/CbN complex and are discussed in terms of the functional organization of the network involving the

  4. PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millings, M.

    2013-09-16

    A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study

  5. Hypothalamic neuron projection to autonomic preganglionic levels related with glucose metabolism: a fluorescent labelling study in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1996-06-01

    The location of hypothalamic paraventricular neurons projecting to sympathetic preganglionic levels and related to the autonomic regulation of various organs involved in glucose metabolism (OGM) was determined by ipsilateral injections of two fluorescent tracers, Diamidino Yellow into the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fast Blue into the left intermediolateral cell column of the T8-T9 spinal cord. Hypothalamospinal neurons were mainly located in the dorsal part of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and the hypothalamobulbar neurons were most abundant in the ventral, medial and extreme lateral parts of the PVH. No double-labelled neurons were found in the hypothalamus. These results can help the knowledge of the neural hypothalamic network related with the autonomic hypothalamic control.

  6. Environmental conditions, political economy, and rates of injection drug use in large US metropolitan areas 1992-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Eric T; Friedman, Samuel R; Brady, Joanne E; Pouget, Enrique R; Tempalski, Barbara; Galea, Sandro

    2010-01-15

    City-specific studies have suggested the quality of the local environment and economic circumstances are associated with greater risk of injection drug use (IDU). No studies have assessed the relation among the quality of the local environment, economic circumstances, and IDU over time across US metropolitan areas. Annual numbers of IDUs in the 88 largest US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) were estimated by extrapolating, adjusting, and allocating existing estimates using various data sources. Generalized estimating equations were used to assess the relation among the quality of the local environment, metropolitan political economy, and IDU prevalence using lagged models taking into account potential confounders. MSAs with a worse local environment (measured as a one standard deviation difference) had a greater risk of IDU (relative risk [RR]=1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01, 1.06); similarly, a one-percentage point worsening of the political economy for an MSA was associated with greater risk of IDU (RR=1.04-1.10). Final models stratified by region indicated heterogeneity of effect by region whereby the quality of the local environment was associated with IDU strongest in the South (RR=1.12, CI: 1.05, 1.12) followed by the West (RR=1.04, CI: 1.01, 1.07) and Midwest (RR=1.03, CI: 1.00, 1.06), and the metropolitan political economy was associated with IDU in the West (RR=1.03-1.09) and Northeast (RR=1.04-1.12). Our results underscore the importance of sociopolitical factors as determinants of IDU in MSAs. Structural solutions targeted at improving environmental conditions and economic circumstances should be considered as drug use interventions. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Trends in the population prevalence of people who inject drugs in US metropolitan areas 1992-2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Tempalski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People who inject drugs (PWID have increased risk of morbidity and mortality. We update and present estimates and trends of the prevalence of current PWID and PWID subpopulations in 96 US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs for 1992-2007. Current estimates of PWID and PWID subpopulations will help target services and help to understand long-term health trends among PWID populations. METHODOLOGY: We calculated the number of PWID in the US annually from 1992-2007 and apportioned estimates to MSAs using multiplier methods. We used four types of data indicating drug injection to allocate national annual totals to MSAs, creating four distinct series of component estimates of PWID in each MSA and year. The four component estimates are averaged to create the best estimate of PWID for each MSA and year. We estimated PWID prevalence rates for three subpopulations defined by gender, age, and race/ethnicity. We evaluated trends using multi-level polynomial models. RESULTS: PWID per 10,000 persons aged 15-64 years varied across MSAs from 31 to 345 in 1992 (median 104.4 to 34 to 324 in 2007 (median 91.5. Trend analysis indicates that this rate declined during the early period and then was relatively stable in 2002-2007. Overall prevalence rates for non-Hispanic black PWID increased in 2005 as compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Hispanic prevalence, in contrast, declined across time. Importantly, results show a worrisome trend in young PWID prevalence since HAART was initiated--the mean prevalence was 90 to 100 per 10,000 youth in 1992-1996, but increased to >120 PWID per 10,000 youth in 2006-2007. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, PWID rates remained constant since 2002, but increased for two subpopulations: non-Hispanic black PWID and young PWID. Estimates of PWID are important for planning and evaluating public health programs to reduce harm among PWID and for understanding related trends in social and health outcomes.

  8. In vivo Investigation of Hypothalamic Secretory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, A L; Jaffe, C A; Padmanabhan, V

    1997-04-01

    The finding that all pituitary hormones are released in a discrete pulsatile fashion and that the pulsatile properties of the pituitary hormone secretion are altered in some physiologic and pathologic conditions prompted the development of techniques designed to study the pattern of release and the regulation of secretion of the hypothalamic neuropeptides. This review describes the currently used techniques to assess hypothalamic hormone secretion. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:105-111). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  9. [Conditioning of emotional behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation (3): The learned behavior caused by hypothalamic stimulation in rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaura, S; Funada, K; Abe, Y; Hosokawa, T

    1976-09-01

    In the present study, the learned behavior caused by hypothalamic electrical stimulation was examined in order to determine the effects of psychotropic drugs. Subjects were albino male rabbits with electrodes chronically implanted in the hypothalamic area. A shuttle box, which was adjusted for behavioral pharmacological estimation of drugs in rabbits, was used. A buzzer sound (85dB) and electrical stimulation of hypothalamus (100 HZ, 1 msec, 1.2-2.0V) were used as the conditional stimulation (CS) and unconditional stimulation (UCS), respectively. The same animal was trained in habituation to a buzzer sound as the CS. For avoidance conditioning in a two-compartment situation, the animal was placed in a shuttle box divided by a hurdle situated at the middle of two-compartments. After the CS was presented for 10 sec, the UCS was given. The animals were subjected to 15 conditioning trials per day. The avoidance and escape behavior model became as distinct by hypothalamic stimulation as by UCS. After termination of the experiments, extinction trials were carried out after which the animals were sacrificed, and localization of the stimulating electrodes was determined histologically.

  10. Hypothalamic control of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, A; Wiedmann, N M; Adler, E S; Oldfield, B J

    2014-10-01

    A detailed appreciation of the control of adipose tissue whether it be white, brown or brite/beige has never been more important to the development of a framework on which to build therapeutic strategies to combat obesity. This is because 1) the rate of fatty acid release into the circulation from lipolysis in white adipose tissue (WAT) is integrally important to the development of obesity, 2) brown adipose tissue (BAT) has now moved back to center stage with the realization that it is present in adult humans and, in its activated form, is inversely proportional to levels of obesity and 3) the identification and characterization of "brown-like" or brite/beige fat is likely to be one of the most exciting developments in adipose tissue biology in the last decade. Central to all of these developments is the role of the CNS in the control of different fat cell functions and central to CNS control is the integrative capacity of the hypothalamus. In this chapter we will attempt to detail key issues relevant to the structure and function of hypothalamic and downstream control of WAT and BAT and highlight the importance of developing an understanding of the neural input to brite/beige fat cells as a precursor to its recruitment as therapeutic target.

  11. Effect of hypothalamic surgery on prolactin release induced by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgo, S; Kato, Y; Chihara, K; Imura, H; Maeda, K

    1976-12-01

    Intravenous injections of varying doses of 5-HTP (1, 3 and 5 mg/100 g body wt), a precursor of serotonin, caused a significant and dose-related increase in plasma prolactin concentrations in urethane-anesthetized rats. Increases in plasma prolactin concentrations caused by 5-HTP (1 mg/100 g body wt iv) were abolished by the concomitant administration of L-DOPA (2 mg/100 g body wt iv). Plasma prolactin levels were also significantly elevated following the injection of 5-HTP in rats with complete hypothalamic deafferentation, whereas 5-HTP had no significant effect on plasma prolactin levels in rats with extensive hypothalamic ablation. These results suggest that 5-HTP causes prolactin secretion by stimulating the serotoninergic mechanism in the hypothalamus.

  12. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease.

  13. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  14. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation.

  15. Estimates of the population prevalence of injection drug users among hispanic residents of large US metropolitan areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Enrique R; Friedman, Samuel R; Cleland, Charles M; Tempalski, Barbara; Cooper, Hannah L F

    2012-06-01

    Little information exists on the population prevalence or geographic distribution of injection drug users (IDUs) who are Hispanic in the USA. Here, we present yearly estimates of IDU population prevalence among Hispanic residents of the 96 most populated US metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 1992-2002. First, yearly estimates of the proportion of IDUs who were Hispanic in each MSA were created by combining data on (1) IDUs receiving drug treatment services in Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)'s Treatment Entry Data System, (2) IDUs being tested in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) HIV-Counseling and Testing System, and (3) incident AIDS diagnoses among IDUs, supplemented by (4) data on IDUs who were living with AIDS. Then, the resulting proportions were multiplied by published yearly estimates of the number of IDUs of all racial/ethnic groups in each MSA to produce Hispanic IDU population estimates. These were divided by Hispanic population data to produce population prevalence rates. Time trends were tested using mixed-effects regression models. Hispanic IDU prevalence declined significantly on average (1992 mean = 192, median = 133; 2002 mean = 144, median = 93; units are per 10,000 Hispanics aged 15-64). The highest prevalence rates across time tended to be in smaller northeastern MSAs. Comparing the last three study years to the first three, prevalence decreased in 82% of MSAs and increased in 18%. Comparisons with data on drug-related mortality and hepatitis C mortality supported the validity of the estimates. Generally, estimates of Hispanic IDU population prevalence were higher than published estimates for non-Hispanic White residents and lower than published estimates for non-Hispanic Black residents. Further analysis indicated that the proportion of IDUs that was Hispanic decreased in 52% and increased in 48% of MSAs between 2002 and 2007. The estimates resulting from this study can

  16. Neuroanatomy and physiology of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis: clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Midge

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the anatomy of the avian hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the somatotrophic axis, and neurohypophysis.

  17. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  18. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eSchneeberger

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control.

  19. Endotoxemia-induced muscle wasting is associated with the change of hypothalamic neuropeptides in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Kaipeng; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Tan, Shanjun; Bai, Xiaowu; Gao, Tao; Xi, Fengchan; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    In critical patients, sepsis-induced muscle wasting is considered to be an important contributor to complications and mortality. Previous work mainly focuses on the peripheral molecular mechanism of muscle degradation, however little evidence exists for the role of central nervous system in the process. In the present study, we, for the first time, characterized the relationship between muscle wasting and central neuropeptide changes in a septic model. Thirty-six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were intraperitoneally injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or saline. Twelve, 24 and 48 hrs after injection, skeletal muscle and hypothalamus tissues were harvested. Muscle wasting was measured by the mRNA expression of two E3 ubiquitin ligases, muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF-1) and muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), as well as 3-methyl-histidine (3-MH) and tyrosine release. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and inflammatory marker expressions were also measured in three time points. LPS injection caused an increase expression of MuRF-1 and MAFbx, and a significant higher release of 3-MH and tyrosine. Hypothalamic neuropeptides, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) presented a dynamic change after LPS injection. Also, hypothalamic inflammatory markers, interleukin-1 β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) increased substantially after LPS administration. Importantly, the expressions of POMC, AgRP and CART were well correlated with muscle atrophy gene, MuRF-1 expression. These findings suggest hypothalamic peptides and inflammation may participate in the sepsis-induced muscle wasting, but the exact mechanism needs further study.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Boehlecke

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various

  1. Endocannabinoid signaling in hypothalamic circuits regulates arousal from general anesthesia in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Haixing; Tong, Li; Gu, Ning; Gao, Fang; Lu, Yacheng; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xin; Bergeron, Richard; Pomeranz, Lisa E.; Wang, Feng; Luo, Chun-Xia; Ren, Yan; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Xie, Zhongcong; Xu, Lin; Li, Jinlian; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2017-01-01

    Consciousness can be defined by two major attributes: awareness of environment and self, and arousal, which reflects the level of awareness. The return of arousal after general anesthesia presents an experimental tool for probing the neural mechanisms that control consciousness. Here we have identified that systemic or intracerebral injection of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM281 into the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) — but not the adjacent perifornical area (Pef) or the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus (VLPO) — accelerates arousal in mice recovering from general anesthesia. Anesthetics selectively activated endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling at DMH glutamatergic but not GABAergic synapses, leading to suppression of both glutamatergic DMH-Pef and GABAergic DMH-VLPO projections. Deletion of CB1R from widespread cerebral cortical or prefrontal cortical (PFC) glutamatergic neurons, including those innervating the DMH, mimicked the arousal-accelerating effects of AM281. In contrast, CB1R deletion from brain GABAergic neurons or hypothalamic glutamatergic neurons did not affect recovery time from anesthesia. Inactivation of PFC-DMH, DMH-VLPO, or DMH-Pef projections blocked AM281-accelerated arousal, whereas activation of these projections mimicked the effects of AM281. We propose that decreased eCB signaling at glutamatergic terminals of the PFC-DMH projection accelerates arousal from general anesthesia through enhancement of the excitatory DMH-Pef projection, the inhibitory DMH-VLPO projection, or both. PMID:28463228

  2. Recent insights into the role of hypothalamic AMPK signaling cascade upon metabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc eClaret

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2004, two seminal papers focused on the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in the hypothalamus opened new avenues of research in the field of the central regulation of energy homeostasis. Over the following 8 years, hundreds of studies have firmly established hypothalamic AMPK as a key sensor and integrator of hormonal and nutritional signals with neurochemical and neurophysiological responses to regulate whole-body energy balance. In this review article we aim to discuss the most recent findings in this particular area of research, highlighting the function of hypothalamic AMPK in appetite, thermogenesis and peripheral glucose metabolism. The diversity of mechanisms by which hypothalamic AMPK regulates energy homeostasis illustrates the importance of this evolutionary-conserved energy signaling cascade in the control of this complex and fundamental biological process.

  3. Role of angiotensin II and vasopressin receptors within the supraoptic nucleus in water and sodium intake induced by the injection of angiotensin II into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antunes V.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the effects of the injection into the supraoptic nucleus (SON of non-peptide AT1- and AT2-angiotensin II (ANG II receptor antagonists, DuP753 and PD123319, as well as of the arginine-vasopressin (AVP receptor antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP, on water and 3% NaCl intake induced by the injection of ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA. The effects on water or 3% NaCl intake were assessed in 30-h water-deprived or in 20-h water-deprived furosemide-treated adult male rats, respectively. The drugs were injected in 0.5 ml over 30-60 s. Controls were injected with a similar volume of 0.15 M NaCl. Antagonists were injected at doses of 20, 80 and 180 nmol. Water and sodium intake was measured over a 2-h period. Previous administration of the AT1 receptor antagonist DuP753 into the SON decreased water (65%, N = 10, P<0.01 and sodium intake (81%, N = 8, P<0.01 induced by the injection of ANG II (10 nmol into the MSA. Neither of these responses was significantly changed by injection of the AT2-receptor antagonist PD123319 into the SON. On the other hand, while there was a decrease in water intake (45%, N = 9, P<0.01, ANG II-induced sodium intake was significantly increased (70%, N = 8, P<0.01 following injection of the V1-type vasopressin antagonist d(CH25-Tyr(Me-AVP into the SON. These results suggest that both AT1 and V1 receptors within the SON may be involved in water and sodium intake induced by the activation of ANG II receptors within the MSA. Furthermore, they do not support the involvement of MSA AT2 receptors in the mediation of these responses.

  4. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  5. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob eBiran

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors, secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms.

  6. Evolution of Gelastic Epilepsy with Hypothalamic Hamartoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The patterns of clinical presentation, evolution of the epilepsy, and electoclinical diagnostic features of hypothalamic hamartoma (HH in 19 patients (8 children and 11 adults, seen between 1991 and 2001, were evaluated at Kings College Hospital and the Institute of Epileptology, London, UK.

  7. Hypothalamic functions in patients with pituitary insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.F.

    2013-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to increase our understanding of hypothalamic (dys)function in patients with pituitary insufficiency. This goal is driven by the clinical experience of persisting symptoms in patients adequately treated for pituitary insufficiency. We focus primarily on patients

  8. MRI of hypothalamic hamartomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barral, V.; Brunelle, F.; Brauner, R.; Rappaport, R.; Lallemand, D.

    1988-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study the MRI characteristics of hypothalamic hamartomas of which only one case has been reported to our knowledge. Radiological studies were normal X-ray studies of the skull and sella turcica and CT studies.

  9. Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Mediates Acupunctural Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis During Ethanol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng Lin; Kim, Sang Chan; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hong Feng; Lee, Bong Hyo; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Chul Won; Cho, Il Je; An, Won G; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Young Woo; Zhao, Rong Jie; Wu, Yi Yan

    2016-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that acupuncture at ST36 (Zu-San-Li) attenuates ethanol withdrawal (EW)-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rats. The current study investigated the involvement of hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) in that process. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with 3 g/kg/d of ethanol or saline for 28 days. After 24 hours of EW, acupuncture was applied to rats at bilateral ST36 points or at nonacupoints (tail) for 1 minute. A high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that EW significantly increased both the NE and the 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Western blot analysis also revealed that EW markedly elevated the phosphorylation rates of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), but spared TH protein expression in the PVN. However, acupuncture at ST36, but not at nonacupoints, greatly inhibited the increase in the hypothalamic NE, MHPG, and phosphorylation rates of TH. Additionally, postacupuncture infusion of NE into the PVN significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of acupuncture at ST36 on the oversecretion of plasma corticosterone during EW. These results suggest that acupuncture at ST36 inhibits EW-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic NEergic system to produce therapeutic effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  10. Semi-analytical models of CO2 Injection into Deep Saline Aquifers: evaluation of the area of review and leakage through abandoned wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, S.; Digiulio, D.; Levine, A.

    2008-12-01

    This presentation will provide a conceptual preview of an Area of Review (AoR) tool being developed by EPA's Office of Research and Development that applies analytic and semi-analytical mathematical solutions to elucidate potential risks associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide into deep saline subsurface formations. These solutions can be applied to commercial scale injections of supercritical CO2 and enable the zone of influence and potential endangerment to be mapped, thereby helping to delineate the AoR. We anticipate implementing the semi-analytical solutions into an open source computer modeling framework. The major risks to be evaluated by the AoR tool include: induced subsurface pressures that may force native saline waters into an underground source of drinking water (USDW), and the potential transport of CO2 away from the injection center and out of the receiving zone. Both of these phenomena are influenced by leakage and compromises of the sealing layers, such as presented by abandoned wells or other subsurface penetrations. The semi-analytical solutions will be tested against numerical solutions (TOUGH2/ECO2N) and field data associated with the Kimberlina test injection site near Bakersfield, CA. The AoR tool will be used to simulate a hypothetical commercial scale injection and to evaluate if existing or potential USDW aquifers may be adversely impacted by short-term or long-term geologic sequestration activities. The AoR tool will be useful for permit applicants and regulators evaluating potential exposure and risks associated with geoequestration under the Underground Injection Control (UIC) program. This project will benefit from partnerships with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Princeton University.

  11. Synaptic innervation to rat hippocampus by vasopressin-immuno-positive fibres from the hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Hernández, V S

    2013-01-03

    The neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) exerts a modulatory role on hippocampal excitability through vasopressin V(1A) and V(1B) receptors. However, the origin and mode of termination of the AVP innervation of the hippocampus remain unknown. We have used light and electron microscopy to trace the origin, distribution and synaptic relationships of AVP-immuno-positive fibres and nerve terminals in the rat hippocampus. Immuno-positive fibres were present in all areas (CA1-3, dentate gyrus) of the whole septo-temporal extent of the hippocampus; they had the highest density in the CA2 region, strongly increasing in density towards the ventral hippocampus. Two types of fibres were identified, both establishing synaptic junctions. Type A had large varicosities packed with immuno-positive large-granulated peptidergic vesicles and few small clear vesicles forming type I synaptic junctions with pyramidal neuron dendrites, dendritic spines and with axonal spines. Type B had smaller varicosities containing mostly small clear vesicles and only a few large-granulated vesicles and established type II synaptic junctions mainly with interneuron dendrites. The AVP-positive axons in stratum oriens appeared to follow and contact metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α)-immuno-positive interneuron dendrites. Fluoro-Gold injection into the hippocampus revealed retrogradely labelled AVP-positive somata in hypothalamic supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei. Hypothalamo-hippocampal AVP-positive axons entered the hippocampus mostly through a ventral route, also innervating the amygdala and to a lesser extent through the dorsal fimbria fornix, in continuation of the septal AVP innervation. Thus, it appears the AVP-containing neurons of the magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei serve as important sources for hippocampal AVP innervation, although the AVP-expressing neurons located in amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis reported previously may also contribute.

  12. Holographic injection-locking of a broad-area laser diode via a photorefractive thin film device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Voorst, P.D.; de Wit, M.R.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Tay, S.; Thomas, J.; Peyghambarian, N.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate locking of a high power broad area laser diode to a single frequency using holographic feedback from a photorefractive polymer thin-film device for the first time. A four-wave mixing setup is used to generate feedback for the broad area diode at the wavelength of the single frequency

  13. Regulation of Energy Balance via BDNF Expressed in Nonparaventricular Hypothalamic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haili; An, Juan Ji; Sun, Chao; Xu, Baoji

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) has been shown to play a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. BDNF is also expressed in other hypothalamic nuclei; however, the role in the control of energy balance for BDNF produced in these structures remains largely unknown. We found that deleting the Bdnf gene in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) during embryogenesis using the Sf1-Cre transgene had no effect on body weight in mice. In contrast, deleting the Bdnf gene in the adult VMH using Cre-expressing virus led to significant hyperphagia and obesity. These observations indicate that the lack of a hyperphagia phenotype in the Sf1-Cre/Bdnf mutant mice is likely due to developmental compensation. To investigate the role of BDNF expressed in other hypothalamic areas, we employed the hypothalamus-specific Nkx2.1-Cre transgene to delete the Bdnf gene. We found that the Nkx2.1-Cre transgene could abolish BDNF expression in many hypothalamic nuclei, but not in the PVH, and that the resulting mutant mice developed modest obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. Thus, BDNF produced in the VMH plays a role in regulating energy intake. Furthermore, BDNF expressed in hypothalamic areas other than PVH and VMH is also involved in the control of energy expenditure.

  14. Influence of angiotensin II receptor subtypes of the paraventricular nucleus on the physiological responses induced by angiotensin II injection into the medial septal area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Wilson Abrão

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We determined the effects of losartan and PD 123319 (antagonists of the AT1 and AT2 angiotensin receptors, respectively, and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II (a relatively peptide antagonist of angiotensin receptors injected into the paraventricular nucleus (PVN on water and 3% NaCl intake, and the diuretic, natriuretic, and pressor effects induced by administration of angiotensin II (ANG II into the medial septal area (MSA of conscious rats. METHODS: Holtzman rats were used . Animals were anesthetized with tribromoethanol (20 mg per 100 grams of body weight, ip. A stainless steel guide cannula was implanted into the MSA and PVN. All drugs were injected in 0.5-mul volumes for 10-15 seconds. Seven days after brain surgery, water and 3% NaCl intake, urine and sodium excretion, and arterial blood pressure were measured. RESULTS: Losartan (40 nmol and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II (40 nmol completely eliminated whereas PD 123319 (40 nmol partially blocked the increase in water and sodium intake and the increase in arterial blood pressure induced by ANG II (10 nmol injected into the MSA. The PVN administration of PD 123319 and [Sar¹, Ala8] ANG II blocked whereas losartan attenuated the diuresis and natriuresis induced by MSA administration of ANG II. CONCLUSION: MSA involvement with PVN on water and sodium homeostasis and arterial pressure modulation utilizing ANGII receptors is suggested.

  15. Hypothalamic CaMKKβ mediates glucagon anorectic effect and its diet-induced resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, Mar; Al-Massadi, Omar; Gallego, Rosalía; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; López, Miguel; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glucagon receptor antagonists and humanized glucagon antibodies are currently studied as promising therapies for obesity and type II diabetes. Among its variety of actions, glucagon reduces food intake, but the molecular mechanisms mediating this effect as well as glucagon resistance are totally unknown. Methods Glucagon and adenoviral vectors were administered in specific hypothalamic nuclei of lean and diet-induced obese rats. The expression of neuropeptides controlling food intake was performed by in situ hybridization. The regulation of factors of the glucagon signaling pathway was assessed by western blot. Results The central injection of glucagon decreased feeding through a hypothalamic pathway involving protein kinase A (PKA)/Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. More specifically, the central injection of glucagon increases PKA activity and reduces protein levels of CaMKKβ and its downstream target phosphorylated AMPK in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC). Consistently, central glucagon significantly decreased AgRP expression. Inhibition of PKA and genetic activation of AMPK in the ARC blocked glucagon-induced anorexia in lean rats. Genetic down-regulation of glucagon receptors in the ARC stimulates fasting-induced hyperphagia. Although glucagon was unable to decrease food intake in DIO rats, glucagon sensitivity was restored after inactivation of CaMKKβ, specifically in the ARC. Thus, glucagon decreases food intake acutely via PKA/CaMKKβ/AMPK dependent pathways in the ARC, and CaMKKβ mediates its obesity-induced hypothalamic resistance. Conclusions This work reveals the molecular underpinnings by which glucagon controls feeding that may lead to a better understanding of disease states linked to anorexia and cachexia. PMID:26909312

  16. Hypothalamic neuropeptides and the regulation of appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer A; Bloom, Stephen R

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptides released by hypothalamic neurons play a major role in the regulation of feeding, acting both within the hypothalamus, and at other appetite regulating centres throughout the brain. Where classical neurotransmitters signal only within synapses, neuropeptides diffuse over greater distances affecting both nearby and distant neurons expressing the relevant receptors, which are often extrasynaptic. As well as triggering a behavioural output, neuropeptides also act as neuromodulators: altering the response of neurons to both neurotransmitters and circulating signals of nutrient status. The mechanisms of action of hypothalamic neuropeptides with established roles in feeding, including melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), the orexins, α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), agouti-gene related protein (AgRP), neuropeptide Y, and oxytocin, are reviewed in this article, with emphasis laid on both their effects on appetite regulating centres throughout the brain, and on examining the evidence for their physiological roles. In addition, evidence for the involvement of several putative appetite regulating hypothalamic neuropeptides is assessed including, ghrelin, cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), neuropeptide W and the galanin-like peptides. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central control of Food Intake'.

  17. Hypothalamic-endocrine aspects in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersén, Asa; Björkqvist, Maria

    2006-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and fatal disorder caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat in the HD gene, resulting in a mutant form of the protein huntingtin. Wild-type and mutant huntingtin are expressed in most tissues of the body but the normal function of huntingtin is not fully known. In HD, the neuropathology is characterized by intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions of huntingtin aggregates, and cell death primarily in striatum and cerebral cortex. However, hypothalamic atrophy occurs at early stages of HD with loss of orexin- and somatostatin-containing cell populations. Several symptoms of HD such as sleep disturbances, alterations in circadian rhythm, and weight loss may be due to hypothalamic dysfunction. Endocrine changes including increased cortisol levels, reduced testosterone levels and increased prevalence of diabetes are found in HD patients. In HD mice, alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs as well as pancreatic beta-cell and adipocyte dysfunction. Increasing evidence points towards important pathology of the hypothalamus and the endocrine system in HD. As many neuroendocrine factors are secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid, blood and urine, it is possible that their levels may reflect the disease state in the central nervous system. Investigating neuroendocrine changes in HD opens up the possibility of finding biomarkers to evaluate future therapies for HD, as well as of identifying novel targets for therapeutic interventions.

  18. Effects of hypothalamic neurodegeneration on energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Wanting Xu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal aging in humans and rodents is accompanied by a progressive increase in adiposity. To investigate the role of hypothalamic neuronal circuits in this process, we used a Cre-lox strategy to create mice with specific and progressive degeneration of hypothalamic neurons that express agouti-related protein (Agrp or proopiomelanocortin (Pomc, neuropeptides that promote positive or negative energy balance, respectively, through their opposing effects on melanocortin receptor signaling. In previous studies, Pomc mutant mice became obese, but Agrp mutant mice were surprisingly normal, suggesting potential compensation by neuronal circuits or genetic redundancy. Here we find that Pomc-ablation mice develop obesity similar to that described for Pomc knockout mice, but also exhibit defects in compensatory hyperphagia similar to what occurs during normal aging. Agrp-ablation female mice exhibit reduced adiposity with normal compensatory hyperphagia, while animals ablated for both Pomc and Agrp neurons exhibit an additive interaction phenotype. These findings provide new insight into the roles of hypothalamic neurons in energy balance regulation, and provide a model for understanding defects in human energy balance associated with neurodegeneration and aging.

  19. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehlecke, Robert

    2004-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various

  1. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from o...

  2. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia

    OpenAIRE

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M.V.; Laak, ter, H.J.; Heins, M.S.; Norren, van, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS....

  3. Paradoxical sleep deprivation activates hypothalamic nuclei that regulate food intake and stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Milene de Oliveira Lara; Sinigaglia-Coimbra, Rita; Kawakami, Suzi Emiko; Tufik, Sergio; Suchecki, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    A large body of evidence has shown that prolonged paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) results in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation, and in loss of body weight despite an apparent increase of food intake, reflecting increased energy expenditure. The flowerpot technique for PSD is an efficient paradigm for investigating the relationships among metabolic regulation and stress response. The purpose of the present study was to examine the mechanisms involved in the effects of 96 h of PSD on metabolism regulation, feeding behaviour and stress response by studying corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and orexin (ORX) immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei. Once-daily assessments of body weight, twice-daily measurements of (spillage-corrected) food intake, and once-daily determinations of plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone were made throughout PSD or at corresponding times in control rats (CTL). Immunoreactivity for CRH in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and for ORX in the hypothalamic lateral area was evaluated at the end of the experimental period. PSD resulted in increased diurnal, but not nocturnal, food intake, producing no significant changes in global food intake. PSD augmented the immunoreactivity for CRH and plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels, characterizing activation of the HPA axis. PSD also markedly increased the ORX immunoreactivity. The average plasma level of corticosterone correlated negatively with body weight gain throughout PSD. These results indicate that augmented ORX and CRH immunoreactivity in specific hypothalamic nuclei may underlie some of the metabolic changes consistently described in PSD.

  4. Hanford 100N Area Apatite Emplacement: Laboratory Results of Ca-Citrate-PO4 Solution Injection and Sr-90 Immobilization in 100N Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szecsody, James E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Moore, Robert C.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Girvin, Donald C.; McKinley, James P.; Truex, Michael J.; Phillips, Jerry L.

    2007-10-01

    This report summarizes laboratory scale studies investigating the remediation of Sr-90 by Ca-citrate-PO4 solution injection/infiltration to support field injection activities in the Hanford 100N area. This study is focused on experimentally testing whether this remediation technology can be effective under field scale conditions to mitigate Sr-90 migration 100N area sediments into the Columbia River. Sr-90 is found primarily adsorbed to sediments by ion exchange (99% adsorbed, < 1% in groundwater) in the upper portion of the unconfined aquifer and lower vadose zone. Although primarily adsorbed, Sr-90 is still considered a high mobility risk as it is mobilized by seasonal river stage increases and by plumes of higher ionic strength relative to groundwater. This remediation technology relies upon the Ca-citrate-PO4 solution forming apatite precipitate [Ca6(PO4)10(OH)2], which incorporates some Sr-90 during initial precipitation and additionally slowly incorporates Sr-90 by solid phase substitution for Ca. Sr substitution occurs because Sr-apatite is thermodynamically more stable than Ca-apatite. Once the Sr-90 is in the apatite structure, Sr-90 will decay to Y-90 (29.1 y half-life) then Zr-90 (64.1 h half-life) without the potential for migration into the Columbia River. For this technology to be effective, sufficient apatite needs to be emplaced in sediments to incorporate Sr and Sr-90 for 300 years (~10 half-lives of Sr-90), and the rate of incorporation needs to exceed the natural groundwater flux rate of Sr in the 100N area. A primary objective of this study is to supply an injection sequence to deliver sufficient apatite into subsurface sediments that minimizes initial mobility of Sr-90, which occurs because the injection solution has a higher ionic strength compared to groundwater. This can be accomplished by sequential injections of low, then high concentration injection of Ca-citrate-PO4 solutions. Assessment of low concentration Ca-citrate-PO4, citrate-PO4

  5. Hypothalamic neuronal targets activated by neuropeptide S%神经肽S激活下丘脑靶神经元的分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫琼; 邵玉峰; 赵鹏; 孔祥攀; 姜信诚; 侯一平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the distributions of neuropeptide S (NPS) induced neuronal activation in hypothalamus in rats because NPS,a newly identified neuropeptide,was presumed to activate the hypothalamic neurons through its receptors to participate hypothalamic physiological regulation.Methods Fos immunohistochemistry was employed to label the activated neurons following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS (1 nmol,n=6) and saline (n=6).The distribution and number of fos immunoreactive (-IR) neurons in the hypothalamus were observed,counted and statistically analyzed.Results The number of fos-IR neurons induced by NPS in the suprachiasmatic nucleus,paraventricular nucleus,dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus,ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus,arcuate nucleus,perifornical nucleus,and the ventral and dorsal tuberomammillary nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area were respectively increased by 322%,108%,274%,126%,267%,520%,641%,586% and 378% compared with saline (P <0.0001).Conclusion NPS-induced a large number of active neurons in the hypothalamus suggest that NPS is involved in hypothalamic physiological regulation including sleep-wake cycle,emotion,feeding,circadian rhythm,temperature and neuroendocrine.%目的 推测新鉴定的神经肽S (NPS)经其受体激活下丘脑神经元参与下丘脑生理调节,运用神经功能活动形态定位法确定NPS在下丘脑靶神经元的分布.方法 注射NPS(1 nmol,n=6)和生理盐水(n=6),c-fos免疫组化学分别标记大鼠中枢fos免疫反应神经元在下丘脑的分布,并统计分析fos免疫反应神经元数量在各核的变化.结果 与生理盐水比较,NPS增加fos免疫反应神经元,数量分别为下丘脑视交叉上核322%,室旁核108%,背内侧核274%,腹内侧核126%,弓状核267%,穹窿周核520%,结节乳头体腹侧核641%,背侧核586%,外侧区378% (P <0.0001).结论 NPS激活下丘脑上述靶神经元,可能与下丘脑睡眠觉醒周期、

  6. Medroxyprogesterone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medroxyprogesterone intramuscular (into a muscle) injection and medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous (under the skin) injection are used to prevent pregnancy. Medroxyprogesterone subcutaneous injection is also used to treat endometriosis (a condition in which ...

  7. Pentamidine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentamidine injection is used to treat pneumonia caused by a fungus called Pneumocystis carinii. It is in ... Pentamidine injection comes as powder to be mixed with liquid to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) ...

  8. Exercise training does not enhance hypothalamic responsiveness to leptin or ghrelin in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, M L; Andrews, Z B; Watt, M J

    2014-02-01

    The detection of hormone and nutrient signals by the hypothalamus is blunted in obesity and contributes to dysregulated energy homeostasis. We investigated whether aerobic exercise training would improve long-term hypothalamic sensitivity to both leptin and ghrelin, independent of acute exercise-induced signalling. Male C57Bl/6J mice were fed either a chow or high-fat diet for 6 weeks, then remained sedentary on their respective diet, or completed 6 weeks of treadmill exercise training with a progressive increase in exercise volume and intensity. Food intake and hypothalamic signalling were assessed in mice injected with leptin or ghrelin at least 24 h after the last exercise bout. Exercise training reduced body mass, increased daily food intake and improved glucose tolerance. Intraperitoneal leptin administration reduced food intake in lean and obese mice, and this was not enhanced after exercise training. Leptin-mediated activation of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 in the arcuate nucleus and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus was not enhanced with exercise training. Ghrelin increased food intake and c-Fos positive neurones in the hypothalamus in lean and obese mice, and these physiological and molecular responses were not enhanced with exercise training. This suggests that the previously reported exercise effects on sensitising hypothalamic signalling and food intake responses may be limited to the period immediately after an exercise bout, and are not a result of stable structural or molecular changes that occur with exercise training. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  9. Numerical modelling of crustal deformation due to fluid extraction and re-injection in the Hengill geothermal area in South Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncu, Daniel; Árnadóttir, Thóra; Ali, Tabrez; Hooper, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Several high temperature geothermal energy production fields are currently harnessed in Iceland. One of these is located at the Hengill triple junction, where the oblique plate motion along the Reykjanes peninsula is partitioned between the E-W oriented transform along the South Iceland Seismic Zone (SISZ) and spreading across the Western Volcanic Zone in SW Iceland. The Hengill volcano is a high temperature geothermal area that is utilized by the Hellisheiði and Nesjavellir power plants. The regions around the power plants are subject to surface deformation due to several processes. These include the motion of the Earth's crust due to plate spreading, co- and post seismic deformation due to earthquakes in the South Iceland Seismic Zone and deformation due to water and steam extraction and wastewater re-injection near geothermal power plants. We measure surface displacement in the Hengill area using both GPS and InSAR data. The former are obtained from four continuous and more than 15 campaign GPS stations in the area, with time-series starting after two M6 earthquakes on 29 May 2008 in Ölfus - the westernmost part of the SISZ. The InSAR data consist of 10 images taken by the TerraSar-X mission, starting October 2009. The InSAR time-series has a temporal resolution of 1 to 3 images per year, taken at an incidence angle of approximately 30° from the vertical. In the InSAR data we can see a clear subsidence signal in the proximity of the power plants with a maximum of ~24 mm/yr in Line-of-Sight direction (LOS) at Hellisheiði, after correcting for plate motion. The subsidence is elongated in NNE-SSW direction and possibly related to the orientation of the Hengill fissure swarm. In addition to subsidence, we observe an uplift signal of ca. 10 mm/yr in LOS west of the Hellisheiði site, potentially due to wastewater re-injection in the area. The area of maximum uplift is located close to the epicenters of two M4 earthquakes that occurred in October 2011. We run

  10. [Safe injection rooms and police crackdowns in areas with heavy drug dealing. Evaluation by counting discarded syringes collected from the public space].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecino, Carmen; Villalbí, Joan R; Guitart, Anna; Espelt, Albert; Bartroli, Montserrat; Castellano, Yolanda; Brugal, M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of drug injection in public places is analysed using as indicator the number of syringes collected from public spaces, evaluating as well the influence of public health harm reduction interventions and of police actions, with a before and after quasi experimental study. Monthly syringe counts on the semester before and after each intervention were compared both in the involved district and in the city as a whole, using the U and z tests with a 95% confidence level. The average number of collected syringes drops from 13.132 in 2004 to 3.190 in 2012. Comparing indicators before and after health and police interventions, the opening of a facility with a supervised drug consumption room in the inner city was associated with a huge reduction in the number of abandoned syringes in the city, while its number did not rise in the district where the facility was located. The subsequent opening of another drug consumption room did not have a significant impact in collected syringes in the area. Some police interventions in 2005-2006 and 2011 had a significant impact in the indicators of the involved districts, while others did not. Harm reduction programs might have a favourable impact on drug injection in public spaces and related syringe presence. Some police interventions appear to have an impact while others do not or just have a modest local and temporary effect.

  11. Neuronal glucoprivation enhances hypothalamic histamine turnover in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oohara, A; Yoshimatsu, H; Kurokawa, M; Oishi, R; Saeki, K; Sakata, T

    1994-08-01

    Histamine (HA) turnover in the rat hypothalamus following insufficient energy supply due to glucoprivation was examined after administration of insulin or 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). HA turnover was assessed by accumulation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MH), a major metabolite of brain HA, following administration of pargyline. Intraperitoneal injection of 1, 2, and 4 U/kg of insulin, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased pargyline-induced accumulation of t-MH. Accumulation of t-MH due to pargyline was inversely related to the concomitant plasma glucose concentration after different doses of insulin. The level of t-MH accumulated by pargyline did not change compared with that of controls, when a euglycemic condition was maintained or insulin at a dose of 6 mU per rat was infused into the third cerebroventricle. Intracerebroventricular infusion of 24 mumol per rat of 2-DG, which had no influence on steady-state levels of HA and t-MH, increased the level of t-MH enhanced by pargyline. The results indicate that an increase in hypothalamic HA turnover in response to glucoprivation may be involved in homeostatic regulation of energy metabolism in the brain.

  12. Development of a data management system for assistance in conducting Area of Reviews (AORs) on Class II injection wells in Oklahoma. Quarterly report, July--September, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, M.W.

    1995-10-25

    Project objectives are to provide the resources and capabilities to permit the State of Oklahoma to conduct Area of Review (AOR) variance analysis on a statewide level including: (1) the analysis and identification of areas which may qualify for AOR variances; (2) the correlation of information from various databases and automation systems to conduct AORs in areas that do not qualify for variances; (3) the evaluation of the risk of pollution, during permitting and monitoring, using risk based data analysis; and (4) the ability to conduct spatial analysis of injection well data in conjunction with other geographically referenced information. The division successfully converted its mainframe computer surety system to the new client server network and implemented it on September 29, 1995. The division currently lacks sufficient storage space to bring the existing oil and gas spatially referenced data systems in-house and fully integrate the systems for use in the determination of AORs or AOR variances. The second installment of the awarded grant allows for the purchase of the developmental server that will provide the minimum computer storage space to convert the remainder of the mainframe computer systems.

  13. Giant solid-cystic hypothalamic hamartoma. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfer, Christian; Kasprian, Gregor; Mühlebner, Angelika; Czech, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare lesions for which different classification schemes have been proposed. The authors report on an exceptionally large solid-cystic hamartoma that led to hydrocephalus, precocious puberty, and intractable gelastic seizures. They discuss potential mechanisms of the development of hypothalamic hamartomas.

  14. Direct Cellular Peptidomics of Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer W.; Atkins, Norman; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Gillette, Martha U.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical complexity of cell-to-cell communication has emerged as a fundamental challenge to understanding brain systems. This is certainly true for the hypothalamus, where neuropeptide signals are heterogeneous, localized and dynamic. Thus far, most hypothalamic peptidomic studies have centered on the entire structure; however, recent advances in collection strategies and analytical technologies have enabled direct, high-resolution peptidomic profiles focused on two regions of interest, the suprachiasmatic and supraoptic nuclei, including their subregions and individual cells. Suites of peptides now can be identified and probed for function. High spatial and analytical sensitivities reveal that discrete hypothalamic nuclei have distinct peptidomic signatures. Peptidomic discovery not only reveals unanticipated complexity, but also peptides previously unknown that act as key circuit components. Analysis of tissue releasates identifies peptides secreted into the extracellular environment and available for transmitting intercellular signals. Direct sampling techniques define peptide-releasate profiles in spatial, temporal and event-dependent patterns. These approaches are providing remarkable new insights into the complexity of neuropeptidergic cell-to-cell signaling central to neuroendocrine physiology. PMID:21334363

  15. The cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF activates hypothalamic urocortin-expressing neurons both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Purser

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold at 48 h. We then performed intracerebroventricular injections of 0.5 mg/mL CNTF into mice, and examined its effects on urocortin-1 neurons post-exposure. Through double-label immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies against c-Fos and urocortin-1, we showed that central CNTF administration significantly activated urocortin-1 neurons in specific areas of the hypothalamus. Taken together, our studies point to a potential role for CNTF in regulating hypothalamic urocortin-1-expressing neurons to mediate its recognized effects on energy homeostasis, neuronal proliferaton/survival, and/or neurogenesis.

  16. [THE INFLUENCE OF MELANIN ON THE GASTRIC MUCOSA AND HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-ADRENOCORTICAL AXIS UNDER ACUTE STRESS CONDITIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golyshkin, D V; Falalyeyeva, T M; Neporada, K S; Beregova, T V

    2015-01-01

    We studied the influence of melanin from yeast-like fungi Nadsoniella nigra strain X1 on the changes of the levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in blood serum of rats, adrenal glands weight ratio and lesions of the gastric mucosa (GM) caused by neuromuscular tension by Selye. Melanin administration restored functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that was evident by an increase of ACTH concentration by 42% and a decrease of cortisol concentration by 19% compared to the rats injected with water (group 2). In rats treated with melanin, the adrenal glands weight ratio, didn't differ from intact control group of the rats. Melanin decreased ulcers area by 64% and reduced the content of free hydroxyproline by 29%, the free fucose by 16% and the free hexuronic acids by 24% in the GM compared to the group 2 of the rats. It is established that the mechanism of melanin stress-protective properties are based on its regulation of the glucocorticoids secretion and prevention of GM collagen and extracellular matrix substances depolymerization. Melanin possesses gastroprotective properties and is a perspective agent for preventing and treatment of consequences of the stress influence on the organism.

