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Sample records for hypomorphic telomerase mutations

  1. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baple, Emma L; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K; Last, James I; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Jackson, Andrew P; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R; Green, Catherine M; Crosby, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA's interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration.

  2. TERT promoter mutations and telomerase reactivation in urothelial cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Borah, Sumit; Xi, Linghe; Zaug, Arthur J.; Powell, Natasha M.; Dancik, Garrett M.; Cohen, Scott; James C Costello; Theodorescu, Dan; Cech, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase, the chromosome end-replicating enzyme, drives human cell immortality and cancer. Point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene promoter occur at high frequency in multiple cancers, including urothelial cancer (UC), but their impact on telomerase function has been unclear. In a study of 23 human UC cell lines, we show that these promoter mutations correlate with higher levels of TERT mRNA, TERT protein, telomerase enzymatic activity and telomer...

  3. Hypomorphic mutations identified in the candidate Leber congenital amaurosis gene CLUAP1.

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    Soens, Zachry T; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Li; Eblimit, Aiden; Dharmat, Rachayata; Li, Yumei; Chen, Yiyun; Naqeeb, Mohammed; Fajardo, Norma; Lopez, Irma; Sun, Zhaoxia; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2016-10-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an early-onset form of retinal degeneration. Six of the 22 known LCA genes encode photoreceptor ciliary proteins. Despite the identification of 22 LCA genes, the genetic basis of ~30% of LCA patients remains unknown. We sought to investigate the cause of disease in the remaining 30% by examining cilia-associated genes. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on an LCA cohort of 212 unsolved probands previously screened for mutations in known retinal-disease genes. Immunohistochemistry using mouse retinas was used to confirm protein localization and zebrafish were used to perform rescue experiments. A homozygous nonsynonymous mutation was found in a single proband in CLUAP1, a gene required for ciliogenesis and cilia maintenance. Cluap1 knockout zebrafish exhibit photoreceptor cell death as early as 5 days after fertilization, and rescue experiments revealed that our proband's mutation is significantly hypomorphic. Consistent with the knowledge that CLUAP1 plays an important role in cilia function and that cilia are critical to photoreceptor function, our results indicate that hypomorphic mutations in CLUAP1 can result in dysfunctional photoreceptors without systemic abnormalities. This is the first report linking mutations in CLUAP1 to human disease and establishes CLUAP1 as a candidate LCA gene.Genet Med 18 10, 1044-1051.

  4. Hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 in human results in a late onset immunodeficiency and no autoimmunity.

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    Picard, Capucine; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Chemin, Karine; Maciorowski, Zofia; Lim, Annick; Mazerolles, Fabienne; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Debre, Marianne; Magny, Jean-Paul; Le Deist, Françoise; Fischer, Alain; Hivroz, Claire

    2009-07-01

    Complete lack of function of the tyrosine kinase ZAP70 in humans results in a severe immunodeficiency, characterized by a lack of mature CD8(+) T cells and non-functional CD4(+) T cells. We report herein an immunodeficiency with an inherited hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 due to a single G-to-A substitution in a non-coding intron. This mutation introduces a new acceptor splice site and allows low levels of normal alternative splicing and of WT ZAP70 expression. This partial deficiency results in a compromised TCR signaling that was totally restored by increased expression of ZAP70, demonstrating that defective activation of the patient T cells was indeed caused by the low level of ZAP70 expression. This partial ZAP70 deficiency was associated with an attenuated clinical and immunological phenotype as compared with complete ZAP70 deficiency. CD4(+) helper T-cell populations including, follicular helper T cells, Th1, Th17 and Treg were detected in the blood. Finally, the patient had no manifestation of autoimmunity suggesting that the T-cell tolerogenic functions were not compromised, in contrast to what has been observed in mice carrying hypomorphic mutations of Zap70. This report extends the phenotype spectrum of ZAP70 deficiency with a residual function of ZAP70.

  5. A Rare Form of Retinal Dystrophy Caused by Hypomorphic Nonsense Mutations in CEP290.

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    Roosing, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P M; Riemslag, Frans C C; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N; Talsma, Herman E; Klessens-Godfroy, Francoise J M; den Hollander, Anneke I; van den Born, L Ingeborgh

    2017-08-22

    To identify the gene defect and to study the clinical characteristics and natural course of disease in a family originally diagnosed with oligocone trichromacy (OT), a rare congenital cone dysfunction syndrome. Extensive clinical and ophthalmologic assessment was performed on two siblings with OT and long-term follow up data were analyzed. Subsequently, whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequence analysis of CEP290 was performed in the two siblings. Additionally, the identified CEP290 mutations were analyzed in persons with achromatopsia (ACHM) (n = 23) and autosomal recessive or isolated cone dystrophy (CD; n = 145). In the first decade of life, the siblings were diagnosed with OT based on low visual acuity, photophobia, nystagmus, and absent cone response on electroretinography , but with normal color discrimination. Over time, the phenotype of OT evolved to a progressive degenerative disease without any CEP290-associated non-ocular features. In both siblings, two nonsense mutations (c.451C>T; p.(Arg151*) and c.4723A>T; p.(Lys1575*)) in CEP290 were found. Previously, p.(Arg151*) was demonstrated to induce nonsense-mediated alternative splicing events leading to intact open reading frames of the resulting mRNA products (p.(Leu148_Glu165del) and p.(Leu148_Lys172del)). mRNA analysis for p.(Lys1575*) confirmed a suspected hypomorphic character, as exon 36 skipping was observed in a small fraction of CEP290 mRNA, resulting in a 36 aa in-frame deletion (p.(Glu1569_Trp1604del)). No additional cases carrying these variants were identified in the ACHM and CD cohorts. Compound heterozygous hypomorphic mutations in CEP290 may lead to a rare form of cone-dominated retinal dystrophy, a novel phenotype belonging to the CEP290-associated spectrum of ciliopathies. These findings provide insight into the effect of CEP290 mutations on the clinical phenotype.

  6. Kras mutations increase telomerase activity and targeting telomerase is a promising therapeutic strategy for Kras-mutant NSCLC

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Weiran; Yin, Yuesong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Bowen; Zhang, Lianmin; Qian, Dong; Li, Chenguang; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Shengguang; Zhu, Jinfang; Gao, Liuwei; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Bin; Hao, Ligang; Wang, Changli

    2016-01-01

    As shortened telomeres inhibit tumor formation and prolong life span in a KrasG12D mouse lung cancer model, we investigated the implications of telomerase in Kras-mutant NSCLC. We found that Kras mutations increased TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) mRNA expression and telomerase activity and telomere length in both immortalized bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (Calu-3). MEK inhibition led to reduced TERT expression and telomerase activity. Furthermore,...

  7. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is due to hypomorphic mutations of the SUMF1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Ida; Bouchè, Valentina; Lombardi, Alessia; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Sulfatases catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds from a wide variety of substrates and are implicated in several human inherited diseases. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the simultaneous deficiency of all known sulfatases. MSD is caused by mutations in the Sulfatase Modifying Factor 1 (SUMF1) gene encoding the alpha-formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which is responsible for the post-translational modification of sulfatases. In all MSD patients, residual sulfatase activities are detectable, at variable levels. To correlate the nature of the residual sulfatase activities detected in MSD patients with residual FGE activity, four FGE mutants (i.e. p.S155P, p.R224W, p.R345C, p.R349W) found in homozygosis in MSD patients were analyzed. Using viral-mediated gene delivery, these mutants were over-expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from a recently developed Sumf1 KO mouse line which is completely devoid of all sulfatase activities. The results obtained indicate that mutant SUMF1 cDNAs encode stable SUMF1 proteins which are of the appropriate molecular weight and are properly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of these cDNAs in Sumf1-/- MEFs results in partial rescue of sulfatase activities. These data indicate that MSD is due to hypomorphic SUMF1 mutations and suggest that complete loss of SUMF1 function is likely to be lethal in humans. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies

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    Radoslava Vazharova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.. The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS.

  9. Cancer-Specific Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT Promoter Mutations: Biological and Clinical Implications

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    Tiantian Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulated evidence has pointed to a key role of telomerase in carcinogenesis. As a RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA at the end of linear chromosomes, and attenuates or prevents telomere erosion associated with cell divisions. By lengthening telomeres, telomerase extends cellular life-span or even induces immortalization. Consistent with its functional activity, telomerase is silent in most human normal somatic cells while active only in germ-line, stem and other highly proliferative cells. In contrast, telomerase activation widely occurs in human cancer and the enzymatic activity is detectable in up to 90% of malignancies. Recently, hotspot point mutations in the regulatory region of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene, encoding the core catalytic component of telomerase, was identified as a novel mechanism to activate telomerase in cancer. This review discusses the cancer-specific TERT promoter mutations and potential biological and clinical significances.

  10. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential...... for detection of recurrences in urine in patients with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A set of 111 UBCs of different stages was used to assess TERT promoter mutations by Sanger sequencing and TERT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription...... surveillance after diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive UBC (n=194), was tested using a SNaPshot assay. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Association of mutation status with age, sex, tobacco, stage, grade, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation, progression-free survival, disease...

  11. Telomere lengths, pulmonary fibrosis and telomerase (TERT mutations.

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    Alberto Diaz de Leon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase is an enzyme that catalyzes the addition of nucleotides on the ends of chromosomes. Rare loss of function mutations in the gene that encodes the protein component of telomerase (TERT have been described in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. Here we examine the telomere lengths and pulmonary fibrosis phenotype seen in multiple kindreds with heterozygous TERT mutations.We have identified 134 individuals with heterozygous TERT mutations from 21 unrelated families. Available medical records, surgical lung biopsies and radiographs were evaluated retrospectively. Genomic DNA isolated from circulating leukocytes has been used to measure telomere lengths with a quantitative PCR assay. We find that telomere lengths of TERT mutation carriers decrease in an age-dependent manner and show progressive shortening with successive generations of mutation inheritance. Family members without TERT mutations have a shorter mean telomere length than normal, demonstrating epigenetic inheritance of shortened telomere lengths in the absence of an inherited TERT mutation. Pulmonary fibrosis is an age-dependent phenotype not seen in mutation carriers less than 40 years of age but found in 60% of men 60 years or older; its development is associated with environmental exposures including cigarette smoking. A radiographic CT pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, which is consistent with a diagnosis of IPF, is seen in 74% of cases and a pathologic pattern of UIP is seen in 86% of surgical lung biopsies. Pulmonary fibrosis associated with TERT mutations is progressive and lethal with a mean survival of 3 years after diagnosis. Overall, TERT mutation carriers demonstrate reduced life expectancy, with a mean age of death of 58 and 67 years for males and females, respectively.A subset of pulmonary fibrosis, like dyskeratosis congenita, bone marrow failure, and liver disease, represents a "telomeropathy" caused by germline mutations in telomerase

  12. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

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    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated...... alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous...... rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability...

  13. Ultrasonographic prediction of highly aggressive telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter-mutated papillary thyroid cancer.

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    Kim, Tae Hyuk; Ki, Chang-Seok; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Oh, Young Lyun; Jang, Hye Won; Kim, Sun Wook; Chung, Jae Hoon; Shin, Jung Hee

    2017-08-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations are found in highly aggressive thyroid malignancies. Our aim was to define the ultrasonographic features of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-mutated papillary thyroid cancer and to evaluate their predictive performances. Ultrasonographic findings were reviewed for 185 patients with surgically confirmed papillary thyroid cancer between 1994 and 2004. Genomic DNA to identify telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations was extracted from archived surgical specimens. Logistic regression analysis was performed to compare clinical factors and ultrasonographic findings between telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-mutated and wild-type papillary thyroid cancers. A telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation was detected in 8.1% (15 of 185) of specimens from papillary thyroid cancer patients with a strong trend toward increasing age. Nonparallel orientation and microlobulated margin were independent ultrasonographic findings for predicting telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-mutated papillary thyroid cancer in patients over 50 years (odds ratio 5.898, 95% confidence interval 1.092-31.851, P = 0.039 for orientation; odds ratio 5.813, 95% confidence interval 1.320-25.602, P = 0.020 for margin). Prevalence of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations increased to 50.0% in papillary thyroid cancer patients older than 50 years with both ultrasonographic findings and was 0% in patients without either finding. For identifying telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-mutated papillary thyroid cancer, ultrasonographic had 64.3% sensitivity, 80.8% specificity, 50.0% positive predictive value and 88.4% negative predictive value. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter-mutated papillary thyroid cancer could be suggested by the ultrasonographic features of nonparallel orientation and microlobulated margin in patients older than 50 years. Prebiopsy recognition of this unique

  14. Compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations cause non-syndromic LHON-like optic neuropathy.

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    Gerber, Sylvie; Ding, Martina G; Gérard, Xavier; Zwicker, Klaus; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Rio, Marlène; Serre, Valérie; Hanein, Sylvain; Munnich, Arnold; Rotig, Agnès; Bianchi, Lucas; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Elpeleg, Orly; Kaplan, Josseline; Brandt, Ulrich; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathy (HON) has been ascribed to mutations in mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics genes, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory enzyme genes or nuclear genes of poorly known mitochondrial function. However, the disease causing gene remains unknown in many families. The objective of the present study was to identify the molecular cause of non-syndromic LHON-like disease in siblings born to non-consanguineous parents of French origin. We used a combination of genetic analysis (gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing) in a multiplex family of non-syndromic HON and of functional analyses in patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified compound heterozygote NDUFS2 disease-causing mutations (p.Tyr53Cys; p.Tyr308Cys). Studies using patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts revealed mildly decreased NDUFS2 and complex I abundance but apparently normal respiratory chain activity. In the yeast Y. lipolytica ortholog NUCM, the mutations resulted in absence of complex I and moderate reduction in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity, respectively. Biallelism for NDUFS2 mutations causing severe complex I deficiency has been previously reported to cause Leigh syndrome with optic neuropathy. Our results are consistent with the view that compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations can cause non-syndromic HON. This observation suggests a direct correlation between the severity of NDUFS2 mutations and that of the disease and further support that there exist a genetic overlap between non-syndromic and syndromic HON due to defective mitochondrial function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Hypomorphic mutations in POLR3A are a frequent cause of sporadic and recessive spastic ataxia.

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    Minnerop, Martina; Kurzwelly, Delia; Wagner, Holger; Soehn, Anne S; Reichbauer, Jennifer; Tao, Feifei; Rattay, Tim W; Peitz, Michael; Rehbach, Kristina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Pyle, Angela; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Timmann, Dagmar; Karaca, Ilker; Lennarz, Martina; Baets, Jonathan; Hengel, Holger; Synofzik, Matthis; Atasu, Burcu; Feely, Shawna; Kennerson, Marina; Stendel, Claudia; Lindig, Tobias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Stirnberg, Rüdiger; Sturm, Marc; Roeske, Sandra; Jung, Johanna; Bauer, Peter; Lohmann, Ebba; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Nicholson, Garth; Mahanjah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Carloni, Paolo; Brüstle, Oliver; Klopstock, Thomas; Mathews, Katherine D; Shy, Michael E; de Jonghe, Peter; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Schmitt, Ina; Wolf, Michael; Greschus, Susanne; Amunts, Katrin; Maier, Wolfgang; Schöls, Ludger; Nürnberg, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan; Klockgether, Thomas; Ramirez, Alfredo; Schüle, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Despite extensive efforts, half of patients with rare movement disorders such as hereditary spastic paraplegias and cerebellar ataxias remain genetically unexplained, implicating novel genes and unrecognized mutations in known genes. Non-coding DNA variants are suspected to account for a substantial part of undiscovered causes of rare diseases. Here we identified mutations located deep in introns of POLR3A to be a frequent cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia and cerebellar ataxia. First, whole-exome sequencing findings in a recessive spastic ataxia family turned our attention to intronic variants in POLR3A, a gene previously associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy type 7. Next, we screened a cohort of hereditary spastic paraplegia and cerebellar ataxia cases (n = 618) for mutations in POLR3A and identified compound heterozygous POLR3A mutations in ∼3.1% of index cases. Interestingly, >80% of POLR3A mutation carriers presented the same deep-intronic mutation (c.1909+22G>A), which activates a cryptic splice site in a tissue and stage of development-specific manner and leads to a novel distinct and uniform phenotype. The phenotype is characterized by adolescent-onset progressive spastic ataxia with frequent occurrence of tremor, involvement of the central sensory tracts and dental problems (hypodontia, early onset of severe and aggressive periodontal disease). Instead of the typical hypomyelination magnetic resonance imaging pattern associated with classical POLR3A mutations, cases carrying c.1909+22G>A demonstrated hyperintensities along the superior cerebellar peduncles. These hyperintensities may represent the structural correlate to the cerebellar symptoms observed in these patients. The associated c.1909+22G>A variant was significantly enriched in 1139 cases with spastic ataxia-related phenotypes as compared to unrelated neurological and non-neurological phenotypes and healthy controls (P = 1.3 × 10-4). In this study we demonstrate that (i) autosomal

  16. A hypomorphic mutation in Lpin1 induces progressively improving neuropathy and lipodystrophy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Nadra, K.; Jagalur, N.B.; Nijman, I.J.; Toonen, P.W.; Medard, J.J.; Gres, S.; de Bruin, A.; Han, G.S.; Brouwers, J.F.; Carman, G.M.; Saulnier-Blache, J.S.; Meijer, D.; Chrast, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Lpin1 gene encodes the phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme Lipin 1, which plays a critical role in lipid metabolism. In this study we describe the identification and characterization of a rat model with a mutated Lpin1 gene (Lpin1(1Hubr)), generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis.

  17. Two CGD Families with a Hypomorphic Mutation in the Activation Domain of p67(phox)

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    Roos, Dirk; van Buul, Jaap D.; Tool, Anton Tj; Matute, Juan D.; Marchal, Christophe M.; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Köker, M. Yavuz; de Boer, Martin; van Leeuwen, Karin; Segal, Anthony W.; Pick, Edgar; Dinauer, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a rare immunodeficiency caused by a defect in the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. This enzyme generates superoxide, which is needed for the killing of bacteria and fungi by phagocytic leukocytes. Most CGD patients have mutations in CYBB, the X-linked gene that encodes

  18. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in tumors originating from the adrenal gland and extra-adrenal paraganglia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papathomas, T.G.; Oudijk, L.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Post, E.; Duijkers, F.A.; Noesel, M.M. van; Hofland, L.J.; Pollard, P.J.; Maher, E.R.; Restuccia, D.F.; Feelders, R.A.; Franssen, G.J.; Timmers, H.J.; Sleijfer, S.; Herder, W.W. de; Krijger, R.R. de; Dinjens, W.N.; Korpershoek, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene have been recently reported in human cancers and proposed as a novel mechanism of telomerase activation. To explore TERT promoter mutations in tumors originating from the adrenal gland and extra-adrenal

  19. A single aspartate mutation in the conserved catalytic site of Rev3L generates a hypomorphic phenotype in vivo and in vitro.

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    Fritzen, Rémi; Delbos, Frédéric; De Smet, Annie; Palancade, Benoît; Canman, Christine E; Aoufouchi, Said; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Storck, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Rev3, the catalytic subunit of yeast DNA polymerase ζ, is required for UV resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis, while its mammalian ortholog, REV3L, plays further vital roles in cell proliferation and embryonic development. To assess the contribution of REV3L catalytic activity to its in vivo function, we generated mutant mouse strains in which one or two Ala residues were substituted to the Asp of the invariant catalytic YGDTDS motif. The simultaneous mutation of both Asp (ATA) phenocopies the Rev3l knockout, which proves that the catalytic activity is mandatory for the vital functions of Rev3L, as reported recently. Surprisingly, although the mutation of the first Asp severely impairs the enzymatic activity of other B-family DNA polymerases, the corresponding mutation of Rev3 (ATD) is hypomorphic in yeast and mouse, as it does not affect viability and proliferation and moderately impacts UVC-induced cell death and mutagenesis. Interestingly, Rev3l hypomorphic mutant mice display a distinct, albeit modest, alteration of the immunoglobulin gene mutation spectrum at G-C base pairs, further documenting its role in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Female heterozygotes for the hypomorphic R40H mutation can have ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and present in early adolescence: a case report and review of the literature

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    Kirk Edwin P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common hereditary urea cycle defect. It is inherited in an X-linked manner and classically presents in neonates with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in males. Females and males with hypomorphic mutations present later, sometimes in adulthood, with episodes that are frequently fatal. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl presented with progressive encephalopathy, hyperammonemic coma and lactic acidosis. She had a history of intermittent regular episodes of nausea and vomiting from seven years of age, previously diagnosed as abdominal migraines. At presentation she was hyperammonemic (ammonia 477 μmol/L with no other biochemical indicators of hepatic dysfunction or damage and had grossly elevated urinary orotate (orotate/creatinine ratio 1.866 μmol/mmol creatinine, reference range A mutation was identified in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene (OTC in our patient confirming the first symptomatic female shown heterozygous for the R40H mutation. A review of the literature and correspondence with authors of patients with the R40H mutation identified one other symptomatic female patient who died of hyperammonemic coma in her late teens. Conclusions This report expands the clinical spectrum of presentation of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to female heterozygotes for the hypomorphic R40H OTC mutation. Although this mutation is usually associated with a mild phenotype, females with this mutation can present with acute decompensation, which can be fatal. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained acute confusion, even without a suggestive family history.

  1. Herpesvirus telomerase RNA (vTR with a mutated template sequence abrogates herpesvirus-induced lymphomagenesis.

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    Benedikt B Kaufer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and telomerase RNA (TR represent the enzymatically active components of telomerase. In the complex, TR provides the template for the addition of telomeric repeats to telomeres, a protective structure at the end of linear chromosomes. Human TR with a mutation in the template region has been previously shown to inhibit proliferation of cancer cells in vitro. In this report, we examined the effects of a mutation in the template of a virus encoded TR (vTR on herpesvirus-induced tumorigenesis in vivo. For this purpose, we used the oncogenic avian herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (MDV as a natural virus-host model for lymphomagenesis. We generated recombinant MDV in which the vTR template sequence was mutated from AATCCCAATC to ATATATATAT (vAU5 by two-step Red-mediated mutagenesis. Recombinant viruses harboring the template mutation replicated with kinetics comparable to parental and revertant viruses in vitro. However, mutation of the vTR template sequence completely abrogated virus-induced tumor formation in vivo, although the virus was able to undergo low-level lytic replication. To confirm that the absence of tumors was dependent on the presence of mutant vTR in the telomerase complex, a second mutation was introduced in vAU5 that targeted the P6.1 stem loop, a conserved region essential for vTR-TERT interaction. Absence of vTR-AU5 from the telomerase complex restored virus-induced lymphoma formation. To test if the attenuated vAU5 could be used as an effective vaccine against MDV, we performed vaccination-challenge studies and determined that vaccination with vAU5 completely protected chickens from lethal challenge with highly virulent MDV. Taken together, our results demonstrate 1 that mutation of the vTR template sequence can completely abrogate virus-induced tumorigenesis, likely by the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, and 2 that this strategy could be used to generate novel vaccine candidates

  2. Telomerase: The Devil Inside

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    Mukesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High telomerase activity is detected in nearly all human cancers but most human cells are devoid of telomerase activity. There is well-documented evidence that reactivation of telomerase occurs during cellular transformation. In humans, tumors can rely in reactivation of telomerase or originate in a telomerase positive stem/progenitor cell, or rely in alternative lengthening of telomeres, a telomerase-independent telomere-length maintenance mechanism. In this review, we will focus on the telomerase positive tumors. In this context, the recent findings that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations represent the most common non-coding mutations in human cancer have flared up the long-standing discussion whether cancer originates from telomerase positive stem cells or telomerase reactivation is a final step in cellular transformation. Here, we will discuss the pros and cons of both concepts in the context of telomere length-dependent and telomere length-independent functions of telomerase. Together, these observations may provoke a re-evaluation of telomere and telomerase based therapies, both in telomerase inhibition for cancer therapy and telomerase activation for tissue regeneration and anti-ageing strategies.

  3. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer: High frequency across stages, detection in urine, and lack of association with outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Allory (Yves); W. Beukers (Willemien); A. Sagrera (Ana); M. Flández (Marta); M. Marqués (Miriam); M. Márquez (Mirari); K.A. van der Keur (Kirstin); L. Dyrskjot (Lars); I. Lurkin (Irene); M. Vermeij (Marcel); A. Carrato (Alfredo); J. Lloreta (Josep); J.A. Lorente (José); E. Carrillo-de Santa Pau (Enrique); R.G. Masius (Roy); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); A.A.G. van Tilborg (Angela); C.S. Abas (Cheno); T.F. Orntoft (Torben); T.C.M. Zuiverloon (Tahlita); N. Malats (Núria); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); F.X. Real (Francisco)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. Objectives To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and

  4. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations are rare in urachal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Sebastian; Herold, Thomas; Krafft, Ulrich; Bremmer, Felix; Tolkach, Yuri; Szász, Attila M; Kriegsmann, Joerg; Gaisa, Nadine T; Niedworok, Christian; Szarvas, Tibor; Reis, Henning

    2017-12-01

    High rates of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have recently been described in urothelial carcinoma (UC). Unlike UC in the bladder, adenocarcinomas account for the majority of urachal cancer (UrC) cases. As data in UrC is unclear, we analyzed TERT promoter mutations in a large cohort of UrC for its differential diagnostic, clinicopathological and prognostic significance. UrC cases from six academic centers were analyzed for c.-146C>T (C250T) and c.-124C>T (C228T) TERT promoter mutations by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Clinicopathological and survival data were collected. The cohort consisted of 15 men (56%) and 12 women (44%) with a median age of 50 years including 23 adenocarcinomas, two squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), one UC and one undifferentiated carcinoma. In one case of (mucinous) urachal adenocarcinoma a C228T mutation was detected (1/23; 4%), like in a case of SCC in addition to one C250T mutation in the UC case. TERT promoter mutations are very rare in urachal adenocarcinomas (unlike in UC) with differential diagnostic implications. Additionally, the low TERT promoter mutation rate in urachal adenocarcinomas is more comparable to colorectal adenocarcinomas than to UC, giving further support to recent genetic findings and therapeutic considerations. © 2017 Japanese Society of Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations cause non-syndromic LHON-like optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, S.; Ding, M.G.; Gerard, X.; Zwicker, K.; Zanlonghi, X.; Rio, M. del; Serre, V.; Hanein, S.; Munnich, A.; Rotig, A.; Bianchi, L.; Amati-Bonneau, P.; Elpeleg, O.; Kaplan, J.; Brandt, U.; Rozet, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathy (HON) has been ascribed to mutations in mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics genes, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory enzyme genes or nuclear genes of poorly known mitochondrial function. However, the disease causing gene remains

  6. The impact of dyskeratosis congenita mutations on the structure and dynamics of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot domain | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The pseudoknot domain is a functionally crucial part of telomerase RNA and influences the activity and stability of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is an inherited disease that is linked to mutations in telomerase RNA and impairs telomerase function. In this paper, we present a computational prediction of the influence of two base DKC mutations on the structure, dynamics, and stability of the pseudoknot domain. We use molecular dynamics simulations, MM-GBSA free energy calculations, static analysis, and melting simulations analysis.

  7. Collapse of Telomere Homeostasis in Hematopoietic Cells Caused by Heterozygous Mutations in Telomerase Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aubert, Geraldine; Baerlocher, Gabriela M.; Vulto, Irma; Poon, Steven S.; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase activity is readily detectable in extracts from human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, but appears unable to maintain telomere length with proliferation in vitro and with age in vivo. We performed a detailed study of the telomere length by flow FISH analysis in leukocytes from 835

  8. Association of telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations with clinicopathological features and prognosis of thyroid cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su X

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Xingyun Su,1 Xiaoxia Jiang,1 Weibin Wang,1 Haiyong Wang,1 Xin Xu,2 Aihui Lin,1 Xiaodong Teng,3 Huiling Wu,4 Lisong Teng1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, 2Department of Medical Oncology, 3Department of Pathology, 4Department of Plastic Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The clinicopathological and prognostic significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations have been widely investigated in thyroid cancer; however, the results are still discrepant. Systematic searches were performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, Ovid, and the Cochran Library databases for relevant articles prior to April 2016. Mutation rates were synthesized by R statistical software. The odds ratio or standardized mean difference with 95% confidence interval was pooled by Stata. A total of 22 studies with 4,907 cases were included in this meta-analysis. TERT promoter mutations tended to present in aggressive histological types including poorly differentiated thyroid cancer (33.37%, anaplastic thyroid cancer (38.69%, and tall-cell variant papillary thyroid cancer (30.23%. These promoter mutations were likely to exist in older patients and males and were well associated with larger tumor size, extrathyroidal extension, vascular invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, advanced tumor stage, disease recurrence/persistence, and mortality. In addition, TERT promoter mutations (especially C228T tended to coexist with BRAFV600E mutation, which indicated more aggressive tumor behavior. Therefore, TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers for early diagnosis, risk stratification, prognostic prediction, and management of thyroid cancer. Keywords: TERT promoter mutations, thyroid cancer, clinicopathological features, prognosis, BRAFV600E mutation

  9. A telomerase immortalized human proximal tubule cell line with a truncation mutation (Q4004X in polycystin-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittney-Shea Herbert

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is associated with a variety of cellular phenotypes in renal epithelial cells. Cystic epithelia are secretory as opposed to absorptive, have higher proliferation rates in cell culture and have some characteristics of epithelial to mesenchymal transitions. In this communication we describe a telomerase immortalized cell line that expresses proximal tubule markers and is derived from renal cysts of an ADPKD kidney. These cells have a single detectable truncating mutation (Q4004X in polycystin-1. These cells make normal appearing but shorter cilia and fail to assemble polycystin-1 in the cilia, and less uncleaved polycystin-1 in membrane fractions. This cell line has been maintained in continuous passage for over 35 passages without going into senescence. Nephron segment specific markers suggest a proximal tubule origin for these cells and the cell line will be useful to study mechanistic details of cyst formation in proximal tubule cells.

  10. A mutation in the catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase alters primer-template alignment while promoting processivity and protein-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairley, Robin C B; Guillaume, Gina; Vega, Leticia R; Friedman, Katherine L

    2011-12-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is required for maintenance of linear chromosome ends (telomeres). In yeast, the Est2 protein reverse transcribes a short template region of the TLC1 RNA using the chromosome terminus to prime replication. Yeast telomeres contain heterogeneous G(1-3)T sequences that arise from incomplete reverse transcription of the TLC1 template and alignment of the DNA primer at multiple sites within the template region. We have previously described mutations in the essential N-terminal TEN domain of Est2p that alter telomere sequences. Here, we demonstrate that one of these mutants, glutamic acid 76 to lysine (est2-LT(E76K)), restricts possible alignments between the DNA primer and the TLC1 template. In addition, this mutant exhibits increased processivity in vivo. Within the context of the telomerase enzyme, the Est2p TEN domain is thought to contribute to enzyme processivity by mediating an anchor-site interaction with the DNA primer. We show that binding of the purified TEN domain (residues 1-161) to telomeric DNA is enhanced by the E76K mutation. These results support the idea that the anchor-site interaction contributes to telomerase processivity and suggest a role for the anchor site of yeast telomerase in mediating primer-template alignment within the active site.

  11. The Presence of Telomere Fusion in Sporadic Colon Cancer Independently of Disease Stage, TP53/KRAS Mutation Status, Mean Telomere Length, and Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Tanaka

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Defects in telomere maintenance can result in telomere fusions that likely play a causative role in carcinogenesis by promoting genomic instability. However, this proposition remains to be fully understood in human colon carcinogenesis. In the present study, the temporal sequence of telomere dysfunction dynamics was delineated by analyzing telomere fusion, telomere length, telomerase activity, hotspot mutations in KRAS or BRAF, and TP53 of tissue samples obtained from 18 colon cancer patients. Our results revealed that both the deficiency of p53 and the shortening of mean telomere length were not necessary for producing telomere fusions in colon tissue. In five cases, telomere fusion was observed even in tissue adjacent to cancerous lesions, suggesting that genomic instability is initiated in pathologically non-cancerous lesions. The extent of mean telomere attrition increased with lymph node invasiveness of tumors, implying that mean telomere shortening correlates with colon cancer progression. Telomerase activity was relatively higher in most cancer tissues containing mutation(s in KRAS or BRAF and/or TP53 compared to those without these hotspot mutations, suggesting that telomerase could become fully active at the late stage of colon cancer development. Interestingly, the majority of telomere fusion junctions in colon cancer appeared to be a chromatid-type containing chromosome 7q or 12q. In sum, this meticulous correlative study not only highlights the concept that telomere fusion is present in the early stages of cancer regardless of TP53/KRAS mutation status, mean telomere length, and telomerase activity, but also provides additional insights targeting key telomere fusion junctions which may have significant implications for colon cancer diagnoses.

  12. A mutation in a functional Sp1 binding site of the telomerase RNA gene (hTERC promoter in a patient with Paroxysmal Nocturnal Haemoglobinuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mason Philip J

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the gene coding for the RNA component of telomerase, hTERC, have been found in autosomal dominant dyskeratosis congenita (DC and aplastic anemia. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH is a clonal blood disorder associated with aplastic anemia and characterized by the presence of one or more clones of blood cells lacking glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored proteins due to a somatic mutation in the PIGA gene. Methods We searched for mutations in DNA extracted from PNH patients by amplification of the hTERC gene and denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (dHPLC. After a mutation was found in a potential transcription factor binding site in one patient electrophoretic mobility shift assays were used to detect binding of transcription factors to that site. The effect of the mutation on the function of the promoter was tested by transient transfection constructs in which the promoter is used to drive a reporter gene. Results Here we report the finding of a novel promoter mutation (-99C->G in the hTERC gene in a patient with PNH. The mutation disrupts an Sp1 binding site and destroys its ability to bind Sp1. Transient transfection assays show that mutations in this hTERC site including C-99G cause either up- or down-regulation of promoter activity and suggest that the site regulates core promoter activity in a context dependent manner in cancer cells. Conclusions These data are the first report of an hTERC promoter mutation from a patient sample which can modulate core promoter activity in vitro, raising the possibility that the mutation may affect the transcription of the gene in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo, and that dysregulation of telomerase may play a role in the development of bone marrow failure and the evolution of PNH clones.

  13. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer: high frequency across stages, detection in urine, and lack of association with outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana; Flández, Marta; Marqués, Miriam; Márquez, Mirari; van der Keur, Kirstin A; Dyrskjot, Lars; Lurkin, Irene; Vermeij, Marcel; Carrato, Alfredo; Lloreta, Josep; Lorente, José A; Carrillo-de Santa Pau, Enrique; Masius, Roy G; Kogevinas, Manolis; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Tilborg, Angela A G; Abas, Cheno; Orntoft, Torben F; Zuiverloon, Tahlita C M; Malats, Núria; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Real, Francisco X

    2014-02-01

    Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential for detection of recurrences in urine in patients with urothelial bladder cancer (UBC). A set of 111 UBCs of different stages was used to assess TERT promoter mutations by Sanger sequencing and TERT messenger RNA (mRNA) expression by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The two most frequent mutations were investigated, using a SNaPshot assay, in an independent set of 184 non-muscle-invasive and 173 muscle-invasive UBC (median follow-up: 53 mo and 21 mo, respectively). Voided urine from patients with suspicion of incident UBC (n=174), or under surveillance after diagnosis of non-muscle-invasive UBC (n=194), was tested using a SNaPshot assay. Association of mutation status with age, sex, tobacco, stage, grade, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutation, progression-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival. In the two series, 78 of 111 (70%) and 283 of 357 (79%) tumors harbored TERT mutations, C228T being the most frequent substitution (83% for both series). TERT mutations were not associated with clinical or pathologic parameters, but were more frequent among FGFR3 mutant tumors (p=0.0002). There was no association between TERT mutations and mRNA expression (p=0.3). Mutations were not associated with clinical outcome. In urine, TERT mutations had 90% specificity in subjects with hematuria but no bladder tumor, and 73% in recurrence-free UBC patients. The sensitivity was 62% in incident and 42% in recurrent UBC. A limitation of the study is its retrospective nature. Somatic TERT promoter mutations are an early, highly prevalent genetic event in UBC and are not associated with TERT mRNA levels or disease outcomes. A SNaPshot assay in urine may

  14. Use of telomerase promoter mutations to mark specific molecular subsets with reciprocal clinical behavior in IDH mutant and IDH wild-type diffuse gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyerli, Cemaliye B; Yüksel, Şirin; Can, Özge; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Oktay, Yavuz; Coşgun, Erdal; Ülgen, Ege; Erdemgil, Yiğit; Sav, Aydın; von Deimling, Andreas; Günel, Murat; Yakıcıer, M Cengiz; Pamir, M Necmettin; Özduman, Koray

    2017-06-16

    OBJECTIVE Recent studies have established that hemispheric diffuse gliomas may be grouped into subsets on the basis of molecular markers; these subsets are loosely correlated with the histopathological diagnosis but are strong predictors of clinical tumor behavior. Based on an analysis of molecular and clinical parameters, the authors hypothesized that mutations of the telomerase promoter (TERTp-mut) mark separate oncogenic programs among isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and/or 2 (IDH) mutant (IDH-mut) and IDH wild-type (IDH-wt) diffuse gliomas independent of histopathology or WHO grade. METHODS Four molecular subsets of the combined statuses of IDH and TERT-promoter mutations (double mutant, IDH only, TERT only, and double negative) were defined. Differences in age, anatomical location, molecular genetics, and survival rates in a surgical cohort of 299 patients with a total of 356 hemispheric diffuse gliomas (WHO Grade II, III, or IV) were analyzed. RESULTS TERTp-mut were present in 38.8% of IDH-mut and 70.2% of IDH-wt gliomas. The mutational status was stable in each patient at 57 recurrence events over a 2645-month cumulative follow-up period. Among patients with IDH-mut gliomas, those in the double-mutant subset had better survival and a lower incidence of malignant degeneration than those in the IDH-only subset. Of patients in the double-mutant subset, 96.3% were also positive for 1p/19q codeletions. All patients with 1p/19q codeletions had TERTp-mut. In patients with IDH-mut glioma, epidermal growth factor receptor or phosphatase and tensin homolog mutations were not observed, and copy-number variations were uncommon. Among IDH-wt gliomas, the TERT-only subset was associated with significantly higher age, higher Ki-67 labeling index, primary glioblastoma-specific oncogenic changes, and poor survival. The double-negative subset was genetically and biologically heterogeneous. Survival analyses (Kaplan-Meier, multivariate, and regression-tree analyses) confirmed that

  15. Telomerase recruitment requires both TCAB1 and Cajal bodies independently.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J Lewis; Zyner, Katherine G; Pickett, Hilda A; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2012-07-01

    The ability of most cancer cells to grow indefinitely relies on the enzyme telomerase and its recruitment to telomeres. In human cells, recruitment depends on the Cajal body RNA chaperone TCAB1 binding to the RNA subunit of telomerase (hTR) and is also thought to rely on an N-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit, hTERT. We demonstrate that coilin, an essential structural component of Cajal bodies, is required for endogenous telomerase recruitment to telomeres but that overexpression of telomerase can compensate for Cajal body absence. In contrast, recruitment of telomerase was sensitive to levels of TCAB1, and this was not rescued by overexpression of telomerase. Thus, although Cajal bodies are important for recruitment, TCAB1 has an additional role in this process that is independent of these structures. TCAB1 itself localizes to telomeres in a telomerase-dependent but Cajal body-independent manner. We identify a point mutation in hTERT that largely abolishes recruitment yet does not affect association of telomerase with TCAB1, suggesting that this region mediates recruitment by an independent mechanism. Our results demonstrate that telomerase has multiple independent requirements for recruitment to telomeres and that the function of TCAB1 is to directly transport telomerase to telomeres.

  16. A mitochondrial DNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase specifically impairs male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulik R; Miriyala, Ganesh K; Littleton, Aimee J; Yang, Heiko; Trinh, Kien; Young, Janet M; Kennedy, Scott R; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pallanck, Leo J; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    Due to their strict maternal inheritance in most animals and plants, mitochondrial genomes are predicted to accumulate mutations that are beneficial or neutral in females but harmful in males. Although a few male-harming mtDNA mutations have been identified, consistent with this ‘Mother’s Curse’, their effect on females has been largely unexplored. Here, we identify COIIG177S, a mtDNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase II, which specifically impairs male fertility due to defects in sperm development and function without impairing other male or female functions. COIIG177S represents one of the clearest examples of a ‘male-harming’ mtDNA mutation in animals and suggest that the hypomorphic mtDNA mutations like COIIG177S might specifically impair male gametogenesis. Intriguingly, some D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds can fully rescue COIIG177S -associated sterility, consistent with previously proposed models that nuclear genomes can regulate the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16923.001 PMID:27481326

  17. Loss of Function of Evc2 in Dental Mesenchyme Leads to Hypomorphic Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Takeda, H; Tsuji, T; Kamiya, N; Kunieda, T; Mochida, Y; Mishina, Y

    2017-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal-recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by short stature and postaxial polydactyly. A series of dental abnormalities, including hypomorphic enamel formation, has been reported in patients with EvC. Despite previous studies that attempted to uncover the mechanism leading to abnormal tooth development, little is known regarding how hypomorphic enamel is formed in patients with EvC. In the current study, using Evc2/ Limbin mutant mice we recently generated, we analyzed enamel formation in the mouse incisor. Consistent with symptoms in human patients, we observed that Evc2 mutant mice had smaller incisors with enamel hypoplasia. Histologic observations coupled with ameloblast marker analyses suggested that Evc2 mutant preameloblasts were capable of differentiating to secretory ameloblasts; this process, however, was apparently delayed, due to delayed odontoblast differentiation, mediated by a limited number of dental mesenchymal stem cells in Evc2 mutant mice. This concept was further supported by the observation that dental mesenchymal-specific deletion of Evc2 phenocopied the tooth abnormalities in Evc2 mutants. Overall, our findings suggest that mutations in Evc2 affect dental mesenchymal stem cell homeostasis, which further leads to hypomorphic enamel formation.

  18. Telomerase in hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Lane, Steven W

    2016-07-01

    The activation of telomere maintenance pathways has long been regarded as a key hallmark of cancer and this has propelled the development of novel inhibitors of telomerase. In this review, we detail the background biology on telomere maintenance in health and disease, then concentrate on the recent preclinical and clinical development behind targeting telomerase in blood cancers. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that imetelstat, a competitive inhibitor of telomerase, has activity in certain hematologic malignancies, in particular the myeloproliferative neoplasms and acute myeloid leukemia. Telomerase inhibition has shown remarkable efficacy in myeloid malignancies, and current and future preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to comprehensively investigate its underlying mechanism of action. Future work should identify the potential genetic susceptibilities to telomerase inhibition therapy, and evaluate rational combinations of telomerase inhibitors with chemotherapy and other novel agents. Robust preclinical evaluation is essential to best translate these new agents successfully into our clinical treatment algorithm for myeloid and other blood cancers.

  19. Therapeutic Targeting of Telomerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Jäger

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomere length and cell function can be preserved by the human reverse transcriptase telomerase (hTERT, which synthesizes the new telomeric DNA from a RNA template, but is normally restricted to cells needing a high proliferative capacity, such as stem cells. Consequently, telomerase-based therapies to elongate short telomeres are developed, some of which have successfully reached the stage I in clinical trials. Telomerase is also permissive for tumorigenesis and 90% of all malignant tumors use telomerase to obtain immortality. Thus, reversal of telomerase upregulation in tumor cells is a potential strategy to treat cancer. Natural and small-molecule telomerase inhibitors, immunotherapeutic approaches, oligonucleotide inhibitors, and telomerase-directed gene therapy are useful treatment strategies. Telomerase is more widely expressed than any other tumor marker. The low expression in normal tissues, together with the longer telomeres in normal stem cells versus cancer cells, provides some degree of specificity with low risk of toxicity. However, long term telomerase inhibition may elicit negative effects in highly-proliferative cells which need telomerase for survival, and it may interfere with telomere-independent physiological functions. Moreover, only a few hTERT molecules are required to overcome senescence in cancer cells, and telomerase inhibition requires proliferating cells over a sufficient number of population doublings to induce tumor suppressive senescence. These limitations may explain the moderate success rates in many clinical studies. Despite extensive studies, only one vaccine and one telomerase antagonist are routinely used in clinical work. For complete eradication of all subpopulations of cancer cells a simultaneous targeting of several mechanisms will likely be needed. Possible technical improvements have been proposed including the development of more specific inhibitors, methods to increase the efficacy of vaccination

  20. Telomerases: chemistry, biology, and clinical applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lue, Neal F; Autexier, Chantal

    2012-01-01

    .... Other topics include telomerase biogenesis, transcriptional and post-translational regulation, off-telomere functions of telomerase and the role of telomerase in cellular senescence, aging and cancer...

  1. Telomerase activity in human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, J.

    2000-10-01

    The overall goal of this collaborative project was to investigate the role in malignant cells of both chromosome telomeres, and telomerase, the enzyme that replicates telomeres. Telomeres are highly conserved nucleoprotein complexes located at the ends of eucaryotic chromosomes. Telomere length in somatic cells is reduced by 40--50 nucleotide pairs with every cell division due to incomplete replication of terminal DNA sequences and the absence of telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein that adds telomere DNA to chromosome ends. Although telomerase is active in cells with extended proliferative capacities, including more than 85% of tumors, work performed under this contract demonstrated that the telomeres of human cancer cells are shorter than those of paired normal cells, and that the length of the telomeres is characteristic of particular types of cancers. The extent of telomere shortening ostensibly is related to the number of cell divisions the tumor has undergone. It is believed that ongoing cell proliferation leads to the accumulation and fixation of new mutations in tumor cell lineages.Therefore, it is not unreasonable to assume that the degree of phenotypic variability is related to the proliferative history of the tumor, and therefore to telomere length, implying a correlation with prognosis. In some human tumors, short telomeres are also correlated with genomic instabilities, including interstitial chromosome translocation, loss of heterozygosity, and aneuoploidy. Moreover, unprotected chromosome ends are highly recombinogenic and telomere shortening in cultured human cells correlates with the formation of dicentric chromosomes, suggesting that critically short telomeres not only identify, but also predispose, cells to genomic instability, again implying a correlation with prognosis. Therefore, telomere length or content could be an important predictor of metastatic potential or responsiveness to various therapeutic modalities.

  2. Inhibition of telomerase recruitment and cancer cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Mai; Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Sullivan, Kelly D; Espinosa, Joaquín M; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-11-15

    Continued proliferation of human cells requires maintenance of telomere length, usually accomplished by telomerase. Telomerase is recruited to chromosome ends by interaction with a patch of amino acids (the TEL patch, for TPP1 glutamate (E) and leucine (L)-rich patch) on the surface of telomere protein TPP1. In previous studies, interruption of this interaction by mutation prevented telomere extension in HeLa cells, but the cell culture continued to grow. We now show that the telomerase inhibitor BIBR1532 acts together with TEL patch mutations to inhibit the growth of HeLa cell lines and that apoptosis is a prominent mechanism of death of these cells. Survivor cells take over the population beginning around 40 days in culture. These cells no longer express the TEL patch mutant TPP1, apparently because of silencing of the expression cassette, a survival mechanism that would not be available to cancer cells. These results provide hope that inhibiting the binding of telomerase to the TEL patch of TPP1, perhaps together with a modest inhibition of the telomerase enzyme, could comprise an effective anticancer therapy for the ∼90% of human tumors that are telomerase-positive.

  3. Telomerer og telomerase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Laila; Kølvraa, Steen

    2010-01-01

    In 2009 the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to EH Blackburn, CW Greider and JW Szostak for their work on "How chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Telomeres are specialized DNA structures localized at the end of linear chromosomes. Telomeres are known as the biol......In 2009 the Nobel Prize in Medicine was awarded to EH Blackburn, CW Greider and JW Szostak for their work on "How chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase". Telomeres are specialized DNA structures localized at the end of linear chromosomes. Telomeres are known...... as the biological clock of the cell, since they shorten with each cell division. Telomerase can elongate telomeres. Telomeres protect chromosome ends against being recognized as double stranded DNA breaks, and are thought to be a guard against cancer. It has furthermore been suggested that telomeres may play a role...

  4. Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 effects on proliferation and telomerase activity in sheep growth plate chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Logan B

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 inhibits growth-plate chondrocyte proliferation and limits bone elongation. Gain-of-function FGFR3 mutations cause dwarfism, reduced telomerase activity and shorter telomeres in growth plate chondroyctes suggesting that FGFR3 reduces proliferative capacity, inhibits telomerase, and enhances senescence. Thyroid hormone (T3 plays a role in cellular maturation of growth plate chondrocytes and a known target of T3 is FGFR3. The present study addressed whether reduced FGFR3 expression enhanced telomerase activity, mRNA expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT and RNA component of telomerase (TR, and chondrocyte proliferation, and whether the stimulation of FGFR3 by T3 evoked the opposite response. Results Sheep growth-plate proliferative zone chondrocytes were cultured and transfected with siRNA to reduce FGFR3 expression; FGFR3 siRNA reduced chondrocyte FGFR3 mRNA and protein resulting in greater proliferation and increased TERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity (p 3 significantly enhanced FGFR3 mRNA and protein expression and reduced telomerase activity (p 3 at the growth plate may be partially mediated through the FGFR3 pathway. Conclusions The results suggest that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation by down-regulating TERT expression and reducing telomerase activity indicating an important role for telomerase in sustaining chondrocyte proliferative capacity during bone elongation.

  5. Cellular defects caused by hypomorphic variants of the Bloom syndrome helicase gene BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Vivek M; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extraordinary cancer incidence early in life and an average life expectancy of ~27 years. Premature stop codons in BLM, which encodes a DNA helicase that functions in DNA double-strand-break repair, make up the vast majority of Bloom syndrome mutations, with only 13 single amino acid changes identified in the syndrome. Sequencing projects have identified nearly one hundred single nucleotide variants in BLM that cause amino acid changes of uncertain significance. Here, in addition to identifying five BLM variants incapable of complementing certain defects of Bloom syndrome cells, making them candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, we characterize a new class of BLM variants that cause some, but not all, cellular defects of Bloom syndrome. We find elevated sister-chromatid exchanges, a delayed DNA damage response and inefficient DNA repair. Conversely, hydroxyurea sensitivity and quadriradial chromosome accumulation, both characteristic of Bloom syndrome cells, are absent. These intermediate variants affect sites in BLM that function in ATP hydrolysis and in contacting double-stranded DNA. Allele frequency and cellular defects suggest candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, and intermediate BLM variants that are hypomorphic which, instead of causing Bloom syndrome, may increase a person's risk for cancer or possibly other Bloom-syndrome-associated disorders, such as type-2 diabetes.