  17. The nutritional induction of COUP-TFII gene expression in ventromedial hypothalamic neurons is mediated by the melanocortin pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sabra-Makke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nuclear receptor chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII is an important coordinator of glucose homeostasis. We report, for the first time, a unique differential regulation of its expression by the nutritional status in the mouse hypothalamus compared to peripheral tissues. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps and insulinopenic mice, we show that insulin upregulates its expression in the hypothalamus. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrate that COUP-TFII gene expression is restricted to a subpopulation of ventromedial hypothalamic neurons expressing the melanocortin receptor. In GT1-7 hypothalamic cells, the MC4-R agonist MTII leads to a dose dependant increase of COUP-TFII gene expression secondarily to a local increase in cAMP concentrations. Transfection experiments, using a COUP-TFII promoter containing a functional cAMP responsive element, suggest a direct transcriptional activation by cAMP. Finally, we show that the fed state or intracerebroventricular injections of MTII in mice induce an increased hypothalamic COUP-TFII expression associated with a decreased hepatic and pancreatic COUP-TFII expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These observations strongly suggest that hypothalamic COUP-TFII gene expression could be a central integrator of insulin and melanocortin signaling pathway within the ventromedial hypothalamus. COUP-TFII could play a crucial role in brain integration of circulating signal of hunger and satiety involved in energy balance regulation.

  18. The role of the chorda tympani nerve in the activation of the rat hypothalamic histaminergic system by leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto-Ishizuka, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamatodani, A

    2001-03-01

    A possible pathway through which leptin activates the histaminergic system was studied using in vivo microdialysis in rats. Intraperitoneal injection of leptin (1.3 mg/kg) caused a significant increase in hypothalamic histamine release, however, its intracerebroventricular injection (10 microg/rat) did not cause any significant changes in the release. Furthermore, leptin (1.3 mg/kg) had no effect on histamine release in rats whose chorda tympani nerves, a branch of the facial nerve which mediates taste information, were transected bilaterally. These findings indicate that leptin activates the histaminergic system by the peripheral signal inputs via the chorda tympani resulting in the suppression of food intake.

  19. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarez-Bolado Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E9.5 contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia. Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5 give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly

  20. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  1. Insights on the injection mechanisms inferred from AMS fabrics of sand injectites in a turbiditic system, the exemple of Bevon area of the SE Basin (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robion, Philippe; Mehl, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    We propose to investigate the set up mechanisms of sands injection in the case of dykes injected in host marls of Aptian-Albian age in the Vocontian basin (SE France). Several models have been proposed for a downward injection of the dyke in the Bevons area and we guess that AMS fabric investigations can be used to infer the flow direction. 144 drill cores distributed on 14 sites were sampled, among which 8 sites in the injectites and 6 sites in the host rocks. The studied dykes are generally of a few decimeters thick and are setting up in both in vertical or oblique position with respect to the subhorizontal bedding of the host rocks. There were sampled from one side to the other in order to track the flow direction by identification of imbricated fabric. Magnetic mineralogy, i.e. unblocking temperature inferred from IRM 3 axes demagnetization, indicates that the ferromagnetics s.l. mineralogy is dominated by an assemblage of magnetite (unblocking temperature Tub=580°C) and pyrrhotite (Tub=325°C). Magnetic susceptibility is low, typical for siliciclastic rocks, ranging from 4x10-5 up to 1.7x10-4 SI. Degree of magnetic anisotropy is likely representative of AMS measurements in sedimentary rocks with weak values, below than 5 %. In marly host rocks magnetic mineralogy is dominated by pyrrhotite associated with magnetite and both the magnetic susceptibility and degree of anisotropy are slightly lower than for injectites. Regarding magnetic fabric axes distribution, despite some dispersion, the results show that minimum axes of AMS (K3) are parallel to the dyke plane, and maximum axes (K1) are roughly in horizontal position. In marly host rocks, the magnetic fabric is related to tectonic shortening. We interpret that the host rocks have recorded the regional tectonic imprint while the magnetic fabric of the injectites are related to early sedimentary processes. The mechanism of set up proposed to explain the magnetic fabric in the Bevon injectites is a step

  2. Hypothalamic inflammation: a double-edged sword to nutritional diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Dongsheng; Liu, Tiewen

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is one of the master regulators of various physiological processes, including energy balance and nutrient metabolism. These regulatory functions are mediated by discrete hypothalamic regions that integrate metabolic sensing with neuroendocrine and neural controls of systemic physiology. Neurons and non-neuronal cells in these hypothalamic regions act supportively to execute metabolic regulations. Under conditions of brain and hypothalamic inflammation, which may result from overnutrition-induced intracellular stresses or disease-associated systemic inflammatory factors, extracellular and intracellular environments of hypothalamic cells are disrupted, leading to central metabolic dysregulations and various diseases. Recent research has begun to elucidate the effects of hypothalamic inflammation in causing diverse components of metabolic syndrome leading to diabetes and cardiovascular disease. These new understandings have provocatively expanded previous knowledge on the cachectic roles of brain inflammatory response in diseases, such as infections and cancers. This review describes the molecular and cellular characteristics of hypothalamic inflammation in metabolic syndrome and related diseases as opposed to cachectic diseases, and also discusses concepts and potential applications of inhibiting central/hypothalamic inflammation to treat nutritional diseases. PMID:22417140

  3. Risk factors for mortality caused by hypothalamic obesity in children with hypothalamic tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, B; Atay, Z; Guran, T; Abalı, S; Bas, S; Turan, S; Bereket, A

    2016-10-01

    Hypothalamic obesity (HyOb) is a common complication of childhood hypothalamic tumours. Patients with HyOb probably have a higher mortality rate than those with other types of obesity due in many cases to obstructive sleep apnoea/hypoventilation. To identify predictive factors for mortality caused by HyOb in children. Twenty children with HyOb secondary to hypothalamic tumours that were followed-up for ≥3 years and aged 6 years at diagnosis (3.71 ± 1.96 vs. 0.83 ± 0.73, P  1 SDS after 6 months of therapy (RR: 8.4, P obesity-related mortality rates were higher in the patients aged  0.05). The mortality rate was also 3.7-fold higher in the patients with a maximum BMI SDS ≥ 3 at any time during the first 3 years after therapy(P > 0.05). An increase in BMI SDS after 6 months of therapy was observed to be a risk factor for mortality caused by HyOb. In addition, age obesity is required. © 2015 World Obesity.

  4. Effects of Physical Exercise on the Intestinal Mucosa of Rats Submitted to a Hypothalamic Obesity Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J R; Freitas, J R; Grassiolli, S

    2016-10-01

    The small intestine plays a role in obesity as well as in satiation. However, the effect of physical exercise on the morphology and function of the small intestine during obesity has not been reported to date. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of physical exercise on morphological aspects of the rat small intestine during hypothalamic monosodium glutamate (MSG)-induced obesity. The rats were divided into four groups: Sedentary (S), Monosodium Glutamate (MSG), Exercised (E), and Exercised Monosodium Glutamate (EMSG). The MSG and EMSG groups received a daily injection of monosodium glutamate (4 g/kg) during the 5 first days after birth. The S and E groups were considered as control groups and received injections of saline. At weaning, at 21 days after birth, the EMSG and E groups were submitted to swimming practice 3 times a week until the 90th day, when all groups were sacrificed and the parameters studied recorded. Exercise significantly reduced fat deposits and the Lee Index in MSG-treated animals, and also reduced the thickness of the intestinal wall, the number of goblet cells and intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. However, physical activity alone increased the thickness and height of villi, and the depth of the crypts. In conclusion, regular physical exercise may alter the morphology or/and functions of the small intestine, reducing the prejudicial effects of hypothalamic obesity. Anat Rec, 299:1389-1396, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Management of optic chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbok, P.; Hentschel, S.; Almqvist, P.; Cochrane, D.D. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Div. of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Dept. of Surgery, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Poskitt, K. [Univ. of British Columbia, British Columbia' s Children' s Hospital, Dept. of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2002-05-01

    The management of optic chiasmatic gliomas is controversial, partly related to failure to separate out those tumors involving the optic chiasm only (chiasmatic tumors) from those also involving the hypothalamus (chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors). The purpose of this study was: (i) to analyze the outcomes of chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors separately; and (ii) to determine the appropriateness of recommending radical surgical resection for the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. A retrospective chart review of all newly diagnosed tumors involving the optic chiasm from 1982-1996 at British Columbia's Children's Hospital was performed. There were 32 patients less than 16 years of age, 14 with chiasmatic and 18 with chiasmatic/hypothalamic astrocytomas, with an average duration of follow-up of 5.8 years and 6.3 years, respectively. Ten of the patients with chiasmatic tumors and none with chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors had neurofibromatosis I. Thirteen of the 14 chiasmatic tumors were managed with observation only, and none had progression requiring active intervention. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors. eight patients had subtotal resections (>95% resection), six had partial resections (50-95%), three had limited resections (<50%), and one had no surgery. There were fewer complications associated with the limited resections, especially with respect to hypothalamic dysfunction. There was no correlation between the extent of resection (subtotal, partial, or limited) and the time to tumor progression (average 18 months). In conclusion, chiasmatic and chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors are different entities, which should be separated out for the Purposes of any study. For the chiasmatic/hypothalamic tumors, there was more morbidity and no prolongation of time to progression when radical resections were compared to more limited resections. Therefore, if surgery is performed, it may be appropriate to do a surgical procedure that strives only to provide a

  6. Doripenem Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called carbapenem antibiotics. It works by killing bacteria.Antibiotics such ... if you are allergic to doripenem injection; other carbapenem antibiotics such as imipenem/cilastatin (Primaxin) or meropenem ( ...

  7. Methotrexate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methotrexate injection is used alone or in combination with other medications to treat gestational trophoblastic tumors (a ... in bones) after surgery to remove the tumor. Methotrexate injection is also used to treat severe psoriasis ( ...

  8. Bendamustine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendamustine injection is used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white ... injection. You should use birth control to prevent pregnancy in yourself or your partner during your treatment ...

  9. Caspofungin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspofungin injection is used in adults and children 3 months of age and older to treat yeast ... people with a weakened ability to fight infection. Caspofungin injection is in a class of antifungal medications ...

  10. Temozolomide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temozolomide is used to treat certain types of brain tumors. Temozolomide is in a class of medications called alkylating ... Temozolomide injection comes as a powder to be added to fluid and injected over 90 minutes intravenously ( ...

  11. Pembrolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembrolizumab injection is used to treat melanoma (a type of skin cancer) that cannot be treated with ... who have a specific type of melanoma tumor. Pembrolizumab injection is also used to treat a certain ...

  12. Lacosamide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants like lacosamide injection to treat various conditions during ...

  13. Midazolam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called benzodiazepines. It works by slowing activity in the brain ... breast-feeding.talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of receiving midazolam injection if you ...

  14. Doxycycline Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxycycline injection is used to treat or prevent bacterial infections, including pneumonia and other respiratory tract infections. ... certain skin, genital, intestine, and urinary system infections. Doxycycline injection may be used to treat or prevent ...

  15. Paclitaxel Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... cancer, and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

  16. Etanercept Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will be using the prefilled syringe or automatic injection device, tell your doctor if you or the person who will be injecting the medication for you are allergic to rubber or latex.tell your doctor and pharmacist what ...

  17. Cyclosporine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyclosporine injection is used with other medications to prevent transplant rejection (attack of the transplanted organ by ... who have received kidney, liver, and heart transplants. Cyclosporine injection should only be used to treat people ...

  18. Estrogen Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estradiol cypionate and estradiol valerate forms of estrogen injection are used to treat hot flushes (hot ... should consider a different treatment. These forms of estrogen injection are also sometimes used to treat the ...

  19. Cefotaxime Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefotaxime injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria including pneumonia and other lower respiratory ... skin, blood, bone, joint, and urinary tract infections. Cefotaxime injection may also be used before surgery, and ...

  20. Synaptic contact between median preoptic neurons and subfornical organ neurons projecting to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hitoshi

    2017-04-01

    It is known that the median preoptic nucleus (POMe) sends dense projections to the subfornical organ (SFO). However, the functional significance of these projections have not been well discussed. In this electron microscopic study, we investigated the presence of synapses between POMe-derived axon terminals and SFO neurons that project to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). After injection of a retrograde tracer, wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase-colloidal gold complex, into the PVN, many labeled neurons were found in the SFO. In contrast, after injection of an anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine, in the POMe, abundant labeled axon varicosities were observed in the SFO. Using electron microscopy, synapses were identified between retrogradely labeled dendrites and cell bodies, and anterogradely labeled axon terminals, indicating that POMe neurons innervate SFO neurons projecting to the PVN. The possibility that POMe neurons play multiple roles in the neuronal circuit responsible for vasopressin release and/or cardiovascular regulation is also discussed.

  1. Different effects on bone strength and cell differentiation in pre pubertal caloric restriction versus hypothalamic suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, R N; Safadi, F F; Barbe, M F; Del Carpio-Cano, Fe; Popoff, S N; Yingling, V R

    2011-10-01

    Hypothalamic amenorrhea and energy restriction during puberty affect peak bone mass accrual. One hypothesis suggests energy restriction alters hypothalamic function resulting in suppressed estradiol levels leading to bone loss. However, both positive and negative results have been reported regarding energy restriction and bone strength. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate energy restriction and hypothalamic suppression during pubertal onset on bone mechanical strength and the osteogenic capacity of bone marrow-derived cells in two models: female rats treated with gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonists (GnRH-a) or 30% energy restriction. At 23 days of age, female Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to three groups: control group (C, n=10), GnRH-a group (n=10), and Energy Restriction (ER, n=12) group. GnRH-a animals received daily injections for 27 days. The animals in the ER group received 70% of the control animals' intake. After sacrifice (50 days of age), body weight, uterine and muscle weights were measured. Bone marrow-derived stromal cells were cultured and assayed for proliferation and differentiation into osteoblasts. Outcome measures included bone strength, bone histomorphometry and architecture, serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin. GnRH-a suppressed uterine weight, decreased osteoblast proliferation, bone strength, trabecular bone volume and architecture compared to control. Elevated serum IGF-1 and osteocalcin levels and body weight were found. The ER model had an increase in osteoblast proliferation compared to the GnRH-a group, similar bone strength relative to body weight and increased trabecular bone volume in the lumbar spine compared to control. The ER animals were smaller but had developed bone strength sufficient for their size. In contrast, suppressed estradiol via hypothalamic suppression resulted in bone strength deficits and trabecular bone volume loss. In summary, our results support the hypothesis that during periods of

  2. Ranitidine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranitidine injection comes as a solution (liquid) to be mixed with another fluid and injected intravenously (into a vein) over 5 to 20 minutes. Ranitidine may also be injected into a muscle. It is usually given every 6 to 8 hours, but may also be given ...

  3. Suppression of episodic growth hormone secretion in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: time-course studies on the hypothalamic pituitary axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murao, S; Sato, M; Tamaki, M; Niimi, M; Ishida, T; Takahara, J

    1995-10-01

    To elucidate the roles of the hypothalamic peptides, GH-releasing hormone (GRH) and somatostatin (SRIH), potentially responsible for altered GH dynamics in diabetes, we studied the time courses of their changes in level associated with altered GH secretion in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. Diabetic mice were used at 4, 7, and 14 days after STZ injection for analyses of 1) GH secretion in vivo, 2) hypothalamic GRH and SRIH messenger RNA (mRNA) levels, 3) pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents, and 4) pituitary GH response to GRH in vitro. GH secretion was completely suppressed 7 and 14 days after STZ injection. The hypothalamic GRH mRNA level was reduced to 59.8%, 61.2%, and 48.5% of control values at 4, 7, and 14 days, respectively. In contrast, the hypothalamic SRIH mRNA level was not altered at all of these time points. Pituitary GH mRNA and protein contents were significantly reduced to 70.2% and 61.5% of those in controls, respectively, only at 14 days. Pituitary GH responses to GRH at three doses (10, 50, and 250 nM) in vitro were remarkably increased at 4, 7, and 14 days. These findings indicate that the diabetic state rapidly and primarily inhibits hypothalamic GRH gene expression without affecting SRIH. A persistent decrease in hypothalamic GRH tone has been suggested to result in inhibition of GH synthesis in the pituitary. Enhancement of GH responsiveness to GRH may be due to the up-regulation of GRH receptors in the pituitary.

  4. Cerebral activations during viewing of food stimuli in adult patients with acquired structural hypothalamic damage: a functional neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C A; Powell, J L; Kemp, G J; Halford, J C G; Wilding, J P; Harrold, J A; Kumar, S V D; Cuthbertson, D J; Cross, A A; Javadpour, M; MacFarlane, I A; Stancak, A A; Daousi, C

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is common following hypothalamic damage due to tumours. Homeostatic and non-homeostatic brain centres control appetite and energy balance but their interaction in the presence of hypothalamic damage remains unknown. We hypothesized that abnormal appetite in obese patients with hypothalamic damage results from aberrant brain processing of food stimuli. We sought to establish differences in activation of brain food motivation and reward neurocircuitry in patients with hypothalamic obesity (HO) compared with patients with hypothalamic damage whose weight had remained stable. In a cross-sectional study at a University Clinical Research Centre, we studied 9 patients with HO, 10 age-matched obese controls, 7 patients who remained weight-stable following hypothalamic insult (HWS) and 10 non-obese controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the fasted state, 1 h and 3 h after a test meal, while subjects were presented with images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and non-food objects. Insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, Peptide YY and ghrelin were measured throughout the experiment, and appetite ratings were recorded. Mean neural activation in the posterior insula and lingual gyrus (brain areas linked to food motivation and reward value of food) in HWS were significantly lower than in the other three groups (P=0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between insulin levels and posterior insula activation (P=0.002). Neural pathways associated with food motivation and reward-related behaviour, and the influence of insulin on their activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of HO.

  5. Ocular Complications Following Autologous Fat Injections into Facial Area: Case Report of a Recovery from Visual Loss After Ophthalmic Artery Occlusion and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantyr, Aleksandra; Orski, Michał; Marchewka, Ida; Szuta, Mariusz; Orska, Małgorzata; Zapała, Jan

    2017-06-01

    With the increase in popularity of the use of cosmetic fillers in plastic and esthetic surgery, the possibility of severe ocular complications should not be neglected. Of the fillers used, autologous fat is the most common to cause permanent visual deterioration, one of the most severe complications associated with the use of cosmetic fillers. Here we present the first report of a complete recovery of visual acuity from an instance of visual loss with no light perception caused by ophthalmic artery occlusion of the right eye following autologous fat injection in the facial area. Immediate ophthalmological intervention and comprehensive therapy with prostaglandins and vinpocetine made it possible to restore retinal perfusion and achieve complete recovery of visual acuity. Awareness of the iatrogenic artery occlusions associated with facial fillers and the need for immediate treatment should be popularized among injectors to prevent devastating consequences, such as permanent vision loss. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  6. Serotonin 5-HT2C receptor-independent expression of hypothalamic NOR1, a novel modulator of food intake and energy balance, in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori, E-mail: knonogaki-tky@umin.ac.jp [Center of Excellence, Division of Molecular Metabolism and Diabetes, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Department of Lifestyle Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Center, Tohoku University (Japan); Kaji, Takao [Department of Lifestyle Medicine, Biomedical Engineering Center, Tohoku University (Japan); Ohba, Yukie; Sumii, Makiko [Center of Excellence, Division of Molecular Metabolism and Diabetes, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Wakameda, Mamoru; Tamari, Tomohiro [Charles River Laboratories Japan, Inc. (Japan)

    2009-08-21

    NOR1, Nur77 and Nurr1 are orphan nuclear receptors and members of the NR4A subfamily. Here, we report that the expression of hypothalamic NOR1 was remarkably decreased in mildly obese {beta}-endorphin-deficient mice and obese db/db mice with the leptin receptor mutation, compared with age-matched wild-type mice, whereas there were no genotypic differences in the expression of hypothalamic Nur77 or Nurr1 in these animals. The injection of NOR1 siRNA oligonucleotide into the third cerebral ventricle significantly suppressed food intake and body weight in mice. On the other hand, the decreases in hypothalamic NOR1 expression were not found in non-obese 5-HT2C receptor-deficient mice. Moreover, systemic administration of m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP), a 5-HT2C/1B receptor agonist, had no effect on hypothalamic NOR1 expression, while suppressing food intake in {beta}-endorphin-deficient mice. These findings suggest that 5-HT2C receptor-independent proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides regulate the expression of hypothalamic NOR1, which is a novel modulator of feeding behavior and energy balance.

  7. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  8. Indirect evidence for decreased hypothalamic somatostatinergic tone in anorexia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Støving, R K; Andersen, M; Flyvbjerg, A

    2002-01-01

    in the central feeding mechanism in anorexia nervosa (AN). Peripheral administration of pyridostigmine (PD) minimizes the release of hypothalamic SRIH. DESIGN: To study the influence of hypothalamic somatostatinergic inhibition on the exaggerated somatotroph responsiveness to GHRH in patients with severe AN, two...... indirectly to greater SRIH withdrawal and greater GHRH release in anorexia nervosa. Moreover, hypothalamic SRIH activity seems to be inversely related to cortisol levels, indirectly supporting the hypothesis that SRIH and CRH neuronal activity are inversely related in anorexia nervosa. Leptin, which...... is believed to act on hypothalamic feeding mechanisms, seems to be positively related to SRIH activity. Finally, the present data demonstrate that the potentiating effect of pyridostigmine in anorexia nervosa is related to body mass index and increases upon weight gain, suggesting that the low...

  9. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the control of energy metabolism and food intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eDrougard

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC and agouti-related protein (AgRP/neuropeptide Y (NPY neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,..., neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,.... The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders.

  10. Hypothalamic germinoma masquerading as superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vethakkan, Shireene R; Venugopal, Yogeswari; Tan, Alexander T B; Paramasivam, Sharmila S; Ratnasingam, Jeyakantha; Razak, Rohaya A; Alias, Azmi; Kassim, Fauziah; Choong, Karen

    2013-01-01

    To report a case of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome secondary to hypothalamic germinoma. We describe the clinical presentation, diagnostic work-up, management, and clinical course of a patient admitted with SMA syndrome who was subsequently found to have a hypothalamic germinoma. An adolescent boy was admitted to the surgical ward with progressive weight loss over a 2 year period and postprandial vomiting. He was diagnosed with SMA syndrome based on evidence of proximal duodenal dilatation, extrinsic compression of the distal duodenum, and a narrowed aortomesenteric angle (16°). Investigations performed to exclude thyrotoxicosis unexpectedly revealed secondary hypothyroidism and further evaluation demonstrated evidence of pan-hypopituitarism. Psychiatric evaluation excluded anorexia nervosa and bulimia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain revealed a heterogeneously enhancing hypothalamic lesion, but a normal pituitary gland. Hormone replacement with hydrocortisone, desmopressin, testosterone, and thyroxine resulted in weight gain and resolution of gastrointestinal symptoms. A transventricular endoscopic biopsy subsequently confirmed a hypothalamic germinoma and he was referred to an oncologist. SMA syndrome secondary to severe weight loss is an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While there have been reports of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and thyrotoxicosis manifesting as SMA syndrome, there are no published reports to date of SMA syndrome secondary to hypothalamic/pituitary disease. Management of SMA syndrome is conservative, as symptoms of intestinal obstruction resolve with weight gain following treatment of the underlying cause. Awareness of this uncommon presentation of endocrine cachexia/hypothalamic disease will prevent unnecessary laparotomies and a misdiagnosis of an eating disorder.

  11. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON HYPOTHALAMIC MECHANISMS OF ANALGESIA INDUCED BY FOUR KINDS OF ACUPUNCTURE THERAPIES IN ADJUVANT ARTHRITIS RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Yi; LIANG Fan-rong; TAO Qiao-lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the mechanisms of analgesia induced by four kinds of acupuncture therapies at the hypothalamic level in adjuvant arthritic rats. Methods: Forty-eight SD rats were randomized into normal, model, electroacupuncture (EA), filiform needle (FN), pricking blood-letting (BL) and point injection (PI) groups, with 8 cases in each. EA (20-100 Hz, 2-4 V and duration of 20 min), FN, BL PI were respectively applied to "Kunlun" (昆仑BL 60). Arthritis model was established by injecting complete Freund's adjuvant (0.1 mL) into the rat's right foot pad. Behavioral reactions, pain threshold (latency of tail flick to heat stimulation) and local swelling severity (foot volume) were detected; the contents of β-endorphin (β-EP) and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were assayed with radioimmunoassay; and the expression of pro-opi-omelanocortin (POMC) mRNA in hypothalamus were determined with hybridization method. Results: The pain threshold was significantly enhanced by all the four kinds of acupuncture therapies, and the effects of EA and PI were more obvious (P0.05). The content of β-EP in the hypothalamus was obviously elevated by EA and FN (P0.05). The content of ACTH in hypothalamus was considerably elevated by PI (P<0.05), but not by the other three therapies. The expression of POMCmRNA in hypothalamus was significantly strengthened by EA and FN (P<0.01), but not by the other two therapies. Conclusion: EA, filiform needle, blood-letting and point-injection all can produce analgesic effect in adjuvant arthritis rats, the effect of EA and filiform needle may be related to their resultant increase of hypothalamic β-EP, and that of point-injection related to the increase of hypothalamic ACTH level.

  12. [Clinical and electroencephalogram study of 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Eiko; Oguni, Hirokazu; Funatsuka, Makoto; Usugi, Tomoko; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Kitami; Nagaki, Shigeru; Osawa, Makiko; Ono, Yuko; Yamane, Fumitaka; Hori, Tomokatsu

    2005-09-01

    We retrospectively studied 5 children with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) to elucidate the clinical, neuroimaging and electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics of this disorder. In all cases, high resolution MRI scans demonstrated an intrahypothalamic mass protruding into the 3rd ventricle. An initial symptom was epileptic attack in 4 cases and precocious puberty in the remaining one. Gelastic seizures developed in 4 of 5 patients at ranging from 2 days to 11 years of age. The ictal EEGs during the gelastic seizures showed diffuse attenuation of background activity, followed by rhythmic slow discharges either diffusely or in the central area. Gamma-knife radiosurgery was performed on 2 cases whose seizures were resistant to available antiepileptic drugs. One of the 2 patients was responded significantly to this treatment, showing the disappearance of combined attacks and a marked reduction of the generalized spike-waves discharges. A more aggressive therapy, including gamma-knife radiosurgery and surgical treatment, should be considered for patients whose seizures are resistant to the medical treatment and causing deterioration of intelligence and behavioral problem.

  13. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure...... build-up was evaluated indirectly from the changes in the flow rate between subcutaneous injections and air injections. This method enabled the tissue counter pressure to be evaluated without a formal clinical study approval. The measurements were coupled to a model for the pressure evolution...

  14. Injection of Retrograde Beads into the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc) and Medial Prefronral Cortex (mPFC) to Isolate Projection-Specific Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA)

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Jessica Walsh, Allyson Friedman, Dipesh Chaudhury, Barbara Juarez, Stacy Ku & Ming-Hu Han ### Abstract Retrograde dyes, such as lumafluors, have been used as tracers to visualize neurons that project to a specific target region. Injection of these dyes provides an important method in being able to understand the functional role of projection-specific neurons. Lumafluors can be directly injected into a target brain region of a mouse and dye positive cells from the project...

  15. Injection MD

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Bracco, C; Drosdal, L; Gianfelice, E; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Papaphilippou, Y; Vanbavinckhove, G

    2012-01-01

    This note summarizes the results obtained at injection during the 2nd MD block and the floating MD block in July. Highlights are presented for injection in the LHC with the Q20 SPS optics, influence of the supercycle and injection with 25 ns bunch spacing. Beams were successfully injected into the LHC using the Q20 optics [1, 3]. Small corrections were needed to steer the beam in the transfer lines. Dispersion measurements were conducted for both beams. The horizontal normalized dispersion in TI2 was a factor 2 smaller for Q20 with respect to Q26, for TI8 on the other hand the opposite was observed. The results for injection loss dependency on super cycle composition show only a small increase in losses for beam 2. The losses observed must therefore mainly come from other sources such as shot-by-shot stability or quality of scraping. For the injection with 25 ns bunch spacing bunches were injected for both beams. For B1 up to the maximum of 288 bunches. For B2 on the other only up to 144 bunches were injected...

  16. Subcutaneous Injections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria

    This thesis is about visualization and characterization of the tissue-device interaction during subcutaneous injection. The tissue pressure build-up during subcutaneous injections was measured in humans. The insulin pen FlexTouchr (Novo Nordisk A/S) was used for the measurements and the pressure...... build-up was evaluated indirectly from the changes in the flow rate between subcutaneous injections and air injections. This method enabled the tissue counter pressure to be evaluated without a formal clinical study approval. The measurements were coupled to a model for the pressure evolution...... in subcutaneous tissue, based on mass conservation and flow in a porous medium. From the measurements the flow permeability and bulk modulus of the tissue were determined. In the adipose tissue the drug forms a bolus from where it is absorbed by the blood capillaries. The spatial distribution of the injected...

  17. Effects of oral and parenteral quinine on rats with ventromedial hypothalamic knife-cut obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, J; Bray, G A; Fisler, J S

    1984-06-01

    The addition of quinine to the food reversed the obesity in rats with hypothalamic hyperphagia induced by knife cuts. Similarly, the injection of quinine into rats with hypothalamic knife cuts reduced food intake and body weight but the effects were smaller than those observed when quinine was added to the diet. Urinary quinine excretion was similar by the oral and parenteral routes. The food intake of the knife-cut animals receiving quinine gradually fell to the same level as in the sham-operated animals receiving quinine by either route. The weights of retroperitoneal fat pads were related to the weights of the animals and were reduced in the quinine-treated groups. Plasma insulin concentrations were significantly higher in the knife-cut animals and were reduced toward control levels by quinine treatment. Gluconeogenesis, measured by incorporation of radioactivity from labeled bicarbonate into glucose, was unaffected by treatment with quinine or by knife cuts. Lipogenesis from tritiated water in vivo was not different between treatment groups in the liver or retroperitoneal fat pads. However, in vivo lipogenesis was reduced in knife-cut rats fed ad libitum compared with quinine-treated rats. The response of lipogenesis to insulin in vitro was also not different between treatment groups. These data suggest that a major part of the reduction in food intake in hyperphagic rats eating a quinine-adulterated diet is due to postingestional events.

  18. Dorsomedial hypothalamic NPY and energy balance control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Sheng; Kim, Yonwook J; Zheng, Fenping

    2012-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a potent hypothalamic orexigenic peptide. Within the hypothalamus, Npy is primarily expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH). While the actions of ARC NPY in energy balance control have been well studied, a role for DMH NPY is still being unraveled. In contrast to ARC NPY that serves as one of downstream mediators of actions of leptin in maintaining energy homeostasis, DMH NPY is not under the control of leptin. Npy gene expression in the DMH is regulated by brain cholecystokinin (CCK) and other yet to be identified molecules. The findings of DMH NPY overexpression or induction in animals with increased energy demands and in certain rodent models of obesity implicate a role for DMH NPY in maintaining energy homeostasis. In support of this view, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated overexpression of NPY in the DMH causes increases in food intake and body weight and exacerbates high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia and obesity. Knockdown of NPY in the DMH via AAV-mediated RNAi ameliorates hyperphagia, obesity and glucose intolerance of Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats in which DMH NPY overexpression has been proposed to play a causal role. NPY knockdown in the DMH also prevents high-fat diet-induced hyperphagia, obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis. A detailed examination of actions of DMH NPY reveals that DMH NPY specifically affects nocturnal meal size and produces an inhibitory action on within meal satiety signals. In addition, DMH NPY modulates energy expenditure likely through affecting brown adipocyte formation and thermogenic activity. Overall, the recent findings provide clear evidence demonstrating critical roles for DMH NPY in energy balance control, and also imply a potential role for DMH NPY in maintaining glucose homeostasis.

  19. Anomalous hypothalamic responses to humor in cataplexy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan L Reiss

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataplexy is observed in a subset of patients with narcolepsy and affects approximately 1 in 2,000 persons. Cataplexy is most often triggered by strong emotions such as laughter, which can result in transient, yet debilitating, muscle atonia. The objective of this study was to examine the neural systems underlying humor processing in individuals with cataplexy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While undergoing functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, we showed ten narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and ten healthy controls humorous cartoons. In addition, we examined the brain activity of one subject while in a full-blown cataplectic attack. Behavioral results showed that participants with cataplexy rated significantly fewer humorous cartoons as funny compared to controls. Concurrent fMRI showed that patients, when compared to controls and in the absence of overt cataplexy symptoms, showed pronounced activity in the emotional network including the ventral striatum and hypothalamus while viewing humorous versus non-humorous cartoons. Increased activity was also observed in the right inferior frontal gyri--a core component of the inhibitory circuitry. In comparison, the one subject who experienced a cataplectic attack showed dramatic reductions in hypothalamic activity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest an overdrive of the emotional circuitry and possible compensatory suppression by cortical inhibitory regions in cataplexy. Moreover, during cataplectic attacks, the hypothalamus is characterized by a marked decrease in activity similar to that observed during sleep. One possible explanation for these findings is an initial overdrive and compensatory shutdown of the hypothalamus resulting in full cataplectic symptoms.

  20. Metabolic Context Regulates Distinct Hypothalamic Transcriptional Responses to Antiaging Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis M. Stranahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is an essential relay in the neural circuitry underlying energy metabolism that needs to continually adapt to changes in the energetic environment. The neuroendocrine control of food intake and energy expenditure is associated with, and likely dependent upon, hypothalamic plasticity. Severe disturbances in energy metabolism, such as those that occur in obesity, are therefore likely to be associated with disruption of hypothalamic transcriptomic plasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effects of two well-characterized antiaging interventions, caloric restriction and voluntary wheel running, in two distinct physiological paradigms, that is, diabetic (db/db and nondiabetic wild-type (C57/Bl/6 animals to investigate the contextual sensitivity of hypothalamic transcriptomic responses. We found that, both quantitatively and qualitatively, caloric restriction and physical exercise were associated with distinct transcriptional signatures that differed significantly between diabetic and non-diabetic mice. This suggests that challenges to metabolic homeostasis regulate distinct hypothalamic gene sets in diabetic and non-diabetic animals. A greater understanding of how genetic background contributes to hypothalamic response mechanisms could pave the way for the development of more nuanced therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic disorders that occur in diverse physiological backgrounds.

  1. Surgical therapy of lesions within the hypothalamic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahlbusch, R.; Schrell, U. (Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    On one hand pituitary microadenomas with autonomous character and those, which had been influenced by hypothalamic disorders, are summarized and discussed. On the other hand, the neurosurgical management of tumours, adjacent to or involved with the hypothalamus, are described. Endocrinologically active pituitary adenomas are characterized by their hormone excess of ACTH, GH, and prolactin. In Cushing's disease endocrine and clinical remission occurred in 74%. 3 patients out of this group showed a reincrease of ACTH after a period of remission, indicating a possible hypothalamic influence. In acromegaly the hypothalamic influence is also discussed. One patient with an ectopic GRF-producing tumour showing a reincrease of GH levels after successful transsphenoidal adenomectomy has been described. In microprolactinomas, 7 patients out of 45 showed a reincrease of prolactin-levels after a period of normalization, we also discussed hypothalamic disorders. Tumours with suprasellar extension such as macroadenomas without endocrine activity and meningiomas are removed nowadays with minimal risk for the life of the patients. In craniopharyngiomas radical excision is accompanied by a high risk of hypothalamic defects caused by mechanical lesions and possible secondary vasospasm. Finally the excision of a hamartoma growing from the floor of the third ventricle into the interpeduncular cistern is discussed. Up to now the successful excision could be documented by endocrinological data, which give no sign of further growth of the hamartoma.

  2. Insulin Detemir Causes Lesser Weight Gain in Comparison to Insulin Glargine: Role on Hypothalamic NPY and Galanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ishraq Zafar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Compared with other insulin analogues, insulin detemir induces less weight gain. This study investigated whether this effect was achieved by influencing the hypothalamic appetite regulators neuropeptide Y (NPY and galanin (GAL. Methods. Type  2 diabetic rat models were established with a high-fat diet and intraperitoneal injection of STZ. All rats were divided into NC, DM, DM+DE and DM+GLA groups. Glycemic levels of all study groups were checked at study onset and after 4 weeks of insulin treatment. Food intake and body weight were monitored during treatment. After 4 weeks, the hypothalamus of rats was examined for NPY and GAL mRNA and protein expression. Results. After 4 weeks of treatment, compared with the DM+GLA group, the DM+DE group exhibited less food intake (P<0.05 and less weight gain (P<0.05, but showed similar glycemic control. The expression of hypothalamic NPY and GAL at both mRNA and protein level were significantly lower (P<0.05 in the DM+DE group. Conclusion. Insulin detemir decreased food intake in type 2 diabetic rats, which led to reduced weight gain when compared to insulin glargine treatment. This effect is likely due to downregulation of hypothalamic NPY and GAL.

  3. Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression is not affected by central serotonin in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancebo, María J; Ceballos, Francisco C; Pérez-Maceira, Jorge; Aldegunde, Manuel

    2013-09-01

    Mammalian studies have shown a link between serotonin (5-HT) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the acute regulation of feeding and energy homeostasis. Taking into account that the actions of 5-HT and NPY on food intake in fish are similar to those observed in mammals, the objective of this study was to characterize a possible short-term interaction between hypothalamic 5-HT and NPY, by examining whether 5-HT regulates NPY gene expression, to help clarify the mechanism underlying the observed anorexigenic action of central 5-HT in the rainbow trout. We used qRT-PCR to determine the levels of NPY mRNA in the hypothalamus-preoptic area (HPA) of rainbow trout after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a single dose of dexfenfluramine (dFF, 3mgkg(-1); 24h-fasted and fed fish) or intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of 5-HT (100μgkg(-1); 24h-fasted fish). Significant suppression of food intake was observed after administration of 5-HT and dFF. No significant changes in NPY gene expression were obtained 150min after administration of 5-HT or dFF. However, administration of the 5HT1B receptor agonist anpirtoline did not have any significant effect on food intake in rainbow trout. The results suggest that in fish, unlike in mammals, neither the NPY neurons of the HPA nor the 5-HT1B receptor subtype participate in the neural circuitry involved in the inhibition of food intake induced by central serotoninergic activation.

  4. Mepolizumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or do not go away: pain, redness, swelling, warmth, burning, or itching in the place mepolizumab was injected headache dry and itchy skin with or without red, scaly rashes back pain muscle spasms Some side ...

  5. Metoclopramide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and feeling of fullness that lasts long after meals. Metoclopramide injection is also used to prevent nausea ... tranylcypromine (Parnate); narcotic medications for pain; sedatives; sleeping pills; tetracycline (Bristacycline, Sumycin); tranquilizers. Your doctor may need ...

  6. Ramucirumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dose of ramucirumab injection. Tell your doctor or nurse if you experience any of the following while you receive ramucirumab: uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body; back pain or spasms; chest pain and tightness; chills; flushing; ...

  7. Alemtuzumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemtuzumab injection is used to treat B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (a slowly developing cancer in which ... of white blood cell accumulate in the body). Alemtuzumab is in a class of medications called monoclonal ...

  8. Ferumoxytol Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferumoxytol injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood ... pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or ...

  9. Fludarabine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fludarabine injection is used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL; a type of cancer of the white ... a reliable method of birth control to prevent pregnancy during this time. Talk to your doctor for ...

  10. Insulin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or buttocks. Do not inject insulin into muscles, scars, or moles. Use a different site for each ... you are using insulin.Alcohol may cause a decrease in blood sugar. Ask your doctor about the ...

  11. Golimumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golimumab injection is used alone or with other medications to relieve the symptoms of certain autoimmune disorders ( ... did not help or could not be tolerated. Golimumab is in a class of medications called tumor ...

  12. Albiglutide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will develop tumors of the thyroid gland, including medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC; a type of thyroid cancer). ... symptoms or those listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, stop using albiglutide injection and call your doctor ...

  13. Dexamethasone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body tissues,) gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Dexamethasone injection is also used for diagnostic testing. ... effects.tell your doctor if you have a fungal infection (other than on your skin or nails). ...

  14. Hydrocortisone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... own organs), gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Hydrocortisone injection is also used to treat certain ... effects.tell your doctor if you have a fungal infection (other than on your skin or nails). ...

  15. Methylprednisolone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... own organs), gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Methylprednisolone injection is also used to treat certain ... effects.tell your doctor if you have a fungal infection (other than on your skin or nails). ...

  16. Glatiramer Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To inject glatiramer, follow these steps: Remove one blister pack from the carton of glatiramer syringes and place ... paper label and remove the syringe from the blister pack. Check your prefilled syringe to be sure it ...

  17. Dexrazoxane Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that are used to treat or prevent certain side effects that may be caused by chemotherapy medications. Dexrazoxane injection (Zinecard) is used to prevent or decrease heart damage caused by doxorubicin in women who are ...

  18. Evolocumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... autoinjector in hot water, microwave, or place in sunlight.Before you use evolocumab injection, look at the ... chills pain or burning during urination muscle or back pain dizziness stomach pain Some side effects can be ...

  19. Cidofovir Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cidofovir injection is used along with another medication (probenecid) to treat cytomegaloviral retinitis (CMV retinitis) in people with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Cidofovir is in a class of medications called antivirals. ...

  20. Brivaracetam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... older. Brivaracetam in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in ... older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants like brivaracetam injection to treat various conditions during ...

  1. Diphenhydramine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not to use diphenhydramine injection if you are breastfeeding because of the risk of harm to infants.tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma or other types of lung disease; glaucoma (a ...

  2. Cefazolin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valve, respiratory tract (including pneumonia), biliary tract, and urinary tract infections. Cefazolin injection also may be used before, during, ... to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website ( ...

  3. Ceftazidime Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... skin, blood, bone, joint, female genital tract, and urinary tract infections. Ceftazidime injection is in a class of medications ... to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website ( ...

  4. Fluconazole Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and fungal infections of the eye, prostate (a male reproductive organ), skin and nails. Fluconazole injection is ... Motrin, others) and naproxen (Aleve, Anaprox, Naprelan); oral contraceptives (birth control pills); oral medication for diabetes such ...

  5. Moxifloxacin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... available.Moxifloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing the bacteria that cause ... you are allergic to moxifloxacin, other quinolone or fluoroquinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gatifloxacin (Tequin) (not available ...

  6. Levofloxacin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... available. Levofloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections. ... severe reaction to levofloxacin; any other quinolone or fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gatifloxacin (Tequin) (not available ...

  7. Ciprofloxacin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... available. Ciprofloxacin injection is in a class of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections. ... reaction to ciprofloxacin or any other quinolone or fluoroquinolone antibiotic such as gatifloxacin (Tequin) (not available in the ...

  8. Alirocumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... further decrease the amount of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol ('bad cholesterol') in the blood. Alirocumab injection is ... antibodies. It works by blocking the production of LDL cholesterol in the body to decrease the amount of ...

  9. Chloramphenicol Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an arm or leg sudden changes in vision pain with eye movement Chloramphenicol injection may cause a condition called gray syndrome in premature and newborn infants. There have also been reports of gray ...