  6. Targeting telomerase with radiolabeled inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghorn, Philip A; Jackson, Mark R; Gouverneur, Veronique; Vallis, Katherine A

    2017-01-05

    The expression of telomerase in approximately 85% of cancers and its absence in the majority of normal cells makes it an attractive target for cancer therapy. However the lag period between initiation of telomerase inhibition and growth arrest makes direct inhibition alone an insufficient method of treatment. However, telomerase inhibition has been shown to enhance cancer cell radiosensitivity. To investigate the strategy of simultaneously inhibiting telomerase while delivering targeted radionuclide therapy to cancer cells, 123 I-radiolabeled inhibitors of telomerase were synthesized and their effects on cancer cell survival studied. An 123 I-labeled analogue of the telomerase inhibitor MST-312 inhibited telomerase with an IC 50 of 1.58 μM (MST-312 IC 50 : 0.23 μM). Clonogenic assays showed a dose dependant effect of 123 I-MST-312 on cell survival in a telomerase positive cell line, MDA-MB-435. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  7. Telomerase inhibitor PinX1 provides a link between TRF1 and telomerase to prevent telomere elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soohoo, Christina Y; Shi, Rong; Lee, Tae Ho; Huang, Pengyu; Lu, Kun Ping; Zhou, Xiao Zhen

    2011-02-04

    Telomere maintenance is essential for protecting chromosome ends. Aberrations in telomere length have been implicated in cancer and aging. Telomere elongation by human telomerase is inhibited in cis by the telomeric protein TRF1 and its associated proteins. However, the link between TRF1 and inhibition of telomerase elongation of telomeres remains elusive because TRF1 has no direct effect on telomerase activity. We have previously identified one Pin2/TRF1-interacting protein, PinX1, that has the unique property of directly binding and inhibiting telomerase catalytic activity (Zhou, X. Z., and Lu, K. P. (2001) Cell 107, 347-359). However, nothing is known about the role of the PinX1-TRF1 interaction in the regulation of telomere maintenance. By identifying functional domains and key amino acid residues in PinX1 and TRF1 responsible for the PinX1-TRF1 interaction, we show that the TRF homology domain of TRF1 interacts with a minimal 20-amino acid sequence of PinX1 via hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. Significantly, either disrupting this interaction by mutating the critical Leu-291 residue in PinX1 or knocking down endogenous TRF1 by RNAi abolishes the ability of PinX1 to localize to telomeres and to inhibit telomere elongation in cells even though neither has any effect on telomerase activity per se. Thus, the telomerase inhibitor PinX1 is recruited to telomeres by TRF1 and provides a critical link between TRF1 and telomerase inhibition to prevent telomere elongation and help maintain telomere homeostasis.

  8. Telomerase and its extracurricular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Rishi Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Yadava, Pramod Kumar

    2013-12-01

    The classical activity of telomerase is to synthesize telomeric repeats and thus maintain telomere length, which in turn ensures chromosome stability and cellular proliferation. However, there is growing evidence that implicates telomerase in many other functions that are independent of TERC being used as its template. Telomerase has an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) activity in the mitochondria. Other than viral RdRPs, it is the only RNA-dependent RNA polymerase that has been identified in mammals. It also plays a role in the Wnt signaling pathway by acting as a transcriptional modulator. Telomerase acts as a reverse transcriptase independent of its core subunit, TERC. Studies indicate that telomerase is also involved in apoptosis and DNA repair.

  9. A second essential function of the Est1-binding arm of yeast telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Kevin J.; Niederer, Rachel O.; Zappulla, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The enzymatic ribonucleoprotein telomerase maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, including humans, and plays a central role in aging and cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is a flexible scaffold that tethers telomerase holoenzyme protein subunits to the complex. Here we test the hypothesis that a lengthy conserved region of the Est1-binding TLC1 arm contributes more than simply Est1-binding function. We separated Est1 binding from potential other functions by tethering TLC1 to Est1 via a heterologous RNA-protein binding module. We find that Est1-tethering rescues in vivo function of telomerase RNA alleles missing nucleotides specifically required for Est1 binding, but not those missing the entire conserved region. Notably, however, telomerase function is restored for this condition by expressing the arm of TLC1 in trans. Mutational analysis shows that the Second Essential Est1-arm Domain (SEED) maps to an internal loop of the arm, which SHAPE chemical mapping and 3D modeling suggest could be regulated by conformational change. Finally, we find that the SEED has an essential, Est1-independent role in telomerase function after telomerase recruitment to the telomere. The SEED may be required for establishing telomere extendibility or promoting telomerase RNP holoenzyme activity. PMID:25737580

  10. A second essential function of the Est1-binding arm of yeast telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Kevin J; Niederer, Rachel O; Zappulla, David C

    2015-05-01

    The enzymatic ribonucleoprotein telomerase maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, including humans, and plays a central role in aging and cancer. Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, is a flexible scaffold that tethers telomerase holoenzyme protein subunits to the complex. Here we test the hypothesis that a lengthy conserved region of the Est1-binding TLC1 arm contributes more than simply Est1-binding function. We separated Est1 binding from potential other functions by tethering TLC1 to Est1 via a heterologous RNA-protein binding module. We find that Est1-tethering rescues in vivo function of telomerase RNA alleles missing nucleotides specifically required for Est1 binding, but not those missing the entire conserved region. Notably, however, telomerase function is restored for this condition by expressing the arm of TLC1 in trans. Mutational analysis shows that the Second Essential Est1-arm Domain (SEED) maps to an internal loop of the arm, which SHAPE chemical mapping and 3D modeling suggest could be regulated by conformational change. Finally, we find that the SEED has an essential, Est1-independent role in telomerase function after telomerase recruitment to the telomere. The SEED may be required for establishing telomere extendibility or promoting telomerase RNP holoenzyme activity. © 2015 Lebo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  11. Is telomerase a viable target in cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buseman, C.M.; Wright, W.E.; Shay, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    The ideal cancer treatment would specifically target cancer cells yet have minimal or no adverse effects on normal somatic cells. Telomerase, the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that maintains the ends of human chromosome, is an attractive cancer therapeutic target for exactly this reason [1]. Telomerase is expressed in more than 85% of cancer cells, making it a nearly universal cancer marker, while the majority of normal somatic cells are telomerase negative. Telomerase activity confers limitless replicative potential to cancer cells, a hallmark of cancer which must be attained for the continued growth that characterizes almost all advanced neoplasms [2]. In this review we will summarize the role of telomeres and telomerase in cancer cells, and how properties of telomerase are being exploited to create targeted cancer therapies including telomerase inhibitors, telomerase-targeted immunotherapies and telomerase-driven virotherapies. A frank and balanced assessment of the current state of telomerase inhibitors with caveats and potential limitations will be included. PMID:21802433

  12. AZT as a telomerase inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Gomez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase is a highly specialized reverse transcriptase and the maintenance of telomeric length is determined by this specific enzyme. The human holoenzyme telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein composed by a catalytic subunit, hTERT, an RNA component, hTR, and a group of associated proteins. Telomerase is normally expressed in embryonic cells and is repressed during adulthood. The enzyme is reexpressed in around 85% of solid tumors. This observation makes it a potential target for developing drugs that could be developed for therapeutic purposes. The identification of the hTERT as a functional catalytic reverse transcriptase prompted studies of inhibiting telomerase with the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor azidothymidine (AZT. Previously, we have demonstrated that AZT binds preferentially to telomeres, inhibits telomerase and enhances tumor cell senescence and apoptosis after AZT treatment in breast mammary adenocarcinoma cells. Since then, several studies have considered AZT for telomerase inhibition and have led to potential clinical strategies for anticancer therapy. This review covers present thinking of the inhibition of telomerase by AZT and future treatment protocols using the drug.

  13. The C-terminal extension of human telomerase reverse transcriptase is necessary for high affinity binding to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Holien, Jessica K; Mathias, Jordan A T; Parker, Michael W; Bryan, Tracy M

    2016-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from short telomere syndromes, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic analyses and molecular modelling of a disease-associated mutant in the C-terminal extension of the reverse transcriptase subunit of human telomerase. The kinetic analyses revealed that the mutation substantially impacts the affinity of telomerase for telomeric DNA, but the magnitude of this impact varies for primers with different 3' ends. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate this finding, revealing that the mutation results in greater movement of a nearby loop, impacting the DNA-RNA helix differentially with different DNA primers. Thus, the data indicate that this region is the location of one of the enzyme conformational changes responsible for the long-standing observation that off-rates of telomerase vary with telomeric 3' end sequence. Our data provide a molecular basis for a disease-associated telomerase mutation, and the first direct evidence for a role of the C-terminal extension in DNA binding affinity, a function analogous to the "thumb" domain of retroviral reverse transcriptases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Intestinal microbiota sustains inflammation and autoimmunity induced by hypomorphic RAG defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, Rosita; Fontana, Elena; Guglielmetti, Simone; Fosso, Bruno; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Maina, Virginia; Taverniti, Valentina; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Mantero, Stefano; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Musio, Silvia; Pedotti, Rosetta; Selmi, Carlo; Mora, J. Rodrigo; Pesole, Graziano; Vezzoni, Paolo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is caused by hypomorphic Rag mutations and characterized by a profound immunodeficiency associated with autoimmune-like manifestations. Both in humans and mice, OS is mediated by oligoclonal activated T and B cells. The role of microbial signals in disease pathogenesis is debated. Here, we show that Rag2R229Q knock-in mice developed an inflammatory bowel disease affecting both the small bowel and colon. Lymphocytes were sufficient for disease induction, as intestinal CD4 T cells with a Th1/Th17 phenotype reproduced the pathological picture when transplanted into immunocompromised hosts. Moreover, oral tolerance was impaired in Rag2R229Q mice, and transfer of wild-type (WT) regulatory T cells ameliorated bowel inflammation. Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency in the gut resulted in enhanced absorption of microbial products and altered composition of commensal communities. The Rag2R229Q microbiota further contributed to the immunopathology because its transplant into WT recipients promoted Th1/Th17 immune response. Consistently, long-term dosing of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ABXs) in Rag2R229Q mice ameliorated intestinal and systemic autoimmunity by diminishing the frequency of mucosal and circulating gut-tropic CCR9+ Th1 and Th17 T cells. Remarkably, serum hyper-IgE, a hallmark of the disease, was also normalized by ABX treatment. These results indicate that intestinal microbes may play a critical role in the distinctive immune dysregulation of OS. PMID:26926994

  15. Inhibition of telomerase potentiates enzalutamide efficiency of androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gecgel, Karaca Kaan; Muduroglu, Mustafa; Erdogan, Suat

    2017-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is one of the main strategies to treat prostate cancer (PCa) at various stages of its development. Androgen receptor (AR) antagonists such as enzalutamide are mainstay treatments for castration-sensitive prostate cancer. Though, a majority of patients initially respond to ADT, most will eventually progress to castrate-resistant, due to the development of different mutations on the AR. PCa cells express high telomerase activity, and there is a correlation between the total activity of telomerase and the Gleason score. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of enzalutamide plus a telomerase inhibitor could be more effective than enzalutamide alone in decreasing cell survival. In this study MTT test, RT-qPCR and imagebased cytometry were used to investigate cell viability, apoptosis and cell cycle progression of androgen-responsive human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. The cells were treated with 5 μM enzalutamide and 40 μM telomerase inhibitor BIBR 1532, or with their combinations for 72 hrs. Enzalutamide and BIBR 1532 alone inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The combinations of the two agents could synergistically induce apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Either inhibition of telomerase by BIBR 1532 or AR blockages by enzalutamide decreased prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the catalytic component of telomerase, hTERT, expression. These results suggest that telomerase inhibition therapy may contribute to the efficacy of enzalutamide in the androgen-sensitive PCa model.

  16. Mutations in IFT172 cause isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bujakowska, K.M; Zhang, Q; Siemiatkowska, A.M; Liu, Q; Place, E; Falk, M.J; Consugar, M; Lancelot, M.E; Antonio, A; Lonjou, C; Carpentier, W; Mohand-Said, S; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M; Leroy, B.P; Gai, X; Sahel, J.A; Born, L.I. van den; Collin, R.W.J; Zeitz, C; Audo, I; Pierce, E.A

    2015-01-01

    ...)] that underlie an isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Extensive functional analyses of the identified mutations in cell culture, rat retina and in zebrafish demonstrated their hypomorphic or null nature...

  17. The hypomorphic TERT A1062T variant is associated with increased treatment-related toxicity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Anna; Krauter, Jürgen; Damm, Frederik; Thol, Felicitas; Göhring, Gudrun; Heuser, Michael; Ottmann, Oliver; Lübbert, Michael; Wattad, Mohammed; Kanz, Lothar; Schlimok, Günter; Raghavachar, Aruna; Fiedler, Walter; Kirchner, Hartmut; Brugger, Wolfram; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Heil, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Wagner, Katharina

    2017-06-01

    Hypomorphic germline variants in TERT, the gene encoding the reverse transcriptase component of the human telomerase complex, occur with a frequency of 3-5% in acute myeloid leukemia. We analyzed the clinical and prognostic impact of the most common TERT A1062T variant in younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia intensively treated within two prospective multicenter trials. Four hundred and twenty patients (age 17-60 years) were analyzed for the TERT A1062T variant by direct sequencing. Fifteen patients (3.6%) carried the TERT A1062T variant. Patients with the TERT A1062T variant had a trend towards less favorable and more intermediate 2/adverse karyotypes/genotypes according to the European Leukemia Net classification. In univariate and multivariate analysis, patients with the TERT A1062T variant had a significantly inferior overall survival compared to wild-type patients (6-year overall survival 20 vs. 41%, p = 0.005). Patients with the TERT A1062T variant showed a high rate of treatment-related mortality: 5/15 (33%) died during induction therapy or in complete remission as compared to 62/405 (15%) of the wild-type patients. In patients with the TERT variant, 14/15 (93%) suffered from non-hematological/non-infectious grade 3/4 adverse events (mostly hepatic and/or mucosal) as compared to 216/405 (53%) wild-type patients (p = 0.006). In multivariate analysis, the TERT A1062T variant was an independent risk factor predicting for adverse events during induction chemotherapy. In conclusion, the TERT A1062T variant is an independent negative prognostic factor in younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia and seems to predispose those patients to treatment-related toxicity.

  18. Telomerase targeting in cancer treatment : new developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, MN; de Jong, S; de Vries, EGE; van der Zee, AGJ

    1999-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein expressed in 85% of advanced cancers but not in most somatic cells, compensates for telomeric DNA erosion and as such stabilizes cell immortality. Telomerase inhibition might restore mortality in tumor cells. Recent progress is illustrated in studies on telomerase and

  19. Oxoisoaporphine as Potent Telomerase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zu-Zhuang; Qin, Qi-Pin; Chen, Jia-Nian; Chen, Zhen-Feng

    2016-11-14

    Two compounds previously isolated from traditional Chinese medicine, Menispermum dauricum (DC), 6-hydroxyl-oxoisoaporphine (H-L a ), and 4,6-di(2-pyridinyl)benzo[ h ]isoindolo[4,5,6- de ]quinolin-8(5 H )-one (H-L b ), were known to have in vitro antitumor activity and to selectively bind human telomeric, c-myc, and bcl-2 G-quadruplexes (G4s). In this study, the binding properties of these two compounds to telomerase were investigated through molecular docking and telomeric repeat amplication protocol and silver staining assay (TRAP-silver staining assay). The binding energies bound to human telomerase RNA were calculated by molecular docking to be -6.43 and -9.76 kcal/mol for H-L a and H-L b , respectively. Compared with H-L a , the ligand H-L b more strongly inhibited telomerase activity in the SK-OV-3 cells model.

  20. Oxoisoaporphine as Potent Telomerase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu-Zhuang Wei

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Two compounds previously isolated from traditional Chinese medicine, Menispermum dauricum (DC, 6-hydroxyl-oxoisoaporphine (H-La, and 4,6-di(2-pyridinylbenzo[h]isoindolo[4,5,6-de]quinolin-8(5H-one (H-Lb, were known to have in vitro antitumor activity and to selectively bind human telomeric, c-myc, and bcl-2 G-quadruplexes (G4s. In this study, the binding properties of these two compounds to telomerase were investigated through molecular docking and telomeric repeat amplication protocol and silver staining assay (TRAP-silver staining assay. The binding energies bound to human telomerase RNA were calculated by molecular docking to be −6.43 and −9.76 kcal/mol for H-La and H-Lb, respectively. Compared with H-La, the ligand H-Lb more strongly inhibited telomerase activity in the SK-OV-3 cells model.

  1. Structure of active dimeric human telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerwald, Anselm; Sandin, Sara; Cristofari, Gaël; Scheres, Sjors H W; Lingner, Joachim; Rhodes, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    Telomerase contains a large RNA subunit, TER, and a protein catalytic subunit, TERT. Whether telomerase functions as a monomer or dimer has been a matter of debate. Here we report biochemical and labeling data that show that in vivo-assembled human telomerase contains two TERT subunits and binds two telomeric DNA substrates. Notably, catalytic activity requires both TERT active sites to be functional, which demonstrates that human telomerase functions as a dimer. We also present the three-dimensional structure of the active full-length human telomerase dimer, determined by single-particle EM in negative stain. Telomerase has a bilobal architecture with the two monomers linked by a flexible interface. The monomer reconstruction at 23-Å resolution and fitting of the atomic structure of the TERT subunit from beetle Tribolium castaneum into the EM density reveals the spatial relationship between RNA and protein subunits, providing insights into telomerase architecture.

  2. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  3. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT Q169 is essential for telomerase function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haley D M Wyatt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that maintains the telomeres of linear chromosomes and preserves genomic integrity. The core components are a catalytic protein subunit, the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, and an RNA subunit, the telomerase RNA (TR. Telomerase is unique in its ability to catalyze processive DNA synthesis, which is facilitated by telomere-specific DNA-binding domains in TERT called anchor sites. A conserved glutamine residue in the TERT N-terminus is important for anchor site interactions in lower eukaryotes. The significance of this residue in higher eukaryotes, however, has not been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To understand the significance of this residue in higher eukaryotes, we performed site-directed mutagenesis on human TERT (hTERT Q169 to create neutral (Q169A, conservative (Q169N, and non-conservative (Q169D mutant proteins. We show that these mutations severely compromise telomerase activity in vitro and in vivo. The functional defects are not due to abrogated interactions with hTR or telomeric ssDNA. However, substitution of hTERT Q169 dramatically impaired the ability of telomerase to incorporate nucleotides at the second position of the template. Furthermore, Q169 mutagenesis altered the relative strength of hTERT-telomeric ssDNA interactions, which identifies Q169 as a novel residue in hTERT required for optimal primer binding. Proteolysis experiments indicate that Q169 substitution alters the protease-sensitivity of the hTERT N-terminus, indicating that a conformational change in this region of hTERT is likely critical for catalytic function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the first detailed evidence regarding the biochemical and cellular roles of an evolutionarily-conserved Gln residue in higher eukaryotes. Collectively, our results indicate that Q169 is needed to maintain the hTERT N-terminus in a conformation that is necessary for optimal enzyme

  4. Telomerase – future drug target enzyme?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Langerholc

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Eucaryotic chromosome endings (telomeres replication problem was solved in the 1980’s by discovery of the telomerase enzyme. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 2009 for the discovery of telomerase. Altered telomerase expression in cancer, and human dream of eternal youth have accelerated the development of pharmacological telomerase inhibitors and activators. However, after 15 years of development they are still not available on the market. In the present article we reviewed pharmacological agents that target telomerase activity, which have entered clinical trials. Current drugs in development are mostly not intended to be used alone, as telomerase inhibitors under clinical trials are used in combination with the existing chemotherapeutics and anti-telomerase vaccines in combination with immuno-stimulants. Apart from cancer and aging, there are other diseases linked to deregulated activity of telomerase/telomeres and we also discuss technical and legal problems that researchers encounter in developing anti-telomerase therapy. Given the pace of development, first anti-telomerase drugs might appear on the market in the next 5 years.

  5. A Hypomorphic PALB2 Allele Gives Rise to an Unusual Form of FA-N Associated with Lymphoid Tumour Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Byrd

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with biallelic truncating mutations in PALB2 have a severe form of Fanconi anaemia (FA-N, with a predisposition for developing embryonal-type tumours in infancy. Here we describe two unusual patients from a single family, carrying biallelic PALB2 mutations, one truncating, c.1676_1677delAAinsG;(p.Gln559ArgfsTer2, and the second, c.2586+1G>A; p.Thr839_Lys862del resulting in an in frame skip of exon 6 (24 amino acids. Strikingly, the affected individuals did not exhibit the severe developmental defects typical of FA-N patients and initially presented with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The expressed p.Thr839_Lys862del mutant PALB2 protein retained the ability to interact with BRCA2, previously unreported in FA-N patients. There was also a large increased chromosomal radiosensitivity following irradiation in G2 and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Although patient cells were unable to form Rad51 foci following exposure to either DNA damaging agent, U2OS cells, in which the mutant PALB2 with in frame skip of exon 6 was induced, did show recruitment of Rad51 to foci following damage. We conclude that a very mild form of FA-N exists arising from a hypomorphic PALB2 allele.

  6. Telomerase activity in gestational trophoblastic disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, A N; Zhang, D.K.; Liu, Y; Ngan, H Y; Shen, D H; Tsao, S. W.

    1999-01-01

    Aims - To investigate the pattern of telomerase activity in hydatidiform mole as compared with normal placenta and choriocarcinoma, and to determine the prognostic significance of telomerase activity in hydatidiform mole. Methods - Telomerase activity in 35 cases of hydatidiform mole, 35 normal placentas, one choriocarcinoma sample, and two choriocarcinoma cell lines (JAR, JEG3) was determined using the sensitive polymerase chain reaction based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) a...

  7. Identification of Telomerase Components and Telomerase Regulating Factors in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    transformation was performed by the lithium acetate method. In experiments involving serial 10-fold dilutions of cells, initial cell density was determined...transcription, and on media containing 5-fluoro- orotic acid (5-FOA) to determine the proportion of cells able to repress URA3 transcription. Plates...uracil or growth in the presence of a drug inhibitory to Ura+ cells (5-fluoro- orotic acid, 5-FOA) [9]. Elimination of telomerase function by deletion

  8. The telomerase essential N-terminal domain promotes DNA synthesis by stabilizing short RNA–DNA hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme that adds repetitive DNA sequences to the ends of chromosomes and consists of two main subunits: the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein and an associated telomerase RNA (TER). The telomerase essential N-terminal (TEN) domain is a conserved region of TERT proposed to mediate DNA substrate interactions. Here, we have employed single molecule telomerase binding assays to investigate the function of the TEN domain. Our results reveal telomeric DNA substrates bound to telomerase exhibit a dynamic equilibrium between two states: a docked conformation and an alternative conformation. The relative stabilities of the docked and alternative states correlate with the number of basepairs that can be formed between the DNA substrate and the RNA template, with more basepairing favoring the docked state. The docked state is further buttressed by the TEN domain and mutations within the TEN domain substantially alter the DNA substrate structural equilibrium. We propose a model in which the TEN domain stabilizes short RNA–DNA duplexes in the active site of the enzyme, promoting the docked state to augment telomerase processivity. PMID:25940626

  9. Cdc20 hypomorphic mice fail to counteract de novo synthesis of cyclin B1 in mitosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malureanu, L.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Jin, F.; Baker, D.J.; Ree, J.H.; Gullon, O.; Chen, Z.; Henley, J.R.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2010-01-01

    Cdc20 is an activator of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome that initiates anaphase onset by ordering the destruction of cyclin B1 and securin in metaphase. To study the physiological significance of Cdc20 in higher eukaryotes, we generated hypomorphic mice that express small amounts of this

  10. A mitochondrial DNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase specifically impairs male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Maulik R; Miriyala, Ganesh K; Littleton, Aimee J; Yang, Heiko; Trinh, Kien; Young, Janet M; Kennedy, Scott R; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pallanck, Leo J; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we identify COII(G177S), a mtDNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase II, which specifically impairs male fertility due to defects in sperm development and function without impairing other male or female functions. COII(G177S...

  11. Prevalence of Telomerase Activity in Human Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hau Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity has been measured in a wide variety of cancerous and non-cancerous tissue types, and the vast majority of clinical studies have shown a direct correlation between it and the presence of cancerous cells. Telomerase plays a key role in cellular immortality and tumorigenesis. Telomerase is activated in 80–90% of human carcinomas, but not in normal somatic cells, therefore, its detection holds promise as a diagnostic marker for cancer. Measurable levels of telomerase have been detected in malignant cells from various samples: tissue from gestational trophoblastic neoplasms; squamous carcinoma cells from oral rinses; lung carcinoma cells from bronchial washings; colorectal carcinoma cells from colonic luminal washings; bladder carcinoma cells from urine or bladder washings; and breast carcinoma or thyroid cancer cells from fine needle aspirations. Such clinical tests for telomerase can be useful as non-invasive and cost-effective methods for early detection and monitoring of cancer. In addition, telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with poor clinical outcome in late-stage diseases such as non-small cell lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and soft tissue sarcomas. In such cases, testing for telomerase activity can be used to identify patients with a poor prognosis and to select those who might benefit from adjuvant treatment. Our review of the latest medical advances in this field reveals that telomerase holds great promise as a biomarker for early cancer detection and monitoring, and has considerable potential as the basis for developing new anticancer therapies.

  12. Telomerase in (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, GBA; De Jong, S; Meersma, GJ; Helder, MN; Hollema, H; de Vries, EGE; Keith, WN; van der Zee, AGJ

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to determine upregulation of the human telomerase RNA component (hTR) and mRNA of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT) in (pre)malignant cervical lesions, to analyze possible intralesional heterogeneity of hTR expression, and to relate hTR and hTERT mRNA levels to

  13. Evolution of Arabidopsis protection of telomeres 1 alters nucleic acid recognition and telomerase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Amit; Beilstein, Mark A; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2016-11-16

    Protection of telomeres (POT1) binds chromosome ends, recognizing single-strand telomeric DNA via two oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding folds (OB-folds). The Arabidopsis thaliana POT1a and POT1b paralogs are atypical: they do not exhibit telomeric DNA binding, and they have opposing roles in regulating telomerase activity. AtPOT1a stimulates repeat addition processivity of the canonical telomerase enzyme, while AtPOT1b interacts with a regulatory lncRNA that represses telomerase activity. Here, we show that OB1 of POT1a, but not POT1b, has an intrinsic affinity for telomeric DNA. DNA binding was dependent upon a highly conserved Phe residue (F65) that in human POT1 directly contacts telomeric DNA. F65A mutation of POT1a OB1 abolished DNA binding and diminished telomerase repeat addition processivity. Conversely, AtPOT1b and other POT1b homologs from Brassicaceae and its sister family, Cleomaceae, naturally bear a non-aromatic amino acid at this position. By swapping Val (V63) with Phe, AtPOT1b OB1 gained the capacity to bind telomeric DNA and to stimulate telomerase repeat addition processivity. We conclude that, in the context of DNA binding, variation at a single amino acid position promotes divergence of the AtPOT1b paralog from the ancestral POT1 protein. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Hypomorphic Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of NSDHL Cause CK Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W.; Severson, Tesa M.; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W.; Kratz, Lisa E.; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D.; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E.; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N.; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Merkens, Louise S.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Waters, Paula J.; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R.; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I.; Herman, Gail E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Steiner, Robert D.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Marra, Marco A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. PMID:21129721

  15. An Alternate Splicing Variant of the Human Telomerase Catalytic Subunit Inhibits Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Yi

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase, a cellular reverse transcriptase, adds telomeric repeats to chromosome ends. In normal human somatic cells, telomerase is repressed and telomeres progressively shorten, leading to proliferative senescence. Introduction of the telomerase (hTERT cDNA is sufficient to produce telomerase activity and immortalize normal human cells, suggesting that the repression of telomerase activity is transcriptional. The telomerase transcript has been shown to have at least six alternate splicing sites (four insertion sites and two deletion sites, and variants containing both or either of the deletion sites are present during development and in a panel of cancer cell lines we surveyed. One deletion (β site and all four insertions cause premature translation terminations, whereas the other deletion (α site is 36 by and lies within reverse transcriptase (RT motif A, suggesting that this deletion variant may be a candidate as a dominant-negative inhibitor of telomerase. We have cloned three alternately spliced hTERT variants that contain the α,β or both α and,β deletion sites. These alternate splicing variants along with empty vector and wild-type hTERT were introduced into normal human fibroblasts and several telomerase-positive immortal and tumor cell lines. Expression of the α site deletion variant (hTERT α− construct was confirmed by Western blotting. We found that none of the three alternate splicing variants reconstitutes telomerase activity in fibroblasts. However, hTERT α− inhibits telomerase activities in telomerase-positive cells, causes telomere shortening and eventually cell death. This alternately spliced dominant-negative variant may be important in understanding telomerase regulation during development, differentiation and in cancer progression.

  16. Structural Basis of Telomerase Inhibition by the Highly Specific BIBR1532.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Christopher; Rice, Cory; Hoffman, Hunter; Harkisheimer, Michael; Sweeney, Melanie; Skordalakes, Emmanuel

    2015-10-06

    BIBR1532 is a highly specific telomerase inhibitor, although the molecular basis for inhibition is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of BIBR1532 bound to Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase (tcTERT). BIBR1532 binds to a conserved hydrophobic pocket (FVYL motif) on the outer surface of the thumb domain. The FVYL motif is near TRBD residues that bind the activation domain (CR4/5) of hTER. RNA binding assays show that the human TERT (hTERT) thumb domain binds the P6.1 stem loop of CR4/5 in vitro. hTERT mutations of the FVYL pocket alter wild-type CR4/5 binding and cause telomere attrition in cells. Furthermore, the hTERT FVYL mutations V1025F, N1028H, and V1090M are implicated in dyskeratosis congenita and aplastic anemia, further supporting the biological and clinical relevance of this novel motif. We propose that CR4/5 contacts with the telomerase thumb domain contribute to telomerase ribonucleoprotein assembly and promote enzymatic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Telomerase and drug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinska, Natalia; Romaniuk, Aleksandra; Paszel-Jaworska, Anna; Toton, Ewa; Kopczynski, Przemyslaw; Rubis, Blazej

    2017-11-01

    It is well known that a decreased expression or inhibited activity of telomerase in cancer cells is accompanied by an increased sensitivity to some drugs (e.g., doxorubicin, cisplatin, or 5-fluorouracil). However, the mechanism of the resistance resulting from telomerase alteration remains elusive. There are theories claiming that it might be associated with telomere shortening, genome instability, hTERT translocation, mitochondria functioning modulation, or even alterations in ABC family gene expression. However, association of those mechanisms, i.e., drug resistance and telomerase alterations, is not fully understood yet. We review the current theories on the aspect of the role of telomerase in cancer cells resistance to therapy. We believe that revealing/unravelling this correlation might significantly contribute to an increased efficiency of cancer cells elimination, especially the most difficult ones, i.e., drug resistant.

  18. Identification of Protein Components of Yeast Telomerase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teng, Shu-Chun

    1998-01-01

    .... Most eukaryotes replicate telomere by a special reverse transcriptase called telomerase. Another pathway of telomere formation is telomere-telomere recombination that uses homologs either in telomeric or subtelomeric repeats as the substrates...

  19. Telomere Maintenance in the Absence of Telomerase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lundblad, Vicki

    2000-01-01

    .... In the budding yeasts S. cerevisiae and K. lactis, telomerase- independent survival is mediated via RAD52-dependent recombination which results in amplification of telomeric and subtelomeric repeat sequences...

  20. Premature aging in telomerase-deficient zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Anchelin

    2013-09-01

    The study of telomere biology is crucial to the understanding of aging and cancer. In the pursuit of greater knowledge in the field of human telomere biology, the mouse has been used extensively as a model. However, there are fundamental differences between mouse and human cells. Therefore, additional models are required. In light of this, we have characterized telomerase-deficient zebrafish (Danio rerio as the second vertebrate model for human telomerase-driven diseases. We found that telomerase-deficient zebrafish show p53-dependent premature aging and reduced lifespan in the first generation, as occurs in humans but not in mice, probably reflecting the similar telomere length in fish and humans. Among these aging symptoms, spinal curvature, liver and retina degeneration, and infertility were the most remarkable. Although the second-generation embryos died in early developmental stages, restoration of telomerase activity rescued telomere length and survival, indicating that telomerase dosage is crucial. Importantly, this model also reproduces the disease anticipation observed in humans with dyskeratosis congenita (DC. Thus, telomerase haploinsufficiency leads to anticipation phenomenon in longevity, which is related to telomere shortening and, specifically, with the proportion of short telomeres. Furthermore, p53 was induced by telomere attrition, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Importantly, genetic inhibition of p53 rescued the adverse effects of telomere loss, indicating that the molecular mechanisms induced by telomere shortening are conserved from fish to mammals. The partial rescue of telomere length and longevity by restoration of telomerase activity, together with the feasibility of the zebrafish for high-throughput chemical screening, both point to the usefulness of this model for the discovery of new drugs able to reactivate telomerase in individuals with DC.

  1. Acute myocardial infarction: 'telomerasing' for cardioprotection

    OpenAIRE

    Sanchís-Gomar, Fabián; Lucía Mulas, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Reactivating the telomerase gene through gene therapy after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has been recently reported to improve survival in mice. Given that regular physical exercise also activates this gene, therapeutic and lifestyle interventions targeting telomerase need to be explored as possible additions to the current armamentarium for myocardial regeneration. 9.292 JCR (2015) Q1, 17/289 Biochemistry & mollecular biology, 17/187 Cell biology, 8/124 Medicine, research & experimen...

  2. Structure and function of echinoderm telomerase RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Li, Yang; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme that requires an integral telomerase RNA (TR) subunit, in addition to the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), for enzymatic function. The secondary structures of TRs from the three major groups of species, ciliates, fungi, and vertebrates, have been studied extensively and demonstrate dramatic diversity. Herein, we report the first comprehensive secondary structure of TR from echinoderms-marine invertebrates closely related to vertebrates-determined by phylogenetic comparative analysis of 16 TR sequences from three separate echinoderm classes. Similar to vertebrate TR, echinoderm TR contains the highly conserved template/pseudoknot and H/ACA domains. However, echinoderm TR lacks the ancestral CR4/5 structural domain found throughout vertebrate and fungal TRs. Instead, echinoderm TR contains a distinct simple helical region, termed eCR4/5, that is functionally equivalent to the CR4/5 domain. The urchin and brittle star eCR4/5 domains bind specifically to their respective TERT proteins and stimulate telomerase activity. Distinct from vertebrate telomerase, the echinoderm TR template/pseudoknot domain with the TERT protein is sufficient to reconstitute significant telomerase activity. This gain-of-function of the echinoderm template/pseudoknot domain for conferring telomerase activity presumably facilitated the rapid structural evolution of the eCR4/5 domain throughout the echinoderm lineage. Additionally, echinoderm TR utilizes the template-adjacent P1.1 helix as a physical template boundary element to prevent nontelomeric DNA synthesis, a mechanism used by ciliate and fungal TRs. Thus, the chimeric and eccentric structural features of echinoderm TR provide unparalleled insights into the rapid evolution of telomerase RNP structure and function. © 2016 Podlevsky et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Telomerase activation by genomic rearrangements in high-risk neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peifer, Martin; Hertwig, Falk; Roels, Frederik; Dreidax, Daniel; Gartlgruber, Moritz; Menon, Roopika; Krämer, Andrea; Roncaioli, Justin L; Sand, Frederik; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Ikram, Fakhera; Schmidt, Rene; Ackermann, Sandra; Engesser, Anne; Kahlert, Yvonne; Vogel, Wenzel; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Thierry-Mieg, Jean; Thierry-Mieg, Danielle; Mariappan, Aruljothi; Heynck, Stefanie; Mariotti, Erika; Henrich, Kai-Oliver; Gloeckner, Christian; Bosco, Graziella; Leuschner, Ivo; Schweiger, Michal R; Savelyeva, Larissa; Watkins, Simon C; Shao, Chunxuan; Bell, Emma; Höfer, Thomas; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Theissen, Jessica; Volland, Ruth; Saadati, Maral; Eggert, Angelika; de Wilde, Bram; Berthold, Frank; Peng, Zhiyu; Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Ortmann, Monika; Büttner, Reinhard; Perner, Sven; Hero, Barbara; Schramm, Alexander; Schulte, Johannes H; Herrmann, Carl; O'Sullivan, Roderick J; Westermann, Frank; Thomas, Roman K; Fischer, Matthias

    2015-10-29

    Neuroblastoma is a malignant paediatric tumour of the sympathetic nervous system. Roughly half of these tumours regress spontaneously or are cured by limited therapy. By contrast, high-risk neuroblastomas have an unfavourable clinical course despite intensive multimodal treatment, and their molecular basis has remained largely elusive. Here we have performed whole-genome sequencing of 56 neuroblastomas (high-risk, n = 39; low-risk, n = 17) and discovered recurrent genomic rearrangements affecting a chromosomal region at 5p15.33 proximal of the telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT). These rearrangements occurred only in high-risk neuroblastomas (12/39, 31%) in a mutually exclusive fashion with MYCN amplifications and ATRX mutations, which are known genetic events in this tumour type. In an extended case series (n = 217), TERT rearrangements defined a subgroup of high-risk tumours with particularly poor outcome. Despite a large structural diversity of these rearrangements, they all induced massive transcriptional upregulation of TERT. In the remaining high-risk tumours, TERT expression was also elevated in MYCN-amplified tumours, whereas alternative lengthening of telomeres was present in neuroblastomas without TERT or MYCN alterations, suggesting that telomere lengthening represents a central mechanism defining this subtype. The 5p15.33 rearrangements juxtapose the TERT coding sequence to strong enhancer elements, resulting in massive chromatin remodelling and DNA methylation of the affected region. Supporting a functional role of TERT, neuroblastoma cell lines bearing rearrangements or amplified MYCN exhibited both upregulated TERT expression and enzymatic telomerase activity. In summary, our findings show that remodelling of the genomic context abrogates transcriptional silencing of TERT in high-risk neuroblastoma and places telomerase activation in the centre of transformation in a large fraction of these tumours.

  4. Telomerase Activity in Human Ovarian Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Christopher M.; Hirte, Hal W.; Bacchetti, Silvia; Harley, Calvin B.

    1994-04-01

    Telomeres fulfill the dual function of protecting eukaryotic chromosomes from illegitimate recombination and degradation and may aid in chromosome attachment to the nuclear membrane. We have previously shown that telomerase, the enzyme which synthesizes telomeric DNA, is not detected in normal somatic cells and that telomeres shorten with replicative age. In cells immortalized in vitro, activation of telomerase apparently stabilizes telomere length, preventing a critical destabilization of chromosomes, and cell proliferation continues even when telomeres are short. In vivo, telomeres of most tumors are shorter than telomeres of control tissues, suggesting an analogous role for the enzyme. To assess the relevance of telomerase and telomere stability in the development and progression of tumors, we have measured enzyme activity and telomere length in metastatic cells of epithelial ovarian carcinoma. We report that extremely short telomeres are maintained in these cells and that tumor cells, but not isogenic nonmalignant cells, express telomerase. Our findings suggest that progression of malignancy is ultimately dependent upon activation of telomerase and that telomerase inhibitors may be effective antitumor drugs.

  5. Telomerase-Associated Protein TEP1 Is Not Essential for Telomerase Activity or Telomere Length Maintenance In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yie; Snow, Bryan E.; Hande, M. Prakash; Baerlocher, Gabriela; Kickhoefer, Valerie A.; Yeung, David; Wakeham, Andrew; Itie, Annick; Siderovski, David P.; Lansdorp, Peter M.; Robinson, Murray O.; Harrington, Lea

    2000-01-01

    TEP1 is a mammalian telomerase-associated protein with similarity to the Tetrahymena telomerase protein p80. Like p80, TEP1 is associated with telomerase activity and the telomerase reverse transcriptase, and it specifically interacts with the telomerase RNA. To determine the role of mTep1 in telomerase function in vivo, we generated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells and mice lacking mTep1. The mTep1-deficient (mTep1−/−) mice were viable and were bred for seven successive generations with no ob...

  6. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: Implications for Instability, Reprograming, and Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sishc, Brock J; Nelson, Christopher B; McKenna, Miles J; Battaglia, Christine L R; Herndon, Andrea; Idate, Rupa; Liber, Howard L; Bailey, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks) and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore, telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles, telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to IRs of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET) gamma(γ)-rays or high LET, high charge, high energy (HZE) particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprograming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of telomeres and telomerase in the

  7. Telomeres and Telomerase in the Radiation Response: implications for instability, reprogramming, and carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock James Sishc

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes comprised of tandem arrays of repetitive DNA sequence that serve to protect chromosomal termini from inappropriate degradation, as well as to prevent these natural DNA ends from being recognized as broken DNA (double-strand breaks; DSBs and triggering of inappropriate DNA damage responses. Preservation of telomere length requires telomerase, the specialized reverse transcriptase capable of maintaining telomere length via template-mediated addition of telomeric repeats onto the ends of newly synthesized chromosomes. Loss of either end-capping function or telomere length maintenance has been associated with genomic instability or senescence in a variety of settings; therefore telomeres and telomerase have well-established connections to cancer and aging. It has long been recognized that oxidative stress promotes shortening of telomeres, and that telomerase activity is a radiation-inducible function. However, the effects of ionizing radiation (IR exposure on telomeres per se are much less well understood and appreciated. To gain a deeper understanding of the roles telomeres and telomerase play in the response of human cells to ionizing radiations of different qualities, we tracked changes in telomeric end-capping function, telomere length, and telomerase activity in panels of mammary epithelial and hematopoietic cell lines exposed to low linear energy transfer (LET gamma(γ-rays or high LET high charge, high energy (HZE particles, delivered either acutely or at low dose rates (LDR. In addition to demonstrating that dysfunctional telomeres contribute to IR-induced mutation frequencies and genome instability, we reveal non-canonical roles for telomerase, in that telomerase activity was required for IR-induced enrichment of mammary epithelial putative stem/progenitor cell populations, a finding also suggestive of cellular reprogramming. Taken together, the results reported here establish the critical importance of

  8. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Challa

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1 in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood. These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene.

  9. Telomerase recruitment in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is not dependent on Tel1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hua; Toro, Tasha B; Paschini, Margherita; Braunstein-Ballew, Bari; Cervantes, Rachel B; Lundblad, Victoria

    2010-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association between the Est1 telomerase subunit and the telomere-binding protein Cdc13 is essential for telomerase to be recruited to its site of action. A current model proposes that Tel1 binding to telomeres marks them for elongation, as the result of phosphorylation of a proposed S/TQ cluster in the telomerase recruitment domain of Cdc13. However, three observations presented here argue against one key aspect of this model. First, the pattern of Cdc13 phosphatase-sensitive isoforms is not altered by loss of Tel1 function or by mutations introduced into two conserved serines (S249 and S255) in the Cdc13 recruitment domain. Second, an interaction between Cdc13 and Est1, as monitored by a two-hybrid assay, is dependent on S255 but Tel1-independent. Finally, a derivative of Cdc13, cdc13-(S/TQ)11→(S/TA)11, in which every potential consensus phosphorylation site for Tel1 has been eliminated, confers nearly wild-type telomere length. These results are inconsistent with a model in which the Cdc13-Est1 interaction is regulated by Tel1-mediated phosphorylation of the Cdc13 telomerase recruitment domain. We propose an alternative model for the role of Tel1 in telomere homeostasis, which is based on the assumption that Tel1 performs the same molecular task at double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosome termini.

  10. The Roles of Telomerase in the Generation of Polyploidy during Neoplastic Cell Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agni Christodoulidou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy contributes to extensive intratumor genomic heterogeneity that characterizes advanced malignancies and is thought to limit the efficiency of current cancer therapies. It has been shown that telomere deprotection in p53-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts leads to high rates of polyploidization. We now show that tumor genome evolution through whole-genome duplication occurs in ∼15% of the karyotyped human neoplasms and correlates with disease progression. In a panel of human cancer and transformed cell lines representing the two known types of genomic instability (chromosomal and microsatellite, as well as the two known pathways of telomere maintenance in cancer (telomerase activity and alternative lengthening of telomeres, telomere dysfunction-driven polyploidization occurred independently of the mutational status of p53. Depending on the preexisting context of telomere maintenance, telomerase activity and its major components, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT and human telomerase RNA component (hTERC, exert both reverse transcriptase-related (canonical and noncanonical functions to affect tumor genome evolution through suppression or induction of polyploidization. These new findings provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of cancer progression that may, in the future, lead to novel therapeutic interventions.

  11. Human Telomerase RNA Processing and Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chi-Kang; Wang, Hui-Fang; Burns, Allison M; Schroeder, Morgan R; Gaspari, Martina; Baumann, Peter

    2015-12-15

    The non-coding RNA subunit of telomerase provides the template for telomerase activity. In diverse fungi, 3' end processing of telomerase RNA involves a single cleavage by the spliceosome. Here, we examine how human telomerase RNA (hTR) primary transcripts are processed into the mature form of precisely 451 nt. We find that the splicing inhibitor isoginkgetin mimics the effects of RNA exosome inhibition and causes accumulation of long hTR transcripts. Depletion of exosome components and accessory factors reveals functions for the cap binding complex (CBC) and the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT) complex in hTR turnover. Whereas longer transcripts are predominantly degraded, shorter precursor RNAs are oligo-adenylated by TRF4-2 and either processed by poly(A)-specific ribonuclease (PARN) or degraded by the exosome. Our results reveal that hTR biogenesis involves a kinetic competition between RNA processing and degradation and suggest treatment options for telomerase insufficiency disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Human Telomerase RNA Processing and Quality Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kang Tseng

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The non-coding RNA subunit of telomerase provides the template for telomerase activity. In diverse fungi, 3′ end processing of telomerase RNA involves a single cleavage by the spliceosome. Here, we examine how human telomerase RNA (hTR primary transcripts are processed into the mature form of precisely 451 nt. We find that the splicing inhibitor isoginkgetin mimics the effects of RNA exosome inhibition and causes accumulation of long hTR transcripts. Depletion of exosome components and accessory factors reveals functions for the cap binding complex (CBC and the nuclear exosome targeting (NEXT complex in hTR turnover. Whereas longer transcripts are predominantly degraded, shorter precursor RNAs are oligo-adenylated by TRF4-2 and either processed by poly(A-specific ribonuclease (PARN or degraded by the exosome. Our results reveal that hTR biogenesis involves a kinetic competition between RNA processing and degradation and suggest treatment options for telomerase insufficiency disorders.

  13. Zoning of mucosal phenotype, dysplasia, and telomerase activity measured by telomerase repeat assay protocol in Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Going, JJ; Fletcher-Monaghan, AJ; Neilson, L; Wisman, BA; van der Zee, A; Stuart, RC; Keith, WN

    2004-01-01

    Glandular dysplasia in Barrett's esophagus may regress spontaneously but can also progress to cancer. The human telomerase RNA template and the human telomerase reverse transcriptase enzyme which do not, of themselves, correlate strongly with telomerase activity, are too often overexpressed in

  14. Protein composition of catalytically active human telomerase from immortal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Scott B; Graham, Mark E; Lovrecz, George O

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex that adds 5'-TTAGGG-3' repeats onto the ends of human chromosomes, providing a telomere maintenance mechanism for approximately 90% of human cancers. We have purified human telomerase approximately 10(8)-fold, with the final elution dependent...... on the enzyme's ability to catalyze nucleotide addition onto a DNA oligonucleotide of telomeric sequence, thereby providing specificity for catalytically active telomerase. Mass spectrometric sequencing of the protein components and molecular size determination indicated an enzyme composition of two molecules...... each of telomerase reverse transcriptase, telomerase RNA, and dyskerin....

  15. Telomerase stimulates ribosomal DNA transcription under hyperproliferative conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Omar Garcia; Assfalg, Robin; Koch, Sylvia; Schelling, Adrian; Meena, Jitendra K; Kraus, Johann; Lechel, Andre; Katz, Sarah-Fee; Benes, Vladimir; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin; Kestler, Hans A; Günes, Cagatay; Iben, Sebastian

    2014-08-13

    In addition to performing its canonical function, Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) has been shown to participate in cellular processes independent of telomerase activity. Furthermore, although TERT mainly localizes to Cajal bodies, it is also present within the nucleolus. Because the nucleolus is the site of rDNA transcription, we investigated the possible role of telomerase in regulating RNA polymerase I (Pol I). Here we show that TERT binds to rDNA and stimulates transcription by Pol I during liver regeneration and Ras-induced hyperproliferation. Moreover, the inhibition of telomerase activity by TERT- or TERC-specific RNA interference, the overexpression of dominant-negative-TERT, and the application of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat reduce Pol I transcription and the growth of tumour cells. In vitro, telomerase can stimulate the formation of the transcription initiation complex. Our results demonstrate how non-canonical features of telomerase may direct Pol I transcription in oncogenic and regenerative hyperproliferation.

  16. Single-molecule imaging of telomerase reverse transcriptase in human telomerase holoenzyme and minimal RNP complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Robert Alexander; Dagdas, Yavuz S; Yilmaz, S Tunc; Yildiz, Ahmet; Collins, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes chromosome-capping telomeric repeats using an active site in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and an integral RNA subunit template. The fundamental question of whether human telomerase catalytic activity requires cooperation across two TERT subunits remains under debate. In this study, we describe new approaches of subunit labeling for single-molecule imaging, applied to determine the TERT content of complexes assembled in cells or cell extract. Surprisingly, telomerase reconstitutions yielded heterogeneous DNA-bound TERT monomer and dimer complexes in relative amounts that varied with assembly and purification method. Among the complexes, cellular holoenzyme and minimal recombinant enzyme monomeric for TERT had catalytic activity. Dimerization was suppressed by removing a TERT domain linker with atypical sequence bias, which did not inhibit cellular or minimal enzyme assembly or activity. Overall, this work defines human telomerase DNA binding and synthesis properties at single-molecule level and establishes conserved telomerase subunit architecture from single-celled organisms to humans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08363.001 PMID:26457608

  17. MYC-dependent downregulation of telomerase by FLT3 inhibitors is required for their therapeutic efficacy on acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolu; Li, Bingnan; Yu, Jingya; Dahlström, Jenny; Tran, Anh Nhi; Björkhom, Magnus; Xu, Dawei

    2018-01-01

    The somatic mutation of FLT3 occurs in 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), with the majority of mutations exhibiting internal tandem duplication (ITD). On the other hand, the induction of telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and the activation of telomerase is a key step in AML development. Here, we sought to determine whether FLT3ITD regulates hTERT expression in AML cells and whether hTERT expression affects FLT3 inhibitors' therapeutic efficacy on AML. FLT3ITD-harboring AML cell lines and primary cells treated with the FLT3 inhibitor PKC412 displayed a rapid decline in the levels of hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity. Moreover, PKC412 inhibited hTERT gene transcription in a c-MYC-dependent manner. The ectopic expression of hTERT significantly attenuated the apoptotic effect of PKC412 on AML cells. Mechanistically, hTERT enhanced the activity of FLT3 downstream effectors or alternative RTK signaling, thereby enhancing AKT phosphorylation, in AML cells treated with PKC412. Collectively, PKC412 downregulates hTERT expression and telomerase activity in a MYC-dependent manner and this effect is required for its optimal anti-AML efficacy, while hTERT over-expression confers AML cells resistance to a targeted therapeutic agent PKC412. These findings suggest that the functional interplay between FLT3ITD and hTERT contributes to the AML pathogenesis and interferes with the efficacy of FLT3ITD-targeted therapy.

  18. Telomerase is required for zebrafish lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina M Henriques

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity is restricted in humans. Consequentially, telomeres shorten in most cells throughout our lives. Telomere dysfunction in vertebrates has been primarily studied in inbred mice strains with very long telomeres that fail to deplete telomeric repeats during their lifetime. It is, therefore, unclear how telomere shortening regulates tissue homeostasis in vertebrates with naturally short telomeres. Zebrafish have restricted telomerase expression and human-like telomere length. Here we show that first-generation tert(-/- zebrafish die prematurely with shorter telomeres. tert(-/- fish develop degenerative phenotypes, including premature infertility, gastrointestinal atrophy, and sarcopaenia. tert(-/- mutants have impaired cell proliferation, accumulation of DNA damage markers, and a p53 response leading to early apoptosis, followed by accumulation of senescent cells. Apoptosis is primarily observed in the proliferative niche and germ cells. Cell proliferation, but not apoptosis, is rescued in tp53(-/-tert(-/- mutants, underscoring p53 as mediator of telomerase deficiency and consequent telomere instability. Thus, telomerase is limiting for zebrafish lifespan, enabling the study of telomere shortening in naturally ageing individuals.