  10. Ontogenetic studies of tolerance development: effects of chronic morphine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, P J; Kuhn, C M

    1995-11-01

    Endogenous opiates are important regulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in rats. Tolerance clearly develops to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis in adult rats (Ignar and Kuhn 1990). The goal of the present study was to determine whether tolerance to morphine-induced stimulation of the HPA axis developed in neonatal and weanling rats treated chronically with morphine. Rats were injected with morphine or saline between days 4-8 postnatal (pups) or days 21-25 (weanlings) and tolerance assessed by determining dose-response curves for ACTH and corticosterone secretion following an acute morphine challenge. Weanlings displayed marked tolerance to the stimulation of ACTH and corticosterone secretion by morphine. Tolerance was also observed in pups to morphine-stimulated ACTH and corticosterone release. These findings suggest that the relative adaptability of the HPA axis to chronic morphine in neonatal and weanling rats is similar.

  11. Hypothalamic Obesity in Craniopharyngioma Patients: Disturbed Energy Homeostasis Related to Extent of Hypothalamic Damage and Its Implication for Obesity Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L. Roth

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic obesity (HO occurs in patients with tumors and lesions in the medial hypothalamic region. Hypothalamic dysfunction can lead to hyperinsulinemia and leptin resistance. This review is focused on HO caused by craniopharyngiomas (CP, which are the most common childhood brain tumors of nonglial origin. Despite excellent overall survival rates, CP patients have substantially reduced quality of life because of significant long-term sequelae, notably severe obesity in about 50% of patients, leading to a high rate of cardiovascular mortality. Recent studies reported that both hyperphagia and decreased energy expenditure can contribute to severe obesity in HO patients. Recognized risk factors for severe obesity include large hypothalamic tumors or lesions affecting several medial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei that impact satiety signaling pathways. Structural damage in these nuclei often lead to hyperphagia, rapid weight gain, central insulin and leptin resistance, decreased sympathetic activity, low energy expenditure, and increased energy storage in adipose tissue. To date, most efforts to treat HO have shown disappointing long-term success rates. However, treatments based on the distinct pathophysiology of disturbed energy homeostasis related to CP may offer options for successful interventions in the future.

  12. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna M Van Opstal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN. The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods. 10 women aged 18-30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI <23 kg/m2 women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local grey volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry.Results. No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in grey matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally.Conclusions. We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls.

  13. The role of NPY in hypothalamic mediated food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Rebecca E; Chee, Melissa J S; Colmers, William F

    2011-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly conserved neuropeptide with orexigenic actions in discrete hypothalamic nuclei that plays a role in regulating energy homeostasis. NPY signals via a family of high affinity receptors that mediate the widespread actions of NPY in all hypothalamic nuclei. These actions are also subject to tight, intricate regulation by numerous peripheral and central energy balance signals. The NPY system is embedded within a densely-redundant network designed to ensure stable energy homeostasis. This redundancy may underlie compensation for the loss of NPY or its receptors in germline knockouts, explaining why conventional knockouts of NPY or its receptors rarely yield a marked phenotypic change. We discuss insights into the hypothalamic role of NPY from studies of its physiological actions, responses to genetic manipulations and interactions with other energy balance signals. We conclude that numerous approaches must be employed to effectively study different aspects of NPY action.

  14. Hypothalamic adipic hypernatraemia syndrome with normal osmoregulation of vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Capapé, Marta; Golmayo, Luz; Lorenzo, Gustavo; Gallego, Nieves; Barrio, Raquel

    2004-10-01

    Adipsic hypernatraemia is an uncommon disorder in childhood caused by a defect in the osmoregulation of thirst, leading to impairment of water homeostasis and chronic hyperosmolality of body fluids. Adipsia is often associated with an abnormality in osmoregulated vasopressin secretion due to the close proximity of the hypothalamic osmoreceptors that control thirst with those regulating vasopressin secretion. Hypothalamic lesions of diverse aetiology (vascular abnormalities, neoplasms, granulomatous diseases, trauma etc.) have been described in this syndrome. We report a 12-year-old boy with evident weight loss due to hypernatraemic dehydration with a selective defect in osmoregulation of thirst and normal vasopressin secretion with no demonstrable structural lesion. To date, only six paediatric patients with this condition have been described in the literature. Hypothalamic adipsic hypernatraemia syndrome must be suspected when a dehydrated patient denies thirst. The study of antidiuretic function is necessary because the osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion could be altered.

  15. Hypothalamic Lipids: Key Regulators of Whole Body Energy Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, Ismael; Fernø, Johan; Diéguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Rubén; López, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Hypothalamic lipid metabolism plays a major role in the physiological regulation of energy balance. Modulation of several enzymatic activities that control lipid biosynthesis, such as fatty acid synthase and AMP-activated protein kinase, impacts both feeding and energy expenditure. However, lipids can also cause pathological alterations in the hypothalamus. Lipotoxicity is promoted by excess lipids in tissues not suitable for their storage. A large amount of evidence has demonstrated that lipotoxicity is a pathophysiological mechanism leading to metabolic diseases such as insulin resistance, cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis, and steatohepatitis. Current data have reported that, similar to what is observed in peripheral tissues, complex lipids such as ceramides and sphingolipids act as lipotoxic species at the hypothalamic level to impact metabolism. Here, we will review what is currently known about hypothalamic lipid metabolism and the modulation of energy homeostasis. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Melatonin acts through MT1/MT2 receptors to activate hypothalamic Akt and suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Juliana A; Kinote, Andrezza; Ignacio-Souza, Letícia M; de Araújo, Thiago M; Razolli, Daniela S; Doneda, Diego L; Paschoal, Lívia B; Lellis-Santos, Camilo; Bertolini, Gisele L; Velloso, Lício A; Bordin, Silvana; Anhê, Gabriel F

    2013-07-15

    Melatonin can contribute to glucose homeostasis either by decreasing gluconeogenesis or by counteracting insulin resistance in distinct models of obesity. However, the precise mechanism through which melatonin controls glucose homeostasis is not completely understood. Male Wistar rats were administered an intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of melatonin and one of following: an icv injection of a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, an icv injection of a melatonin receptor (MT) antagonist, or an intraperitoneal (ip) injection of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Anesthetized rats were subjected to pyruvate tolerance test to estimate in vivo glucose clearance after pyruvate load and in situ liver perfusion to assess hepatic gluconeogenesis. The hypothalamus was removed to determine Akt phosphorylation. Melatonin injections in the central nervous system suppressed hepatic gluconeogenesis and increased hypothalamic Akt phosphorylation. These effects of melatonin were suppressed either by icv injections of PI3K inhibitors and MT antagonists and by ip injection of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. We conclude that melatonin activates hypothalamus-liver communication that may contribute to circadian adjustments of gluconeogenesis. These data further suggest a physiopathological relationship between the circadian disruptions in metabolism and reduced levels of melatonin found in type 2 diabetes patients.

  17. Excess of leptin inhibits hypothalamic KiSS-1 expression in pubertal mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Yeon Ahn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available &lt;B&gt;Purpose:&lt;/B&gt; Leptin has been considered a link between metabolic state and reproductive activity. Defective reproductive function can occur in leptin-deficient and leptin-excessive conditions. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of centrally injected leptin on the hypothalamic &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; system in relation to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH action in the initial stage of puberty. &lt;B&gt;Methods:&lt;/B&gt; Leptin (1 μg was injected directly into the ventricle of pubertal female mice. The resultant gene expressions of hypothalamic &lt;I&gt;GnRH&lt;/I&gt; and &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; and pituitary LH, 2 and 4 hours after injection, were compared with those of saline-injected control mice. The changes in the gene expressions after blocking the GnRH action were also analyzed. &lt;B&gt;Results:&lt;/B&gt; The basal expression levels of &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt;, GnRH, and LH were significantly higher in the pubertal mice than in the prepubertal mice. The 1-μg leptin dose significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt;, GnRH, and LH in the pubertal mice. A &lt;I&gt;GnRH&lt;/I&gt; antagonist significantly increased the &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; and GnRH mRNA expression levels, and the additional leptin injection decreased the gene expression levels compared with those in the control group. &lt;B&gt;Conclusion:&lt;/B&gt; The excess leptin might have suppressed the central reproductive axis in the pubertal mice by inhibiting the &lt;I&gt;KiSS-1&lt;/I&gt; expression, and this mechanism is independent of the GnRH-LHestradiol feedback loop.

  18. Anisomycin Injection in Area CA3 of the Hippocampus Impairs Both Short-Term and Long-Term Memories of Contextual Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal…

  19. Anisomycin Injection in Area CA3 of the Hippocampus Impairs Both Short-Term and Long-Term Memories of Contextual Fear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remaud, Jessica; Ceccom, Johnatan; Carponcy, Julien; Dugué, Laura; Menchon, Gregory; Pech, Stéphane; Halley, Helene; Francés, Bernard; Dahan, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is involved in the consolidation of short-term memory into long-term memory. Previous electrophysiological data concerning LTP in CA3 suggest that protein synthesis in that region might also be necessary for short-term memory. We tested this hypothesis by locally injecting the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin in hippocampal…

  20. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamoru Tanida

    Full Text Available In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb. We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  1. Involvement of hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase in leptin-induced sympathetic nerve activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanida, Mamoru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, leptin released from the white adipose tissue acts on the central nervous system to control feeding behavior, cardiovascular function, and energy metabolism. Central leptin activates sympathetic nerves that innervate the kidney, adipose tissue, and some abdominal organs in rats. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is essential in the intracellular signaling pathway involving the activation of leptin receptors (ObRb). We investigated the potential of AMPKα2 in the sympathetic effects of leptin using in vivo siRNA injection to knockdown AMPKα2 in rats, to produce reduced hypothalamic AMPKα2 expression. Leptin effects on body weight, food intake, and blood FFA levels were eliminated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. Leptin-evoked enhancements of the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney, brown and white adipose tissues were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. To check whether AMPKα2 was specific to sympathetic changes induced by leptin, we examined the effects of injecting MT-II, a melanocortin-3 and -4 receptor agonist, on the sympathetic nerve outflows to the kidney and adipose tissue. MT-II-induced sympatho-excitation in the kidney was unchanged in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. However, responses of neural activities involving adipose tissue to MT-II were attenuated in AMPKα2 siRNA-treated rats. These results suggest that hypothalamic AMPKα2 is involved not only in appetite and body weight regulation but also in the regulation of sympathetic nerve discharges to the kidney and adipose tissue. Thus, AMPK might function not only as an energy sensor, but as a key molecule in the cardiovascular, thermogenic, and lipolytic effects of leptin through the sympathetic nervous system.

  2. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  3. Facilitated thyrotropin release after retrochiasmatic hypothalamic knife cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C P; Colombo, J A

    1981-03-01

    Diencephalic structures that influence plasma thyrotropin (TSH) in male rats under pentobarbital anesthesia (35 mg/kg, IP) were studied by combining medial preoptic area-suprachiasmatic nucleus (MPOA-Sch) bilateral electrical stimulation (monophasic pulses, 200 microA at 50 Hz, 30 min) with progressive midline lesions produced by a retractable Halász knife. Plasma TSH was measured by radioimmunoassay just before (0 time) and at 30, 60 and 90 min after the beginning of stimulation. Rats that had received only sham surgical procedures 90 days prior to stimulation were characterized by a more than 2-3 fold elevation in basal (0 time) plasma TSH levels when compared to those found in intact control rats and expected elevations in plasma TSH at 30 min after stimulation were eliminated. After a small frontal cut (1.3 FC), 0 time plasma TSH levels increased more tha 4-fold above those of controls in association with a facilitation of stimulated release of TSH. When the knife blade radius was 1.5 mm (1.5 FC) the facilitation of TSH release after stimulation occurred again; however, 0 time plasma TSH concentrations in 1.5 FC rats were not different from control levels. These effects of midline cortical, thalamic and hypothalamic damage on TSH release required the passage of more than 12 days after brain surgery. Collectively, these findings suggest potential neural elements that are inhibitory for 'basal' and 'phasic' TSH release which are in close proximity to a separate excitatory neural system and which can be activated by MPOA-Sch stimulation.

  4. Intracerebroventricular Injection of Metformin Induces Anorexia in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Metformin, an oral biguanide insulin-sensitizing agent, is well known to decrease appetite. Although there is evidence that metformin could affect the brain directly, the exact mechanism is not yet known. Methods To evaluate whether metformin induces anorexia via the hypothalamus, various concentrations of metformin were injected into the lateral ventricle of rats through a chronically implanted catheter and food intake was measured for 24 hours. The hypothalamic neuropeptides asso...

  5. [Managment of subretinal heamorrhages within the macular area using intravitreal injections of recombined tissue plasminogen activator, sulphur hexafluoride and ranihizumab--preliminary report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniewicz, Joanna; Kubicka-Trząska, Agnieszka; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Romanowska-Dixon, Boźena

    2015-01-01

    Submacular hemorrhages cause serious vision impairment. Patient observation, waiting for the spontaneous blood reabsorption and resolution of the haemorrhage leads to the severe damage to retinal tissue as a result of scar formation. The paper presents 7 cases of patients with submacular haemorrhages treated with intravitreal injections of recombined tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA) and sulphur hexafluoride (SFG). In 4 cases, the haemorrhage was secondary to AMD, in two cases to trauma, and it was idiopathic in one case. All patients were treated with intravitreal injections of rtPA and SF6 for thrombolysis and pneumatic displacement of haemorrhage outside macular structures. Ranibizumab was additionally administered to patients with age-related macular degeneration. Such treatment improved visual acuity in all patients, reducing the central retinal thickness as shown in follow-up optical coherence tomography. The presented treatment of submacular hemorrhages with intravitreal injections of rtPA and SF6 provided good results, but in order to develop a standard management algorithm for this disease, the analysis of larger patient sample is required.

  6. Optogenetic Activation of a Lateral Hypothalamic-Ventral Tegmental Drive-Reward Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Benaliouad, Faiza; Zamora-Olivencia, Veronica; Wise, Roy A

    2016-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus can motivate feeding or can serve as a reward in its own right. It remains unclear whether the same or independent but anatomically overlapping circuitries mediate the two effects. Electrical stimulation findings implicate medial forebrain bundle (MFB) fibers of passage in both effects, and optogenetic studies confirm a contribution from fibers originating in the lateral hypothalamic area and projecting to or through the ventral tegmental area. Here we report that optogenetic activation of ventral tegmental fibers from cells of origin in more anterior or posterior portions of the MFB failed to induce either reward or feeding. The feeding and reward induced by optogenetic activation of fibers from the lateral hypothalamic cells of origin were influenced similarly by variations in stimulation pulse width and pulse frequency, consistent with the hypothesis of a common substrate for the two effects. There were, however, several cases where feeding but not self-stimulation or self-stimulation but not feeding were induced, consistent with the hypothesis that distinct but anatomically overlapping systems mediate the two effects. Thus while optogenetic stimulation provides a more selective tool for characterizing the mechanisms of stimulation-induced feeding and reward, it does not yet resolve the question of common or independent substrates.

  7. Distribution of type 1 cannabinoid receptor-expressing neurons in the septal-hypothalamic region of the mouse: colocalization with GABAergic and glutamatergic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabovszky, Erik; Wittmann, Gábor; Kalló, Imre; Füzesi, Tamás; Fekete, Csaba; Liposits, Zsolt

    2012-04-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is the principal mediator of retrograde endocannabinoid signaling in the brain. In this study, we addressed the topographic distribution and amino acid neurotransmitter phenotype of endocannabinoid-sensitive hypothalamic neurons in mice. The in situ hybridization detection of CB1 mRNA revealed high levels of expression in the medial septum (MS) and the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), moderate levels in the preoptic area and the hypothalamic lateroanterior (LA), paraventricular (Pa), ventromedial (VMH), lateral mammillary (LM), and ventral premammillary (PMV) nuclei, and low levels in many other hypothalamic regions including the suprachiasmatic (SCh) and arcuate (Arc) nuclei. This regional distribution pattern was compared with location of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic and glutamatergic cell groups, as identified by the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and type 2 vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT2) mRNAs, respectively. The MS, DBB, and preoptic area showed overlaps between GABAergic and CB1-expressing neurons, whereas hypothalamic sites with moderate CB1 signals, including the LA, Pa, VMH, LM, and PMV, were dominated by glutamatergic neurons. Low CB1 mRNA levels were also present in other glutamatergic and GABAergic regions. Dual-label in situ hybridization experiments confirmed the cellular co-expression of CB1 with both glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. In this report we provide a detailed anatomical map of hypothalamic glutamatergic and GABAergic systems whose neurotransmitter release is controlled by retrograde endocannabinoid signaling from hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic target neurons. This neuroanatomical information contributes to an understanding of the role that the endocannabinoid system plays in the regulation of endocrine and metabolic functions.

  8. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  9. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Witkamp, R.F.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Laak, ter M.C.; Heins, M.S.; Norren, van K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections b

  10. Magel2 is required for leptin-mediated depolarization of POMC neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Mercer

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome is the most common syndromic form of human obesity and is caused by the loss of function of several genes, including MAGEL2. Mice lacking Magel2 display increased weight gain with excess adiposity and other defects suggestive of hypothalamic deficiency. We demonstrate Magel2-null mice are insensitive to the anorexic effect of peripherally administered leptin. Although their excessive adiposity and hyperleptinemia likely contribute to this physiological leptin resistance, we hypothesized that Magel2 may also have an essential role in intracellular leptin responses in hypothalamic neurons. We therefore measured neuronal activation by immunohistochemistry on brain sections from leptin-injected mice and found a reduced number of arcuate nucleus neurons activated after leptin injection in the Magel2-null animals, suggesting that most but not all leptin receptor-expressing neurons retain leptin sensitivity despite hyperleptinemia. Electrophysiological measurements of arcuate nucleus neurons expressing the leptin receptor demonstrated that although neurons exhibiting hyperpolarizing responses to leptin are present in normal numbers, there were no neurons exhibiting depolarizing responses to leptin in the mutant mice. Additional studies demonstrate that arcuate nucleus pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC expressing neurons are unresponsive to leptin. Interestingly, Magel2-null mice are hypersensitive to the anorexigenic effects of the melanocortin receptor agonist MT-II. In Prader-Willi Syndrome, loss of MAGEL2 may likewise abolish leptin responses in POMC hypothalamic neurons. This neural defect, together with increased fat mass, blunted circadian rhythm, and growth hormone response pathway defects that are also linked to loss of MAGEL2, could contribute to the hyperphagia and obesity that are hallmarks of this disorder.

  11. Hypothalamic neuropeptide expression following chronic food restriction in sedentary and wheel-running rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rijke, C E; Hillebrand, J J G; Verhagen, L A W; Roeling, T A P; Adan, R A H

    2005-10-01

    When rats are given access to a running-wheel in combination with food restriction, they will become hyperactive and decrease their food intake, a paradoxical phenomenon known as activity-based anorexia (ABA). Little is known about the regulation of the hypothalamic neuropeptides that are involved in the regulation of food intake and energy balance during the development of ABA. Therefore, rats were killed during the development of ABA, before they entered a state of severe starvation. Neuropeptide mRNA expression levels were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR on punches of separate hypothalamic nuclei. As is expected in a state of negative energy balance, expression levels of agouti-related protein (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were increased 5-fold in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of food-restricted running ABA rats vs 2-fold in sedentary food-restricted controls. The co-regulated expression of AgRP and NPY strongly correlated with relative body weight and white adipose tissue mass. Arcuate expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was reduced 2-fold in the ABA group. In second-order neurons of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) mRNA expression was upregulated 2-fold in food-restricted running rats, but not in food-restricted sedentary controls. Prepro-orexin, CART and corticotropin-releasing hormone expression levels in the LHA and the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) were unchanged in both food-restricted groups. From this study it was concluded that during the development of ABA, neuropeptides in first-order neurons in the ARC and MCH in the LHA are regulated in an adequate response to negative energy balance, whereas expression levels of the other studied neuropeptides in secondary neurons of the LHA and PVN are unchanged and are probably regulated by factors other than energy status alone.

  12. Glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchoa, Ernane Torres; Silva, Lilian Eslaine C M; de Castro, Margaret; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Elias, Lucila L K

    2012-06-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency is associated with a decrease of food intake. Orexigenic peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti related protein (AgRP), and the anorexigenic peptide proopiomelanocortin (POMC), expressed in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC), are regulated by meal-induced signals. Orexigenic neuropeptides, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) and orexin, expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), also control food intake. Thus, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that glucocorticoids are required for changes in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides induced by feeding. Male Wistar rats (230-280 g) were subjected to ADX or sham surgery. ADX animals received 0.9% NaCl in the drinking water, and half of them received corticosterone in the drinking water (B: 25 mg/L, ADX+B). Six days after surgery, animals were fasted for 16 h and they were decapitated before or 2 h after refeeding for brain tissue and blood collections. Adrenalectomy decreased NPY/AgRP and POMC expression in the ARC in fasted and refed animals, respectively. Refeeding decreased NPY/AgRP and increased POMC mRNA expression in the ARC of sham and ADX+B groups, with no effects in ADX animals. The expression of MCH and orexin mRNA expression in the LHA was increased in ADX and ADX+B groups in fasted condition, however there was no effect of refeeding on the expression of MCH and orexin in the LHA in the three experimental groups. Refeeding increased plasma leptin and insulin levels in sham and ADX+B animals, with no changes in leptin concentrations in ADX group, and insulin response to feeding was lower in this group. Taken together, these data demonstrated that circulating glucocorticoids are required for meal-induced changes in NPY, AgRP and POMC mRNA expression in the ARC. The lower leptin and insulin responses to feeding may contribute to the altered hypothalamic neuropeptide expression after adrenalectomy.

  13. Sarilumab Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the needle. Do not try to warm the medication by heating it in a microwave, placing it in warm water or in direct sunlight, or through any other method.Before injecting, check the prefilled syringe to be sure that the expiration date printed on the package has not passed. Look ...

  14. Enfuvirtide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inject enfuvirtide into any skin that has a tattoo, scar, bruise, mole, a burn site, or has ... Enfuvirtide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away: itching, swelling, pain, tingling, discomfort, ...

  15. Fluorouracil Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of a doctor who is experienced in giving chemotherapy medications for cancer. Treatment with fluorouracil injection may cause serious side effects. ... this medication.If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor ... (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/ ...

  16. Lanreotide Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanreotide injection is used to treat people with acromegaly (condition in which the body produces too much growth hormone, causing enlargement of the hands, feet, and facial features; joint pain; and other symptoms) who have not successfully, or cannot be treated ...

  17. Paliperidone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the body slow movements or shuffling walk painful erection of the penis that lasts for hours cough, chills and/or other signs of infection Paliperidone injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.If you experience a ...

  18. Ziprasidone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stiffness falling confusion sweating loss of consciousness painful erection of the penis that lasts for hours Ziprasidone injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while receiving this medication.If you experience a ...

  19. Risperidone Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control slow movements or shuffling walk falling painful erection of the penis that lasts for hours Risperidone extended-release injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while receiving this medication.If you experience a ...

  20. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, P. K.; Harada, H.; Hayashi, N.; Horino, K.; Hotchi, H.; Kinsho, M.; Takayanagi, T.; Tani, N.; Togashi, T.; Ueno, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Irie, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS) of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) as well as to the main ring (MR) at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100πmmmrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150πmmmrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the present principle.

  1. Beam emittance control by changing injection painting area in a pulse-to-pulse mode in the 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Saha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The 3-GeV rapid cycling synchrotron (RCS of Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC simultaneously delivers high intensity beam to the Material and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF as well as to the main ring (MR at a repetition rate of 25 Hz. The RCS is designed for a beam power of 1 MW. RCS has to meet not only the need of power upgrade but also the specific requirement of each downstream facility. One of the issues, especially for high intensity operation, is to maintain two different transverse sizes of the extracted beam for MLF and MR; namely, a wider beam for MLF in order to reduce damage on the neutron production target but reversely a narrower one for the MR in order to ensure a permissible beam loss in the beam transport line of 3-GeV to MR and also in the MR. We proposed pulse-to-pulse direct control of the transverse painting area during the RCS beam injection process in order to get an extracted beam profile as desired. In addition to two existing dc septum magnets used for fixing injected beam trajectory for MLF beam, two additional dipoles named pulse steering magnets are designed for that purpose in order to control injected beam trajectory for a smaller painting area for the MR. The magnets are already installed in the injection beam transport line and successfully commissioned well in advance before they will be put in normal operation in 2014 for the 400 MeV injected beam energy upgraded from that of the present 181 MeV. Their parameters are found to be consistent to those expected in the corresponding numerical simulations. A trial one cycle user operation run for a painting area of 100π  mm mrad for the MR switching from the MLF painting area of 150π  mm mrad has also been successfully carried out. The extracted beam profile for the MR is measured to be sufficiently narrower as compared to that for the MLF, consistent with numerical simulation successfully demonstrating validity of the

  2. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berteau C

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cecile Berteau,1 Orchidée Filipe-Santos,1 Tao Wang,2 Humberto E Rojas,2 Corinne Granger,1 Florence Schwarzenbach1 1Becton-Dickinson Medical Pharmaceutical Systems, Le Pont de Claix, France; 2Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Aim: The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC injection pain tolerance. Methods: The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8–10, and 15–20 cP combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s. All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain. The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Results: Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003. Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm than medium (VAS =16.6 mm or low (VAS =22.1 mm viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002. Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89. Slow (0.02 mL/s or fast (0.30 mL/s injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79. In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15–20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High

  3. A case for hypothalamic acromegaly: a clinicopathological study of six patients with hypothalamic gangliocytomas producing growth hormone-releasing factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asa, S L; Scheithauer, B W; Bilbao, J M; Horvath, E; Ryan, N; Kovacs, K; Randall, R V; Laws, E R; Singer, W; Linfoot, J A

    1984-05-01

    We report the histological, ultrastructural, and immunocytochemical features of six hypothalamic gangliocytomas associated with pituitary GH cell adenomas and/or acromegaly. In four patients, the gangliocytoma was intrasellar, and no hypothalamic investigation was performed; in two patients, autopsy confirmed hypothalamic involvement. Four patients had a gangliocytoma associated with pituitary GH cell adenoma and acromegaly; electron microscopy demonstrated an intimate association between neurons and adenomatous GH cells. One patient had a gangliocytoma and a GH cell adenoma but no clinical evidence of acromegaly. In the sixth patient, clinical and biochemical acromegaly was manifest, but no pituitary adenoma was demonstrated. Using immunocytochemistry, human pancreatic tumor GRF (hptGRF-40) was localized in the majority of neurons of all six gangliocytomas. The pituitary adenomas and nontumorous adenohypophyses were negative for hptGRF-40. In addition, somatostatin, glucagon, and GnRH were demonstrated within some neurons of several tumors; insulin and gastrin stains were equivocal. These findings confirm previous proposals of production of a GRF by such gangliocytomas. While the significance of other peptides found in some of the tumors is uncertain, the presence of hptGRF-40 in neurons of these gangliocytomas supports the theory that GRF excess is the mechanism responsible for over-production of GH and provides evidence for a syndrome of hypothalamic acromegaly.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-07-16

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 322 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 01-25-01, AST Release (Area 1); 03-25-03, Mud Plant AST Diesel Release (Area 3); 03-20-05, Injection Wells (Area 3). Corrective Action Unit 322 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. The investigation of three CASs in CAU 322 will determine if hazardous and/or radioactive constituents are present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  5. The ventral-hypothalamic input route: a common neural network for abstract cognition and sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motofei, Ion G; Rowland, David L

    2014-02-01

    Classically, external receptors of the body transmit information from the environment to the cerebral cortex via the thalamus. This review explains and argues that only concrete external information is transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex via a thalamic route, while abstract and sexual external information are actually transmitted from peripheral receptors to the cortex through a cognitive hypothalamic route. Sexual function typically implies participation of two distinct partners, ensuring reproduction in many species including humans. Human sexual response involves participation of multiple (environmental, biological, psychological) kinds of stimuli and processing, so the understanding of sexual control and response supposes integration between the classical physiological mechanisms with the more complex processes of our 'mind'. Cognition and sexuality are two relational functions, which are dependent on concrete (colours, sounds, etc.) and/or abstract (gestures, facial expression, how you move, the way you say something seemingly trivial, etc.) environmental cues. Abstract cues are encoded independent of the specific object features of the stimuli, suggesting that such cues should be transmitted and interpreted within the brain through a system different than the classical thalamo-cortical network that operates on concrete (material) information. Indeed, data show that the cerebral cortex is capable of interpreting two distinct (concrete and abstract) formats of information via distinct and non-compatible brain areas. We expand upon this abstract-concrete dichotomy of the brain, positing that the two distinct cortical networks should be uploaded with distinct information from the environment via two distinct informational input routes. These two routes would be represented by the two distinct routes of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS), namely the classical/dorsal thalamic input route for concrete information and the ventral

  6. Subcutaneous (SQ) injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    SQ injections; Sub-Q injections; Diabetes subcutaneous injection; Insulin subcutaneous injection ... NIH. Giving a subcutaneous injection . Rockville, MD. National ... of Health and Human Services NIH publications; 2015. Available ...

  7. Effects of fluoxetine administration on hypothalamic melanocortin system in obese Zucker rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churruca, I; Portillo, M P; Casis, L; Gutiérrez, A; Macarulla, M T; Echevarría, E

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the potential involvement of melanocortin system in the anorectic mechanism of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, in obese Zucker rats. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. The control group was given 0.9% NaCl solution. RT-PCR for pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), Agouti gene related peptide (AgRP) and melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4-R) in the hypothalamus, as well as regional immunostaining for alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and MC4-R were carried out. Fluoxetine administration increased POMC expression and reduced MC4-R expression in the hypothalamus, without changes in AgRP mRNA levels. Moreover, an increase in the numbers of alpha-MSH positively immunostained neural cells in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), as well as a significant decrease in the numbers of neural cells positively immunostained for MC4-R in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), without changes in lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), were observed. These results suggest the involvement of alpha-MSH in central fluoxetine anorectic action.

  8. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects.

  9. The orexin neuropeptide system: physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Anastasia N.; Perez-Leighton, Claudio Esteban; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1) How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2) What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3) What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes. PMID:25408639

  10. The orexin neuropeptide system: Physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia N Zink

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1 How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2 What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3 What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes.

  11. Hypothalamic GPR40 signaling activated by free long chain fatty acids suppresses CFA-induced inflammatory chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamoto, Kazuo; Nishinaka, Takashi; Sato, Naoya; Mankura, Mitsumasa; Koyama, Yutaka; Kasuya, Fumiyo; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2013-01-01

    GPR40 has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). However, reports studying functional role of GPR40 in the brain are lacking. The present study focused on the relationship between pain regulation and GPR40, investigating the functional roles of hypothalamic GPR40 during chronic pain caused using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory chronic pain mouse model. GPR40 protein expression in the hypothalamus was transiently increased at day 7, but not at days 1, 3 and 14, after CFA injection. GPR40 was co-localized with NeuN, a neuron marker, but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocyte marker. At day 1 after CFA injection, GFAP protein expression was markedly increased in the hypothalamus. These increases were significantly inhibited by the intracerebroventricular injection of flavopiridol (15 nmol), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, depending on the decreases in both the increment of GPR40 protein expression and the induction of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7 after CFA injection. Furthermore, the level of DHA in the hypothalamus tissue was significantly increased in a flavopiridol reversible manner at day 1, but not at day 7, after CFA injection. The intracerebroventricular injection of DHA (50 µg) and GW9508 (1.0 µg), a GPR40-selective agonist, significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7, but not at day 1, after CFA injection. These effects were inhibited by intracerebroventricular pretreatment with GW1100 (10 µg), a GPR40 antagonist. The protein expression of GPR40 was colocalized with that of β-endorphin and proopiomelanocortin, and a single intracerebroventricular injection of GW9508 (1.0 µg) significantly increased the number of neurons double-stained for c-Fos and proopiomelanocortin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Our findings suggest that hypothalamic GPR40 activated by free long chain fatty

  12. Hypothalamic GPR40 signaling activated by free long chain fatty acids suppresses CFA-induced inflammatory chronic pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Nakamoto

    Full Text Available GPR40 has been reported to be activated by long-chain fatty acids, such as docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. However, reports studying functional role of GPR40 in the brain are lacking. The present study focused on the relationship between pain regulation and GPR40, investigating the functional roles of hypothalamic GPR40 during chronic pain caused using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA-induced inflammatory chronic pain mouse model. GPR40 protein expression in the hypothalamus was transiently increased at day 7, but not at days 1, 3 and 14, after CFA injection. GPR40 was co-localized with NeuN, a neuron marker, but not with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte marker. At day 1 after CFA injection, GFAP protein expression was markedly increased in the hypothalamus. These increases were significantly inhibited by the intracerebroventricular injection of flavopiridol (15 nmol, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, depending on the decreases in both the increment of GPR40 protein expression and the induction of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7 after CFA injection. Furthermore, the level of DHA in the hypothalamus tissue was significantly increased in a flavopiridol reversible manner at day 1, but not at day 7, after CFA injection. The intracerebroventricular injection of DHA (50 µg and GW9508 (1.0 µg, a GPR40-selective agonist, significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at day 7, but not at day 1, after CFA injection. These effects were inhibited by intracerebroventricular pretreatment with GW1100 (10 µg, a GPR40 antagonist. The protein expression of GPR40 was colocalized with that of β-endorphin and proopiomelanocortin, and a single intracerebroventricular injection of GW9508 (1.0 µg significantly increased the number of neurons double-stained for c-Fos and proopiomelanocortin in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus. Our findings suggest that hypothalamic GPR40 activated by free long

  13. Sex differences in hypothalamic astrocyte response to estradiol stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo John

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reproductive functions controlled by the hypothalamus are highly sexually differentiated. One of the most dramatic differences involves estrogen positive feedback, which leads to ovulation. A crucial feature of this positive feedback is the ability of estradiol to facilitate progesterone synthesis in female hypothalamic astrocytes. Conversely, estradiol fails to elevate hypothalamic progesterone levels in male rodents, which lack the estrogen positive feedback-induced luteinizing hormone (LH surge. To determine whether hypothalamic astrocytes are sexually differentiated, we examined the cellular responses of female and male astrocytes to estradiol stimulation. Methods Primary adult hypothalamic astrocyte cultures were established from wild type rats and mice, estrogen receptor-α knockout (ERKO mice, and four core genotype (FCG mice, with the sex determining region of the Y chromosome (Sry deleted and inserted into an autosome. Astrocytes were analyzed for Sry expression with reverse transcription PCR. Responses to estradiol stimulation were tested by measuring free cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i with fluo-4 AM, and progesterone synthesis with column chromatography and radioimmunoassay. Membrane estrogen receptor-α (mERα levels were examined using surface biotinylation and western blotting. Results Estradiol stimulated both [Ca2+]i release and progesterone synthesis in hypothalamic astrocytes from adult female mice. Male astrocytes had a significantly elevated [Ca2+]i response but it was significantly lower than in females, and progesterone synthesis was not enhanced. Surface biotinylation demonstrated mERα in both female and male astrocytes, but only in female astrocytes did estradiol treatment increase insertion of the receptor into the membrane, a necessary step for maximal [Ca2+]i release. Regardless of the chromosomal sex, estradiol facilitated progesterone synthesis in astrocytes from mice with ovaries

  14. Sustained alterations of hypothalamic tanycytes during posttraumatic hypopituitarism in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterstock, Guillaume; El Yandouzi, Taoufik; Romanò, Nicola; Carmignac, Danielle; Langlet, Fanny; Coutry, Nathalie; Guillou, Anne; Schaeffer, Marie; Chauvet, Norbert; Vanacker, Charlotte; Galibert, Evelyne; Dehouck, Bénédicte; Robinson, Iain C A F; Prévot, Vincent; Mollard, Patrice; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Méry, Pierre-François

    2014-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of hypopituitarism, which compromises patients' recovery, quality of life, and life span. To date, there are no means other than standardized animal studies to provide insights into the mechanisms of posttraumatic hypopituitarism. We have found that GH levels were impaired after inducing a controlled cortical impact (CCI) in mice. Furthermore, GHRH stimulation enhanced GH to lower level in injured than in control or sham mice. Because many characteristics were unchanged in the pituitary glands of CCI mice, we looked for changes at the hypothalamic level. Hypertrophied astrocytes were seen both within the arcuate nucleus and the median eminence, two pivotal structures of the GH axis, spatially remote to the injury site. In the arcuate nucleus, GHRH neurons were unaltered. In the median eminence, injured mice exhibited unexpected alterations. First, the distributions of claudin-1 and zonula occludens-1 between tanycytes were disorganized, suggesting tight junction disruptions. Second, endogenous IgG was increased in the vicinity of the third ventricle, suggesting abnormal barrier properties after CCI. Third, intracerebroventricular injection of a fluorescent-dextran derivative highly stained the hypothalamic parenchyma only after CCI, demonstrating an increased permeability of the third ventricle edges. This alteration of the third ventricle might jeopardize the communication between the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland. In conclusion, the phenotype of CCI mice had similarities to the posttraumatic hypopituitarism seen in humans with intact pituitary gland and pituitary stalk. It is the first report of a pathological status in which tanycyte dysfunctions appear as a major acquired syndrome.

  15. Effects of increased hypothalamic leptin gene expression on ovariectomy-induced bone loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M A; Iwaniec, U T; Turner, R T; Wronski, T J; Kalra, S P

    2011-08-01

    Estrogen deficiency results in accelerated bone turnover with a net increase in bone resorption. Subcutaneous administration of leptin attenuates bone loss in ovariectomized (ovx) rats by reducing bone resorption. However, in addition to its direct beneficial effects, leptin has been reported to have indirect (central nervous system-mediated) antiosteogenic effects on bone, which may limit the efficacy of elevated serum leptin to prevent estrogen deficiency-associated bone loss. The present study evaluated the long-term effects of increased hypothalamic leptin transgene expression, using recombinant adeno-associated virus-leptin (rAAV-Lep) gene therapy, on bone mass, architecture, and cellular endpoints in sexually mature ovx Sprague-Dawley rats. Ovx rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP (control vector encoding green fluorescent protein) and maintained for 10 weeks. Additional controls consisted of ovary-intact rats and ovx rats pair-fed to rAAV-Lep rats. Lumbar vertebrae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography and tibiae by histomorphometry. Cancellous bone volume was lower and osteoclast perimeter, osteoblast perimeter, and bone marrow adipocyte density were greater in ovx rats compared to ovary-intact controls. In contrast, differences among ovx groups were not detected for any endpoint evaluated. In conclusion, whereas estrogen deficiency resulted in marked cancellous osteopenia, increased bone turnover and marrow adiposity, increasing hypothalamic leptin transgene expression in ovx rats had neither detrimental nor beneficial effects on bone mass, architecture, or cellular endpoints. These findings demonstrate that the antiresorptive effects of subcutaneous leptin administration in ovx rats are mediated through leptin targets in the periphery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Unimpaired thermogenic response to noradrenaline in genetic (ob/ob) and hypothalamic (MSG) obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duloo, A G; Miller, D S

    1984-04-01

    The thermogenic response to noradrenaline administration was investigated at 25 degrees C in two models of obese mice (genetic ob/ob obesity of the ' QEC ' strain and monosodium-glutamate-induced obesity) and in their respective lean littermates. Subcutaneous injections of a low dose of noradrenaline (100 micrograms/kg body wt.) elevated metabolic rate by about 30% in both obese models but not in their respective lean counterparts. In contrast, the increase in metabolic rate after injections of a high dose of noradrenaline (600 micrograms/kg body wt.) was of a similar magnitude in both lean and obese animals: metabolic rate was increased by 70-80%. These results indicate that the overall whole body thermogenic capacity is unimpaired at room temperature in this ' QEC ' strain of ob/ob mice and in the hypothalamic damaged obese mice. Obesity in these models is therefore not associated with a reduced ability to respond to noradrenaline but could rather be due to a failure to release noradrenaline.

  17. Effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) secretion in male goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hara, Sayaka; Sawai, Ken; Fülöp, Ferenc; Nagy, György Miklos; Hashizume, Tsutomu

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the effects of hypothalamic dopamine (DA) on salsolinol (SAL)-induced prolactin (PRL) release in goats. The PRL-releasing response to an intravenous (i.v.) injection of SAL was examined after treatment with augmentation of central DA using carbidopa (carbi) and L-dopa in male goats under 8-h (8 h light, 16 h dark) or 16-h (16 h light, 8 h dark) photoperiod conditions. The carbi and L-dopa treatments reduced basal PRL concentrations in the 16-h photoperiod group (P PRL concentration in the control group for the 8-h photoperiod was lower than that for the 16-h photoperiod (P PRL promptly after the injection in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiod groups (P PRL-releasing responses for the 16-h photoperiod were greater than those for the 8-h photoperiod (P PRL release in both the 8- and 16-h photoperiods (P PRL in male goats, regardless of the photoperiod, which suggests that both SAL and DA are involved in regulating the secretion of PRL in goats.

  18. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 91: AREA 3 U3fi INJECTION WELL, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA FOR THE PERIOD NOVEMBER 2003 - OCTOBER 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-01-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary of inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This report covers the annual period November 2003 through October 2004. Site inspections of CAU 91 are performed every six months to identify any significant changes that could impact the proper operation of the waste disposal unit. Inspection results for the current period indicate that the overall condition of the concrete pad, perimeter fence, and warning signs is good.

  19. Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 91: Area 3 U-3fi Injection Well with Errata Sheet and Certification, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro Nevada Environmental Services

    2010-08-10

    The closure report for CAU 91 has no Use Restriction Form or drawing/map included in the document to describe the use restricted area, however, Section 3.3.3 states that the site will be fenced and signage placed indicating the area as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Unit. The drawing that was placed in the FFACO indicating the use restricted area lists the coordinates for the RCRA Unit in Nevada State Plan Coordinates - North American Datum of 1983. In the ensuing years the reporting of coordinates has been standardized so that all coordinates are reported in the same manner, which is: NAD 27 UTM Zone 11 N, meters. This Errata Sheet updates the coordinate reporting to the currently accepted method and includes an aerial photo showing the RCRA Unit with the coordinates listed showing the use restricted area.

  20. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  1. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eZorzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1 cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction.

  2. [Conditioned trace reactions of hypothalamic neurons following exposure to vibration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednikova, Iu S

    1977-01-01

    Trace reactions were studied in 112 hypothalamic units in rabbits during motor defensive conditioning to time after vibration action of two intensities. A later formation of conditioned trace reactions was observed as compared to the control. Vibration of lesser intensity improved the course of trace processes and slightly increased the number of neurones responding to the conditioned stimulus (45% as against 43% in the control); after a stronger vibration action, conditioned reactions to time were recorded only in 29% of the hypothalamic cells eith a simultaneous diminution of the trace response. It has been assumed that the observed transformations result from changes of the significance of the reinforcing factor in the formation of a motor defensive conditioned reflex after the action of vibration.

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic function in girls with premature thelarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquino, A M; Piccolo, F; Scalamandre, A; Malvaso, M; Ortolani, R; Boscherini, B

    1980-01-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadotropic activity was investigated in 9 girls with premature thelarche, and compared with that in 9 healthy girls and 6 girls with true precocious puberty. The gonadotropin stimulation test with luteinising hormone-releasing hormone was used. Girls with premature thelarche showed luteinising hormone response resembling that of normal girls, and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) response quite similar to that of girls with precocious puberty. This suggests that in premature thelarche there is a partial activation of the diencephalic-hypophyseal-gonadal axis, which affects FSH only. Premature thelarche therefore, should be considered as one of the disorders due to altered sensitivity of the hypothalamic receptors which regulate sex maturation. PMID:6779715

  4. Stochastic modeling of the hypothalamic pulse generator activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camproux, A C; Thalabard, J C; Thomas, G

    1994-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) is released by the pituitary in discrete pulses. In the monkey, the appearance of LH pulses in the plasma is invariably associated with sharp increases (i.e, volleys) in the frequency of the hypothalamic pulse generator electrical activity, so that continuous monitoring of this activity by telemetry provides a unique means to study the temporal structure of the mechanism generating the pulses. To assess whether the times of occurrence and durations of previous volleys exert significant influence on the timing of the next volley, we used a class of periodic counting process models that specify the stochastic intensity of the process as the product of two factors: 1) a periodic baseline intensity and 2) a stochastic regression function with covariates representing the influence of the past. This approach allows the characterization of circadian modulation and memory range of the process underlying hypothalamic pulse generator activity, as illustrated by fitting the model to experimental data from two ovariectomized rhesus monkeys.

  5. Hypothalamic pituitary disorders expressed by galactorrhea. A dynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, F R

    1975-11-01

    Physiologic and pathologic production of milk involves complex relations between the mammary glands, hormones, and the central nervous system. In all the galactorrhea syndromes there is a functional or mechanical problem at the pituitary level, with abnormal secretion or reserve of prolactin secretion. Stimulatory agents of prolactin, like thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), chlorpromazine, amnio acids, and insulin, can be helpful in the study of the hypothalamic pituitary functional reserve, while the osmotic tests seem to provide a clear distinction between functional and tumoral causes. The inhibitory agents of prolactin secretion, L-dopa and CB 154, permit the study of the negative control of the hormone. In addition, CB 154 appears to be an effective treatment for functional galactorrhea. Hyperprolactinemia appears to exert an inhibitory influence on gonadotropins. Clomiphene, acting on the hypothalamus, and LHRH, acting on the gonadotropes, permit the assessment of the gonadotropic hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis.

  6. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Endocrine System in the Hagfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masumi eNozaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates. Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrate known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates, the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTH mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  7. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  8. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Wardlaw, Sharon L.

    2011-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans a...

  9. Hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Masumi

    2013-12-30

    The hypothalamic-pituitary system is considered to be a seminal event that emerged prior to or during the differentiation of the ancestral agnathans (jawless vertebrates). Hagfishes as one of the only two extant members of the class of agnathans are considered the most primitive vertebrates known, living or extinct. Accordingly, studies on their reproduction are important for understanding the evolution and phylogenetic aspects of the vertebrate reproductive endocrine system. In gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates), the hormones of the hypothalamus and pituitary have been extensively studied and shown to have well-defined roles in the control of reproduction. In hagfish, it was thought that they did not have the same neuroendocrine control of reproduction as gnathostomes, since it was not clear whether the hagfish pituitary gland contained tropic hormones of any kind. This review highlights the recent findings of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal endocrine system in the hagfish. In contrast to gnathostomes that have two gonadotropins (GTH: luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone), only one pituitary GTH has been identified in the hagfish. Immunohistochemical and functional studies confirmed that this hagfish GTH was significantly correlated with the developmental stages of the gonads and showed the presence of a steroid (estradiol) feedback system at the hypothalamic-pituitary levels. Moreover, while the identity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has not been determined, immunoreactive (ir) GnRH has been shown in the hagfish brain including seasonal changes of ir-GnRH corresponding to gonadal reproductive stages. In addition, a hagfish PQRFamide peptide was identified and shown to stimulate the expression of hagfish GTHβ mRNA in the hagfish pituitary. These findings provide evidence that there are neuroendocrine-pituitary hormones that share common structure and functional features compared to later evolved vertebrates.

  10. Differential sensitivity to nicotine among hypothalamic magnocellular neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J D; Jacobsen, Julie; Kiss, Adrian Emil

    2012-01-01

    The magnocellular neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN) and supraoptic nuclei (SON) either contain vasopressin or oxytocin. Even though both hormones are released after systemic administration of nicotine, the mechanism through which the two populations of neurons are activated...... is not known. This study was carried out in the rat to investigate the effect of increasing doses of nicotine on subsets of magnocellular neurons containing either oxytocin or vasopressin....

  11. Mechanism of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in regulating asthmatic attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia Liu; Rong Dong; Jian Xiao; Nina Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUD: It has been confirmed that c-fos expession increased markedly in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus(PVN)during asthmatic attack in rats,and PVN has extensive physiological functions,involving in the regulation of respiratory system,etc.OBJECTIVE: To observe the alteration of electroencephalogram(EEG)and power spectra in PVN during the asthmatic attack,and the alteraiton of lung function and diaphragmatic muscle discharge after bilateral PVN lesion in asthmatic rats.DESIGN:A randomized control study.SETTING: Laboratory of Physiology and Pharmacology,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Southeast University.MATERIALS: Forty-eight male adult SD rats of 260-300g were used.The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups(n=8):control group,asthma group,electrolytic lesion of PVN group,KA-induced lesion of PVN group,sham electrolytic lesion of PVN group and sham kainic acid(KA)-induced lesion of PVN group.KA,chicken ovalbumin and aluminum hydroxide were purchased from American Sigma Company.Bordetella pertrssis vaccine (Institute of Biological Products of Shanghai);stereotaxic apparartus (Jianwan Ⅱ,China);Iesion-producing device (YC-2 programmable stimulato,Chengdu Iustrument Company);MD2000 signal processing system(Nanjing Medical School); data acquisition system (RM6240B,Chengdu Instrument Company).METHODS:The experiments were carried out in the Laboratory of Physiology and Pharmacology,School of Basic Medical Sciences,Southeast University from January to August in 2006.①Rats except for control group were sensitized with an intraperitoneal injection of 100 mg chicken ovalbumin and 100 mg aluminum hydroxide and Bordetella pertussis vaccine containing 5×109 heat-killed in 1 mL of sterile saline.From the fifteenth to seventeenth days rats received three times aerosolized ovalbumin challenge. In rats of the control group and asthma group three steel electrodes were placed into the left PVN(AP-1.8 mm,LR 0.4 mm,OH-7.9 mm).parietal cortex and subcutaneous tissue in

  12. EJE PRIZE 2017: Hypothalamic AMPK: a golden target against obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular gauge that is activated under conditions, such as low energy, increasing energy production and reducing energy waste. Centrally, the AMPK pathway is a canonical route regulating energy homeostasis, by integrating peripheral signals, such as hormones and metabolites, with neuronal networks. Current evidence links hypothalamic AMPK with feeding, brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis and browning of white adipose tissue (WAT), as well as muscle metabolism, hepatic function and glucose homeostasis. The relevance of these data is interesting from a therapeutic point of view as several agents with potential anti-obesity and/or antidiabetic effects, some currently in clinical use, such as nicotine, metformin and liraglutide are known to act through AMPK, either peripherally or centrally. Furthermore, the orexigenic and weight-gaining effects of the worldwide use of antipsychotic drugs (APDs), such as olanzapine, are also mediated by hypothalamic AMPK. Overall, this evidence makes hypothalamic AMPK signaling an interesting target for the drug development, with its potential for controlling both sides of the energy balance equation, namely feeding and energy expenditure through defined metabolic pathways. © 2017 The authors.

  13. Effects of sugar solutions on hypothalamic appetite regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colley, Danielle L; Castonguay, Thomas W

    2015-02-01

    Several hypotheses for the causes of the obesity epidemic in the US have been proposed. One such hypothesis is that dietary intake patterns have significantly shifted to include unprecedented amounts of refined sugar. We set out to determine if different sugars might promote changes in the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling food intake by measuring several hypothalamic peptides subsequent to overnight access to dilute glucose, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, or fructose solutions. Rats were given access to food, water and a sugar solution for 24h, after which blood and tissues were collected. Fructose access (as opposed to other sugars that were tested) resulted in a doubling of circulating triglycerides. Glucose consumption resulted in upregulation of 7 satiety-related hypothalamic peptides whereas changes in gene expression were mixed for remaining sugars. Also, following multiple verification assays, 6 satiety related peptides were verified as being affected by sugar intake. These data provide evidence that not all sugars are equally effective in affecting the control of intake.

  14. Role of leptin in energy expenditure: the hypothalamic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, R; Beerens, S; Adan, R A H

    2017-06-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin is a peripheral signal that informs the brain about the metabolic status of an organism. Although traditionally viewed as an appetite-suppressing hormone, studies in the past decade have highlighted the role of leptin in energy expenditure. Leptin has been shown to increase energy expenditure in particular through its effects on the cardiovascular system and brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis via the hypothalamus. The current review summarizes the role of leptin signaling in various hypothalamic nuclei and its effects on the sympathetic nervous system to influence blood pressure, heart rate, and BAT thermogenesis. Specifically, the role of leptin signaling on three different hypothalamic nuclei, the dorsomedial hypothalamus, the ventromedial hypothalamus, and the arcuate nucleus, is reviewed. It is known that all of these brain regions influence the sympathetic nervous system activity and thereby regulate BAT thermogenesis and the cardiovascular system. Thus the current work focuses on how leptin signaling in specific neuronal populations within these hypothalamic nuclei influences certain aspects of energy expenditure. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Evaluation of the impact of viscosity, injection volume, and injection flow rate on subcutaneous injection tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteau, Cecile; Filipe-Santos, Orchidée; Wang, Tao; Rojas, Humberto E; Granger, Corinne; Schwarzenbach, Florence

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of fluid injection viscosity in combination with different injection volumes and flow rates on subcutaneous (SC) injection pain tolerance. The study was a single-center, comparative, randomized, crossover, Phase I study in 24 healthy adults. Each participant received six injections in the abdomen area of either a 2 or 3 mL placebo solution, with three different fluid viscosities (1, 8-10, and 15-20 cP) combined with two different injection flow rates (0.02 and 0.3 mL/s). All injections were performed with 50 mL syringes and 27G, 6 mm needles. Perceived injection pain was assessed using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) (0 mm/no pain, 100 mm/extreme pain). The location and depth of the injected fluid was assessed through 2D ultrasound echography images. Viscosity levels had significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.0003). Specifically, less pain was associated with high viscosity (VAS =12.6 mm) than medium (VAS =16.6 mm) or low (VAS =22.1 mm) viscosities, with a significant difference between high and low viscosities (P=0.0002). Target injection volume of 2 or 3 mL was demonstrated to have no significant impact on perceived injection pain (P=0.89). Slow (0.02 mL/s) or fast (0.30 mL/s) injection rates also showed no significant impact on perceived pain during SC injection (P=0.79). In 92% of injections, the injected fluid was located exclusively in SC tissue whereas the remaining injected fluids were found located in SC and/or intradermal layers. The results of this study suggest that solutions of up to 3 mL and up to 15-20 cP injected into the abdomen within 10 seconds are well tolerated without pain. High viscosity injections were shown to be the most tolerated, whereas injection volume and flow rates did not impact perceived pain.

  16. Ketamine and Etomidate Down-regulate the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis in an Endotoxemic Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnier, Emmanuel; Clavier, Thomas; Tonon, Marie-Christine; Selim, Jean; Lefevre-Scelles, Antoine; Morin, Fabrice; Tamion, Fabienne; Dureuil, Bertrand; Castel, Hélène; Compere, Vincent

    2017-08-01

    We compared the effects of etomidate and ketamine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during sepsis. Mice (n = 5/group) were injected intraperitoneally with lipopolysaccharide (10 mg/kg) and 6 h later randomized to receive ketamine (100 mg/kg), etomidate (30 mg/kg), or saline. At two time points (12 and 48 h), messenger RNA levels of hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary proopiomelanocortin, and four adrenal enzymes (P450 side-chain cleavage, 3β-hydroxysteroid deshydrogenase, 21-hydroxylase, and 11β-hydroxylase) were measured by in situ hybridization (results are presented as optical density), and plasma levels of corticosterone and adrenocorticotropin hormones were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (mean ± SD). At 12 h, lipopolysaccharide induced an overexpression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (32 ± 5 vs. 18 ± 6, P ketamine reduced P450 side-chain cleavage (19 ± 7 and 19 ± 3 vs. 32 ± 4, P Ketamine also inhibited adrenocorticotropin hormone production (2.5 ± 3.6 vs. 36 ± 15 pg/ml, P Ketamine and etomidate did not modify corticosterone plasma levels. Our endotoxemic model induces an initial activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, followed by a secondary inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis processes. Ketamine and etomidate inhibit the enzyme expression and activity of the adrenal gland at the early stage.

  17. Hypothalamic obesity in patients with craniopharyngioma: Profound changes of several weight regulatory circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eRoth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most striking examples of dysfunctional hypothalamic signaling of energy homeostasis is observed in patients with hypothalamic lesions leading to hypothalamic obesity (HO. This drastic condition is frequently seen in patients with craniopharyngioma (CP, an embryological tumor located in the hypothalamic and/or pituitary region, frequently causing not only hypopituitarism, but also leading to damage of medial hypothalamic nuclei due to the tumor and its treatment. HO syndrome in CP patients is characterized by fatigue, decreased physical activity, uncontrolled appetite, and morbid obesity, and is associated with insulin and leptin resistance. Mechanisms leading to the profoundly disturbed energy homeostasis are complex. This review summarizes different aspects of important clinical studies as well as data obtained in rodent studies. In addition a model is provided describing how medial hypothalamic lesion can interact simultaneously with several weight regulating circuitries.

  18. Effects of black cohosh and estrogen on the hypothalamic nuclei of ovariectomized rats at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Zhang; Xiaoyan, Ma; Mukun, Yang; Ke, Wang; Liyuan, Yang; Sainan, Zhu; Jing, Jia; Lihua, Qin; Wenpei, Bai

    2012-08-01

    Cimicifuga racemosa (L.) Nutt. (CR), known as black cohosh, has been used in Europe as a medicinal plant for more than a century and its roots have been widely used for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. Remifemin, the main ingredient in liquid or tablet medications prepared from isopropyl alcohol extracts of black cohosh rhizome, has also been evaluated in clinical studies. To observe changes in the expression of the c-Fos protein in the hypothalamic nuclei of four groups of rats-sham-operated group (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX) group, ovariectomized group treated with estrogen(OVX+E), and ovariectomized group treated with the isopropanol extract of Cimicifuga racemosa (OVX+ICR)-and to investigate the mechanisms of black cohosh and estrogen that take place in the hypothalamic nuclei of ovariectomized rats. Fifty rats were assigned to each of the four groups and placed in incubators at 4 °C, 10 °C, 25 °C, 33 °C, or 38 °C for 2 h. They were then anesthetized, and their brains were removed after heart perfusion. c-Fos expression in the hypothalamic nuclei was evaluated using immunohistochemical methods. In the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO), ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), and suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) of the SHAM group, in the anterior hypothalamic area (AH) and supraoptic nucleus (SO) of all four groups, and in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the SHAM, OVX and OVX+E groups, the c-Fos-positive cell densities all changed in a similar manner: the cell density decreased when the temperature was less than 25 °C and the density increased when the temperature was greater than 25 °C, demonstrating a V-type curve. The c-Fos density was lowest at 25°C. The other nuclei demonstrated irregular changes. The positive cell densities in the MnPO, AH, and PVN of the SHAM, OVX+E, and OVX+ICR groups were greater than the densities measured in the OVX group at all temperatures, except 25 °C. Positive cell densities in the SHAM, OVX+E, and OVX+ICR groups were

  19. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dalteparin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pa' rin)If you have an epidural or spinal anesthesia or a spinal puncture while using a 'blood ... left in your body, if you recently had spinal anesthesia (administration of pain medication in the area around ...

  1. Heparin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cord to test for infection or other problems), spinal anesthesia (administration of pain medication in the area around the spine), surgery, especially involving the brain, spinal cord or eye, or a heart attack. Also ...

  2. Update on stress and depression: the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mello Andrea de Abreu Feijó de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 50 years, relationships between stress and the neurobiological changes seen in psychiatric disorders have been well-documented. A major focus of investigations in this area has been the role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis, both as a marker of stress response and as a mediator of additional downstream pathophysiologic changes. This review examines the emerging literature concerning the relationship between stress, HPA axis function, and depression, as well as the role of early life stress as an important risk factor for HPA axis dysregulation. The more recent studies reviewed suggest that the prominence of HPA axis hyperactivity in adults with depressive and anxiety disorders may constitute a link between the occurrence of adversity in childhood and the development of adult psychopathology

  3. Interactions between leptin and hypothalamic neuropeptide Y neurons in the control of food intake and energy homeostasis in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q; Bing, C; Al-Barazanji, K; Mossakowaska, D E; Wang, X M; McBay, D L; Neville, W A; Taddayon, M; Pickavance, L; Dryden, S; Thomas, M E; McHale, M T; Gloyer, I S; Wilson, S; Buckingham, R; Arch, J R; Trayhurn, P; Williams, G

    1997-03-01

    Leptin acts on the brain to inhibit feeding, increase thermogenesis, and decrease body weight. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-ergic neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) that project to the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei (DMH) are postulated to control energy balance by stimulating feeding and inhibiting thermogenesis, especially under conditions of energy deficit. We investigated whether leptin's short-term effects on energy balance are mediated by inhibition of the NPY neurons. Recombinant murine leptin (11 microg) injected into the lateral ventricle of fasted adult Wistar rats inhibited food intake by 20-25% between 2 and 6 h after administration, compared with saline-treated controls (P ARC, PVN, and DMH and significantly decreased hypothalamic NPY mRNA levels (0.61 +/- 0.02 vs. 0.78 +/- 0.03 arbitrary units; P 0.1), but plasma leptin levels were significantly higher (4.88 +/- 0.66 vs. 2.85 +/- 0.20 ng/ml; P ARC-PVN projection; reduced NPY release in the PVN may mediate leptin's hypophagic and thermogenic actions. Conversely, NPY-induced obesity results in raised circulating leptin concentrations. Leptin and the NPY-ergic ARC-PVN neurons may interact in a homeostatic loop to regulate body fat mass and energy balance.

  4. The role of oestradiol in sexually dimorphic hypothalamic-pituitary-adrena axis responses to intracerebroventricular ethanol administration in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, J W; Binks, S L; Li, Y; Selvage, D

    2010-01-01

    Systemic ethanol (EtOH) administration activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of rats in a sexually dimorphic manner. The present studies tested the role played by the central nervous system (CNS) in this phenomenon. To localise the effects of the drug to the brain, we utilised an experimental paradigm whereby a small, nontoxic amount of the drug was delivered via intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection. EtoH administered i.c.v. rapidly diffuses throughout the cerebrospinal fluid and brain, and does not cause neuronal damage or have any long-term physiological or behavioural effects. Experimental groups included intact males, intact cycling females, and ovariectomised (OVX) animals with or without replacement oestradiol (E(2)). Intracerebroventricular EtOH-induced HPA hormonal activation was determined by measuring plasma adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) levels. Activation of brain areas that both regulate HPA function and are responsive to gonadal hormones was determined using expression of the transcription factor c-fos (Fos) as a marker of neuronal activity. We observed sex- and oestrous cycle- dependent differences in HPA activation by EtOH as measured by both these parameters. ACTH secretion was highest in females in pro-oestrus or oestrus, just prior to or after the endogenous peak of E(2), as was Fos expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) and the locus coreuleus (LC) of the brainstem. In OVX animals, E(2) replacement caused an increase in PVN and LC Fos expression in response to i.c.v. EtOH compared to OVX controls, but a decrease in ACTH secretion. Taken together, these results indicate that at the level of the CNS, EtOH stimulates HPA activity more robustly at times when the effects of E(2) are high, but that E(2) alone is not responsible for this effect. The data further suggest that the LC plays an important role in the circuitry, which appears to be different from that activated following the systemic

  5. Worldwide Injection Technique Questionnaire Study: Population Parameters and Injection Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Hirsch, Laurence J; Menchior, Astrid R; Morel, Didier R; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    From February 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, 13,289 insulin-injecting patients from 423 centers in 42 countries took part in one of the largest surveys ever performed in diabetes. The goal was to assess patient characteristics, as well as historical and practical aspects of their injection technique. Results show that 4- and 8-mm needle lengths are each used by nearly 30% of patients and 5- and 6-mm needles each by approximately 20%. Higher consumption of insulin (as measured by total daily dose) is associated with having lipohypertrophy (LH), injecting into LH, leakage from the injection site, and failing to reconstitute cloudy insulin. Glycated hemoglobin values are, on average, 0.5% higher in patients with LH and are significantly higher with incorrect rotation of sites and with needle reuse. Glycated hemoglobin values are lower in patients who distribute their injections over larger injection areas and whose sites are inspected routinely. The frequencies of unexpected hypoglycemia and glucose variability are significantly higher in those with LH, those injecting into LH, those who incorrectly rotate sites, and those who reuse needles. Needles associated with diabetes treatment are the most commonly used medical sharps in the world. However, correct disposal of sharps after use is critically suboptimal. Many used sharps end up in public trash and constitute a major accidental needlestick risk. Use of these data should stimulate renewed interest in and commitment to optimizing injection practices in patients with diabetes.

  6. Magma injection beneath the urban area of Naples: a new mechanism for the 2012–2013 volcanic unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Auria, Luca; Pepe, Susi; Castaldo, Raffaele; Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, Giovanni; Ricciolino, Patrizia; Tizzani, Pietro; Casu, Francesco; Lanari, Riccardo; Manzo, Mariarosaria; Martini, Marcello; Sansosti, Eugenio; Zinno, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    We found the first evidence, in the last 30 years, of a renewed magmatic activity at Campi Flegrei caldera from January 2012 to June 2013. The ground deformation, observed through satellite interferometry and GPS measurements, have been interpreted as the effect of the intrusion at shallow depth (3090 ± 138 m) of 0.0042 ± 0.0002 km3 of magma within a sill. This interrupts about 28 years of dominant hydrothermal activity and occurs in the context of an unrest phase which began in 2005 and within a more general ground uplift that goes on since 1950. This discovery has implications on the evaluation of the volcanic risk and in the volcanic surveillance of this densely populated area. PMID:26279090

  7. Hypothalamic opioid-melanocortin appetitive balance and addictive craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Whilst the parallels between drug and food craving are receiving increasing attention, the recently elucidated complex physiology of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centres has been largely overlooked in the efforts to understand drug craving which is one of the most refractory and problematic aspects of drug and behavioural addictions. Important conceptual gains could be made by researchers from both appetite and addiction neuroscience if they were to have an improved understanding of each others' disciplines. It is well known in addiction medicine that the use of many substances is elevated in opiate dependency. There is voluminous evidence of very high rates of drug use in opiate agonist maintained patients, and the real possibility exists that opiate agonist therapy therefore increases drug craving. Conversely, opiate antagonist therapy with naloxone or naltrexone has been shown to reduce most chemical and behavioural addictions, and naltrexone is now being developed together with bupropion as the anti-obesity drug "Contrave". Hypothalamic melanocortins, particularly α-MSH, are known to constitute the main brake to consumptive behaviour of food. There is a well described antagonism between melanocortins and opioids at many loci including the hypothalamus. Administration of exogenous opiates is known to both suppress α-MSH and to stimulate hedonic food consumption. Opiate maintenance programs are associated with weight gain. As monoamines, opioids and cannabinoids are known to be involved in appetite regulation, and as endorphin opioids are known to be perturbed in other addictions, further exploration of the hypothalamic appetite regulatory centre would appear to be an obvious, albeit presently largely overlooked, locus in which to study drug and other craving mechanisms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurological complications after gamma-knife radiosurgery for hypothalamic hamartoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butragueño Laiseca, Laura; Oikonomopoulou, Niki; Miranda Herrero, María Concepción; Barredo Valderrama, Estíbaliz; Vázquez López, María; Jiménez de Domingo, Ana; Aguado Del Hoyo, Alejandra; García-Leal, Roberto; Meiriño, Rosa M

    2016-09-01

    The Gamma-knife technique is a safe and effective option for the treatment of hypothalamic hamartomas that produce epileptic seizures refractory to medical treatment and/or serious behavioral disorders. After this type of radiosurgery, an adequate symptomatic control is normally achieved, with notable decrease or even disappearance of the seizures. Radiological changes, such as a decrease in the size of the tumor or adjacent edema secondary to non-necrotizing radioinduced inflammatory reaction are unusual consequences. Side effects and neurological complications are also rare events. This report describes an unusual case of complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma as well as neurological complications after Gamma-knife surgery (receiving 13 Gy to the 85% isodose line, 1 cm(3) of tumor volume) in a 8-year-old boy who suffered from severe refractory seizures. After radiosurgery, the patient experienced a notable improvement in his symptoms, achieving seizure cessation within 3 months. However, 4 months after the procedure he presented drowsiness, fever and decreased level of consciousness due to a direct effect on the hypothalamus with local and regional edema secondary to the radiosurgery that was performed. He was successfully treated with corticosteroids (with a total duration of 11 months), and twelve months after the surgery, complete disappearance of both the nodular lesion and the secondary edema was observed. The patient remains seizure-free in the last 16 months, with remarkable changes in his behavior. The present case shows that complete radiological resolution of a hypothalamic hamartoma after Gamma-knife technique is unusual but possible, without long-term neurological consequences. Nevertheless, despite its low incidence, if a patient presents neurological symptoms, primarily during the first year after intervention, possible complications of this type of surgery must be taken into account. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric

  9. Leptin Responsive and GABAergic Projections to the Rostral Preoptic Area in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuure, W A; Quennell, J H; Anderson, G M

    2016-03-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role in the control of reproduction via signalling in hypothalamic neurones. The drivers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurones, do not have the receptors for leptin. Therefore, intermediate leptin responsive neurones must provide leptin-to-GnRH signalling. We investigated the populations of leptin responsive neurones that provide input to the rostral preoptic area (rPOA) where GnRH cell bodies reside. Fluorescent retrograde tracer beads (RetroBeads; Lumafluor Inc., Naples, FL, USA) were injected into the rPOA of transgenic leptin receptor enhanced green fluorescent protein (Lepr-eGFP) reporter mice. Uptake of the RetroBeads by Lepr-eGFP neurones was assessed throughout the hypothalamus. RetroBead uptake was most evident in the medial arcuate nucleus (ARC), the dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and the ventral premammillary nucleus (PMV) of the hypothalamus. The uptake of RetroBeads specifically by Lepr-eGFP neurones was highest in the medial ARC (18% of tracer-labelled neurones Lepr-eGFP-positive). Because neurones that are both leptin responsive and GABAergic play a critical role in the regulation of fertility by leptin, we next focussed on the location of these populations. To address whether GABAergic neurones in leptin-responsive hypothalamic regions project to the rPOA, the experiment was repeated in GABA neurone reporter mice (Vgat-tdTomato). Between 10% and 45% of RetroBead-labelled neurones in the ARC were GABAergic, whereas uptake of tracer by GABAergic neurones in the DMN and PMV was very low (leptin responsive and GABAergic neurones from the ARC project to the region of the GnRH cell bodies. Our findings suggest that LEPR-expressing GABA neurones from the ARC may be mediators of leptin-to-GnRH signalling.

  10. [Effects of electro-acupuncture on signal transduction pathway of hypothalamic neuroendocrine system in ovariectomized rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Feng; Ma, Shu-Lan; Chen, Bo-Ying

    2009-06-01

    To compare the varieties and contents of the main nerval information molecules in perfusate from hypothalamic medial preoptic area (MPOA) of the rats in different sexual cycles and the ovariectomized rats treated by electro-acupuncture, so as to observe the similarities and differences of hypothalamic neuroendocrine signal transduction pathway under the physiological and pathological status, and to explore the mechanisms of neuroendocrine signal transduction of electro-acupuncture therapeutic effect in perimenopausal syndrome. The stereo localization technique and push-and-pull perfusion of the rat brain nucleus were adopted for collecting the hypothalamic MPOA perfusate of the female rats with normal sexual cycle, and also for collecting the MPOA perfusate of ovariectomized rats after electro-acupuncture treatment as acupuncture perfusate (AP). After being respectively microinjected into MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the influence of the different perfusates on vagina cytology and serum estradiol (E2) level was observed. The contents of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), dopamine (DA), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp) and beta-endorphin (beta-EP) in the perfusate of each group were detected by radioimmunoassay or high performance liquid chromatography, and then the varieties and contents of these substances in the perfusate of each group were compared and analyzed. The contents of neural active substances including DA, GABA, Glu, and beta-EP in the perfusate from the rats' MPOA during different stages of sexual cycle showed some regular changes. After the perfusate was microinjected respectively into the MPOA of the ovariectomized rats, the changes of animal vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level showed the similar four-stage cycle characteristics as normal rats; the changes of vaginal exfoliated cells and serum E2 level of the ovariectomized rats without electro-acupuncture treatment showed the acupuncture-like effects

  11. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lower Pomc but higher Agrp mRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic

  12. Immediate and prolonged effects of alcohol exposure on the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in adult and adolescent rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALLEN, Camryn D.; LEE, Soon; KOOB, George F.; RIVIER, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Part of this influence is likely exerted directly at the level of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) gene, but intermediates may also play a role. Here we review the effect of alcohol on this axis, provide new data on the effects of binge drinking during adolescence, and argue for a role of catecholaminergic circuits. Indeed, acute injection of this drug activates brain stem adrenergic and noradrenergic circuits, and their lesion, or blockade of α1 adrenergic receptors significantly blunts alcohol-induced ACTH release. As alcohol can influence the HPA axis even once discontinued, and alcohol consumption in young people is associated with increased adult drug abuse (a phenomenon possibly mediated by the HPA axis), we determined whether alcohol consumption during adolescence modified this axis. The number of CRF-immunoreactive (ir) cells/section was significantly decreased in the central nucleus of the amygdala of adolescent self-administering binge-drinking animals, compared to controls. When another group of adolescent binge-drinking rats was administered alcohol in adulthood, the number of colocalized c-fos-ir and PNMT-ir cells/brain stem section in the C3 area was significantly decreased, compared to controls. As the HPA axis response to alcohol is blunted in adult rats exposed to alcohol vapors during adolescence, a phenomenon which was not observed in our model of self-administration, it is possible that the blood alcohol levels achieved in various models play a role in the long-term consequences of exposure to alcohol early in life. Collectively, these results suggest an important role of brain catecholamines in modulating the short- and long-term consequences of alcohol administration. PMID:21300146

  13. Hypothalamic delivery of doxycycline-inducible leptin gene allows for reversible transgene expression and physiological responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, J; Zolotukhin, S; Prima, V; Shek, E W; Matheny, M K; Scarpace, P J

    2002-11-01

    Our purpose was to incorporate regulation into the recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding leptin by introducing a tet-inducible promotor. This system, TET-Ob, allows for control of leptin gene expression via doxycycline in drinking water. F344XBN rats (aged 4 months) were given a hypothalamic injection of TET-Ob or control virus. During 34 days of doxycycline (doxy) administration to all rats (STAGE 1), TET-Ob rats gained 50.7% less mass, ate 10.4% less food, and had a 77.5% reduction in serum leptin as compared with controls. Doxy was then withdrawn from half of the TET-Ob rats for 32 days (TET-Ob-OFF), while half continued to receive doxy (TET-Ob-ON) (stage 2). During stage 2, TET-Ob-ON rats gained 44.8% less mass than TET-Ob-OFF and ate significantly less food than both TET-Ob-OFF and controls. Serum leptin increased to 83.4% of control values in TET-Ob-OFF, but remained very low in the in TET-Ob-ON. At death, visceral adiposity was 14.5% of controls in TET-Ob-ON animals, but had risen to 76.9% of controls in TET-Ob-OFF. A reversible increase in both leptin signal transduction in the hypothalamus and uncoupling protein expression in brown adipose was recorded. This system allows for more precise regulation of gene therapy-mediated fat loss.

  14. Differential role of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons in reward seeking motivated by cocaine versus palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Fardon, Rémi; Cauvi, Gabrielle; Kerr, Tony M; Weiss, Friedbert

    2016-08-24

    Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin (Orx/Hcrt) neurons are thought to mediate both food-reinforced behaviors and behavior motivated by drugs of abuse. However, the relative role of the Orx/Hcrt system in behavior motivated by food versus drugs of abuse remains unclear. This investigation addressed this question by contrasting hypothalamic Orx/Hcrt neuronal activation associated with reinstatement of reward seeking induced by stimuli conditioned to cocaine (COC) versus highly palatable food reward, sweetened condensed milk (SCM). Orx/Hcrt neuronal activation in the lateral hypothalamus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and perifornical area, determined by dual c-fos/orx immunocytochemistry, was quantified in rat brains, following reinstatement of reward seeking induced by a discriminative stimulus (S(+) ) conditioned to COC or SCM. The COC S(+) and SCM S(+) initially produced the same magnitude of reward seeking. However, over four subsequent tests, behavior induced by the SCM S(+) decreased to extinction levels, whereas reinstatement induced by the COC S(+) perseverated at undiminished levels. Following both the first and fourth tests, the percentage of Orx/Hcrt cells expressing Fos was significantly increased in all hypothalamic subregions in rats tested with the COC S(+) but not rats tested with the SCM S(+) . These findings point toward a role for the Orx/Hcrt system in perseverating, compulsive-like COC seeking but not behavior motivated by palatable food. Moreover, analysis of the Orx/Hcrt recruitment patterns suggests that failure of Orx/Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus to respond to inhibitory inputs from Orx/Hcrt neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamus/perifornical area may contribute to the perseverating nature of COC seeking.

  15. Oral glucose intake inhibits hypothalamic neuronal activity more effectively than glucose infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Vidarsdottir, S.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Viergever, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Grond, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    We previously showed that hypothalamic neuronal activity, as measured by the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI signal, declines in response to oral glucose intake. To further explore the mechanism driving changes in hypothalamic neuronal activity in response to an oral glucose load,

  16. Role of Hypothalamic Creb-Binding Protein in Obesity and Molecular Reprogramming of Metabolic Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, C.L.; Yang, L.; Dacks, P.A.; Isoda, F.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Mobbs, C.V.

    2016-01-01

    We have reported a correlation between hypothalamic expression of Creb-binding protein (Cbp) and lifespan, and that inhibition of Cbp prevents protective effects of dietary restriction during aging, suggesting that hypothalamic Cbp plays a role in responses to nutritional status and energy balance.

  17. HYPOTHALAMIC BLOOD-FLOW REMAINS UNALTERED FOLLOWING CHRONIC NITRIC-OXIDE SYNTHASE BLOCKADE IN RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BENYO, Z; SZABO, C; STUIVER, BT; BOHUS, B; SANDOR, P

    1995-01-01

    The effect of the chronic oral application of N-G-nitro-L-arginine methyl eater (L-NAME), a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) production, was studied on hypothalamic blood flow (HBF) and hypothalamic nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in rats. L-NAME was dissolved in the drinking water, in a c

  18. Thyroid hormone exerts negative feedback on hypothalamic type 4 melanocortin receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decherf, Stéphanie; Seugnet, Isabelle; Kouidhi, Soumaya; Lopez-Juarez, Alejandra; Clerget-Froidevaux, Marie-Stéphanie; Demeneix, Barbara A

    2010-03-01

    The type 4 melanocortin receptor MC4R, a key relay in leptin signaling, links central energy control to peripheral reserve status. MC4R activation in different brain areas reduces food intake and increases energy expenditure. Mice lacking Mc4r are obese. Mc4r is expressed by hypothalamic paraventricular Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) neurons and increases energy usage through activation of Trh and production of the thyroid hormone tri-iodothyronine (T(3)). These facts led us to test the hypothesis that energy homeostasis should require negative feedback by T(3) on Mc4r expression. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed hyperthyroidism reduces Mc4r mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus. Comparative in silico analysis of Mc4r regulatory regions revealed two evolutionarily conserved potential negative thyroid hormone-response elements (nTREs). In vivo ChIP assays on mouse hypothalamus demonstrated association of thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) with a region spanning one nTRE. Further, in vivo gene reporter assays revealed dose-dependent T(3) repression of transcription from the Mc4r promoter in mouse hypothalamus, in parallel with T(3)-dependent Trh repression. Mutagenesis of the nTREs in the Mc4r promoter demonstrated direct regulation by T(3), consolidating the ChIP results. In vivo shRNA knockdown, TR over-expression approaches and use of mutant mice lacking specific TRs showed that both TRalpha and TRbeta contribute to Mc4r regulation. T(3) repression of Mc4r transcription ensures that the energy-saving effects of T(3) feedback on Trh are not overridden by MC4R activation of Trh. Thus parallel repression by T(3) on hypothalamic Mc4r and Trh contributes to energy homeostasis.

  19. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor is centrally involved in learning under moderate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Morgan; Chen, Alon; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2013-08-01

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neuropeptide is found to have a pivotal role in the regulation of the behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stressful challenges. Here, we studied the involvement of the hypothalamic CRF in learning under stressful conditions. We have used a site-specific viral approach to knockdown (KD) CRF expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). The two-way shuttle avoidance (TWSA) task was chosen to assess learning and memory under stressful conditions. Control animals learned to shuttle from one side to the other to avoid electrical foot shock by responding to a tone. Novel object and social recognition tasks were used to assess memory under less stressful conditions. KD of PVN-CRF expression decreased the number of avoidance responses in a TWSA session under moderate (0.8 mA), but not strong (1.5 mA), stimulus intensity compared to control rats. On the other hand, KD of PVN-CRF had no effect on memory performance in the less stressful novel object or social recognition tasks. Interestingly, basal or stress-induced corticosterone levels in CRF KD rats were not significantly different from controls. Taken together, the data suggest that the observed impairment was not a result of alteration in HPA axis activity, but rather due to reduced PVN-CRF activity on other brain areas. We propose that hypothalamic CRF is centrally involved in learning under moderate stressful challenge. Under 'basal' (less stressful) conditions or when the intensity of the stress is more demanding, central CRF ceases to be the determinant factor, as was indicated by performances in the TWSA with higher stimulus intensity or in the less stressful tasks of object and social recognition.

  20. Functional cross-talk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and -adrenal axes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viau, V

    2002-06-01

    Under normal conditions, the adrenal glucocorticoids, the endproduct of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, provide a frontline of defence against threats to homeostasis (i.e. stress). On the other hand, chronic HPA drive and glucocorticoid hypersecretion have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several forms of systemic, neurodegenerative and affective disorders. The HPA axis is subject to gonadal influence, indicated by sex differences in basal and stress HPA function and neuropathologies associated with HPA dysfunction. Functional cross-talk between the gonadal and adrenal axes is due in large part to the interactive effects of sex steroids and glucocorticoids, explaining perhaps why several disease states linked to stress are sex-dependent. Realizing the interactive nature by which the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal and HPA systems operate, however, has made it difficult to model how these hormones act in the brain. Manipulation of one endocrine system is not without effects on the other. Simultaneous manipulation and assessment of both endocrine systems can overcome this problem. This dual approach in the male rat reveals that testosterone can act and interact on different aspects of basal and stress HPA function. Basal adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release is regulated by testosterone-dependent effects on arginine vasopressin synthesis, and corticosterone-dependent effects on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) synthesis in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus. In contrast, testosterone and corticosterone interact on stress-induced ACTH release and drive to the PVN motor neurones. Candidate structures mediating this interaction include several testosterone-sensitive afferents to the HPA axis, including the medial preoptic area, central and medial amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis. All of these relay homeostatic information and integrate reproductive and social behaviour. Because these modalities are affected

  1. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew eElson; Joseph eBovi; Kawaljeet eKaur; Diana eMaas; Grant eSinson; Chris eSchultz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife) on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT) ...

  2. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Autoimmunity and Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Guaraldi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of secondary hypopituitarism in children and adults, and is responsible for impaired quality of life, disabilities and compromised development. Alterations of pituitary function can occur at any time after the traumatic event, presenting in various ways and evolving during time, so they require appropriate screening for early detection and treatment. Although the exact pathophysiology is unknown, several mechanisms have been hypothesized, including hypothalamic-pituitary autoimmunity (HP-A. The aim of this study was to systematically review literature on the association between HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Major pitfalls related to the HP-A investigation were also discussed. Methods: The PubMed database was searched with a string developed for this purpose, without temporal or language limits, for original articles assessing the association of HP-A and TBI-induced hypopituitarism. Results: Three articles from the same group met the inclusion criteria. Anti-pituitary and anti-hypothalamic antibodies were detected using indirect immunofluorescence in a significant number of patients with acute and chronic TBI. Elevated antibody titer was associated with an increased risk of persistent hypopituitarism, especially somatotroph and gonadotroph deficiency, while no correlations were found with clinical parameters. Conclusion: HPA seems to contribute to TBI-induced pituitary damage, although major methodological issues need to be overcome and larger studies are warranted to confirm these preliminary data.

  3. Early effects of cranial irradiation on hypothalamic-pituitary function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, K.S.; Tse, V.K.; Wang, C.; Yeung, R.T.; Ma, J.T.; Ho, J.H.

    1987-03-01

    Hypothalamic-pituitary function was studied in 31 patients before and after cranial irradiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The estimated radiotherapy (RT) doses to the hypothalamus and pituitary were 3979 +/- 78 (+/- SD) and 6167 +/- 122 centiGrays, respectively. All patients had normal pituitary function before RT. One year after RT, there was a significant decrease in the integrated serum GH response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In the male patients, basal serum FSH significantly increased, while basal serum LH and testosterone did not change. Moreover, in response to LHRH, the integrated FSH response was increased while that of LH was decreased. Such discordant changes in FSH and LH may be explained by a defect in LHRH pulsatile release involving predominantly a decrease in pulse frequency. The peak serum TSH response to TRH became delayed in 28 patients, suggesting a defect in TRH release. Twenty-one patients were reassessed 2 yr after RT. Their mean basal serum T4 and plasma cortisol levels had significantly decreased. Hyperprolactinemia associated with oligomenorrhoea was found in 3 women. Further impairment in the secretion of GH, FSH, LH, TSH, and ACTH had occurred, and 4 patients had hypopituitarism. Thus, progressive impairment in hypothalamic-pituitary function occurs after cranial irradiation and can be demonstrated as early as 1 yr after RT.

  4. Nutritional Recovery Promotes Hypothalamic Inflammation in Rats during Adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Barbosa Farias Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated whether protein restriction in fetal life alters food intake and glucose homeostasis in adulthood by interfering with insulin signal transduction through proinflammatory mechanisms in the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues. Rats were divided into the following: a control group (C; a recovered group (R; and a low protein (LP group. Relative food intake was greater and serum leptin was diminished in LP and R compared to C rats. Proinflammatory genes and POMC mRNA were upregulated in the hypothalamus of R group. Hypothalamic NPY mRNA expression was greater but AKT phosphorylation was diminished in the LP than in the C rats. In muscle, AKT phosphorylation was higher in restricted than in control animals. The HOMA-IR was decreased in R and C compared to the LP group. In contrast, the Kitt in R was similar to that in C and both were lower than LP rats. Thus, nutritional recovery did not alter glucose homeostasis but produced middle hyperphagia, possibly due to increased anorexigenic neuropeptide expression that counteracted the hypothalamic inflammatory process. In long term protein deprived rats, hyperphagia most likely resulted from increased orexigenic neuropeptide expression, and glucose homeostasis was maintained, at least in part, at the expense of increased muscle insulin sensitivity.

  5. Disruption of neurogenesis by hypothalamic inflammation in obesity or aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-12-01

    Adult neural stem cells contribute to neurogenesis and plasticity of the brain which is essential for central regulation of systemic homeostasis. Damage to these homeostatic components, depending on locations in the brain, poses threat to impaired neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, cognitive loss and energy imbalance. Recent research has identified brain metabolic inflammation via proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ) and its downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB pathway as a non-classical linker of metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. Chronic activation of the pathway results in impairment of energy balance and nutrient metabolism, impediment of neurogenesis, neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation, collectively converging on metabolic and cognitive decline. Hypothalamic IKKβ/NF-κB via inflammatory crosstalk between microglia and neurons has been discovered to direct systemic aging by inhibiting the production of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and inhibition of inflammation or GnRH therapy could revert aging related degenerative symptoms at least in part. This article reviews the crucial role of hypothalamic inflammation in affecting neural stem cells which mediates the neurodegenerative mechanisms of causing metabolic derangements as well as aging-associated disorders or diseases.