  19. Detection of human telomerase reverse transcriptase messenger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detection of Telomerase enzyme in exfoliated urinary cells is a potentially good molecular diagnostic marker in bladder cancer, since the catalytic subunit of this enzyme (hTERT) proved to be essential for cellular immortality and oncogenesis. Subjects and Methods: The study comprised 39 patients (36 with urothelial

  20. Telomeres, telomerase and premature ovarian failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Košir Pogačnik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized structures at the ends of chromosomes, consisting of six repeated nucleotides in TTAGGG sequence. Genome stability is partly maintained by the architecture of telomeres and is gradually lost as telomeres progressively shorten with each cell replication. Critically shortened telomeres are recognized by DNA repair mechanisms as DNA damage and the cell replication cycle stops. The cell eventually dies or undergoes cell apoptosis. Telomere represents a cellular marker of biological age and are therefore also called cell mitotic clock. The enzyme that counteracts telomere shortening by adding nucleotides to the 3’ end of DNA strand is called telomerase. It is composed of the RNA subunit (TR, which is special type of messenger RNA (mRNA, the catalytic protein subunit (TERT, which works as a reverse transcriptase and numerous additional proteins. Telomerase is active in some germline, epithelial and haemopoietic cells, but in most somatic cells the activity is undetectable. In literature, the length of telomeres is closely connected with premature ovarian failure (POF. POF is generally defined as the onset of menopause before the age of 40. The causes of disease are genetical, autoimmune, iatrogenic or if we cannot establish the cause – idiopathic. A lot of studies examined correlation between idiopathic POF, length of telomeres and telomerase activity. The studies mostly show that women with POF have shortened telomeres and decreased activity of telomerase as compared to healthy women.

  1. Telomerase inhibitors: a patent review (2010-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Ruo-Jun; Chen, Long-Wang; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that catalyses the addition of telomeric repeat sequences (having the sequence 5'-TTAGGG-3' in humans) to the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase activity is detected in most types of human tumours, but it is almost undetectable in normal somatic cells. Therefore, telomerase is a promising therapeutic target. To date, the known inhibitors of telomerase include nucleoside analogues, oligonucleotides and G-quadruplex stabilizers. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of telomerase inhibitors, the relationships between telomerase inhibitors, cancer, and fields such as inflammation. This review summarizes new patents published on telomerase inhibitors from 2010 to 2015. The review provides a brief account of the background, development, and on-going issues involving telomerase inhibitors. In particular, this review emphasizes imetelstat (GRN163L) and some typical G-quadruplex stabilizers that participate in telomerase inhibition. Overall, the research scope of antineoplastic is becoming broader and telomerase inhibitors have been shown to be a promising therapeutic target. Therefore, novel antineoplastic agents with greater activity and higher specificity must be developed.

  2. Telomerase expression in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Felice, Bruna; Annunziata, Anna; Fiorentino, Giuseppe; Manfellotto, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Raffaella; Marino, Rita; Borra, Marco; Biffali, Elio

    2014-10-01

    Telomerase and telomeric complex have been linked to a variety of disease states related to neurological dysfunction. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, telomerase activity, as human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, has not been characterized yet. Here, for the first time, we characterized telomerase and related pathway in blood sample and spinal cord from ALS patients compared with healthy controls. We found that hTERT expression level was significantly lower in ALS patients and was correlated either to p53 mRNA expression or p21 expression, pointing out the hypothesis that telomerase inhibition could be a pathogenetic contributor to neurodegeneration in ALS. As a consequence of the reduced telomerase activity, we identified shorter telomeres in leukocytes from sporadic ALS patients compared with healthy control group.

  3. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. Kuijpers (Taco W.); E.M.M. van Leeuwen (Ester); B.H. Barendregt (Barbara); P. Klarenbeek (Paul); D.J. Aan de Kerk (Daan); P.A. Baars (Paul); M.H. Jansen (Machiel H.); N. de Vries (Nicolette); R.A.W. van Lier (Rene); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B+T-NK-X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined

  4. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Barendregt, Barbara H.; Klarenbeek, Paul; Aan de Kerk, Daan J.; Baars, Paul A.; Jansen, Machiel H.; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A. W.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined

  5. Inhibition of telomerase by BIBR 1532 and related analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barma, D K; Elayadi, Anissa; Falck, J R; Corey, David R

    2003-04-07

    BIBR 1532 has been reported to be a potent, small molecule inhibitor of human telomerase, suggesting it as a lead for the development of anti-telomerase therapy. We confirm the ability of BIBR 1532 to inhibit telomerase and report the discovery of an equally potent analogue. Importantly, IC(50) values in cell extract are considerably higher than those previously reported using assays for purified enzyme, indicating that substantial improvement may be necessary.

  6. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer.

  7. Differences in telomerase activity between colon and rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayiomamitis, Georgios D.; Notas, George; Zaravinos, Apostolos; Zizi-Sermpetzoglou, Adamantia; Georgiadou, Maria; Sfakianaki, Ourania; Kouroumallis, Elias

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers and the third leading cause of cancer death in both sexes. The disease progresses as a multistep process and is associated with genetic alterations. One of the characteristic features of cancer is telomerase activation. We sought to evaluate the differences in telomerase activity between colon cancer and adjacent normal tissue and to correlate the differences in telomerase activity between different locations with clinicopathological factors and survival. Methods Matched colon tumour samples and adjacent normal mucosa samples 10 cm away from the tumour were collected during colectomy. We assessed telomerase activity using real time polymerase chain reaction. Several pathological characteristics of tumours, including p53, Ki-67, p21, bcl2 and MLH1 expression were also studied. Results We collected samples from 49 patients. There was a significantly higher telomerase activity in colon cancer tissue than normal tissue. Adenocarcinomas of the right colon express significantly higher telomerase than left-side cancers. Colon cancers and their adjacent normal tissue had significantly more telomerase and were more positive to MLH1 than rectal cancers. The expression of p53 negatively correlated to telomerase activity and was linked to better patient survival. Conclusion Colon and rectal cancers seem to have different telomerase and MLH1 profiles, and this could be another factor for their different biologic and clinical behaviour and progression. These results support the idea that the large bowel cannot be considered a uniform organ, at least in the biology of cancer. PMID:24869613

  8. Telomerase activation. One step on the road to cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greider, C W

    1999-03-01

    Ever since the discovery that telomeres are short in cancer cells and telomerase is activated in immortal cells, telomerase has been an oncogene wannabe. Oncogenes have been the glamour genes of molecular biology for 20 years, garnering flashy headlines and name recognition. More recently, tumor-suppressor genes have joined oncogenes on center stage. Recent evidence has shown that MYC upregulates the catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT, and that TERT cooperates with HPV E7 in cell immortalization. This evidence now supports the placement of telomerase among the cancer gene elite.

  9. Lack of TERT Promoter Mutations in Human B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Lam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL are a heterogeneous group of immune cell neoplasms that comprise molecularly distinct lymphoma subtypes. Recent work has identified high frequency promoter point mutations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT gene of different cancer types, including melanoma, glioma, liver and bladder cancer. TERT promoter mutations appear to correlate with increased TERT expression and telomerase activity in these cancers. In contrast, breast, pancreatic, and prostate cancer rarely demonstrate mutations in this region of the gene. TERT promoter mutation prevalence in NHL has not been thoroughly tested thus far. We screened 105 B-cell lymphoid malignancies encompassing nine NHL subtypes and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, for TERT promoter mutations. Our results suggest that TERT promoter mutations are rare or absent in most NHL. Thus, the classical TERT promoter mutations may not play a major oncogenic role in TERT expression and telomerase activation in NHL.

  10. Telomerase activity and telomerase reverse transcriptase expression induced by selenium in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ri-An; Chen, Hua-Jie; He, Ling-Fei; Chen, Bing; Chen, Xue-Min

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the effects of sodium selenite on telomerase activity, apoptosis and expression of TERT, c-myc and p53 in rat hepatocytes. Selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10 micromol/kg was given to SD rats by gavage. In rat hepatocytes, telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP), apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry, and expressions of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), c-myc and p53 were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). c-Myc and P53 proteins were detected by immunochemistry. Selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10 micromol/kg significantly increased hepatocellular telomerase activity and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Although selenium at doses of 2.5, 5.0, and 10 micromol/kg displayed no obvious enhancing effect on the TERT mRNA expression in rat hepatocytes (P > 0.05), it significantly increased the c-myc mRNA and p53 mRNA expression at the dose of 10 micromol/kg (P Selenium at doses of 5.0 and 10 micromol/kg obviously increased the content of P53 protein in rat hepatocytes, but only at the dose of 10 micromol/kg, it significantly promoted the value of c-Myc protein in them. Selenium can slightly increase telomerase activity and TERT expression, and significantly induce apoptosis and over-expression of c-myc and p53 at relatively high doses. The beneficial effects of selenium on senescence and aging may be mediated by telomerase activation and expression of TERT, c-myc, and p53 in rat hepatocytes.

  11. The β-carboline alkaloid harmine inhibits telomerase activity of MCF-7 cells by down-regulating hTERT mRNA expression accompanied by an accelerated senescent phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The end replication problem, which occurs in normal somatic cells inducing replicative senescence, is solved in most cancer cells by activating telomerase. The activity of telomerase is highly associated with carcinogenesis which makes the enzyme an attractive biomarker in cancer diagnosis and treatment. The indole alkaloid harmine has multiple pharmacological properties including DNA intercalation which can lead to frame shift mutations. In this study, harmine was applied to human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Its activity towards telomerase was analyzed by utilizing the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP. Our data indicate that harmine exhibits a pronounced cytotoxicity and induces an anti-proliferation state in MCF-7 cells which is accompanied by a significant inhibition of telomerase activity and an induction of an accelerated senescence phenotype by over-expressing elements of the p53/p21 pathway.

  12. Analyses of Tomato Fruit Brightness Mutants Uncover Both Cutin-Deficient and Cutin-Abundant Mutants and a New Hypomorphic Allele of GDSL Lipase[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants. PMID:24357602

  13. Analyses of tomato fruit brightness mutants uncover both cutin-deficient and cutin-abundant mutants and a new hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants.

  14. Generation of a hypomorphic model of propionic acidemia amenable to gene therapy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Adam J; Hofherr, Sean E; Hillestad, Matthew; Barry, Mary; Weaver, Eric; Venezia, Sarah; Kraus, Jan P; Matern, Dietrich; Barry, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a recessive genetic disease that results in an inability to metabolize certain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. Current treatment involves restricting consumption of these substrates or liver transplantation. Deletion of the Pcca gene in mice mimics the most severe forms of the human disease. Pcca(-) mice die within 36 hours of birth, making it difficult to test intravenous systemic therapies in them. We generated an adult hypomorphic model of PA in Pcca(-) mice using a transgene bearing an A138T mutant of the human PCCA protein. Pcca(-/-)(A138T) mice have 2% of wild-type PCC activity, survive to adulthood, and have elevations in propionyl-carnitine, methylcitrate, glycine, alanine, lysine, ammonia, and markers associated with cardiomyopathy similar to those in patients with PA. This adult model allowed gene therapy testing by intravenous injection with adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) and adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV8) vectors. Ad5-mediated more rapid increases in PCCA protein and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) activity in the liver than AAV8 and both vectors reduced propionylcarnitine and methylcitrate levels. Phenotypic correction was transient with first generation Ad whereas AAV8-mediated long-lasting effects. These data suggest that this PA model may be a useful platform for optimizing systemic intravenous therapies for PA.

  15. Spironolactone ameliorates PIT1-dependent vascular osteoinduction in klotho-hypomorphic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Leibrock, Christina B; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kuhn, Volker; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Ahmed, Mohamed S E; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Kuro-O, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2013-02-01

    Klotho is a potent regulator of 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] formation and calcium-phosphate metabolism. Klotho-hypomorphic mice (kl/kl mice) suffer from severe growth deficits, rapid aging, hyperphosphatemia, hyperaldosteronism, and extensive vascular and soft tissue calcification. Sequelae of klotho deficiency are similar to those of end-stage renal disease. We show here that the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone reduced vascular and soft tissue calcification and increased the life span of kl/kl mice, without significant effects on 1,25(OH)2D3, FGF23, calcium, and phosphate plasma concentrations. Spironolactone also reduced the expression of osteoinductive Pit1 and Tnfa mRNA, osteogenic transcription factors, and alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) in calcified tissues of kl/kl mice. In human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs), aldosterone dose-dependently increased PIT1 mRNA expression, an effect paralleled by increased expression of osteogenic transcription factors and enhanced ALP activity. The effects of aldosterone were reversed by both spironolactone treatment and PIT1 silencing and were mitigated by FGF23 cotreatment in HAoSMCs. In conclusion, aldosterone contributes to vascular and soft tissue calcification, an effect due, at least in part, to stimulation of spironolactone-sensitive, PIT1-dependent osteoinductive signaling.

  16. Nucleophosmin Interacts with PIN2/TERF1-interacting Telomerase Inhibitor 1 (PinX1) and Attenuates the PinX1 Inhibition on Telomerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Derek Hang-Cheong; Ho, Sai-Tim; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Jin, Rui; Wang, Ya-Nan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Huang, Jun-Jian; Shaw, Pang-Chui

    2017-03-03

    Telomerase activation and telomere maintenance are critical for cellular immortalization and transformation. PIN2/TERF1-interacting telomerase inhibitor 1 (PinX1) is a telomerase regulator and the aberrant expression of PinX1 causes telomere shortening. Identifying PinX1-interacting proteins is important for understanding telomere maintenance. We found that PinX1 directly interacts with nucleophosmin (NPM), a protein that has been shown to positively correlate with telomerase activity. We further showed that PinX1 acts as a linker in the association between NPM and hTERT, the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Additionally, the recruitment of NPM by PinX1 to the telomerase complex could partially attenuate the PinX1-mediated inhibition on telomerase activity. Taken together, our data reveal a novel mechanism that regulates telomerase activation through the interaction between NPM, PinX1 and the telomerase complex.

  17. Inhibition of telomerase activity and cell growth by free and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inhibition of telomerase activity and cell growth by free and nanoliposomal forms of punicalagin in human leukemia cell line K562. ... telomerase activity, following treatment with punicalagin, of the free and nanoliposomal forms were measured by telomeric repeat amplification protocol-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

  18. Telomerase Activity and Genetic Alterations in Primary Breast Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Papadopoulou

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that the structural and numerical chromosome abnormalities recorded in breast cancer could be the result of telomere dysfunction and that telomerase is activated de novo to provide a survival mechanism curtailing further chromosomal aberrations. However, recent in vivo and in vitro data show that the ectopic expression of telomerase promotes tumorigenesis via a telomere length-independent mechanism. In this study, the relation between telomerase expression and the extent of chromosomal aberrations was investigated in 62 primary breast carcinomas. Telomerase activity was measured using a polymerase chain reaction-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and 92% of the tumors were found to express telomerase with a relative activity ranging from 0 to 3839.6. Genetic alterations were determined by G-banding and comparative genomic hybridization analysis and 97% of the tumors exhibited chromosomal aberrations ranging from 0 to 44 (average: 10.98. In the overall series, the relationship between telomerase activity levels and genetic changes could be best described by a quadratic model, whereas in tumors with below-average genetic alteration numbers, a significant positive association was recorded between the two variables (coefficient=0.374, P= .017. The relationship between telomerase activity levels and the extent of genetic alteration may reflect the complex effect of telomerase activation upon tumor progression in breast carcinomas.

  19. β-Cyclodextrin-curcumin complex inhibit telomerase gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of telomerase gene in cells effectively was reduced as the concentration of β-cyclodextrin –curcumin complex was increased. The results show that β-cyclodextrin -curcumin complex have cytotoxic effect on T47D cell line through down regulation of telomerase expression and induction apoptosis by enhancing ...

  20. Single-Molecule Studies of Telomeres and Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W; Stone, Michael D

    2017-05-22

    Telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that protect chromosome ends from dangerous processing events. In most tissues, telomeres shorten with each round of cell division, placing a finite limit on cell growth. In rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers, cells bypass this growth limit through telomerase-catalyzed maintenance of telomere length. The dynamic properties of telomeres and telomerase render them difficult to study using ensemble biochemical and structural techniques. This review describes single-molecule approaches to studying how individual components of telomeres and telomerase contribute to function. Single-molecule methods provide a window into the complex nature of telomeres and telomerase by permitting researchers to directly visualize and manipulate the individual protein, DNA, and RNA molecules required for telomere function. The work reviewed in this article highlights how single-molecule techniques have been utilized to investigate the function of telomeres and telomerase.

  1. Telomerase Structure Paves the way for New Cancer Therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skordalakes, S.

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of a single enzyme, telomerase, is associated with the uncontrollable proliferation of cells observed in as many as 90% of all of human cancers. Since the mid-1990s, when telomerase activity was detected in human tumors, scientists have eyed the enzyme as an ideal target for developing broadly effective anticancer drugs. One of the missing links in the effort to identify such therapies has been the high-resolution structure of the enzyme, a powerful tool used for the identification and development of clinical drugs. A recent structure of the catalytic subunit of teleomerase from the Skordalakes laboratory, a major advancement in the field of telomeres, has opened the door to the development of new, broadly effective cancer drugs, as well as anti-aging therapies. Here we present a brief description of telomerase biology, current efforts to identify telomerase function modulators and the potential importance of the telomerase structure in future drug development.

  2. TERRA promotes telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Martin; Wischnewski, Harry; Bah, Amadou; Hu, Yan; Liu, Na; Lafranchi, Lorenzo; King, Megan C; Azzalin, Claus M

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase-mediated telomere elongation provides cell populations with the ability to proliferate indefinitely. Telomerase is capable of recognizing and extending the shortest telomeres in cells; nevertheless, how this mechanism is executed remains unclear. Here, we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, shortened telomeres are highly transcribed into the evolutionarily conserved long noncoding RNA TERRA A fraction of TERRA produced upon telomere shortening is polyadenylated and largely devoid of telomeric repeats, and furthermore, telomerase physically interacts with this polyadenylated TERRA in vivo We also show that experimentally enhanced transcription of a manipulated telomere promotes its association with telomerase and concomitant elongation. Our data represent the first direct evidence that TERRA stimulates telomerase recruitment and activity at chromosome ends in an organism with human-like telomeres. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. A Pilot Study of the Telomerase Inhibitor Imetelstat for Myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Lasho, Terra L; Begna, Kebede H; Patnaik, Mrinal M; Zblewski, Darci L; Finke, Christy M; Laborde, Rebecca R; Wassie, Emnet; Schimek, Lauren; Hanson, Curtis A; Gangat, Naseema; Wang, Xiaolin; Pardanani, Animesh

    2015-09-03

    Current drugs for myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis, including Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, do not induce complete or partial remissions. Imetelstat is a 13-mer lipid-conjugated oligonucleotide that targets the RNA template of human telomerase reverse transcriptase. We sought to obtain preliminary information on the therapeutic activity and safety of imetelstat in patients with high-risk or intermediate-2-risk myelofibrosis. Imetelstat was administered as a 2-hour intravenous infusion (starting dose, 9.4 mg per kilogram of body weight) every 1 to 3 weeks. The primary end point was the overall response rate, and the secondary end points were adverse events, spleen response, and independence from red-cell transfusions. A total of 33 patients (median age, 67 years) met the eligibility criteria; 48% had received prior JAK inhibitor therapy. A complete or partial remission occurred in 7 patients (21%), with a median duration of response of 18 months (range, 13 to 20+) for complete responses and 10 months (range, 7 to 10+) for partial responses. Bone marrow fibrosis was reversed in all 4 patients who had a complete response, and a molecular response occurred in 3 of the 4 patients. Response rates were 27% among patients with a JAK2 mutation versus 0% among those without a JAK2 mutation (P=0.30) and 32% among patients without an ASXL1 mutation versus 0% among those with an ASXL1 mutation (P=0.07). The rate of complete response was 38% among patients with a mutation in SF3B1 or U2AF1 versus 4% among patients without a mutation in these genes (P=0.04). Responses did not correlate with baseline telomere length. Treatment-related adverse events included grade 4 thrombocytopenia (in 18% of patients), grade 4 neutropenia (in 12%), grade 3 anemia (in 30%), and grade 1 or 2 elevation in levels of total bilirubin (in 12%), alkaline phosphatase (in 21%), and aspartate aminotransferase (in 27%). Imetelstat was found to be active in patients with myelofibrosis

  4. Feedback regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase: new insight into the evolving field of telomerase in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Huang, Cheng; He, Xu; Tian, Yuan-Yao; Zhou, De-Xi; He, Yong; Liu, Xin-Hua; Li, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic component of telomerase, especially the rate-limiting determinant of telomerase activity. So far, TERT has been reported to be over-expressed in more than 90% of cancers, thereby playing a critical role in sustained proliferation and survival potentials of various cancer cells. Over the past decade, a comprehensive network of transcription factors has been shown to be involved in the regulation of TERT. Furthermore, accumulating evidence has suggested that TERT could modulate the expression of numerous genes involved in diverse group of cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and cellular signaling. Therefore, it indicates that TERT is both an effector and a regulator in carcinoma. However, the mechanisms of the interaction between TERT and its target genes are still not fully understood. Thus, it is necessary to consolidate and summarize recent developments of the cross-talk between TERT and related genes in cancer cells or other cells with cancer cell characteristics, and elucidate these relevant mechanisms. In this review, we focus on various signaling pathways and genes that participate in the feedback regulation of TERT and the underlying feedback loop mechanism of TERT, further providing new insights into non-telomeric functions of telomerase and potentially to be used as a novel therapeutic target for cancer. © 2013.

  5. Processive and Distributive Extension of Human Telomeres by Telomerase Under Homeostatic and Non-equilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Abreu, Eladio; Kim, Jinyong; Stadler, Guido; Eskiocak, Ugur; Terns, Michael P.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Specific information about how telomerase acts in vivo is necessary for understanding telomere dynamics in human tumor cells. Our results imply that under homeostatic telomere length-maintenance conditions only one molecule of telomerase acts at each telomere during every cell division and processively adds ~60 nt to each end. In contrast, multiple molecules of telomerase act at each telomere when telomeres are elongating (non-equilibrium conditions). Telomerase extension is less processive during the first few weeks following the reversal of long-term treatment with the telomerase inhibitor GRN163L, a time when Cajal bodies fail to deliver telomerase RNA to telomeres. This result implies that processing of telomerase by Cajal bodies may affect its processivity. Overexpressed telomerase is also less processive than the endogenously expressed telomerase. These findings reveal two major distinct extension modes adopted by telomerase in vivo. PMID:21549308

  6. Telomerase expression is sufficient for chromosomal integrity in cells lacking p53 dependent G1 checkpoint function

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    Simpson Dennis A

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secondary cultures of human fibroblasts display a finite lifespan ending at senescence. Loss of p53 function by mutation or viral oncogene expression bypasses senescence, allowing cell division to continue for an additional 10 – 20 doublings. During this time chromosomal aberrations seen in mitotic cells increase while DNA damage and decatenation checkpoint functions in G2 cells decrease. Methods To explore this complex interplay between chromosomal instability and checkpoint dysfunction, human fibroblast lines were derived that expressed HPV16E6 oncoprotein or dominant-negative alleles of p53 (A143V and H179Q with or without the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Results Cells with normal p53 function displayed 86 – 93% G1 arrest after exposure to 1.5 Gy ionizing radiation (IR. Expression of HPV16E6 or p53-H179Q severely attenuated G1 checkpoint function (3 – 20% arrest while p53-A143V expression induced intermediate attenuation (55 – 57% arrest irrespective of telomerase expression. All cell lines, regardless of telomerase expression or p53 status, exhibited a normal DNA damage G2 checkpoint response following exposure to 1.5 Gy IR prior to the senescence checkpoint. As telomerase-negative cells bypassed senescence, the frequencies of chromosomal aberrations increased generally congruent with attenuation of G2 checkpoint function. Telomerase expression allowed cells with defective p53 function to grow >175 doublings without chromosomal aberrations or attenuation of G2 checkpoint function. Conclusion Thus, chromosomal instability in cells with defective p53 function appears to depend upon telomere erosion not loss of the DNA damage induced G1 checkpoint.

  7. Hypomorphism of Fto and Rpgrip1l causes obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigopoulos, George; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Rausch, Richard; Gill, Richard; Penn, David Barth; Skowronski, Alicja A; LeDuc, Charles A; Lanzano, Anthony J; Zhang, Pumin; Storm, Daniel R; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2016-05-02

    Noncoding polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene represent common alleles that are strongly associated with effects on food intake and adiposity in humans. Previous studies have suggested that the obesity-risk allele rs8050136 in the first intron of FTO alters a regulatory element recognized by the transcription factor CUX1, thereby leading to decreased expression of FTO and retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein-1 like (RPGRIP1L). Here, we evaluated the effects of rs8050136 and another potential CUX1 element in rs1421085 on expression of nearby genes in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived (iPSC-derived) neurons. There were allele-dosage effects on FTO, RPGRIP1L, and AKT-interacting protein (AKTIP) expression, but expression of other vicinal genes, including IRX3, IRX5, and RBL2, which have been implicated in mediating functional effects, was not altered. In vivo manipulation of CUX1, Fto, and/or Rpgrip1l expression in mice affected adiposity in a manner that was consistent with CUX1 influence on adiposity via remote effects on Fto and Rpgrip1l expression. In support of a mechanism, mice hypomorphic for Rpgrip1l exhibited hyperphagic obesity, as the result of diminished leptin sensitivity in Leprb-expressing neurons. Together, the results of this study indicate that the effects of FTO-associated SNPs on energy homeostasis are due in part to the effects of these genetic variations on hypothalamic FTO, RPGRIP1L, and possibly other genes.

  8. Reduced Ca2+ entry and suicidal death of erythrocytes in PDK1 hypomorphic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, Michael; Mahmud, Hasan; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Florian

    2008-02-01

    The phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 is a key element in the phosphoinositol-3-kinase signalling pathway, which is involved in the regulation of ion channels, transporters, cell volume and cell survival. Eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes, is characterized by decrease in cell volume, cell membrane blebbing and phospholipids scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Oxidative stress, osmotic shock or Cl- removal trigger eryptosis by activation of Ca2+-permeable cation channels and subsequent increase in cytosolic Ca2+ activity. To explore the impact of PDK1 for erythrocyte survival, eryptosis was analysed in hypomorphic mice (pdk1hm) expressing only some 25% of PDK1 and in their wild-type littermates (pdk1wt). Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter and phosphatidylserine exposure from annexin-V binding in fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis. Forward scatter was smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Oxidative stress (100 microM tert-butylhydroperoxide), osmotic shock (+300 mM sucrose) and Cl- removal (replacement of Cl- with gluconate) all decreased forward scatter and increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding erythrocytes from both pdk1hm and pdk1wt mice. After treatment, the forward scatter was similar in both genotypes, but the percentage of annexin-V binding was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. According to Fluo-3 fluorescence, cytosolic Ca2+ activity was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Treatment with Ca2+-ionophore ionomycin (1 microM) was followed by an increase in annexin-V binding to similar levels in pdk1hm and pdk1wt erythrocytes. The experiments reveal that PDK1 deficiency is associated with decreased Ca2+ entry into erythrocytes and thus with blunted eryptotic effects of oxidative stress, osmotic shock and Cl- removal.

  9. Perifosine as a potential novel anti-telomerase therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holohan, Brody; Hagiopian, Moriah M; Lai, Tsung-Po; Huang, Ejun; Friedman, Daphne R; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2015-09-08

    Most tumors circumvent telomere-length imposed replicative limits through expression of telomerase, the reverse transcriptase that maintains telomere length. Substantial evidence that AKT activity is required for telomerase activity exists, indicating that AKT inhibitors may also function as telomerase inhibitors. This possibility has not been investigated in a clinical context despite many clinical trials evaluating AKT inhibitors. We tested if Perifosine, an AKT inhibitor in clinical trials, inhibits telomerase activity and telomere maintenance in tissue culture and orthotopic xenograft models as well as in purified CLL samples from a phase II Perifosine clinical trial. We demonstrate that Perifosine inhibits telomerase activity and induces telomere shortening in a wide variety of cell lines in vitro, though there is substantial heterogeneity in long-term responses to Perifosine between cell lines. Perifosine did reduce primary breast cancer orthotopic xenograft tumor size, but did not impact metastatic burden in a statistically significant manner. However, Perifosine reduced telomerase activity in four of six CLL patients evaluated. Two of the patients were treated for four to six months and shortening of the shortest telomeres occurred in both patients' cells. These results indicate that it may be possible to repurpose Perifosine or other AKT pathway inhibitors as a novel approach to targeting telomerase.

  10. Multiple DNA Interactions Contribute to the Initiation of Telomerase Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir Andersson, Ahu; Gustafsson, Cecilia; Krishnankutty, Roopesh; Cohn, Marita

    2017-07-07

    Telomerase maintains telomere length and chromosome integrity by adding short tandem repeats of single-stranded DNA to the 3' ends, via reverse transcription of a defined template region of its RNA subunit. To further understand the telomerase elongation mechanism, we studied the primer utilization and extension activity of the telomerase from the budding yeast Naumovozyma castellii (Saccharomyces castellii), which displays a processive nucleotide and repeat addition polymerization. For the efficient initiation of canonical elongation, telomerase required 4-nt primer 3' end complementarity to the template RNA. This DNA-RNA hybrid formation was highly important for the stabilization of an initiation-competent telomerase-DNA complex. Anchor site interactions with the DNA provided additional stabilization to the complex. Our studies indicate three additional separate interactions along the length of the DNA primer, each providing different and distinct contributions to the initiation event. A sequence-independent anchor site interaction acts immediately adjacent to the base-pairing 3' end, indicating a protein anchor site positioned very close to the catalytic site. Two additional anchor regions further 5' on the DNA provide sequence-specific contributions to the initiation of elongation. Remarkably, a non-telomeric sequence in the distal 25- to 32-nt region negatively influences the initiation of telomerase elongation, suggesting an anchor site with a regulatory role in the telomerase elongation decision. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Telomerase RNA is more than a DNA template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2016-08-02

    The addition of telomeric DNA to chromosome ends is an essential cellular activity that compensates for the loss of genomic DNA that is due to the inability of the conventional DNA replication apparatus to duplicate the entire chromosome. The telomerase reverse transcriptase and its associated RNA bind to the very end of the telomere via a sequence in the RNA and specific protein-protein interactions. Telomerase RNA also provides the template for addition of new telomeric repeats by the reverse-transcriptase protein subunit. In addition to the template, there are 3 other conserved regions in telomerase RNA that are essential for normal telomerase activity. Here we briefly review the conserved core regions of telomerase RNA and then focus on a recent study in fission yeast that determined the function of another conserved region in telomerase RNA called the Stem Terminus Element (STE). (1) The STE is distant from the templating core of telomerase in both the linear and RNA secondary structure, but, nonetheless, affects the fidelity of telomere sequence addition and, in turn, the ability of telomere binding proteins to bind and protect chromosome ends. We will discuss possible mechanisms of STE action and the suitability of the STE as an anti-cancer target.

  12. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MERISTEM DISORGANIZATION1 encodes TEN1, an essential telomere protein that modulates telomerase processivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leehy, Katherine A; Lee, Jung Ro; Song, Xiangyu; Renfrew, Kyle B; Shippen, Dorothy E

    2013-04-01

    Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being recognized as DNA damage, and they facilitate the complete replication of linear chromosomes. CST [for CTC1(Cdc13)/STN1/TEN1] is a trimeric chromosome end binding complex implicated in both aspects of telomere function. Here, we characterize TEN1 in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We report that TEN1 (for telomeric pathways in association with Stn1, which stands for suppressor of cdc thirteen) is encoded by a previously characterized gene, MERISTEM DISORGANIZATION1 (MDO1). A point mutation in MDO1, mdo1-1/ten1-3 (G77E), triggers stem cell differentiation and death as well as a constitutive DNA damage response. We provide biochemical and genetic evidence that ten1-3 is likely to be a null mutation. As with ctc1 and stn1 null mutants, telomere tracts in ten1-3 are shorter and more heterogeneous than the wild type. Mutants also exhibit frequent telomere fusions, increased single-strand telomeric DNA, and telomeric circles. However, unlike stn1 or ctc1 mutants, telomerase enzyme activity is elevated in ten1-3 mutants due to an increase in repeat addition processivity. In addition, TEN1 is detected at a significantly smaller fraction of telomeres than CTC1. These data indicate that TEN1 is critical for telomere stability and also plays an unexpected role in modulating telomerase enzyme activity.

  14. Telomeres and telomerase as therapeutic targets to prevent and treat age-related diseases [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bär

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres, the protective ends of linear chromosomes, shorten throughout an individual’s lifetime. Telomere shortening is a hallmark of molecular aging and is associated with premature appearance of diseases associated with aging. Here, we discuss the role of telomere shortening as a direct cause for aging and age-related diseases. In particular, we draw attention to the fact that telomere length influences longevity. Furthermore, we discuss intrinsic and environmental factors that can impact on human telomere erosion. Finally, we highlight recent advances in telomerase-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of diseases associated with extremely short telomeres owing to mutations in telomerase, as well as age-related diseases, and ultimately aging itself.

  15. Alternative mechanisms of telomere lengthening: Permissive mutations, DNA repair proteins and tumorigenic progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocha, April Renee Sandy; Harris, Julia [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Groden, Joanna, E-mail: joanna.groden@osumc.edu [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Neoplastic cells maintain telomeres by telomerase or ALT. ► Genetic mutations in p53, ATRX, DAXX or H3F3A may activate ALT. ► Many DNA repair proteins are involved in ALT. ► Tumor progression is favored by telomerase expression. - Abstract: Telomeres protect chromosome termini to maintain genomic stability and regulate cellular lifespan. Maintenance of telomere length is required for neoplastic cells after the acquisition of mutations that deregulate cell cycle control and increase cellular proliferation, and can occur through expression of the enzyme telomerase or in a telomerase-independent manner termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The precise mechanisms that govern the activation of ALT or telomerase in tumor cells are unknown, although cellular origin may favor one or the other mechanisms. ALT pathways are incompletely understood to date; however, recent publications have increasingly broadened our understanding of how ALT is activated, how it proceeds, and how it influences tumor growth. Specific mutational events influence ALT activation, as mutations in genes that suppress recombination and/or alterations in the regulation of telomerase expression are associated with ALT. Once engaged, ALT uses DNA repair proteins to maintain telomeres in the absence of telomerase; experiments that manipulate the expression of specific proteins in cells using ALT are illuminating some of its mechanisms. Furthermore, ALT may influence tumor growth, as experimental and clinical data suggest that telomerase expression may favor tumor progression. This review summarizes recent findings in mammalian cells and models, as well as clinical data, that identify the genetic mutations permissive to ALT, the DNA repair proteins involved in ALT mechanisms and the importance of telomere maintenance mechanisms for tumor progression. A comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms that permit tumor cell immortalization will be important for identifying

  16. Telomeres and Telomerase in Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Jih-Kai Yeh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are tandem repeat DNA sequences present at the ends of each eukaryotic chromosome to stabilize the genome structure integrity. Telomere lengths progressively shorten with each cell division. Inflammation and oxidative stress, which are implicated as major mechanisms underlying cardiovascular diseases, increase the rate of telomere shortening and lead to cellular senescence. In clinical studies, cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and hypertension have been associated with short leukocyte telomere length. In addition, low telomerase activity and short leukocyte telomere length have been observed in atherosclerotic plaque and associated with plaque instability, thus stroke or acute myocardial infarction. The aging myocardium with telomere shortening and accumulation of senescent cells limits the tissue regenerative capacity, contributing to systolic or diastolic heart failure. In addition, patients with ion-channel defects might have genetic imbalance caused by oxidative stress-related accelerated telomere shortening, which may subsequently cause sudden cardiac death. Telomere length can serve as a marker for the biological status of previous cell divisions and DNA damage with inflammation and oxidative stress. It can be integrated into current risk prediction and stratification models for cardiovascular diseases and can be used in precise personalized treatments. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of telomeres and telomerase in the aging process and their association with cardiovascular diseases. In addition, we discuss therapeutic interventions targeting the telomere system in cardiovascular disease treatments.

  17. Late-Onset Non-HLH Presentations of Growth Arrest, Inflammatory Arachnoiditis, and Severe Infectious Mononucleosis, in Siblings with Hypomorphic Defects in UNC13D

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    Paul Edgar Gray

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi-allelic null mutations affecting UNC13D, STXBP2, or STX11 result in defects of lymphocyte cytotoxic degranulation and commonly cause familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL in early life. Patients with partial loss of function are increasingly being diagnosed after presenting with alternative features of this disease, or with HLH later in life. Here, we studied two sisters with lymphocyte degranulation defects secondary to compound heterozygote missense variants in UNC13D. The older sibling presented aged 11 with linear growth arrest and delayed puberty, 2 years prior to developing transient ischemic attacks secondary to neuroinflammation and hypogammaglobulinemia, but no FHL symptoms. Her geno-identical younger sister was initially asymptomatic but then presented at the same age with severe EBV-driven infectious mononucleosis, which was treated aggressively and did not progress to HLH. The sisters had similar natural killer cell degranulation; however, while cytotoxic activity was moderately reduced in the asymptomatic patient, it was completely absent in both siblings during active disease. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the age of 15, the older child has completely recovered NK cell cytotoxicity, is asymptomatic, and has experienced an exceptional compensatory growth spurt. Her younger sister was also successfully transplanted and is currently disease free. The current study reveals previously unappreciated manifestations of FHL in patients who inherited hypomorphic gene variants and also raises the important question of whether a threshold of minimum NK function can be defined that should protect a patient from serious disease manifestations such as HLH.

  18. Telomerase-inhibitory effects of sugar-modified nucleotide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinmei, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hazuki; Amano, Rie; Suzuki, Kaori; Saneyoshi, Mineo; Yamaguchi, Toyofumi

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase is an endogenous reverse transcriptase that uses its internal RNA moiety as a template for the synthesis of telomere repeats, thus maintaining telomere length. To study the susceptibility of telomerase to sugar-modified nucleotide analogs, inhibition by arabinofuranosylguanine 5'-triphosphate (araGTP), 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (AZdGTP), 2',3'-dideoxy-2'-fluoroarabino-furanosylguanine 5'-triphosphate (FaraGTP), and their thymine counterparts was investigated. Among these compounds, all dGTP analogs showed potent inhibitory activity against human telomerase. Conversely, dTTP analogs showed moderate or weak inhibition. Partially purified telomerase from cherry salmon testis utilized ddGTP and AZdGTP as substrates into the 3'-terminus of DNA.

  19. Targeting DNA-PKcs and telomerase in brain tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Resham Lal; Lim, Hui Kheng; Venkatesan, Shriram; Lee, Phoebe Su Wen; Hande, M Prakash

    2014-10-13

    Patients suffering from brain tumours such as glioblastoma and medulloblastoma have poor prognosis with a median survival of less than a year. Identifying alternative molecular targets would enable us to develop different therapeutic strategies for better management of these tumours. Glioblastoma (MO59K and KNS60) and medulloblastoma cells (ONS76) were used in this study. Telomerase inhibitory effects of MST-312, a chemically modified-derivative of epigallocatechin gallate, in the cells were assessed using telomere repeat amplification protocol. Gene expression analysis following MST-312 treatment was done by microarray. Telomere length was measured by telomere restriction fragments analysis. Effects of MST-312 on DNA integrity were evaluated by single cell gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence assay and cytogenetic analysis. Phosphorylation status of DNA-PKcs was measured with immunoblotting and effects on cell proliferation were monitored with cell titre glow and trypan blue exclusion following dual inhibition. MST-312 showed strong binding affinity to DNA and displayed reversible telomerase inhibitory effects in brain tumour cells. In addition to the disruption of telomere length maintenance, MST-312 treatment decreased brain tumour cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest and double strand breaks (DSBs). DNA-PKcs activation was observed in telomerase-inhibited cells presumably as a response to DNA damage. Impaired DNA-PKcs in MO59J cells or in MO59K cells treated with DNA-PKcs inhibitor, NU7026, caused a delay in the repair of DSBs. In contrast, MST-312 did not induce DSBs in telomerase negative osteosarcoma cells (U2OS). Combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and telomerase resulted in an increase in telomere signal-free chromosomal ends in brain tumour cells as well. Interestingly, continual exposure of brain tumour cells to telomerase inhibitor led to population of cells, which displayed resistance to telomerase inhibition-mediated cell arrest. DNA-PKcs ablation

  20. Telomerase as a Cancer Target. Development of New Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, D.L. Mengual; Armando, R.G.; Cerrudo, C.S.; Ghiringhelli, P.D.; Gomez, D.E.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are the terminal part of the chromosome containing a long repetitive and non-codifying sequence that has as function protecting the chromosomes. In normal cells, telomeres lost part of such repetitive sequence in each mitosis, until telomeres reach a critical point, triggering at that time senescence and cell death. However, in most of tumor cells in each cell division a part of the telomere is lost, however the appearance of an enzyme called telomerase synthetize the segment that just has been lost, therefore conferring to tumor cells the immortality hallmark. Telomerase is significantly overexpressed in 80–95% of all malignant tumors, being present at low levels in few normal cells, mostly stem cells. Due to these characteristics, telomerase has become an attractive target for new and more effective anticancer agents. The capability of inhibiting telomerase in tumor cells should lead to telomere shortening, senescence and apoptosis. In this work, we analyze the different strategies for telomerase inhibition, either in development, preclinical or clinical stages taking into account their strong points and their caveats. We covered strategies such as nucleosides analogs, oligonucleotides, small molecule inhibitors, G-quadruplex stabilizers, immunotherapy, gene therapy, molecules that affect the telomere/telomerase associated proteins, agents from microbial sources, among others, providing a balanced evaluation of the status of the inhibitors of this powerful target together with an analysis of the challenges ahead. PMID:26873194

  1. Telomeres and telomerase in prostate cancer development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mindy Kim; Meeker, Alan

    2017-10-01

    Aberrations in telomere biology are among the earliest events in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and continue during tumour progression. Substantial telomere shortening occurs in prostate cancer cells and high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Not all mechanisms of telomere shortening are understood, but oxidative stress from local inflammation might accelerate prostatic telomere loss. Critically short telomeres can drive the accumulation of tumour-promoting genomic alterations; however, continued telomere erosion is unsustainable and must be mitigated to ensure cancer cell survival and unlimited replication potential. Prostate cancers predominantly maintain telomeres by activating telomerase, but alternative mechanisms of telomere extension can occur in metastatic disease. Telomerase activity and telomere length assessment might be useful in prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Telomere shortening in normal stromal cells has been associated with prostate cancer, whereas variable telomere lengths in prostate cancer cells and telomere shortening in cancer-associated stromal cells correlated with lethal disease. Single-agent telomerase-targeted treatments for solid cancers were ineffective in clinical trials but have not been investigated in prostate cancer and might be useful in combination with established regimens. Telomere-directed strategies have not been explored as extensively. Telomere deprotection strategies have the advantage of being effective in both telomerase-dependent and telomerase-independent cancers. Disruption of androgen receptor function in prostate cancer cells results in telomere dysfunction, indicating telomeres and telomerase as potential therapeutic targets in prostate cancer.

  2. Role for telomerase in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraret, Nathalie; Houssaïni, Amal; Abid, Shariq; Quarck, Rozenn; Marcos, Elisabeth; Parpaleix, Aurelien; Gary-Bobo, Guillaume; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Derumeaux, Geneviève; Boczkowski, Jorge; Delcroix, Marion; Blasco, Maria A; Lipskaia, Larissa; Amsellem, Valérie; Adnot, Serge

    2015-02-24

    Cells exhibiting dysregulated growth may express telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the dual function of which consists of maintaining telomere length, in association with the RNA template molecule TERC, and controlling cell growth. Here, we investigated lung TERT in human and experimental pulmonary hypertension (PH) and its role in controlling pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PA-SMC) proliferation. Marked TERT expression or activity was found in lungs from patients with idiopathic PH and from mice with PH induced by hypoxia or serotonin-transporter overexpression (SM22-5HTT(+) mice), chiefly within PA-SMCs. In cultured mouse PA-SMCs, TERT was expressed on growth stimulation by serum. The TERT inhibitor imetelstat and the TERT activator TA65 abrogated and stimulated PA-SMC growth, respectively. PA-SMCs from PH mice showed a heightened proliferative phenotype associated with increased TERT expression, which was suppressed by imetelstat treatment. TERC(-/-) mice at generation 2 and TERT(-/-) mice at generations 2, 3, and 4 developed less severe PH than did wild-type mice exposed to chronic hypoxia, with less distal pulmonary artery muscularization and fewer Ki67-stained proliferating PA-SMCs. Telomere length differed between TERC(-/-) and TERT(-/-) mice, whereas PH severity was similar in the 2 strains and across generations. Chronic imetelstat treatment reduced hypoxia-induced PH in wild-type mice or partially reversed established PH in SM22-5HTT(+) mice while simultaneously decreasing TERT expression. Opposite effects occurred in mice treated with TA65. Telomerase exerts telomere-independent effects on PA-SMC growth in PH and may constitute a treatment target for PH. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wolters Kluwer.

  3. Enzymatic activity of endogenous telomerase associated with intact nuclei from human leukemia CEM cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, T M; Trevino, A; Woynarowski, J M

    1999-11-01

    Telomerase, a telomere-specific DNA polymerase and novel target for chemotherapeutic intervention, is found in many types of cancers. Telomerase activity is typically assayed using an exogenous primer and cellular extracts as the source of enzyme. Since the nuclear organization might affect telomerase function, we developed a system in which telomerase in intact nuclei catalyzes primer extension. Telomerase activity in isotonically isolated nuclei from human CEM cells shows low processivity (addition of up to four TTAGGG repeats). In contrast, telomerase activity which leaks into a 500 g postnuclear supernatant and the activity in a CHAPS extract are highly processive. The nucleotide inhibitor, 7-deaza-dGTP, seems to be more inhibitory against the nuclei-associated enzyme compared to telomerase from cytoplasmic extracts. However, 7-deaza-dATP and ddGTP are less inhibitory against nuclei-associated telomerase. The results suggest that the association of telomerase with the nuclear chromatin affects telomerase activity. Examination of telomerase activity in a more natural nuclear environment may shed new light on the telomerase function and provide a useful system for the evaluation of new telomerase inhibitors. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  4. cDNA Library Screening Identifies Protein Interactors Potentially Involved in Non-telomeric Roles of Arabidopsis Telomerase

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    Ladislav eDokládal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase-reverse transcriptase (TERT plays an essential catalytic role in maintaining telomeres. However, in animal systems telomerase plays additional non-telomeric functional roles. We previously screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the C-terminal extension (CTE TERT domain and identified a nuclear-localized protein that contains a RNA recognition motif (RRM. This RRM-protein forms homodimers in both plants and yeast. Mutation of the gene encoding the RRM-protein had no detectable effect on plant growth and development, nor did it affect telomerase activity or telomere length in vivo, suggesting a non-telomeric role for TERT/RRM-protein complexes. The gene encoding the RRM-protein is highly expressed in leaf and reproductive tissues. We further screened an Arabidopsis cDNA library for proteins that interact with the RRM-protein and identified five interactors. These proteins are involved in numerous non-telomere-associated cellular activities. In plants, the RRM-protein, both alone and in a complex with its interactors, localizes to nuclear speckles. Transcriptional analyses in wild-type and rrm mutant plants, as well as transcriptional co-analyses, suggest that TERT, the RRM-protein, and the RRM-protein interactors may play important roles in non-telomeric cellular functions.

  5. Telomerase Inhibitor Imetelstat in Patients with Essential Thrombocythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerlocher, Gabriela M; Oppliger Leibundgut, Elisabeth; Ottmann, Oliver G; Spitzer, Gary; Odenike, Olatoyosi; McDevitt, Michael A; Röth, Alexander; Daskalakis, Michael; Burington, Bart; Stuart, Monic; Snyder, David S

    2015-09-03

    Imetelstat, a 13-mer oligonucleotide that is covalently modified with lipid extensions, competitively inhibits telomerase enzymatic activity. It has been shown to inhibit megakaryocytic proliferation in vitro in cells obtained from patients with essential thrombocythemia. In this phase 2 study, we investigated whether imetelstat could elicit hematologic and molecular responses in patients with essential thrombocythemia who had not had a response to or who had had unacceptable side effects from prior therapies. A total of 18 patients in two sequential cohorts received an initial dose of 7.5 or 9.4 mg of imetelstat per kilogram of body weight intravenously once a week until attainment of a platelet count of approximately 250,000 to 300,000 per cubic millimeter. The primary end point was the best hematologic response. Imetelstat induced hematologic responses in all 18 patients, and 16 patients (89%) had a complete hematologic response. At the time of the primary analysis, 10 patients were still receiving treatment, with a median follow-up of 17 months (range, 7 to 32 [ongoing]). Molecular responses were seen in 7 of 8 patients who were positive for the JAK2 V617F mutation (88%; 95% confidence interval, 47 to 100). CALR and MPL mutant allele burdens were also reduced by 15 to 66%. The most common adverse events during treatment were mild to moderate in severity; neutropenia of grade 3 or higher occurred in 4 of the 18 patients (22%) and anemia, headache, and syncope of grade 3 or higher each occurred in 2 patients (11%). All the patients had at least one abnormal liver-function value; all persistent elevations were grade 1 or 2 in severity. Rapid and durable hematologic and molecular responses were observed in patients with essential thrombocythemia who received imetelstat. (Funded by Geron; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01243073.).

  6. Telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA is induced by telomere shortening to nucleate telomerase molecules at short telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanelli, Emilio; Romero, Carmina Angelica Perez; Chartrand, Pascal

    2013-09-26

    Elongation of a short telomere depends on the action of multiple telomerase molecules, which are visible as telomerase RNA foci or clusters associated with telomeres in yeast and mammalian cells. How several telomerase molecules act on a single short telomere is unknown. Herein, we report that the telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA is involved in the nucleation of telomerase molecules into clusters prior to their recruitment at a short telomere. We find that telomere shortening induces TERRA expression, leading to the accumulation of TERRA molecules into a nuclear focus. Simultaneous time-lapse imaging of telomerase RNA and TERRA reveals spontaneous events of telomerase nucleation on TERRA foci in early S phase, generating TERRA-telomerase clusters. This cluster is subsequently recruited to the short telomere from which TERRA transcripts originate during S phase. We propose that telomere shortening induces noncoding RNA expression to coordinate the recruitment and activity of telomerase molecules at short telomeres. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Understanding TERT Promoter Mutations: A Common Path to Immortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert J A; Rube, H Tomas; Xavier-Magalhães, Ana; Costa, Bruno M; Mancini, Andrew; Song, Jun S; Costello, Joseph F

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase (TERT) activation is a fundamental step in tumorigenesis. By maintaining telomere length, telomerase relieves a main barrier on cellular lifespan, enabling limitless proliferation driven by oncogenes. The recently discovered, highly recurrent mutations in the promoter of TERT are found in over 50 cancer types, and are the most common mutation in many cancers. Transcriptional activation of TERT, via promoter mutation or other mechanisms, is the rate-limiting step in production of active telomerase. Although TERT is expressed in stem cells, it is naturally silenced upon differentiation. Thus, the presence of TERT promoter mutations may shed light on whether a particular tumor arose from a stem cell or more differentiated cell type. It is becoming clear that TERT mutations occur early during cellular transformation, and activate the TERT promoter by recruiting transcription factors that do not normally regulate TERT gene expression. This review highlights the fundamental and widespread role of TERT promoter mutations in tumorigenesis, including recent progress on their mechanism of transcriptional activation. These somatic promoter mutations, along with germline variation in the TERT locus also appear to have significant value as biomarkers of patient outcome. Understanding the precise molecular mechanism of TERT activation by promoter mutation and germline variation may inspire novel cancer cell-specific targeted therapies for a large number of cancer patients. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Nonsense mutations in the shelterin complex genes ACD and TERF2IP in familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoude, Lauren G; Pritchard, Antonia L; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The shelterin complex protects chromosomal ends by regulating how the telomerase complex interacts with telomeres. Following the recent finding in familial melanoma of inactivating germline mutations in POT1, encoding a member of the shelterin complex, we searched for mutations in the...

  9. Telomerase in relation to clinicopathologic prognostic factors and survival in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, GBA; Knol, AJ; Helder, MN; Krans, M; de Vries, EGE; Hollema, H; de Jong, S; van der Zee, AGJ

    2001-01-01

    We investigated, in cervical cancer, the relation between telomerase activity, telomerase RNA (hTR) and mRNA of the catalytic subunit of telomerase, hTERT, with "classic" clinicopathological factors as well as survival. Frozen specimens were obtained from 107 consecutive patients with cervical

  10. Immortalization of human CD8+ T cell clones by ectopic expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijberg, E.; Ruizendaal, J. J.; Snijders, P. J.; Kueter, E. W.; Walboomers, J. M.; Spits, H.

    2000-01-01

    Replicative senescence of T cells is correlated with erosion of telomere ends. Telomerase plays a key role in maintaining telomere length. Therefore, it is thought that telomerase regulates the life span of T cells. To test this hypothesis, we have over-expressed human telomerase reverse

  11. Telomerase efficiently elongates highly transcribing telomeres in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin O Farnung

    Full Text Available RNA polymerase II transcribes the physical ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes into a variety of long non-coding RNA molecules including telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA. Since TERRA discovery, advances have been made in the characterization of TERRA biogenesis and regulation; on the contrary its associated functions remain elusive. Most of the biological roles so far proposed for TERRA are indeed based on in vitro experiments carried out using short TERRA-like RNA oligonucleotides. In particular, it has been suggested that TERRA inhibits telomerase activity. We have exploited two alternative cellular systems to test whether TERRA and/or telomere transcription influence telomerase-mediated telomere elongation in human cancer cells. In cells lacking the two DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3b, TERRA transcription and steady-state levels are greatly increased while telomerase is able to elongate telomeres normally. Similarly, telomerase can efficiently elongate transgenic inducible telomeres whose transcription has been experimentally augmented. Our data challenge the current hypothesis that TERRA functions as a general inhibitor of telomerase and suggest that telomere length homeostasis is maintained independently of TERRA and telomere transcription.

  12. Clonal cell populations unresponsive to radiosensitization induced by telomerase inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yeun-Jin; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Jeong-Eun; Juhn, Kyoung-Mi; Woo, Seon Rang; Kim, Hee-Young; Han, Young-Hoon; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kang, Chang-Mo [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Young-Do [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won-Bong [Division of Natural Science, Seoul Women' s University, Seoul 139-774 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Gil Hong, E-mail: ghpark@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} In our present manuscript, we have clearly showed an interesting but problematic obstacle of a radiosensitization strategy based on telomerase inhibition by showing that: Clonal population unresponsive to this radiosensitization occasionally arise. {yields} The telomere length of unsensitized clones was reduced, as was that of most sensitized clones. {yields} The unsensitized clones did not show chromosome end fusion which was noted in all sensitized clones. {yields} P53 status is not associated with the occurrence of unsensitized clone. {yields} Telomere end capping in unsensitized clone is operative even under telomerase deficiency. -- Abstract: A combination of a radiotherapeutic regimen with telomerase inhibition is valuable when tumor cells are to be sensitized to radiation. Here, we describe cell clones unresponsive to radiosensitization after telomere shortening. After extensive division of individual transformed clones of mTERC{sup -/-} cells, about 22% of clones were unresponsive to radiosensitization even though telomerase action was inhibited. The telomere lengths of unsensitized mTERC{sup -/-} clones were reduced, as were those of most sensitized clones. However, the unsensitized clones did not exhibit chromosomal end-to-end fusion to the extent noted in all sensitized clones. Thus, a defense mechanism preventing telomere erosion is operative even when telomeres become shorter under conditions of telomerase deficiency, and results in unresponsiveness to the radiosensitization generally mediated by telomere shortening.

  13. Mathematical model of a telomerase transcriptional regulatory network developed by cell-based screening: analysis of inhibitor effects and telomerase expression mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E Bilsland

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on transcription of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT. Many transcription factors affect TERT, though regulation occurs in context of a broader network. Network effects on telomerase regulation have not been investigated, though deeper understanding of TERT transcription requires a systems view. However, control over individual interactions in complex networks is not easily achievable. Mathematical modelling provides an attractive approach for analysis of complex systems and some models may prove useful in systems pharmacology approaches to drug discovery. In this report, we used transfection screening to test interactions among 14 TERT regulatory transcription factors and their respective promoters in ovarian cancer cells. The results were used to generate a network model of TERT transcription and to implement a dynamic Boolean model whose steady states were analysed. Modelled effects of signal transduction inhibitors successfully predicted TERT repression by Src-family inhibitor SU6656 and lack of repression by ERK inhibitor FR180204, results confirmed by RT-QPCR analysis of endogenous TERT expression in treated cells. Modelled effects of GSK3 inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO predicted unstable TERT repression dependent on noise and expression of JUN, corresponding with observations from a previous study. MYC expression is critical in TERT activation in the model, consistent with its well known function in endogenous TERT regulation. Loss of MYC caused complete TERT suppression in our model, substantially rescued only by co-suppression of AR. Interestingly expression was easily rescued under modelled Ets-factor gain of function, as occurs in TERT promoter mutation. RNAi targeting AR, JUN, MXD1, SP3, or TP53, showed that AR suppression does rescue endogenous TERT expression following MYC knockdown in these cells and SP3 or TP53 siRNA also cause partial recovery. The model therefore successfully predicted several

  14. Mathematical model of a telomerase transcriptional regulatory network developed by cell-based screening: analysis of inhibitor effects and telomerase expression mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsland, Alan E; Stevenson, Katrina; Liu, Yu; Hoare, Stacey; Cairney, Claire J; Roffey, Jon; Keith, W Nicol

    2014-02-01

    Cancer cells depend on transcription of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). Many transcription factors affect TERT, though regulation occurs in context of a broader network. Network effects on telomerase regulation have not been investigated, though deeper understanding of TERT transcription requires a systems view. However, control over individual interactions in complex networks is not easily achievable. Mathematical modelling provides an attractive approach for analysis of complex systems and some models may prove useful in systems pharmacology approaches to drug discovery. In this report, we used transfection screening to test interactions among 14 TERT regulatory transcription factors and their respective promoters in ovarian cancer cells. The results were used to generate a network model of TERT transcription and to implement a dynamic Boolean model whose steady states were analysed. Modelled effects of signal transduction inhibitors successfully predicted TERT repression by Src-family inhibitor SU6656 and lack of repression by ERK inhibitor FR180204, results confirmed by RT-QPCR analysis of endogenous TERT expression in treated cells. Modelled effects of GSK3 inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO) predicted unstable TERT repression dependent on noise and expression of JUN, corresponding with observations from a previous study. MYC expression is critical in TERT activation in the model, consistent with its well known function in endogenous TERT regulation. Loss of MYC caused complete TERT suppression in our model, substantially rescued only by co-suppression of AR. Interestingly expression was easily rescued under modelled Ets-factor gain of function, as occurs in TERT promoter mutation. RNAi targeting AR, JUN, MXD1, SP3, or TP53, showed that AR suppression does rescue endogenous TERT expression following MYC knockdown in these cells and SP3 or TP53 siRNA also cause partial recovery. The model therefore successfully predicted several aspects of TERT

  15. Telomere stability and telomerase in mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Graakjaer, Jesper; Kølvrå, Steen

    2008-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive genetic material that cap and thereby protect the ends of chromosomes. Each time a cell divides, telomeres get shorter. Telomere length is mainly maintained by telomerase. This enzyme is present in high concentrations in the embryonic stem cells and in fast growing...... embryonic cells, and declines with age. It is still unclear to what extent there is telomerase in adult stem cells, but since these are the founder cells of cells of all the tissues in the body, understanding the telomere dynamics and expression of telomerase in adult stem cells is very important....... In the present communication we focus on telomere expression and telomere length in stem cells, with a special focus on mesenchymal stem cells. We consider different mechanisms by which stem cells can maintain telomeres and also focus on the dynamics of telomere length in mesenchymal stem cells, both the overall...

  16. Telomerase inhibition effectively targets mouse and human AML stem cells and delays relapse following chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik Otzen; Heidel, Florian H.

    2014-01-01

    priority. Here, we show that targeting telomerase activity eradicates AML LSCs. Genetic deletion of the telomerase subunit Terc in a retroviral mouse AML model induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of LSCs, and depletion of telomerase-deficient LSCs is partially rescued by p53 knockdown. Murine Terc......(-/-) LSCs express a specific gene expression signature that can be identified in human AML patient cohorts and is positively correlated with patient survival following chemotherapy. In xenografts of primary human AML, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase targets LSCs, impairs leukemia...... progression, and delays relapse following chemotherapy. Altogether, these results establish telomerase inhibition as an effective strategy for eliminating AML LSCs....

  17. Telomerase-independent paths to immortality in predictable cancer subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Stephen T

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers commandeer the activity of telomerase - the remarkable enzyme responsible for prolonging cellular lifespan by maintaining the length of telomeres at the ends of chromosomes. Telomerase is only normally active in embryonic and highly proliferative somatic cells. Thus, targeting telomerase is an attractive anti-cancer therapeutic rationale currently under investigation in various phases of clinical development. However, previous reports suggest that an average of 10-15% of all cancers lose the functional activity of telomerase and most of these turn to an Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres pathway (ALT). ALT-positive tumours will therefore not respond to anti-telomerase therapies and there is a real possibility that such drugs would be toxic to normal telomerase-utilising cells and ultimately select for resistant cells that activate an ALT mechanism. ALT exploits certain DNA damage response (DDR) components to counteract telomere shortening and rapid trimming. ALT has been reported in many cancer subtypes including sarcoma, gastric carcinoma, central nervous system malignancies, subtypes of kidney (Wilm's Tumour) and bladder carcinoma, mesothelioma, malignant melanoma and germ cell testicular cancers to name but a few. A recent heroic study that analysed ALT in over six thousand tumour samples supports this historical spread, although only reporting an approximate 4% prevalence. This review highlights the various methods of ALT detection, unravels several molecular ALT models thought to promote telomere maintenance and elongation, spotlights the DDR components known to facilitate these and explores why certain tissues are more likely to subvert DDR away from its usually protective functions, resulting in a predictive pattern of prevalence in specific cancer subsets.

  18. Telomere Transcripts Target Telomerase in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Kreilmeier

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding transcripts from telomeres, called telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, were identified as blocking telomerase activity (TA, a telomere maintenance mechanism (TMM, in tumors. We expressed recombinant TERRA transcripts in tumor cell lines with TA and with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT to study effects on TMM and cell growth. Adeno- and lentivirus constructs (AV and LV were established for transient and stable expression of approximately 130 units of telomere hexanucleotide repeats under control of cytomegalovirus (CMV and human RNase P RNA H1 (hH1 promoters with and without polyadenylation, respectively. Six human tumor cell lines either using telomerase or ALT were infected and analyzed for TA levels. Pre-infection cells using telomerase had 1%–3% of the TERRA expression levels of ALT cells. AV and LV expression of recombinant TERRA in telomerase positive cells showed a 1.3–2.6 fold increase in TERRA levels, and a decrease in TA of 25%–58%. Dominant-negative or small hairpin RNA (shRNA viral expression against human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT results in senescence, not induced by TERRA expression. Population doubling time, cell viability and TL (telomere length were not impacted by ectopic TERRA expression. Clonal growth was reduced by TERRA expression in TA but not ALT cell lines. ALT cells were not affected by treatments applied. Established cell models and tools may be used to better understand the role of TERRA in the cell, especially for targeting telomerase.

  19. Telomerase activity in human leukemic cells with or without monosomy 7 or 7q-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Jørn E

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bone marrow material from patients with various leukemias we noted that samples with either a deletion on the long arm of one chromosome 7 (7q- or a monosomy 7 had a higher telomerase activity. Considering that introduction of a chromosome 7 into a cancer cell line had been reported to eliminate telomerase activity, that 7q- is a common negative prognostic finding in cancers, and that the deleted segment (band 7q31 contains an unidentified tumor suppressor gene, we wondered if this gene might be a telomerase inhibitor. Results We found no significant difference in telomerase activity between the three groups of patient samples. In contrast to reports on tumor cell lines we observed no amplification of the telomerase genes. Methods We analyzed telomerase activity and copy number of the telomerase genes hTERT and hTR in frozen archival bone marrow samples from leukemia patients with a referral diagnosis of AML, and either a monosomy for chromosome 7, a deletion on the long arm of chromosome 7 (7q-, or none of these aberrations. Telomerase activity was measured with a commercially available kit, and the copy number of the telomerase genes was tested by FISH. Conclusions We found no evidence of a telomerase inhibitor in band 7q31. The lack of telomerase gene amplification found in cell lines from solid tumors could reflect that this amplification is a property of solid tumors, not of hematological cancers.

  20. PIF1 disruption or NBS1 hypomorphism does not affect chromosome healing or fusion resulting from double-strand breaks near telomeres in murine embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, Gloria E.; Gao, Qing; Miller, Douglas; Snow, Bryan E.; Harrington, Lea A.; Murnane, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase serves to maintain telomeric repeat sequences at the ends of chromosomes. However, telomerase can also add telomeric repeat sequences at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), a process called chromosome healing. Here, we employed a method of inducing DSBs near telomeres to query the role of two proteins, PIF1 and NBS1, in chromosome healing in mammalian cells. PIF1 was investigated because the PIF1 homolog in S. cerevisiae inhibits chromosome healing, as shown by a 1000-fold increase in...

  1. Two pathways recruit telomerase to Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Chan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase, Est2p, is a telomere associated throughout most of the cell cycle, while the Est1p subunit binds only in late S/G2 phase, the time of telomerase action. Est2p binding in G1/early S phase requires a specific interaction between telomerase RNA (TLC1 and Ku80p. Here, we show that in four telomerase-deficient strains (cdc13-2, est1A, tlc1-SD, and tlc1-BD, Est2p telomere binding was normal in G1/early S phase but reduced to about 40-50% of wild type levels in late S/G2 phase. Est1p telomere association was low in all four strains. Wild type levels of Est2p telomere binding in late S/G2 phase was Est1p-dependent and required that Est1p be both telomere-bound and associated with a stem-bulge region in TLC1 RNA. In three telomerase-deficient strains in which Est1p is not Est2p-associated (tlc1-SD, tlc1-BD, and est2A, Est1p was present at normal levels but its telomere binding was very low. When the G1/early S phase and the late S/G2 phase telomerase recruitment pathways were both disrupted, neither Est2p nor Est1p was telomere-associated. We conclude that reduced levels of Est2p and low Est1p telomere binding in late S/G2 phase correlated with an est phenotype, while a WT level of Est2p binding in G1 was not sufficient to maintain telomeres. In addition, even though Cdc13p and Est1p interact by two hybrid, biochemical and genetic criteria, this interaction did not occur unless Est1p was Est2p-associated, suggesting that Est1p comes to the telomere only as part of the holoenzyme. Finally, the G1 and late S/G2 phase pathways for telomerase recruitment are distinct and are likely the only ones that bring telomerase to telomeres in wild-type cells.

  2. Leptin upregulates telomerase activity and transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, He, E-mail: herenrh@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China); Zhao, Tiansuo; Wang, Xiuchao; Gao, Chuntao; Wang, Jian; Yu, Ming [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China); Hao, Jihui, E-mail: jihuihao@yahoo.com [Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Tianjin (China)

    2010-03-26

    The aim was to analyze the mechanism of leptin-induced activity of telomerase in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that leptin activated telomerase in a dose-dependent manner; leptin upregulated the expression of Human Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (hTERT) at mRNA and protein levels; blockade of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation significantly counteracted leptin-induced hTERT transcription and protein expression; chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that leptin enhanced the binding of STAT3 to the hTERT promoter. This study uncovers a new mechanism of the proliferative effect of leptin on breast cancer cells and provides a new explanation of obesity-related breast cancer.

  3. Friend or foe? Telomerase as a pharmacological target in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Aissa, Karima; Ebben, Johnathan D; Kadlec, Andrew O; Beyer, Andreas M

    2016-09-01

    Aging, cancer, and chronic disease have remained at the forefront of basic biological research for decades. Within this context, significant attention has been paid to the role of telomerase, the enzyme responsible for lengthening telomeres, the nucleotide sequences located at the end of chromosomes found in the nucleus. Alterations in telomere length and telomerase activity are a common denominator to the underlying pathology of these diseases. While nuclear-specific, telomere-lengthening effects of telomerase impact cellular/organismal aging and cancer development, non-canonical, extra-nuclear, and non-telomere-lengthening contributions of telomerase have only recently been described and their exact physiological implications are ill defined. Although the mechanism remains unclear, recent reports reveal that the catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), regulates levels of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (mtROS), independent of its established role in the nucleus. Telomerase inhibition has been the target of chemotherapy (directed or indirectly) for over a decade now, yet no telomerase inhibitor is FDA approved and few are currently in late-stage clinical trials, possibly due to underappreciation of the distinct extra-nuclear functions of telomerase. Moreover, evaluation of telomerase-specific therapies is largely limited to the context of chemotherapy, despite reports of the beneficial effects of telomerase activation in the cardiovascular system in relation to such processes as endothelial dysfunction and myocardial infarction. Thus, there is a need for better understanding of telomerase-focused cell and organism physiology, as well as development of telomerase-specific therapies in relation to cancer and extension of these therapies to cardiovascular pathologies. This review will detail findings related to telomerase and evaluate its potential to serve as a therapeutic target. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Telomeres and Telomerase in The Aging Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aging per se is a risk factor for reduced cardiac function and heart diseases, even when adjusted for aging-associated cardiovascular risk factors. Accordingly, aging-related biochemical and cell-biological changes lead to pathophysiological conditions, especially reduced heart function and heart disease. CONTENT: Telomere dysfunction induces a profound p53-dependent repression of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis and function, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1a and PGC-1b in the heart, which leads to bioenergetic compromise due to impaired oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. This telomere-p53-PGC mitochondrial/metabolic axis integrates many factors linked to heart aging including increased DNA damage, p53 activation, mitochondrial, and metabolic dysfunction and provides a molecular basis of how dysfunctional telomeres can compromise cardiomyocytes and stem cell compartments in the heart to precipitate cardiac aging. SUMMARY: The aging myocardium with telomere shortening and accumulation of senescent cells restricts the tissue regenerative ability, which contributes to systolic or diastolic heart failure. Moreover, patients with ion-channel defects might have genetic imbalance caused by oxidative stress-related accelerated telomere shortening, which may subsequently cause sudden cardiac death. Telomere length can serve as a marker for the biological status of previous cell divisions and DNA damage with inflammation and oxidative stress. It can be integrated into current risk prediction and stratification models for cardiovascular diseases and can be used in precise personalized treatments. KEYWORDS: aging, telomere, telomerase, aging heart, mitochondria, cardiac stem cell

  5. MDM2 negatively regulates the human telomerase RNA gene promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith W Nicol

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that NF-Y and Sp1 interact with the human telomerase RNA (hTR promoter and play a central role in its regulation. We have also shown that pRB activates the hTR promoter, but the mechanism of pRb directed activation is unknown. It has recently been reported that pRB induces Sp1 activity by relieving inhibition mediated by mdm2. The aim was to investigate possible roles for mdm2 in hTR promoter regulation. Methods Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to determine binding of mdm2 to the hTR promoter. Transfection and luciferase assays were used to investigate mdm2 repression of the promoter activity and interaction with known transcriptional modulators. Results Here we show using chromatin immunoprecipitation that mdm2 specifically binds the hTR promoter in vivo. Transient co-transfection experiments using an hTR promoter luciferase reporter construct show that hTR promoter activity is inhibited by over-expression of mdm2 in 5637 bladder carcinoma cells (p53 and pRB negative, low mdm2. Titration of mdm2 was able to antagonise activation of hTR promoter activity mediated by pRB or Sp1 over-expression, although in the presence of pRB, mdm2 could not repress promoter activity below basal levels. Using an Sp1 binding site mutation construct we showed that mdm2 repression did not absolutely require Sp1 binding sites in the hTR promoter, suggesting the possibility of pRB/Sp1 independent mechanisms of repression. Finally, we show that NF-Y mediated transactivation of the hTR promoter was also suppressed by mdm2 in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusions These studies suggest that mdm2 may inhibit the hTR promoter by multiple mechanisms. Mdm2 may directly repress activation by both pRB and Sp1, or activation by NF-Y. Furthermore, the ability of mdm2 to interact and interfere with components of the general transcription machinery might partly explain the general repressive effect seen here. Elucidation of

  6. Complete genetic suppression of polyp formation and reduction of CpG-island hypermethylation in Apc(Min/+) Dnmt1-hypomorphic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, Cindy A; Nickel, Andrea E; Laird, Peter W

    2002-03-01

    Promoter CpG island hypermethylation of critical genes is thought to play an important role in human colorectal tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that low levels of CpG island methylation occur in the normal intestinal mucosa of Apc(Min/+) mice and are increased in Multiple Intestinal Metaplasia (Min) polyps. We examined the interaction between CpG island hypermethylation and tumorigenesis by genetically modulating expression levels of the predominant DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt1, in Apc(Min/+) mice. We show that a combination of Dnmt1 hypomorphic alleles results in the complete suppression of polyp formation and an accompanying reduction in the frequency of CpG island methylation in both the normal intestinal mucosa and intestinal adenomas. These results suggest that sufficient DNA methyltransferase expression is a prerequisite for polyp formation and that hypomorphic alleles of Dnmt1 are not merely genetic modifiers but the first identified true genetic suppressors of the Min phenotype.

  7. The inhibitory effect of Curcuma longa extract on telomerase activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Telomerase is reactivated in lung cancer cells, the most prevalent cancer worldwide, but not normal cells. Therefore, targeting it, preferably with natural compounds derive from medicinal plant such as curcumin, could have important effect on treatment of lung cancer. Curcumin, derived from Curcuma longa rhizome, has ...

  8. The inhibitory effect of Curcuma longa extract on telomerase activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... Telomerase is reactivated in lung cancer cells, the most prevalent cancer worldwide, but not normal cells. Therefore, targeting it, preferably with natural compounds derive from medicinal plant such as curcumin, could have important effect on treatment of lung cancer. Curcumin, derived from Curcuma.

  9. Urine Telomerase for Diagnosis and Surveillance of Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Lamarca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has increased incidence during last decades. For those patients with nonmuscle involved tumors, noninvasive diagnosis test and surveillance methods must be designed to avoid current cystoscopies that nowadays are done regularly in a lot of patients. Novel urine biomarkers have been developed during last years. Telomerase is important in cancer biology, improving the division capacity of cancer cells. Even urinary telomerase could be a potentially useful urinary tumor marker; its use for diagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients or its impact during surveillance is still unknown. Moreover, there will need to be uniformity and standardization in the assays before it can become useful in clinical practice. It does not seem to exist a real difference between the most classical assays for the detection of urine telomerase (TRAP and hTERT. However, the new detection methods with modified TeloTAGGG telomerase or with gold nanoparticles must also be taken into consideration for the correct development of this diagnosis method. Maybe the target population would be the high-risk groups within screening programs. To date there is no enough evidence to use it alone and to eliminate cystoscopies from the diagnosis and surveillance of these patients. The combination with cytology or FISH is still preferred.

  10. Antitumor effects of telomerase inhibitor TMPyP4 in osteosarcoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Jun; Matsuo, Toshihiro; Shimose, Shoji; Kubo, Tadahiko; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2011-11-01

    Telomere studies in carcinomas have been extensively reported for prognostic utility and effective methods for targeting telomerase therapy has been described, but efficacy of telomerase inhibitor remained unknown in sarcoma cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of telomerase inhibitor cationic porphyrin TMPyP4 on telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth, and apoptosis in osteosarcoma cell lines. TMPyP4 significantly inhibited telomerase activity in telomerase positive HOS and Saos-2, but not in MG-63. TMPyP4 significantly induced telomere shortening, and inhibition of the cell growth in HOS and Saos-2 with over 17% apoptosis rates. In terms of MG-63, TMPyP4 did not induce inhibition of both telomerase activity and cell growth, although it induced significant telomere shortening. Telomere length after treatment was 5.60 kb in HOS, 4.00 kb in Saos-2, and 9.89 kb in MG-63. These results may suggest that both telomerase activity loss and sufficient telomere shortening are necessary to inhibit cell growth in telomerase positive osteosarcoma cells. TMPyP4 did not induced telomere shortening but significantly inhibited the growth with 22.6% apoptosis rate in telomerase negative with extremely longer telomere-U2OS, may indicating the antitumor effect of TMPyP4 may be related to DNA damage including telomere dysfunction through G-quadruplex stabilization, independent on telomere length. Copyright © 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  11. Relationship between Dyskerin Expression and Telomerase Activity in Human Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Montanaro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleolar protein dyskerin is involved in the modification of specific uridine residues to pseudouridine on ribosomal and small nuclear RNAs and in the stabilization of the telomerase RNA component (TERC. In this study we investigated for the first time the relationship between dyskerin expression and telomerase activity in a series of 61 primary breast carcinomas. We found that when dyskerin mRNA values were very low the telomerase activity was markedly reduced, independently of the expression of other important components of the telomerase complex such as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT. In vitro experiments showed that reduction of dyskerin expression affect telomerase activity through the reduction of TERC. Only when TERC levels were strongly reduced telomerase activity was hindered. Retroviral mediated over-expression of TERC abolished the telomerase impairment due to dyskerin knock down. In conclusion, our results indicated that, beside its effect on ribosome biogenesis, the levels of dyskerin in cancer cells modulate telomerase activity through the regulation of TERC levels, independently of TERT expression. This should be taken into consideration when utilizing TERT expression as a surrogate indicator of telomerase activity in tumour pathology.

  12. The influence of the telomere-telomerase system on diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi Nan, Wu; Ling, Zhang; Bing, Chen

    2015-06-01

    The telomere-telomerase system plays an important role in the pathogenesis and disease progression of diabetes mellitus as well as in its vascular complications. Recent studies suggest that telomere shortening and abnormal telomerase activity occur in patients with diabetes mellitus, and targeting the telomere-telomerase system has become a prospective treatment for diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. This review highlights the significance of the telomere-telomerase system and supports its role as a possible therapeutic target for patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications Areas covered: This review covers the advances in understanding the telomere-telomerase system over the last 30 years and its significance in diabetes mellitus. In addition, it provides knowledge regarding the significance of the telomere-telomerase system in diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications as well as its role and mechanisms in oxidative stress, cell therapy and antioxidant activity Expert opinion: The telomere-telomerase system may be a potential therapeutic target that can protect against DNA damage and apoptosis in patients with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. DNA damage and apoptosis are associated with oxidative stress and are involved in the dysfunction of pancreatic β cells, insulin resistance, and its vascular complications. Abnormalities in the telomere-telomerase system may be associated with diabetes mellitus and its vascular complications. Therapies targeting telomere-telomerase system, telomerase reverse transcriptase transfection and alterative telomere lengthening must be identified before gene therapy can commence.

  13. The AAA-ATPase NVL2 is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Her, Joonyoung [Departments of Biology and Integrated Omics for Biomedical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, In Kwon, E-mail: topoviro@yonsei.ac.kr [Departments of Biology and Integrated Omics for Biomedical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of the AAA-ATPase NVL2 as a novel hTERT-interacting protein. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NVL2 associates with catalytically active telomerase via an interaction with hTERT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NVL2 is a telomerase component essential for holoenzyme assembly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATP-binding activity of NVL2 is required for hTERT binding and telomerase assembly. -- Abstract: Continued cell proliferation requires telomerase to maintain functional telomeres that are essential for chromosome integrity. Although the core enzyme includes a telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and a telomerase RNA component (TERC), a number of auxiliary proteins have been identified to regulate telomerase assembly, localization, and enzymatic activity. Here we describe the characterization of the AAA-ATPase NVL2 as a novel hTERT-interacting protein. NVL2 interacts and co-localizes with hTERT in the nucleolus. NLV2 is also found in association with catalytically competent telomerase in cell lysates through an interaction with hTERT. Depletion of endogenous NVL2 by small interfering RNA led to a decrease in hTERT without affecting the steady-state levels of hTERT mRNA, thereby reducing telomerase activity, suggesting that NVL2 is an essential component of the telomerase holoenzyme. We also found that ATP-binding activity of NVL2 is required for hTERT binding as well as telomerase assembly. Our findings suggest that NVL2, in addition to its role in ribosome biosynthesis, is essential for telomerase biogenesis and provides an alternative approach for inhibiting telomerase activity in cancer.

  14. P. berghei telomerase subunit TERT is essential for parasite survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka A Religa

    Full Text Available Telomeres define the ends of chromosomes protecting eukaryotic cells from chromosome instability and eventual cell death. The complex regulation of telomeres involves various proteins including telomerase, which is a specialized ribonucleoprotein responsible for telomere maintenance. Telomeres of chromosomes of malaria parasites are kept at a constant length during blood stage proliferation. The 7-bp telomere repeat sequence is universal across different Plasmodium species (GGGTTT/CA, though the average telomere length varies. The catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT, is present in all sequenced Plasmodium species and is approximately three times larger than other eukaryotic TERTs. The Plasmodium RNA component of TERT has recently been identified in silico. A strategy to delete the gene encoding TERT via double cross-over (DXO homologous recombination was undertaken to study the telomerase function in P. berghei. Expression of both TERT and the RNA component (TR in P. berghei blood stages was analysed by Western blotting and Northern analysis. Average telomere length was measured in several Plasmodium species using Telomere Restriction Fragment (TRF analysis. TERT and TR were detected in blood stages and an average telomere length of ∼ 950 bp established. Deletion of the tert gene was performed using standard transfection methodologies and we show the presence of tert- mutants in the transfected parasite populations. Cloning of tert- mutants has been attempted multiple times without success. Thorough analysis of the transfected parasite populations and the parasite obtained from extensive parasite cloning from these populations provide evidence for a so called delayed death phenotype as observed in different organisms lacking TERT. The findings indicate that TERT is essential for P. berghei cell survival. The study extends our current knowledge on telomere biology in malaria parasites and validates further

  15. The C-terminal domain of Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase holoenzyme protein p65 induces multiple structural changes in telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Benjamin M.; Loper, John; Najarro, Kevin; Stone, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The unique cellular activity of the telomerase reverse transcriptase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) requires proper assembly of protein and RNA components into a functional complex. In the ciliate model organism Tetrahymena thermophila, the La-domain protein p65 is required for in vivo assembly of telomerase. Single-molecule and biochemical studies have shown that p65 promotes efficient RNA assembly with the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein, in part by inducing a bend in the conserved stem IV region of telomerase RNA (TER). The domain architecture of p65 consists of an N-terminal domain, a La-RRM motif, and a C-terminal domain (CTD). Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET), we demonstrate the p65CTD is necessary for the RNA remodeling activity of the protein and is sufficient to induce a substantial conformational change in stem IV of TER. Moreover, nuclease protection assays directly map the site of p65CTD interaction to stem IV and reveal that, in addition to bending stem IV, p65 binding reorganizes nucleotides that comprise the low-affinity TERT binding site within stem–loop IV. PMID:22315458

  16. Lack of correlation between telomere length and telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Wysoki, Jacek; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Pernak, Monika; Nowicka, Karina; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Jerzy

    2003-12-01

    The expression of three components of telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT, TP1) along with telomerase activity and telomere length in leukemic cells was investigated. Cells were isolated from peripheral blood and/or bone marrow of children with acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic (ANLL) leukemia. Expression of three components of telomerase as well as telomerase activity was found in all leukemic cells. Chemiluminescent detection of terminal restriction fragments (TRF) from DNA isolated from ALL cells showed variable patterns expressing considerable heterogeneity of telomere length. The ALL cells appeared to have both long and short telomere lengths, in contrast to normal peripheral lymphocytes, which produced limited pattern of TRF. The ANLL cells produced predominantly short telomere pattern despite high telomerase activity and expression. It can be concluded that high telomerase activity and expression in leukemic cells is not always correlated with long telomeres (TRF pattern).

  17. Critical Role for Telomerase in the Mechanism of Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Human Microcirculation

    OpenAIRE

    Beyer, Andreas M.; Freed, Julie K.; Durand, Matthew J.; Riedel, Michael; Ait-Aissa, Karima; Green, Paula; Hockenberry, Joseph C.; Morgan, R. Garret; Donato, Anthony J.; Peleg, Refael; Gasparri, Mario; Rokkas, Chris K.; Santos, Janine H.; Priel, Esther; Gutterman, David D.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Telomerase is a nuclear regulator of telomere elongation with recent reports suggesting a role in regulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Flow-mediated dilation in patients with cardiovascular disease is dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species. Objective: We examined the hypothesis that telomerase activity modulates microvascular flow-mediated dilation, and loss of telomerase activity contributes to the change of mediator from nitric oxide to mitochondria...

  18. Synthesis and biological evaluation of hybrid acridine-HSP90 ligand conjugates as telomerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, S; Gunaratnam, M; Spiteri, C; Sharma, P; Alharthy, R D; Neidle, S; Moses, J E

    2015-08-21

    The synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of bifunctional acridine-HSP90 inhibitor ligands as telomerase inhibitors is herein described. Four hybrid acridine-HSP90 inhibitor conjugates were prepared using a click-chemistry approach, and subsequently shown to display comparable results to the established telomerase inhibitor BRACO-19 in the TRAP-LIG telomerase assay. The conjugates also demonstrated significant cyctotoxity against a number of cancer cell lines, in the sub-μM range.

  19. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas.

  20. Detection of telomerase activity in Plasmodium falciparum using a nonradioactive method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubiano Claudia C

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, quick and sensitive method was used to detect telomerase activity in Plasmodium falciparum. The telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay was modified using electrophoresis and staining with SYBR-green I to detect telomerase activity in a range of 10² to 10(7 parasites. This might be a useful way to ascertain telomerase activity in different types of nontumor cells.

  1. The addition of a spin column step in the telomeric repeat application protocol removes telomerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chieh; Huang, Fong-Chun; Lin, Jing-Jer

    2015-06-01

    Telomerase activity in cancer cells is commonly analyzed by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay termed the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP). However, nonspecific inhibition of Taq polymerase during the PCR step is frequently observed in inhibitor analysis or drug screening. Thus, the removal of excess inhibitors prior to PCR is an essential step for the proper evaluation of telomerase inhibitory effects. Here, a size exclusion spin column was applied to remove small molecular weight inhibitors from the telomerase extension products. The spin column-added protocol, termed sTRAP, provides a more reliable estimation of the inhibitory effects of telomerase activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Human cells lacking coilin and Cajal bodies are proficient in telomerase assembly, trafficking and telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanlian; Deng, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Hu, Qian; Liu, Haiying; Songyang, Zhou; Ma, Wenbin; Chen, Shi; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The RNA component of human telomerase (hTR) localizes to Cajal bodies, and it has been proposed that Cajal bodies play a role in the assembly of telomerase holoenzyme and telomerase trafficking. Here, the role of Cajal bodies was examined in Human cells deficient of coilin (i.e. coilin-knockout (KO) cells), in which no Cajal bodies are detected. In coilin-KO cells, a normal level of telomerase activity is detected and interactions between core factors of holoenzyme are preserved, indicating that telomerase assembly occurs in the absence of Cajal bodies. Moreover, dispersed hTR aggregates and forms foci specifically during S and G2 phase in coilin-KO cells. Colocalization of these hTR foci with telomeres implies proper telomerase trafficking, independent of Cajal bodies. Therefore, telomerase adds similar numbers of TTAGGG repeats to telomeres in coilin-KO and controls cells. Overexpression of TPP1-OB-fold blocks cell cycle-dependent formation of hTR foci and inhibits telomere extension. These findings suggest that telomerase assembly, trafficking and extension occur with normal efficiency in Cajal bodies deficient human cells. Thus, Cajal bodies, as such, are not essential in these processes, although it remains possible that non-coilin components of Cajal bodies and/or telomere binding proteins (e.g. TPP1) do play roles in telomerase biogenesis and telomere homeostasis. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Combined Telomerase Inhibition and Immunotherapy in the Prevention and Treatment of Mammary Carcinomas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gong, Jianlin

    2007-01-01

    .... The mammary carcinomas occur in multiple stages. In addition, the progressive malignant transformation is closely correlated with telomerase activity using telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP...

  4. Improved Inhibition of Telomerase by Short Twisted Intercalating Nucleic Acids under Molecular Crowding Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Tani; Pradhan, Devranjan; Géci, Imrich

    2012-01-01

    Human telomeric DNA has the ability to fold into a 4-stranded G-quadruplex structure. Several G-quadruplex ligands are known to stabilize the structure and thereby inhibit telomerase activity. Such ligands have demonstrated efficient telomerase inhibition in dilute conditions, but under molecular......-based telomerase repeat amplification assay (TRAP) assay as well as nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-based TRAP, we demonstrate remarkable enhancement in their anti-telomerase activity even under molecular crowding conditions. This is the first time in which a G-quadruplex stabilizing agent has...

  5. The non-coding RNA TERRA is a natural ligand and direct inhibitor of human telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Sophie; Reichenbach, Patrick; Lingner, Joachim

    2010-09-01

    Telomeres, the physical ends of eukaryotes chromosomes are transcribed into telomeric repeat containing RNA (TERRA), a large non-coding RNA of unknown function, which forms an integral part of telomeric heterochromatin. TERRA molecules resemble in sequence the telomeric DNA substrate as they contain 5'-UUAGGG-3' repeats near their 3'-end which are complementary to the template sequence of telomerase RNA. Here we demonstrate that endogenous TERRA is bound to human telomerase in cell extracts. Using in vitro reconstituted telomerase and synthetic TERRA molecules we demonstrate that the 5'-UUAGGG-3' repeats of TERRA base pair with the RNA template of the telomerase RNA moiety (TR). In addition TERRA contacts the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein subunit independently of hTR. In vitro studies further demonstrate that TERRA is not used as a telomerase substrate. Instead, TERRA acts as a potent competitive inhibitor for telomeric DNA in addition to exerting an uncompetitive mode of inhibition. Our data identify TERRA as a telomerase ligand and natural direct inhibitor of human telomerase. Telomerase regulation by the telomere substrate may be mediated via its transcription.

  6. Single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer studies of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot: temperature-/urea-dependent folding kinetics and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2014-04-10

    The ribonucleoprotein telomerase is an RNA-dependent DNA polymerase that catalyzes the repetitive addition of a short, species-specific, DNA sequence to the ends of linear eukaryotic chromosomes. The single RNA component of telomerase contains both the template sequence for DNA synthesis and a functionally critical pseudoknot motif, which can also exist as a less stable hairpin. Here we use a minimal version of the human telomerase RNA pseudoknot to study this hairpin-pseudoknot structural equilibrium using temperature-controlled single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) experiments. The urea dependence of these experiments aids in determination of the folding kinetics and thermodynamics. The wild-type pseudoknot behavior is compared and contrasted to a mutant pseudoknot sequence implicated in a genetic disorder-dyskeratosis congenita. These findings clearly identify that this 2nt noncomplementary mutation destabilizes the folding of the wild-type pseudoknot by substantially reducing the folding rate constant (≈ 400-fold) while only nominally increasing the unfolding rate constant (≈ 5-fold). Furthermore, the urea dependence of the equilibrium and rate constants is used to develop a free energy landscape for this unimolecular equilibrium and propose details about the structure of the transition state. Finally, the urea-dependent folding experiments provide valuable physical insights into the mechanism for destabilization of RNA pseudoknots by such chemical denaturants.

  7. A telomerase em células-tronco hematopoéticas Telomerase in hematopoietic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Perini

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A proliferação das células-tronco hematopoéticas sofre a perda dos telômeros a cada divisão celular. Alguns autores discordam quanto à perda ou não do potencial proliferativo e capacidade de auto-renovação das células mais diferenciadas. Revisaremos aqui o papel da telomerase na biologia do sistema hematopoético, na diferenciação normal ou maligna, assim como no envelhecimento das células-tronco hematopoéticas. A constante renovação celular requerida pela hematopoese confere às células-tronco embrionárias, assim como à maioria das células tumorais, um aumento da capacidade proliferativa marcada pela detecção da enzima telomerase e possível manutenção dos telômeros. Estudos clínicos se farão necessários para esclarecer melhor a atividade da telomerase em células-tronco hematopoéticas, seu possível uso como marcador de diagnóstico e seu uso a fim de propósitos prognósticos.Hematopoietic stem cell proliferation leads to telomere length decreases at each cellular division. Some authors disagree about the telomere influence on the reduction of the proliferative potential and capacity of self renewal. Here we review telomerase function in the biology of the hematopoietic system, in normal or differentiation and its influence on the ageing of hematopoietic stem cells. The constant cellular renewal required to maintain the hematopoietic system, provides embryonic stem cells, as well as malignant cells, an increased proliferative capacity. This is marked by the detection of telomerase enzyme activity and possible telomere maintenance. Clinical trials will be required to clarify telomerase activity in hematopoietic stem cells, its possible use as a diagnostic marker and its use for prognostic purposes.

  8. Relationship between physical activity level, telomere length, and telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Andrew T; Zimmerman, Jo B; Witkowski, Sarah; Hearn, Joe W; Hatfield, Bradley D; Roth, Stephen M

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of exercise energy expenditure (EEE) with both telomere length and telomerase activity in addition to accounting for hTERT C-1327T promoter genotype. Sixty-nine (n = 34 males; n = 35 females) participants 50-70 yr were assessed for weekly EEE level using the Yale Physical Activity Survey. Lifetime consistency of EEE was also determined. Subjects were recruited across a large range of EEE levels and separated into quartiles: 0-990, 991-2340, 2341-3540, and >3541 kcal x wk(-1). Relative telomere length and telomerase activity were measured in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The second EEE quartile exhibited significantly longer telomere lengths [1.12 +/- 0.03 relative units (RU)] than both the first and fourth EEE quartiles (0.94 +/- 0.03 and 0.96 +/- 0.03 RU, respectively; P EEE quartiles. An association was observed between telomerase enzyme activity and hTERT genotype with the TT genotype (1.0 x 10(-2) +/- 4.0 x 10(-3) attomoles (amol) per 10,000 cells; n = 19) having significantly greater telomerase enzyme activity than both the CT (1.3 x 10(-3) +/- 3.2 x 10(-3); n = 30) and CC groups (5.0 x 10(-4) +/- 3.9 x 10(-3); n = 20; P = 0.01). These results indicate that moderate physical activity levels may provide a protective effect on PBMC telomere length compared with both low and high EEE levels.

  9. Strict control of telomerase activation using Cre-mediated inversion

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    Harrington Lea

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cells appear exquisitely sensitive to the levels of hTERT expression, the telomerase reverse transcriptase. In primary cells that do not express hTERT, telomeres erode with each successive cell division, leading to the eventual loss of telomere DNA, an induction of a telomere DNA damage response, and the onset of cellular senescence or crisis. In some instances, an average of less than one appropriately spliced hTERT transcript per cell appears sufficient to restore telomerase activity and telomere maintenance, and overcome finite replicative capacity. Results To underscore this sensitivity, we showed that a widely used system of transcriptional induction involving ecdysone (muristerone led to sufficient expression of hTERT to immortalize human fibroblasts, even in the absence of induction. To permit tightly regulated expression of hTERT, or any other gene of interest, we developed a method of transcriptional control using an invertible expression cassette flanked by antiparallel loxP recombination sites. When introduced into human fibroblasts with the hTERT cDNA positioned in the opposite orientation relative to a constitutively active promoter, no telomerase activity was detected, and the cell population retained a mortal phenotype. Upon inversion of the hTERT cDNA to a transcriptionally competent orientation via the action of Cre recombinase, cells acquired telomerase activity, telomere DNA was replenished, and the population was immortalized. Further, using expression of a fluorescent protein marker, we demonstrated the ability to repeatedly invert specific transcripts between an active and inactive state in an otherwise isogenic cell background. Conclusion This binary expression system thus provides a useful genetic means to strictly regulate the expression of a given gene, or to control the expression of at least two different genes in a mutually exclusive manner.

  10. 5'UTR mutations of ENG cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

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    Damjanovich Kristy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a vascular disorder characterized by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations, and telangiectases. The majority of the patients have a mutation in the coding region of the activin A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1 or Endoglin (ENG gene. However, in approximately 15% of cases, sequencing analysis and deletion/duplication testing fail to identify mutations in the coding regions of these genes. Knowing its vital role in transcription and translation control, we were prompted to investigate the 5'untranslated region (UTR of ENG. Methods and Results We sequenced the 5'UTR of ENG for 154 HHT patients without mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 coding regions. We found a mutation (c.-127C > T, which is predicted to affect translation initiation and alter the reading frame of endoglin. This mutation was found in a family with linkage to the ENG, as well as in three other patients, one of which had an affected sibling with the same mutation. In vitro expression studies showed that a construct with the c.-127C > T mutation alters the translation and decreases the level of the endoglin protein. In addition, a c.-9G > A mutation was found in three patients, one of whom was homozygous for this mutation. Expression studies showed decreased protein levels suggesting that the c.-9G > A is a hypomorphic mutation. Conclusions Our results emphasize the need for the inclusion of the 5'UTR region of ENG in clinical testing for HHT.

  11. Telomerase contributes to fludarabine resistance in primary human leukemic lymphocytes.

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    May Shawi

    Full Text Available We report that Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor that binds to the RNA component of telomerase (hTR, can sensitize primary CLL lymphocytes to fludarabine in vitro. This effect was observed in lymphocytes from clinically resistant cases and with cytogenetic abnormalities associated with bad prognosis. Imetelstat mediated-sensitization to fludarabine was not associated with telomerase activity, but with the basal expression of Ku80. Since both Imetelstat and Ku80 bind hTR, we assessed 1 if Ku80 and Imetelstat alter each other's binding to hTR in vitro and 2 the effect of an oligonucleotide complementary to the Ku binding site in hTR (Ku oligo on the survival of primary CLL lymphocytes exposed to fludarabine. We show that Imetelstat interferes with the binding of Ku70/80 (Ku to hTR and that the Ku oligo can sensitize CLL lymphocytes to FLU. Our results suggest that Ku binding to hTR may contribute to fludarabine resistance in CLL lmphocytes. This is the first report highlighting the potentially broad effectiveness of Imetelstat in CLL, and the potential biological and clinical implications of a functional interaction between Ku and hTR in primary human cancer cells.

  12. Use of Telomerase Enzyme in Diagnosis and Treatment

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    Figen Guzelgul,Kiymet Aksoy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are structures on the tip of eukaryotic chromosomes known as telomer. These non-translated repeat sequences participate in the stabilization of chromosomes. These structures shorten 10-12 bp in each replication. However, there is an enzyme which takes effect to prevent the shortening of chromosomes. This enzyme is found in germ cells, embriyonic stem cells, single celled eukaryotes and cancerous cells. Telomer has important roles on aging and cancer. In the last decade, medical sciences focus on the probability of use of telomerase enzyme retarding the aging course and inerease life expectancy. In addition, the presence of the enzyme in cancerous cells suggests the use of this enzyme for cancer diagnosis as a biomarker. The telomerase enzymes may also be used in cancer treatment. Studies on the prevention of ability of finite division of the cancer cells by the inactivation of the telomerase enzyme are promising. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2011; 20(2.000: 69-88

  13. trt-1 is the Caenorhabditis elegans catalytic subunit of telomerase.

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    Bettina Meier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutants of trt-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans telomerase reverse transcriptase, reproduce normally for several generations but eventually become sterile as a consequence of telomere erosion and end-to-end chromosome fusions. Telomere erosion and uncapping do not cause an increase in apoptosis in the germlines of trt-1 mutants. Instead, late-generation trt-1 mutants display chromosome segregation defects that are likely to be the direct cause of sterility. trt-1 functions in the same telomere replication pathway as mrt-2, a component of the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen-like sliding clamp. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex may be required for telomerase to act at chromosome ends in C. elegans. Although telomere erosion limits replicative life span in human somatic cells, neither trt-1 nor telomere shortening affects postmitotic aging in C. elegans. These findings illustrate effects of telomere dysfunction in C. elegans mutants lacking the catalytic subunit of telomerase, trt-1.

  14. The yeast telomerase RNA, TLC1, participates in two distinct modes of TLC1-TLC1 association processes in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Tet Matsuguchi; Elizabeth Blackburn

    2016-01-01

    Telomerase core enzyme minimally consists of the telomerase reverse transcriptase domain-containing protein (Est2 in budding yeast S. cerevisiae) and telomerase RNA, which contains the template specifying the telomeric repeat sequence synthesized. Here we report that in vivo, a fraction of S. cerevisiae telomerase RNA (TLC1) molecules form complexes containing at least two molecules of TLC1, via two separable modes: one requiring a sequence in the 3? region of the immature TLC1 precursor and ...

  15. Troglitazone suppresses telomerase activity independently of PPARγ in estrogen-receptor negative breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Johnny

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one the highest causes of female cancer death worldwide. Many standard chemotherapeutic agents currently used to treat breast cancer are relatively non-specific and act on all rapidly dividing cells. In recent years, more specific targeted therapies have been introduced. It is known that telomerase is active in over 90% of breast cancer tumors but inactive in adjacent normal tissues. The prevalence of active telomerase in breast cancer patients makes telomerase an attractive therapeutic target. Recent evidence suggests that telomerase activity can be suppressed by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. However, its effect on telomerase regulation in breast cancer has not been investigated. Methods In this study, we investigated the effect of the PPARγ ligand, troglitazone, on telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Real time RT-PCR and telomerase activity assays were used to evaluate the effect of troglitazone. MDA-MB-231 cells had PPARγ expression silenced using shRNA interference. Results We demonstrated that troglitazone reduced the mRNA expression of hTERT and telomerase activity in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Troglitazone reduced telomerase activity even in the absence of PPARγ. In agreement with this result, we found no correlation between PPARγ and hTERT mRNA transcript levels in breast cancer patients. Statistical significance was determined using Pearson correlation and the paired Student's t test. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first time that the effect of troglitazone on telomerase activity in breast cancer cells has been investigated. Our data suggest that troglitazone may be used as an anti-telomerase agent; however, the mechanism underlying this inhibitory effect remains to be determined.