  6. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  7. A treasure trove of hypothalamic neurocircuitries governing body weight homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianna, Claudia R; Coppari, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Changes in physical activities and feeding habits have transformed the historically rare disease of obesity into a modern metabolic pandemic. Obesity occurs when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure over time. This energy imbalance significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus and as such represents an enormous socioeconomic burden and health threat. To combat obesity, a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neurocircuitries underlying normal body weight homeostasis is required. In the 1940s, pioneering lesion experiments unveiled the importance of medial and lateral hypothalamic structures. In the 1980s and 1990s, several neuropeptides and peripheral hormones critical for appropriate feeding behavior, energy expenditure, and hence body weight homeostasis were identified. In the 2000s, results from metabolic analyses of genetically engineered mice bearing mutations only in selected neuronal groups greatly advanced our knowledge of the peripheral/brain feedback-loop modalities by which central neurons control energy balance. In this review, we will summarize these recent progresses with particular emphasis on the biochemical identities of hypothalamic neurons and molecular components underlying normal appetite, energy expenditure, and body weight homeostasis. We will also parse which of those neurons and molecules are critical components of homeostatic adaptive pathways against obesity induced by hypercaloric feeding.

  8. MRI of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyropoulou, Maria I. [University of Ioannina, Department of Radiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece); Kiortsis, Dimitrios Nikiforos [University of Ioannina, Department of Physiology, Medical School, Ioannina (Greece)

    2005-11-01

    In childhood, the MR characteristics of the normal pituitary gland are well established. During the first 2 months of life the adenohypophysis demonstrates high signal. Pituitary gland height (PGH) decreases during the 1st year of life and then increases, reaching a plateau after puberty. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) increases in both sexes up to the age of 20 years. On dynamic contrast-enhanced studies, the posterior pituitary lobe enhances simultaneously with the straight sinus, and the adenohypophysis later, but within 30 s. In genetically determined dysfunctional states, the adenohypophysis may be normal, hypoplastic, or enlarged. Pituitary enlargement, observed in Prop 1 gene mutations, is characterized by a mass interposed between the anterior and posterior lobes. An ectopic posterior lobe (EPP), associated with a hypoplastic or absent pituitary stalk, may be observed in patients with hypopituitarism. Tumors of the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP) axis may be the origin of adenohypophyseal deficiencies. A small hypointense adenohypophysis is found in iron overload states and is often associated with hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Absence of the posterior lobe bright signal, with or without a thick pituitary stalk or a mass at any site from the median eminence to the posterior pituitary lobe, may be found in diabetes insipidus. Hydrocephalus, suprasellar arachnoid cysts, hypothalamic hamartomas and craniopharyngiomas may result in central precocious puberty (CPP). Increased PGH in girls with idiopathic CPP is useful for its differential diagnosis from premature thelarche (PT). Pituitary adenomas, observed mainly in adolescents, present the same MR characteristics as those in adults. (orig.)

  9. Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin processing and the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Sharon L

    2011-06-11

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons play a key role in regulating energy balance and neuroendocrine function. Much attention has been focused on the regulation of POMC gene expression with less emphasis on regulated peptide processing. This is particularly important given the complexity of posttranslational POMC processing which is essential for the generation of biologically active MSH peptides. Mutations that impair POMC sorting and processing are associated with obesity in humans and in animals. Specifically, mutations in the POMC processing enzymes prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3) and in carboxypeptidase E (CPE) and in the α-MSH degrading enzyme, PRCP, are associated with changes in energy balance. There is increasing evidence that POMC processing is regulated with respect to energy balance. Studies have implicated both the leptin and insulin signaling pathways in the regulation of POMC at various steps in the processing pathway. This article will review the role of hypothalamic POMC in regulating energy balance with a focus on POMC processing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward.

  11. Penicillin G Procaine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penicillin G procaine injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used to treat ... in the treatment of certain serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications ...

  12. Body surface area adapted iopromide 300 mg/ml versus 370 mg/ml contrast medium injection protocol: Influence on quantitative and clinical assessment in combined PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A., E-mail: fverburg@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Apitzsch, Jonas [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lensing, Carina [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Müllerstrasse 178, 13353 Berlin (Germany); Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P. Debyelaan 25, 6229 HX Maastricht (Netherlands); Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Pauwelsstraße 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the quantitative and qualitative differences between combined positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography (PET/CT) enhanced with contrast medium with either an iodine concentration 300 mg/ml or 370 mg/ml. Materials and methods: 120 consecutive patients scheduled for F-18-Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT were included. The first (second) 60 patients received contrast medium with 300 (370) mg iodine/ml. Intravenous injection protocols were adapted for an identical iodine delivery rate (1.3 mg/s) and body surface area (BSA) adapted iodine dose (22.26 g I/m{sup 2}). Maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) and contrast enhancement (HU) were determined in the ascending aorta, the abdominal aorta, the inferior vena cava, the portal vein, the liver and the right kidney in the venous contrast medium phase. PET data were evaluated visually for the presence of malignancy and image quality. Results: Both media caused significantly higher values for HU, SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} for the enhanced PET/CT than the non-enhanced one (all p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in the degree of increase of HU, SUV{sub mean} and SUV{sub max} between the two contrast media at any anatomic site (all p > 0.05). Visual evaluation of lesions showed no differences between contrast and non-contrast PET/CT or between the two different contrast media (p = 0.77). Conclusion: When using a constant iodine delivery rate and total iodine dose in a BSA adapted injection protocol, there are no quantitative or qualitative differences in either CT or PET between contrast media with an iodine concentration of 300 mg/ml and 370 mg/ml, respectively.

  13. Chlorella vulgaris reduces the impact of stress on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and brain c-fos expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Queiroz, Julia; Marín Blasco, Ignacio; Gagliano, Humberto; Daviu, Nuria; Gómez Román, Almudena; Belda, Xavier; Carrasco, Javier; Rocha, Michelle C; Palermo Neto, João; Armario, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Predominantly emotional stressors activate a wide range of brain areas, as revealed by the expression of immediate early genes, such as c-fos. Chlorella vulgaris (CV) is considered a biological response modifier, as demonstrated by its protective activities against infections, tumors and stress. We evaluated the effect of acute pretreatment with CV on the peripheral and central responses to forced swimming stress in adult male rats. Pretreatment with CV produced a significant reduction of stress-related hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activation, demonstrated by decreased corticotrophin releasing factor gene expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and lower ACTH response. Hyperglycemia induced by the stressor was similarly reduced. This attenuated neuroendocrine response to stress occurred in parallel with a diminished c-fos expression in most evaluated areas, including the PVN. The data presented in this study reinforce the usefulness of CV to diminish the impact of stressors, by reducing the HPA response. Although our results suggest a central effect of CV, further studies are necessary to understand the precise mechanisms underpinning this effect.

  14. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to iron dextran injection; any other iron injections such as ferric carboxymaltose (Injectafer), ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit);any other ...

  15. Tuberal hypothalamic neurons secreting the satiety molecule Nesfatin-1 are critically involved in paradoxical (REM sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Jego

    Full Text Available The recently discovered Nesfatin-1 plays a role in appetite regulation as a satiety factor through hypothalamic leptin-independent mechanisms. Nesfatin-1 is co-expressed with Melanin-Concentrating Hormone (MCH in neurons from the tuberal hypothalamic area (THA which are recruited during sleep states, especially paradoxical sleep (PS. To help decipher the contribution of this contingent of THA neurons to sleep regulatory mechanisms, we thus investigated in rats whether the co-factor Nesfatin-1 is also endowed with sleep-modulating properties. Here, we found that the disruption of the brain Nesfatin-1 signaling achieved by icv administration of Nesfatin-1 antiserum or antisense against the nucleobindin2 (NUCB2 prohormone suppressed PS with little, if any alteration of slow wave sleep (SWS. Further, the infusion of Nesfatin-1 antiserum after a selective PS deprivation, designed for elevating PS needs, severely prevented the ensuing expected PS recovery. Strengthening these pharmacological data, we finally demonstrated by using c-Fos as an index of neuronal activation that the recruitment of Nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons within THA is positively correlated to PS but not to SWS amounts experienced by rats prior to sacrifice. In conclusion, this work supports a functional contribution of the Nesfatin-1 signaling, operated by THA neurons, to PS regulatory mechanisms. We propose that these neurons, likely releasing MCH as a synergistic factor, constitute an appropriate lever by which the hypothalamus may integrate endogenous signals to adapt the ultradian rhythm and maintenance of PS in a manner dictated by homeostatic needs. This could be done through the inhibition of downstream targets comprised primarily of the local hypothalamic wake-active orexin- and histamine-containing neurons.

  16. The Third Injection Technique Workshop In Athens (TITAN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frid, A.; Hirsch, L.; Gaspar, R.; Hicks, D.; Kreugel, G.; Liersch, J.; Letondeur, C.; Sauvanet, J. P.; Tubiana-Rufi, N.; Strauss, K.

    The first Injection Technique workshop brought together endocrinologists and injection experts from around the world in Strasbourg in 1997. From its work came groundbreaking recommendations which advanced best practices in areas such as the use of a skin fold when injecting. The second Injection

  17. The Third Injection Technique Workshop In Athens (TITAN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frid, A.; Hirsch, L.; Gaspar, R.; Hicks, D.; Kreugel, G.; Liersch, J.; Letondeur, C.; Sauvanet, J. P.; Tubiana-Rufi, N.; Strauss, K.

    2010-01-01

    The first Injection Technique workshop brought together endocrinologists and injection experts from around the world in Strasbourg in 1997. From its work came groundbreaking recommendations which advanced best practices in areas such as the use of a skin fold when injecting. The second Injection Tec

  18. Desipramine inhibits histamine H1 receptor-induced Ca2+ signaling in rat hypothalamic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ah Kang

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus in the brain is the main center for appetite control and integrates signals from adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. Antidepressants are known to modulate the activities of hypothalamic neurons and affect food intake, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which antidepressants modulate hypothalamic function remain unclear. Here we have investigated how hypothalamic neurons respond to treatment with antidepressants, including desipramine and sibutramine. In primary cultured rat hypothalamic cells, desipramine markedly suppressed the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ evoked by histamine H1 receptor activation. Desipramine also inhibited the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing hormone in hypothalamic GT1-1 cells. The effect of desipramine was not affected by pretreatment with prazosin or propranolol, excluding catecholamine reuptake activity of desipramine as an underlying mechanism. Sibutramine which is also an antidepressant but decreases food intake, had little effect on the histamine-induced Ca(2+ increase or AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Our results reveal that desipramine and sibutramine have different effects on histamine H1 receptor signaling in hypothalamic cells and suggest that distinct regulation of hypothalamic histamine signaling might underlie the differential regulation of food intake between antidepressants.

  19. Pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypothalamic obesity in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ja Hye; Choi, Jin-Ho

    2013-12-01

    The hypothalamus plays a key role in the regulation of body weight by balancing the intake of food, energy expenditure, and body fat stores, as evidenced by the fact that most monogenic syndromes of morbid obesity result from mutations in genes expressed in the hypothalamus. Hypothalamic obesity is a result of impairment in the hypothalamic regulatory centers of body weight and energy expenditure, and is caused by structural damage to the hypothalamus, radiotherapy, Prader-Willi syndrome, and mutations in the LEP, LEPR, POMC, MC4R and CART genes. The pathophysiology includes loss of sensitivity to afferent peripheral humoral signals, such as leptin, dysregulated insulin secretion, and impaired activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Dysregulation of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 activity and melatonin may also have a role in the development of hypothalamic obesity. Intervention of this complex entity requires simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms that are deranged in patients with hypothalamic obesity. Despite a great deal of theoretical understanding, effective treatment for hypothalamic obesity has not yet been developed. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms that control food intake and energy homeostasis and pathophysiology of hypothalamic obesity can be the cornerstone of the development of new treatments options. Early identification of patients at-risk can relieve the severity of weight gain by the provision of dietary and behavioral modification, and antiobesity medication. This review summarizes recent advances of the pathophysiology, endocrine characteristics, and treatment strategies of hypothalamic obesity.

  20. Regional haemodynamic effects of mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid agonists microinjected into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of conscious, unrestrained rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Pître, M

    1995-06-01

    1. The cardiovascular effects of bilateral injection into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei of selective mu-, delta-, and kappa-opioid receptor agonists were investigated in conscious, unrestrained Wistar Kyoto rats, chronically instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes for measurement of regional haemodynamics. 2. The selective mu-agonist [D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly5ol]enkephalin (DAMGO), injected bilaterally into the hypothalamic paraventricular nuclei (0.01-1.0 nmol), caused increases in blood pressure, tachycardias, vasoconstriction in renal and superior mesenteric vascular beds and substantial vasodilatation in the hindquarter vascular bed. 3. The administration of increasing doses (0.01-5.0 nmol) of the selective delta-agonist [D-Phe2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE) or the selective kappa-agonist, U50488H into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) had no significant effect on blood pressure, heart rate, or regional haemodynamics. 4. Together, the present results are further evidence of a role for opioid peptides, especially acting at mu-receptors in the PVN, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system, whereas a role for opioid peptides, acting at delta- and kappa-receptors in the PVN, seems less obvious from the present results.

  1. Hypothalamic obesity after craniopharyngioma: mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Lustig

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common complication after craniopharyngioma therapy, occurring in up to 75% of survivors. Its weight gain is unlike that of normal obesity, in that it occurs even with caloric restriction, and attempts at lifestyle modification are useless to prevent or treat the obesity. The pathogenesis of this condition involves the inability to transduce afferent hormonal signals of adiposity, in effect mimicking a state of CNS starvation. Efferent sympathetic activity drops, resulting in malaise and reduced energy expenditure, and vagal activity increases, resulting in increased insulin secretion and adipogenesis. Lifestyle intervention is essentially useless in this syndrome, termed hypothalamic obesity. Pharmacologic treatment is also difficult, consisting of adrenergics to mimic sympathetic activity, or suppression of insulin secretion with octreotide, or both. Recently, bariatric surgery (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, laparoscopic gastric banding, truncal vagotomy have also been attempted with variable results. Early and intensive management is required to mitigate the obesity and its negative consequences.

  2. Early life origins of obesity: role of hypothalamic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouret, Sebastien G

    2009-03-01

    The incidence of obesity is increasing at an alarming rate and this worldwide epidemic represents an ominous predictor of increases in diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Epidemiological and animals studies suggest that maternal obesity and alterations in postnatal nutrition are associated with increased risks for obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes in the offspring. Furthermore, there is also growing appreciation that developmental programming of neuroendocrine systems by the perinatal environment represents a possible cause for these diseases. This review article provides a synthesis of recent evidence concerning the actions of perinatal hormones and nutrition in programming the development and organization of hypothalamic circuits that regulate body weight and energy balance. Particular attention is given to the neurodevelopmental actions of insulin and leptin.

  3. Perinatal nutrition programs the hypothalamic melanocortin system in offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattez, J-S; Delahaye, F; Lukaszewski, M-A; Risold, P-Y; Eberlé, D; Vieau, D; Breton, C

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological studies initially suggested that maternal undernutrition leading to low birth weight may predispose for long-lasting energy balance disorders. High birth weight due to maternal obesity or diabetes, inappropriate early postnatal nutrition, and rapid catch-up growth, may also sensitize to increased risk of obesity. As stated by the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease concept, the perinatal perturbation of fetus/neonate nutrient supply might be a crucial determinant of individual programming of body weight set-point. The hypothalamic melanocortin system composed of the melanocortin receptor 4, its agonist α-melanin-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and its antagonist agouti-related protein (AgRP) is considered as the main central anorexigenic pathway controlling energy homeostasis. Studies in numerous animal models demonstrated that this system is a prime target of developmental programming by maternal nutritional manipulation. In rodents, the perinatal period of life corresponds largely to the period of brain maturation (i. e., melanocortin neuronal differentiation and development of their neural projections). In contrast, these phenomena essentially take place before birth in bigger mammals. Despite these different developmental time windows, altricial and precocial species share several common offspring programming mechanisms. Offspring from malnourished dams present a hypothalamic melanocortin system with a series of alterations: impaired neurogenesis and neuronal functionality, disorganization of feeding pathways, modified glucose sensing, and leptin/insulin resistance. Overall, these alterations may account for the long-lasting dysregulation of energy balance and obesity. Following maternal malnutrition, hormonal and epigenetic mechanisms might be responsible for melanocortin system programming in offspring. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Genetic, hypothalamic and endocrine features of clinical and experimental obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, G A

    1992-01-01

    Obesity occurs in both clinical and animal forms in a variety of specific models which allow study of its underlining endocrine and mechanistic features. Among the neuroendocrine varieties of obesity, polycystic ovaries are probably the most common. The importance of the gonadal feedback system for regulation of food intake and obesity is indicated by the effects of castration in experimental animals which is a widely used mechanism for producing experimental obesity. Cushing syndrome and hypothalamic obesity are rare clinical syndromes. The current evidence suggests that there are two types of hypothalamic obesity from a mechanistic point of view--one associated with hyperphagia as a necessary and sufficient cause and a disturbance of the autonomic nervous system without hyperphagia as a second mechanism. Although genetic factors underlie most types of human obesity, there are several dymorphic forms of obesity including the Prader-Willy syndrome, Cohen's syndrome, Carpenter's syndrome, Ahlstrom's syndrome and the Bardet-Biedel syndrome. The Prader-Willi syndrome is characterized by obesity hypotonia hypogonadism and mental retardation. In animals, a dominant form of inheritance of obesity is seen in the yellow mouse. Current evidence suggests that this syndrome can be explained by reduced acetylation of MSH in the pituitary and/or hypothalamus. Several recessively inherited forms of obesity exist including the obese mouse, the diabetes mouse, fatty rat, the fat mouse, tubby mouse and the corpulent rat. In addition, there are a number of polygenic types of experimental obesity. The final mechanistic classification of obesity are those due to dietary manipulation. For both human beings and animals, a highly fat diet appears to be particularly problematic for the development of obesity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Thiamine deficiency induces anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M; Alimov, A P; Wang, H; Frank, J A; Katz, W; Xu, M; Ke, Z-J; Luo, J

    2014-05-16

    Obesity and eating disorders are prevailing health concerns worldwide. It is important to understand the regulation of food intake and energy metabolism. Thiamine (vitamin B1) is an essential nutrient. Thiamine deficiency (TD) can cause a number of disorders in humans, such as Beriberi and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. We demonstrated here that TD caused anorexia in C57BL/6 mice. After feeding a TD diet for 16days, the mice displayed a significant decrease in food intake and an increase in resting energy expenditure (REE), which resulted in a severe weight loss. At the 22nd day, the food intake was reduced by 69% and 74% for male and female mice, respectively in TD group. The REE increased by ninefolds in TD group. The loss of body weight (17-24%) was similar between male and female animals and mainly resulted from the reduction of fat mass (49% decrease). Re-supplementation of thiamine (benfotiamine) restored animal's appetite, leading to a total recovery of body weight. The hypothalamic adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical regulator of food intake. TD inhibited the phosphorylation of AMPK in the arcuate nucleus (ARN) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus without affecting its expression. TD-induced inhibition of AMPK phosphorylation was reversed once thiamine was re-supplemented. In contrast, TD increased AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle and upregulated the uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipose tissues which was consistent with increased basal energy expenditure. Re-administration of thiamine stabilized AMPK phosphorylation in the skeletal muscle as well as energy expenditure. Taken together, TD may induce anorexia by inhibiting hypothalamic AMPK activity. With a simultaneous increase in energy expenditure, TD caused an overall body weight loss. The results suggest that the status of thiamine levels in the body may affect food intake and body weight.

  6. Hypothalamic CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate energy balance in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Clark, Samantha; Cannich, Astrid; Klugmann, Matthias; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation is generally considered a powerful orexigenic signal and inhibition of the endocannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. The hypothalamus plays a critical role in regulating energy balance by modulating both food intake and energy expenditure. Although CB(1) receptor signaling has been implicated in the modulation of both these mechanisms, a complete understanding of its role in the hypothalamus is still lacking. Here we combined a genetic approach with the use of adeno-associated viral vectors to delete the CB(1) receptor gene in the adult mouse hypothalamus and assessed the impact of such manipulation on the regulation of energy balance. Viral-mediated deletion of the CB(1) receptor gene in the hypothalamus led to the generation of Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice, which displayed an approximately 60% decrease in hypothalamic CB(1) receptor mRNA levels. Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice maintained on a normocaloric, standard diet showed decreased body weight gain over time, which was associated with increased energy expenditure and elevated β(3)-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 mRNA levels in the brown adipose tissue but, surprisingly, not to changes in food intake. Additionally, Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice were insensitive to the anorectic action of the hormone leptin (5 mg/kg) and displayed a time-dependent hypophagic response to the CB(1) inverse agonist rimonabant (3 mg/kg). Altogether these findings suggest that hypothalamic CB(1) receptor signaling is a key determinant of energy expenditure under basal conditions and reveal its specific role in conveying the effects of leptin and pharmacological CB1 receptor antagonism on food intake.

  7. Hypothalamic glutamate levels following serotonergic stimulation: a pilot study using 7-Tesla magnetic resonance spectroscopy in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G E; der Grond, J van; Teeuwisse, W M; Langeveld, T J C; van Pelt, J; Verhagen, J C M; de Kam, M L; Cohen, A F; Zitman, F G; van Gerven, J M A

    2010-04-16

    Functional proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be applied to measure pharmacodynamic effects of central nervous system (CNS)-active drugs. The serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), administered together with carbidopa and granisetron to improve kinetics and reduce adverse effects, acutely enhances central serotonergic neurotransmission and induces hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-(HPA) axis activation. We studied the hypothalamic levels of glutamate/glutamine (Glx), choline (Chol), N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and creatine using 7-Tesla (7T) MRS, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in peripheral blood, after the administration of the 5-HTP function test in healthy volunteers. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, two-way cross-over study was performed in 12 healthy males with a 7day wash-out period. After administration of the oral 5-HTP function test, ACTH and cortisol were measured over 4h and MRS scans at 7T were performed every 30min over 3h measuring Glx:Creatine, Chol:Creatine and NAA:Creatine ratios. In the hypothalamus, the administration of 5-HTP had no effect on the average Glx, Chol or NAA levels over 180min but induced a significant decrease of Glx at 60min on post-hoc analysis. 5-HTP-induced significant ACTH release reaching an E(max) of 60.2ng/L at 80min followed by cortisol with an E(max) of 246.4ng/mL at 110min. The reduction in hypothalamic Glx levels after serotonergic stimulation is compatible with activation of excitatory neurons in this region, which is expected to cause depletion of local glutamate stores. The hypothalamic MRS-response reached its maximum prior to subsequent increases of ACTH and cortisol, which support the functional relevance of hypothalamic Glx-depletion for activation of the HPA-axis. This exploratory study shows that MRS is capable of detecting neuronal activation following functional stimulation of a targeted brain area. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sipuleucel-T Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipuleucel-T injection is used to treat certain types of advanced prostate cancer. Sipuleucel-T injection is in a class of medications called ... Sipuleucel-T injection comes as a suspension (liquid) to be injected over about 60 minutes into a vein ...

  9. The effect of injection duration and injection site on pain and bruising of subcutaneous injection of heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourghaznein, Tayebe; Azimi, Amir Vahedian; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2014-04-01

    To determine and compare the effects of four methods of subcutaneous heparin injection on pain and bruising in abdomen and thighs. Subcutaneous heparin injection is a common nursing clinical intervention. Nurses frequently inject heparin subcutaneously and this action often results in some complications such as bruising, haematoma, pain and induration in the injection site. There are also some other factors inducing complications associated with heparin injection, including the injection site and the injection duration. A quasi-experimental within-subject design. This study was conducted on 90 patients with COPD hospitalised in two ICU wards at two teaching hospitals in urban areas of Iran. They were administered heparin subcutaneously, 4000 units every 12 hours. Each patient received four injections in their abdomen and thighs, using four different methods. The number and size of bruising at the injection site were measured through a flexible millimetre ruler, 48 hours after each injection. The severity of pain was measured through pain visual analogue scale immediately after each injection. Collected data were analysed by descriptive and analytical statistics using spss 11.5 software. In the method 15 seconds injection duration and waiting for 5 seconds before withdrawing the needle, the number of bruising was significantly lower and size of bruising was significantly smaller, but no significant difference was found in the severity of pain. However, in other methods, the severity of pain in thighs was significantly higher than in abdomen, but no statistically significant difference was reported between the size and number of bruising in abdomen and thighs. The method 15 seconds injection duration and waiting for 5 seconds before withdrawing the needle is recommended to be used for subcutaneous heparin injection by clinical nurses. As to the results, the severity of pain in abdomen was lower than in thighs. This study proposed a suitable method for subcutaneous

  10. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes: sex differences in regulation of stress responsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyola, Mario G; Handa, Robert J

    2017-08-31

    Gonadal hormones play a key role in the establishment, activation, and regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. By influencing the response and sensitivity to releasing factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones, gonadal steroids help orchestrate the gain of the HPA axis to fine-tune the levels of stress hormones in the general circulation. From early life to adulthood, gonadal steroids can differentially affect the HPA axis, resulting in sex differences in the responsivity of this axis. The HPA axis influences many physiological functions making an organism's response to changes in the environment appropriate for its reproductive status. Although the acute HPA response to stressors is a beneficial response, constant activation of this circuitry by chronic or traumatic stressful episodes may lead to a dysregulation of the HPA axis and cause pathology. Compared to males, female mice and rats show a more robust HPA axis response, as a result of circulating estradiol levels which elevate stress hormone levels during non-threatening situations, and during and after stressors. Fluctuating levels of gonadal steroids in females across the estrous cycle are a major factor contributing to sex differences in the robustness of HPA activity in females compared to males. Moreover, gonadal steroids may also contribute to epigenetic and organizational influences on the HPA axis even before puberty. Correspondingly, crosstalk between the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and HPA axes could lead to abnormalities of stress responses. In humans, a dysregulated stress response is one of the most common symptoms seen across many neuropsychiatric disorders, and as a result, such interactions may exacerbate peripheral pathologies. In this review, we discuss the HPA and HPG axes and review how gonadal steroids interact with the HPA axis to regulate the stress circuitry during all stages in life.

  11. Hypothalamic Leptin Gene Therapy Reduces Bone Marrow Adiposity in ob/ob Mice Fed Regular and High-Fat Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Branscum, Adam J.; Kalra, Satya P.; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2016-01-01

    Low bone mass is often associated with elevated bone marrow adiposity. Since osteoblasts and adipocytes are derived from the same mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) progenitor, adipocyte formation may increase at the expense of osteoblast formation. Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone known to regulate energy and bone metabolism. Leptin deficiency and high-fat diet-induced obesity are associated with increased marrow adipose tissue (MAT) and reduced bone formation. Short-duration studies suggest that leptin treatment reduces MAT and increases bone formation in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice fed a regular diet. Here, we determined the long-duration impact of increased hypothalamic leptin on marrow adipocytes and osteoblasts in ob/ob mice following recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) gene therapy. Eight- to 10-week-old male ob/ob mice were randomized into four groups: (1) untreated, (2) rAAV-Lep, (3) rAAV-green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP), or (4) pair-fed to rAAV-Lep. For vector administration, mice were injected intracerebroventricularly with either rAAV-leptin gene therapy (rAAV-Lep) or rAAV-GFP (9 × 107 particles) and maintained for 30 weeks. In a second study, the impact of increased hypothalamic leptin levels on MAT was determined in mice fed high-fat diets; ob/ob mice were randomized into two groups and treated with either rAAV-Lep or rAAV-GFP. At 7 weeks post-vector administration, half the mice in each group were switched to a high-fat diet for 8 weeks. Wild-type (WT) controls included age-matched mice fed regular or high-fat diet. High-fat diet resulted in a threefold increase in MAT in WT mice, whereas MAT was increased by leptin deficiency up to 50-fold. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast perimeter and osteoclast perimeter with minor change in cancellous bone architecture. The gene therapy decreased MAT levels in ob/ob mice fed regular or high-fat diet to values similar to WT mice fed regular diet. These findings suggest

  12. Posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular changes elicited by electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, H; Rivest, R; Marsden, C A

    1991-07-01

    The posterior hypothalamic receptors involved in the cardiovascular responses to electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla were investigated in urethane-anaesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla produced a significant increase in systolic blood pressure. This response was significantly attenuated by the prior administration of d,l-propranolol (20 micrograms), clonidine (8 micrograms), atropine (8 micrograms) or methysergide (10 micrograms) into the posterior hypothalamus, but not by cimetidine (11 micrograms), chlorpheniramine (12 micrograms), naloxone (10 micrograms) or a vasopressin V1 antagonist (100 ng). The effect of clonidine (8 micrograms) on the pressor response to stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla was antagonized by idazoxan (66 micrograms). These results confirm that the cardiovascular changes elicited by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla area are, in part, centrally modulated by alpha 2 and beta-adrenoceptors in the posterior hypothalamus which exert respectively, inhibitory and stimulatory effect. Furthermore the results indicate the involvement of posterior hypothalamic cholinergic and serotonergic receptors in the pressor response produced by stimulation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla.

  13. Injection moulding for macro and micro products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul

    The purpose of the literature survey is to investigate the injection moulding technology in the macro and micro areas from the basic to the state-of-the-art recent technology. Injection moulding is a versatile production process for the manufacturing of plastic parts and the process is extensively...... used for macro products but with the ages it is going deep into the micro areas having machine and process improvements. Extensive research work on injection moulding is going on all over the world. New ideas are flowing into the machines, materials and processes. The technology has made significant...... advancement in the area of micro injection moulding, multi-component and two component injection mounding. In near future it is likely to be the way of manufacturing moulded interconnects devices (MID) for a low cost integration of electrical and mechanical functionalities on a single device. This paper...

  14. Moderate long-term modulation of neuropeptide Y in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus induces energy balance alterations in adult rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide Y (NPY produced by arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons has a strong orexigenic effect on target neurons. Hypothalamic NPY levels undergo wide-ranging oscillations during the circadian cycle and in response to fasting and peripheral hormones (from 0.25 to 10-fold change. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of a moderate long-term modulation of NPY within the ARC neurons on food consumption, body weight gain and hypothalamic neuropeptides. We achieved a physiological overexpression (3.6-fold increase and down-regulation (0.5-fold decrease of NPY in the rat ARC by injection of AAV vectors expressing NPY and synthetic microRNA that target the NPY, respectively. Our work shows that a moderate overexpression of NPY was sufficient to induce diurnal over-feeding, sustained body weight gain and severe obesity in adult rats. Additionally, the circulating levels of leptin were elevated but the immunoreactivity (ir of ARC neuropeptides was not in accordance (POMC-ir was unchanged and AGRP-ir increased, suggesting a disruption in the ability of ARC neurons to response to peripheral metabolic alterations. Furthermore, a dysfunction in adipocytes phenotype was observed in these obese rats. In addition, moderate down-regulation of NPY did not affect basal feeding or normal body weight gain but the response to food deprivation was compromised since fasting-induced hyperphagia was inhibited and fasting-induced decrease in locomotor activity was absent.These results highlight the importance of the physiological ARC NPY levels oscillations on feeding regulation, fasting response and body weight preservation, and are important for the design of therapeutic interventions for obesity that include the NPY.

  15. Hypopituitarism after external irradiation. Evidence for both hypothalamic and pituitary origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaan, N.A.; Bakdash, M.M.; Caderao, J.B.; Cangir, A.; Jesse, R.H. Jr.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    Endocrine complications after radiotherapy for tumors of the head and neck are thought to be relatively rare. The availability of synthetic hypothalamic hormones for clinical investigations and the radioimmunoassay of hormones have enabled us to study function of the hypothalamic pituitary axis in 15 patients who had radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer. Fourteen had evidence of endocrine deficiency. Twelve patients had evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction, 7 developed primary pituitary hormone deficiencies, and 3 developed primary hypothyroidism. These results indicate that (1) secondary hypopituitarism due to a hypothalamic lesion after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer may be more common than suspected in the past; (2) primary hypopituitarism after irradiation of extracranial tumors can occur; and (3) primary hypothyroidism may result from irradiation of regional neck nodes.

  16. Inhibition of hypothalamic Foxo1 expression reduced food intake in diet-induced obesity rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eduardo R. Ropelle; José R. Pauli; Patrícia Prada; Dennys E. Cintra; Guilherme Z. Rocha; Juliana C. Moraes; Marisa J. S. Frederico; Gabrielle da Luz; Ricardo A. Pinho; José B. C. Carvalheira; Licio A. Velloso; Mario A. Saad; Cláudio T. De Souza

    2009-01-01

    ... in insulin resistance and obesity remains unclear. Here, we identify that a high-fat diet impaired insulin-induced hypothalamic Foxo1 phosphorylation and degradation, increasing the nuclear Foxo1 activity and hyperphagic response in rats...

  17. Neuropeptide exocytosis involving synaptotagmin-4 and oxytocin in hypothalamic programming of body weight and energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guo; Bai, Hua; Zhang, Hai; Dean, Camin; Wu, Qiang; Li, Juxue; Guariglia, Sara; Meng, Qingyuan; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-02-10

    Hypothalamic neuropeptides play essential roles in regulating energy and body weight balance. Energy imbalance and obesity have been linked to hypothalamic signaling defects in regulating neuropeptide genes; however, it is unknown whether dysregulation of neuropeptide exocytosis could be critically involved. This study discovered that synaptotagmin-4, an atypical modulator of synaptic exocytosis, is expressed most abundantly in oxytocin neurons of the hypothalamus. Synaptotagmin-4 negatively regulates oxytocin exocytosis, and dietary obesity is associated with increased vesicle binding of synaptotagmin-4 and thus enhanced negative regulation of oxytocin release. Overexpressing synaptotagmin-4 in hypothalamic oxytocin neurons and centrally antagonizing oxytocin in mice are similarly obesogenic. Synaptotagmin-4 inhibition prevents against dietary obesity by normalizing oxytocin release and energy balance under chronic nutritional excess. In conclusion, the negative regulation of synaptotagmin-4 on oxytocin release represents a hypothalamic basis of neuropeptide exocytosis in controlling obesity and related diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gap Junctions Contribute to Ictal/Interictal Genesis in Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Gao, Ming; Rice, Stephen G; Tsang, Candy; Beggs, John; Turner, Dharshaun; Li, Guohui; Yang, Bo; Xia, Kunkun; Gao, Fenfei; Qiu, Shenfeng; Liu, Qiang; Kerrigan, John F

    2016-06-01

    Human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH) is a rare subcortical lesion associated with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Cellular mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are unknown. We hypothesized that neuronal gap junctions contribute to epileptogenesis through synchronous activity within the neuron networks in HH tissue. We studied surgically resected HH tissue with Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, biocytin microinjection of recorded HH neurons, and microelectrode patch clamp recordings with and without pharmacological blockade of gap junctions. Normal human hypothalamus tissue was used as a control. Western blots showed increased expression of both connexin-36 (Cx36) and connexin-43 (Cx43) in HH tissue compared with normal human mammillary body tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Cx36 and Cx43 are expressed in HH tissue, but Cx36 was mainly expressed within neuron clusters while Cx43 was mainly expressed outside of neuron clusters. Gap-junction profiles were observed between small HH neurons with electron microscopy. Biocytin injection into single recorded small HH neurons showed labeling of adjacent neurons, which was not observed in the presence of a neuronal gap-junction blocker, mefloquine. Microelectrode field recordings from freshly resected HH slices demonstrated spontaneous ictal/interictal-like discharges in most slices. Bath-application of gap-junction blockers significantly reduced ictal/interictal-like discharges in a concentration-dependent manner, while not affecting the action-potential firing of small gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons observed with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the same patient's HH tissue. These results suggest that neuronal gap junctions between small GABAergic HH neurons participate in the genesis of epileptic-like discharges. Blockade of gap junctions may be a new therapeutic strategy for controlling seizure activity in HH patients.

  19. Differential contribution of hypothalamic MAPK activity to anxiety-like behaviour in virgin and lactating rats.

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    Benjamin Jurek

    Full Text Available The c-Raf - MEK1/2 - ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK intracellular signalling cascade in neurons plays important roles in the control of a variety of behaviours, including social behaviours and anxiety. These roles partially overlap with those described for oxytocin (OXT, and it has been shown that OXT activates the MAPK pathway in the hypothalamus (of male, and hippocampus (of female rats. Here, by combining behavioural (light/dark box and biochemical analyses (western blotting, we tested two hypotheses: (i that OXT is anxiolytic within the hypothalamus of females, and (ii that this effect, as well as that of lactation-associated anxiolysis, depends on the recruitment of the MAPK pathway. We found that, when injected bilaterally into the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, OXT decreased anxiety-like behaviour in virgins, and that this effect depended on phosphorylation of MEK1/2. MAPK pathway activation in lactation was evident by high phosphorylated (p MEK1/2 levels, and nuclear translocation of ERK1. The high pMEK1/2 levels were necessary for the anxiolytic phenotype typically observed during lactation. Interestingly, exogenous OXT in lactating rats reduced pMEK1/2 levels without a concomitant effect on anxiety, indicating that OXT receptor activation can lead to recruitment of additional intracellular pathways to modulate MEK activity. Still other pathways could include MEK, but without subsequent activation of ERK, as we did not observe any increase in OXT-induced ERK phosphorylation. Together the results demonstrate that the MAPK pathway, especially MEK1/2, is critically involved in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviour in female rats.

  20. Hypothalamic leptin gene therapy reduces body weight without accelerating age-related bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Russell T; Dube, Michael; Branscum, Adam J; Wong, Carmen P; Olson, Dawn A; Zhong, Xiaoying; Kweh, Mercedes F; Larkin, Iske V; Wronski, Thomas J; Rosen, Clifford J; Kalra, Satya P; Iwaniec, Urszula T

    2015-12-01

    Excessive weight gain in adults is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, dieting, exercise, and pharmacological interventions have had limited long-term success in weight control and can result in detrimental side effects, including accelerating age-related cancellous bone loss. We investigated the efficacy of using hypothalamic leptin gene therapy as an alternative method for reducing weight in skeletally-mature (9 months old) female rats and determined the impact of leptin-induced weight loss on bone mass, density, and microarchitecture, and serum biomarkers of bone turnover (CTx and osteocalcin). Rats were implanted with cannulae in the 3rd ventricle of the hypothalamus and injected with either recombinant adeno-associated virus encoding the gene for rat leptin (rAAV-Leptin, n=7) or a control vector encoding green fluorescent protein (rAAV-GFP, n=10) and sacrificed 18 weeks later. A baseline control group (n=7) was sacrificed at vector administration. rAAV-Leptin-treated rats lost weight (-4±2%) while rAAV-GFP-treated rats gained weight (14±2%) during the study. At study termination, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats weighed 17% less than rAAV-GFP-treated rats and had lower abdominal white adipose tissue weight (-80%), serum leptin (-77%), and serum IGF1 (-34%). Cancellous bone volume fraction in distal femur metaphysis and epiphysis, and in lumbar vertebra tended to be lower (PLeptin and rAAV-GFP rats. In summary, rAAV-Leptin-treated rats maintained a lower body weight compared to baseline and rAAV-GFP-treated rats with minimal effects on bone mass, density, microarchitecture, or biochemical markers of bone turnover.

  1. Gap Junctions Contribute to Ictal/Interictal Genesis in Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas

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    Jie Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH is a rare subcortical lesion associated with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Cellular mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are unknown. We hypothesized that neuronal gap junctions contribute to epileptogenesis through synchronous activity within the neuron networks in HH tissue. We studied surgically resected HH tissue with Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, biocytin microinjection of recorded HH neurons, and microelectrode patch clamp recordings with and without pharmacological blockade of gap junctions. Normal human hypothalamus tissue was used as a control. Western blots showed increased expression of both connexin-36 (Cx36 and connexin-43 (Cx43 in HH tissue compared with normal human mammillary body tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Cx36 and Cx43 are expressed in HH tissue, but Cx36 was mainly expressed within neuron clusters while Cx43 was mainly expressed outside of neuron clusters. Gap-junction profiles were observed between small HH neurons with electron microscopy. Biocytin injection into single recorded small HH neurons showed labeling of adjacent neurons, which was not observed in the presence of a neuronal gap-junction blocker, mefloquine. Microelectrode field recordings from freshly resected HH slices demonstrated spontaneous ictal/interictal-like discharges in most slices. Bath-application of gap-junction blockers significantly reduced ictal/interictal-like discharges in a concentration-dependent manner, while not affecting the action-potential firing of small gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons observed with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the same patient's HH tissue. These results suggest that neuronal gap junctions between small GABAergic HH neurons participate in the genesis of epileptic-like discharges. Blockade of gap junctions may be a new therapeutic strategy for controlling seizure activity in HH patients.

  2. On Maximal Injectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Yi WANG; Guo ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    A right R-module E over a ring R is said to be maximally injective in case for any maximal right ideal m of R, every R-homomorphism f : m → E can be extended to an R-homomorphism f' : R → E. In this paper, we first construct an example to show that maximal injectivity is a proper generalization of injectivity. Then we prove that any right R-module over a left perfect ring R is maximally injective if and only if it is injective. We also give a partial affirmative answer to Faith's conjecture by further investigating the property of maximally injective rings. Finally, we get an approximation to Faith's conjecture, which asserts that every injective right R-module over any left perfect right self-injective ring R is the injective hull of a projective submodule.

  3. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

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    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction.

  4. Unsaturated Fatty Acids Revert Diet-Induced Hypothalamic Inflammation in Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Cintra, Dennys E.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Moraes, Juliana C.; José R. Pauli; Joseane Morari; Claudio T. De Souza; Renato Grimaldi; Marcela Stahl; Carvalheira, José B.; Saad, Mario J.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In experimental models, hypothalamic inflammation is an early and determining factor in the installation and progression of obesity. Pharmacological and gene-based approaches have proven efficient in restraining inflammation and correcting the obese phenotypes. However, the role of nutrients in the modulation of hypothalamic inflammation is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we show that, in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, partial substitution of the fatty acid c...

  5. Proliferative hypothalamic neurospheres express NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A and differentiate to functional neurons.