  16. Novel molecular changes induced by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interaction in adolescence: a hippocampal proteomic study in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrah R Spencer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin 1 (NRG1 is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia and cannabis dependence. Mice that are hypomorphic for Nrg1 (Nrg1 HET mice display schizophrenia-relevant behavioural phenotypes and aberrant expression of serotonin and glutamate receptors. Nrg1 HET mice also display idiosyncratic responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC. To gain traction on the molecular pathways disrupted by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions we conducted a proteomic study. Adolescent wildtype (WT and Nrg1 HET mice were exposed to repeated injections of vehicle or THC and their hippocampi were submitted to 2D gel proteomics. Comparison of WT and Nrg1 HET mice identified proteins linked to molecular changes in schizophrenia that have not been previously associated with Nrg1. These proteins are involved in vesicular release of neurotransmitters such as SNARE proteins; enzymes impacting serotonergic neurotransmission, and; proteins affecting growth factor expression. Nrg1 HET mice treated with THC expressed a distinct protein expression signature compared to WT mice. Replicating prior findings, THC caused proteomic changes in WT mice suggestive of greater oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. We have previously observed that THC selectively increased hippocampal NMDA receptor binding of adolescent Nrg1 HET mice. Here we observed outcomes consistent with heightened NMDA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission. This included differential expression of proteins involved in NMDA receptor trafficking to the synaptic membrane; lipid raft stabilization of synaptic NMDA receptors; and homeostatic responses to dampen excitotoxicity. These findings uncover for the first time novel proteins altered in response to Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions that improves our molecular understanding of Nrg1 signaling and Nrg1-mediated genetic vulnerability to the neurobehavioural effects

  17. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) activity upon recombinant expression and purification of human telomerase in a bacterial system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Debra T; Thiyagarajan, Thirumagal; Larson, Amy C; Hansen, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Telomerase biogenesis is a highly regulated process that solves the DNA end-replication problem. Recombinant expression has so far been accomplished only within a eukaryotic background. Towards structural and functional analyses, we developed bacterial expression of human telomerase. Positive activity by the telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) was identified in cell extracts of Escherichia coli expressing a sequence-optimized hTERT gene, the full-length hTR RNA with a self-splicing hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, and the human heat shock complex of Hsp90, Hsp70, p60/Hop, Hsp40, and p23. The Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin did not affect post-assembly TRAP activity. By various purification methods, TRAP activity was also obtained upon expression of only hTERT and hTR. hTERT was confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry in a ∼120 kDa SDS-PAGE fragment from a TRAP-positive purification fraction. TRAP activity was also supported by hTR constructs lacking the box H/ACA small nucleolar RNA domain. End-point TRAP indicated expression levels within 3-fold of that from HeLa carcinoma cells, which is several orders of magnitude below detection by the direct assay. These results represent the first report of TRAP activity from a bacterium and provide a facile system for the investigation of assembly factors and anti-cancer therapeutics independently of a eukaryotic setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Potent Human Telomerase Inhibitors: Molecular Dynamic Simulations, Multiple Pharmacophore-Based Virtual Screening, and Biochemical Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirgahi Talari, Faezeh; Bagherzadeh, Kowsar; Golestanian, Sahand; Jarstfer, Michael; Amanlou, Massoud

    2015-12-28

    Telomere maintenance is a universal cancer hallmark, and small molecules that disrupt telomere maintenance generally have anticancer properties. Since the vast majority of cancer cells utilize telomerase activity for telomere maintenance, the enzyme has been considered as an anticancer drug target. Recently, rational design of telomerase inhibitors was made possible by the determination of high resolution structures of the catalytic telomerase subunit from a beetle and subsequent molecular modeling of the human telomerase complex. A hybrid strategy including docking, pharmacophore-based virtual screening, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) were used to identify new human telomerase inhibitors. Docking methodology was applied to investigate the ssDNA telomeric sequence and two well-known human telomerase inhibitors' (BIBR1532 and MST-312) modes of interactions with hTERT TEN domain. Subsequently molecular dynamic simulations were performed to monitor and compare hTERT TEN domain, TEN-ssDNA, TEN-BIBR1532, TEN-MST-312, and TEN-ssDNA-BIBR1532 behavior in a dynamic environment. Pharmacophore models were generated considering the inhibitors manner in the TEN domain anchor site. These exploratory studies identified several new potent inhibitors whose IC50 values were generated experimentally in a low micromolar range with the aid of biochemical assays, including both the direct telomerase and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assays. The results suggest that the current models of human telomerase are useful templates for rational inhibitor design.

  19. Telomerase activity is not enough for tumor initiation in human cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... These observations provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that telomere length, not telomerase, deter- mines the proliferative capacity of cells. Ectopic expression of telomerase alone has not resulted in increased growth rate, cytogenetic abnor- malities and p53 and pRb-mediated cell cycle changes.

  20. Rapid and quantitative measuring of telomerase activity using an electrochemiluminescent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da; Zhu, Debin; Jia, Li

    2007-11-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds telomeric repeats to the 3'end of chromosomal DNA for maintaining chromosomal integrity and stability. This strong association of telomerase activity with tumors establishing it is the most widespread cancer marker. A number of assays based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been developed for the evaluation of telomerase activity. However, those methods require gel electrophoresis and some staining procedures. We developed an electrochemiluminescent (ECL) sensor for the measuring of telomerase activity to overcome these problems such as troublesome post-PCR procedures and semi-quantitative assessment in the conventional method. In this assay 5'-biotinylated telomerase synthesis (TS) primer serve as the substrate for the extension of telomeric repeats under telomerase. The extension products were amplified with this TS primer and a tris-(2'2'-bipyridyl) ruthenium (TBR)-labeled reversed primer. The amplified products was separated and enriched in the surface of electrode by streptavidin-coated magnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signals of the TBR labeled. Measuring telomerase activity use the sensor is easy, sensitive, rapid, and applicable to quantitative analysis, should be clinically useful for the detection and monitoring of telomerase activity.

  1. Progressive Increase in Telomerase Activity From Benign Melanocytic Conditions to Malignant Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben D. Ramirez

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The expression of telomerase activity and the in situ localization of the human telomerase RNA component (hTR in melanocytic skin lesions was evaluated in specimens from sixty-three patients. Specimens of melanocytic nevi, primary melanomas and subcutaneous metastases of melanoma were obtained from fifty-eight patients, whereas metastasized lymph nodes were obtained from five patients. Telomerase activity was determined in these specimens by using a Polymerase Chain Reaction—based assay (TRAP. High relative mean telomerase activity levels were detected in metastatic melanoma (subcutaneous metastasess = 54.5, lymph node metastasess = 56.5. Much lower levels were detected in primary melanomas, which increased with advancing levels of tumor cell penetration (Clark II = 0.02, Clark III = 1.1, and Clark IV = 1.9. Twenty-six formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded melanocytic lesions were sectioned and analyzed for telomerase RNA with a radioactive in situ hybridization assay. In situ hybridization studies with a probe to the template RNA component of telomerase confirmed that expression was almost exclusively confined to tumor cells and not infiltrating lymphocytes. These results indicate that levels of telomerase activity and telomerase RNA in melanocytic lesions correlate well with clinical stage and could potentially assist in the diagnosis of borderline lesions.

  2. Telomerase activation as a possible mechanism of action for psychopharmacological interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bersani, F.S.; Lindqvist, D.; Mellon, S.H.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Verhoeven, J.E.; Revesz, D.; Reus, V.I.; Wolkowitz, O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Originally studied in relation to aging and cancer research, telomerase is now also investigated in relation to psychiatric disorders and treatments. Based on emerging clinical and preclinical data, we hypothesise that telomerase activation could represent a novel element mediating the mechanism of

  3. Telomerase activity is sufficient to allow transformed cells to escape from crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, T L; Leibowitz, G; Levine, F

    1999-03-01

    The introduction of simian virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT) into human primary cells enables them to proliferate beyond their normal replicative life span. In most cases, this temporary escape from senescence eventually ends in a second proliferative block known as "crisis," during which the cells cease growing or die. Rare immortalization events in which cells escape crisis are frequently correlated with the presence of telomerase activity. We tested the hypothesis that telomerase activation is the critical step in the immortalization process by studying the effects of telomerase activity in two mortal SVLT-Rasval12-transformed human pancreatic cell lines, TRM-6 and betalox5. The telomerase catalytic subunit, hTRT, was introduced into late-passage cells via retroviral gene transfer. Telomerase activity was successfully induced in infected cells, as demonstrated by a telomerase repeat amplification protocol assay. In each of nine independent infections, telomerase-positive cells formed rapidly dividing cell lines while control cells entered crisis. Telomere lengths initially increased, but telomeres were then maintained at their new lengths for at least 20 population doublings. These results demonstrate that telomerase activity is sufficient to enable transformed cells to escape crisis and that telomere elongation in these cells occurs in a tightly regulated manner.

  4. A new strategy for detection and development of tractable telomerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Elysia P M T; Wu, Kun-Liang; Pettus, Thomas R R; Reich, Norbert O

    2012-04-26

    Despite intense academic and industrial efforts and innumerable in vitro and cell studies, no small-molecule telomerase inhibitors have emerged as drugs. Insufficient understanding of enzyme structure and mechanisms of interdiction coupled with the substantial complexities presented by its dimeric composition have stalled all progress toward small-molecule therapeutics. Here we challenge the assumption that human telomerase provides the best platform for inhibitor development by probing a monomeric Tetrahymena telomerase with six tool compounds. We find BIBR-1532 (2) and MST-312 (5) inhibit only human telomerase, whereas β-R (1), THyF (3), TMPyP4 (6), and EGCG (4) inhibit both enzymes. Our study demonstrates that some small-molecule scaffolds can be easily surveyed with in vitro studies using Tetrahymena telomerase, a finding that could lead to more tractable inhibitors with a greater potential for development given the more precise insights that can be gleaned from this more easily expressed and assayed monomeric enzyme.

  5. A novel electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of telomerase activity based on structure-switching DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zi; Wang, Hai-Bo; Chen, Ke; Gao, Qing; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2014-03-15

    Telomerase has been considered to be an important tumor biomarker for early cancer diagnostics and a valuable target for therapy treatment. A novel electrochemical biosensor based on structure-switching DNA probe with ferrocene (Fc) as the electroactive reporter to detect telomerase activity was developed. The developed approach displayed desirable dynamic range from 10(2) to 6 × 10(4) Hela cells mL(-1) with a detection limit of 100 Hela cells mL(-1). This biosensor afforded good reproducibility, stability and simple operations. It provided a useful platform for practical use in quantitative telomerase activity assay for clinical applications. Telomerase inhibitor performance was also investigated and the results indicated the approach was suitable for telomerase inhibitor screening research. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploring the mechanism of inhibition of human telomerase by cysteine-reactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Guillaume; Dingli, Florent; Masson, Vanessa; Dauzonne, Daniel; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Loew, Damarys; Bombard, Sophie

    2017-03-01

    Telomerase is an almost universal cancer target that consists minimally of a core protein human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and a RNA component human telomerase RNA (hTR). Some inhibitors of this enzyme are thought to function by the covalent binding to one or several cysteine residues; however, this inhibition mechanism has never been investigated because of the difficulty in producing telomerase. In this study, we use a recent method to produce recombinant hTERT to analyze the effect of cysteine-reactive inhibitors on telomerase. Using mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis, we identify several targeted residues in separated domains of the hTERT protein and show that cysteine-reactive reagents abolish the interaction with the CR4/5 region of hTR. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Telomerase Inhibition Effectively Targets Mouse and Human AML Stem Cells and Delays Relapse Following Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruedigam, Claudia; Bagger, Frederik O.; Heidel, Florian H.; Kuhn, Catherine Paine; Guignes, Solene; Song, Axia; Austin, Rebecca; Vu, Therese; Lee, Erwin; Riyat, Sarbjit; Moore, Andrew S.; Lock, Richard B.; Bullinger, Lars; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Armstrong, Scott A.; Williams, David A.; Lane, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive and lethal blood cancer maintained by rare populations of leukemia stem cells (LSCs). Selective targeting of LSCs is a promising approach for treating AML and preventing relapse following chemotherapy, and developing such therapeutic modalities is a key priority. Here, we show that targeting telomerase activity eradicates AML LSCs. Genetic deletion of the telomerase subunit Terc in a retroviral mouse AML model induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of LSCs, and depletion of telomerase-deficient LSCs is partially rescued by p53 knockdown. Murine Terc−/− LSCs express a specific gene expression signature that can be identified in human AML patient cohorts and is positively correlated with patient survival following chemotherapy. In xenografts of primary human AML, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase targets LSCs, impairs leukemia progression, and delays relapse following chemotherapy. Together, these results establish telomerase inhibition as an effective strategy for eliminating AML LSCs. PMID:25479751

  8. Integrated Nanosensors to Determine Levels and Functional Activity of Human Telomerase1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, J Manuel; Grimm, Jan; Josephson, Lee; Weissleder, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase is a key oncogenic enzyme, and a number of novel telomerase inhibitors are currently under development. Because inhibition can be achieved either at the protein or at the enzymatic activity level, independent measurements of these parameters are important in the development of effective therapeutic agents. In the current study, we have developed a set of functional magnetic nanosensors capable of measuring the concentration of telomerase, as well as its enzymatic activity in parallel. The method is based on a magnetic relaxation switch assay, which can be performed in crude tissue samples and is fast and extremely sensitive. Using this method, we were able to detect different amounts of telomerase protein and activity in various cancer and normal cell lines. Furthermore, we were able to study the effect of phosphorylation on telomerase activity. This system not only could provide a rapid assay for the evaluation of antitelomerase therapies but could also be implemented to the study of other cancer markers. PMID:18813356

  9. Combination treatment with flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 reduces cancer stem cell traits by targeting STAT3 and telomerase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chung, Seyung S; Oliva, Bryant; Dwabe, Sami; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2016-01-01

    .... However, to date, efficient targeted-therapy for metastatic CRC is ill-defined. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment of flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 may reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) traits...

  10. Novel Mutation of the TINF2 Gene in a Patient with Dyskeratosis Congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjaporn Panichareon

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC is a rare inherited disease that is characterized by abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and mucosal leukoplakia. DKC is caused by an abnormality in a component of the telomerase and shelterin complexes. TINF2 encodes a protein in the shelterin complex and TERC encodes a component of the telomerase complex. Mutations of both genes have been associated with DKC. This study examined mutations in TINF2 and TERC by direct DNA sequencing in a Thai patient with DKC. We identified a novel mutation (c.845G>T that is located in exon 6 of TINF2 and changes an arginine to leucine (Arg282Leu. This identified mutation could be applied for molecular genetic diagnosis and genetic counseling of patients with DKC.

  11. Abrogation of radiation-inducible telomerase upregulation in HPV16 E6 transfectants of human lymphoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhof, D.; Auberger, F.; Ruess, A.; Weber, K.J. [Radiobiology Research Lab., Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany); Wenz, F. [Section for Radiation Oncology, Univ. Clinic Mannheim (Germany)

    2004-01-01

    Background: telomerase activity in a human lymphoblastoid cell line with wild-type p53 status (TK6) was previously shown to be rapidly induced by ionizing radiation doses as low as 10 cgy. Since this low-dose response was absent in a closely related cell line overexpressing a mutant form of p53 (WTK1), the putative involvement of p53 was further investigated using stable human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6 transfectants of these cell lines. The E6 product mediates rapid degradation of wild-type p53, but has also been found to upregulate telomerase. Material and methods: telomerase activity in HPV16 E6 transfectants of the human lymphoblastoid cell lines TK6 and WTK1 was measured by PCR/ELISA and was quantified using internal standards (titration by cell number) run within each separate assay. Mean telomere length was determined by southern hybridization of terminal restriction fragments with a biotin-labeled telomeric DNA probe. Results: the TK6E6 and the WTK1E6 cells exhibited higher baseline telomerase activities than the parental cells. This was also accompanied by increased telomere lengths. Radiation exposure (up to 10 gy) was unable to significantly further enhance telomerase activities, although the dynamic range of the assay would have allowed to record higher signals. Conclusion: the lacking radiation induction of telomerase activities in the E6 transfectants could reflect saturation, if E6 and radiation would share a common pathway of telomerase upregulation. Present evidence from the literature, however, suggests that E6 mediates telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) subunit transcriptional activation, whereas radiation signals to posttranscriptional/posttranslational control of telomerase activity. Therefore, the present data enforce the previous hypothesis of a p53 dependence of telomerase upregulation by low doses of radiation and its abrogation, likely due to p53 degradation, in E6-expressing cells. (orig.)

  12. Is telomerase reactivation associated with the down-regulation of TGF β receptor-II expression in human breast cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Valene

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that synthesizes telomeres and plays an important role in chromosomal stability and cellular immortalisation. Telomerase activity is detectable in most human cancers but not in normal somatic cells. TGF beta (transforming growth factor beta is a member of a family of cytokines that are essential for cell survival and seems to be down-regulated in human cancer. Recent in vitro work using human breast cancer cell lines has suggested that TGF beta down-regulates the expression of hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase : the catalytic subunit of telomerase. We have therefore hypothesised that telomerase reactivation is associated with reduced immunohisto-chemical expression of TGF beta type II receptor (RII in human breast cancer. Methods TGF beta RII immunohistochemical expression was determined in 24 infiltrating breast carcinomas with known telomerase activity (17 telomerase-positive and 7 telomerase-negative. Immunohistochemical expression of TGF beta RII was determined by a breast pathologist who was blinded to telomerase data. Results TGF beta RII was detected in all lesions. The percentage of stained cells ranged from 1–100%. The difference in TGF beta RII expression between telomerase positive and negative tumours was not statistically significant (p = 1.0. Conclusion The results of this pilot study suggest that there is no significant association between telomerase reactivation and TGF-beta RII down-regulation in human breast cancer.

  13. The TPR-containing domain within Est1 homologs exhibits species-specific roles in telomerase interaction and telomere length homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LeBel Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first telomerase-associated protein (Est1 was isolated in yeast due to its essential role in telomere maintenance. The human counterparts EST1A, EST1B, and EST1C perform diverse functions in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD, telomere length homeostasis, and telomere transcription. Although Est1 and EST1A/B interact with the catalytic subunit of yeast and human telomerase (Est2 and TERT, respectively, the molecular determinants of these interactions have not been elaborated fully. Results To investigate the functional conservation of the EST1 protein family, we performed protein-protein interaction mapping and structure-function analysis. The domain in hEST1A most conserved between species, containing a TPR (tricotetrapeptide repeat, was sufficient for interaction of hEST1A with multiple fragments of hTERT including the N-terminus. Two mutations within the hTERT N-terminus that perturb in vivo function (NAAIRS92, NAAIRS122 did not affect this protein interaction. ScEst1 hybrids containing the TPR of hEST1A, hEST1B, or hEST1C were expressed in yeast strains lacking EST1, yet they failed to complement senescence. Point mutations within and outside the cognate ScEst1 TPR, chosen to disrupt a putative protein interaction surface, resulted in telomere lengthening or shortening without affecting recruitment to telomeres. Conclusions These results identify a domain encompassing the TPR of hEST1A as an hTERT interaction module. The TPR of S. cerevisiae Est1 is required for telomerase-mediated telomere length maintenance in a manner that appears separable from telomere recruitment. Discrete residues in or adjacent to the TPR of Est1 also regulate telomere length homeostasis.

  14. Gene Targeted Mice with Conditional Knock-In (-Out) of NMDAR Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Rolf; Eltokhi, Ahmed; Single, Frank N

    2017-01-01

    the germ line of mice as hypomorphic Grin alleles. By breeding these hypomorphic Grin gene targeted mice with Cre recombinase expressing mice, the hypomorphic Grin allele can be activated at specific time points in specific cell types, and the function of the mutated NMDAR can be analyzed in these - so called - conditional mouse models. In this method chapter, we describe in detail the different methodical steps for successful gene targeting and generation of conditional NMDAR mutant mouse lines. Within the last 20 years, several students in our Department of Molecular Neurobiology in Heidelberg used these techniques several times to generate different mouse lines with mutated NMDARs.

  15. Telomerase abrogation dramatically accelerates TRF2-induced epithelial carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Blanco, Raquel; Muñoz, Purificación; Flores, Juana M.; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A.

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 is a telomere-binding protein with roles in telomere protection and telomere-length regulation. The fact that TRF2 is up-regulated in some human tumors suggests a role of TRF2 in cancer. Mice that overexpress TRF2 in the skin, K5TRF2 mice, show critically short telomeres and are susceptible to UV-induced carcinogenesis as a result of deregulated XPF/ERCC1 activity, a nuclease involved in UV damage repair. Here we demonstrate that, when in combination with telomerase deficiency, TRF2 acts...

  16. Identification of human telomerase assembly inhibitors enabled by a novel method to produce hTERT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Guillaume; Kaiser, Markus; Dingli, Florent; Lahuna, Olivier; Naud-Martin, Delphine; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Loew, Damarys; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Bombard, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase is the enzyme that maintains the length of telomeres. It is minimally constituted of two components: a core reverse transcriptase protein (hTERT) and an RNA (hTR). Despite its significance as an almost universal cancer target, the understanding of the structure of telomerase and the optimization of specific inhibitors have been hampered by the limited amount of enzyme available. Here, we present a breakthrough method to produce unprecedented amounts of recombinant hTERT and to reconstitute human telomerase with purified components. This system provides a decisive tool to identify regulators of the assembly of this ribonucleoprotein complex. It also enables the large-scale screening of small-molecules capable to interfere with telomerase assembly. Indeed, it has allowed us to identify a compound that inhibits telomerase activity when added prior to the assembly of the enzyme, while it has no effect on an already assembled telomerase. Therefore, the novel system presented here may accelerate the understanding of human telomerase assembly and facilitate the discovery of potent and mechanistically unique inhibitors. PMID:25958399

  17. The hTERTα Splice Variant is a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorel M. Colgin

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available The telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT is an essential component of the holoenzyme complex that adds telomeric repeats to the ends of human chromosomes. Maintenance of telomeres by telomerase or another mechanism is required for cell immortalization, and loss of telomeric DNA has been proposed as a trigger for cellular senescence. Available evidence suggests that regulation of telomerase activity primarily depends on transcriptional control of hTERT. However, several human tissues as well as some normal cell strains have been shown to express low levels of hTERT mRNA even though they lack telomerase activity. We have previously identified six splice variants of hTERT, including a “deletion” variant (hTERTα that is missing conserved residues from the catalytic core of the protein. Several of the deletion variants have been detected in normal and developing human tissues. We now show that hTERTα inhibits endogenous telomerase activity, which results in telomere shortening and chromosome end-to-end fusions. Telomerase inhibition induced a senescence-like state in HT1080 cells and apoptosis in a jejunal fibroblast cell line. These results suggest a possible role for hTERT splice variants in the regulation of telomerase activity.

  18. Telomerase activity promotes osteoblast differentiation by modulating IGF-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Hamid; Qiu, Weimin; Li, Chen; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Abdallah, Basem M; Kassem, Moustapha

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of deficient telomerase activity to age-related decline in osteoblast functions and bone formation is poorly studied. We have previously demonstrated that telomerase over-expression led to enhanced osteoblast differentiation of human bone marrow skeletal (stromal) stem cells (hMSC) in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated the signaling pathways underlying the regulatory functions of telomerase in osteoblastic cells. Comparative microarray analysis and Western blot analysis of telomerase-over expressing hMSC (hMSC-TERT) versus primary hMSC revealed significant up-regulation of several components of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. Specifically, a significant increase in IGF-induced AKT phosphorylation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed in hMSC-TERT. Enhanced ALP activity was reduced in presence of IGF1 receptor inhibitor: picropodophyllin. In addition, telomerase deficiency caused significant reduction in IGF signaling proteins in osteoblastic cells cultured from telomerase deficient mice (Terc(-/-)). The low bone mass exhibited by Terc(-/-) mice was associated with significant reduction in serum levels of IGF1 and IGFBP3 as well as reduced skeletal mRNA expression of Igf1, Igf2, Igf2r, Igfbp5 and Igfbp6. IGF1-induced osteoblast differentiation was also impaired in Terc(-/-) MSC. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that impaired IGF/AKT signaling contributes to the observed decreased bone mass and bone formation exhibited by telomerase deficient osteoblastic cells.

  19. Telomeres and Telomerase in Hematopoietic Dysfunction: Prognostic Implications and Pharmacological Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Vasko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte telomere length (TL has been suggested as a marker of biological age in healthy individuals, but can also reflect inherited and acquired hematopoietic dysfunctions or indicate an increased turnover of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell compartment. In addition, TL is able to predict the response rate of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, indicates clinical outcomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, and can be used as screening tool for genetic sequencing of selected genes in patients with inherited bone marrow failure syndromes (BMFS. In tumor cells and clonal hematopoietic disorders, telomeres are continuously stabilized by reactivation of telomerase, which can selectively be targeted by telomerase-specific therapy. The use of the telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat in patients with essential thrombocythmia or myelofibrosis as well as the use of dendritic cell-based telomerase vaccination in AML patients with complete remissions are promising examples for anti-telomerase targeted strategies in hematologic malignancies. In contrast, the elevation in telomerase levels through treatment with androgens has become an exciting clinical intervention for patients with BMFS. Here, we review recent developments, which highlight the impact of telomeres and telomerase targeted therapies in hematologic dysfunctions.

  20. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengying Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment.

  1. NAC selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity: A higher redox homeostasis threshold exists in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengying; Wu, Meilin; Wang, Jing; Sui, Yilun; Liu, Shanlin; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase activity controls telomere length, and this plays an important role in stem cells, aging and tumors. Antioxidant was shown to protect telomerase activity in normal cells but inhibit that in cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is elusive. Here we found that 7721 hepatoma cells held a higher redox homeostasis threshold than L02 normal liver cells which caused 7721 cells to have a higher demand for ROS; MnSOD over-expression in 7721 decreased endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited telomerase activity; Akt phosphorylation inhibitor and NAC both inhibited 7721 telomerase activity. The over-elimination of ROS by NAC resulted in the inhibition of Akt pathway. Our results suggest that ROS is involved in the regulation of cancer telomerase activity through Akt pathway. The different intracellular redox homeostasis and antioxidant system in normal cells and tumor cells may be the cause of the opposite effect on telomerase activity in response to NAC treatment. Our results provide a theoretical base of using antioxidants selectively inhibit cancer telomerase activity. Findings of the present study may provide insights into novel approaches for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Stiffened yeast telomerase RNA supports RNP function in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Kevin J.; Zappulla, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The 1157-nt Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA, TLC1, in addition to providing a 16-nt template region for reverse transcription, has been proposed to act as a scaffold for protein subunits. Although accessory subunits of the telomerase ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex function even when their binding sites are relocated on the yeast telomerase RNA, the physical nature of the RNA scaffold has not been directly analyzed. Here we explore the structure–function organization of the yeast telomerase RNP by extensively stiffening the three long arms of TLC1, which connect essential and important accessory protein subunits Ku, Est1, and Sm7, to its central catalytic hub. This 956-nt triple-stiff-arm TLC1 (TSA-T) reconstitutes active telomerase with TERT (Est2) in vitro. Furthermore, TSA-T functions in vivo, even maintaining longer telomeres than TLC1 on a per RNA basis. We also tested functional contributions of each stiffened arm within TSA-T and found that the stiffened Est1 and Ku arms contribute to telomere lengthening, while stiffening the terminal arm reduces telomere length and telomerase RNA abundance. The fact that yeast telomerase tolerates significant stiffening of its RNA subunit in vivo advances our understanding of the architectural and functional organization of this RNP and, more broadly, our conception of the world of lncRNPs. PMID:22850424

  3. Cycloastragenol Is a Potent Telomerase Activator in Neuronal Cells: Implications for Depression Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny C.F. Ip

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cycloastragenol (CAG is an aglycone of astragaloside IV. It was first identified when screening Astragalus membranaceus extracts for active ingredients with antiaging properties. The present study demonstrates that CAG stimulates telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human neonatal keratinocytes. In particular, CAG promotes scratch wound closure of human neonatal keratinocyte monolayers in vitro. The distinct telomerase-activating property of CAG prompted evaluation of its potential application in the treatment of neurological disorders. Accordingly, CAG induced telomerase activity and cAMP response element binding (CREB activation in PC12 cells and primary neurons. Blockade of CREB expression in neuronal cells by RNA interference reduced basal telomerase activity, and CAG was no longer efficacious in increasing telomerase activity. CAG treatment not only induced the expression of bcl2, a CREB-regulated gene, but also the expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase in primary cortical neurons. Interestingly, oral administration of CAG for 7 days attenuated depression-like behavior in experimental mice. In conclusion, CAG stimulates telomerase activity in human neonatal keratinocytes and rat neuronal cells, and induces CREB activation followed by tert and bcl2 expression. Furthermore, CAG may have a novel therapeutic role in depression. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. RNA/DNA hybrid binding affinity determines telomerase template-translocation efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaodong; Xie, Mingyi; Brown, Andrew F; Bley, Christopher J; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase synthesizes telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini from an intrinsic RNA template. The processive synthesis of DNA repeats relies on a unique, yet poorly understood, mechanism whereby the telomerase RNA template translocates and realigns with the DNA primer after synthesizing each repeat. Here, we provide evidence that binding of the realigned RNA/DNA hybrid by the active site is an essential step for template translocation. Employing a template-free human telomerase system, we demonstrate that the telomerase active site directly binds to RNA/DNA hybrid substrates for DNA polymerization. In telomerase processivity mutants, the template-translocation efficiency correlates with the affinity for the RNA/DNA hybrid substrate. Furthermore, the active site is unoccupied during template translocation as a 5 bp extrinsic RNA/DNA hybrid effectively reduces the processivity of the template-containing telomerase. This suggests that strand separation and template realignment occur outside the active site, preceding the binding of realigned hybrid to the active site. Our results provide new insights into the ancient RNA/DNA hybrid binding ability of telomerase and its role in template translocation. PMID:21989387

  5. [Effects of differentially expressed proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma cell treated by different telomerase inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiao; Zhang, Zhiyong; He, Min; Wang, Xia; Zheng, Weiwei

    2010-03-01

    To detect differentially expressed proteins in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors including antisense oligodeoxynuclectide of human telomerase RNA (hTR-ASODN), sense oligodeoxynuclectide of hTR (hTR-SODN), ASODN of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT-ASODN), SODN of hTERT (hTERT-SODN), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT), all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and adriamycin (ADM) using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrom (SELDI-TOF-MS) technology. SELDI-TOF-MS technology and weak cation exchanger (WCX-2) protein chip were used to detect differentially expressed secretory and cytoplasmic proteins of SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors. The control group was hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC-7721 cell without any disposal. The results of WCX-2 protein chip showed that the secretory and cytoplasmic proteins were differentially expressed in SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors. But some proteins were down-regulated or up-regulated together in all experimental groups. The molecular weight of these differential proteins were all less than 10,000 Da. Differentially expressed and common changes of proteins in SMMC-7721 cell treated separately by eight telomerase inhibitors would associate with telomerase activity.

  6. A novel telomerase activator suppresses lung damage in a murine model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Jourdan Le Saux

    Full Text Available The emergence of diseases associated with telomere dysfunction, including AIDS, aplastic anemia and pulmonary fibrosis, has bolstered interest in telomerase activators. We report identification of a new small molecule activator, GRN510, with activity ex vivo and in vivo. Using a novel mouse model, we tested the potential of GRN510 to limit fibrosis induced by bleomycin in mTERT heterozygous mice. Treatment with GRN510 at 10 mg/kg/day activated telomerase 2-4 fold both in hematopoietic progenitors ex vivo and in bone marrow and lung tissue in vivo, respectively. Telomerase activation was countered by co-treatment with Imetelstat (GRN163L, a potent telomerase inhibitor. In this model of bleomycin-induced fibrosis, treatment with GRN510 suppressed the development of fibrosis and accumulation of senescent cells in the lung via a mechanism dependent upon telomerase activation. Treatment of small airway epithelial cells (SAEC or lung fibroblasts ex vivo with GRN510 revealed telomerase activating and replicative lifespan promoting effects only in the SAEC, suggesting that the mechanism accounting for the protective effects of GRN510 against induced lung fibrosis involves specific types of lung cells. Together, these results support the use of small molecule activators of telomerase in therapies to treat idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  7. Active Yeast Telomerase Shares Subunits with Ribonucleoproteins RNase P and RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Bruno; Laterreur, Nancy; Perederina, Anna; Noël, Jean-François; Dubois, Marie-Line; Krasilnikov, Andrey S; Wellinger, Raymund J

    2016-05-19

    Telomerase is the ribonucleoprotein enzyme that replenishes telomeric DNA and maintains genome integrity. Minimally, telomerase activity requires a templating RNA and a catalytic protein. Additional proteins are required for activity on telomeres in vivo. Here, we report that the Pop1, Pop6, and Pop7 proteins, known components of RNase P and RNase MRP, bind to yeast telomerase RNA and are essential constituents of the telomerase holoenzyme. Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 binding is specific and involves an RNA domain highly similar to a protein-binding domain in the RNAs of RNase P/MRP. The results also show that Pop1/Pop6/Pop7 function to maintain the essential components Est1 and Est2 on the RNA in vivo. Consistently, addition of Pop1 allows for telomerase activity reconstitution with wild-type telomerase RNA in vitro. Thus, the same chaperoning module has allowed the evolution of functionally and, remarkably, structurally distinct RNPs, telomerase, and RNases P/MRP from unrelated progenitor RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ATM and ATR Signaling Regulate the Recruitment of Human Telomerase to Telomeres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian S. Tong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The yeast homologs of the ATM and ATR DNA damage response kinases play key roles in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, but the role of ATM/ATR in the mammalian telomerase pathway has been less clear. Here, we demonstrate the requirement for ATM and ATR in the localization of telomerase to telomeres and telomere elongation in immortal human cells. Stalled replication forks increased telomerase recruitment in an ATR-dependent manner. Furthermore, increased telomerase recruitment was observed upon phosphorylation of the shelterin component TRF1 at an ATM/ATR target site (S367. This phosphorylation leads to loss of TRF1 from telomeres and may therefore increase replication fork stalling. ATM and ATR depletion reduced assembly of the telomerase complex, and ATM was required for telomere elongation in cells expressing POT1ΔOB, an allele of POT1 that disrupts telomere-length homeostasis. These data establish that human telomerase recruitment and telomere elongation are modulated by DNA-damage-transducing kinases.

  9. Colorimetry and SERS dual-mode detection of telomerase activity: combining rapid screening with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Min; Chen, Peng; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dual-mode telomerase activity detection method, which has several distinctive advantages. First, colorimetric functionality allows rapid preliminary discrimination of telomerase activity by the naked eye. Second, the employment of SERS technique results in greatly improved detection sensitivity. Third, the combination of colorimetry and SERS into one detection system can ensure highly efficacious and sensitive screening of numerous samples. Besides, the avoidance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures further guarantees fine reliability and simplicity. Generally, the presented method is realized by an "elongate and capture" procedure. To be specific, gold nanoparticles modified with Raman molecules and telomeric repeat complementary oligonucleotide are employed as the colorimetric-SERS bifunctional reporting nanotag, while magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with telomerase substrate oligonucleotide are used as the capturing substrate. Telomerase can synthesize and elongate telomeric repeats onto the capturing substrate. The elongated telomeric repeats subsequently facilitate capturing of the reporting nanotag via hybridization between telomeric repeat and its complementary strand. The captured nanotags can cause a significant difference in the color and SERS intensity of the magnetically separated sediments. Thus both the color and SERS can be used as indicators of the telomerase activity. With fast screening ability and outstanding sensitivity, we anticipate that this method would greatly promote practical application of telomerase-based early-stage cancer diagnosis.

  10. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) - enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) network regulates lipid metabolism and DNA damage responses in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahim; Patrick, Shruti; Sheikh, Touseef; Sharma, Vikas; Pathak, Pankaj; Malgulwar, Prit Benny; Kumar, Anupam; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Sarkar, Chitra; Sen, Ellora

    2017-12-01

    Elevated expression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a histone H3K27 methyltransferase, was observed in gliomas harboring telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations. Given the known involvement of TERT and EZH2 in glioma progression, the correlation between the two and subsequently its involvement in metabolic programming was investigated. Inhibition of human telomerase reverse transcriptase either pharmacologically or through genetic manipulation not only decreased EZH2 expression, but also (i) abrogated FASN levels, (ii) decreased de novo fatty acid accumulation, and (iii) increased ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) phosphorylation levels. Conversely, diminished TERT and FASN levels upon siRNA-mediated EZH2 knockdown indicated a positive correlation between TERT and EZH2. Interestingly, ATM kinase inhibitor rescued TERT inhibition-mediated decrease in FASN and EZH2 levels. Importantly, TERT promoter mutant tumors exhibited greater microsatellite instability, heightened FASN levels and lipid accumulation. Coherent with in vitro findings, pharmacological inhibition of TERT by costunolide decreased lipid accumulation and elevated ATM expression in heterotypic xenograft glioma mouse model. By bringing TERT-EZH2 network at the forefront as driver of dysregulated metabolism, our findings highlight the non-canonical but distinct role of TERT in metabolic reprogramming and DNA damage responses in glioblastoma. © 2017 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  11. Pterostilbene as a potential novel telomerase inhibitor: molecular docking studies and its in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippani, Radhika; Prakhya, Laxmi Jaya Shankar; Porika, Mahendar; Sirisha, Kalam; Abbagani, Sadanandam; Thammidala, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Pterostilbene is a naturally occurring dimethyl ether analog of resveratrol identified in several plant species. Telomerase is important in tumor initiation and cellular immortalization. Given the striking correlations between telomerase activity and proliferation capacity in tumor cells, telomerase had been considered as a potentially important molecular target in cancer therapeutics. Molecular docking studies were performed on pterostilbene with the crystal structure of telomerase (3DU6). Pterostilbene was evaluated for its in vitro cytotoxicity in breast (MCF7) and lung cancer (NCI H-460) cell lines, antimitotic activity in green grams and telomerase activity. Curcumin was used as a standard. Docking results indicated good interaction between pterostilbene and the active site of telomerase and the docked energy of pterostilbene was -7.10 kcal/mol. Pterostilbene showed strong inhibitory effect on in vitro telomerase activity and cell growth in both the cell lines tested in a dose dependent manner. Cancer cells treated with 80 µM pterostilbene exhibited significant telomerase inhibition, after 72 hours (MCF-7 and NCI H-460; 81.52% and 74.69% reduction, respectively, compared to control). The IC50 of pterostilbene for anti-proliferative activity in MCF7 and NCI H-460 cell lines were found to be 30.0 and 47.2 µM, respectively. The best antimitotic activity was obtained with 80 μM of pterostilbene (100% reduction in water imbibition). All the above results were comparable to that of curcumin. The drug-related properties of pterostilbene were calculated using Molinspiration, Osiris Property Explorer and ACD/Chemsketch softwares. Pterostilbene obeyed Lipinski's Rule of Five indicating its therapeutic potential in humans. It was found that the telomerase inhibitory activity exhibited by pterostilbene was dependent of the cell viability and has the potential to be a new drug candidate against breast and lung cancers.

  12. Evolution of Arabidopsis protection of telomeres 1 alters nucleic acid recognition and telomerase regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Amit; Beilstein, Mark A.; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Protection of telomeres (POT1) binds chromosome ends, recognizing single-strand telomeric DNA via two oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding folds (OB-folds). The Arabidopsis thaliana POT1a and POT1b paralogs are atypical: they do not exhibit telomeric DNA binding, and they have opposing roles in regulating telomerase activity. AtPOT1a stimulates repeat addition processivity of the canonical telomerase enzyme, while AtPOT1b interacts with a regulatory lncRNA that represses telomerase activit...

  13. Inhibition of Telomerase as a Therapeutic Target for the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Counter, Christopher M

    2005-01-01

    .... Critical for this type of endless cell division is an enzyme named telomerase. This enzyme is usually dormant in most normal tissues, but is resurrected in prostate cancer cells by yet unknown genetic changes...

  14. Identification of New Genes that Regulate Telomerase and Telomere Length in Budding Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pennock, Erin

    2001-01-01

    ... of telomerase to the chromosome end. The exact molecular mechanism by which Cdc13 protects the telomere has not been elucidated, although Stn1, a protein previously shown to interact with Cdc13, may contribute to end protection...

  15. Identification of the Types Properties and Functional Characteristics of Telomerase Expressing Cells in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hines, William

    2003-01-01

    ... biochemical and functional properties may be characterized. Through examining the role of telomerase in cancer, this project also fosters the education of the candidate through the interaction with several experts in breast cancer pathology, epidemiology, bio...

  16. Identification of the Types, Properties, and Functional Characteristics of Telomerase Expressing Cells in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hines, William C; Griffith, Jeffrey K

    2005-01-01

    ... biochemical and functional properties may be characterized. Through examining the role of telomerase in cancer, this project also fosters the education of the candidate through the interaction with several experts in breast cancer pathology, epidemiology, bio...

  17. Identification of New Genes that Regulate Telomerase and Telomere Length in Budding Yeast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Otero, Joel

    2003-01-01

    In budding yeast, Cdc13 has both an essential function in chromosome end protection as well as a non-essential role in telomere replication, by mediating recruitment of telomerase to the chromosome end...

  18. Telomerase activity promotes osteoblast differentiation by modulating IGF-signaling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Hamid; Qiu, Weimin; Li, Chen

    2015-01-01

    MSC) in vitro and in vivo. Here, we investigated the signaling pathways underlying the regulatory functions of telomerase in osteoblastic cells. Comparative microarray analysis and Western blot analysis of telomerase-over expressing hMSC (hMSC-TERT) versus primary hMSC revealed significant up......The contribution of deficient telomerase activity to age-related decline in osteoblast functions and bone formation is poorly studied. We have previously demonstrated that telomerase over-expression led to enhanced osteoblast differentiation of human bone marrow skeletal (stromal) stem cells (h......-regulation of several components of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. Specifically, a significant increase in IGF-induced AKT phosphorylation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were observed in hMSC-TERT. Enhanced ALP activity was reduced in presence of IGF1 receptor inhibitor: picropodophyllin...

  19. Live-cell imaging of budding yeast telomerase RNA and TERRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprade, Hadrien; Lalonde, Maxime; Guérit, David; Chartrand, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    In most eukaryotes, the ribonucleoprotein complex telomerase is responsible for maintaining telomere length. In recent years, single-cell microscopy techniques such as fluorescent in situ hybridization and live-cell imaging have been developed to image the RNA subunit of the telomerase holoenzyme. These techniques are now becoming important tools for the study of telomerase biogenesis, its association with telomeres and its regulation. Here, we present detailed protocols for live-cell imaging of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase RNA subunit, called TLC1, and also of the non-coding telomeric repeat-containing RNA TERRA. We describe the approach used for genomic integration of MS2 stem-loops in these transcripts, and provide information for optimal live-cell imaging of these non-coding RNAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Telomerase activity and its association with psychological stress, mental disorders, lifestyle factors and interventions: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W; Cheung, S T; Tsao, S W; Wang, X M; Tiwari, A F Y

    2016-02-01

    To summarise and discuss the association between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. A systematic review was carried out to identify prospective or retrospective studies and interventions published up to June 2015 that reported associations between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. Electronic data bases of PubMed, ProQuest, CINAHL and Google Scholar were searched. Twenty six studies on humans measured telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or leukocytes and examined its association with psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors. Of those studies, three reported significantly decreased telomerase activity in individuals under chronic psychological stress. Interestingly, one of the three studies found that acute laboratory psychological stress significantly increased telomerase activity. Nine studies reported mixed results on association between mental disorders and telomerase activity. Of the nine studies, five reported that major depressive disorder (MDD) was associated with significantly increased telomerase activity. In thirteen out of fourteen studies on lifestyle factors, it was reported that physical exercise, diet micronutrient supplementation, mindfulness meditation, Qigong practice or yoga mediation resulted in increase in telomerase activity. In addition, two studies on animal models showed that depression-like behaviour was associated with decreased hippocampus telomerase activity. Five animal studies showed that physical exercise increased telomerase activity by cell-type-specific and genotype-specific manners. Although multi-facet results were reported on the association between telomerase activity and psychological stress, mental disorders and lifestyle factors, there were some consistent findings in humans such as (1) decreased telomerase activity in individuals under chronic stress, (2) increased

  1. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  2. The HSP90 inhibitor alvespimycin enhances the potency of telomerase inhibition by imetelstat in human osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yafang; Bobb, Daniel; He, Jianping; Hill, D Ashley; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    The unsatisfactory outcomes for osteosarcoma necessitate novel therapeutic strategies. This study evaluated the effect of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat in pre-clinical models of human osteosarcoma. Because the chaperone molecule HSP90 facilitates the assembly of telomerase protein, the ability of the HSP90 inhibitor alvespimycin to potentiate the effect of the telomerase inhibitor was assessed. The effect of single or combined treatment with imetelstat and alvespimycin on long-term growth was assessed in osteosarcoma cell lines (143B, HOS and MG-63) and xenografts derived from 143B cells. Results indicated that imetelstat as a single agent inhibited telomerase activity, induced telomere shortening, and inhibited growth in all 3 osteosarcoma cell lines, though the bulk cell cultures did not undergo growth arrest. Combined treatment with imetelstat and alvespimycin resulted in diminished telomerase activity and shorter telomeres compared to either agent alone as well as higher levels of γH2AX and cleaved caspase-3, indicative of increased DNA damage and apoptosis. With dual telomerase and HSP90 inhibition, complete growth arrest of bulk cell cultures was achieved. In xenograft models, all 3 treatment groups significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with the placebo-treated control group, with the greatest effect seen in the combined treatment group (imetelstat, p = 0.045, alvespimycin, p = 0.034; combined treatment, p = 0.004). In conclusion, HSP90 inhibition enhanced the effect of telomerase inhibition in pre-clinical models of osteosarcoma. Dual targeting of telomerase and HSP90 warrants further investigation as a therapeutic strategy.

  3. The effect of Bortezomib and Rapamycin on Telomerase Activity in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orit Uziel

    2014-12-01

    In the light of the crucial role of telomerase in cancer cells, it was important to characterize the possible relations between telomerase and bortezomib and to distinguish the biochemical mechanisms of its regulation and its interactions with other signal transduction inhibitors such as rapamycin. The results of this work encourage the in vivo examination of the therapeutic potential of the combination of bortezomib and rapamycin in Mantle Cell Lymphoma patients.

  4. Behaviour of telomere and telomerase during aging and regeneration in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Anchelin

    Full Text Available Telomere length and telomerase activity are important factors in the pathobiology of human diseases. Age-related diseases and premature aging syndromes are characterized by short telomeres, which can compromise cell viability, whereas tumour cells can prevent telomere loss by aberrantly upregulating telomerase. The zebrafish (Danio rerio offers multiple experimental manipulation advantages over other vertebrate models and, therefore, it has been recently considered as a potential model for aging, cancer, and regeneration studies. However, it has only partially been exploited to shed light on these fundamental biological processes. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate telomere length and telomerase expression and activity in different strains of zebrafish obtained from different stock centres to determine whether they undergo any changes during aging and regeneration. We found that although both telomerase expression and telomere length increased from embryo to adulthood stages, they drastically declined in aged fish despite telomerase activity was detected in different tissues of old fish. In addition, we observed a weaker upregulation of telomerase expression in regenerating fins of old fish, which well correlates with their impaired regeneration capacity. Strikingly, telomeres were elongated or maintained during the fin regeneration process at all ages and after repeated amputations, likely to support high cell proliferation rates. We conclude that the expression of telomerase and telomere length are closely related during the entire life cycle of the fish and that these two parameters can be used as biomarkers of aging in zebrafish. Our results also reveal a direct relationship between the expression of telomerase, telomere length and the efficiency of tissue regeneration.

  5. Behaviour of Telomere and Telomerase during Aging and Regeneration in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Pérez, Francisca; García-Navarro, Esther M.; Cayuela, María L.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere length and telomerase activity are important factors in the pathobiology of human diseases. Age-related diseases and premature aging syndromes are characterized by short telomeres, which can compromise cell viability, whereas tumour cells can prevent telomere loss by aberrantly upregulating telomerase. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) offers multiple experimental manipulation advantages over other vertebrate models and, therefore, it has been recently considered as a potential model for aging, cancer, and regeneration studies. However, it has only partially been exploited to shed light on these fundamental biological processes. The aim of this study was, therefore, to investigate telomere length and telomerase expression and activity in different strains of zebrafish obtained from different stock centres to determine whether they undergo any changes during aging and regeneration. We found that although both telomerase expression and telomere length increased from embryo to adulthood stages, they drastically declined in aged fish despite telomerase activity was detected in different tissues of old fish. In addition, we observed a weaker upregulation of telomerase expression in regenerating fins of old fish, which well correlates with their impaired regeneration capacity. Strikingly, telomeres were elongated or maintained during the fin regeneration process at all ages and after repeated amputations, likely to support high cell proliferation rates. We conclude that the expression of telomerase and telomere length are closely related during the entire life cycle of the fish and that these two parameters can be used as biomarkers of aging in zebrafish. Our results also reveal a direct relationship between the expression of telomerase, telomere length and the efficiency of tissue regeneration. PMID:21347393

  6. Telomerase Activity Is Sufficient To Allow Transformed Cells To Escape from Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Tanya L.; Leibowitz, Gil; Levine, Fred

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of simian virus 40 large T antigen (SVLT) into human primary cells enables them to proliferate beyond their normal replicative life span. In most cases, this temporary escape from senescence eventually ends in a second proliferative block known as “crisis,” during which the cells cease growing or die. Rare immortalization events in which cells escape crisis are frequently correlated with the presence of telomerase activity. We tested the hypothesis that telomerase activation ...

  7. Telomerase activity is spontaneously increased in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis and correlates with cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Volke, Anne Rehné; Lund, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme involved with cellular proliferation and cellular senescence. The aim of the present study was to investigate telomerase activity in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to observe its regulation of cellular proliferation. Peripheral......, and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) (0.1 microg/ml). Telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-based telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 and 72 h of incubation. In addition, DNA synthesis of the cells was assayed using 3H......-thymidine incorporation. We found that telomerase activity in non-stimulated PBMC from patients with AD was significantly up-regulated without any stimulation during the 72 h of in vitro incubation. The most potent stimulator of telomerase activity was SEA, followed by anti-CD3 plus IL-2, anti-CD3 alone, and PPD. IL-2...

  8. Inhibition of telomerase causes vulnerability to endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, Toru; Nakatsu, Kanako; Shimamoto, Akira; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-08-26

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we investigated the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced cell death. ER stress-induced cell death was ameliorated in telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) over-expressing MCF7 cells (MCF7-TERT cell). Telomerase specific inhibitor, BIBR1532, reversed the inhibitory effect of TERT on ER stress-induced cell death in MCF7-TERT cells. These findings suggest that BIBR1532 may specifically inhibit telomerase activity, thereby inducing cell death in ER stress-exposed cells. TERT was expressed in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. To analyze the possible involvement of telomerase in ER stress-induced neuronal cell death, we treated SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells with BIBR1532 and analyzed ER stress-induced cell death. We found that BIBR1532 significantly enhanced the ER stress-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that inhibition of telomerase activity may enhance vulnerability to neuronal cell death caused by ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The telomerase inhibitor imetelstat depletes cancer stem cells in breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Immanual; Tressler, Robert; Bassett, Ekaterina; Harley, Calvin; Buseman, Christen M; Pattamatta, Preeti; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W; Go, Ning F

    2010-11-15

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are rare drug-resistant cancer cell subsets proposed to be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of cancer and metastasis. Telomerase is constitutively active in both bulk tumor cell and CSC populations but has only limited expression in normal tissues. Thus, inhibition of telomerase has been shown to be a viable approach in controlling cancer growth in nonclinical studies and is currently in phase II clinical trials. In this study, we investigated the effects of imetelstat (GRN163L), a potent telomerase inhibitor, on both the bulk cancer cells and putative CSCs. When breast and pancreatic cancer cell lines were treated with imetelstat in vitro, telomerase activity in the bulk tumor cells and CSC subpopulations were inhibited. Additionally, imetelstat treatment reduced the CSC fractions present in the breast and pancreatic cell lines. In vitro treatment with imetelstat, but not control oligonucleotides, also reduced the proliferation and self-renewal potential of MCF7 mammospheres and resulted in cell death after telomerase activity expression levels or telomere length of CSCs and bulk tumor cells in these cell lines did not correlate with the increased sensitivity of CSCs to imetelstat, suggesting a mechanism of action independent of telomere shortening for the effects of imetelstat on the CSC subpopulations. Our results suggest that imetelstat-mediated depletion of CSCs may offer an alternative mechanism by which telomerase inhibition may be exploited for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2010 AACR.

  10. A Cajal body-independent pathway for telomerase trafficking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Rebecca L; Li, Jian; Culp, Bradley R; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P

    2010-10-15

    The intranuclear trafficking of human telomerase involves a dynamic interplay between multiple nuclear sites, most notably Cajal bodies and telomeres. Cajal bodies are proposed to serve as sites of telomerase maturation, storage, and assembly, as well as to function in the cell cycle-regulated delivery of telomerase to telomeres in human cells. Here, we find that telomerase RNA does not localize to Cajal bodies in mouse cells, and instead resides in separate nuclear foci throughout much of the cell cycle. However, as in humans, mouse telomerase RNA (mTR) localizes to subsets of telomeres specifically during S phase. The localization of mTR to telomeres in mouse cells does not require coilin-containing Cajal bodies, as mTR is found at telomeres at similar frequencies in cells from wild-type and coilin knockout mice. At the same time, we find that human TR localizes to Cajal bodies (as well as telomeres) in mouse cells, indicating that the distinct trafficking of mTR is attributable to an intrinsic property of the RNA (rather than a difference in the mouse cell environment such as the properties of mouse Cajal bodies). We also find that during S phase, mTR foci coalesce into short chains, with at least one of the conjoined mTR foci co-localizing with a telomere. These findings point to a novel, Cajal body-independent pathway for telomerase biogenesis and trafficking in mice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of telomeres and telomerase from the single-celled eukaryote Giardia intestinalis.