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    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available Some pathological conditions with feeding pattern alterations, including obesity and Huntington disease (HD are associated with hypothalamic dysfunction and neuronal cell death. Additionally, the hypothalamus is a neurogenic region with the constitutive capacity to generate new cells of neuronal lineage, in adult rodents. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of feeding-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and their capacity to differentiate to functional neurons which have been described to be affected by hypothalamic dysfunction. Our study shows that hypothalamic progenitor cells from rat embryos grow as floating neurospheres and express the feeding-related neuropeptides Neuropeptide Y (NPY, Agouti-related Protein (AGRP, Pro-OpioMelanocortin (POMC, Cocaine-and-Amphetamine Responsive Transcript (CART and Orexin-A/Hypocretin-1. Moreover the relative mRNA expression of NPY and POMC increases during the expansion of hypothalamic neurospheres in proliferative conditions.Mature neurons were obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic progenitor cells including NPY, AGRP, POMC, CART and Orexin-A positive neurons. Furthermore the relative mRNA expression of NPY, CART and Orexin-A increases after the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres. Similarly to the adult hypothalamic neurons the neurospheres-derived neurons express the glutamate transporter EAAT3. The orexigenic and anorexigenic phenotype of these neurons was identified by functional response to ghrelin and leptin hormones, respectively. This work demonstrates the presence of appetite-related neuropeptides in hypothalamic progenitor cells and neurons obtained from the differentiation of hypothalamic neurospheres, including the neuronal phenotypes that have been described by others as being affected by hypothalamic neurodegeneration. These in vitro models can be used to study hypothalamic progenitor cells aiming a therapeutic intervention to

  6. Tibolone Rapidly Attenuates the GABAB Response in Hypothalamic Neurones

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    Qiu, Jian; Bosch, Martha A.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.; Kloosterboer, Helenius J.; Kelly, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Tibolone is primarily used for the treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone is rapidly converted into three major metabolites: 3α- and 3β-hydroxy-tibolone (3α- and 3βOH-tibolone), which have oestrogenic effects, and the Δ4-isomer (Δ4-tibolone), which has progestogenic and androgenic effects. Since tibolone is effective in treating climacteric symptoms, the effects on the brain may be explained by the oestrogenic activity of tibolone. Previously using whole-cell patch clamp recording, we found that 17β-oestradiol (E2) rapidly altered GABA neurotransmission in hypothalamic neurones through a membrane oestrogen receptor (mER). E2 reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate G-protein-coupled, inwardly rectifying K+ channels in hypothalamic neurones. Therefore, we hypothesized that tibolone may have some rapid effects through the mER and sought to elucidate the signalling pathway of tibolone’s action using selective inhibitors and whole cell recording in ovariectomized female guinea pigs and mice. A sub-population of neurones was identified post hoc as proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurones by immunocytochemical staining. Similar to E2, we have found that tibolone and its active metabolite 3βOH-tibolone rapidly reduced the potency of the GABAB receptor agonist baclofen to activate GIRK channels in POMC neurones. The effects were blocked by the ER antagonist ICI 182,780. Other metabolites of tibolone (3αOH-tibolone and Δ4-tibolone) had no effect. Furthermore, tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) was fully efficacious in ERαKO and ERβKO mice to attenuate GABAB responses. The effects of tibolone were blocked by phospholipase C inhibitor U73122. However, in contrast to E2, the effects of tibolone were not blocked by protein kinase C inhibitors or protein kinase A inhibitors. It appears that tibolone (and 3βOH-tibolone) activates phospholipase C leading to PIP2 metabolism and direct alteration of GIRK channel function. Therefore, tibolone

  7. Galanin: a hypothalamic-hypophysiotropic hormone modulating reproductive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, F J; Merchenthaler, I; Ching, M; Wisniewski, M G; Negro-Vilar, A

    1991-01-01

    Galanin (GAL) is widely distributed in the peripheral and the central nervous systems. In the brain, the highest GAL concentrations are observed within the hypothalamus and, particularly, in nerve terminals of the median eminence. This location, as well as GAL actions on prolactin, growth hormone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion, suggest the possibility that GAL may act as a putative hypothalamic-hypophysiotropic hormone. To establish this, GAL and LHRH levels were measured in hypophyseal portal plasma samples using specific radioimmunoassays. Rat galanin (rGAL) concentrations in portal blood were approximately 7-fold higher than those observed in peripheral plasma in male and female (estrus, diestrus) rats, indicating an active secretory process of rGAL into the portal vasculature. Frequent (10 min) sampling revealed that rGAL and LHRH were secreted into the portal circulation in a pulsatile manner with a pulse frequency of one pulse per hour. Interestingly, both hormone series depicted a high degree of coincident episodes. In fact, the probability of random coincidence, calculated by the algorithm HYPERGEO, was less than 0.01. Moreover, the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold, when given systemically, was taken up by GAL neurons in the hypothalamus, including a subset of neurons expressing rGAL and LHRH, strengthening the notion of the existence of a GAL neuronal system connected to the hypophyseal portal circulation. These observations reinforce the concept that GAL regulates pituitary hormone secretion. To analyze this in further detail, the effects of rGAL on LH secretion were evaluated under basal and stimulated conditions. rGAL induced a small but dose-dependent increase in LH secretion from cultured, dispersed pituitary cells. Interestingly, rGAL enhanced the ability of LHRH to stimulate LH release. The tight link between GAL and LHRH neuronal systems is strengthened by the observation that during the estrous cycle of the rat

  8. Increasing fatty acid oxidation remodels the hypothalamic neurometabolome to mitigate stress and inflammation.

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    Joseph W McFadden

    Full Text Available Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1 and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx, exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism.

  9. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

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    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically.

  10. Social crowding stress diminishes the pituitary-adrenocortical and hypothalamic histamine response to adrenergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugajski, J; Gadek-Michalska, A; Borycz, J

    1993-12-01

    Social stress of crowding almost totally reduced the rise in serum corticosterone elicited by intracerebroventricular administration of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, after 3 and 7 day of crowding and substantially diminished that response after 14 and 21 days. Crowding stress totally abolished the increase in hypothalamic histamine induced by isoprenaline in control rats. Crowding also significantly diminished the increase in serum corticosterone evoked by clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, and abolished the clonidine-induced elevation in hypothalamic histamine levels. The stimulatory effect of phenylephrine, an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist, on corticosterone secretion was only moderately diminished in crowded rats. Neither phenylephrine nor crowding stress changed significantly the hypothalamic histamine levels. These results indicate that social stress of crowding considerably impairs the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical responsiveness to central beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation. Crowding also abolishes the rise in hypothalamic histamine induced by beta- and alpha 2-adrenergic agonist, suggesting a role of hypothalamic histamine in the HPA adaptation to the social stress of crowding.

  11. Adrenalectomy stimulates hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin expression but does not correct diet-induced obesity

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    Beasley Joe

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated glucocorticoid production and reduced hypothalamic POMC mRNA can cause obese phenotypes. Conversely, adrenalectomy can reverse obese phenotypes caused by the absence of leptin, a model in which glucocorticoid production is elevated. Adrenalectomy also increases hypothalamic POMC mRNA in leptin-deficient mice. However most forms of human obesity do not appear to entail elevated plasma glucocorticoids. It is therefore not clear if reducing glucocorticoid production would be useful to treat these forms of obesity. We hypothesized that adrenalectomy would increase hypothalamic POMC mRNA and reverse obese phenotypes in obesity due to a high-fat diet as it does in obesity due to leptin deficiency. Results Retired breeder male mice were placed on a high-fat diet or a low-fat diet for two weeks, then adrenalectomized or sham-adrenalectomized. The high-fat diet increased body weight, adiposity, and plasma leptin, led to impaired glucose tolerance, and slightly stimulated hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC expression. Adrenalectomy of mice on the high-fat diet significantly reduced plasma corticosterone and strikingly increased both pituitary and hypothalamic POMC mRNA, but failed to reduce body weight, adiposity or leptin, although slight improvements in glucose tolerance and metabolic rate were observed. Conclusion These data suggest that neither reduction of plasma glucocorticoid levels nor elevation of hypothalamic POMC expression is effective to significantly reverse diet-induced obesity.

  12. Gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas. An update in the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

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    José F. Tellez-Zenteno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available José F. Tellez-Zenteno1, Cesar Serrano-Almeida2, Farzad Moien-Afshari11Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada; 2Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Gelastic seizures are epileptic events characterized by bouts of laughter. Laughter-like vocalization is usually combined with facial contraction in the form of a smile. Autonomic features such as flushing, tachycardia, and altered respiration are widely recognized. Conscious state may not be impaired, although this is often difficult to asses particularly in young children. Gelastic seizures have been associated classically to hypothalamic hamartomas, although different extrahypothalamic localizations have been described. Hypothalamic hamartomas are rare congenital lesions presenting with the classic triad of gelastic epilepsy, precocious puberty and developmental delay. The clinical course of patients with gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas is progressive, commencing with gelastic seizures in infancy, deteriorating into more complex seizure disorder resulting in intractable epilepsy. Electrophysiological, radiological, and pathophysiological studies have confirmed the intrinsic epileptogenicity of the hypothalamic hamartoma. Currently the most effective surgical approach is the trancallosal anterior interforniceal approach, however newer approaches including the endoscopic and other treatment such as radiosurgery and gamma knife have been used with success. This review focuses on the syndrome of gelastic seizures associated with hypothalamic hamartomas, but it also reviews other concepts such as status gelasticus and some aspects of gelastic seizures in other locations.Keywords: epilepsy, gelastic seizures, epilepsy surgery, hypothalamic hamartoma, intractable epilepsy

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Guo; Gonzalez, Frank J; Park, Sung-Min; Cai, Dongsheng

    2011-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  14. Hypoxia-inducible factor directs POMC gene to mediate hypothalamic glucose sensing and energy balance regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF is a nuclear transcription factor that responds to environmental and pathological hypoxia to induce metabolic adaptation, vascular growth, and cell survival. Here we found that HIF subunits and HIF2α in particular were normally expressed in the mediobasal hypothalamus of mice. Hypothalamic HIF was up-regulated by glucose to mediate the feeding control of hypothalamic glucose sensing. Two underlying molecular pathways were identified, including suppression of PHDs by glucose metabolites to prevent HIF2α degradation and the recruitment of AMPK and mTOR/S6K to regulate HIF2α protein synthesis. HIF activation was found to directly control the transcription of POMC gene. Genetic approach was then employed to develop conditional knockout mice with HIF inhibition in POMC neurons, revealing that HIF loss-of-function in POMC neurons impaired hypothalamic glucose sensing and caused energy imbalance to promote obesity development. The metabolic effects of HIF in hypothalamic POMC neurons were independent of leptin signaling or pituitary ACTH pathway. Hypothalamic gene delivery of HIF counteracted overeating and obesity under conditions of nutritional excess. In conclusion, HIF controls hypothalamic POMC gene to direct the central nutrient sensing in regulation of energy and body weight balance.

  15. Psoriasis severity and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function: results from the CALIPSO study

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    A.R. Brunoni

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease that significantly impacts life quality, being associated with stress and mental disorders. We investigated whether the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis was associated with psoriasis severity, daily life stress and anxiety, and depressive symptoms. In this ancillary study, which was part of the CALIPSO (coronary artery calcium in psoriasis study, saliva was collected from 102 patients with psoriasis immediately upon awakening, 30, and 60 min after awakening, at 2:00 pm and at bedtime (five time points to determine salivary cortisol levels. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to evaluate the association of clinical and psychopathological variables with HPA activity. We found a direct correlation between bedtime cortisol and psoriasis severity evaluated by the psoriasis area severity index (PASI; r=0.39, P<0.001. No correlations between other clinical and psychopathological variables or with other cortisol assessments were observed. The findings indicated that HPA dysfunction may be present in psoriasis, as bedtime cortisol was correlated with psoriasis severity. Our study is limited by the lack of a control group; therefore, we were not able to explore whether these cortisol values were different compared with a concurrent, healthy sample.

  16. Anorexia and Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Mice With Hypothalamic Ablation of Glut4 Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y.; McGraw, Timothy E.

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin–mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron–ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism. PMID:25187366

  17. Maternal prenatal licorice consumption alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis function in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räikkönen, Katri; Seckl, Jonathan R; Heinonen, Kati; Pyhälä, Riikka; Feldt, Kimmo; Jones, Alexander; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Phillips, David I W; Lahti, Jari; Järvenpää, Anna-Liisa; Eriksson, Johan G; Matthews, Karen A; Strandberg, Timo E; Kajantie, Eero

    2010-11-01

    Overexposure to glucocorticoids has been proposed as a mechanism by which prenatal adversity 'programs' the function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA), thereby increasing the risk of adult diseases. Glycyrrhizin, a natural constituent of licorice, potently inhibits 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, the feto-placental barrier to the higher maternal cortisol levels. We studied if maternal consumption of glycyrrhizin in licorice associates with HPAA function in children. Diurnal salivary cortisol and salivary cortisol during the Trier Social Stress Test for Children (TSST-C) were measured in children (n=321, mean age=8.1, SD=0.3 years) whose mothers consumed varying levels of glycyrrhizin in licorice during pregnancy; exposure-level groups were labeled high (≥500 mg/week), moderate (250-499 mg/week) and zero-low (0-249 mg/week). In comparison to the zero-low exposure group, children in the high exposure group had 19.2% higher salivary cortisol awakening peak, 33.1% higher salivary cortisol awakening slope, 15.4% higher salivary cortisol awakening area under the curve (AUC), 30.8% higher baseline TSST-C salivary cortisol levels, and their salivary cortisol levels remained high throughout the TSST-C protocol (P-values HPAA function by overexposure to glucocorticoids. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anorexia and impaired glucose metabolism in mice with hypothalamic ablation of Glut4 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Hongxia; Lu, Taylor Y; McGraw, Timothy E; Accili, Domenico

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) uses glucose independent of insulin. Nonetheless, insulin receptors and insulin-responsive glucose transporters (Glut4) often colocalize in neurons (Glut4 neurons) in anatomically and functionally distinct areas of the CNS. The apparent heterogeneity of Glut4 neurons has thus far thwarted attempts to understand their function. To answer this question, we used Cre-dependent, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation to selectively remove basal hypothalamic Glut4 neurons and investigate the resulting phenotypes. After Glut4 neuron ablation, mice demonstrate altered hormone and nutrient signaling in the CNS. Accordingly, they exhibit negative energy balance phenotype characterized by reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure, without locomotor deficits or gross neuronal abnormalities. Glut4 neuron ablation affects orexigenic melanin-concentrating hormone neurons but has limited effect on neuropeptide Y/agouti-related protein and proopiomelanocortin neurons. The food intake phenotype can be partially normalized by GABA administration, suggesting that it arises from defective GABAergic transmission. Glut4 neuron-ablated mice show peripheral metabolic defects, including fasting hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance, decreased insulin levels, and elevated hepatic gluconeogenic genes. We conclude that Glut4 neurons integrate hormonal and nutritional cues and mediate CNS actions of insulin on energy balance and peripheral metabolism.

  19. Epoetin Alfa Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Combivir), a medication used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Epoetin alfa injection is also used before ... inject epoetin alfa, as directed by your doctor. Write down the date, time, dose of epoetin alfa ...

  20. Collagenase Clostridium Histolyticum Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is used to treat Dupuytren's contracture (a painless thickening and tightening of tissue [cord] beneath ... of tissue can be felt upon examination. Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum injection is also used to treat Peyronie's ...

  1. Iron Sucrose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  2. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection, or ICSI, is a form of in vitro fertilization in which fertilization occurs outside of the ... laboratory dish. Within a few hours, a single sperm is injected through a fine needle into the ...

  3. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  4. Calcitonin Salmon Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcitonin salmon injection is used to treat osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to weaken and break more easily. Calcitonin salmon injection is also used to treat Paget's disease ...

  5. Other Injectable Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... July 17, 2013 Last Edited: February 22, 2017 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: cg-infusion-sets,meds-bg-injectables,cg-injection-aids, In this section Treatment and Care Medication Insulin & ...

  6. Injection losses and protection

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, W; Baudrenghien, P; Bracco, C; Dehning, B; Di Mauro, A; Drosdal, L; Emery, J; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Höfle, W; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Radaelli, S; Shaposhnilova, E; Uythoven, J; Valuch, D; Wenninger, J; Zamantzas, C; Gianfelice-Wendt, E

    2012-01-01

    Injection losses are compared for 2010 and 2011 operation. Mitigation techniques which were put in place in 2010 to reduce losses at injection are described. Issues in 2011 operation, their potential improvements and the performance reach for 2012 are shown.

  7. Hypothalamic gene expression underlying pre-hibernation satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, C; Hampton, M; Andrews, M T

    2015-03-01

    Prior to hibernation, 13-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) enter a hypophagic period where food consumption drops by an average of 55% in 3 weeks. This occurs naturally, while the ground squirrels are in constant environmental conditions and have free access to food. Importantly, this transition occurs before exposure to hibernation conditions (5°C and constant darkness), so the ground squirrels are still maintaining a moderate level of activity. In this study, we used the Illumina HiSeq 2000 system to sequence the hypothalamic transcriptomes of ground squirrels before and after the autumn feeding transition to examine the genes underlying this extreme change in feeding behavior. The hypothalamus was chosen because it is known to play a role in the control and regulation of food intake and satiety. Overall, our analysis identified 143 genes that are significantly differentially expressed between the two groups. Specifically, we found five genes associated with feeding behavior and obesity (VGF, TRH, LEPR, ADIPOR2, IRS2) that are all upregulated during the hypophagic period, after the feeding transition has occurred. We also found that serum leptin significantly increases in the hypophagic group. Several of the genes associated with the natural autumnal feeding decline in 13-lined ground squirrels show parallels to signaling pathways known to be disrupted in human metabolic diseases, like obesity and diabetes. In addition, many other genes were identified that could be important for the control of food consumption in other animals, including humans.

  8. Hypothalamic Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Effects on Glucose Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyi; Balland, Eglantine; Cowley, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    The central link between obesity and type 2 diabetes is the development of insulin resistance. To date, it is still not clear whether hyperinsulinemia causes insulin resistance, which underlies the pathogenesis of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes, owing to the sophisticated regulatory mechanisms that exist in the periphery and in the brain. In recent years, accumulating evidence has demonstrated the existence of insulin resistance within the hypothalamus. In this review, we have integrated the recent discoveries surrounding both central and peripheral insulin resistance to provide a comprehensive overview of insulin resistance in obesity and the regulation of systemic glucose homeostasis. In particular, this review will discuss how hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia in obesity impair insulin sensitivity in tissues such as the liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and the brain. In addition, this review highlights insulin transport into the brain, signaling pathways associated with hypothalamic insulin receptor expression in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and finally the perturbation of systemic glucose homeostasis as a consequence of central insulin resistance. We also suggest future approaches to overcome both central and peripheral insulin resistance to treat obesity and type 2 diabetes. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Study on Correlation between Neuropeptide and Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓燕; 吕淑兰; 曹缵孙; 毛文军; 宋青

    2001-01-01

    Objective To explore the correlation between neuropeptide and functional hypothalam ic amenorrhea (FHA)Materials & Methods The basic and GnRH-stimulated levels of serum FSH, LH and plasma β-endorphin (β-EP), somatostatin (SS) in 33 patients with FHA and 17 women with normal menstrual cycles were tested by RIA.Results β-EP level in FHA group was significantly higher than that in control group and had a negative correlation with FSH and LH. The basic SS level in FHA group had no significant difference compared with the control group, but it had negative correlation with LH and no correlation with FSH. β-EP level in FHA group decreased after being stimulated with GnRH, and reached its minimum value after 15 min, then gradually rose back to the basic level. β-EP level in control group had no regular changes. SS level in both group did not change obviously.Conclusion The increased level of β-EP may play an important role in FHA. GnRH can inhibit β-EP level to some extent, while the effect of SS on FHA deserve further research.

  10. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone's central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1.

  11. Membrane-initiated Estrogen Signaling in Hypothalamic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Martin J.; Rønnekleiv, Oline K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary It is well known that many of the actions of 17β-estradiol (E2) in the central nervous system are mediated via intracellular receptor/transcription factors that interact with steroid response elements on target genes. However, there is compelling evidence for membrane steroid receptors for estrogen in hypothalamic and other brain neurons. But it is not well understood how estrogen signals via membrane receptors, and how these signals impact not only membrane excitability but also gene transcription in neurons. Indeed, it has been known for sometime that E2 can rapidly alter neuronal activity within seconds, indicating that some cellular effects can occur via membrane delimited events. In addition, E2 can affect second messenger systems including calcium mobilization and a plethora of kinases to alter cell signaling. Therefore, this review will consider our current knowledge of rapid membrane-initiated and intracellular signaling by E2 in the hypothalamus, the nature of receptors involved and how they contribute to homeostatic functions. PMID:18538919

  12. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: Potential new players in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wierucka-Rybak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  13. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Saeideh; Tabrizi, Nasim; Moein, Houshang; Zare, Mohammad; Barekatain, Majid; Basiratnia, Reza; Rahimian, Elham; Mehvari Habibabadi, Amirali; Moein, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs) are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms. PMID:28246530

  14. An Undiagnosed Case of Hypothalamic Hamartoma with a Rare Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Badihian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hypothalamic hamartomas (HHs are rare tumor-like malformations that may present with complex partial seizures refractory to anticonvulsants in adulthood. The condition may be misdiagnosed because of rarity. Case Presentation. We report a 25-year-old man with complaint of seizures presented by falling, tonic spasm of limbs, oral automatism, vocalization, and hypermotor activities. His seizures started at the age of one month and presented as eye deviation and upper limbs myoclonic jerk, followed by frequent seizures with variable frequency. The patient had delayed developmental milestones and was mentally retarded. He was hospitalized and underwent video-EEG monitoring and neuroimaging, and the diagnosis of HH was made. The patient became candidate for surgery after that. Conclusion. In this case, the underlying etiology of seizures was diagnosed after 25 years. HH is a rare condition and neurologists may encounter very small number of these cases during their practice. Therefore, they should consider it in patients who present with suspected signs and symptoms.

  15. Regulation of nucleus accumbens activity by the hypothalamic neuropeptide MCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Robert M.; Liu, Rong-Jian; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.; Sharf, Ruth; Yeckel, Mark F.; Laubach, Mark; Aghajanian, George K.; DiLeone, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) are brain regions important for food intake. The AcbSh contains high levels of receptor for melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), a lateral hypothalamic peptide critical for feeding and metabolism. MCH receptor (MCHR1) activation in the AcbSh increases food intake while AcbSh MCHR1 blockade reduces feeding. Here biochemical and cellular mechanisms of MCH action in the rodent AcbSh are described. A reduction of phosphorylation of GluR1 at Serine 845 (pSer845) is shown to occur after both pharmacological and genetic manipulations of MCHR1 activity. These changes depend upon signaling through Gi/o, and result in decreased surface expression of GluR1-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). Electrophysiological analysis of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the AcbSh revealed decreased amplitude of AMPAR-mediated synaptic events (mEPSC) with MCH treatment. In addition, MCH suppressed action potential firing MSNs through K+ channel activation. Finally, in vivo recordings confirmed that MCH reduces neuronal cell firing in the AcbSh in freely moving animals. The ability of MCH to reduce cell firing in the AcbSh is consistent with a general model from other pharmacological and electrophysiological studies whereby reduced AcbSh neuronal firing leads to food intake. The current work integrates the hypothalamus into this model, providing biochemical and cellular mechanisms whereby metabolic and limbic signals converge to regulate food intake. PMID:20554878

  16. Hypothalamic-Pituitary Function in Brain Death: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair-Collins, Michael; Northrup, Jesse; Olcese, James

    2016-01-01

    The Uniform Determination of Death Act (UDDA) states that an individual is dead when "all functions of the entire brain" have ceased irreversibly. However, it has been questioned whether some functions of the hypothalamus, particularly osmoregulation, can continue after the clinical diagnosis of brain death (BD). In order to learn whether parts of the hypothalamus can continue to function after the diagnosis of BD, we performed 2 separate systematic searches of the MEDLINE database, corresponding to the functions of the posterior and anterior pituitary. No meta-analysis is possible due to nonuniformity in the clinical literature. However, some modest generalizations can reasonably be drawn from a narrative review and from anatomic considerations that explain why these findings should be expected. We found evidence suggesting the preservation of hypothalamic function, including secretion of hypophysiotropic hormones, responsiveness to anterior pituitary stimulation, and osmoregulation, in a substantial proportion of patients declared dead by neurological criteria. We discuss several possible explanations for these findings. We conclude by suggesting that additional clinical research with strict inclusion criteria is necessary and further that a more nuanced and forthright public dialogue is needed, particularly since standard diagnostic practices and the UDDA may not be entirely in accord.

  17. Bacteria, viruses, and hypothalamic inflammation: Potential new players in obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wierucka-Rybak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight and obese has become an increasingly serious clinical and socioeconomic problem worldwide. The rapidly rising prevalence of obesity has prompted studies on modifiable, causative factors and novel treatment options for this disorder. Recent evidence indicates that excessive weight gain that leads to being overweight and obese may result from alterations in gut microflora. Studies in humans and animals demonstrated that the composition of gut microbiota may differ in lean and obese subjects, suggesting that these differences result in the increased efficiency of caloric extraction from food, enhanced lipogenesis, and impaired central and peripheral regulation of energy balance. Other studies revealed an excessive increase in body weight in a significant percentage of people infected with human adenoviruses SMAM-1 and Ad-36. Dysregulation of adipocyte function by viruses appears to be the most likely cause of excessive fat accumulation in these individuals. Studies on the pathomechanisms related to the pathogenesis of obesity indicated that a high-fat diet triggers the inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, an event that promotes weight gain and further defends elevated body weight through the initiation of central leptin and insulin resistance and impairment of regenerative capacity of hypothalamic neurons. Exposure to a high-calorie diet appears to predispose individuals to obesity not only because of excessive caloric intake but also because of the induction of microbiota- and central inflammatory response-dependent changes that lead to a dysregulation of energy balance.

  18. Melatonin controls seasonal breeding by a network of hypothalamic targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revel, Florent G; Masson-Pévet, Mireille; Pévet, Paul

    2009-01-01

    In seasonal species, the photoperiod (i.e. day length) tightly regulates reproduction to ensure that birth occurs at the most favourable time of year. In mammals, a distinct photoneuroendocrine circuit controls this process via the pineal hormone melatonin. This hormone is responsible for the sea......In seasonal species, the photoperiod (i.e. day length) tightly regulates reproduction to ensure that birth occurs at the most favourable time of year. In mammals, a distinct photoneuroendocrine circuit controls this process via the pineal hormone melatonin. This hormone is responsible...... for the seasonal timing of reproduction, but the anatomical substrates and the cellular mechanisms through which melatonin modulates seasonal functions remain imprecise. Recently, several genes have been identified as being regulated by the photoperiod in the brain of seasonal mammals. These genes are thought....../GPR54 system and to the RFamide-related peptides.Interestingly, these systems involve different hypothalamic nuclei, suggesting that several brain loci may be crucial for melatonin to regulate reproduction, and thus represent key starting points to identify the long-sought-after mode and site...

  19. Hypothalamic regulation of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eZhang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and diabetes are increasing at an alarming rate worldwide, but the strategies for the prevention and treatment of these disorders remain inadequate. Brown adipose tissue (BAT is important for cold protection by producing heat using lipids and glucose as metabolic fuels. This thermogenic action causes increased energy expenditure and significant lipid/glucose disposal. In addition, BAT in white adipose tissue (WAT or beige cells have been found and they also exhibit the thermogenic action similar to BAT. These data provide evidence indicating BAT/beige cells as a potential target for combating obesity and diabetes. Recent discoveries of active BAT and beige cells in adult humans have further highlighted this potential. Growing studies have also shown the importance of central nervous system in the control of BAT thermogenesis and WAT browning using animal models. This review is focused on central neural thermoregulation, particularly addressing our current understanding of the importance of hypothalamic neural signaling in the regulation of BAT/beige thermogenesis and energy homeostasis.

  20. Melanocortin-induced PKA activation inhibits AMPK activity via ERK-1/2 and LKB-1 in hypothalamic GT1-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, Ellen; Buech, Thomas R H; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    α-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-induced activation of the melanocortin-4 receptor in hypothalamic neurons increases energy expenditure and inhibits food intake. Active hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been reported to enhance food intake, and in vivo experiments suggested that intrahypothalamic injection of melanocortins decreased food intake due to the inhibition of AMPK activity. However, it is not clear whether α-MSH affects AMPK via direct intracellular signaling cascades or if the release of paracrine factors is involved. Here, we used a murine, hypothalamic cell line (GT1-7 cells) and monitored AMPK phosphorylation at Thr(172), which has been suggested to increase AMPK activity. We found that α-MSH dephosphorylated AMPK at Thr(172) and consequently decreased phosphorylation of the established AMPK substrate acetyl-coenzyme A-carboxylase at Ser(79). Inhibitory effects of α-MSH on AMPK were blocked by specific inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA) or ERK-1/2, pointing to an important role of both kinases in this process. Because α-MSH-induced activation of ERK-1/2 was blunted by PKA inhibitors, we propose that ERK-1/2 serves as a link between PKA and AMPK in GT1-7 cells. Furthermore, down-regulation of liver kinase B-1, but not inhibition of calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β or TGFβ-activated kinase-1 decreased basal phosphorylation of AMPK and its dephosphorylation induced by α-MSH. Thus, we propose that α-MSH inhibits AMPK activity via a linear pathway, including PKA, ERK-1/2, and liver kinase B-1 in GT1-7 cells. Given the importance of the melanocortin system in the formation of adipositas, detailed knowledge about this pathway might help to develop drugs targeting obesity.

  1. Beam injection into RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

    1997-07-01

    During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

  2. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  3. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...

  4. Injection moulding for macro and micro products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul

    used for macro products but with the ages it is going deep into the micro areas having machine and process improvements. Extensive research work on injection moulding is going on all over the world. New ideas are flowing into the machines, materials and processes. The technology has made significant......The purpose of the literature survey is to investigate the injection moulding technology in the macro and micro areas from the basic to the state-of-the-art recent technology. Injection moulding is a versatile production process for the manufacturing of plastic parts and the process is extensively...

  5. Evidence for a role of nitric oxide in hindlimb vasodilation induced by hypothalamic stimulation in anesthetized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos L. Ferreira-Neto

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus produces cardiovascular adjustments consisting of hypertension, tachycardia, visceral vasoconstriction and hindlimb vasodilation. Previous studies have demonstrated that hindlimb vasodilation is due a reduction of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone and to activation of beta2-adrenergic receptors by catecholamine release. However, the existence of a yet unidentified vasodilator mechanism has also been proposed. Recent studies have suggested that nitric oxide (NO may be involved. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of NO in the hindquarter vasodilation in response to hypothalamic stimulation. In pentobarbital-anesthetized rats hypothalamic stimulation (100 Hz, 150µA, 6 s produced hypertension, tachycardia, hindquarter vasodilation and mesenteric vasoconstriction. Alpha-adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1.5 mg/kg, iv plus bilateral adrenalectomy did not modify hypertension, tachycardia or mesenteric vasoconstriction induced by hypothalamic stimulation. Hindquarter vasodilation was strongly reduced but not abolished. The remaining vasodilation was completely abolished after iv injection of the NOS inhibitor L-NAME (20 mg/kg, iv. To properly evaluate the role of the mechanism of NO in hindquarter vasodilation, in a second group of animals L-NAME was administered before alpha-adrenoceptor blockade plus adrenalectomy. L-NAME treatment strongly reduced hindquarter vasodilation in magnitude and duration. These results suggest that NO is involved in the hindquarter vasodilation produced by hypothalamic stimulation.Em animais anestesiados a EE do hipotálamo produz um padrão de ajustes cardiovasculares caracterizado por hipertensão arterial, taquicardia, vasodilatação muscular e vasoconstrição mesentérica, entretanto, os mecanismos periféricos envolvidos nestes ajustes cardiovasculares ainda não foram completamente esclarecidos. O presente estudo teve como objetivo caracterizar

  6. Presence of TSH receptors in discrete areas of the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem with relevance for feeding controls-Support for functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jonathan R; Iresjö, Britt-Marie; Wärnåker, Sara; Smedh, Ulrika

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that brain-derived thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and its receptor (TSHr) are present in hypothalamic extracts. No studies investigating both the anatomical location and functional significance of putative TSHr proteins in specific central nervous system (CNS) nuclei involved in feeding controls have yet been conducted. The aim was thus to determine whether TSHr are present in nuclei associated with feeding behavior, and if such receptors may be functional. Brain tissue from adult rats was analyzed for gene expression and receptor protein expression was investigated with immunohistochemistry and western blotting. To investigate whether putative TSHr may be functional, we evaluated food intake of rats given intraparenchymal nanoinjections of TSH into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). RT-qPCR confirmed previous reports that TSHr mRNA is expressed in CNS tissues of the adult rat. Immunohistochemistry showed TSHr-immunoreactivity in the arcuate, the ventromedial, the dorsomedial, and the paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei. We also found TSHr-ir in the dorsal hindbrain to be localized to the area postrema, NTS, dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus, and the hypoglossal motor nucleus. Further protein analysis with western blotting showed 120kDa TSHr-ir proteins present in the hypothalamus and brainstem. Injections of TSH into the NTS reduced food intake similar to the positive control, urocortin. These data suggest that functional TSHr are present in the caudal brainstem and hypothalamic nuclei of relevance for feeding control as a possibly uncleaved holoreceptor, and highlights a hindbrain component to central TSH inhibition of food intake. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effects of hypothalamic microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) on estral cycle and morphology of the genital tract in the female rat (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, M A; Oteui, J T; Benedetti, W I

    1975-01-01

    To determine whether central catecholaminergic pathways are involved in the neural contral of gonadotrophin secretion, they were interrupted at the hypothalamic level by microinjections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The effects on ovulation, estral cycle and ovarian and uterine histology were studied. Microinjections of 50 mug of 6-OHDA hydrobromyde were made bilaterally into the anterolateral hypothalamus in a group of rats. Another group was injected with 25 mug of 6-OHDA, while a control group recieved an equivalent volume (5 mul) of saline with ascorbic acid. Animals injected with 50 mug of 6-OHDA showed blockade of ovulation, vaginal cytology characteristics of persistent estrous, polyfollicular ovaries and enlarged uteri with hypertrophic endometrial glands. In the group injected with 25 mug, similiar effects were demonstrated, but the number of affected animals was smaller than that in the 50 mug group. Control animals dit not show modifications, either in estral cycle or in ovarian and uterine histology. These results suggest that 6-OHDA injected into the anterolateral hypothalmus interferes with catecholaminergic pathways that participate in the neural control of ovulation.

  8. Regulation of hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in diet induced obesity resistant rats: possible targets for obesity prediction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cifani, Carlo; Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria V; Pucci, Mariangela; Giusepponi, Maria E; Romano, Adele; Di Francesco, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; D'Addario, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    .... To investigate the individual sensitivity to weight gain/resistance, we here studied gene transcription regulation of several hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of energy balance...

  9. Stimulation of lateral hypothalamic kainate receptors selectively elicits feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettes, Stacey R; Heyming, Theodore W; Stanley, B Glenn

    2007-12-12

    Glutamate and its receptor agonists, NMDA, AMPA, and KA, elicit feeding when microinjected into the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of satiated rats. However, determining the relative contributions of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and KA receptors (KARs) to LH feeding mechanisms has been difficult due to a lack of receptor selective agonists and antagonists. Furthermore, LH injection of KA produces behavioral hyperactivity, questioning a role for KARs in feeding selective stimulation. In the present study, we used the KAR agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), which selectively binds the GluR5 subunit of KARs, to stimulate feeding, presumably via KAR activation. Using ATPA, we tested whether: (1) LH injection of ATPA elicits feeding, (2) prior treatment with the non-selective AMPA/KAR antagonist, CNQX, suppresses ATPA-elicited feeding, and (3) LH injection of ATPA elicits behavioral patterns specific for feeding. We found that injection of ATPA (0.1 and 1 nmol) elicited an intense feeding response (e.g., 4.8+/-1.6 g) that was blocked by LH pretreatment with CNQX, but was unaffected by pretreatment with the AMPAR selective antagonist, GYKI 52466. Furthermore, minute-by-minute behavioral analysis revealed that LH injection of ATPA increased time spent feeding to 55% of the initial test period with little or no effects on other behaviors at any time. In contrast, LH injection of KA similarly increased feeding but also produced intense locomotor activity. These data suggest that selective activation of LH KARs containing GluR5 subunit(s) is sufficient to elicit feeding.

  10. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor but not neurotrophin-3 enhances differentiation of somatostatin neurons in hypothalamic cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudes, C; Petit, F; Kordon, C; Faivre-Bauman, A

    2000-09-01

    The present work investigated whether neurotrophins could differentially affect in vitro growth and maturation of two related subsets of hypothalamic neurons, hypophysiotropic somatostatin (SRIH) neurons projecting from the periventricular area and arcuate SRIH interneurons. For this purpose, the hypothalamus of 17-day-old rat fetuses was sampled and separated into a ventral and a dorsal fragment containing respectively periventricular and arcuate regions. Each fragment was dissociated and seeded separately in defined medium. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), two important members of the neurotrophin family involved in neuronal differentiation and plasticity, were added to the cultures at seeding time. After 6 or 11 days in vitro, neurons were labeled with an anti-SRIH antiserum and submitted to morphometric analysis. In parallel, SRIH mRNA was estimated by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and neuronal SRIH content, basal and depolarisation-stimulated releases measured by radioimmunoassay. The response of control, non-labeled neurons was estimated by neuronal counts and by assaying glutamic acid decarboxylase, a marker of a large majority of hypothalamic neurons. BDNF markedly increased the size and the branching number of SRIH periventricular cell bodies. Expression of SRIH mRNA, as well as SRIH content and release into the culture medium, were also stimulated by the neurotrophin. Non-SRIH neurons were not affected by the treatment. Under the same conditions, arcuate neurons exhibited a weak, mostly transient response to BDNF. NT-3 was ineffective on either neuronal subset. Immunoneutralization of Trk receptors provided further evidence for BDNF effect specificity. The results indicate that BDNF is a selective activator of the differentiation of hypophysiotropic SRIH neurons in the periventricular area of the hypothalamus.

  11. [Impregnoarchitectonic study of neurons in the caudal hypothalamic area in sheep].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajtová, V

    1985-06-01

    The impregnoarchitectonics of neurons in the regio hypothalamica caudalis was studied by the methods after Ramón-Moliner and Golgi-Cox. Neuron types, morphology of synaptic conjugations and orientation of dendrites and axons are indicated for each nucleus. Small spindle-shaped neurons are the most frequent neuron forms occurring in the regio hypothalamica caudalis. It is only in the nucl. hypothalamicus perifornicalis that neuron processes and the long cell axes are oriented around the columna fornicis. One especially large neuron "occupies" the dorsal part of this nucleus.

  12. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eDominguez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture, supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: 1 The supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. 2 The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2 and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1 portions. 3 Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. 4 Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote, and the alar supraoptoparaventricular region is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  13. Patterns of hypothalamic regionalization in amphibians and reptiles: common traits revealed by a genoarchitectonic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín; Moreno, Nerea

    2015-01-01

    Most studies in mammals and birds have demonstrated common patterns of hypothalamic development highlighted by the combination of developmental regulatory genes (genoarchitecture), supporting the notion of the hypothalamus as a component of the secondary prosencephalon, topologically rostral to the diencephalon. In our comparative analysis we have summarized the data on the expression patterns of different transcription factors and neuroactive substances, used as anatomical markers, in the developing hypothalamus of the amphibian Xenopus laevis and the juvenile turtle Pseudemys scripta. This analysis served to highlight the organization of the hypothalamus in the anamniote/amniotic transition. We have identified supraoptoparaventricular and the suprachiasmatic regions (SCs) in the alar part of the hypothalamus, and tuberal and mammillary regions in the basal hypothalamus. Shared features in the two species are: (1) The supraoptoparaventricular region (SPV) is defined by the expression of Otp and the lack of Nkx2.1/Isl1. It is subdivided into rostral, rich in Otp and Nkx2.2, and caudal, only Otp-positive, portions. (2) The suprachiasmatic area contains catecholaminergic cell groups and lacks Otp, and can be further divided into rostral (rich in Nkx2.1 and Nkx2.2) and a caudal (rich in Isl1 and devoid of Nkx2.1) portions. (3) Expression of Nkx2.1 and Isl1 define the tuberal hypothalamus and only the rostral portion expresses Otp. (4) Its caudal boundary is evident by the lack of Isl1 in the adjacent mammillary region, which expresses Nkx2.1 and Otp. Differences in the anamnio-amniote transition were noted since in the turtle, like in other amniotes, the boundary between the alar hypothalamus and the telencephalic preoptic area shows distinct Nkx2.2 and Otp expressions but not in the amphibian (anamniote), and the alar SPV is defined by the expression of Otp/Pax6, whereas in Xenopus only Otp is expressed.

  14. Identification of hypothalamic neuron-derived neurotrophic factor as a novel factor modulating appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Mardi S; Swanson, Roy D; Semsarzadeh, Nina N; McCulloh, Patrick S; Kwon, Kiwook; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Wong, G William; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-06-15

    Disruption of finely coordinated neuropeptide signals in the hypothalamus can result in altered food intake and body weight. We identified neuron-derived neurotrophic factor (NENF) as a novel secreted protein through a large-scale screen aimed at identifying novel secreted hypothalamic proteins that regulate food intake. We observed robust Nenf expression in hypothalamic nuclei known to regulate food intake, and its expression was altered under the diet-induced obese (DIO) condition relative to the fed state. Hypothalamic Nenf mRNA was regulated by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, itself an important regulator of appetite. Delivery of purified recombinant BDNF into the lateral cerebral ventricle decreased hypothalamic Nenf expression, while pharmacological inhibition of trkB signaling increased Nenf mRNA expression. Furthermore, recombinant NENF administered via an intracerebroventricular cannula decreased food intake and body weight and increased hypothalamic Pomc and Mc4r mRNA expression. Importantly, the appetite-suppressing effect of NENF was abrogated in obese mice fed a high-fat diet, demonstrating a diet-dependent modulation of NENF function. We propose the existence of a regulatory circuit involving BDNF, NENF, and melanocortin signaling. Our study validates the power of using an integrated experimental and bioinformatic approach to identify novel CNS-derived proteins with appetite-modulating function and reveals NENF as an important central modulator of food intake.

  15. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Burke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone we measured the hypothalamic responsiveness to this chemo-signal in 39 prepubertal and 41 adolescent boys and girls by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. We then investigated whether 36 prepubertal children and 38 adolescents diagnosed with Gender Dysphoria (GD; DSM-5 exhibited sex-atypical (in accordance with their experienced gender, rather than sex-typical (in accordance with their natal sex hypothalamic activations during olfactory stimulation with androstadienone. We found that the sex difference in responsiveness to androstadienone was already present in prepubertal control children and thus likely developed during early perinatal development instead of during sexual maturation. Adolescent girls and boys with GD both responded remarkably like their experienced gender, thus sex-atypical. In contrast, prepubertal girls with GD showed neither a typically male nor female hypothalamic activation pattern and prepubertal boys with GD had hypothalamic activations in response to androstadienone that were similar to control boys, thus sex-typical. We present here a unique data set of boys and girls diagnosed with GD at two different developmental stages, showing that these children possess certain sex-atypical functional brain characteristics and may have undergone atypical sexual differentiation of the brain.

  16. Altered hypothalamic protein expression in a rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-na Cong

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a neurodegenerative disorder, which is characterized by progressive motor impairment and cognitive alterations. Changes in energy metabolism, neuroendocrine function, body weight, euglycemia, appetite function, and circadian rhythm can also occur. It is likely that the locus of these alterations is the hypothalamus. We used the HD transgenic (tg rat model bearing 51 CAG repeats, which exhibits similar HD symptomology as HD patients to investigate hypothalamic function. We conducted detailed hypothalamic proteome analyses and also measured circulating levels of various metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic and symptomatic animals. Our results demonstrate that there are significant alterations in HD rat hypothalamic protein expression such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, heat shock protein-70, the oxidative damage protein glutathione peroxidase (Gpx4, glycogen synthase1 (Gys1 and the lipid synthesis enzyme acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1 (Agpat1. In addition, there are significant alterations in various circulating metabolic hormones and lipids in pre-symptomatic animals including, insulin, leptin, triglycerides and HDL, before any motor or cognitive alterations are apparent. These early metabolic and lipid alterations are likely prodromal signs of hypothalamic dysfunction. Gaining a greater understanding of the hypothalamic and metabolic alterations that occur in HD, could lead to the development of novel therapeutics for early interventional treatment of HD.

  17. Evaluation of hypothalamic murine and human melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Basu, Arunabha; Gardner, Ryan M; Aspelund, Sender; Wen, Xin; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-11-07

    The melanocortin 3 receptor (MC3R) is involved in regulation of energy homeostasis. However, its transcript structure is not well understood. We therefore studied initiation and termination sites for hypothalamic murine Mc3r and human MC3R transcripts. Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) was performed for the 5' and 3' ends of murine and human hypothalamic RNA. 5' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated mouse hypothalamus expresses two major Mc3r transcription start sites: one with a 5' UTR approximately 368 bases in length and another previously unknown transcript with a 5' UTR approximately 440 bases in length. 5' RACE experiments using human hypothalamic RNA identified a 5' UTR beginning 533 bases upstream of the start codon with a 248 base splice. 3' RACE experiments using hypothalamic murine RNA indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 1286 bases after the translational stop codon, with a previously unknown 787 base splice between consensus splice donor and acceptor sites. 3' RACE experiments using human MC3R transcript indicated the 3' UTR terminates approximately 115-160 bases after the translational stop codon. These data provide insight into melanocortin 3 receptor transcript structure.

  18. Epidural injections for back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ESI; Spinal injection for back pain; Back pain injection; Steroid injection - epidural; Steroid injection - back ... be pregnant What medicines you are taking, including herbs, supplements, and other drugs you bought without a ...