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    Uzlíková, Magdalena; Fulnečková, Jana; Weisz, Filip; Sýkorová, Eva; Nohýnková, Eva; Tůmová, Pavla

    2017-01-01

    The ends of linear chromosomes, telomeres, are most commonly maintained by the enzyme telomerase. Our study presents the characteristics of telomeres and telomerase from the single-celled parasitic eukaryote Giardia intestinalis. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we localized telomeres during all stages of the trophozoite cell cycle and demonstrated differences in the observed number of telomeric foci, indicating telomere clustering. The length of Giardia telomeres was determined in different cell lines derived from WB clinical isolate using terminal restriction fragment analysis and ranged from 0.5 to 2.5kb; moreover, a BAL-31 digestion experiment did not reveal any long interstitial telomeric sequences in the genome. Despite the absence of the specific T motif in the telomerase catalytic subunit, the presence of an active telomerase enzyme synthesising telomeric repeats in Giardia was proved by a Telomere repeat amplification protocol assay, and its localization in nuclei was determined by the expression of recombinant GiTERT. Except for the Giardia-type TAGGG telomeric repeat, Giardia telomerase was proved to synthesize in vitro also other repeat variants, TAAGG and TAAGGG. In summary, despite its unusual characteristics, including a structurally divergent but active telomerase, unique terminal sequences and relatively short telomeres, the present data support the view that the chromosomal termini in Giardia are maintained in a conservative manner that is common to other eukaryotes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Epigenetic perturbation driving asleep telomerase reverse transcriptase: Possible therapeutic avenues in carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Nilednu, Pritish; Kumar, Azad; Sharma, Nilesh Kumar

    2017-03-01

    In the last decade, implications of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a component of ribonucleoprotein telomerase in aging, senescence, and stem cell are highly evident. Besides, the activation of hTERT is also being documented several cancer types including carcinoma. The awakening of telomerase during carcinoma initiation and development is being seen with different perspectives including genetic and epigenetic tools and events. In view of several tumor progenitors genes (also referred as epigenetic mediators), telomerase is placed as key enzyme to achieve the carcinoma phenotype and sustain during the progression. It is true that swaying of telomerase in carcinoma could be facilitated with dedicated set of epigenetic modulators and modifiers players. These epigenetic alterations are heritable, potentially reversible, and seen as the epigenetic signature of carcinoma. Several papers converge to suggest that DNA methylation, histone modification, and small non-coding RNAs are the widely appreciated epigenetic changes towards hTERT modulation. In this review, we summarize the contribution of epigenetic factors in the telomerase activation and discuss potential avenues to achieve therapeutic intervention in carcinoma.

  13. Analysis of telomerase activity based on a spired DNA tetrahedron TS primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wen, Yanli; Wang, Lele; Liang, Wen; Xu, Li; Ren, Shuzhen; Zou, Ziying; Zuo, Xiaolei; Fan, Chunhai; Huang, Qing; Liu, Gang; Jia, Nengqin

    2015-05-15

    The development of sensitive telomerase biosensors is hindered by the restricted accessibility of telomere strand (TS) primer and the limited enzyme reaction space, which is mainly confined by the vertical distance. In this work, we designed an electrochemical telomerase biosensor based on a spired DNA tetrahedron TS primer (STTS). By adding a rigid dsDNA spire onto the top of the DNA tetrahedron, we successfully regulated the distance between the TS primer and the surface, and thus greatly facilitated the telomerase elongation on surface. The signal-to-noise ratio was 2 times higher than TSP without the spire structure. The limit of detection was calculated to be lower than 10 HeLa cells, which is at least 2 magnitudes lower than other surface extension-based electrochemical telomerase sensors without amplification. The practicability of STTS sensor was also demonstrated by analysing various other cell lines including cancer cells, stem cells of high telomerase activity and somatic cells of low telomerase activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Telomerase expression in individuals with chronic and aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katarkar, Atul; Saha, Arindam; Mukherjee, Sanjit; Kundu, Debabrata; Bandyopadhyay, Prasanta; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of human telomerase reverse transcription (hTERT) enzyme in chronic periodontitis (CP) and aggressive periodontitis (AgP) compared with healthy individuals. A total of 79 individuals consented to participate in the study. The study sample comprised healthy individuals (n = 30), patients with CP (n = 30), and patients with AgP (n = 19). Gingival tissue was collected and evaluated for hTERT expression by Western blot and immunohistochemical methods. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed using the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples. The hTERT messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in AgP compared with CP (P periodontal disease progression, suggesting that hTERT could be a potential prognostic marker.

  15. Glucose restriction decreases telomerase activity and enhances its inhibitor response on breast cancer cells: possible extra-telomerase role of BIBR 1532.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardi, Layal; Alaaeddine, Nada; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Serhal, Rim; Khalil, Charbel; Hilal, George

    2014-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made to understand the association between lifestyle and diet in cancer initiation and promotion. Because excessive glucose consumption is a key metabolic hallmark of cancer cells, glucose restriction (GR) decreases the proliferation, and promotes the differentiation and transformation of cancer cells to quiescent cells. The immortality of cancerous cells is largely assured by telomerase, which is an interesting target for inhibition by BIBR 1532. In this study, we investigated the effect of GR on telomerase activity and on the efficacy of its inhibition by BIBR 1532. Breast cancer MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 cells were cultured in DMEM (Dulbecco's modified eagle's media) with 0, 1 or 4.5 g/l of glucose. The telomerase activity was measured via quantitative Real-Time PCR, and the two telomerase subunits were semi-quantified by RT-PCR. Proliferation test and mitochondrial metabolism were assessed via tetrazolium salt reduction and cell counts; apoptosis was assessed via caspase-3 quantification and flow cytometry. A decrease in the telomerase activity of more than 75% was associated with a significant reduction in the mRNA expression of its catalytic subunit hTERT (Reverse Transcriptase) and a decrease in the mitochondrial metabolism by more than 80% under restricted glucose conditions. In addition, GR increased the effect of BIBR 1532. Glucose deprivation induces apoptosis via BIBR 1532-mediated telomerase inhibition in triple negative breast cancer cells, as assessed by caspase-3 measurements and Annexin analysis. Taken together, our results suggest that the effect of BIBR 1532 is potentiated by GR to induce triple negative breast cancer cell death.

  16. Valproic Acid Induces Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Expression during Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Chan; Choi, Chang Soon; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Lee, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Se Jin; Hwangbo, Ram; Hong, Minha; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Han, Seol-Heui; Bahn, Geon Ho; Shin, Chan Young

    2017-10-01

    The valproic acid (VPA)-induced animal model is one of the most widely utilized environmental risk factor models of autism. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains an insurmountable challenge among neurodevelopmental disorders due to its heterogeneity, unresolved pathological pathways and lack of treatment. We previously reported that VPA-exposed rats and cultured rat primary neurons have increased Pax6 expression during post-midterm embryonic development which led to the sequential upregulation of glutamatergic neuronal markers. In this study, we provide experimental evidence that telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), a protein component of ribonucleoproteins complex of telomerase, is involved in the abnormal components caused by VPA in addition to Pax6 and its downstream signals. In embryonic rat brains and cultured rat primary neural progenitor cells (NPCs), VPA induced the increased expression of TERT as revealed by Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunostainings. The HDAC inhibitor property of VPA is responsible for the TERT upregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that VPA increased the histone acetylation but blocked the HDAC1 binding to both Pax6 and Tert genes. Interestingly, the VPA-induced TERT overexpression resulted to sequential upregulations of glutamatergic markers such as Ngn2 and NeuroD1, and inter-synaptic markers such as PSD-95, α-CaMKII, vGluT1 and synaptophysin. Transfection of Tert siRNA reversed the effects of VPA in cultured NPCs confirming the direct involvement of TERT in the expression of those markers. This study suggests the involvement of TERT in the VPA-induced autistic phenotypes and has important implications for the role of TERT as a modulator of balanced neuronal development and transmission in the brain.

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibitor AR42 regulates telomerase activity in human glioma cells via an Akt-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Luen; Huang, Po-Hsien; Chiu, Hao-Chieh; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; Kuo, Cheng-Ju; Chen, Huan-Da; Chen, Chang-Shi

    2013-05-24

    Epigenetic regulation via abnormal activation of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is a mechanism that leads to cancer initiation and promotion. Activation of HDACs results in transcriptional upregulation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and increases telomerase activity during cellular immortalization and tumorigenesis. However, the effects of HDAC inhibitors on the transcription of hTERT vary in different cancer cells. Here, we studied the effects of a novel HDAC inhibitor, AR42, on telomerase activity in a PTEN-null U87MG glioma cell line. AR42 increased hTERT mRNA in U87MG glioma cells, but suppressed total telomerase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Further analyses suggested that AR42 decreases the phosphorylation of hTERT via an Akt-dependent mechanism. Suppression of Akt phosphorylation and telomerase activity was also observed with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 further supporting the hypothesis that Akt signaling is involved in suppression of AR42-induced inhibition of telomerase activity. Finally, ectopic expression of a constitutive active form of Akt restored telomerase activity in AR42-treated cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the novel HDAC inhibitor AR42 can suppress telomerase activity by inhibiting Akt-mediated hTERT phosphorylation, indicating that the PI3K/Akt pathway plays an important role in the regulation of telomerase activity in response to this HDAC inhibitor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A three-state model for the regulation of telomerase by TERRA and hnRNPA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redon, Sophie; Zemp, Ivo; Lingner, Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Telomeres, the physical ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, are transcribed into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), a large non-coding RNA, which forms an integral part of telomeric heterochromatin. In vitro, naked TERRA molecules are efficient inhibitors of human telomerase, base-pairing via their 5'-UUAGGG-3' repeats with the template sequence of telomerase RNA, in addition to contacting the telomerase reverse transcriptase protein subunit. In vivo, however, TERRA-mediated inhibition of telomerase can be prevented by unknown mechanisms. Also, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNPA1) has been implicated in telomere length control. In vivo, TERRA is partially associated with hnRNPA1, and hnRNPA1 is also detected at telomeres. We demonstrate that on binding of TERRA, hnRNPA1 can alleviate the TERRA-mediated inhibition of telomerase. However, when in excess over TERRA, hnRNPA1 becomes itself an inhibitor of telomere extension, on binding of the telomeric DNA substrate. Yet, hnRNPA1 has no notable direct effects on the telomerase catalysis. Our in vitro results suggest that TERRA-mediated telomerase inhibition may be prevented by hnRNPA1 in vivo. Telomere extension by telomerase may require balanced levels of TERRA and hnRNPA1 at telomeres. Thus, TERRA and hnRNPA1 can function as a bimolecular regulator to turn telomerase and the telomere on and off.

  19. The Novel Retinoid, 9cUAB30, Inhibits Telomerase and Induces Apoptosis in HL60 Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, William K; DeAngelis, J Tyson; Berletch, Joel B; Phipps, Sharla MO; Andrews, Lucy G; Brouillette, Wayne J; Muccio, Donald D; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein important to neoplastic immortality, is up-regulated in approximately 85% of cancers, including leukemias. In this study, 9cUAB30, a novel retinoic acid, resulted in differentiation of HL60 leukemia cells as indicated by morphologic changes characteristic of granulocytes. It also caused a down-regulation of hTERT gene expression and a decrease in telomerase activity. Telomerase inhibition was followed by loss of proliferative capacity, induction of apoptosis, and partial differentiation. These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of 9cUAB30 at inhibiting telomerase activity by down-regulating hTERT gene expression in human leukemic cells. PMID:18795149

  20. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L) limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchett, Katrina M; Yan, Ying; Ouellette, Michel M

    2014-01-01

    Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat) is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation), but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size). GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM) and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM) resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1) and 69 (CD18) doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX) and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity) and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage). Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  1. Telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat (GRN163L limits the lifespan of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina M Burchett

    Full Text Available Telomerase is required for the unlimited lifespan of cancer cells. The vast majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas overexpress telomerase activity and blocking telomerase could limit their lifespan. GRN163L (Imetelstat is a lipid-conjugated N3'→P5' thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide that blocks the template region of telomerase. The aim of this study was to define the effects of long-term GRN163L exposure on the maintenance of telomeres and lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells. Telomere size, telomerase activity, and telomerase inhibition response to GRN163L were measured in a panel of 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines. The cell lines exhibited large differences in levels of telomerase activity (46-fold variation, but most lines had very short telomeres (2-3 kb in size. GRN163L inhibited telomerase in all 10 pancreatic cancer cell lines, with IC50 ranging from 50 nM to 200 nM. Continuous GRN163L exposure of CAPAN1 (IC50 = 75 nM and CD18 cells (IC50 = 204 nM resulted in an initial rapid shortening of the telomeres followed by the maintenance of extremely short but stable telomeres. Continuous exposure to the drug eventually led to crisis and to a complete loss of viability after 47 (CAPAN1 and 69 (CD18 doublings. Crisis In these cells was accompanied by activation of a DNA damage response (γ-H2AX and evidence of both senescence (SA-β-galactosidase activity and apoptosis (sub-G1 DNA content, PARP cleavage. Removal of the drug after long-term GRN163L exposure led to a reactivation of telomerase and re-elongation of telomeres in the third week of cultivation without GRN163L. These findings show that the lifespan of pancreatic cancer cells can be limited by continuous telomerase inhibition. These results should facilitate the design of future clinical trials of GRN163L in patients with pancreatic cancer.

  2. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel MA; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin AM; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-01-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication, and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify DONSON as a novel fork protection factor, and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilises forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATR-dependent signalling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity, and potentiating chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in patient cells, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we identify mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism, and establish DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:28191891

  3. Colorimetry and SERS dual-mode detection of telomerase activity: combining rapid screening with high sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Shenfei; Wang, Zhuyuan; Chen, Hui; Hu, Guohua; Liu, Min; Chen, Peng; Cui, Yiping

    2014-01-01

    As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dual-mode telomerase activity detection method, which has several distinctive advantages. First, colorimetric functionality allows rapid preliminary discrimination of telomerase activity by the naked eye. Second, the employment of SERS technique results in greatly improved detection sensitivity. Third, the combination of colorimetry and SERS into one detection system can ensure highly efficacious and sensitive screening of numerous samples. Besides, the avoidance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) procedures further guarantees fine reliability and simplicity. Generally, the presented method is realized by an ``elongate and capture'' procedure. To be specific, gold nanoparticles modified with Raman molecules and telomeric repeat complementary oligonucleotide are employed as the colorimetric-SERS bifunctional reporting nanotag, while magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with telomerase substrate oligonucleotide are used as the capturing substrate. Telomerase can synthesize and elongate telomeric repeats onto the capturing substrate. The elongated telomeric repeats subsequently facilitate capturing of the reporting nanotag via hybridization between telomeric repeat and its complementary strand. The captured nanotags can cause a significant difference in the color and SERS intensity of the magnetically separated sediments. Thus both the color and SERS can be used as indicators of the telomerase activity. With fast screening ability and outstanding sensitivity, we anticipate that this method would greatly promote practical application of telomerase-based early-stage cancer diagnosis.As an important biomarker and therapeutic target, telomerase has attracted considerable attention concerning its detection and monitoring. Here, we present a colorimetry and

  4. Influence of Amalaki Rasayana on telomerase activity and telomere length in human blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, Kanive P; Dash, Sweta; Shivakumar, Marigowda B; Shetty, Pavithra R; Raghu, Kothanahalli S; Shamprasad, Bhanuvalli R; Udupi, Vishwanatha; Acharya, Raviraj V; Vidya, Prasanna B; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Mana, Anandan E; Moni, Rajesh; Sankaran, Muraleedharan T; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    Indian traditional medicine practices use defined rasayana preparations to improve the quality of life in aged individuals. Amalaki Rasayana is one such rasayana prepared from the fruits of Phyllanthus emblica and is popularly used to prevent or treat various age related health conditions. Telomerase activity in the cells maintains telomere length and is implicated in ageing and various diseases wherein the shortening of telomere during ageing is controlled chiefly by the telomerase activity. In the present study, we investigated telomerase activity and telomere length in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of aged individuals administered with Amalaki Rasayana. Amalaki Rasayana was administered to healthy, aged (45-60 years) volunteers for 45 days after koshta shuddhi procedure. The telomerase activity and telomere length were analyzed on 0, 45th and 90th days of Amalaki Rasayana administration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these individuals and compared with age-matched placebo group and young volunteers (22-30 years). The data were compared between the groups. The results indicated an increase in telomerase activity with no discernible change in telomere length in the Amalaki administered participants. The comparison between young and aged participants revealed higher telomerase activity in young participants with no significant differences in telomere length. The data indicate that the maintenance of telomere length is facilitated by an increase in telomerase activity upon rasayana administration in aged individuals and Amalaki Rasayana may prevent the erosion of telomeres over a period of time in aged individuals to promote healthy ageing. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Telomerase activity in patients with stage 2-5D chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidir, Veysel; Aynali, Ayse; Altuntas, Atila; Inal, Salih; Aridogan, Buket; Sezer, Mehmet Tugrul

    Molecular mechanisms of increased cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) associated with biological age are not well understood. Recent studies support the hypothesis that common factors responsible for this phenomenon are cellular aging and telomere dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between telomerase activity and CKD stages. The study included 120 patients who were followed-up for CKD stage 2-5D, composed of 30 patients of each stage and 30 healthy volunteers without any known disease who were admitted to our hospital for routine check-ups. Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was measured using the TRAP assay. A significant difference was observed for telomerase activity in PBMC between groups. The detected levels were lowest in the healthy control group (0.15±0.02), and highest in CKD stage 5D patients (0.23±0.04). In CKD patients, telomerase activity in PBMC was positively correlated with the CKD stage, serum creatinine, potassium and parathormone levels, and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body mass index (BMI), platelet count and serum calcium levels. According to the linear regression analysis, independent predictors for high telomerase activity in CKD patients were eGFR and BMI. Telomerase activity in PBMC increases with advancing CKD stage in CKD patients. Increased telomerase activity in PBMC is associated with eGFR and BMI. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation Profile of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Shin Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to significant insights into the genetic basis of thyroid tumorigenesis. Among the mutations commonly seen in thyroid cancers, the vast majority are associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF mutations are the most common mutations observed in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, followed by RET/PTC rearrangements and RAS mutations, while follicular thyroid cancers are more likely to harbor RAS mutations or PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ rearrangements. Beyond these more common mutations, alterations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter have recently been associated with clinicopathologic features, disease prognosis, and tumorigenesis in thyroid cancer. While the mutations underlying thyroid tumorigenesis are well known, the frequency of these mutations is strongly associated with geography, with clear differences reported between Asian and Western countries. Of particular interest is the prevalence of BRAF mutations, with Korean patients exhibiting the highest rate of BRAF-associated thyroid cancers in the world. Here, we review the prevalence of each of the most common mutations in Asian and Western countries, and identify the characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid cancer in Asians.

  7. Hedgehog signaling regulates telomerase reverse transcriptase in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapati Mazumdar

    Full Text Available The Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway is critical for normal embryonic development, tissue patterning and cell differentiation. Aberrant HH signaling is involved in multiple human cancers. HH signaling involves a multi-protein cascade activating the GLI proteins that transcriptionally regulate HH target genes. We have previously reported that HH signaling is essential for human colon cancer cell survival and inhibition of this signal induces DNA damage and extensive cell death. Here we report that the HH/GLI axis regulates human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, which determines the replication potential of cancer cells. Suppression of GLI1/GLI2 functions by a C-terminus truncated GLI3 repressor mutant (GLI3R, or by GANT61, a pharmacological inhibitor of GLI1/GLI2, reduced hTERT protein expression in human colon cancer, prostate cancer and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM cell lines. Expression of an N-terminus deleted constitutively active mutant of GLI2 (GLI2ΔN increased hTERT mRNA and protein expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity in human colon cancer cells while GANT61 inhibited hTERT mRNA expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with GLI1 or GLI2 antibodies precipitated fragments of the hTERT promoter in human colon cancer cells, which was reduced upon exposure to GANT61. In contrast, expression of GLI1 or GLI2ΔN in non-malignant 293T cells failed to alter the levels of hTERT mRNA and protein, or hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Further, expression of GLI2ΔN increased the telomerase enzyme activity, which was reduced by GANT61 administration in human colon cancer, prostate cancer, and GBM cells. These results identify hTERT as a direct target of the HH signaling pathway, and reveal a previously unknown role of the HH/GLI axis in regulating the replication potential of cancer cells. These findings are of significance in understanding the important regulatory

  8. The Telomerase Inhibitor MST-312 Interferes with Multiple Steps in the Herpes Simplex Virus Life Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberichter, Jarod; Roberts, Scott; Abbasi, Imran; Dedthanou, Phonphanh; Pradhan, Prajakta; Nguyen, Marie L

    2015-10-01

    The life cycle of herpes simplex virus (HSV) has the potential to be further manipulated to yield novel, more effective therapeutic treatments. Recent research has demonstrated that HSV-1 can increase telomerase activity and that expression of the catalytic component of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), alters sensitivity to HSV-dependent apoptosis. Telomerase is a cellular enzyme that synthesizes nucleotide repeats at the ends of chromosomes (telomeres), which prevents shortening of the 3' ends of DNA with each cell division. Once telomeres reach a critical length, cells undergo senescence and apoptosis. Here, we used a cell-permeable, reversible inhibitor of the telomerase enzyme, MST-312, to investigate telomerase activity during HSV infection. Human mammary epithelial cells immortalized through TERT expression and human carcinoma HEp-2 cells were infected with the KOS1.1 strain of HSV-1 in the presence of MST-312. MST-312 treatment reduced the number of cells displaying a cytopathic effect and the accumulation of immediate early and late viral proteins. Moreover, the presence of 20 μM to 100 μM MST-312 during infection led to a 2.5- to 5.5-log10 decrease in viral titers. MST-312 also inhibited the replication of HSV-2 and a recent clinical isolate of HSV-1. Additionally, we determined that MST-312 has the largest impact on viral events that take place prior to 5 h postinfection (hpi). Furthermore, MST-312 treatment inhibited virus replication, as measured by adsorption assays and quantification of genome replication. Together, these findings demonstrate that MST-312 interferes with the HSV life cycle. Further investigation into the mechanism for MST-312 is warranted and may provide novel targets for HSV therapies. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections can lead to cold sores, blindness, and brain damage. Identification of host factors that are important for the virus life cycle may provide novel targets for HSV antivirals. One such factor

  9. Human telomerase RNA component expression in Spitz nevi, common melanocytic nevi, and malignant melanomas.

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    Guttman-Yassky, Emma; Bergman, Reuven; Manov, Lena; Sprecher, Eli; Shaefer, Yan; Kerner, Hedviga

    2002-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein DNA polymerase that is capable of synthesizing telomeres onto the ends of chromosomes. The cumulative loss of telomerase activity is believed to be associated with cell senescence. Telomerase activity has been shown to be higher in malignant melanomas than in common melanocytic nevi. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the pattern of expression of the human telomerase RNA (hTER) component in routinely processed specimens of Spitz nevi, malignant melanomas, and ordinary melanocytic nevi. Ten specimens of each type of tumor were studied, using an in situ hybridization technique. All three types of tumors demonstrated moderate to high intensities of hTER expression, usually in more than half of the tumor cells, and the majority of the studied lesions in each group did not show stratification of staining. The hTER component was also detected in the epidermis, sweat glands, and pilosebaceous units. hTER levels do not necessarily correlate with the level of telomerase activity, and the level and pattern of hTER expression are not useful as an adjunct to the histologic differential diagnosis of Spitz nevi from melanocytic nevi and malignant melanomas.

  10. Synergistic tumor suppression by combined inhibition of telomerase and CDKN1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Romi; Dong, Yuying; Solomon, Peter D; Wettersten, Hiromi I; Cheng, Christopher J; Min, Jin-Na; Henson, Jeremy; Dogra, Shaillay Kumar; Hwang, Sung H; Hammock, Bruce D; Zhu, Lihua J; Reddel, Roger R; Saltzman, W Mark; Weiss, Robert H; Chang, Sandy; Green, Michael R; Wajapeyee, Narendra

    2014-07-29

    Tumor suppressor p53 plays an important role in mediating growth inhibition upon telomere dysfunction. Here, we show that loss of the p53 target gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A, also known as p21(WAF1/CIP1)) increases apoptosis induction following telomerase inhibition in a variety of cancer cell lines and mouse xenografts. This effect is highly specific to p21, as loss of other checkpoint proteins and CDK inhibitors did not affect apoptosis. In telomerase, inhibited cell loss of p21 leads to E2F1- and p53-mediated transcriptional activation of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis, resulting in increased apoptosis. Combined genetic or pharmacological inhibition of telomerase and p21 synergistically suppresses tumor growth. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simultaneous inhibition of telomerase and p21 also suppresses growth of tumors containing mutant p53 following pharmacological restoration of p53 activity. Collectively, our results establish that inactivation of p21 leads to increased apoptosis upon telomerase inhibition and thus identify a genetic vulnerability that can be exploited to treat many human cancers containing either wild-type or mutant p53.

  11. Effect of telomerase inhibition on preclinical models of malignant rhabdoid tumor.

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    Hu, Yafang; Bobb, Daniel; Lu, Yunbiao; He, Jianping; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2014-09-01

    Novel treatment approaches are desperately needed for malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT). Telomerase is an attractive therapeutic target because it is specific to cancer and critical for cancer cell immortality. We evaluated the effect of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat in preclinical models of MRT. Three MRT cell lines, BT-12, G401, and RT-peri, were treated with the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat. The effects of imetelstat on telomere length, DNA damage response, and cell proliferation were assessed. The efficacy of imetelstat in vivo was evaluated in subcutaneous xenografts derived from each of the cell lines. Treatment with imetelstat resulted in inhibition of telomerase activity, marked telomere shortening, and activation of the DNA damage response pathway, as measured by formation of γ-H2AX nuclear foci, phosphorylation of ATM, and phosphorylation of TP53. Imetelstat-treated G401 cells underwent complete growth arrest after 16 passages. The other two cell lines exhibited growth inhibition. Imetelstat resulted in 40-50% growth inhibition compared to placebo-treated controls in all three xenograft models. The activity of imetelstat as a single agent suggests that further studies of telomerase inhibitors in combination with other agents may be warranted. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Novel Efficient Cell-Penetrating, Peptide-Mediated Strategy for Enhancing Telomerase Inhibitor Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Alarcón, Andrés; Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2015-12-01

    At present, there are several therapeutic approaches for targeting telomerase in tumors. One in particular, currently undergoing clinical trials, is based on synthetic lipid-modified oligonucleotide antagonists aimed at inhibiting the ribonucleoprotein subunit of human telomerase. However, while enabling efficient uptake, the lipid modifications reduce the potency of the therapeutic oligonucleotides compared to nonmodified oligonucleotides. Moreover, lipid modification may increase oligonucleotide accumulation in the liver causing undesirable hepatotoxicity. Noncovalent complexation strategies for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated delivery present an option to circumvent the need for potency-reducing modifications, while allowing for a highly efficient uptake, and could significantly improve the efficiency of telomerase-targeting cancer therapeutics. Delivery of a nonlipidated locked nucleic acid/2'-O-methyl mixmer significantly inhibits the telomerase activity in treated HeLa cells. The inhibitory effect was further improved through addition of a CPP. Furthermore, calculated IC50-values for the oligonucleotide delivered by CPPs into HeLa cells are more than 20 times lower than telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat, currently undergoing clinical trials. These results emphasize the potential of CPP-mediated delivery of future pharmaceuticals and provide means by which to enhance an already promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment.

  13. Ethanolic periwinkle leaf extract reduces telomerase expression in T47D cancer cells

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    Endang Purwaningsih

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cancer cells have a relatively high telomerase activity and a lower p53 protein expression than normal cells, so that cancer cells have the ability to continue to proliferate and do not undergo apoptosis. One of the cancer treatments is chemotherapy using bioactive ingredients from synthesis or isolation of natural materials. One of the plants that have potential as anticancer agent is periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus L. The research objective was to evaluate the effect of ethanolic periwinkle leaf extract against p53 protein and telomerase expression in T47D cancer cells. METHODS An experimental study with controls was conducted involving T47D breast cancer cells. They were divided into 3 groups (control, ½ dose of IC50/26.849 µg/mL, and one dose of IC50/53.699 µg/mL at a cell density of 1 x 104 cells/well. Expression of p53 and telomerase was measured by the immunohistochemistry method. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by a multiple comparison test. RESULTS Periwinkle leaf extract significantly increased p53 protein expression (p<0.05 at both treatment doses, ½ IC50 and IC50, compared to the control group and it highly significantly reduced telomerase expression (p<0.01, in comparison with the control group at both treatment doses. CONCLUSION Periwinkle leaf extract has potential as an anti-breast cancer agent by increasing p53 protein expression and inhibiting telomerase expression.

  14. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase regulation by DNA methylation, transcription factor binding and alternative splicing (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avin, Brittany A; Umbricht, Christopher B; Zeiger, Martha A

    2016-12-01

    The catalytic subunit of telomerase, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), plays an essential role in telomere maintenance to oppose cellular senescence and, is highly regulated in normal and cancerous cells. Regulation of hTERT occurs through multiple avenues, including a unique pattern of CpG promoter methylation and alternative splicing. Promoter methylation affects the binding of transcription factors, resulting in changes in expression of the gene. In addition to expression level changes, changes in promoter binding can affect alternative splicing in a cotranscriptional manner. The alternative splicing of hTERT results in either the full length transcript which can form the active telomerase complex with hTR, or numerous inactive isoforms. Both regulation strategies are exploited in cancer to activate telomerase, however, the exact mechanism is unknown. Therefore, unraveling the link between promoter methylation status and alternative splicing for hTERT could expose yet another level of hTERT regulation. In an attempt to provide insight into the cellular control of active telomerase in cancer, this review will discuss our current perspective on CpG methylation of the hTERT promoter region, summarize the different forms of alternatively spliced variants, and examine examples of transcription factor binding that affects splicing.

  15. Effects of Curcuma longa Extract on Telomerase Activity in Lung and Breast Cancer Cells

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    Nosratollah Zarghami

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of Curcuma longa extract on the telomerase gene expression in QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: The present study is an experimental research. Using 3 different phases n-hexane, dichloromethane and methanol, total extract of Curcuma longa in a serial dilution was prepared and three phases was analyzed for determining which phase has more curcuminoids. Then the extract cytotoxicity effect was tested on breast cancer cell line (T47D, and lung cancer cell line (QU-DB by 24, 48 and 72 h MTT (Dimethyl thiazolyl diphenyl tetrazolium assay. Then, the cells were treated with serial concentrations of the extract. Finally, total protein was extracted from the control and test groups, its quantity was determined and telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay was performed for measurement of possible inhibition of the telomerase activity. Results: Cell viability and MTT-based cytotoxicity assay show that the total extract of Curcuma longa has cytotoxic effect with different IC50s in breast and lung cancer cell lines. Analysis of TRAP assay also shows a significant reduction in telomerase activity on both cancer cells with different levels. Conclusion: Curcuma longa extract has anti-proliferation and telomerase inhibitory effects on QU-DB lung cancer and T47D breast cancer cells with differences in levels of telomerase inhibition.

  16. Telomerase Inhibitory Effects of Red Pigment Rubropunctatin and Statin Monacolin L Isolated from Red Yeast Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Wang, Qijun; Sung, Changkeun

    2017-04-26

    In addition to the cholesterol-lowering activity of red yeast rice (RYR), its anticancer activities have been frequently reported. However, the mechanism of action of the anticancer activity of RYR is not yet fully understood. The objective of the current study was to elucidate anticancer compositions and anticancer mechanism of actions of RYR. The isolated compounds from RYR were subjected to anti-proliferation assay, apoptosis assay via flow cytometry, and telomerase inhibitory assay via telomeric repeat amplification protocol-PCR (TRAP-PCR) assay, and Western blotting assay in an in vitro cell culture system. The results showed that a statin, monacolin L, and a red pigment, rubropunctatin, from RYR exhibited very strong cancer cell proliferation inhibitory effects; the rubropunctatin was comparable with anticancer drug cis-platinum, taxol, and 10-hydroxy-camptothecin (HCPT) in their IC50 values. Monacolin L and rubropunctatin exerted their anticancer activity via telomerase inhibitory effects. Monacolin L and rubropunctatin presented the similar telomerase inhibitory effects as the anticancer drug cis-platinum, while the anticancer drug HCPT presented a weak telomerase inhibitory effect in the TRAP-PCR assay. Meanwhile, rubropunctatin and cis-platinum did not present strong apoptosis induction activity as the momacolin L and HCPT did. These results indicate that the RYR may exert anticancer effects through the telomerase inhibitory effect of rubropunctatin and the apoptosis-induction effect of monacolin L.

  17. Comparison of telomerase activity in prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia

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    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA on chromosome ends. The enzyme is important for the immortalization of cancer cells because it maintains the telomeres. METHODS: Telomerase activity (TA was measured by fluorescence-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (FTRAP assay in prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. RESULTS: TA was present in 91.4% of 70 prostate cancers, 68.8% of 16 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, 43.3% of 30 BPH*, 21.4% of 14 atrophy and 20% of 15 normal samples adjacent to tumor. There was not any significant correlation between TA, histopathological tumor stage or gleason score. In contrast to high TA in the BPH* tissue from the cancer-bearing gland, only 6.3% of 32 BPH specimens from patients only diagnosed with BPH were telomerase activity-positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that TA is present in most prostate cancers. The high rate of TA in tissue adjacent to tumor may be attributed either to early molecular alteration of cancer that was histologically unapparent, or to the presence of occult cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the re-expression of telomerase activity could be one step in the transformation of BPH to PIN. KEY WORDS: Telomerase activity, prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  18. Telomerase from human leukemia cells: properties and its interaction with deoxynucleoside analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, R B; Pai, S B; Kukhanova, M; Dutschman, G E; Guo, X; Cheng, Y C

    1998-05-01

    Telomerase is a unique reverse transcriptase involved in the maintenance of genomic integrity. In an attempt to understand the properties of this enzyme and to study the effect of deoxynucleoside analogues, we have isolated and partially purified telomerase from the blast cells of a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. During the course of purification of telomerase, three characteristic forms of this enzyme activity were separated. Two processive forms and one less processive form were noted. All forms of the enzyme activities could be abolished by RNase A and proteinase K treatments, implying that they are ribonucleoproteins. The major form of telomerase was characterized with respect to divalent ion requirements, effect of salt and nonionic detergents. The Km of deoxynucleoside triphosphates was determined with a modified telomerase repeat array protocol assay. Studies with deoxynucleoside analogues indicated that 3'-azido-3'deoxythymidine triphosphate is much more inhibitory than 2',3'-dideoxy 2',3'didehydrothymidine triphosphate, and the cytidine analogue ddCTP was not inhibitory. ddGTP was the most potent inhibitor among all dideoxynucleosides studied.

  19. Single-molecule FRET-Rosetta reveals RNA structural rearrangements during human telomerase catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W; Kappel, Kalli; Das, Rhiju; Stone, Michael D

    2017-02-01

    Maintenance of telomeres by telomerase permits continuous proliferation of rapidly dividing cells, including the majority of human cancers. Despite its direct biomedical significance, the architecture of the human telomerase complex remains unknown. Generating homogeneous telomerase samples has presented a significant barrier to developing improved structural models. Here we pair single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) measurements with Rosetta modeling to map the conformations of the essential telomerase RNA core domain within the active ribonucleoprotein. FRET-guided modeling places the essential pseudoknot fold distal to the active site on a protein surface comprising the C-terminal element, a domain that shares structural homology with canonical polymerase thumb domains. An independently solved medium-resolution structure of Tetrahymena telomerase provides a blind test of our modeling methodology and sheds light on the structural homology of this domain across diverse organisms. Our smFRET-Rosetta models reveal nanometer-scale rearrangements within the RNA core domain during catalysis. Taken together, our FRET data and pseudoatomic molecular models permit us to propose a possible mechanism for how RNA core domain rearrangement is coupled to template hybrid elongation. © 2017 Parks et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Induced senescence in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells containing elevated telomerase activity and extended telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, E C; DiMaio, D

    2001-11-01

    Proliferation of normal somatic human cells in culture is limited by replicative senescence, a growth-arrested state that appears to be triggered by the erosion of telomeres. Tumor cells such as HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, which contain short telomeres, can be induced to undergo senescence by various manipulations including oncogene withdrawal. Repression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 E6/E7 genes in HeLa cells by the bovine papillomavirus E2 transcriptional regulatory protein results in reactivation of the dormant p53 and p105(Rb) tumor suppressor pathways in these cells, repression of telomerase, and profound growth arrest. Strikingly, the growth-arrested cells rapidly and synchronously acquired numerous characteristics of primary cells undergoing replicative senescence. To explore the role of telomerase and telomere length in induced senescence, we expressed an exogenous hTERT gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase, to generate stable HeLa cell clones with elevated telomerase activity and extended telomeres. Expression of the E2 protein in these cells repressed HPV E6/E7 expression, activated tumor suppressor pathways, and induced senescence as assessed by growth arrest, morphological changes, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase expression, and increased autofluorescence. Cells carrying the hTERT gene and control cells displayed identical responses to E2 expression. Therefore, HeLa cell senescence induced by HPV repression is not triggered by short telomeres or low levels of telomerase activity.

  1. Telomerase in relation to expression of p53, c-Myc and estrogen receptor in ovarian tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, GBA; Hollema, H; Helder, MN; Knol, AJ; Van Der Meer, GT; Krans, M; De Jong, S; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase activity and its subunits (hTERC, hTERT mRNA) were evaluated in ovarian tumours in relation to the expression of p53, c-Myc and estrogen receptor (ER). Furthermore, relations between telomerase activity, hTERC and hTERT with known clinicopathologic prognostic factors and survival in

  2. Reconstitution of active telomerase in primary human foreskin fibroblasts : effects on proliferative characteristics and response to ionizing radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, H.H.; Waarde-Verhagen, M.A.W.H. van; Assen-Bolt, A.J. van; Rodemann, H.P.; Prowse, K.R.; Linskens, M.H.K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere shortening has been proposed to trigger senescence, and since most primary cells do not express active telomerase, reactivation of telomerase activity was proposed as a safe and non-transforming way of immortalizing cells. However, to study radiation responses, it is as yet unclear

  3. The effects of erythropoietin signaling on telomerase regulation in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells

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    Uziel, Orit, E-mail: Oritu@clalit.org.il [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Kanfer, Gil [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Dep. of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Beery, Einat [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Yelin, Dana; Shepshelovich, Daniel [Medicine A, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Bakhanashvili, Mary [Unit of Infectious Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Nordenberg, Jardena [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Dep. of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Endocrinology Laboratory, Beilinson Medical Center, Petah-Tikva (Israel); Lahav, Meir [Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel); Medicine A, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Ramat-Aviv (Israel)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We assumed that some of erythropoietin adverse effects may be mediated by telomerase activity. • EPO administration increased telomerase activity, cells proliferation and migration. • The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of erythropoietin. • Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme totally abolished that effect. • This effect was mediated via the Lyn–AKT axis and not by the canonical JAK2–STAT pathway. - Abstract: Treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) in several cancers is associated with decreased survival due to cancer progression. Due to the major importance of telomerase in cancer biology we hypothesized that some of these effects may be mediated through EPO effect on telomerase. For this aim we explored the possible effects of EPO on telomerase regulation, cell migration and chemosensitivity in non-erythroid malignant and non-malignant cells. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity (TA) and cell migration increased in response to EPO. EPO had no effect on cancer cells sensitivity to cisplatinum and on the cell cycle status. The inhibition of telomerase modestly repressed the proliferative effect of EPO. Telomere shortening caused by long term inhibition of the enzyme abolished the effect of EPO, suggesting that EPO effects on cancer cells are related to telomere dynamics. TA was correlated with the levels of Epo-R. The increase in TA was mediated post-translationally through the Lyn-Src and not the canonical JAK2 pathway.

  4. Telomerase activity in high-grade cervical lesions is associated with allelic imbalance at 6Q14-22.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van M.; Steenbergen, R.D.M.; Wilde, de J.; Helmerhorst, TJ; Verheijen, R.H.M.; Risse, E.K.J.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Our study attempts to establish the relationship between telomerase activity and allelic imbalance (AI) on chromosomes 3p and 6 in high-risk HPV-containing cervical lesions. These chromosomes were implicated previously in telomerase regulation in HPV containing immortalized cells and cervical cancer

  5. TRAP-silver staining, a highly sensitive assay for measuring telomerase activity in tumor tissue and cell lines

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    C.A. Dalla Torre

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of telomerase activity in clinically obtained tumor samples may provide important information for use as both a diagnostic marker and a prognostic indicator for patient outcome. In order to evaluate telomerase activity in tumor tissue without radiolabeling the product, we developed a simple telomeric repeat amplification protocol-silver-staining assay that is less time-consuming, is safe and requires minimal equipment. In addition, we determined the sensitivity of the silver-staining method by using extracts of telomerase-positive thyroid carcinoma cell lines which were serially diluted from 5,000 to 10 cells. Telomerase activity was also assayed in 19 thyroid tumors, 2 normal controls and 27 bone marrow aspirates. The results indicate that the technique permits the detection of telomerase activity from 5000 to as few as 10 cells. We propose that it could be immediately applicable in many laboratories due to the minimal amount of equipment required.

  6. Imetelstat, a telomerase inhibitor, differentially affects normal and malignant megakaryopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoyan, G; Kraus, T; Ye, F; Eng, K; Crispino, J D; Hoffman, R; Iancu-Rubin, C

    2017-11-01

    Imetelstat (GRN163L) is a specific telomerase inhibitor that has demonstrated clinical activity in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) and in patients with solid tumors. The antitumor effects were associated with the development of thrombocytopenia, one of the common side effects observed in patients treated with imetelstat. The events underlying these adverse effects are not apparent. In this report, we investigated the potential mechanisms that account for imetelstat's beneficial effects in MPN patients and the manner by which imetelstat treatment leads to a reduction in platelet numbers. Using a well-established system of ex vivo megakaryopoiesis, we demonstrated that imetelestat treatment affects normal megakaryocyte (MK) development by exclusively delaying maturation of MK precursor cells. By contrast, additional stages along MPN MK development were affected by imetelstat resulting in reduced numbers of assayable colony-forming unit MK and impaired MK maturation. In addition, treatment with imetelstat inhibited the secretion of fibrogenic growth factors by malignant but not by normal MK. Our results indicate that the delay observed in normal MK maturation may account for imetelstat-induced thrombocytopenia, while the more global effects of imetelstat on several stages along the hierarchy of MPN megakaryopoiesis may be responsible for the favorable clinical outcomes reported in MPN patients.

  7. The telomerase inhibitor PinX1 is a major haploinsufficient tumor suppressor essential for chromosome stability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Huang, Pengyu; Shi, Rong; Lee, Tae Ho; Lu, Gina; Zhang, Zhihong; Bronson, Roderick; Lu, Kun Ping

    2011-04-01

    Telomerase is activated in most human cancers and is critical for cancer cell growth. However, little is known about the significance of telomerase activation in chromosome instability and cancer initiation. The gene encoding the potent endogenous telomerase inhibitor PinX1 (PIN2/TRF1-interacting, telomerase inhibitor 1) is located at human chromosome 8p23, a region frequently exhibiting heterozygosity in many common human cancers, but the function or functions of PinX1 in development and tumorigenesis are unknown. Here we have shown that PinX1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor essential for chromosome stability in mice. We found that PinX1 expression was reduced in most human breast cancer tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, PinX1 heterozygosity and PinX1 knockdown in mouse embryonic fibroblasts activated telomerase and led to concomitant telomerase-dependent chromosomal instability. Moreover, while PinX1-null mice were embryonic lethal, most PinX1+/- mice spontaneously developed malignant tumors with evidence of chromosome instability. Notably, most PinX1 mutant tumors were carcinomas and shared tissues of origin with human cancer types linked to 8p23. PinX1 knockout also shifted the tumor spectrum of p53 mutant mice from lymphoma toward epithelial carcinomas. Thus, PinX1 is a major haploinsufficient tumor suppressor essential for maintaining telomerase activity and chromosome stability. These findings uncover what we believe to be a novel role for PinX1 and telomerase in chromosome instability and cancer initiation and suggest that telomerase inhibition may be potentially used to treat cancers that overexpress telomerase.

  8. Amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in leukemic cells with high expression and activity of telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Tomasz; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Zawada, Mariola; Pernak, Monika; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowicka, Karina; Mankowski, Przemyslaw; Nowak, Jerzy

    2006-08-01

    Reactivation of telomerase plays an important role in carcinogenesis. Malignant cells almost always possess high activity and expression of telomerase. The aim of this study was to see whether there is any relationship between telomerase activity and expression and hTERT and hTERC gene amplification in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and non-lymphoblastic leukemia (ANLL) cells. In addition telomere length was tested in leukemic cells at the time of diagnosis and during remission. Expression of the three components of telomerase (hTERT, hTERC and TP1) as well as telomerase activity was found both in ALL and ANLL cells. Telomerase activity was diminished in patients in remission. The leukemic cells showed considerable heterogeneity of terminal restriction fragments, that is telomere length. ALL cells showed a variable pattern of telomere length in contrast to ANLL cells which produced a predominantly short telomere pattern. Telomere length in the lymphocytes of leukemia patients was shorter in remission as compared to the time of diagnosis. FISH analysis revealed amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes in ALL and ANLL cells. Quantitative analysis showed that leukemic cells possess higher number of hTERT and hTERC copies than the normal PBL. Our results suggest that the activation of telomerase in leukemic cells is connected with amplification of hTERT and hTERC genes. The high expression and activity of telomerase found in leukemic cells may be partially explained by amplified hTERT and hTERC genes. Amplification of the telomerase genes seems to be a common event in carcinogenesis and may play a role in telomerase reactivation leading to cell immortalization.

  9. Effect of estradiol and bisphenol A on human hepatoblastoma cell viability and telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, B L; Zhao, Q Z; Gao, X Y; Hou, G J

    2015-11-01

    Sex hormones from environmental and physiological sources might play a major role in the pathogenesis of hepatoblastoma in children. This study investigated the effects of estradiol and bisphenol A on the proliferation and telomerase activity of human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells. The cells were divided into 6 treatment groups: control, bisphenol A, estradiol, anti-estrogen ICI 182,780 (hereinafter ICI), bisphenol A+ICI, and estradiol+ICI. Cell proliferation was measured based on average absorbance using the Cell Counting-8 assay. The cell cycle distribution and apoptotic index were determined by flow cytometry. Telomerase activity was detected by polymerase chain reaction and a telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. A higher cell density was observed in bisphenol A (Pbisphenol A+ICI (Pbisphenol A and estradiol promote HepG2 cell proliferation in vitro by inhibition of apoptosis and stimulation of telomerase activity via an estrogen receptor-dependent pathway.

  10. Peroxiredoxin 1 Protects Telomeres from Oxidative Damage and Preserves Telomeric DNA for Extension by Telomerase

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    Eric Aeby

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage of telomeres can promote cancer, cardiac failure, and muscular dystrophy. Specific mechanisms protecting telomeres from oxidative damage have not been described. We analyzed telomeric chromatin composition during the cell cycle and show that the antioxidant enzyme peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1 is enriched at telomeres during S phase. Deletion of the PRDX1 gene leads to damage of telomeric DNA upon oxidative stress, revealing a protective function of PRDX1 against oxidative damage at telomeres. We also show that the oxidized nucleotide 8-oxo-2′deoxyguanosine-5′-triphosphate (8oxodGTP causes premature chain termination when incorporated by telomerase and that some DNA substrates terminating in 8oxoG prevent extension by telomerase. Thus, PRDX1 safeguards telomeres from oxygen radicals to counteract telomere damage and preserve telomeric DNA for elongation by telomerase.

  11. The telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit from the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis.

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    Dolores Bautista-España

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase in the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis. This protein (Trt1 contains 1371 amino acids and all of the characteristic TERT motifs. Mutants created by disrupting trt1 had senescent traits, such as delayed growth, low replicative potential, and reduced survival, that were reminiscent of the traits observed in est2 budding yeast mutants. Telomerase activity was observed in wild-type fungus sporidia but not those of the disruption mutant. The introduction of a self-replicating plasmid expressing Trt1 into the mutant strain restored growth proficiency and replicative potential. Analyses of trt1 crosses in planta suggested that Trt1 is necessary for teliospore formation in homozygous disrupted diploids and that telomerase is haploinsufficient in heterozygous diploids. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment analysis in the progeny hinted at alternative survival mechanisms similar to those of budding yeast.

  12. The telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit from the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-España, Dolores; Anastacio-Marcelino, Estela; Horta-Valerdi, Guillermo; Celestino-Montes, Antonio; Kojic, Milorad; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo; Reyes-Cervantes, Hortensia; Vázquez-Cruz, Candelario; Guzmán, Plinio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase in the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis. This protein (Trt1) contains 1371 amino acids and all of the characteristic TERT motifs. Mutants created by disrupting trt1 had senescent traits, such as delayed growth, low replicative potential, and reduced survival, that were reminiscent of the traits observed in est2 budding yeast mutants. Telomerase activity was observed in wild-type fungus sporidia but not those of the disruption mutant. The introduction of a self-replicating plasmid expressing Trt1 into the mutant strain restored growth proficiency and replicative potential. Analyses of trt1 crosses in planta suggested that Trt1 is necessary for teliospore formation in homozygous disrupted diploids and that telomerase is haploinsufficient in heterozygous diploids. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment analysis in the progeny hinted at alternative survival mechanisms similar to those of budding yeast.