  19. Function and innervation of the locus ceruleus in a macaque model of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Kim, Aaron; Cameron, Judy L

    2013-02-01

    A body of knowledge implicates an increase in output from the locus ceruleus (LC) during stress. We questioned the innervation and function of the LC in our macaque model of Functional Hypothalamic Amenorrhea, also known as Stress-Induced Amenorrhea. Cohorts of macaques were initially characterized as highly stress resilient (HSR) or stress-sensitive (SS) based upon the presence or absence of ovulation during a protocol involving 2 menstrual cycles with psychosocial and metabolic stress. Afterwards, the animals were rested until normal menstrual cycles resumed and then euthanized on day 5 of a new menstrual cycle [a] in the absence of further stress; or [b] after 5 days of resumed psychosocial and metabolic stress. In this study, parameters of the LC were examined in HSR and SS animals in the presence and absence of stress (2×2 block design) using ICC and image analysis. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of catecholamines; and the TH level was used to assess by inference, NE output. The pixel area of TH-positive dendrites extending outside the medial border of the LC was significantly increased by stress to a similar degree in both HSR and SS animals (p<0.0001). There is a significant CRF innervation of the LC. The positive pixel area of CRF boutons, lateral to the LC, was higher in SS than HSR animals in the absence of stress. Five days of moderate stress significantly increased the CRF-positive bouton pixel area in the HSR group (p<0.02), but not in the SS group. There is also a significant serotonin innervation of the LC. A marked increase in medial serotonin dendrite swelling and beading was observed in the SS+stress group, which may be a consequence of excitotoxicity. The dendrite beading interfered with analysis of axonal boutons. However, at one anatomical level, the serotonin-positive bouton area was obtained between the LC and the superior cerebellar peduncle. Serotonin-positive bouton pixel area was significantly

  20. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modelling of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis following treatment with GnRH analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornøe, Christoffer Wenzel; Agersø, Henrik; Senderovitz, Thomas;

    2007-01-01

    Aims To develop a population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis describing the changes in luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone concentrations following treatment with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist triptorelin...... and the GnRH receptor blocker degarelix. Methods Fifty-eight healthy subjects received single subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of 3.75 mg of triptorelin and 170 prostate cancer patients received multiple subcutaneous doses of degarelix of between 120 and 320 mg. All subjects were pooled...... for the different dynamic responses observed after administration of both GnRH agonists and GnRH receptor blockers, suggesting that the model adequately characterizes the underlying physiology of the endocrine system....

  1. Underground Injection Control (UIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provide information on: individual injection well classes; regulations specific to each well class; technical guidance; compliance assistance; federal, state, and tribal/territory roles and responsibilities.

  2. Ferric Carboxymaltose Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pharmacist if you are allergic to ferric carboxymaltose injection, ferumoxytol (Feraheme), iron dextran (Dexferrum, Infed), iron sucrose (Venofer), or sodium ferric gluconate (Ferrlecit); any other ...

  3. Piezoelectric Injection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mock, R.; Lubitz, K.

    The origin of direct injection can be doubtlessly attributed to Rudolf Diesel who used air assisted injection for fuel atomisation in his first self-ignition engine. Although it became apparent already at that time that direct injection leads to reduced specific fuel consumption compared to other methods of fuel injection, it was not used in passenger cars for the moment because of its disadvantageous noise generation as the requirements with regard to comfort were seen as more important than a reduced specific consumption.

  4. Crucial role of zebrafish prox1 in hypothalamic catecholaminergic neurons development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Giacco Luca

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prox1, the vertebrate homolog of prospero in Drosophila melanogaster, is a divergent homeogene that regulates cell proliferation, fate determination and differentiation during vertebrate embryonic development. Results Here we report that, in zebrafish, prox1 is widely expressed in several districts of the Central Nervous System (CNS. Specifically, we evidenced prox1 expression in a group of neurons, already positive for otp1, located in the hypothalamus at the level of the posterior tuberculum (PT. Prox1 knock-down determines the severe loss of hypothalamic catecholaminergic (CA neurons, identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression, and the synergistic prox1/otp1 overexpression induces the appearance of hypothalamic supernumerary TH-positive neurons and ectopic TH-positive cells on the yolk epitelium. Conclusion Our findings indicate that prox1 activity is crucial for the proper development of the otp1-positive hypothalamic neuronal precursors to their terminal CA phenotype.

  5. Giant hypothalamic hamartoma associated with an intracranial cyst in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joo Yeon; Khang, Shin Kwang [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hye Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    We report the case of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma with a large intracranial cyst in a neonate. On ultrasonography, the lesion presented as a lobulated, mass-like lesion with similar echogenicity to the adjacent brain parenchyma, located anterior to the underdeveloped and compressed left temporal lobe, and presenting as an intracranial cyst in the left cerebral convexity without definite internal echogenicity or septa. The presence of a hypothalamic hamartoma and intracranial neurenteric cyst were confirmed by surgical biopsy. The association of a giant hypothalamic hamartoma and a neurenteric cyst is rare. Due to the rarity of this association, the large size of the intracranial cyst, and the resulting distortion in the regional anatomy, the diagnosis of the solid mass was not made correctly on prenatal high-resolution ultrasonography.

  6. Hypothalamic function in women with secondary hypogonadism and unresponsive to clomiphene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, C A

    1987-01-01

    Seven women with secondary hypogonadism who had been previously unresponsive to two 5-d courses of clomiphene citrate, were treated with clomiphene citrate 100 mg daily for 10 d. LH and FSH concentrations were measured in serum collected at 15-min intervals for 5 h before and on the 10th day of treatment and oestradiol was measured in the first two samples on each day. Four women responded with an increase in the amplitude of LH pulses and in mean LH values and in three there was a marked increase in serum oestradiol concentrations. Three women who showed no gonadotrophin response were subsequently unresponsive to pulsatile LHRH therapy. These preliminary data are consistent with the hypothesis that hypothalamic hypogonadotrophism may result from hypersensitivity of the hypothalamus to oestrogen negative feedback and that the hypothalamic potential for secretion of LHRH is unimpaired. Prolonged treatment with clomiphene may provide a simple test of hypothalamic function in women with normal pituitary function.

  7. Interactions between hormonal and environmental signals on hypothalamic neurons molecular mechanisms signaling environmental events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y S; Dellovade, T L; Pfaff, D W

    1997-04-01

    It is axiomatic that the central nervous system must manage the integration of several environmental factors with steroid hormonal influences for the biologically adaptive performance of reproductive behavior. Launching from established behavioral investigations and from hormonal influences on gene function in the brain, we review here studies on how synaptic inputs and sex hormone influences codetermine hypothalamic gene expression. A particularly exciting implication of results on the ability of thyroid hormone receptors to interfere with estrogen receptor-dependent neuroendocrine function is that environmentally stimulated changes in thyroid hormone levels could influence hypothalamic transcriptional mechanisms important for behavior. If so, this would unite naturalistic environmental thinking with molecular neurobiological thinking important for the hypothalamic control of reproduction. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997;8:111-115). (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  8. The histone acetyltransferase MOF activates hypothalamic polysialylation to prevent diet-induced obesity in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenachot, Xavier; Rigault, Caroline; Nédélec, Emmanuelle; Laderrière, Amélie; Khanam, Tasneem; Gouazé, Alexandra; Chaudy, Sylvie; Lemoine, Aleth; Datiche, Frédérique; Gascuel, Jean; Pénicaud, Luc; Benani, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Overfeeding causes rapid synaptic remodeling in hypothalamus feeding circuits. Polysialylation of cell surface molecules is a key step in this neuronal rewiring and allows normalization of food intake. Here we examined the role of hypothalamic polysialylation in the long-term maintenance of body weight, and deciphered the molecular sequence underlying its nutritional regulation. We found that upon high fat diet (HFD), reduced hypothalamic polysialylation exacerbated the diet-induced obese phenotype in mice. Upon HFD, the histone acetyltransferase MOF was rapidly recruited on the St8sia4 polysialyltransferase-encoding gene. Mof silencing in the mediobasal hypothalamus of adult mice prevented activation of the St8sia4 gene transcription, reduced polysialylation, altered the acute homeostatic feeding response to HFD and increased the body weight gain. These findings indicate that impaired hypothalamic polysialylation contribute to the development of obesity, and establish a role for MOF in the brain control of energy balance. PMID:25161885

  9. DiI tracing of the hypothalamic projection systems during perinatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Georgievna Makarenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is the higher neuroendocrine center of the brain and therefore possesses numerous intrinsic axonal connections and is connected by afferent and efferent fiber systems with other brain structures. These projection systems have been described in detail in the adult but data on their early development is sparse. Here I review studies of the time schedule and features of the development of the major hypothalamic axonal systems. In general, anterograde tracing experiments have been used to analyze short distance projections from the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei, while hypothalamic projections to the posterior and intermediate pituitary lobes and median eminence, mammillary body tracts and reciprocal septohypothalamic connections have been described with retrograde tracing. The available data demonstrate that hypothalamic connections develop with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity, innervating each target with a unique developmental schedule which in many cases can be correlated with the functional maturity of the projection system.

  10. DiI tracing of the hypothalamic projection systems during perinatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Irina G

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is the higher neuroendocrine center of the brain and therefore possesses numerous intrinsic axonal connections and is connected by afferent and efferent fiber systems with other brain structures. These projection systems have been described in detail in the adult but data on their early development is sparse. Here I review studies of the time schedule and features of the development of the major hypothalamic axonal systems. In general, anterograde tracing experiments have been used to analyze short distance projections from the arcuate and anteroventral periventricular nuclei (Pe), while hypothalamic projections to the posterior and intermediate pituitary lobes (IL) and median eminence, mammillary body tracts and reciprocal septohypothalamic connections have been described with retrograde tracing. The available data demonstrate that hypothalamic connections develop with a high degree of spatial and temporal specificity, innervating each target with a unique developmental schedule which in many cases can be correlated with the functional maturity of the projection system.

  11. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats. PMID:24944903

  12. Hypothalamic KLF4 mediates leptin's effects on food intake via AgRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez-Rebordelo, Estrella; Gallego, Rosalia; Gandara, Marina; Lear, Pamela; Lopez, Miguel; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2014-07-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger-type transcription factor expressed in a range of tissues that plays multiple functions. We report that hypothalamic KLF4 represents a new transcription factor specifically modulating agouti-related protein (AgRP) expression in vivo. Hypothalamic KLF4 colocalizes with AgRP neurons and is modulated by nutritional status and leptin. Over-expression of KLF4 in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) induces food intake and increases body weight through the specific stimulation of AgRP, as well as blunting leptin sensitivity in lean rats independent of forkhead box protein 01 (FoxO1). Down-regulation of KLF4 in the ARC inhibits fasting-induced food intake in both lean and diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Silencing KLF4, however, does not, on its own, enhance peripheral leptin sensitivity in DIO rats.

  13. Hypothalamic serotonin-insulin signaling cross-talk and alterations in a type 2 diabetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazoglou, Ioannis; Berthou, Flavien; Vicaire, Nicolas; Rouch, Claude; Markaki, Eirini M; Bailbe, Danielle; Portha, Bernard; Taouis, Mohammed; Gerozissis, Kyriaki

    2012-03-05

    Serotonin and insulin are key regulators of homeostatic mechanisms in the hypothalamus. However, in type 2 diabetes, the hypothalamic responsiveness to serotonin is not clearly established. We used a diabetic model, the Goto Kakizaki (GK) rats, to explore insulin receptor expression, insulin and serotonin efficiency in the hypothalamus and liver by means of Akt phosphorylation. Insulin or dexfenfluramine (stimulator of serotonin) treatment induced Akt phosphorylation in Wistar rats but not in GK rats that exhibit down-regulated insulin receptor. Studies in a neuroblastoma cell line showed that serotonin-induced Akt phosphorylation is PI3-kinase dependent. Finally, in response to food intake, hypothalamic serotonin release was reduced in GK rats, indicating impaired responsiveness of this neurotransmitter. In conclusion, hypothalamic serotonin as insulin efficiency is impaired in diabetic GK rats. The insulin-serotonin cross-talk and impairment observed is one potential key modification in the brain during the onset of diabetes.

  14. Effects of nutritional stress during different developmental periods on song and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriengwatana, B; Wada, H; Schmidt, K L; Taves, M D; Soma, K K; MacDougall-Shackleton, S A

    2014-03-01

    In songbirds, developmental stress affects song learning and production. Altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function resulting in elevated corticosterone (CORT) may contribute to this effect. We examined whether developmental conditions affected the association between adult song and HPA axis function, and whether nutritional stress before and after nutritional independence has distinct effects on song learning and/or vocal performance. Zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) were raised in consistently high (HH) or low (LL) food conditions until post-hatch day (PHD) 62, or were switched from high to low conditions (HL) or vice versa (LH) at PHD 34. Song was recorded in adulthood. We assessed the response of CORT to handling during development and to dexamethasone (DEX) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenges during adulthood. Song learning and vocal performance were not affected by nutritional stress at either developmental stage. Nutritional stress elevated baseline CORT during development. Nutritional stress also increased rate of CORT secretion in birds that experienced stress only in the juvenile phase (HL group). Birds in the LL group had lower CORT levels after injection of ACTH compared to the other groups, however there was no effect of nutritional stress on the response to DEX. Thus, our findings indicate that developmental stress can affect HPA function without concurrently affecting song.

  15. Research Resource: The Dexamethasone Transcriptome in Hypothalamic Embryonic Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Krystle A; Peffer, Melanie E; Zhang, Janie Y; Luthra, Soumya; Chakka, Anish B; Couger, Matthew B; Chandran, Uma R; Monaghan, A Paula; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to excess glucocorticoids during fetal development has long-lasting physiological and behavioral consequences, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The impact of prenatal glucocorticoids exposure on stress responses in juvenile and adult offspring implicates the developing hypothalamus as a target of adverse prenatal glucocorticoid action. Therefore, primary cultures of hypothalamic neural-progenitor/stem cells (NPSCs) derived from mouse embryos (embryonic day 14.5) were used to identify the glucocorticoid transcriptome in both males and females. NPSCs were treated with vehicle or the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone (dex; 100nM) for 4 hours and total RNA analyzed using RNA-Sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that primary hypothalamic NPSC cultures expressed relatively high levels of a number of genes regulating stem cell proliferation and hypothalamic progenitor function. Interesting, although these cells express glucocorticoid receptors (GRs), only low levels of sex-steroid receptors are expressed, which suggested that sex-specific differentially regulated genes identified are mediated by genetic and not hormonal influences. We also identified known or novel GR-target coding and noncoding genes that are either regulated equivalently in male and female NPSCs or differential responsiveness in one sex. Using gene ontology analysis, the top functional network identified was cell proliferation and using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation observed a reduction in proliferation of hypothalamic NPSCs after dexamethasone treatment. Our studies provide the first characterization and description of glucocorticoid-regulated pathways in male and female embryonically derived hypothalamic NPSCs and identified GR-target genes during hypothalamic development. These findings may provide insight into potential mechanisms responsible for the long-term consequences of fetal glucocorticoid exposure in adulthood.

  16. Dorsomedial hypothalamic GABA regulates anxiety in the social interaction test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, A; Katner, J S

    1995-02-01

    Blockade of GABAA function in the region of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of rats is known to elicit a constellation of physiologic responses including increases in heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (BP), respiratory rate, and plasma catecholamine levels, as well as behavioral responses such as increases in locomotor activity and anxiogenic-like effects as measured in a conflict test and the elevated plus-maze test. The aim of the present study was to test the effects of microinjecting GABAA antagonists bicuculline methiodide (BMI) and picrotoxin, as well as the GABAA agonist muscimol, into the DMH of rats placed in the social interaction (SI) test. Muscimol decreased HR and BP but increased SI, whereas the GABA antagonists increased HR and BP but decreased SI time. Blocking the HR changes elicited by GABAergic drugs injected into the DMH with systemic injections of atenolol and atropine methylbromide did not block their effects on SI.

  17. Hypothalamic kappa opioid receptor mediates both diet‐induced and melanin concentrating hormone–induced liver damage through inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Sanchez‐Rebordelo, Estrella; Romero‐Picó, Amparo; Kalló, Imre; Chee, Melissa J.; Porteiro, Begoña; Al‐Massadi, Omar; Contreras, Cristina; Fernø, Johan; Senra, Ana; Gallego, Rosalia; Folgueira, Cintia; Seoane, Luisa M.; van Gestel, Margriet; Adan, Roger A.; Liposits, Zsolt; Dieguez, Carlos; López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The opioid system is widely known to modulate the brain reward system and thus affect the behavior of humans and other animals, including feeding. We hypothesized that the hypothalamic opioid system might also control energy metabolism in peripheral tissues. Mice lacking the kappa opioid receptor (κOR) and adenoviral vectors overexpressing or silencing κOR were stereotaxically delivered in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of rats. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was inhibited by pharmacological (tauroursodeoxycholic acid) and genetic (overexpression of the chaperone glucose‐regulated protein 78 kDa) approaches. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by histological techniques and western blot. We show that in the LHA κOR directly controls hepatic lipid metabolism through the parasympathetic nervous system, independent of changes in food intake and body weight. κOR colocalizes with melanin concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH‐R1) in the LHA, and genetic disruption of κOR reduced melanin concentrating hormone–induced liver steatosis. The functional relevance of these findings was given by the fact that silencing of κOR in the LHA attenuated both methionine choline–deficient, diet‐induced and choline‐deficient, high‐fat diet–induced ER stress, inflammation, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis, whereas overexpression of κOR in this area promoted liver steatosis. Overexpression of glucose‐regulated protein 78 kDa in the liver abolished hypothalamic κOR‐induced steatosis by reducing hepatic ER stress. Conclusions: This study reveals a novel hypothalamic–parasympathetic circuit modulating hepatic function through inflammation and ER stress independent of changes in food intake or body weight; these findings might have implications for the clinical use of opioid receptor antagonists. (Hepatology 2016;64:1086‐1104) PMID:27387967

  18. EFFECT OF ANESTHETIZING THE REGION OF THE PARAVENTRICULAR HYPOTHALAMIC NUCLEI ON ENERGY-METABOLISM DURING EXERCISE IN THE RAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDIJK, G; VISSING, J; STEFFENS, AB; GALBO, H

    1994-01-01

    The ventromedial and posterior hypothalamic nuclei are known to influence glucoregulation during exercise. The extensive projections of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN) to the sympathetic nervous system suggest that the PVN also may be involved in glucoregulation during exercise. The r

  19. Photoperiod and acute energy deficits interact on components of the thyroid hormone system in hypothalamic tanycytes of the Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwig, Annika; Wilson, Dana; Logie, Tracy J; Boelen, Anita; Morgan, Peter J; Mercer, Julian G; Barrett, Perry

    2009-05-01

    In the Siberian hamster, seasonal weight loss occurs gradually over many weeks during autumn and winter. This is driven by a regulatory mechanism that is able to integrate duration of exposure to short days (SDs) with the size of body energy reserves. After food restriction in SDs, followed by ad libitum refeeding, body weight of the hamster does not return to its former level; rather, it increases to a level defined by the length of time spent in SDs. In this report, we show that components of the thyroid hormone system that are involved in seasonal weight loss change expression in response to 48 h of starvation. Eight weeks in an SD photoperiod induced weight loss in the Siberian hamster. In the hypothalamus of these hamsters, type II deiodinase expression was decreased and type III deiodinase expression was induced, but there was no change in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y or thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene expression. For the first time, we show that the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 is expressed in tanycytes and is increased in response to an SD photoperiod. Food restriction (48 h of starvation) reversed the direction of gene expression change for type II and III deiodinase and monocarboxylate transporter 8 induced by SD photoperiods. Furthermore, fasting increased neuropeptide Y expression and decreased thyrotropin-releasing hormone expression. VGF, a gene upregulated in SDs in the dorsal region of the medial posterior area of the arcuate nucleus, was not changed by starvation. These data point to a mechanism whereby energy deprivation can interact with an SD photoperiod on hypothalamic tanycytes to regulate components of the thyroid hormone system involved in photoperiodic regulation of seasonal physiology.

  20. Effects of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptor antagonism on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Donald R; Cramer, Jeffrey; Morin, S Michelle

    2012-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is the major hypothalamic neuropeptide responsible for stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), resulting in the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids from the adrenal cortex. In a recent study, we reported the discovery of the CRF1 receptor antagonist, 3-(4-chloro-2-morpholin-4-yl-thiazol-5-yl)-8-(1-ethylpropyl)-2,6-dimethyl-imidazo[1,2-b]pyridazine (MTIP), which has efficacy in preclinical models of stress-induced alcohol consumption. Because CRF1 is important in HPAA activation, we evaluated the effects of MTIP administration on rodent HPAA function. Initial studies established the MTIP doses required for brain and pituitary CRF1 occupancy and those associated with the inhibition of intracerebroventricular CRF on the HPAA in mice. Then, rat basal plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations were measured hourly by radioimmunoassay for 24 h after three daily doses of MTIP or vehicle. In these studies, the early phase of the nocturnal CORT surge was reduced; however, the area under the CORT curve was identical for the 24-h period. In subsequent studies, increases in plasma CORT due to direct pharmacological manipulation of the HPAA axis or by stressors were evaluated after MTIP treatment in mice. MTIP attenuated CORT responses generated by immediate bolus administration of insulin or ethanol; however, MTIP did not affect activation of the HPAA by other stressors and pharmacological agents. Therefore, MTIP can modulate basal HPAA activity during the CORT surge and reduced activation after a select number of stressors but does not produce a lasting suppression of basal CORT. The ability of MTIP to modulate plasma CORT after hyperinsulinemia may provide a surrogate strategy for a target occupancy biomarker.

  1. Thermoregulatory Instability in Childhood: Linking the Normal Brain to Hypothalamic Storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Alves Martins

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Central core temperature is tightly controlled by hypothalamic centers, a feature that makes sudden changes in body temperature very unusual. A dysfunction of these hypothalamic pathways leads to Shapiro’s syndrome, comprising spontaneous hypothermia, hyperhidrosis, and corpus callosum dysgenesis. Although it may affect any age, usually it presents in childhood. Variants to this syndrome with completely normal brain anatomy have been consistently reported, expanding the clinical spectrum of the syndrome. Herein, we report the case of a 4-year-old girl with Shapiro’s syndrome and unaffected corpus callosum.

  2. Increased concentration of. cap alpha. - and. gamma. -endorphin in post mortem hypothalamic tissue of schizophrenic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiegant, V.M.; Verhoef, C.J.; Burbach, J.P.H.; de Wied, D.

    1988-01-01

    The concentrations of ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..- and ..gamma..-endorphin were determined by radioimmunoassay in HPLC fractionated extracts of post mortem hypothalamic tissue obtained from schizophrenic patients and controls. The hypothalamic concentration of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphin was significantly higher in patients than in controls. No difference was found in the concentration of ..beta..-endorphin, the putative precursor of ..cap alpha..- and ..gamma..-endorphins. These results suggest a deviant metabolism of ..beta..-endorphin in the brain of schizophrenic patients. Whether this phenomenon is related to the psychopathology, or is a consequence of ante mortem farmacotherapy, remains to be established.

  3. Hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and central diabetes insipidus probably linked to Rathke's cleft cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Tomoko; Yamada, Hodaka; Yoshida, Masashi; Aoki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Aki; Kusaka, Ikuyo; Toyoshima, Hideo; Kakei, Masafumi; Ishikawa, San-E

    2015-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was admitted due to weight loss and generalized malaise. The basal levels of all the anterior pituitary hormones, except for prolactin, were reduced. However, they were all elevated in response to exogenous hypothalamic hormones. After starting hydrocortisone replacement, the patient had polyuria of >5,000 mL/day. T1-weighted MRI depicted a low signal of an oval mass in the sella turcica and an iso-intense signal of another mass at the pituitary stalk. These findings indicate a hypothalamic type of hypopituitarism and masked central diabetes insipidus which possibly derived from the atypical occupation of Rathke's cleft cyst at the pituitary stalk.

  4. Alterations in hypothalamic gene expression following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Pedersen, Philip J.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2016-01-01

    of energy balance.  Methods: Lean male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent either RYGB or sham surgery. Body weight and food intake were monitored bi-weekly for 60 days post-surgery. In situ hybridization mRNA analysis of hypothalamic AgRP, NPY, CART, POMC and MCH was applied to RYGB and sham animals and compared......Objective: The role of the central nervous system in mediating metabolic effects of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is poorly understood. Using a rat model of RYGB, we aimed to identify changes in gene expression of key hypothalamic neuropeptides known to be involved in the regulation...

  5. Hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPAA) axis function in adult Fischer-344 rats exposed during development to neurotoxic chemicals perinatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosecrans, J A; Johnson, J H; Tilson, H A; Hong, J S

    1984-01-01

    The major objective of these experiments was to determine long-term effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis (HPAA) of adult rats exposed during development to chlordecone, an organochlorine insecticide. Chlordecone was administered to mothers prenatally plus the first 12 days of the neonatal period (6 ppm in the diet) or neonatally via a single subcutaneous injection to rats at 4 days of age (1 mg/pup in 20 micrograms of DMSO). DMSO (20 microliters/pup) and dexamethasone (100 micrograms/pup in 20 microliters saline) were also injected on day 4. HPAA function was evaluated at 70-80 days of age. Responsiveness of the HPAA to a repeated stressor was evaluated by exposing rats of each treatment group to a 7-day stress-induced analgesia (SIA) paradigm consisting of a daily 15 sec foot-shock (0.9 mA) exposure which was preceded by a 15 sec white noise conditioned stimulus. The behavioral response to daily stress was evaluated by measuring tail-flick latencies immediately before and/or after each stress exposure. The conditioned response to stress was evaluated 24 hours after the last of 7 daily foot-shock sessions in which rats of each treatment and experimental group were exposed to the shock chamber only. All rats were killed 15 minutes after the final session and tissue (serum and adrenals) were removed and frozen for later chemical analysis; serum and adrenal corticosterone (CS) and serum prolactin (Prl) levels were measured. Perinatal exposure to chlordecone did not significantly alter the behavioral and/or neuroendocrine responses to stress. Ambient hormone levels (both CS and Prl), however, were uniformly attenuated by chlordecone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Changes in the hypothalamic-hypophyseal axis of mares in relation to the winter solstice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvia, P J; Johnson, L; Fitzgerald, B P

    1992-09-01

    In mares, the amount of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is low in the hypothalamus during seasonal anoestrus, but by early spring, concentrations of GnRH are high. The timing of this response was characterized more precisely by determining concentrations of GnRH in hypothalamic tissue collected immediately before and at various times after the winter solstice (22 December 1986). Ovaries, pituitary gland, hypothalamus and a blood sample were collected from six groups of mares (6-12 mares per group) at death, 1 week before day of the winter solstice and 1, 2, 3 and 12 weeks afterwards. No significant changes in weight of the anterior pituitary gland or concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were observed in the anterior pituitary gland (P > 0.1). Mean diameter of the largest follicle, number of follicles > or = 20 mm in diameter and concentrations of LH and FSH in serum remained unchanged for weeks -1 to +3 (P < 0.05), then increased significantly by week 12 (P < 0.001). Content and concentration of GnRH in the median eminence was low at -1 week, increased gradually (P < 0.05) to a maximum by +1 week, then decreased gradually (P < 0.05) to low values at 12 weeks. Means (+/- SEM) for -1, +1 and +12 weeks were 33.5 +/- 5.5, 117.7 +/- 18.6 and 29.8 +/- 3.7 ng GnRH, respectively. Mean content of GnRH in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus showed a reciprocal pattern.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  8. Sleep and Endocrinology: Hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal axis and growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Goswami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The supra-chiasmatic nucleus (SCN is the primarily biological clock determining thecircadian rhythm. The neurons of the nucleus making this clock have inherent rhythmand set in biological day and night. These periods usually corresponds to day/night, andindirectly to sleep-wakefulness cycle, in most individuals. Retino-hypothalamic tractcarrying photic information from the retina provides the most important input tomaintain the inherent rhythm of the SCN. The rhythmic discharges from the SCN tovarious neurons of the central nervous system, including pineal gland andhypothalamus, translate into circadian rhythm characteristic of several hormones andmetabolites such as glucose. As a result there is a pattern of hormonal changesoccurring during cycle of sleep wakefulness. Most characteristic of these changes aresurge of melatonin with biological night, surge of growth hormone-releasing hormone(GHRHat onset of sleep and surge of corticotropin-releasinghormone(CRHduring late part of the sleep. The cause and effect relationship of the hypothalamicreleasing hormones and their target hormones on various phases of sleep includinginitial non rapid eye movement (NREM phase at onset of sleep, and rapid eyemovement (REM phase near awakening, is an upcoming research area. Sleepelectroencephalogram (EEG determining the onset of NREM and REM sleep is animportant tool complimenting the studies assessing relationship between varioushormones and phases of sleep. The slow wave activity (SWA corresponds to theintensity of sleep at its onset during the biological night of an individual. Besides,GHRH and CRH, several other peptide and steroid hormones such as growthhormone (GH, its secretagogues, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, estrogen anddehydroepiandrosterone sulfate are associated or have the potential to change phases ofsleep including initial slow wave-NREM sleep.

  9. Hypothalamic, pituitary and thyroid dysfunction after radiotherapy to the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samaan, N.A.; Vieto, R.; Schultz, P.N.; Maor, M.; Meoz, R.T.; Sampiere, V.A.; Cangir, A.; Ried, H.L.; Jesse, R.H. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    One hundred-ten patients who had nasopharyngeal cancer and paranasal sinus tumors and were free of the primary disease were studied one to 26 years following radiotherapy. There were 70 males and 40 females ranging in age from 4 to 75 years, with a mean age of 36.5 years. During therapy both the hypothalamus and the anterior pituitary gland were in the field of irradiation. The radiation dose to the hypothalamus and the anterior pituitary gland was estimated to be 400 to 7500 rad with a median dose of 5618 rad to the anterior pituitary gland and a median dose of 5000 rad to the hypothalamus. We found evidence of endocrine deficiencies in 91 of the 110 patients studied. Seventy-six patients showed evidence of one or more hypothalamic lesions and 43 patients showed evidence of primary pituitary deficiency. Forty of the 66 patients who received radiotherapy to the neck for treatment or prevention of lymph node metastasis showed evidence of primary hypothyroidism. The range of the dose to the thyroid area was 3000 to 8800 rad with a median of 5000 rad. One young adult woman who developed galactorrhea and amenorrhea 2 years following radiotherapy showed a high serum prolactin level, but had normal anterior pituitary function and sella turcica. She regained her menses and had a normal pregnancy and delivery following bromocriptine therapy. These results indicate that endocrine deficiencies after radiotherapy for tumors of the head and neck are common and should be detected early and treated. Long-term follow-up of these patients is indicated since complications may appear after the completion of radiotherapy.

  10. [Intra-articular injections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Ch

    2015-09-01

    It is not unusual for a specialist or general practitioner to be presented with a pathology which necessitates the use of an intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, hyaluronic acid or a local anaesthetic. It would seem to be interesting to update and to precise the techniques and methods of intraarticular injections which have appeared in recent international publications, when we know that 30 % of the injections given into the knee and so called "dry" are incorrect and, therefore, inefficient. The indication of an articular injection depends, firstly, on the diagnosis which should be done with great care; after which should be an objective analysis complete with secondary effects linked to both the injection and the product used. The conditions of asepsis, the choice of needles and quantities of the injection and even the ways of the injections should be reviewed in detail. The last studies clearly question the secondary effects of the cartilage degradations of the cortisone given as an intra-articular injection and shows its efficiency on the pain and inflammatory phenomonen in osteoarthritis. Studies on hyaluronic acid are often contradictory going from a modest result to an important pain relief but it is necessary to be aware that the objective criteria are difficult to interpret. The use of local anaesthetics in intra-articular is limited by the few indications in view of the major risk of aggravating the pre-existing lesions by the disappearing signs of pain.

  11. Injection of Deuterium Pellets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.; Andersen, P.; Andersen, S. A.

    1984-01-01

    A pellet injection system made for the TFR tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses, Paris is described. 0.12-mg pellets are injected with velocities of around 600-700 m/s through a 5-m long guide tube. Some details of a new light gas gun are given; with this gun, hydrogen pellets are accelerated...

  12. Corticotropin, Repository Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.P. Acthar Gel® ... Corticotropin repository injection comes as a long acting gel to inject under the skin or into a ... prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, or herbal products you are taking or plan to take. ...

  13. Separably injective Banach spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Avilés, Antonio; Castillo, Jesús M F; González, Manuel; Moreno, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    This monograph contains a detailed exposition of the up-to-date theory of separably injective spaces: new and old results are put into perspective with concrete examples (such as l∞/c0 and C(K) spaces, where K is a finite height compact space or an F-space, ultrapowers of L∞ spaces and spaces of universal disposition). It is no exaggeration to say that the theory of separably injective Banach spaces is strikingly different from that of injective spaces. For instance, separably injective Banach spaces are not necessarily isometric to, or complemented subspaces of, spaces of continuous functions on a compact space. Moreover, in contrast to the scarcity of examples and general results concerning injective spaces, we know of many different types of separably injective spaces and there is a rich theory around them. The monograph is completed with a preparatory chapter on injective spaces, a chapter on higher cardinal versions of separable injectivity and a lively discussion of open problems and further lines o...

  14. Effect of treatment modality on the hypothalamic-pituitary function of patients treated with radiation therapy for pituitary adenomas: Hypothalamic dose and endocrine outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eElson

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both fractionated external beam radiotherapy and single fraction radiosurgery for pituitary adenomas are associated with the risk of hypothalamic-pituitary (HP axis dysfunction.Objective: To analyze the effect of treatment modality (Linac, TomoTherapy, or Gamma Knife on hypothalamic dose and correlate these with HP-Axis deficits after radiotherapy.Methods:Radiation plans of patients treated postoperatively for pituitary adenomas using Linac-based 3D Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT (n=11, TomoTherapy-based Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT (n=10, or Gamma Knife Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS(n=12 were retrospectively reviewed. Dose to the hypothalamus was analyzed and postradiotherapy hormone function including growth hormone (GH, thyroid (TSH, adrenal (ACTH, prolactin (PRL, and gonadotropins (FSH/LH were assessed. Results:Post-radiation, 13 of 27 (48% patients eligible for analysis developed at least one new hormone deficit, of which 8 of 11 (72% occurred in the Linac group, 4 of 8 (50% occurred in the TomoTherapy group, and 1 of 8 (12.5% occurred in the Gamma Knife group. Compared with fractionated techniques, Gamma Knife showed improved hypothalamic sparing for DMax Hypo, and V12Gy. For fractionated modalities, TomoTherapy showed improved dosimetric characteristics over Linac-based treatment with hypothalamic DMean (44.8 Gy vs. 26.8 Gy p=0.02, DMax (49.8 Gy vs. 39.1 Gy p=0.04, and V12Gy (100% vs. 76% p=0.004.Conclusion:Maximal dosimetric avoidance of the hypothalamus was achieved using Gamma Knife-based radiosurgery followed by TomoTherapy-based IMRT, and Linac-based 3D conformal radiation therapy, respectively.

  15. Dimethyl Ether Injection Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorenson, Spencer C.; Glensvig, Michael; Abata, Duane L.

    1998-01-01

    effects of DME in high pressure injection have also been observed. DME has a higher compressibility than diesel fuel, resulting in larger pressure oscillations in the injection system during the injection process. The oscillations with DME also have a slower delay rate than those of diesel fuel......A series of preliminary investigations has been performed in order to investigate the behavior of DME in a diesel injection environment. These studies have in-cluded visual observations of the spray penetration and angles for high pressure injection into Nitrogen using conventional jerk pump...... in the same system. As a first attempt to simulate combustion of DME in Diesel engines, the results of the spray studies have been incorporated into a simplified spray combustion model. A turbulent jet structure was adjusted to fit the penetration rates of the observed sprays. The observed spray widths agreed...

  16. Central melanin-concentrating hormone influences liver and adipose metabolism via specific hypothalamic nuclei and efferent autonomic/JNK1 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Beiroa, Daniel; Vázquez, María J; Morgan, Donald A; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Porteiro, Begoña; Díaz-Arteaga, Adenis; Senra, Ana; Busquets, Silvia; Velásquez, Douglas A; Al-Massadi, Omar; Varela, Luis; Gándara, Marina; López-Soriano, Francisco-Javier; Gallego, Rosalía; Seoane, Luisa M; Argiles, Josep M; López, Miguel; Davis, Roger J; Sabio, Guadalupe; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Rahmouni, Kamal; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2013-03-01

    Specific neuronal circuits modulate autonomic outflow to liver and white adipose tissue. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-deficient mice are hypophagic, lean, and do not develop hepatosteatosis when fed a high-fat diet. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of MCH, an orexigenic neuropeptide specifically expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area, on hepatic and adipocyte metabolism. Chronic central administration of MCH and adenoviral vectors increasing MCH signaling were performed in rats and mice. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. We showed that the activation of MCH receptors promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas it increases fat deposition in white adipose tissue via the suppression of sympathetic traffic. These metabolic actions are independent of parallel changes in food intake and energy expenditure. In the liver, MCH triggers lipid accumulation and lipid uptake, with c-Jun N-terminal kinase being an essential player, whereas in adipocytes MCH induces metabolic pathways that promote lipid storage and decreases lipid mobilization. Genetic activation of MCH receptors or infusion of MCH specifically in the lateral hypothalamic area modulated hepatic lipid metabolism, whereas the specific activation of this receptor in the arcuate nucleus affected adipocyte metabolism. Our findings show that central MCH directly controls hepatic and adipocyte metabolism through different pathways. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Central Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Influences Liver and Adipose Metabolism Via Specific Hypothalamic Nuclei and Efferent Autonomic/JNK1 Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbernon, Monica; Beiroa, Daniel; Vázquez, María J.; Morgan, Donald A.; Veyrat–Durebex, Christelle; Porteiro, Begoña; Díaz–Arteaga, Adenis; Senra, Ana; Busquets, Silvia; Velásquez, Douglas A.; Al–Massadi, Omar; Varela, Luis; Gándara, Marina; López–Soriano, Francisco–Javier; Gallego, Rosalía; Seoane, Luisa M.; Argiles, Josep M.; López, Miguel; Davis, Roger J.; Sabio, Guadalupe; Rohner–Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Rahmouni, Kamal; Dieguez, Carlos; Nogueiras, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Specific neuronal circuits modulate autonomic outflow to liver and white adipose tissue. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-deficient mice are hypophagic, lean, and do not develop hepatosteatosis when fed a high-fat diet. Herein, we sought to investigate the role of MCH, an orexigenic neuropeptide specifically expressed in the lateral hypothalamic area, on hepatic and adipocyte metabolism. METHODS Chronic central administration of MCH and adenoviral vectors increasing MCH signaling were performed in rats and mice. Vagal denervation was performed to assess its effect on liver metabolism. The peripheral effects on lipid metabolism were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. RESULTS We showed that the activation of MCH receptors promotes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease through the parasympathetic nervous system, whereas it increases fat deposition in white adipose tissue via the suppression of sympathetic traffic. These metabolic actions are independent of parallel changes in food intake and energy expenditure. In the liver, MCH triggers lipid accumulation and lipid uptake, with c-Jun N-terminal kinase being an essential player, whereas in adipocytes MCH induces metabolic pathways that promote lipid storage and decreases lipid mobilization. Genetic activation of MCH receptors or infusion of MCH specifically in the lateral hypothalamic area modulated hepatic lipid metabolism, whereas the specific activation of this receptor in the arcuate nucleus affected adipocyte metabolism. CONCLUSIONS Our findings show that central MCH directly controls hepatic and adipocyte metabolism through different pathways. PMID:23142626

  18. InsR/FoxO1 signaling curtails hypothalamic POMC neuron number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leona Plum

    Full Text Available Insulin receptor (InsR signaling through transcription factor FoxO1 is important in the development of hypothalamic neuron feeding circuits, but knowledge about underlying mechanisms is limited. To investigate the role of InsR/FoxO1 signaling in the development and maintenance of these circuits, we surveyed the pool of hypothalamic neurons expressing Pomc mRNA in different mouse models of impaired hypothalamic InsR signaling. InsR ablation in the entire hypothalamus did not affect Pomc-neuron number at birth, but resulted in a 25% increase, most notably in the middle arcuate nucleus region, in young adults. Selective restoration of InsR expression in POMC neurons in these mice partly reversed the abnormality, resulting in a 10% decrease compared to age-matched controls. To establish whether FoxO1 signaling plays a role in this process, we examined POMC neuron number in mice with POMC-specific deletion of FoxO1, and detected a 23% decrease in age-matched animals, consistent with a cell-autonomous role of InsR/FoxO1 signaling in regulating POMC neuron number, distinct from its established role to activate Pomc transcription. These changes in Pomc cells occurred in the absence of marked changes in humoral factors or hypothalamic NPY neurons.

  19. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  20. Fluoxetine induces proliferation and inhibits differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lígia Sousa-Ferreira

    Full Text Available A significant number of children undergo maternal exposure to antidepressants and they often present low birth weight. Therefore, it is important to understand how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs affect the development of the hypothalamus, the key center for metabolism regulation. In this study we investigated the proliferative actions of fluoxetine in fetal hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells and demonstrate that fluoxetine induces the proliferation of these cells, as shown by increased neurospheres size and number of proliferative cells (Ki-67+ cells. Moreover, fluoxetine inhibits the differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells, as demonstrated by decreased number of mature neurons (Neu-N+ cells and increased number of undifferentiated cells (SOX-2+ cells. Additionally, fluoxetine-induced proliferation and maintenance of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells leads to changes in the mRNA levels of appetite regulator neuropeptides, including Neuropeptide Y (NPY and Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART. This study provides the first evidence that SSRIs affect the development of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro with consequent alterations on appetite neuropeptides.

  1. Androgenic anabolic steroid use and severe hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction : a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, E.; Keizer, H.A.; Kuipers, H.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.

    2003-01-01

    The data of the present case demonstrate that the abuse of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) may lead to serious health effects. Although most clinical attention is usually directed towards peripheral side effects, the most serious central side effect, hypothalamic-pituitary-dysfunction, is often o

  2. Cyclophosphamide for Rapid-Onset Obesity, Hypothalamic Dysfunction, Hypoventilation, and Autonomic Dysregulation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Paz-Priel, Ido; Cooke, David W.; Chen, Allen R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, autonomic dysregulation, and neural crest tumor syndrome have poor long-term outcomes. We report a patient who was treated successfully with high-dose cyclophosphamide immunoablation. This experience offers a novel therapeutic approach and an indirect insight into the underlying pathogenesis of this syndrome.

  3. Mechanisms underlying prorenin actions on hypothalamic neurons implicated in cardiometabolic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Pitra

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: We identified novel neuronal targets and cellular mechanisms underlying PR/PRR actions in critical hypothalamic neurons involved in cardiometabolic regulation. This fundamental mechanistic information regarding central PR/PRR actions is essential for the development of novel RAS-based therapeutic targets for the treatment of cardiometabolic disorders in obesity and hypertension.

  4. Cultured hypothalamic neurons are resistant to inflammation and insulin resistance induced by saturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Kim, Francis; Schwartz, Michael W; Wisse, Brent E

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation induced by high-fat feeding causes insulin and leptin resistance and contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity. Since in vitro exposure to saturated fatty acids causes inflammation and insulin resistance in many cultured cell types, we determined how cultured hypothalamic neurons respond to this stimulus. Two murine hypothalamic neuronal cell cultures, N43/5 and GT1-7, were exposed to escalating concentrations of saturated fatty acids for up to 24 h. Harvested cells were evaluated for activation of inflammation by gene expression and protein content. Insulin-treated cells were evaluated for induction of markers of insulin receptor signaling (p-IRS, p-Akt). In both hypothalamic cell lines, inflammation was induced by prototypical inflammatory mediators LPS and TNFalpha, as judged by induction of IkappaBalpha (3- to 5-fold) and IL-6 (3- to 7-fold) mRNA and p-IkappaBalpha protein, and TNFalpha pretreatment reduced insulin-mediated p-Akt activation by 30% (P saturated fatty acids on nonneuronal cells.