  13. Novel FGF8 Mutations Associated with Recessive Holoprosencephaly, Craniofacial Defects, and Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mark J.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Tziaferi, Vaitsa; Gregory, Louise C.; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Signore, Massimo; Puelles, Eduardo; Gerrelli, Dianne; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Raza, Jamal; Walker, Joanna; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Tsai, Pei-San; Pitteloud, Nelly; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Context: Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 8 is important for GnRH neuronal development with human mutations resulting in Kallmann syndrome. Murine data suggest a role for Fgf8 in hypothalamo-pituitary development; however, its role in the etiology of wider hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction in humans is unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to screen for FGF8 mutations in patients with septo-optic dysplasia (n = 374) or holoprosencephaly (HPE)/midline clefts (n = 47). Methods: FGF8 was analyzed by PCR and direct sequencing. Ethnically matched controls were then screened for mutated alleles (n = 480–686). Localization of Fgf8/FGF8 expression was analyzed by in situ hybridization in developing murine and human embryos. Finally, Fgf8 hypomorphic mice (Fgf8loxPNeo/−) were analyzed for the presence of forebrain and hypothalamo-pituitary defects. Results: A homozygous p.R189H mutation was identified in a female patient of consanguineous parentage with semilobar HPE, diabetes insipidus, and TSH and ACTH insufficiency. Second, a heterozygous p.Q216E mutation was identified in a female patient with an absent corpus callosum, hypoplastic optic nerves, and Moebius syndrome. FGF8 was expressed in the ventral diencephalon and anterior commissural plate but not in Rathke's pouch, strongly suggesting early onset hypothalamic and corpus callosal defects in these patients. This was consolidated by significantly reduced vasopressin and oxytocin staining neurons in the hypothalamus of Fgf8 hypomorphic mice compared with controls along with variable hypothalamo-pituitary defects and HPE. Conclusion: We implicate FGF8 in the etiology of recessive HPE and potentially septo-optic dysplasia/Moebius syndrome for the first time to our knowledge. Furthermore, FGF8 is important for the development of the ventral diencephalon, hypothalamus, and pituitary. PMID:21832120

  14. Vascular Actions of Angiotensin 1–7 in the Human Microcirculation – Novel Role for Telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Matthew J.; Zinkevich, Natalya S.; Riedel, Michael; Gutterman, David D.; Nasci, Victoria L.; Salato, Valerie K.; Hijjawi, John B.; Reuben, Charles F.; North, Paula E.; Beyer, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study examined vascular actions of angiotensin 1–7 (ANG 1–7) in human atrial and adipose arterioles. Approach and Results The endothelial-derived hyperpolarizing factor of flow mediated dilation (FMD) switches from anti-proliferative nitric oxide (NO) to pro-atherosclerotic hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in arterioles from humans with coronary artery disease (CAD). Given the known vasoprotective properties of ANG 1–7, we tested the hypothesis that overnight ANG 1–7 treatment restores the NO-component of FMD in arterioles from CAD patients. Endothelial telomerase activity is essential for preserving the NO-component of vasodilation in the human microcirculation, thus we also tested whether telomerase activity was necessary for ANG 1–7 mediated vasoprotection by treating separate arterioles with ANG 1–7 ± the telomerase inhibitor BIBR-1532. ANG 1–7 dilated arterioles from patients without CAD, whereas dilation was significantly reduced in arterioles from CAD patients. In atrial arterioles from CAD patients incubated with ANG 1–7 overnight, the NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME abolished FMD while the H2O2 scavenger PEG catalase had no effect. Conversely, in vessels incubated with ANG 1–7 + BIBR-1532, L-NAME had no effect on FMD but PEG catalase abolished dilation. In cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells, ANG 1–7 significantly increased telomerase activity. These results indicate that ANG 1–7 dilates human microvessels, and dilation is abrogated in the presence of CAD. Further, ANG 1–7 treatment is sufficient to restore the NO component of FMD in arterioles from CAD patients in a telomerase-dependent fashion. Conclusion ANG 1–7 exerts vasoprotection in the human microvasculature via modulation of telomerase activity. PMID:27079876

  15. Critical Role for Telomerase in the Mechanism of Flow-Mediated Dilation in the Human Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas M; Freed, Julie K; Durand, Matthew J; Riedel, Michael; Ait-Aissa, Karima; Green, Paula; Hockenberry, Joseph C; Morgan, R Garret; Donato, Anthony J; Peleg, Refael; Gasparri, Mario; Rokkas, Chris K; Santos, Janine H; Priel, Esther; Gutterman, David D

    2016-03-04

    Telomerase is a nuclear regulator of telomere elongation with recent reports suggesting a role in regulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Flow-mediated dilation in patients with cardiovascular disease is dependent on the formation of reactive oxygen species. We examined the hypothesis that telomerase activity modulates microvascular flow-mediated dilation, and loss of telomerase activity contributes to the change of mediator from nitric oxide to mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Human coronary and adipose arterioles were isolated for videomicroscopy. Flow-mediated dilation was measured in vessels pretreated with the telomerase inhibitor BIBR-1532 or vehicle. Statistical differences between groups were determined using a 2-way analysis of variance repeated measure (n≥4; PBIBR-1532, arterioles from non-CAD subjects maintained the magnitude of dilation but changed the mediator from nitric oxide to mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide (% max diameter at 100 cm H2O: vehicle 74.6±4.1, L-NAME 37.0±2.0*, PEG-catalase 82.1±2.8; BIBR-1532 69.9±4.0, L-NAME 84.7±2.2, PEG-catalase 36.5±6.9*). Conversely, treatment of microvessels from CAD patients with the telomerase activator AGS 499 converted the PEG-catalase-inhibitable dilation to one mediated by nitric oxide (% max diameter at 100 cm H2O: adipose, AGS 499 78.5±3.9; L-NAME 10.9±17.5*; PEG-catalase 79.2±4.9). Endothelial-independent dilation was not altered with either treatment. We have identified a novel role for telomerase in re-establishing a physiological mechanism of vasodilation in arterioles from subjects with CAD. These findings suggest a new target for reducing the oxidative milieu in the microvasculature of patients with CAD. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. PinX1 regulation of telomerase activity and apoptosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Xiao-Fen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interacting protein X1 (PinX1 has been identified as a critical telomerase inhibitor and proposed to be a putative tumor suppressor gene. Loss of PinX1 has been found in a large variety of malignancies, however, its function in inhibiting telomerase activity of tumor cells is not well documented. Here we show that PinX1 is essential for down-regulation telomerase activity of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods Expression vectors of human PinX1 (pEGFP-C3-PinX1 and its small interfering RNA (PinX1-FAM-siRNA were constructed and transfected into NPC. Their effects on mRNA of telomerase catalytic subunit (hTERT, telomerase activity, cell proliferation, cell migration, wound healing, cell cycles and apoptosis were examined using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, stretch PCR, MTT assay, Transwell, scratch assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Results Transfection of pEGFP-C3-PinX1 and PinX1-FAM-siRNA increased and reduced PinX1 mRNA by 1.6-fold and 70%, respectively. Over-expression of PinX1 decreased hTERT mRNA by 21%, reduced telomerase activity, inhibited cell growth, migration and wound healing ability, arrested cells in G0/G1 phase, and increased apoptotic index. In contrast, down-regulation of PinX1 did not alter the above characteristics. Conclusions PinX1 may play important roles in NPC proliferation, migration and apoptosis and has application potential in tumor-targeted gene therapy.

  17. Vascular Actions of Angiotensin 1-7 in the Human Microcirculation: Novel Role for Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Matthew J; Zinkevich, Natalya S; Riedel, Michael; Gutterman, David D; Nasci, Victoria L; Salato, Valerie K; Hijjawi, John B; Reuben, Charles F; North, Paula E; Beyer, Andreas M

    2016-06-01

    This study examined vascular actions of angiotensin 1-7 (ANG 1-7) in human atrial and adipose arterioles. The endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) switches from antiproliferative nitric oxide (NO) to proatherosclerotic hydrogen peroxide in arterioles from humans with coronary artery disease (CAD). Given the known vasoprotective properties of ANG 1-7, we tested the hypothesis that overnight ANG 1-7 treatment restores the NO component of FMD in arterioles from patients with CAD. Endothelial telomerase activity is essential for preserving the NO component of vasodilation in the human microcirculation; thus, we also tested whether telomerase activity was necessary for ANG 1-7-mediated vasoprotection by treating separate arterioles with ANG 1-7±the telomerase inhibitor 2-[[(2E)-3-(2-naphthalenyl)-1-oxo-2-butenyl1-yl]amino]benzoic acid. ANG 1-7 dilated arterioles from patients without CAD, whereas dilation was significantly reduced in arterioles from patients with CAD. In atrial arterioles from patients with CAD incubated with ANG 1-7 overnight, the NO synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester abolished FMD, whereas the hydrogen peroxide scavenger polyethylene glycol catalase had no effect. Conversely, in vessels incubated with ANG 1-7+2-[[(2E)-3-(2-naphthalenyl)-1-oxo-2-butenyl1-yl]amino]benzoic acid, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester had no effect on FMD, but polyethylene glycol catalase abolished dilation. In cultured human coronary artery endothelial cells, ANG 1-7 significantly increased telomerase activity. These results indicate that ANG 1-7 dilates human microvessels, and dilation is abrogated in the presence of CAD. Furthermore, ANG 1-7 treatment is sufficient to restore the NO component of FMD in arterioles from patients with CAD in a telomerase-dependent manner. ANG 1-7 exerts vasoprotection in the human microvasculature via modulation of telomerase activity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Oxidative stress may enhance the malignant potential of human hepatocellular carcinoma by telomerase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Nakajima, Tomoki; Katagishi, Tatsuo; Okada, Yoshihisa; Jo, Masayasu; Kagawa, Keizo; Okanoue, Takeshi; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2009-07-01

    Continuous oxidative stress (OS) plays an important role in the progression of chronic liver diseases and hepatocarcinogenesis through telomere shortening in hepatocytes. However, it has not been established how the OS influences the progression of human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). We examined the correlations of OS with telomere length of cancer cells, telomerase activity and other clinicopathological factors in 68 HCCs. The level of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) as a marker of OS was examined immunohistochemically and OS was scored in four grades (0-3). The telomere length of cancer cells was measured by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization. Telomerase activity was measured by (i) immunodetection of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and (ii) telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Telomerase related proteins, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and Akt, and other clinicopathological factors were also evaluated. As the OS grade increased, the average telomere length became significantly shorter in HCCs, especially in the hTERT-negative group. In the state of high-grade OS, hTERT-positive HCC cells showed more proliferative and less apoptotic features compared with hTERT-negative HCC cells. Telomerase activity, as measured by the TRAP assay, was strongly correlated with OS grade in HCCs. Furthermore, a high OS grade was correlated with the downexpression of PTEN and the activation of Akt. Oxidative stress enhanced the malignant potential of HCCs through the activation of telomerase, which raises the possibility of using OS as a marker for assessing the clinical state of HCCs.

  19. A non-canonical function of zebrafish telomerase reverse transcriptase is required for developmental hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Imamura

    Full Text Available Although it is clear that telomerase expression is crucial for the maintenance of telomere homeostasis, there is increasing evidence that the TERT protein can have physiological roles that are independent of this central function. To further examine the role of telomerase during vertebrate development, the zebrafish telomerase reverse transcriptase (zTERT was functionally characterized. Upon zTERT knockdown, zebrafish embryos show reduced telomerase activity and are viable, but develop pancytopenia resulting from aberrant hematopoiesis. The blood cell counts in TERT-depleted zebrafish embryos are markedly decreased and hematopoietic cell differentiation is impaired, whereas other somatic lineages remain morphologically unaffected. Although both primitive and definitive hematopoiesis is disrupted by zTERT knockdown, the telomere lengths are not significantly altered throughout early development. Induced p53 deficiency, as well as overexpression of the anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and E1B-19K, significantly relieves the decreased blood cells numbers caused by zTERT knockdown, but not the impaired blood cell differentiation. Surprisingly, only the reverse transcriptase motifs of zTERT are crucial, but the telomerase RNA-binding domain of zTERT is not required, for rescuing complete hematopoiesis. This is therefore the first demonstration of a non-canonical catalytic activity of TERT, which is different from "authentic" telomerase activity, is required for during vertebrate hematopoiesis. On the other hand, zTERT deficiency induced a defect in hematopoiesis through a potent and specific effect on the gene expression of key regulators in the absence of telomere dysfunction. These results suggest that TERT non-canonically functions in hematopoietic cell differentiation and survival in vertebrates, independently of its role in telomere homeostasis. The data also provide insights into a non-canonical pathway by which TERT functions to modulate

  20. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide against human telomerase reverse transcriptase inhibits the proliferation of Eca-109 esophageal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAN, XIANG-KUI; YAN, RUI-HUA; LI, BAO-JIANG; CHEN, XIANG-MING; WEI, LIN; WANG, ZHOU

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the growth of tumor cells may be inhibited by antisense oligonucleotides (ASODNs) targeted against human telomerase (hTR) or human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), resulting in antitumor activity in a wide variety of tumors. However, few studies have investigated the effect of hTERT gene-targeted ASODNs on telomerase activity and cell proliferation in human esophageal cancer. In the present study, an MTT assay was used to determine the growth inhibition rate of Eca-109 cells treated with a hTERT-targeted phosphorothioate-ASODN (PS-ASODN). An inverted microscope was used to observe the morphologic changes of the cells following treatment with 5 μM PS-ASODN for 10 days. Telomerase activity was detected using the silver staining semi-quantitative telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Following treatment with the PS-ASODN (1–5 μmol/l), the proliferation of the Eca-109 cells was inhibited. The differences in inhibition rate between the PS-ASODN and blank control groups were statistically significant (Pgroups. The inhibition rate increased gradually as the concentration of the PS-ASODN increased and with time, suggesting that the PS-ASODN inhibited the growth of Eca-109 cells in a concentration-dependent, time-dependent and sequence-specific manner. The growth rate of the cells incubated with the PS-ASODN was reduced compared with that of the control cells. Cells treated with the PS-ASODN became round, suspended and reduced in size. The PS-ASODN was also found to inhibit telomerase activity. The ability of the PS-ASODN to inhibit the telomerase activity and cell proliferation of the Eca-109 cell line suggests that ASODNs have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of esophageal cancer. PMID:25187833

  1. Increased fibroblast telomerase expression precedes myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Reis Waisberg

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study sought to identify the relationship between fibroblast telomerase expression, myofibroblasts, and telomerase-mediated regulatory signals in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: Thirty-four surgical lung biopsies, which had been obtained from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and histologically classified as usual interstitial pneumonia, were examined. Immunohistochemistry was used to evaluate fibroblast telomerase expression, myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and the tissue expression of inter leu kin-4, transforming growth factor-β, and basic fibroblast growth factor. The point-counting technique was used to quantify the expression of these markers in unaffected, collapsed, mural fibrosis, and honeycombing areas. The results were correlated to patient survival. RESULTS: Fibroblast telomerase expression and basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression were higher in collapsed areas, whereas myofibroblast expression and interleukine-4 tissue expression were higher in areas of mural fibrosis. Transforming growth factor-β expression was higher in collapsed, mural fibrosis and honeycombing areas in comparison to unaffected areas. Positive correlations were found between basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression and fibroblast telomerase expression and between interleukin-4 tissue expression and myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression. Negative correlations were observed between interleukin-4 expression and basic fibroblast growth factor tissue expression in areas of mural fibrosis. Myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression and interleukin-4 tissue expression in areas of mural fibrosis were negatively associated with patient survival. CONCLUSION: Fibroblast telomerase expression is higher in areas of early remodeling in lung tissues demonstrating typical interstitial pneumonia, whereas myofibroblast α-smooth muscle actin expression predominates in areas of late remodeling

  2. TERRA mimicking ssRNAs prevail over the DNA substrate for telomerase in vitro due to interactions with the alternative binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhibek, Dulat; Skvortsov, Dmitry; Andreeva, Anna; Zatsepin, Timofei; Arutyunyan, Alexandr; Zvereva, Maria; Dontsova, Olga

    2016-06-01

    Telomerase is a key component of the telomere length maintenance system in the majority of eukaryotes. Telomerase displays maximal activity in stem and cancer cells with high proliferative potential. In humans, telomerase activity is regulated by various mechanisms, including the interaction with telomere ssDNA overhangs that contain a repetitive G-rich sequence, and with noncoding RNA, Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA), that contains the same sequence. So these nucleic acids can compete for telomerase RNA templates in the cell. In this study, we have investigated the ability of different model substrates mimicking telomere DNA overhangs and TERRA RNA to compete for telomerase in vitro through a previously developed telomerase inhibitor assay. We have shown in this study that RNA oligonucleotides are better competitors for telomerase that DNA ones as RNA also use an alternative binding site on telomerase, and the presence of 2'-OH groups is significant in these interactions. In contrast to DNA, the possibility of forming intramolecular G-quadruplex structures has a minor effect for RNA binding to telomerase. Taking together our data, we propose that TERRA RNA binds better to telomerase compared with its native substrate - the 3'-end of telomere DNA overhang. As a result, some specific factor may exist that participates in switching telomerase from TERRA to the 3'-end of DNA for telomere elongation at the distinct period of a cell cycle in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Structural Basis of Telomerase Inhibition by the Highly Specific BIBR1532

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Christopher; Rice, Cory; Hoffman, Hunter; Harkisheimer, Michael; Sweeny, Melanie; Skordalakes, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    BIBR1532 is a highly specific telomerase inhibitor, however the molecular basis for inhibition is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of BIBR1532 bound to Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase (tcTERT). BIBR1532 binds to a conserved hydrophobic pocket (FVYL motif) on the outer surface of the thumb domain. The FVYL motif is near TRBD residues that bind the activation domain (CR4/5) of hTER. RNA binding assays show that the human TERT (hTERT) thumb domain binds the P6.1...

  4. Telomerase promoter reprogramming and interaction with general transcription factors in the human mesenchymal stem cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Hoare, Stacey F.; Kassem, Moustapha

    2006-01-01

    The human adult mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) does not express telomerase and has been shown to be the target for neoplastic transformation after transduction with hTERT. These findings lend support to the stem cell hypothesis of cancer development but by supplying hTERT, the molecular events...... and that modifications of the chromatin environment lead to reactivation of telomerase gene expression. It is shown that repression of hTERT expression in hMSCs is due to promoter-specific histone hypoacetylation coupled with low Pol II and TFIIB trafficking. This repression is overcome by treatment with Trichostatin...

  5. Study of hTERT and Histone 3 Mutations in Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana-Pereira, Marta; Almeida, Gisele Caravina; Stavale, João Norberto; Malheiro, Susana; Clara, Carlos; Lobo, Patrícia; Pimentel, José; Reis, Rui Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Hotspot activating mutations of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter region were recently described in several tumor types. These mutations lead to enhanced expression of telomerase, being responsible for telomere maintenance and allowing continuous cell division. Additionally, there are alternative telomere maintenance mechanisms, associated with histone H3 mutations, responsible for disrupting the histone code and affecting the regulation of transcription. Here, we investigated the clinical relevance of these mechanistically related molecules in medulloblastoma. Sixty-nine medulloblastomas, formalin fixed and paraffin embedded, from a cohort of patients aged 1.5-70 years, were used to investigate the hotspot mutations of the hTERT promoter region, i.e. H3F3A and HIST1H3B, using Sanger sequencing. We successfully sequenced hTERT in all 69 medulloblastoma samples and identified a total of 19 mutated cases (27.5%). c.-124:G>A and c.-146:G>A mutations were detected, respectively, in 16 and 3 samples. Similar to previous reports, hTERT mutations were more frequent in older patients (p < 0.0001), being found only in 5 patients <20 years of age. In addition, hTERT-mutated tumors were more frequently recurrent (p = 0.026) and hTERT mutations were significantly enriched in tumors located in the right cerebellar hemisphere (p = 0.039). No mutations were found on the H3F3A or HIST1H3B genes. hTERT promoter mutations are frequent in medulloblastoma and are associated with older patients, prone to recurrence and located in the right cerebellar hemisphere. On the other hand, histone 3 mutations do not seem to be present in medulloblastoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Thyroglobulin may affect telomerase activity in thyroid follicular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasaka, Akio; Oda, Naohisa; Nakai, Akira; Hotta, Keiko; Nagata, Mutsuko; Kato, Taiya; Suzuki, Atsushi; Itoh, Mitsuyasu; Miura, Hitoshi; Hakuta, Motoo; Yoshida, Shonen; Hibi, Yatsuka; Iwase, Katsumi

    2009-04-01

    Telomerase (TA) activity is known to be present in malignant tumor cells, but not in most somatic differentiated cells. TA shows relatively high activity in thyroid cancer cells, but reports vary. This fact prompted us to elucidate whether cell component inhibitors of TA in the thyroid follicles can modulate its activity. The activity of TA extracted from Hela cells was inhibited by mixing with the supernatant fraction of human thyroid tissue extract. To examine the effect of iodine, thyroid hormones (l-T3 and l-T4) and human thyroglobulin (hTg) contained in the thyroid follicles, l-T3, l-T4 and hTg were added to the TRAP assay system in vitro, using TA from Hela cells. Iodine, l-T3 and l-T4 did not affect TA activity, but hTg inhibited the TA activity in a dose-dependent manner (IC(50) of hTg: ca 0.45 microM: inhibiting concentration of hTg was from 0.15 microM to 3.0 microM). The hTg inhibition was not evident in the RT-PCR system, suggesting no effect of hTg on Taq DNA polymerase activity. The hTg inhibition of TA activity was attenuated by dNTP but not significantly by TS primer. These data suggest that hTg contained in thyroid follicular cells of various thyroid diseases may affect the TA activity measured in biopsied thyroid specimens, and that the reduction of the TA activity by hTg may induce slow progression and growth, and low grade malignancy of thyroid cancer, particularly differentiated carcinoma.

  7. Germline TERT promoter mutations are rare in familial melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harland, Mark; Petljak, Mia; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela

    2016-01-01

    T>G variant) has been reported in one family. We tested for the TERT promoter variant in 675 multicase families wild-type for the known high penetrance familial melanoma genes, 1863 UK population-based melanoma cases and 529 controls. Germline lymphocyte telomere length was estimated in carriers...... telomere length of a carrier was similar to wild-type cases. We provide evidence confirming that a rare promoter variant of TERT (c.-57 T>G) is associated with high penetrance, early onset melanoma and potentially other cancers, and explains ...Germline CDKN2A mutations occur in 40 % of 3-or-more case melanoma families while mutations of CDK4, BAP1, and genes involved in telomere function (ACD, TERF2IP, POT1), have also been implicated in melanomagenesis. Mutation of the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene (c.-57...

  8. TERT promoter mutations and their association with BRAF V600E mutation and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Qu, Shen; Liu, Rengyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Shi, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Guangwu; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Hongyu; Wang, Yangang; Sun, Hui; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xing, Mingzhao

    2014-06-01

    Promoter mutations chr5:1,295,228C>T and chr5:1,295,250C>T (termed C228T and C250T, respectively) in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been reported in various cancers and need to be further investigated in thyroid cancer. The aim of the study was to explore TERT promoter mutations in various thyroid tumors and examine their relationship with BRAF V600E mutation, iodine intake, and clinicopathological behaviors of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter and BRAF mutations were identified by sequencing genomic DNA of primary thyroid tumors from normal- and high-iodine regions in China, and clinicopathological correlation was analyzed. The C228T mutation was found in 9.6% (39 of 408) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), C250T was found in 1.7% (7 of 408) of PTC, and they were collectively found in 11.3% (46 of 408) of PTC. C228T was found in 31.8% (7 of 22) and C250T in 4.6% (1 of 22) of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and they were collectively found in 36.4% (8 of 22) of FTC. No TERT mutation was found in 44 benign thyroid tumors. The two mutations occurred in 3.8% (6 of 158) of BRAF mutation-negative PTC vs 16.0% (40 of 250) of BRAF mutation-positive PTC (P = 5.87 × 10(-4)), demonstrating their association. Unlike BRAF mutation, TERT promoter mutations were not associated with high iodine intake, but they were associated with older patient age, larger tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, and advanced stages III/IV of PTC. Coexisting TERT and BRAF mutations were even more commonly and more significantly associated with clinicopathological aggressiveness. In this large cohort, we found TERT promoter mutations to be common, particularly in FTC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, and associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics.

  9. The effect of β-ionone on telomerase activity in the human leukemia cell line K562

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Faezizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Telomerase is highly activated in most human cancer cells, therefore, its inhibition has been proposed as a novel and promising strategy for cancer therapy. Many plant-derived anticancer agents act through inhibition of telomerase activity and induction of apoptosis. β-ionone, a carotenoid compound isolated from Roseaceae, has been reported to possess anticancer properties. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanism of β-ionone-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cell line K562 with special emphasis on its role in telomerase inhibition. Method: In this study the anti-proliferation effect of β-ionone on K562 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Apoptosis rate was detected by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry analysis. Telomerase activity was measured by (TRAP ELISA assay. Results: Exposure of K562 cells to β-ionone caused a dose-dependent decrease in proliferation. Flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst staining showed that percentage of apoptotic cells markedly increased with an increase in β-ionone concentration. Compared to control cells, treatment of K562 cells with β-ionone resulted in a significant decrease of telomerase activity. Moreover, a positive correlation was detected between telomerase inhibition and apoptosis induction in the treated K562 cells. Conclusion: Based on these results, β-ionone is an appropriate candidate for inhibiting telomerase activity in K562 cells. Therefore, it may be utilized as a novel drug against some leukemia cell lines.

  10. Telomerase activity of the Lugol-stained and -unstained squamous epithelia in the process of oesophageal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inai, M; Kano, M; Shimada, Y; Sakurai, T; Chiba, T; Imamura, M

    2001-09-28

    Up-regulation of telomerase has been reported in many cancers. Our aim was to characterize telomerase activity in various states of the oesophagus to facilitate better understanding of carcinogenesis of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. During endoscopic examinations, we obtained 45 Lugol-stained normal epithelia, 31 Lugol-unstained epithelia (14 oesophagitis, 7 mild dysplasia, 5 severe dysplasia and 5 intramucosal cancer) and 9 advanced cancer. Telomerase activity was semi-quantified by a telomeric repeat amplification protocol using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA was examined by in situ hybridization. In the Lugol-stained normal epithelia, telomerase activity increased in proportion to the increase of severity of the accompanying lesions, with a rank order of advanced cancer, intramucosal cancer, mild dysplasia and oesophagitis. In the Lugol-unstained lesions and advanced cancer, telomerase activity was highest in advanced cancer. Up-regulation of telomerase in normal squamous epithelium may be a marker of progression of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright 2001 Cancer Research Campaign

  11. Combination treatment with flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 reduces cancer stem cell traits by targeting STAT3 and telomerase

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Seyung S.; Oliva, Bryant; Dwabe, Sami; Jaydutt V Vadgama

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. The malignant CRC that undergoes metastasis in the advanced stage is usually refractory to existing chemotherapy and shows a poor prognosis. However, to date, efficient targeted-therapy for metastatic CRC is ill-defined. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment of flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 may reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) traits. To characterize CSC phenotype, we performed the ...

  12. Glucose restriction decreases telomerase activity and enhances its inhibitor response on breast cancer cells: possible extra-telomerase role of BIBR 1532

    OpenAIRE

    Wardi, Layal; Alaaeddine, Nada; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Serhal, Rim; Khalil, Charbel; Hilal, George

    2014-01-01

    Background Considerable progress has been made to understand the association between lifestyle and diet in cancer initiation and promotion. Because excessive glucose consumption is a key metabolic hallmark of cancer cells, glucose restriction (GR) decreases the proliferation, and promotes the differentiation and transformation of cancer cells to quiescent cells. The immortality of cancerous cells is largely assured by telomerase, which is an interesting target for inhibition by BIBR 1532. In ...

  13. Label-free molecular beacons-based cascade amplification DNA machine for sensitive detection of telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kan; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Sensitive detection of telomerase activity is critical to cancer diagnosis, screening of anticancer drugs and evaluation of cancer therapy. Herein, a label-free molecular beacons-based DNA machine was developed for sensitive detection of telomerase activity. The DNA machine consisted of T7 exonuclease (T7 Exo), label-free recognition molecular beacon (RMB) and signal molecular beacon (SMB) with projecting 5'-terminuses, which can protect RMB and SMB from being digested by T7 Exo. Firstly, telomerase elongated telomerase substrate (TS) primer, generating a telomerase elongation production (TEP) with tandem repeats (TTAGGG) n . Next, TEP activated the DNA machine by hybridizing with RMB, unfolding RMB with a recessed 5'-terminus, making RMB deprotection from T7 Exo. Then T7 Exo-assisted cycling cleavage was incurred, releasing intact TEP and numerous DNA fragments (trigger DNA), which got recycling I. Subsequently, trigger DNA specifically opened SMB and was recycled by T7 Exo, liberating multiple G-quadruplex (G4) structures, which got recycling II. Finally, TEP and the liberative G4 structures strongly interacted with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM), yielding a significantly enhanced fluorescence together. In this way, per telomerase-mediated elongation event was efficiently converted into the greatly amplified fluorescence signals. Telomerase activity in crude HeLa cells extracts equivalent to 50 cells/mL was successfully measured with a linear range from 50 cells/mL to 2000 cells/mL. Besides, the strategy was also successfully used to assay the inhibition effect of a telomerase-inhibiting drug, demonstrating the strategy holds the potential to screen telomerase inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Activity and expression of human telomerase in normal and malignant cells in gastric and colon cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Jerzy; Januszkiewicz, Danuta; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Nowicka-Kujawska, Karina; Pernak, Monika; Rembowska, Jolanta; Nowak, Tomasz; Wysocki, Jacek

    2003-01-01

    The reactivation of telomerase is believed to play an important role in immortalization and carcinogenesis. To investigate the expression of three components of the telomerase complex (hTR, hTERT and TP1), along with telomerase activity in malignant and normal cells. Cells were isolated from gastric and colon cancer, and from normal mucosa from the stomach and colon of participating patients. Expression of hTERT, hTR and TP1 has been studied by the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The telomerase repeat amplification protocol and PCR enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for analysis of telomerase activity. All telomerase components were consistently expressed in colon and gastric cancer cells. Neoplastic RNA produced consistently very strong amplification signals either for hTR, hTERT or TP1. The expression of hTR was observed in RNA isolated from all normal mucosa samples and from peripheral blood lymphocytes. The expression of TP1 and hTERT has been found in the majority of normal cells; however, the amplification signals produced were usually much weaker than in malignant cells. The limiting dilution experiments indicated that the cancer cells have at least 100-fold higher telomerase activity and at least 25-fold higher TP1 and hTERT expression in comparison to normal cells. It can be concluded that all the cancer cells tested have higher telomerase expression and activity than normal cells. Therefore, telomerase can be a good cancer marker, provided that quantitative analysis is carried out. Copyright 2003 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  15. Telomere maintenance in laser capture microdissection-purified Barrett's adenocarcinoma cells and effect of telomerase inhibition in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Masood A; Qazi, Aamer; Batchu, Ramesh B; Bertheau, Robert C; Wong, Jason YY; Rao, Manjula Y; Prasad, Madhu; Chanda, Diptiman; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Anderson, Kenneth C; Steffes, Christopher P; Munshi, Nikhil C; De Vivo, Immaculata; Beer, David G.; Gryaznov, Sergei; Weaver, Donald W; Goyal, Raj K

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to investigate telomere function in normal and Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BEAC) cells purified by laser capture microdissection (LCM) and to evaluate the impact of telomerase inhibition in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Experimental Design: Epithelial cells were purified from surgically resected esophagi. Telomerase activity was measured by modified “Telomeric Repeat Amplification Protocol” and telomere length determined by Real-Time PCR assay. To evaluate the impact of telomerase inhibition, adenocarcinoma cell lines were continuously treated with a specific telomerase inhibitor (GRN163L) and live cell number determined weekly. Apoptosis was evaluated by annexin labeling and senescence by beta-galactosidase staining. For in vivo studies, SCID-mice were subcutaneously inoculated with adenocarcinoma cells and following appearance of palpable tumors, injected intraperitoneally with saline or GRN163L. Results: Telomerase activity was significantly elevated whereas telomeres were shorter in BEAC cells relative to normal esophageal epithelial cells. The treatment of adenocarcinoma cells with telomerase inhibitor, GRN163L, led to loss of telomerase activity, reduction in telomere length, and growth arrest through induction of both the senescence and apoptosis. GRN163L induced cell death could also be expedited by addition of chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and ritonavir. Finally, the treatment with GRN163L led to a significant reduction in tumor volume in a subcutaneous tumor model. Conclusions: We show that telomerase activity is significantly elevated whereas telomeres are shorter in BEAC and suppression of telomerase inhibits proliferation of adenocarcinoma cells both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18676772

  16. Synthesis and Enantiomeric Separation of a Novel Spiroketal Derivative: A Potent Human Telomerase Inhibitor with High in Vitro Anticancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuggetta, Maria Pia; De Mico, Antonella; Cottarelli, Andrea; Morelli, Franco; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Ulgheri, Fausta; Peluso, Paola; Mannu, Alberto; Deligia, Francesco; Marchetti, Mauro; Roviello, Giovanni; Reyes Romero, Atilio; Dömling, Alexander; Spanu, Pietro

    2016-10-13

    The synthesis, the enantiomeric separation, and the characterization of new simple spiroketal derivatives have been performed. The synthesized compounds have shown a very high anticancer activity. Cell proliferation assay showed that they induce a remarkable inhibition of cell proliferation in all cell lines treated, depending on culture time and concentration. The compounds have also shown a potent nanomolar human telomerase inhibition activity and apoptosis induction. CD melting experiments demonstrate that spiroketal does not affect the G-quadruplex (G4) thermal stability. Docking studies showed that telomerase inhibition could be determined by a spiroketal interaction with the telomerase enzyme.

  17. Telomerase activity is increased and telomere length shortened in T cells from blood of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Higashi, N; Hansen, E R

    2000-01-01

    We studied telomerase activity and telomere length in PBMC and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from blood obtained from a total of 32 patients with atopic dermatitis, 16 patients with psoriasis, and 30 normal controls. The telomerase activity was significantly increased in PBMC from the patients......(+) T cell subsets from normal donors. In conclusion, the increased telomerase activity and shortened telomere length indicates that T lymphocytes in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are chronically stimulated and have an increased cellular turnover in vivo....

  18. A Highly Sensitive Telomerase Activity Assay that Eliminates False-Negative Results Caused by PCR Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenobu Yaku

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An assay for telomerase activity based on asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (A-PCR on magnetic beads (MBs and subsequent application of cycling probe technology (CPT is described. In this assay, the telomerase reaction products are immobilized on MBs, which are then washed to remove PCR inhibitors that are commonly found in clinical samples. The guanine-rich sequences (5'-(TTAGGGn-3' of the telomerase reaction products are then preferentially amplified by A-PCR, and the amplified products are subsequently detected via CPT, where a probe RNA with a fluorophore at the 5' end and a quencher at the 3' end is hydrolyzed by RNase H in the presence of the target DNA. The catalyst-mediated cleavage of the probe RNA enhances fluorescence from the 5' end of the probe. The assay allowed us to successfully detect HeLa cells selectively over normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF cells. Importantly, this selectivity produced identical results with regard to detection of HeLa cells in the absence and presence of excess NHDF cells; therefore, this assay can be used for practical clinical applications. The lower limit of detection for HeLa cells was 50 cells, which is lower than that achieved with a conventional telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay. Our assay also eliminated false-negative results caused by PCR inhibitors. Furthermore, we show that this assay is appropriate for screening among G-quadruplex ligands to find those that inhibit telomerase activity.

  19. Quinazoline derivative from indigenous isolate, Nocardiopsis alba inhibits human telomerase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, K G; Thandeeswaran, M; Ayub Nawaz, K A; Easwaran, M; Jayagopi, K K; Ebrahimi, L; Palaniswamy, M; Mahendran, R; Angayarkanni, J

    2016-12-01

    Aim of this study was isolation and screening of various secondary metabolites produced by indigenous isolates of soil Actinomycetes for human telomerase inhibitory activity. Extracellular extract from culture suspension of various soil Actinomycetes species were tested for telomerase inhibitory activity. The organism which produced telomerase inhibitor was identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The active fraction was purified by HPLC and analysed by GC-MS to identify the compound. In GC-MS analysis, the active principle was identified as 3-[4'-(2″-chlorophenyl)-2'-thiazolyl]-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro quinazoline. The G-quadruplex stabilizing ability of the compound was checked by molecular docking and simulation experiments with G-quadruplex model (PDB ID-1L1H). The selective binding ability of the compound with G-quadruplex over Dickerson-Drew dodecamer DNA structures showed that the compound possess high selectivity towards G-quadruplex. Quinazoline derivative isolated from an indigenous strain of Nocardiopsis alba inhibited telomerase. Molecular docking and simulation studies predicted that this compound is a strong stabilizer of G-quadruplex conformation. It also showed a preferable binding to G-quadruplex DNA over normal DNA duplex. This particular compound can be suggested as a suitable compound for developing a future anticancer drug. The selectivity towards G-quadruplex over normal DNA duplex gives a clue that it is likely to show lower cytotoxicity in normal cells. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Correlation of Bmi-1 expression and telomerase activity in human ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, F. B.; Sui, L. H.; Xin, T.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between the oncoprotein Bmi-1 and telomerase activity in ovarian cancer. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is used to detect the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of Bmi-1 protein in 47 ovarian epithelial cancer cases, and immunohistochemistry

  1. Analysis of DNA methylation status of the promoter of human telomerase reverse transcriptase in gastric carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenghui; Xu, Jinheng; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Weiming

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is expressed in normal somatic cells and reactivated in majority of tumor cells. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), a catalytic subunit of telomerase, is a rate-limiting factor of telomerase activity. Evidence has shown that gastric cancer is the result of genetics and epignomics. DNA methylation is one of the most important research fields in epigenomics. It is one of the mechanisms resulting in gene silencing in carcinogenesis. Genomic DNAs were extracted from normal gastric mucosa, precancerous lesions and gastric cancer samples and were modified by sodium bisulfite. The modified genomic DNAs were amplified by PCR with primers that did not contain CpG sites. Each PCR product was sequenced. By matching the sequencing results and the original sequence, the status of each sample was obtained. PCR was carried out to identify hTERT expression. The promoter of hTERT in gastric cancer was more methylated than in the precancerous lesions and normal gastric mucosa (pmaker in early diagnosis of gastric cancer. During gastric carcinogenesis, expression of hTERT was increased. This may suggest that methylation of hTERT may influence expression of hTERT. 2010 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Biosensor Techniques Used for Determination of Telomerase Activity in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny Katz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring telomerase activity has proven successful for the determination of cancer in malignant somatic cells. Early conventional methods for the detection of telomerase activity include in vitro analysis via a primer extension assay, and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay. TRAP incorporates the polymerase chain reaction (PCR step to increase the sensitivity of a given sample. However, research suggests that the TRAP technique suffers from false negative results, caused by failure of its PCR step. Other limitations of TRAP include the post-PCR steps involving polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis which are time inefficient. Thus, various efforts have been made to eliminate the PCR step of TRAP by using a variety of biosensor detection devices. This review mainly focuses on these alternatives including: optical, electrochemical, magnetic, and nanowire conductive signaling techniques to measure the telomerase activity produced via label free biosensor assay—via biocatalytic labels involving beacons, DNAzyme, ferrocenyl-naphthalene diimides, avidin-alkaline phosphatase and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs. These biosensor techniques are sensitive and provide precise and rapid results in the detection of telomerase activity.

  3. Biosensor Techniques Used for Determination of Telomerase Activity in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulla, Eliona; Katz, Evgeny

    2008-01-01

    Measuring telomerase activity has proven successful for the determination of cancer in malignant somatic cells. Early conventional methods for the detection of telomerase activity include in vitro analysis via a primer extension assay, and the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. TRAP incorporates the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) step to increase the sensitivity of a given sample. However, research suggests that the TRAP technique suffers from false negative results, caused by failure of its PCR step. Other limitations of TRAP include the post-PCR steps involving polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis which are time inefficient. Thus, various efforts have been made to eliminate the PCR step of TRAP by using a variety of biosensor detection devices. This review mainly focuses on these alternatives including: optical, electrochemical, magnetic, and nanowire conductive signaling techniques to measure the telomerase activity produced via label free biosensor assay—via biocatalytic labels involving beacons, DNAzyme, ferrocenyl-naphthalene diimides, avidin-alkaline phosphatase and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). These biosensor techniques are sensitive and provide precise and rapid results in the detection of telomerase activity. PMID:27879712

  4. Antimetastatic Effects of a Novel Telomerase Inhibitor, GRN163L, on Human Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Imetelstat (50- Palm -TAGGGTTAGACAA-NH2-30) is an oli- gonucleotide containing a sequence complementary to the hTR template region of telomerase. For short...cell line (PC-3). Invest Urol 1979;17(1):16–23. 4. van Bokhoven A, Varella-Garcia M, Korch C, Johannes WU, Smith EE, Miller HL, Nordeen SK, Miller GJ

  5. Influence of Amalaki Rasayana on telomerase activity and telomere length in human blood mononuclear cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanive P. Guruprasad

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: The data indicate that the maintenance of telomere length is facilitated by an increase in telomerase activity upon rasayana administration in aged individuals and Amalaki Rasayana may prevent the erosion of telomeres over a period of time in aged individuals to promote healthy ageing.

  6. HOT1 is a mammalian direct telomere repeat-binding protein contributing to telomerase recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappei, D.; Butter, F.; Benda, C.; Scheibe, M.; Draskovic, Irena; Stevense, M.; Novo, C.L.; Basquin, C.; Araki, M.; Araki, K.; Krastev, D.B.; Kittler, R.; Jessberger, R.; Londono-Vallejo, J.A.; Mann, M.; Buchholz, F.

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive DNA structures that, together with the shelterin and the CST complex, protect the ends of chromosomes. Telomere shortening is mitigated in stem and cancer cells through the de novo addition of telomeric repeats by telomerase. Telomere elongation requires the delivery of the

  7. Risk of multiple myeloma is associated with polymorphisms within telomerase genes and telomere length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campa, Daniele; Martino, Alessandro; Varkonyi, Judit

    2015-01-01

    had longer telomeres compared to controls (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 0.63-2.24; p(trend)  = 0.01 comparing the quartile with the longest LTL versus the shortest LTL). Our data suggest the hypothesis of decreased disease risk by genetic variants that reduce the efficiency of the telomerase complex...

  8. Normal T-cell telomerase activity and upregulation in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, KC; Otto, SA; Wisman, GBA; Fleury, S; Reiss, P; ten Kate, RW; van der Zee, AGJ; Miedema, F

    1999-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 infection, decrease of telomere length is mainly found in CD8(+) T cells and not in CD4(+) T cells. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that can synthesize telomeric sequence onto chromosomal ends, can compensate for telomere loss. Here, we investigated if

  9. Telomerase activity in needle biopsies from prostate cancer and benign prostates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, LFA; Wisman, GBA; Ruiters, MHJ; Mensink, HJA; Veenstra, R.

    Background Telomerase activation is thought to be essential for the immortality of cancer cells. It may be a prognostic factor in small volume well differentiated prostate cancers and hence a guide for the aggressiveness of the approach. The length of the chromosome tips (telomeres) are maintained

  10. Effects of allicin on both telomerase activity and apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li; Wang, Xu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of allicin on both telomerase activity and apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. METHODS: The gastric cancer SGC-7901 adenocarcinoma cells were treated with allicin and the cell cycle, inhibitory rate, apoptosis, telomerase activity and morphologic changes were studied by MTT assay, flow cytometry (FCM), TRAP-PCR-ELISA assay, light microscope, electron microscope respectively. Results were compared with that of AZT (3’-Azido-3’-deoxythymidine). RESULTS: SGC-7901 cells were suppressed after exposure to allicin of 0.016 mg/mL, 0.05 mg/mL, and 0.1 mg/mL for 48 h. Compared with the control, the difference was significant (P Allicin could induce apoptosis of the cells in a dose-dependent and non-linear manner and increase the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase. Compared with the control, the difference was significant in terms of the percentage of cells in the G2/M phase (P Allicin could inhibit telomerase activity in a time-dependent and dose-dependent pattern. After exposure to allicin at 0.016 mg/mL for 24 hours, SGC-7901 cells showed typical morphologic change. CONCLUSION: Allicin can inhibit telomerase activity and induce apoptosis of gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Allicin may be more effective than AZT. PMID:12970878

  11. Telomere- and Telomerase-Associated Proteins and Their Functions in the Plant Cell

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schrumpfová, P.; Schorová, Š.; Fajkus, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 851 (2016) ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-06943S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : telomere * telomerase * telomeric proteins Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  12. Expression of telomerase reverse transcriptase and telomere elongation during sexual maturation in Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Y; Matsuura, T; Haga, N; Mitsui, Y

    2001-02-21

    Paramecium caudatum has a sexually immature period that lasts for about 60 fissions. To examine the possibility that telomere length is one of the determining factors of the duration of immaturity, we cloned the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene from P. caudatum, and analyzed its expression levels at mRNA, telomerase activity, and telomere length during the course of clonal division. Paramecium TERT (Pc_TERT) cDNA encodes a basic protein of 107 kDa that harbors conserved RT motifs, T motif, CP motif, and N motif. Pc_TERT mRNA is expressed at very low levels only detectable by RT-PCR, but constitutively, during immature and mature periods, exhibiting abundant telomerase activity. No clear phase shift in Pc_TERT expression, telomerase activity, or telomere length was observed at the point of maturation in P. caudatum. Instead, the telomere elongates successively as cells divide in P. caudatum, although a close species, P. tetraurelia, was reported to keep the length constant. We discuss possible mechanisms for the expression of sexual activity associated with telomere length in P. caudatum.

  13. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  14. Changes in stress, eating, and metabolic factors are related to changes in telomerase activity in a randomized mindfulness intervention pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daubenmier, Jennifer; Lin, Jue; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Hecht, Frederick M; Kristeller, Jean; Maninger, Nicole; Kuwata, Margaret; Bacchetti, Peter; Havel, Peter J; Epel, Elissa

    2012-07-01

    Psychological distress and metabolic dysregulation are associated with markers of accelerated cellular aging, including reduced telomerase activity and shortened telomere length. We examined whether participation in a mindfulness-based intervention, and, secondarily, improvements in psychological distress, eating behavior, and metabolic factors are associated with increases in telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We enrolled 47 overweight/obese women in a randomized waitlist-controlled pilot trial (n=47) of a mindfulness-based intervention for stress eating and examined changes in telomerase activity from pre- to post-intervention. In secondary analyses, changes in telomerase activity across the sample were examined in relation to pre- to post-intervention changes in psychological distress, eating behavior, and metabolic factors (weight, serum cortisol, fasting glucose and insulin, and insulin resistance). Both groups increased in mean telomerase activity over 4 months in intent-to-treat and treatment efficacy analyses (pstress, anxiety, dietary restraint, dietary fat intake, cortisol, and glucose were negatively correlated with changes in telomerase activity. In exploratory analyses, decreases in dietary fat intake partially mediated the association between dietary restraint and telomerase activity with marginal significance. While there was no clear effect of the intervention on telomerase activity, there was a striking pattern of correlations between improvements in psychological distress, eating behavior, and metabolic health and increases in telomerase activity. These findings suggest that telomerase activity may be in part regulated by levels of both psychological and metabolic stress. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Biological significance of PinX1 telomerase inhibitor in esophageal carcinoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiang-Kui; Yan, Rui-Hua; Geng, Xiang-Qun; Li, Jing-Shan; Chen, Xiang-Ming; Li, Jian-Zhe

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, to investigate the expression of PinX1 gene and its functional effects in human esophageal carcinoma (Eca)-109 cell line, expression vectors of human PinX1 (pEGFP-C3-PinX1) and its small interfering RNA (PinX1-FAM-siRNA) were constructed and transfected into Eca-109 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. Firstly, the mRNA expression level of PinX1 was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Once successful transfection was achieved, the effects on the mRNA level of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), telomerase activity, cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR, stretch PCR, MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Analysis of restriction and sequencing demonstrated that the recombining plasmids were successfully constructed. The results also indicated that transfection with pEGFP-C3-PinX1 and PinX1-FAM-siRNA into Eca-109 cells significantly increased PinX1 mRNA, decreased hTERT mRNA by 29.9% (Ptelomerase activity (Ptelomerase activity and cell apoptotic index were not altered. Exogenous PinX1 has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in human Eca. PinX1 can inhibit human telomerase activity and the expression of hTERT mRNA, reduce tumor cell growth and induce apoptosis. Notably, these inhibitory functions were inhibited by silencing PinX1 in Eca with PinX1-FAM-siRNA. PinX1 was successfully increased and decreased in the present study, demonstrating that it may be a potential telomerase activity inhibitor. As PinX1 is an endogenous telomerase inhibitor, it may be used as a novel tumor-targeted gene therapy.

  16. Correlation between telomerase and mTOR pathway in cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Fatma; Biray Avci, Cigir

    2018-01-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are defined as a subset of tumor cells, are able to self-renew, proliferate, differentiate similar to normal stem cells. Therefore, targeting CSCs has been considered as a new approach in cancer therapy. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase which plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, cell growth, self-renewal in CSCs. On the other hand, hTERT overactivation provides replicative feature and immortality to CSCs, so the stemness and replicative properties of CSCs depend on telomerase activity. Therefore hTERT/telomerase activity may become a universal biomarker for anticancer therapy and it is an attractive therapeutic target for CSCs. It is known that mTOR regulates telomerase activity at the translational and post-translational level. Researchers show that mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduces telomerase activity without changing hTERT mRNA activity. Correlation between mTOR and hTERT is important for survival and immortality of cancer cells. In addition, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway and hTERT up-regulation are related with cancer stemness features and drug resistance. mTOR inhibitor and TERT inhibitor combination may construct a novel strategy in cancer stem cells and it can make a double effect on telomerase enzyme. Consequently, inhibition of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway components and hTERT activation may prohibit CSC self-renewal and surpass CSC-mediated resistance in order to develop new cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of the antioxidant defence system and telomerase in arsenic-induced genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caradonna, Fabio; Mauro, Maurizio

    2016-11-01

    Arsenic (AS) is a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-inducer carcinogen, whose mode of action is still unclear. To defend against ROS, cells use enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Failure of antioxidant systems (AXS) can result in dicentric chromosomes formation as well as telomere associations for the reduced activity of telomerase. In order to clarify the long-term effects of a past AS exposure, we evaluated the efficiency of the AXS and the telomerase activity in the progeny of arsenite-treated cells named ASO (arsenic shake-off) cells, previously obtained from arsenite-treated V79 cells and selected by shake-off. Despite SOD 1 expression level correlated to the level of ROS observed over time, no changes of the relative amount of antioxidant activities were observed in ASO cells. Moreover, we found that clones characterised by low levels of SOD 1 and high levels of ROS acquired a transformed phenotype. Treatment with 5-azacytidine determined an increase of SOD 1 expression in a clone and decrease in one other, suggesting that aberrant DNA methylation may be responsible for the abnormal expression of SOD 1 or SOD 1 inhibitor genes in different clones. TRAP assay results showed that the progeny of arsenite-treated cells were characterised by a time-dependent decrease of telomerase activity. Integrated results suggest that the increases of ROS levels are accompanied by defective telomerase activity. Finally, we propose that cells escaping the arsenite-induced death perpetuated the memory of past exposure via ROS likely because antioxidant and telomerase activity impairment and ultimately acquire a transformed phenotype. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Telomerase inhibition targets clonogenic multiple myeloma cells through telomere length-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brennan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells constitute the majority of tumor cells in multiple myeloma (MM but lack the potential for sustained clonogenic growth. In contrast, clonotypic B cells can engraft and recapitulate disease in immunodeficient mice suggesting they serve as the MM cancer stem cell (CSC. These tumor initiating B cells also share functional features with normal stem cells such as drug resistance and self-renewal potential. Therefore, the cellular processes that regulate normal stem cells may serve as therapeutic targets in MM. Telomerase activity is required for the maintenance of normal adult stem cells, and we examined the activity of the telomerase inhibitor imetelstat against MM CSC. Moreover, we carried out both long and short-term inhibition studies to examine telomere length-dependent and independent activities.Human MM CSC were isolated from cell lines and primary clinical specimens and treated with imetelstat, a specific inhibitor of the reverse transcriptase activity of telomerase. Two weeks of exposure to imetelstat resulted in a significant reduction in telomere length and the inhibition of clonogenic MM growth both in vitro and in vivo. In addition to these relatively long-term effects, 72 hours of imetelstat treatment inhibited clonogenic growth that was associated with MM CSC differentiation based on expression of the plasma cell antigen CD138 and the stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase. Short-term treatment of MM CSC also decreased the expression of genes typically expressed by stem cells (OCT3/4, SOX2, NANOG, and BMI1 as revealed by quantitative real-time PCR.Telomerase activity regulates the clonogenic growth of MM CSC. Moreover, reductions in MM growth following both long and short-term telomerase inhibition suggest that it impacts CSC through telomere length-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  19. Dynamic telomerase gene suppression via network effects of GSK3 inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E Bilsland

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase controls telomere homeostasis and cell immortality and is a promising anti-cancer target, but few small molecule telomerase inhibitors have been developed. Reactivated transcription of the catalytic subunit hTERT in cancer cells controls telomerase expression. Better understanding of upstream pathways is critical for effective anti-telomerase therapeutics and may reveal new targets to inhibit hTERT expression.In a focused promoter screen, several GSK3 inhibitors suppressed hTERT reporter activity. GSK3 inhibition using 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime suppressed hTERT expression, telomerase activity and telomere length in several cancer cell lines and growth and hTERT expression in ovarian cancer xenografts. Microarray analysis, network modelling and oligonucleotide binding assays suggested that multiple transcription factors were affected. Extensive remodelling involving Sp1, STAT3, c-Myc, NFkappaB, and p53 occurred at the endogenous hTERT promoter. RNAi screening of the hTERT promoter revealed multiple kinase genes which affect the hTERT promoter, potentially acting through these factors. Prolonged inhibitor treatments caused dynamic expression both of hTERT and of c-Jun, p53, STAT3, AR and c-Myc.Our results indicate that GSK3 activates hTERT expression in cancer cells and contributes to telomere length homeostasis. GSK3 inhibition is a clinical strategy for several chronic diseases. These results imply that it may also be useful in cancer therapy. However, the complex network effects we show here have implications for either setting.