  5. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  6. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine

  7. Childhood Craniopharyngioma with Hypothalamic Obesity - No Long-term Weight Reduction due to Rehabilitation Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, A. S.; Hoffmann, A.; Gebhardt, U.; Waldeck, E.; Springer, S.; Mueller, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity due to hypothalamic involvement has major impact on prognosis in long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma. The long-term effects of rehabilitation efforts on weight development and obesity in these patients are not analyzed up to now. Patients and Methods: 108

  8. Relationship between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis and fatty acid metabolism in recurrent depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocking, Roel J T; Ruhe, Eric; Assies, Johanna; Lok, Anja; Koeter, Maarten W J; Visser, Ieke; Bockting, Claudi L H; Schene, Aart H

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activity and fatty acid (FA)-metabolism have been observed in (recurrent) major depressive disorder (MDD). Through the pathophysiological roles of FAs in the brain and cardiovascular system, a hypothesized relationship between HPA-axis activit

  9. Characterization of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis in familial longevity under resting conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.W.; Roelfsema, F.; Akintola, A.A.; Oei, N.Y.; Cobbaert, C.M.; Ballieux, B.E.; van der Grond, J.; Westendorp, R.G.; Pijl, H.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis is the most important neuro-endocrine stress response system of our body which is of critical importance for survival. Disturbances in HPA-axis activity have been associated with adverse metabolic and cognitive changes. Humans enriched for lon

  10. Nicotine induces negative energy balance through hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Morentin, Pablo B; Whittle, Andrew J; Fernø, Johan; Nogueiras, Rubén; Diéguez, Carlos; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; López, Miguel

    2012-04-01

    Smokers around the world commonly report increased body weight after smoking cessation as a major factor that interferes with their attempts to quit. Numerous controlled studies in both humans and rodents have reported that nicotine exerts a marked anorectic action. The effects of nicotine on energy homeostasis have been mostly pinpointed in the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms controlling its action are still not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its effect on energy balance. Here we demonstrate that nicotine-induced weight loss is associated with inactivation of hypothalamic AMPK, decreased orexigenic signaling in the hypothalamus, increased energy expenditure as a result of increased locomotor activity, increased thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and alterations in fuel substrate utilization. Conversely, nicotine withdrawal or genetic activation of hypothalamic AMPK in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus reversed nicotine-induced negative energy balance. Overall these data demonstrate that the effects of nicotine on energy balance involve specific modulation of the hypothalamic AMPK-BAT axis. These targets may be relevant for the development of new therapies for human obesity.

  11. Bile acids modulate glucocorticoid metabolism and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obstructive jaundice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNeilly, Alison D; Macfarlane, David P; O'Flaherty, Emmett

    2010-01-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis occurs in cirrhosis and cholestasis and is associated with increased concentrations of bile acids. We investigated whether this was mediated through bile acids acting to impair steroid clearance by inhibiting glucocorticoid metabolism by 5beta-reductase....

  12. Exercise in rats does not alter hypothalamic AMP-activated protein kinase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Nielsen, Jakob Nis

    2005-01-01

    or ran for 30 or 60 min on a treadmill (22 m/min, 10% slope) were sacrificed immediately after exercise or after 60 min recovery either in the fasted state or after oral gavage with glucose (3 g/kg body weight). Exercise decreased muscle and liver glycogen substantially. Hypothalamic total or a2...

  13. HPG-axis hormones during puberty : A study on the association with hypothalamic and pituitary volumes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peper, Jiska S.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; van Leeuwen, Marieke; Schnack, Hugo G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, Rene S.; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff

    2010-01-01

    Objective: During puberty, the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, leading to increases in luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and sex steroids (testosterone and estradiol) levels. We aimed to study the association between hypothalamic and pituitary volum

  14. Childhood craniopharyngioma: greater hypothalamic involvement before surgery is associated with higher homeostasis model insulin resistance index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sainte-Rose Christian

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity seems to be linked to the hypothalamic involvement in craniopharyngioma. We evaluated the pre-surgery relationship between the degree of this involvement on magnetic resonance imaging and insulin resistance, as evaluated by the homeostasis model insulin resistance index (HOMA. As insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, soluble leptin receptor (sOB-R and ghrelin may also be involved, we compared their plasma concentrations and their link to weight change. Methods 27 children with craniopharyngioma were classified as either grade 0 (n = 7, no hypothalamic involvement, grade 1 (n = 8, compression without involvement, or grade 2 (n = 12, severe involvement. Results Despite having similar body mass indexes (BMI, the grade 2 patients had higher glucose, insulin and HOMA before surgery than the grade 0 (P = 0.02, The data for the whole population before and 6–18 months after surgery showed increases in BMI (P Conclusion The hypothalamic involvement by the craniopharyngioma before surgery seems to determine the degree of insulin resistance, regardless of the BMI. The pre-surgery HOMA values were correlated with the post-surgery weight gain. This suggests that obesity should be prevented by reducing inn secretion in those cases with hypothalamic involvement.

  15. Genetic polymorphisms in the hypothalamic pathway in relation to subsequent weight change - the DIOGenes Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huaidong, D.U.; Vimaleswaran, K.S.; Angquist, L.; Hansen, R.D.; A, van der D.L.; Holst, C.; Tjonneland, A.; Overvad, K.; Uhre Jakobsen, M.; Boeing, H.; Meidtner, K.; Palli, D.; Masala, G.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Saris, W.H.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Wareham, N.J.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Loos, R.J.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the components involved in the hypothalamic pathway may influence weight gain and dietary factors may modify their effects. \\\\ Aim: We conducted a case-cohort study to investigate the associations of SNPs in candidate genes with

  16. Hypothalamic Pituitary Adrenal Axis Functioning in Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Duran, Nestor L.; Olson, Sheryl L.; Hajal, Nastassia J.; Felt, Barbara T.; Vazquez, Delia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) reactivity and proactive and reactive aggression in pre-pubertal children. After a 30-min controlled base line period, 73 7-year-old children (40 males and 33 females) were randomly assigned to one of two experimental tasks designed to…

  17. Sleep restriction alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meerlo, P; Koehl, M; van der Borght, K; Turek, FW

    2002-01-01

    Chronic sleep restriction is an increasing problem in many countries and may have many, as yet unknown, consequences for health and well being. Studies in both humans and rats suggest that sleep deprivation may activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, one of the main neuroendocrine st

  18. Single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shehaby, Amr M N; Reda, Wael A; Abdel Karim, Khaled M; Emad Eldin, Reem M; Nabeel, Ahmed M

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE Because of their critical and central location, it is deemed necessary to fractionate when considering irradiating optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas. Stereotactic fractionated radiotherapy is considered safer when dealing with gliomas in this location. In this study, the safety and efficacy of single-session stereotactic radiosurgery for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were reviewed. METHODS Between December 2004 and June 2014, 22 patients with optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas were treated by single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Twenty patients were available for follow-up for a minimum of 1 year after treatment. The patients were 5 to 43 years (median 16 years) of age. The tumor volume was 0.15 to 18.2 cm(3) (median 3.1 cm(3)). The prescription dose ranged from 8 to 14 Gy (median 11.5 Gy). RESULTS The mean follow-up period was 43 months. Five tumors involved the optic nerve only, and 15 tumors involved the chiasm/hypothalamus. Two patients died during the follow-up period. The tumors shrank in 12 cases, remained stable in 6 cases, and progressed in 2 cases, thereby making the tumor control rate 90%. Vision remained stable in 12 cases, improved in 6 cases, and worsened in 2 cases in which there was tumor progression. Progression-free survival was 83% at 3 years. CONCLUSIONS The initial results indicate that single-session Gamma Knife radiosurgery is a safe and effective treatment option for optic pathway/hypothalamic gliomas.

  19. Adolescent Survivors of Hurricane Katrina: A Pilot Study of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; Tucker, Phebe; Nitiéma, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Background: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis constitutes an important biological component of the stress response commonly studied through the measurement of cortisol. Limited research has examined HPA axis dysregulation in youth exposed to disasters. Objective: This study examined HPA axis activation in adolescent Hurricane Katrina…

  20. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Veltman, Dick J; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the hy

  1. Programming of hypothalamic energy balance gene expression in rats by maternal diet during pregnancy and lactation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cripps, R. L; Martin-Gronert, M. S; Archer, Z. A; Hales, C. N; Mercer, J. G; Ozanne, S. E

    2009-01-01

    .... Expression of hypothalamic energy balance genes was assessed using in situ hybridisation. Recuperated pups were smaller at birth, but caught up with controls by day 21 and gained more weight than controls between weaning and 12 weeks of age (p<0.05...

  2. Association of Obesity-Mediated Insulin Resistance and Hypothalamic Volumes: Possible Sex Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Ha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamus is important in hunger and metabolism. Although a lot is known about the basic role of the human hypothalamus, less is known about how the in vivo volume is affected in obesity, particularly among adolescents. Based on pediatric body mass index percentiles, 95 participants were assigned to lean or obese groups. All subjects had medical evaluations, including fasting blood tests, to assess insulin sensitivity and circulating CRP and neurotrophins (NGF and BDNF and an MRI of the brain. Hypothalamic volumes were measured by a segmentation method combining manual and automated steps. Overall, obese participants had descriptively smaller hypothalamic volumes, although this difference did not reach statistical significance; however, among obese participants, females had significantly smaller hypothalamic volumes than their male counterparts. There was a significant interaction between insulin resistance and sex on hypothalamus volume; obese females with significant insulin resistance have smaller hypothalamic volumes than obese males. Obese adolescents had higher circulating CRP and neurotrophin levels. Furthermore, among obese females, BDNF concentrations were inversely associated with hypothalamus volumes (r=−0.48. Given this negative association between BDNF and hypothalamus volumes among obese insulin-resistant females, elevated neurotrophin levels may suggest an attempt at protective compensation.

  3. Hypothalamic food intake regulation in a cancer-cachectic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Dijk, van M.; Dijk, F.J.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Faber, J.; Argiles, J.M.; Laviano, A.; Müller, M.R.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Appetite is frequently affected in cancer patients leading to anorexia and consequently insufficient food intake. In this study, we report on hypothalamic gene expression profile of a cancer-cachectic mouse model with increased food intake. In this model, mice bearing C26 tumour have an i

  4. Behavioral and endocrine responses of rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus (Brattleboro strain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohus, B.; Wimersma Greidanus, T.B. van; Wied, D. de

    1975-01-01

    Behavioral and endocrine profiles were established of homozygous (HO-DI) and heterozygous (HE-DI) rats with hereditary hypothalamic diabetes insipidus in comparison to Wistar strain rats. HO-DI rats were inferior in acquiring and maintaining active and passive avoidance behavior. Behavioral deficits

  5. Childhood Craniopharyngioma with Hypothalamic Obesity - No Long-term Weight Reduction due to Rehabilitation Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, A. S.; Hoffmann, A.; Gebhardt, U.; Waldeck, E.; Springer, S.; Mueller, H. L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Severe obesity due to hypothalamic involvement has major impact on prognosis in long-term survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma. The long-term effects of rehabilitation efforts on weight development and obesity in these patients are not analyzed up to now. Patients and Methods: 108 pa

  6. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity in older persons with and without a depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhebergen, D.; Korten, N. C. M.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.; Stek, M. L.; van der Mast, R. C.; Voshaar, R. Oude; Comijs, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Altered functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) has been associated with depression, but findings have been inconsistent. Among older depressed persons, both hyperactivity and hypo-activity of the HPA-axis were demonstrated. However, most studies were population

  7. Hypothalamic response to the chemo-signal androstadienone in gender dysphoric children and adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Sarah M; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; Veltman, Dick J; Klink, Daniel T; Bakker, J.

    2014-01-01

    The odorous steroid androstadienone, a putative male chemo-signal, was previously reported to evoke sex differences in hypothalamic activation in adult heterosexual men and women. In order to investigate whether puberty modulated this sex difference in response to androstadienone, we measured the

  8. Gallium-67 breast uptake in a patient with hypothalamic granuloma (sarcoid)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, R.; Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.; Fay, J.; Gale, D.R.

    1988-01-01

    An unusual case is presented of bilateral breast uptake of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate in a patient with a hypothalamic granuloma in the absence of galactorrhea is presented. A possible mechanism for this incidental finding is elevated prolactin levels, as other causes of gallium breast uptake such as drug therapy, and intrinsic breast disease, were not present.

  9. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and early onset of cannabis use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizink, Anja C.; Ferdinand, Robert F.; Ormel, Johan; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2006-01-01

    Aims To identify early onset cannabis users by measuring basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, which may be a risk factor for early onset substance use when showing low activity. Design In a prospective cohort study, adolescents who initiated cannabis use at an early age (9-12 ye

  10. Injection moulding antireflective nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Alexander Bruun; Clausen, Jeppe Sandvik; Mortensen, N. Asger

    in an injection moulding process, to fabricate the antireflective surfaces. The cycle-time was 35 s. The injection moulded structures had a height of 125 nm, and the visible spectrum reflectance of injection moulded black polypropylene surfaces was reduced from 4.5±0.5% to 2.5±0.5%. The gradient of the refractive...... index of the nanostructured surfaces was estimated from atomic force micrographs and the theoretical reflectance was calculated using the transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. The measured reflectance shows good agreement with the theory of graded index antireflective nanostructures...

  11. ALICE Injected Beam Accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2009-01-01

    The ALICE (point 2) interaction region is sensitive to beam orbit errors arising from magnet setting errors on injection. In this report, beam accident scenarios under injection for ALICE are described, focusing on ultra- fast error injection scenarios for the interaction straight correctors and dipoles. Beam 1 and beam 2 accident scenarios are considered, where the errors can lead to beam orbits striking the ALICE vacuum chamber or elements of the machine. The required thresholds for magnet current interlocks are calculated to avoid machine and detector risk.

  12. LHCb Injected Beam Accidents

    CERN Document Server

    Appleby, R B

    2009-01-01

    The LHCb (point 8) interaction region is sensitive to beam orbit errors arising from magnet setting errors on injection. In this report, beam accident scenarios under injection for LHCb are described, focusing on ultra- fast error injection scenarios for the interaction straight correctors and dipoles. Beam 1 and beam 2 accident scenarios are considered, where the errors can lead to beam orbits striking the LHCb vacuum chamber or elements of the machine. The required thresholds for magnet current interlocks are calculated to avoid machine and detector risk.

  13. Early metabolic programming of puberty onset: impact of changes in postnatal feeding and rearing conditions on the timing of puberty and development of the hypothalamic kisspeptin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Juan M; Bentsen, Agnete H; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel A; Ruiz-Pino, Francisco; Romero, Magdalena; Garcia-Galiano, David; Aguilar, Enrique; Pinilla, Leonor; Diéguez, Carlos; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Tena-Sempere, Manuel

    2011-09-01

    Kiss1 neurons have recently emerged as a putative conduit for the metabolic gating of reproduction, with leptin being a regulator of hypothalamic Kiss1 expression. Early perturbations of the nutritional status are known to predispose to different metabolic disorders later in life and to alter the timing of puberty; however, the potential underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. Here we report how changes in the pattern of postnatal feeding affect the onset of puberty and evaluate key hormonal and neuropeptide [Kiss1/kisspeptin (Kp)] alterations linked to these early nutritional manipulations. Female rats were raised in litters of different sizes: small (four pups per dam: overfeeding), normal (12 pups per dam), and large litters (20 pups per litter: underfeeding). Postnatal overfeeding resulted in persistently increased body weight and earlier age of vaginal opening, as an external sign of puberty, together with higher levels of leptin and hypothalamic Kiss1 mRNA. Conversely, postnatal underfeeding caused a persistent reduction in body weight, lower ovarian and uterus weights, and delayed vaginal opening, changes that were paralleled by a decrease in leptin and Kiss1 mRNA levels. Kisspeptin-52 immunoreactivity (Kp-IR) in the hypothalamus displayed similar patterns, with lower numbers of Kp-IR neurons in the arcuate nucleus of postnatally underfed animals, and a trend for increased Kp-positive fibers in the periventricular area of early overfed rats. Yet, gonadotropin responses to Kp at puberty were similar in all groups, except for enhanced responsiveness to low doses of Kp-10 in postnatally underfed rats. In conclusion, our data document that the timing of puberty is sensitive to both overfeeding and subnutrition during early (postnatal) periods and suggest that alterations in hypothalamic expression of Kiss1/kisspeptin may underlie at least part of such programming phenomenon.

  14. Common injections in musculoskeletal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monseau, Aaron J; Nizran, Parminder Singh

    2013-12-01

    Musculoskeletal injections are a common procedure in primary care and sports medicine but can be intimidating for some clinicians. This article addresses current evidence for corticosteroid injections, and common injection indications and techniques, namely knee, subacromial bursa, glenohumeral joint, lateral epicondyle, de Quervain tenosynovitis, and greater trochanteric bursa injections. Preparation for injections and some evidence for ultrasound guidance are also reviewed.

  15. Expanding indications for the extended endoscopic endonasal approach to hypothalamic gliomas: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Marucci, Gianluca; Acciarri, Nicola; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Object In the last decade the indications for the endoscopic endonasal approach have been progressively expanded to include lesions that have not been traditionally considered amenable to resection through the transsphenoidal route. In this study, the authors analyze their experience with hypothalamic gliomas treated via the endoscopic endonasal approach. Methods Consecutive cases of hypothalamic gliomas treated since 2007 via an endoscopic endonasal approach were reviewed. Preoperative and postoperative neuroimaging as well as endocrinological, neurological, and visual symptoms were analyzed to assess the surgical outcome. Signs and symptoms of hypothalamic dysfunction including body mass index (BMI), memory, sleep-wake rhythm, and polyphagia were prospectively collected pre- and postoperatively to assess hypothalamic function. Quality of life was evaluated using the Katz scale. Results In the initial phase the endoscopic endonasal approach was adopted in 3 cases with a palliative intent, to obtain a biopsy sample or for debulking of the mass followed by radio- or chemotherapy. In 2 later cases it was successfully adopted to achieve gross-total tumor resection. Complications consisted of 2 postoperative CSF leaks, which required an endoscopic endonasal reintervention. Visual deficit improved in 3 cases and normalized in the other 2. Four patients developed diabetes insipidus, and 3 an anterior panhypopituitarism. All patients had a moderate increase in BMI. No patients presented with any other signs of hypothalamic damage, and their quality of life at follow-up is normal. Conclusions Despite the limitations of a short follow-up and small sample, the authors' early experience with the endoscopic endonasal approach has revealed it to be a direct, straightforward, and safe approach to third ventricle astrocytomas. It allowed the authors to perform tumor resection with the same microsurgical technique: dissecting the tumor with 2 hands, performing a central debulking

  16. Fundus artery occlusion caused by cosmetic facial injections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Yanyun; Wang Wenying; Li Jipeng; Yu Yajie; Li Lin; Lu Ning

    2014-01-01

    Background With the increasing popularity of cosmetic facial filler injections in recent years,more and more associated complications have been reported.However,the causative surgical procedures and preventative measures have not been studied well up to now.The aim of this stady was to investigate the clinical characteristics and visual prognosis of fundus artery occlusion resulting from cosmetic facial filler injections.Methods Thirteen consecutive patients with fundus artery occlusion caused by facial filler injections were included.Main outcome measures were filler materials,injection sites,best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA),fundus fluorescein angiography,and associated ocular and systemic manifestations.Results Eleven patients had ophthalmic artery occlusion (OAO) and one patient each had central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO) and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION).Injected materials included autologous fat (seven cases),hyaluronic acid (five cases),and bone collagen (one case).Injection sites were the frontal area (five cases),periocular area (two cases),temple area (two cases),and nose area and nasal area (4 cases).Injected autologous fat was associated with worse final BCVA than hyaluronic acid.The BCVA of seven patients with autologous fat injection in frontal area and temple area was no light perception.Most of the patients with OAO had ocular pain,headache,ptosis,ophthalmoplegia,and no improvement in final BCVA.Conclusions Cosmetic facial injections can cause fundus artery occlusion.Autologous fat injection tends to be associated with painful blindness,ptosis,ophthalmoplegia,and poor visual outcomes.The prognosis is much worse with autologous fat injection than hyaluronic acid injection.

  17. IncobotulinumtoxinA Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injected into a muscle, it blocks the nerve signals that cause uncontrollable tightening and movements of the ... any of these symptoms, do not drive a car, operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities.if ...

  18. Amphotericin B Liposomal Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lining of the spinal cord and brain) and visceral leishmaniasis (a parasitic disease that usually affects spleen, ... complex injection: fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, flushing, back pain with or without chest tightness, chest pain, shortness ...

  19. Litter size variation in hypothalamic gene expression determines adult metabolic phenotype in Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Ying Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10-12 and small (3-4 litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii, a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood.

  20. Injection and Dump Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bracco, C; Barnes, M J; Carlier, E; Drosdal, L N; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Meddahi, M; Mertens, V; Uythoven, J

    2012-01-01

    Performance and failures of the LHC injection and ex- traction systems are presented. In particular, a comparison with the 2010 run, lessons learnt during operation with high intensity beams and foreseen upgrades are described. UFOs, vacuum and impedance problems related to the injection and extraction equipment are analysed together with possible improvements and solutions. New implemented features, diagnostics, critical issues of XPOC and IQC applications are addressed.

  1. Metabolic regulation of lateral hypothalamic glucose-inhibited orexin neurons may influence midbrain reward neurocircuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zhenyu; Santiago, Ammy M; Thomas, Mark P; Routh, Vanessa H

    2014-09-01

    Lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin neurons modulate reward-based feeding by activating ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons. We hypothesize that signals of peripheral energy status influence reward-based feeding by modulating the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin glucose-inhibited (GI) neurons. This hypothesis was tested using electrophysiological recordings of LHA orexin-GI neurons in brain slices from 4 to 6week old male mice whose orexin neurons express green fluorescent protein (GFP) or putative VTA-DA neurons from C57Bl/6 mice. Low glucose directly activated ~60% of LHA orexin-GFP neurons in both whole cell and cell attached recordings. Leptin indirectly reduced and ghrelin directly enhanced the activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by glucose decreases from 2.5 to 0.1mM by 53±12% (n=16, PFasting increased activation of LHA orexin-GI neurons by decreased glucose, as would be predicted by these hormonal effects. We also evaluated putative VTA-DA neurons in a novel horizontal slice preparation containing the LHA and VTA. Decreased glucose increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents (sEPSCs; 125 ± 40%, n=9, P<0.05) and action potentials (n=9; P<0.05) in 45% (9/20) of VTA DA neurons. sEPSCs were completely blocked by AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX 20 μM, n=4; APV 20μM, n=4; respectively), demonstrating that these sEPSCs were mediated by glutamatergic transmission onto VTA DA neurons. Orexin-1 but not 2 receptor antagonism with SB334867 (10μM; n=9) and TCS-OX2-29 (2μM; n=5), respectively, blocks the effects of decreased glucose on VTA DA neurons. Thus, decreased glucose increases orexin-dependent excitatory glutamate neurotransmission onto VTA DA neurons. These data suggest that the glucose sensitivity of LHA orexin-GI neurons links metabolic state and reward-based feeding.

  2. Results and analysis of the 2008-2009 Insulin Injection Technique Questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Coninck, Carina; Frid, Anders; Gaspar, Ruth; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Larry; Kreugel, Gillian; Liersch, Jutta; Letondeur, Corinne; Sauvanet, Jean-Pierre; Tubiana, Nadia; Strauss, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    Background: The efficacy of injection therapy in diabetes depends on correct injection technique and, to provide patients with guidance in this area, we must understand how they currently inject. Methods: From September 2008 to June 2009, 4352 insulin-injecting Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic patients fr

  3. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  4. Syringe injectable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  5. Area postrema lesions produce feeding deficits in the rat: effects of preoperative dieting and 2-deoxy-D-glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, R J; Fox, E; Drugovich, M L

    1982-11-01

    To investigate the possible role of the area postrema (AP) in the control of food intake and body weight, male albino rats were divided into four groups: (a) animals dieted to 80% of their original body weights prior to receiving AP lesions, (b) nondieted animals with AP lesions, (c) animals dieted to 80% prior to receiving sham lesions, and (d) nondieted animals with sham lesions. Lesions of the AP in nondieted rats resulted in hypophagia, hypodipsia and body weight loss followed by recovery of normal intake and maintenance of body weight at a fixed percentage of the sham operated animals' weight. Reducing body weight prior to surgery led to body weight maintenance levels equivalent to those of the nondieted groups. We also tested the animals for sensitivity to glucoprivation caused by intraperitoneal injections of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG). Injections of 2-DG produced hyperphagia in sham lesioned rats, but not in rats with AP lesions. Our data suggest that the effects of AP lesions on intake and body weight are similar, in several important respects, to the lateral hypothalamic feeding syndrome and to the effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. We discuss the results with respect to hierarchical levels of neural circuitry involved in controlling feeding behavior.

  6. Hypothalamic fatty acid sensing in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis): response to long-chain saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated (n-3) fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde-Sieira, Marta; Bonacic, Kruno; Velasco, Cristina; Valente, Luisa M P; Morais, Sofia; Soengas, José L

    2015-12-15

    We assessed the presence of fatty acid (FA)-sensing mechanisms in hypothalamus of Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) and investigated their sensitivity to FA chain length and/or level of unsaturation. Stearate (SA, saturated FA), oleate (OA, monounsaturated FA of the same chain length), α-linolenate [ALA, a n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) of the same chain length], and eicosapentanoate (EPA, a n-3 PUFA of a larger chain length) were injected intraperitoneally. Parameters related to FA sensing and neuropeptide expression in the hypothalamus were assessed after 3 h and changes in accumulated food intake after 4, 24, and 48 h. Three FA sensing systems characterized in rainbow trout were also found in Senegalese sole and were activated by OA in a way similar to that previously characterized in rainbow trout and mammals. These hypothalamic FA sensing systems were also activated by ALA, differing from mammals, where n-3 PUFAs do not seem to activate FA sensors. This might suggest additional roles and highlights the importance of n-3 PUFA in fish diets, especially in marine species. The activation of FA sensing seems to be partially dependent on acyl chain length and degree of saturation, as no major changes were observed after treating fish with SA or EPA. The activation of FA sensing systems by OA and ALA, but not SA or EPA, is further reflected in the expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the control of food intake. Both OA and ALA enhanced anorexigenic capacity compatible with the activation of FA sensing systems.

  7. Intestinal fatty acid infusion modulates food preference as well as calorie intake via the vagal nerve and midbrain-hypothalamic neural pathways in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Nobuya; Ito, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Hideki; Shiuchi, Tetsuya; Okamoto, Shiki; Wakitani, Korekiyo; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2012-09-01

    The intestine plays important roles in the regulation of feeding behavior by sensing macronutrients. Intestinal fatty acids strongly suppress food intake, but little is known about whether intestinal fatty acids affect food preference. We investigated the effects of jejunal fatty acids infusion on food preference by conducting two-diet choice experiments in rats fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and a high-carbohydrate diet (HCD). Jejunal linoleic acid (18:2) infusion reduced HFD intake dose-dependently, while HCD intake increased with the middle dose of the infusion we examined (100 μL/h) and reduced to the control level with the higher doses (150 and 200 μL/h). α-Linolenic acid (18:3), but not caprylic acid (8:0), altered the food preference and total calorie intake in the same manner as linoleic acid. Linoleic acid infusion dose-dependently increased plasma glucagon-like peptide-1, peptide YY and cholecystokinin levels, but not ghrelin levels. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy or midbrain transection prevented the change in food preference and total calorie intake by linoleic acid infusion. Jejunal linoleic acid infusion increased norepinephrine turnover in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, while intracerebroventricular injection of idazoxan, an α2-adrenergic receptor (AR) antagonist, suppressed the increased HCD intake, but did not affect the decreased HFD intake. These findings indicated that intestinal long-chain fatty acids modulated food preference as well as total calorie intake via the vagal nerve and midbrain-hypothalamic neural pathways. The effects of the α2-AR antagonist in the brain suggested that the brain distinctly controlled HCD and HFD intake in response to jejunal linoleic acid infusion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Defining global gene expression changes of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in female sGnRH-antisense transgenic common carp (Cyprinus carpio.

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    Jing Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis is critical in the development and regulation of reproduction in fish. The inhibition of neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH expression may diminish or severely hamper gonadal development due to it being the key regulator of the axis, and then provide a model for the comprehensive study of the expression patterns of genes with respect to the fish reproductive system. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a previous study we injected 342 fertilized eggs from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio with a gene construct that expressed antisense sGnRH. Four years later, we found a total of 38 transgenic fish with abnormal or missing gonads. From this group we selected the 12 sterile females with abnormal ovaries in which we combined suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH and cDNA microarray analysis to define changes in gene expression of the HPG axis in the present study. As a result, nine, 28, and 212 genes were separately identified as being differentially expressed in hypothalamus, pituitary, and ovary, of which 87 genes were novel. The number of down- and up-regulated genes was five and four (hypothalamus, 16 and 12 (pituitary, 119 and 93 (ovary, respectively. Functional analyses showed that these genes involved in several biological processes, such as biosynthesis, organogenesis, metabolism pathways, immune systems, transport links, and apoptosis. Within these categories, significant genes for neuropeptides, gonadotropins, metabolic, oogenesis and inflammatory factors were identified. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study indicated the progressive scaling-up effect of hypothalamic sGnRH antisense on the pituitary and ovary receptors of female carp and provided comprehensive data with respect to global changes in gene expression throughout the HPG signaling pathway, contributing towards improving our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and regulative pathways in the

  9. Transient gastric irritation in the neonatal rats leads to changes in hypothalamic CRF expression, depression- and anxiety-like behavior as adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liansheng Liu

    Full Text Available AIMS: A disturbance of the brain-gut axis is a prominent feature in functional bowel disorders (such as irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia and psychological abnormalities are often implicated in their pathogenesis. We hypothesized that psychological morbidity in these conditions may result from gastrointestinal problems, rather than causing them. METHODS: Functional dyspepsia was induced by neonatal gastric irritation in male rats. 10-day old male Sprague-Dawley rats received 0.1% iodoacetamide (IA or vehicle by oral gavage for 6 days. At 8-10 weeks of age, rats were tested with sucrose preference and forced-swimming tests to examine depression-like behavior. Elevated plus maze, open field and light-dark box tests were used to test anxiety-like behaviors. ACTH and corticosterone responses to a minor stressor, saline injection, and hypothalamic CRF expression were also measured. RESULTS: Behavioral tests revealed changes of anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in IA-treated, but not control rats. As compared with controls, hypothalamic and amygdaloid CRF immunoreactivity, basal levels of plasma corticosterone and stress-induced ACTH were significantly higher in IA-treated rats. Gastric sensory ablation with resiniferatoxin had no effect on behaviors but treatment with CRF type 1 receptor antagonist, antalarmin, reversed the depression-like behavior in IA-treated rats CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that transient gastric irritation in the neonatal period can induce a long lasting increase in depression- and anxiety-like behaviors, increased expression of CRF in the hypothalamus, and an increased sensitivity of HPA axis to stress. The depression-like behavior may be mediated by the CRF1 receptor. These findings have significant implications for the pathogenesis of psychological co-morbidity in patients with functional bowel disorders.

  10. Altered functional resting-state hypothalamic connectivity and abnormal pituitary morphology in children with Prader-Willi syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Lukoshe (Akvile); Van Dijk, S.E. (Suzanne E.); G.E. van den Bosch (Gerbrich); A. van der Lugt (Aad); T.J.H. White (Tonya); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder, characterized by endocrine problems and hyperphagia, indicating hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. However, few studies have explored the underlying neurobiology of the hypothalamus and its functional conn

  11. Effects of morphine on hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine and dopamine in non-stressed and stressed rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suemaru,Shuso

    1985-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of morphine on the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF, norepinephrine (NE and dopamine (DA concentrations were investigated in non-stressed and stressed rats. Acutely administered morphine stimulated both the synthesis and release of CRF in the hypothalamus, thereby activating the pituitary-adrenocortical system in non-stressed rats, but inhibited the stress-induced CRF synthesis and ACTH-corticosterone secretion. Either a morphine or ether-laparotomy stress reduced NE and DA concentrations in the hypothalamus. A pretreatment with morphine inhibited the stress-induced reduction in the hypothalamic NE and DA concentrations, and induced a significant increase in the DA concentration. These observations suggest that hypothalamic NE and DA are involved in morphine-induced changes in hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA activity and that endogenous opiates have a role in regulating CRF secretion by interacting with hypothalamic biogenic amines.

  12. Reduced fasting-induced activation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons is associated with hyperleptinemia and increased leptin sensitivity in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becskei, Csilla; Lutz, Thomas A; Riediger, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Fasting increases c-Fos expression in neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in lean, but not in hyperleptinemic mice with late-onset obesity (LOO). Although obesity is associated with leptin resistance, we hypothesized that under fasting conditions, leptin sensitivity might be restored and that hyperleptinemia may counteract the neuronal response to fasting. We investigated whether the reduced fasting response of ARC neurons in LOO is paralleled by an increase in leptin sensitivity, as measured by leptin-induced STAT-3 phosphorylation. To assess leptin's role in the modulation of the fasting-induced ARC activation, we investigated c-Fos responses and hormone and metabolite levels in hyperleptinemic diet-induced obese (DIO) and in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Leptin induced a stronger STAT-3 phosphorylation in fasted LOO and lean mice than in ad libitum-fed animals. Similar to LOO, hyperleptinemic DIO mice showed no c-Fos response after fasting, while ob/ob mice showed a stronger response than lean control mice. Mimicking hyperleptinemia by repeated leptin injections in lean mice during fasting attenuated the fasting-induced c-Fos expression. Our findings indicate that high leptin levels prevent the fasting-induced activation of ARC neurons in mice. Moreover, leptin sensitivity is dynamic in obese subjects and depends on the feeding status. During short-term increases in leptin sensitivity, e.g., during fasting, leptin signaling appears to be effective, even in hyperleptinemic obesity. As reflected by the blockade of the fasting-induced ARC activation, fasting seems to interfere with the responsiveness of the ARC to signals related to the status of energy intake.

  13. The decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion induced by suckling: comparison of voltammetric and radioisotopic methods of measurement. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotsky, P.M.; Neill, J.D.

    1982-03-01

    Previous in situ voltammetric microelectrode measurements of median eminence dopamine release during mammary nerve stimulation of anesthetized lactating rats revealed a transient (1-3 min) 70% decline of dopamine concentrations. This dopamine was believed to be destined for secretion into the hypophysial portal circulation, but direct experimental support for this supposition was lacking. Thus, in the present study, (3H)dopamine release into brief sequential samples of hypophysial portal blood was compared with dopamine release in the median eminence measured by voltammetry. Lactating female rats were urethane anesthetized, and the median eminence pituitary region was exposed. (3H)Tyrosine was injected into a jugular cannula (100 microCi) followed by continuous infusion (5 microCi/min). In a preliminary experiment, this regimen produced a steady state level of (3H)dopamine in the portal blood within 45 min. In subsequent experiments, portal blood was collected as sequential 3-min samples, and electrochemical sampling from a microelectrode placed in the median eminence occurred at 1-min intervals. Electrochemical current resulting from the oxidation of dopamine in the medial median eminence was unvarying throughout the 75-min experiment in control rats (n . 4) and during the 30-min control period preceding mammary nerve stimulation in the other group (n . 4). These results were paralled by (3H) dopamine levels in portal blood during the same periods of time. All animals showed simultaneous decreases in oxidation current and (3H)dopamine levels within 1-4 min after initiation of mammary nerve stimulation. These and earlier results demonstrate that mammary nerve stimulation (and by extension, suckling) induces a momentary, but profound, decrease in hypothalamic dopamine secretion which precedes or accompanies the rise in PRL secretion evoked by the same stimulus.

  14. Hypothalamic-specific manipulation of Fto, the ortholog of the human obesity gene FTO, affects food intake in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Loraine Tung

    Full Text Available Sequence variants in the first intron of FTO are strongly associated with human obesity and human carriers of the risk alleles show evidence for increased appetite and food intake. Mice globally lacking Fto display a complex phenotype characterised by both increased energy expenditure and increased food intake. The site of action of FTO on energy balance is unclear. Fasting reduces levels of Fto mRNA in the arcuate nucleus (ARC of the hypothalamus, a site where Fto expression is particularly high. In this study, we have extended this nutritional link by demonstrating that consumption of a high fat diet (45% results in a 2.5 fold increase in Arc Fto expression. We have further explored the role of hypothalamic Fto in the control of food intake by using stereotactic injections coupled with AAV technology to bi-directionally modulate Fto expression. An over expression of Fto protein by 2.5-fold in the ARC results in a 14% decrease in average daily food intake in the first week. In contrast, knocking down Arc Fto expression by 40% increases food intake by 16%. mRNA levels of Agrp, Pomc and Npy, ARC-expressed genes classically associated with the control of food intake, were not affected by the manipulation of Fto expression. However, over expression of Fto resulted in a 4-fold increase in the mRNA levels of Stat3, a signalling molecule critical for leptin receptor signalling, suggesting a possible candidate for the mediation of Fto's actions. These data provide further support for the notion that FTO itself can influence key components of energy balance, and is therefore a strong candidate for the mediation of the robust association between FTO intronic variants and adiposity. Importantly, this provide the first indication that selective alteration of FTO levels in the hypothalamus can influence food intake, a finding consistent with the reported effects of FTO alleles on appetite and food intake in man.

  15. Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and blood pressure in mature male guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjanin, Sonja; Kapoor, Amita; Matthews, Stephen G

    2004-07-01

    Pregnant guinea pigs were treated with dexamethasone (1 mg kg(-1)) or vehicle on days 40-41, 50-51 and 60-61 of gestation, after which animals delivered normally. Adult male offspring were catheterized at 145 days of age and subjected to tests of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in basal and activated states. Animals exposed to dexamethasone in utero (mat-dex) exhibited increased hippocampus-to-brain weight ratio, increased adrenal-to-body weight ratio and increased mean arterial pressure. There were no effects on gestation length, birth weight and postnatal growth. There were no overall differences in diurnal plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol profiles, though there were subtle differences during the subjective afternoon between control and mat-dex offspring. A significant decrease in initial ACTH suppression was observed following dexamethasone injection in mat-dex offspring compared to control offspring. Molecular analysis revealed significantly increased MR mRNA expression in the limbic system and particularly in the dentate gyrus in mat-dex offspring. In the anterior pituitary, both pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA levels were significantly elevated in mat-dex offspring. In conclusion, (1) repeated prenatal treatment with synthetic glucocorticoid (sGC) permanently programmes organ growth, blood pressure and HPA regulation in mature male offspring and these changes involve modification of corticosteroid receptor expression in the brain and pituitary; (2) the effects of prenatal sGC exposure on HPA function appear to change as a function of age, indicating the importance of investigating HPA and cardiovascular outcome at multiple time points throughout life.

  16. Estrogen alters baseline and inflammatory-induced cytokine levels independent from hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivers, Kai-Yvonne; Amador, Nicole; Abrams, Lisa; Hunter, Deirtra; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2015-04-01

    Although estrogen reduces inflammatory-mediated pain responses, the mechanisms behind its effects are unclear. This study investigated if estrogen modulates inflammatory signaling by reducing baseline or inflammation-induced cytokine levels in the injury-site, serum, dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and/or spinal cord. We further tested whether estrogen effects on cytokine levels are in part mediated through hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation. Lumbar DRG, spinal cord, serum, and hind paw tissue were analyzed for cytokine levels in 17β-estradiol-(20%) or vehicle-(100% cholesterol) treated female rats following ovariectomy/sham adrenalectomy (OVX), adrenalectomy/sham ovariectomy (ADX) or ADX+OVX operation at baseline and post formalin injection. Formalin significantly increased pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-6 levels in the paw, as well as pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels in the DRG, spinal cord and serum in comparison to naïve conditions. Estrogen replacement significantly increased anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in the DRG. Centrally, estradiol significantly decreased pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β levels, as well as IL-10 levels, in the spinal cord in comparison to cholesterol treatment. At both sites, most estradiol modulatory effects occurred irrespective of pain or surgical condition. Estradiol alone had no influence on cytokine release in the paw or serum, indicating that estrogen effects were site-specific. Although cytokine levels were altered between surgical conditions at baseline and following formalin administration, ADX operation did not significantly reverse estradiol's modulation of cytokine levels. These results suggest that estrogen directly regulates cytokines independent of HPA axis activity in vivo, in part by reducing cytokine levels in the spinal cord.

  17. The impact of adipose tissue-derived factors on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsatsanis, Christos; Dermitzaki, Eirini; Avgoustinaki, Pavlina; Malliaraki, Niki; Mytaras, Vasilis; Margioris, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue produces factors, including adipokines, cytokines and chemokines which, when released, systemically exert endocrine effects on multiple tissues thereby affecting their physiology. Adipokines also affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis both centrally, at the hypothalamic-pituitary level, and peripherally acting on the gonads themselves. Among the adipokines, leptin, adiponectin, resistin, chemerin and the peptide kisspeptin have pleiotropic actions on the HPG axis affecting male and female fertility. Furthermore, adipokines and adipose tissue-produced factors readily affect the immune system resulting in inflammation, which in turn impact the HPG axis, thus evidencing a link between metabolic inflammation and fertility. In this review we provide an overview of the existing extensive bibliography on the crosstalk between adipose tissue-derived factors and the HPG axis, with particular focus on the impact of obesity and the metabolic syndrome on gonadal function and fertility.

  18. Function of hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian system in radiation treatment of patients with cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modnikov, O.P. (Kirgizskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Onkologii i Radiologii, Frunze (USSR))

    1984-08-01

    Radioimmunoassay of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian interrelationships was performed in 87 patients with cervical cancer and 37 practically healthy women. The basal level of the follicle-stimulating hormone (ESH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and estradiol as well as their response to the administration of the releasing factor of the hypothalamus (luliberin) were studied. Some disorders that manifested themselves in the decreased level of estradiol, were established in the patients with cervical cancer even before irradiation. Concomitant radiation therapy resulted in pronounced changes in the activities of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian system that manifested themselves in the lowered rate of LH increment in response to the administration of luliberin and the absence of estradiol response to the load. These changes persisted long after the termination of concomitant radiation therapy.

  19. Microglia Dictate the Impact of Saturated Fat Consumption on Hypothalamic Inflammation and Neuronal Function

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    Martin Valdearcos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Diets rich in saturated fat produce inflammation, gliosis, and neuronal stress in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH. Here, we show that microglia mediate this process and its functional impact. Although microglia and astrocytes accumulate in the MBH of mice fed a diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs, only the microglia undergo inflammatory activation, along with a buildup of hypothalamic SFAs. Enteric gavage specifically with SFAs reproduces microglial activation and neuronal stress in the MBH, and SFA treatment activates murine microglia, but not astrocytes, in culture. Moreover, depleting microglia abrogates SFA-induced inflammation in hypothalamic slices. Remarkably, depleting microglia from the MBH of mice abolishes inflammation and neuronal stress induced by excess SFA consumption, and in this context, microglial depletion enhances leptin signaling and reduces food intake. We thus show that microglia sense SFAs and orchestrate an inflammatory process in the MBH that alters neuronal function when SFA consumption is high.

  20. In situ hybridization of oxytocin messenger RNA: macroscopic distribution and quantitation in rat hypothalamic cell groups

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    Burbach, J.P.; Voorhuis, T.A.; van Tol, H.H.; Ivell, R.

    1987-05-29

    Oxytocin mRNA was detected in the rat hypothalamus by in situ hybridization to a single stranded /sup 35/S-labelled DNA probe and the distribution of oxytocin mRNA-containing cell groups was studied at the macroscopic level. Specificity of hybridization was confirmed by comparison to vasopressin mRNA hybridization in parallel tissue sections. Cell groups containing oxytocin mRNA were confined to a set of hypothalamic cell groups, i.c. the supraoptic, paraventricular, anterior commissural nuclei, nucleus circularis and scattered hypothalamic islets. These cell groups displayed similar densities of autoradiographic signals indicating that the oxytocin gene is expressed at approximately the same average level at these various sites.