  20. The effects of nucleoside analogs on telomerase and telomeres in Tetrahymena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, C; Blackburn, E H

    1994-03-25

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase is a specialized type of cellular reverse transcriptase which synthesizes one strand of telomeric DNA, using as the template a sequence in the RNA moiety of telomerase. We analyzed the effects of various nucleoside analogs, known to be chain-terminating inhibitors of retroviral reverse transcriptases, on Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase activity in vitro. We also analyzed the effects of such analogs on telomere length and maintenance in vivo, and on vegetative growth and mating of Tetrahymena cells. Arabinofuranyl-guanosine triphosphate (Ara-GTP) and ddGTP both efficiently inhibited telomerase activity in vitro, while azidothymidine triphosphate (AZT-TP), dideoxyinosine triphosphate (ddITP) or ddTTP were less efficient inhibitors. All of these nucleoside triphosphate analogs, however, produced analog-specific alterations of the normal banding patterns seen upon gel electrophoresis of the synthesis products of telomerase, suggesting that their chain terminating and/or competitive actions differ at different positions along the RNA template. The analogs AZT, 3'-deoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine (d4T) and Ara-G in nucleoside form caused consistent and rapid telomere shortening in vegetatively growing Tetrahymena. In contrast, ddG or ddI had no effect on telomere length or cell growth rates. AZT caused growth rates and viability to decrease in a fraction of cells, while Ara-G had no such effects even after several weeks in culture. Neither AZT, Ara-G, acycloguanosine (Acyclo-G), ddG nor ddI had any detectable effect on cell mating, as assayed by quantitation of the efficiency of formation of progeny from mated cells. However, AZT decreased the efficiency of programmed de novo telomere addition during macronuclear development in mating cells.

  1. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients.

  2. DNA-fueled molecular machine for label-free and non-enzymatic ultrasensitive detection of telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Panpan; Ran, Xiang; Liu, Chaoqun; Liu, Chaoying; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-08-02

    Herein, a non-enzymatic and label-free strategy based on DNA-fueled molecular machine was developed for ultrasensitive detection of telomerase activity in cancer cell extracts even at the single-cell level.

  3. Targeted Therapy of Human Breast Cancer by 2-5A-Antisense Directed Against Telomerase RNA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cowell, John

    2002-01-01

    Targeting telomerase RNA (hTR) for degradation in breast cancer cells using antisense oligonuclotides has demonstrated a high level of cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo Cell death is rapid and specific to cells expressing...

  4. Cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of nibrin by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gina; Cilli, Domenica; Berardinelli, Francesco; Viganotti, Mara; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio; di Masi, Alessandra

    2012-10-01

    The Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in NBN gene and characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiations (IR). The N-terminus of nibrin (NBN) contains a tandem breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domain that represents one of the major mediators of phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions in processes related to cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair functions. Patients with NBS compound heterozygous for the 657del5 hypomorphic mutation and for the Arg215Trp missense mutation (corresponding to the 643C>T gene mutation) display a clinical phenotype more severe than that of patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. Here, we show that both the 657del5 and Arg215Trp mutations, occurring within the tandem BRCT domains of NBN, although not altering the assembly of the MRE11/RAD50/NBN (MRN) complex, affect the MRE11 IR-induced nuclear foci (IRIF) formation and the DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling via the phosphorylation of both ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM downstream targets (e.g., SMC1 and p53). Remarkably, data obtained indicate that the cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of NBN by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation. Indeed, the 70-kDa NBN fragment, arising from the 657del5 mutation, maintains the capability to interact with MRE11 and γ-H2AX and to form IRIF. Altogether, the role of the tandem BRCT domains of NBN in the localization of the MRN complex at the DNA DSB and in the activation of the damage response is highlighted. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. HCV Induces Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase, Increases Its Catalytic Activity, and Promotes Caspase Degradation in Infected Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaowen; Tran, Huy; Mathahs, M. Meleah; Moninger, Thomas O.; Schmidt, Warren N.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Telomerase repairs the telomeric ends of chromosomes and is active in nearly all malignant cells. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is known to be oncogenic and potential interactions with the telomerase system require further study. We determined the effects of HCV infection on human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression and enzyme activity in primary human hepatocytes and continuous cell lines. Results Primary human hepatocytes and Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells showed early de novo TERT protein expression 2–4 days after infection and these events coincided with increased TERT promoter activation, TERT mRNA, and telomerase activity. Immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that NS3-4A protease-helicase, in contrast to core or NS5A, specifically bound to the C-terminal region of TERT through interactions between helicase domain 2 and protease sequences. Increased telomerase activity was noted when NS3-4A was transfected into cells, when added to reconstituted mixtures of TERT and telomerase RNA, and when incubated with high molecular weight telomerase ‘holoenzyme’ complexes. The NS3-4A catalytic effect on telomerase was inhibited with primuline or danoprevir, agents that are known to inhibit NS3 helicase and protease activities respectively. In HCV infected cells, NS3-4A could be specifically recovered with telomerase holoenzyme complexes in contrast to NS5A or core protein. HCV infection also activated the effector caspase 7 which is known to target TERT. Activation coincided with the appearance of lower molecular weight carboxy-terminal fragment(s) of TERT, chiefly sized at 45 kD, which could be inhibited with pancaspase or caspase 7 inhibitors. Conclusions HCV infection induces TERT expression and stimulates telomerase activity in addition to triggering Caspase activity that leads to increased TERT degradation. These activities suggest multiple points whereby the virus can influence neoplasia. The NS3-4A protease-helicase can directly bind to TERT

  6. Telomerase Inhibition Decreases Alpha-Fetoprotein Expression and Secretion by Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Tahtouh, Roula; Azzi, Anne-Sophie; Alaaeddine, Nada; Chamat, Soulaima; Bouharoun-Tayoun, Hasnaa; Wardi, Layal; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Antoun, Najibe Abou; Hilal, George

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. A...

  7. The isothiocyanate erucin abrogates telomerase in hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in an orthotopic xenograft tumour model of HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Corinna; Hertrampf, Anke; Zimmermann, Stefan; Stetter, Nadine; Wagner, Meike; Kleinhans, Claudia; Erlacher, Miriam; Schüler, Julia; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker; Lamy, Evelyn

    2014-12-01

    In contrast to cancer cells, most normal human cells have no or low telomerase levels which makes it an attractive target for anti-cancer drugs. The small molecule sulforaphane from broccoli is known for its cancer therapeutic potential in vitro and in vivo. In animals and humans it was found to be quickly metabolized into 4-methylthiobutyl isothiocyanate (MTBITC, erucin) which we recently identified as strong selective apoptosis inducer in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Here, we investigated the relevance of telomerase abrogation for cytotoxic efficacy of MTBITC against HCC. The drug was effective against telomerase, independent from TP53 and MTBITC also blocked telomerase in chemoresistant subpopulations. By using an orthotopic human liver cancer xenograft model, we give first evidence that MTBITC at 50 mg/KG b.w./d significantly decreased telomerase activity in vivo without affecting enzyme activity of adjacent normal tissue. Upon drug exposure, telomerase decrease was consistent with a dose-dependent switch to anti-survival, cell arrest and apoptosis in our in vitro HCC models. Blocking telomerase by the specific inhibitor TMPyP4 further sensitized cancer cells to MTBITC-mediated cytotoxicity. Overexpression of hTERT, but not enzyme activity deficient DNhTERT, protected against apoptosis; neither DNA damage nor cytostasis induction by MTBITC was prevented by hTERT overexpression. These findings imply that telomerase enzyme activity does not protect against MTBITC-induced DNA damage but impacts signalling processes upstream of apoptosis execution level. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  8. Telomerase inhibition by siRNA causes senescence and apoptosis in Barrett's adenocarcinoma cells: mechanism and therapeutic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batchu Ramesh B

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cancer cells, telomerase induction helps maintain telomere length and thereby bypasses senescence and provides enhanced replicative potential. Chemical inhibitors of telomerase have been shown to reactivate telomere shortening and cause replicative senescence and apoptotic cell death of tumor cells while having little or no effect on normal diploid cells. Results We designed siRNAs against two different regions of telomerase gene and evaluated their effect on telomere length, proliferative potential, and gene expression in Barrett's adenocarcinoma SEG-1 cells. The mixture of siRNAs in nanomolar concentrations caused a loss of telomerase activity that appeared as early as day 1 and was essentially complete at day 3. Inhibition of telomerase activity was associated with marked reduction in median telomere length and complete loss of detectable telomeres in more than 50% of the treated cells. Telomere loss caused senescence in 40% and apoptosis in 86% of the treated cells. These responses appeared to be associated with activation of DNA sensor HR23B and subsequent activation of p53 homolog p73 and p63 and E2F1. Changes in these gene regulators were probably the source of observed up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, p16 and GADD45. Elevated transcript levels of FasL, Fas and caspase 8 that activate death receptors and CARD 9 that interacts with Bcl10 and NFKB to enhance mitochondrial translocation and activation of caspase 9 were also observed. Conclusion These studies show that telomerase siRNAs can cause effective suppression of telomerase and telomere shortening leading to both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via mechanisms that include up-regulation of several genes involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Telomerase siRNAs may therefore be strong candidates for highly selective therapy for chemoprevention and treatment of Barrett's adenocarcinoma.

  9. The Opdc missense mutation of Pax2 has a milder than loss-of-function phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sally H; McKie, Lisa; West, Katrine; Coghill, Emma L; Favor, Jack; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Brown, Steve D M; Jackson, Ian J

    2011-01-15

    Renal-coloboma syndrome, also known as papillorenal syndrome, is an autosomal dominant human disorder in which optic disc coloboma is associated with kidney abnormalities. Mutations in the paired domain transcription factor PAX2 have been found to be the underlying cause of this disease. Disease severity varies between patients, and in some cases, renal hypoplasia has been found in the absence of any retinal defects. Here we report an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutation, Opdc, which is an isoleucinetothreonine missense mutation, I40T, in the first α-helix of the Pax2 paired domain. The mutant protein binds target DNA sequences less strongly than the wild-type protein and acts poorly to transactivate target promoters in culture. The phenotypic consequence of this mutation on the development of the eye and ear is similar to that reported for null alleles of Pax2. However, in homozygotes, cerebellar development is normal on a genetic background in which loss of Pax2 results in failure of cerebellar formation. Moreover, there is a genetic background effect on the heterozygous phenotype such that on some strain backgrounds, kidney development is unaffected. Opdc is the first hypomorphic mutation reported for Pax2 that differs in phenotype from loss-of-function mutations. These results suggest that PAX2 is a strong candidate gene for cases in which human patients have optic disc coloboma not associated with renal dysplasia.

  10. The inhibitory effect of helenalin on telomerase activity is attributed to the alkylation of the CYS445 residue: evidence from QM/MM simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Liancai; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2014-06-01

    Enhanced telomerase activity is a hallmark in the majority of cancer cells. Thus, understanding the interactions between telomerase and its inhibitors is fundamentally important for the development of novel anticancer drugs without severe side effects. In this study, the covalent binding of helenalin to CYS445 of telomerase (PDB ID: 3DU6) was simulated using combined quantum chemical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. The results showed that the reaction was a reversible Michael-type addition and a hydrogen bond was formed between helenalin and the side chain of LYS416 of telomerase during the reaction procedure. The LYS416 residue is vital to telomere DNA recognition by interacting with DNA base through hydrogen bonds. The alkylation of CYS445 of telomerase by helenalin may interfere with the telomere DNA recognition at the telomerase active site, thus resulting in inhibition of the enzyme activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Telomerase and it's inhibition in caner: a review article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori-Daloii MR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Telomere, by which is a terminal structure of eukaryotic chromosomes was discovered at first in 1938 and has a vital role in chromosome protection. Telomere in human and other vertebrates consists of thousands of 5′-TTAGGG-3′ tandem repeats at the end of the chromosome, has a main role in the chromosome stability. Telomere protects the end of the chromosome from degeneration, rearrangement and end to end fusion. There is a telomere loss at every cell division. Progressive loss in telomere length results in disassociation of telomere binding proteins and change in gene expression profiles. Adjacent genes are suppressed by the telomere effect so the telomere loss results in adjacent gene expressions. Apoptosis and replicative senescence are caused by progressive telomere loss. There are three mechanisms for increasing telomere length in eukaryotes and telomerase is the predominant mechanism. Telomerase can synthesize telomere, without the template. Telomerase is overexpressed In 90% of cancers. Therefore cancerous cells compensate the telomere loss in every cell division because of telomerase. In conclusion, telomerase is a proper target for cancer therapy and many methods including direct inhibition of telomerase

  12. A mutation in TGFB3 associated with a syndrome of low muscle mass, growth retardation, distal arthrogryposis and clinical features overlapping with Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienhoff, Hugh Young; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Morissette, Rachel; Khrebtukova, Irina; Melnick, Jonathan; Luo, Shujun; Leng, Nan; Kim, Yeon-Jin; Schroth, Gary; Westwick, John; Vogel, Hannes; McDonnell, Nazli; Hall, Judith G; Whitman, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of growth factors are key regulators of mammalian development and their dysregulation is implicated in human disease, notably, heritable vasculopathies including Marfan (MFS, OMIM #154700) and Loeys-Dietz syndromes (LDS, OMIM #609192). We described a syndrome presenting at birth with distal arthrogryposis, hypotonia, bifid uvula, a failure of normal post-natal muscle development but no evidence of vascular disease; some of these features overlap with MFS and LDS. A de novo mutation in TGFB3 was identified by exome sequencing. Several lines of evidence indicate the mutation is hypomorphic suggesting that decreased TGF-β signaling from a loss of TGFB3 activity is likely responsible for the clinical phenotype. This is the first example of a mutation in the coding portion of TGFB3 implicated in a clinical syndrome suggesting TGFB3 is essential for both human palatogenesis and normal muscle growth. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Formation of radiation induced chromosome aberrations: involvement of telomeric sequences and telomerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirzio, L.

    2004-07-15

    As telomeres are crucial for chromosome integrity; we investigated the role played by telomeric sequences in the formation and in the transmission of radio-induced chromosome rearrangements in human cells. Starting from interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) as putative region of breakage, we showed that the radiation sensitivity is not equally distributed along chromosomes and. is not affected by ITS. On the contrary, plasmid integration sites are prone to radio-induced breaks, suggesting a possible integration at sites already characterized by fragility. However plasmids do not preferentially insert at radio-induced breaks in human cells immortalized by telomerase. These cells showed remarkable karyotype stability even after irradiation, suggesting a role of telomerase in the genome maintenance despite functional telomeres. Finally, we showed that the presence of more breaks in a cell favors the repair, leading to an increase of transmissible rearrangements. (author)

  14. Unusually stable abnormal karyotype in a highly aggressive melanoma negative for telomerase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irminger-Finger Irmgard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant melanomas are characterized by increased karyotypic complexity, extended aneuploidy and heteroploidy. We report a melanoma metastasis to the peritoneal cavity with an exceptionally stable, abnormal pseudodiploid karyotype as verified by G-Banding, subtelomeric, centromeric and quantitative Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization (FISH. Interestingly this tumor had no detectable telomerase activity as indicated by the Telomere Repeat Amplification Protocol. Telomeric Flow-FISH and quantitative telomeric FISH on mitotic preparations showed that malignant cells had relatively short telomeres. Microsatellite instability was ruled out by the allelic pattern of two major mononucleotide repeats. Our data suggest that a combination of melanoma specific genomic imbalances were sufficient and enough for this fatal tumor progression, that was not accompanied by genomic instability, telomerase activity, or the engagement of the alternative recombinatorial telomere lengthening pathway.

  15. Influence of Amalaki Rasayana on telomerase activity and telomere length in human blood mononuclear cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guruprasad, Kanive P.; Sweta Dash; Shivakumar, Marigowda B.; Pavithra R. Shetty; Kothanahalli S. Raghu; Shamprasad, Bhanuvalli R.; Vishwanatha Udupi; Acharya, Raviraj V.; Vidya, Prasanna B.; Jayakrishna Nayak; Anandan E. Mana; Rajesh Moni; Sankaran, Muraleedharan T.; Kapaettu Satyamoorthy

    2017-01-01

    Background: Indian traditional medicine practices use defined rasayana preparations to improve the quality of life in aged individuals. Amalaki Rasayana is one such rasayana prepared from the fruits of Phyllanthus emblica and is popularly used to prevent or treat various age related health conditions. Telomerase activity in the cells maintains telomere length and is implicated in ageing and various diseases wherein the shortening of telomere during ageing is controlled chiefly by the telomera...

  16. The isolation and characterization of a novel telomerase immortalized first trimester trophoblast cell line, Swan 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straszewski-Chavez, S L; Abrahams, V M; Alvero, A B; Aldo, P B; Ma, Y; Guller, S; Romero, R; Mor, G

    2009-11-01

    Studies using first trimester trophoblast cells may be limited by the inability to obtain patient samples and/or adequate cell numbers. First trimester trophoblast cell lines have been generated by SV40 transformation or similar methods, however, this approach is known to induce phenotypic and karyotypic abnormalities. The introduction of telomerase has been proposed to be a viable alternative for the immortalization of primary human cells. To investigate whether telomerase-induced immortalization might be a more feasible approach for the generation of first trimester trophoblast cell lines, we isolated primary trophoblast cells from a 7-week normal placenta and infected the cells with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase. Although this hTERT-infected first trimester trophoblast cell line, which we have named Swan 71, has been propagated for more than 100 passages, it still has attributes that are characteristic of primary first trimester trophoblast cells. The Swan 71 cells are positive for the expression of cytokeratin 7, vimentin and HLA-G, but do not express CD45, CD68 or the Fibroblast Specific Antigen (FSA), CD90/Thy-1. In addition, we also demonstrated that the Swan 71 cells secrete fetal fibronectin (FFN) as well as low levels of human Chorionic Gonadotrophin (hCG). Moreover, the Swan 71 cells exhibit a cytokine and growth factor profile that is similar to primary trophoblast cells and are resistant to Fas, but not TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. This suggests that the Swan 71 cells may represent a valuable model for future in vitro trophoblast studies.

  17. Telomerase inhibition improves tumor response to radiotherapy in a murine orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, Sylvain; Malleval, Céline; El Hamdani, Badia; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Bolbos, Radu; Langlois, Jean-Baptiste; Manas, Patrick; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Alphonse, Gersende; Honnorat, Jérôme; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Poncet, Delphine

    2015-07-17

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most frequent and aggressive type of adult brain tumor. Most GBMs express telomerase; a high level of intra-tumoral telomerase activity (TA) is predictive of poor prognosis. Thus, telomerase inhibitors are promising options to treat GBM. These inhibitors increase the response to radiotherapy (RT), in vitro as well as in vivo. Since typical treatments for GBM include RT, our objective was to evaluate the efficiency of Imetelstat (TA inhibitor) combined with RT. We used a murine orthotopic model of human GBM (N = 8 to11 mice per group) and μMRI imaging to evaluate the efficacy of Imetelstat (delivered by intra-peritoneal injection) alone and combined with RT. Using a clinically established protocol, we demonstrated that Imetelstat significantly: (i) inhibited the TA in the very center of the tumor, (ii) reduced tumor volume as a proportion of TA inhibition, and (iii) increased the response to RT, in terms of tumor volume regression and survival increase. Imetelstat is currently evaluated in refractory brain tumors in young patients (without RT). Our results support its clinical evaluation combined with RT to treat GBM.

  18. Mixed Integer Linear Programming based machine learning approach identifies regulators of telomerase in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poos, Alexandra M; Maicher, André; Dieckmann, Anna K; Oswald, Marcus; Eils, Roland; Kupiec, Martin; Luke, Brian; König, Rainer

    2016-06-02

    Understanding telomere length maintenance mechanisms is central in cancer biology as their dysregulation is one of the hallmarks for immortalization of cancer cells. Important for this well-balanced control is the transcriptional regulation of the telomerase genes. We integrated Mixed Integer Linear Programming models into a comparative machine learning based approach to identify regulatory interactions that best explain the discrepancy of telomerase transcript levels in yeast mutants with deleted regulators showing aberrant telomere length, when compared to mutants with normal telomere length. We uncover novel regulators of telomerase expression, several of which affect histone levels or modifications. In particular, our results point to the transcription factors Sum1, Hst1 and Srb2 as being important for the regulation of EST1 transcription, and we validated the effect of Sum1 experimentally. We compiled our machine learning method leading to a user friendly package for R which can straightforwardly be applied to similar problems integrating gene regulator binding information and expression profiles of samples of e.g. different phenotypes, diseases or treatments. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Telomerase Protects Werner Syndrome Lineage-Specific Stem Cells from Premature Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi-Hung Cheung

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS patients exhibit premature aging predominantly in mesenchyme-derived tissues, but not in neural lineages, a consequence of telomere dysfunction and accelerated senescence. The cause of this lineage-specific aging remains unknown. Here, we document that reprogramming of WS fibroblasts to pluripotency elongated telomere length and prevented telomere dysfunction. To obtain mechanistic insight into the origin of tissue-specific aging, we differentiated iPSCs to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs. We observed recurrence of premature senescence associated with accelerated telomere attrition and defective synthesis of the lagging strand telomeres in MSCs, but not in NPCs. We postulate this “aging” discrepancy is regulated by telomerase. Expression of hTERT or p53 knockdown ameliorated the accelerated aging phenotypein MSC, whereas inhibition of telomerase sensitized NPCs to DNA damage. Our findings unveil a role for telomerase in the protection of accelerated aging in a specific lineage of stem cells.

  20. Telomerase prevents accelerated senescence in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient human fibroblasts

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    Wu Yi-Hsuan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fibroblasts derived from glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD-deficient patients display retarded growth and accelerated cellular senescence that is attributable to increased accumulation of oxidative DNA damage and increased sensitivity to oxidant-induced senescence, but not to accelerated telomere attrition. Here, we show that ectopic expression of hTERT stimulates telomerase activity and prevents accelerated senescence in G6PD-deficient cells. Stable clones derived from hTERT-expressing normal and G6PD-deficient fibroblasts have normal karyotypes, and display no sign of senescence beyond 145 and 105 passages, respectively. Activation of telomerase, however, does not prevent telomere attrition in earlier-passage cells, but does stabilize telomere lengths at later passages. In addition, we provide evidence that ectopic expression of hTERT attenuates the increased sensitivity of G6PD-deficient fibroblasts to oxidant-induced senescence. These results suggest that ectopic expression of hTERT, in addition to acting in telomere length maintenance by activating telomerase, also functions in regulating senescence induction.

  1. The hypothetical ancestral animal. the Urmetazoa: telomerase activity in sponges (Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ISABEL M. MÜLLER

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Sponges (Porifera represent the lowest metazoan phylum, characterized by a pronounced plasticity in the determination of cell lineages, and they are the closest related taxon to the hypothetical ancestral animal, the Urmetazoa, from which the metazoan lineages diverged. In a first approach to elucidate the molecular mechanisms controlling the switch from the cell lineage with a putative indefinite growth capacity to senescent, somatic cells, the activity of the telomerase as an indicator for immortality has been determined. The studies were performed with the marine demosponges Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium, in vivo with tissue but also in vitro using the primmorph system. Primmorphs are formed from dissociated cells which have retained their proliferation potency. It was found that the activity of telomerase in tissue of both sponges is high. Based on this and additional findings it is assumed that the separation of the senescent sponge cell lineage from the immortal germ-/somatic cell lineage is triggered by the loss of contact to cell adhesion factors. First evidence is included which suggests that the final progress of the senescent, telomerase-negative cells to cell death is caused by apoptosis.

  2. Study on Growth Inhibition of Implanted Tumor in Nude Mice by Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotide Targeting Telomerase RNA

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    Hongtao YU

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective Many studies have proven that telomerase plays an important role during the occurrence and development of lung cancer, which has been an important target in gene therapy. The aim of this study is to explore the inhibitory effect of antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN targeting human telomerase RNA on implanted tumor growth in nude mice. Mothods Implanted tumor models were Constructed in nude mice using human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Eighteen Balb/C nude mice with implanted tumors were divided into three groups randomly: antisense oligodeoxynucleotide group (group ASODN, sense oligodeoxynucleotide group (group SODN, normal saline group (group NS, with 6 mice respectively. ASODs or SODNs mixed with Lipofectamine-2000 was injected into tumor directly every 24 h for fourteen days. Results The inhibitory rates of tumor volume in Group ASODN and Group SODN were 43.94% and 6.91%, respectively. There was significant difference between the two groups (t=6.17, P<0.001. All the animals tolerated the drugs well and there was no nausea, vomiting and subcutaneous hemorrhage to occur during the therapy. The weight of the animals increased slightly at the end of experiment. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that intratumoral injection of human telomerase ribonucleic acid (hTR ASOND could effectively inhibit the growth of implanted tumor in nude mice.

  3. eIF4E-Overexpression imparts perillyl alcohol and rapamycin-mediated regulation of telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundin, Tabetha; Peffley, Dennis; Hentosh, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    Translation is mediated partly by regulation of free eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) levels through PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling. Cancer cells treated with the plant-derived perillyl alcohol (POH) or the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin dephosphorylate eIF4E-binding protein (4E-BP1) and attenuate cap-dependent translation. We previously showed in cancer cell lines with elevated eIF4E that POH and rapamycin regulate telomerase activity through this pathway. Here, immortalized Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) control cells and CHO cells with forced eIF4E expression (rb4E) were used to elucidate eIF4E's role in telomerase regulation by POH and rapamycin. Despite 5-fold higher eIF4E amounts in rb4E, telomerase activity, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) mRNA, and TERT protein were nearly equivalent in control and rb4E cells. In control cells, telomerase activity, TERT mRNA and protein levels were unaffected by either compound. In contrast, telomerase activity and TERT protein were both attenuated by either agent in rb4E cells, but without corresponding TERT mRNA decreases indicating a translational/post-translational process. S6K, Akt, and 4E-BP1 were modulated by mTOR mediators only in the presence of increased eIF4E. Thus, eIF4E-overexpression in rb4E cells enables inhibitory effects of POH and rapamycin on telomerase and TERT protein. Importantly, eIF4E-overexpression modifies cellular protein synthetic processes and gene regulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting homologous recombination and telomerase in Barrett’s adenocarcinoma: Impact on telomere maintenance, genomic instability, and tumor growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Renquan; Pal, Jagannath; Buon, Leutz; Nanjappa, Puru; Shi, Jialan; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Guo, Lin; Yu, Min; Gryaznov, Sergei; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Shammas, Masood A.

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), a mechanism to accurately repair DNA in normal cells, is deregulated in cancer. Elevated/deregulated HR is implicated in genomic instability and telomere maintenance, which are critical lifelines of cancer cells. We have previously shown that HR activity is elevated and significantly contributes to genomic instability in BAC. The purpose of this study was to evaluate therapeutic potential of HR inhibition, alone and in combination with telomerase inhibition, in BAC. We demonstrate that telomerase inhibition in BAC cells increases HR activity, RAD51 expression, and association of RAD51 to telomeres. Suppression of HR leads to shorter telomeres as well as markedly reduced genomic instability in BAC cells over time. Combination of HR suppression (whether transgenic or chemical) with telomerase inhibition, causes a significant increase in telomere attrition and apoptotic death in all BAC cell lines tested, relative to either treatment alone. A subset of treated cells also stain positive for β-galactosidase, indicating senescence. The combined treatment is also associated with decline in S-phase and a strong G2/M arrest, indicating massive telomere attrition. In a subcutaneous tumor model, the combined treatment resulted in the smallest tumors, which were even smaller (P=0.001) than those resulted from either treatment alone. Even the tumors removed from these mice had significantly reduced telomeres and evidence of apoptosis. We therefore conclude that although telomeres are elongated by telomerase, elevated RAD51/HR assist in their maintenance/stabilization in BAC cells. Telomerase inhibitor prevents telomere elongation but induces RAD51/HR, which contribute to telomere maintenance/stabilization and prevention of apoptosis, reducing the efficacy of treatment. Combining HR inhibition with telomerase, makes telomeres more vulnerable to degradation and significantly increases/expedites their attrition, leading to apoptosis. We therefore

  5. Targeting homologous recombination and telomerase in Barrett's adenocarcinoma: impact on telomere maintenance, genomic instability and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, R; Pal, J; Buon, L; Nanjappa, P; Shi, J; Fulciniti, M; Tai, Y-T; Guo, L; Yu, M; Gryaznov, S; Munshi, N C; Shammas, M A

    2014-03-20

    Homologous recombination (HR), a mechanism to accurately repair DNA in normal cells, is deregulated in cancer. Elevated/deregulated HR is implicated in genomic instability and telomere maintenance, which are critical lifelines of cancer cells. We have previously shown that HR activity is elevated and significantly contributes to genomic instability in Barrett's esophageal adenocarcinoma (BAC). The purpose of this study was to evaluate therapeutic potential of HR inhibition, alone and in combination with telomerase inhibition, in BAC. We demonstrate that telomerase inhibition in BAC cells increases HR activity, RAD51 expression, and association of RAD51 to telomeres. Suppression of HR leads to shorter telomeres as well as markedly reduced genomic instability in BAC cells over time. Combination of HR suppression (whether transgenic or chemical) with telomerase inhibition, causes a significant increase in telomere attrition and apoptotic death in all BAC cell lines tested, relative to either treatment alone. A subset of treated cells also stain positive for β-galactosidase, indicating senescence. The combined treatment is also associated with decline in S-phase and a strong G2/M arrest, indicating massive telomere attrition. In a subcutaneous tumor model, the combined treatment resulted in the smallest tumors, which were even smaller (P=0.001) than those that resulted from either treatment alone. Even the tumors removed from these mice had significantly reduced telomeres and evidence of apoptosis. We therefore conclude that although telomeres are elongated by telomerase, elevated RAD51/HR assist in their maintenance/stabilization in BAC cells. Telomerase inhibitor prevents telomere elongation but induces RAD51/HR, which contributes to telomere maintenance/stabilization and prevention of apoptosis, reducing the efficacy of treatment. Combining HR inhibition with telomerase renders telomeres more vulnerable to degradation and significantly increases/expedites their

  6. Coupled down-regulation of mTOR and telomerase activity during fluorouracil-induced apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma Cells

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    Wu Mengchao

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most invasive and frequently diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in many regions of Asia. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway is involved in multiple cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, tumorigenesis, and apoptosis. Up-regulation of telomerase activity is thought to be a critical step leading to cell transformation. Methods This study investigated changes in mTOR pathway and telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cell line SMMC-7721 treated with chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-Fu. We detected apoptosis of hepatocarcinoma cells by TUNEL assay. Telomerase activity, hTERT transcription level and p- p70 S6k was demonstrated by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol and silver staining assay, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay and Western blot analysis respectively. Results Treating SMMC-7721 cells with 5-Fu leads to apoptosis of the cells, and reduction in telomerase activity, as well as a dramatic reduction in the activated form of p70 S6 kinase, a mTOR substrate. The 5-Fu treatment nearly abolishes transcription of hTERT (the major component of telomerase mRNA. Treating SMMC-7721 cells with Rapamycin, a specific mTOR inhibitor, significantly reduce hTERT protein level but did not affect hTERT transcription. 5-Fu and rapamycin were synergistic in regards to down-regulation of telomerase activity in hepatocarcinoma cells. Conclusion These results suggest that chemotherapeutic agent 5-Fu may down-regulate telomerase activity at both transcriptional level and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway-dependent post-transcriptional level to facilitate hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  7. Overexpression of Telomerase Protects Human and Murine Lung Epithelial Cells from Fas- and Bleomycin-Induced Apoptosis via FLIP Upregulation.

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    Nissim Arish

    Full Text Available High doses of bleomycin administered to patients with lymphomas and other tumors lead to significant lung toxicity in general, and to apoptosis of epithelial cells, in particular. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelium is an important step in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The Fas-FasL pathway is one of the main apoptotic pathways involved. Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein RNA-dependent DNA polymerase complex consisting of an RNA template and a catalytic protein, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT. Telomerase also possess extra-telomeric roles, including modulation of transcription of anti-apoptotic genes, differentiation signals, and more. We hypothesized that telomerase overexpression affects Fas-induced epithelial cell apoptosis by an extra-telomeric role such as regulation of anti-apoptotic genes, specifically FLICE-like inhibitory protein (FLIP. Telomerase in mouse (MLE and human (A549 lung epithelial cell lines was upregulated by transient transfection using cDNA hTERT expression vector. Telomerase activity was detected using a real-time PCR-based system. Bleomycin, and bleomycin-induced Fas-mediated apoptosis following treatment with anti-Fas activating mAb or control IgG, were assessed by Annexin V staining, FACS analysis, and confocal microscopy; caspase cleavage by Western blot; FLIP or Fas molecule detection by Western blot and flow cytometry. hTERT transfection of lung epithelial cells resulted in a 100% increase in their telomerase activity. Fas-induced lung epithelial cell apoptosis was significantly reduced in hTERT-transfected cells compared to controls in all experiments. Lung epithelial cells with increased telomerase activity had higher levels of FLIP expression but membrane Fas expression was unchanged. Upregulation of hTERT+ in human lung epithelial cells and subsequent downregulation of FLIP by shFLIP-RNA annulled hTERT-mediated resistance to apoptosis. Telomerase-mediated FLIP overexpression may

  8. Dose-Dependent Cytotoxic Effects of Boldine in HepG-2 Cells—Telomerase Inhibition and Apoptosis Induction

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    Sakineh Kazemi Noureini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant metabolites are valuable sources of novel therapeutic compounds. In an anti-telomerase screening study of plant secondary metabolites, the aporphine alkaloid boldine (1,10-dimethoxy-2,9-dihydroxyaporphine exhibited a dose and time dependent cytotoxicity against hepatocarcinoma HepG-2 cells. Here we focus on the modes and mechanisms of the growth-limiting effects of this compound. Telomerase activity and expression level of some related genes were estimated by real-time PCR. Modes of cell death also were examined by microscopic inspection, staining methods and by evaluating the expression level of some critically relevant genes. The growth inhibition was correlated with down-regulation of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT gene (p < 0.01 and the corresponding reduction of telomerase activity in sub-cytotoxic concentrations of boldine (p < 0.002. However, various modes of cell death were stimulated, depending on the concentration of boldine. Very low concentrations of boldine over a few passages resulted in an accumulation of senescent cells so that HepG-2 cells lost their immortality. Moreover, boldine induced apoptosis concomitantly with increasing the expression of bax/bcl2 (p < 0.02 and p21 (p < 0.01 genes. Boldine might thus be an interesting candidate as a potential natural compound that suppresses telomerase activity in non-toxic concentrations.

  9. Telomere Elongation and Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Achieved from Telomerase Haplo-Insufficient Cells by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

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    Li-Ying Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Haplo-insufficiency of telomerase genes in humans leads to telomere syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenital and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Generation of pluripotent stem cells from telomerase haplo-insufficient donor cells would provide unique opportunities toward the realization of patient-specific stem cell therapies. Recently, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (ntESCs have been efficiently achieved by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT. We tested the hypothesis that SCNT could effectively elongate shortening telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient cells in the ntESCs with relevant mouse models. Indeed, telomeres of telomerase haplo-insufficient (Terc+/− mouse cells are elongated in ntESCs. Moreover, ntESCs derived from Terc+/− cells exhibit naive pluripotency as evidenced by generation of Terc+/− ntESC clone pups by tetraploid embryo complementation, the most stringent test of naive pluripotency. These data suggest that SCNT could offer a powerful tool to reprogram telomeres and to discover the factors for robust restoration of telomeres and pluripotency of telomerase haplo-insufficient somatic cells.

  10. Correlation between Ki-67 and telomerase expression with in situ hybridization for high-risk human papillomavirus

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    Vega-Peсa Arianna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the relationship of Ki-67 and telomerase expression with the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and the physical state of the DNA of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV types. A comparative study was done on 80 biopsies of human (female cervical tissue, distributed in the following manner: 20 CIN-negative biopsies and 60 CIN-positive biopsies of varying grades. The detection of the proteins Ki-67 and telomerase was performed through immunohistochemistry; the detection of HR-HPV, by in situ hybridization. The expression of Ki-67 and telomerase increased with the progression of the CIN lesion (p <0.001. The HR-HPV genome was detected in 75% of the cases with CIN, as well as in 20% of the tissues without histological lesions (p=0.001. A significant association was found between the increase in telomerase and Ki-67 expression and the integration of the DNA of HR-HPV. The overexpression of Ki-67, telomerase and the presence the integration of the DNA of HR-HPV are evidenced by more aggressive lesions that may progress to invasive carcinoma.

  11. The MRT-1 nuclease is required for DNA crosslink repair and telomerase activity in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Bettina; Barber, Louise J; Liu, Yan; Shtessel, Ludmila; Boulton, Simon J; Gartner, Anton; Ahmed, Shawn

    2009-11-18

    The telomerase reverse transcriptase adds de novo DNA repeats to chromosome termini. Here we define Caenorhabditis elegans MRT-1 as a novel factor required for telomerase-mediated telomere replication and the DNA-damage response. MRT-1 is composed of an N-terminal domain homologous to the second OB-fold of POT1 telomere-binding proteins and a C-terminal SNM1 family nuclease domain, which confer single-strand DNA-binding and processive 3'-to-5' exonuclease activity, respectively. Furthermore, telomerase activity in vivo depends on a functional MRT-1 OB-fold. We show that MRT-1 acts in the same telomere replication pathway as telomerase and the 9-1-1 DNA-damage response complex. MRT-1 is dispensable for DNA double-strand break repair, but functions with the 9-1-1 complex to promote DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair. Our data reveal MRT-1 as a dual-domain protein required for telomerase function and ICL repair, which raises the possibility that telomeres and ICL lesions may share a common feature that plays a critical role in de novo telomere repeat addition.

  12. Telomerase activity as a biomarker for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease in scrapings and frozen sections from patients with abnormal cervical smear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wisman, GBA; Hollema, H; de Jong, S; ter Schegget, J; Tjong-A-Hung, SP; Ruiters, MHJ; Krans, M; de Vries, EGE; van der Zee, AGJ

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of semiquantitative telomerase activity assessment in cervical scrapings together with human papillomavirus (HPV) typing for detection of (pre)neoplastic cervical lesions and to compare telomerase activity in cervical scrapings and frozen specimens from the

  13. Lack of telomerase RNA gene hTERC expression in alternative lengthening of telomeres cells is associated with methylation of the hTERC promoter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoare, SF; Bryce, LA; Wisman, GBA; Burns, S; Going, JJ; van der Zee, AGJ; Keith, WN

    2001-01-01

    The immortal phenotype of most human cancers is attributable to telomerase expression. However, a number of immortal cell lines and tumors achieve telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase via alternative mechanisms known as ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). Here we show that the

  14. A spontaneous mutation in contactin 1 in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davisson, Muriel T; Bronson, Roderick T; Tadenev, Abigail L D; Motley, William W; Krishnaswamy, Arjun; Seburn, Kevin L; Burgess, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1) cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these ends, we have analyzed a new, spontaneous mutation in the mouse Cntn1 gene that arose in a BALB/c genetic background. The overt phenotype is very similar to the knockout of Cntn1, with affected animals having reduced body weight, a failure to thrive, locomotor abnormalities, and a lifespan of 2-3 weeks. Mice homozygous for the new allele have CNTN1 protein undetectable by western blotting, suggesting that it is a null or very severe hypomorph. In an analysis of neuromuscular function, neuromuscular junctions had normal morphology, consistent with previous studies in knockout mice, and the muscles were able to generate appropriate force when normalized for their reduced size in late stage animals. Therefore, the Cntn1 mutant mice do not show evidence for a myopathy, but instead the phenotype is likely to be caused by dysfunction in the nervous system. Given the similarity of CNTN1 to other Ig-superfamily proteins such as DSCAMs, we also characterized the expression and localization of Cntn1 in the retinas of mutant mice for developmental defects. Despite widespread expression, no anomalies in retinal anatomy were detected histologically or using a battery of cell-type specific antibodies. We therefore conclude that the phenotype of the Cntn1 mice arises from dysfunction in the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system, and is similar in either a BALB/c or B6;129;Black Swiss background, raising a possible discordance between the mouse and human phenotypes resulting from Cntn

  15. A spontaneous mutation in contactin 1 in the mouse.

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    Muriel T Davisson

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1 cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these ends, we have analyzed a new, spontaneous mutation in the mouse Cntn1 gene that arose in a BALB/c genetic background. The overt phenotype is very similar to the knockout of Cntn1, with affected animals having reduced body weight, a failure to thrive, locomotor abnormalities, and a lifespan of 2-3 weeks. Mice homozygous for the new allele have CNTN1 protein undetectable by western blotting, suggesting that it is a null or very severe hypomorph. In an analysis of neuromuscular function, neuromuscular junctions had normal morphology, consistent with previous studies in knockout mice, and the muscles were able to generate appropriate force when normalized for their reduced size in late stage animals. Therefore, the Cntn1 mutant mice do not show evidence for a myopathy, but instead the phenotype is likely to be caused by dysfunction in the nervous system. Given the similarity of CNTN1 to other Ig-superfamily proteins such as DSCAMs, we also characterized the expression and localization of Cntn1 in the retinas of mutant mice for developmental defects. Despite widespread expression, no anomalies in retinal anatomy were detected histologically or using a battery of cell-type specific antibodies. We therefore conclude that the phenotype of the Cntn1 mice arises from dysfunction in the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system, and is similar in either a BALB/c or B6;129;Black Swiss background, raising a possible discordance between the mouse and human phenotypes

  16. Mutations in TERT promoter and FGFR3 and telomere length in bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, Ismail; Rachakonda, P Sivaramakrishna; Heidenreich, Barbara; de Verdier, Petra J; Ryk, Charlotta; Steineck, Gunnar; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) genes constitute the most recurrent somatic alterations in urothelial carcinoma of bladder. In this study, we screened DNA from 327 urothelial bladder carcinomas from well-documented patients, with different stages and grades and known TERT promoter mutational status, for FGFR3 alterations and measured relative telomere length (RTL). Although, the frequency of the TERT promoter mutations was higher than those in FGFR3; however, the alterations at the two loci occurred together more frequently than per chance [Odds ratio (OR) = 4.93, 95% CI = 2.72-8.92, p FGFR3 mutations had shorter RTL than those without mutations (p FGFR3 mutations than without mutations implies mechanistic relevance of telomere biology in cancer progression. The observed association with recurrence and survival shows that the TERT promoter mutations can potentially be used as markers to refine selection of patients for different treatments. The overwhelming frequency of the TERT promoter mutations also represents a case for development of an eventual therapeutic target. © 2015 UICC.

  17. Telomerase expression extends the proliferative life-span and maintains the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Janne Lytoft; Rosada, Cecilia; Serakinci, Nedime

    2002-01-01

    . The transduced cells have now undergone more than 260 population doublings (PD) and continue to proliferate, whereas control cells underwent senescence-associated proliferation arrest after 26 PD. The cells maintained production of osteoblastic markers and differentiation potential during continuous subculturing......, did not form tumors, and had a normal karyotype. When implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice, the transduced cells formed more bone than did normal cells. These results suggest that ectopic expression of telomerase in hMSCs prevents senescence-associated impairment of osteoblast functions.......Human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) were stably transduced by a retroviral vector containing the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT). Transduced cells (hMSC-TERTs) had telomerase activity, and the mean telomere length was increased as compared with that of control cells...

  18. Radiosensitization to X-ray radiation by telomerase inhibitor MST-312 in human hepatoma HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yali; Sun, Chao; Mao, Aihong; Zhang, Xin; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Hong

    2015-02-15

    Previous studies in malignant cells have shown that irradiation-induced upregulation of telomerase activity, not only protected damaged telomeres, but also contributed to DNA damage repair by chromosomal healing and increased resistance to irradiation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitizing effect of telomerase inhibitor MST-312 and the corresponding mechanism in the human hepatoma cell line HepG2. Cell proliferation, telomerase activity, cell cycle distribution, DNA damage and repair, expression of p53, mitochondrial membrane potential, and cell apoptosis were measured with the MTT assay, real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, western blots, JC-1 staining, and Hoechst 33258 staining, respectively. MST-312 effectively inhibited telomerase activity and showed relative weak toxicity to HepG2 cells at 4 μM. Compared with irradiation alone, 4 μM MST-312 pretreatment, followed by X-ray treatment, significantly reduced clonogenic potential. Aggravated DNA damage and increased sub-G1 cell fractions were observed. Further investigation found that homologous recombination (HR) repair protein Rad51 foci nuclear formation was blocked, and expression of p53 was elevated. These led to the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and enhanced the apoptotic rate. These data demonstrated that disturbances of telomerase function could enhance the radiosensitivity of HepG2 cells to X-ray irradiation by impairing HR repair processes. In addition, telomerase inhibitor MST-312 may be useful as an adjuvant treatment in combination with irradiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Common Cancer Risk-Associated Allele in the hTERT Locus Encodes a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killedar, Anagha; Stutz, Michael D; Sobinoff, Alexander P; Tomlinson, Christopher G; Bryan, Tracy M; Beesley, Jonathan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Reddel, Roger R; Pickett, Hilda A

    2015-06-01

    The TERT-CLPTM1L region of chromosome 5p15.33 is a multi-cancer susceptibility locus that encodes the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, of the telomerase enzyme. Numerous cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including rs10069690, have been identified within the hTERT gene. The minor allele (A) at rs10069690 creates an additional splice donor site in intron 4 of hTERT, and is associated with an elevated risk of multiple cancers including breast and ovarian carcinomas. We previously demonstrated that the presence of this allele resulted in co-production of full length (FL)-hTERT and an alternatively spliced, INS1b, transcript. INS1b does not encode the reverse transcriptase domain required for telomerase enzyme activity, but we show here that INS1b protein retains its ability to bind to the telomerase RNA subunit, hTR. We also show that INS1b expression results in decreased telomerase activity, telomere shortening, and an increased telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR). We employed antisense oligonucleotides to manipulate endogenous transcript expression in favor of INS1b, which resulted in a decrease in telomerase activity. These data provide the first detailed mechanistic insights into a cancer risk-associated SNP in the hTERT locus, which causes cell type-specific expression of INS1b transcript from the presence of an additional alternative splice site created in intron 4 by the risk allele. We predict that INS1b expression levels cause subtle inadequacies in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, resulting in an increased risk of genetic instability and therefore of tumorigenesis.

  20. A Common Cancer Risk-Associated Allele in the hTERT Locus Encodes a Dominant Negative Inhibitor of Telomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anagha Killedar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The TERT-CLPTM1L region of chromosome 5p15.33 is a multi-cancer susceptibility locus that encodes the reverse transcriptase subunit, hTERT, of the telomerase enzyme. Numerous cancer-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including rs10069690, have been identified within the hTERT gene. The minor allele (A at rs10069690 creates an additional splice donor site in intron 4 of hTERT, and is associated with an elevated risk of multiple cancers including breast and ovarian carcinomas. We previously demonstrated that the presence of this allele resulted in co-production of full length (FL-hTERT and an alternatively spliced, INS1b, transcript. INS1b does not encode the reverse transcriptase domain required for telomerase enzyme activity, but we show here that INS1b protein retains its ability to bind to the telomerase RNA subunit, hTR. We also show that INS1b expression results in decreased telomerase activity, telomere shortening, and an increased telomere-specific DNA damage response (DDR. We employed antisense oligonucleotides to manipulate endogenous transcript expression in favor of INS1b, which resulted in a decrease in telomerase activity. These data provide the first detailed mechanistic insights into a cancer risk-associated SNP in the hTERT locus, which causes cell type-specific expression of INS1b transcript from the presence of an additional alternative splice site created in intron 4 by the risk allele. We predict that INS1b expression levels cause subtle inadequacies in telomerase-mediated telomere maintenance, resulting in an increased risk of genetic instability and therefore of tumorigenesis.

  1. Targeting cancer stem cell propagation with palbociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor: Telomerase drives tumor cell heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonuccelli, Gloria; Peiris-Pages, Maria; Ozsvari, Bela; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2017-02-07

    In this report, we systematically examined the role of telomerase activity in lung and ovarian cancer stem cell (CSC) propagation. For this purpose, we indirectly gauged telomerase activity, by linking the hTERT-promoter to eGFP. Using lung (A549) and ovarian (SKOV3) cancer cells, transduced with the hTERT-GFP reporter, we then employed GFP-expression levels to fractionate these cell lines into GFP-high and GFP-low populations. We functionally compared the phenotype of these GFP-high and GFP-low populations. More specifically, we now show that the cancer cells with higher telomerase activity (GFP-high) are more energetically activated, with increased mitochondrial mass and function, as well as increased glycolytic activity. This was further validated and confirmed by unbiased proteomics analysis. Cells with high telomerase activity also showed an increased capacity for stem cell activity (as measured using the 3D-spheroid assay) and cell migration (as measured using a Boyden chamber approach). These enhanced biological phenotypes were effectively inhibited by classical modulators of energy metabolism, which target either i) mitochondrial metabolism (i.e., oligomycin) or ii) glycolysis (i.e., 2-deoxy-glucose), or iii) by using the FDA-approved antibiotic doxycycline, which inhibits mitochondrial biogenesis. Finally, the level of telomerase activity also determined the ability of hTERT-high cells to proliferate, as assessed by measuring DNA synthesis via EdU incorporation. Consistent with these observations, treatment with an FDA-approved CDK4/6 inhibitor (PD-0332991/palbociclib) specifically blocked the propagation of both lung and ovarian CSCs. Virtually identical results were obtained with breast CSCs, which were also highly sensitive to palbociclib at concentrations in the nanomolar range. In summary, CSCs with high telomerase activity are among the most energetically activated, migratory and proliferative cell sub-populations. These observations may provide a

  2. Combination treatment with flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 reduces cancer stem cell traits by targeting STAT3 and telomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seyung S; Oliva, Bryant; Dwabe, Sami; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2016-08-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. The malignant CRC that undergoes metastasis in the advanced stage is usually refractory to existing chemotherapy and shows a poor prognosis. However, to date, efficient targeted-therapy for metastatic CRC is ill-defined. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment of flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 may reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) traits. To characterize CSC phenotype, we performed the CD133/CD44 subpopulation profiling, tumorsphere formation assay, cell invasion assay and wound healing assay. We have examined the augmenting effects of the combined treatment of morin and MST‑312 for 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) efficacy in human colorectal cancer. Morin and MST‑312 combined treatment reduced CD133 (+) and CD44 (+) subpopulations in human colorectal and breast cancer cells, respectively. Tumorsphere formation and cell invasiveness were decreased with the morin and MST‑312 combination treatment. Consistent with these data, morin and MST‑312 treatment decreased the wound healing capacity of human breast cancer cells. Stress and apoptosis antibody arrays revealed that there were specific upregulated and downregulated proteins resulting from different treatments. Phosphorylation levels of BAD, p53 and Chk1 were enhanced upon morin/MST‑312 treatments in HT-29 cells, whereas caspase-3 cleavage level and expression of IκBα were downregulated by combined morin/MST‑312 treatment in SW620 cells. Finally, morin and MST‑312 co-treatment further augmented the 5-FU efficacy, chemosensitizing the 5-FU resistant human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study suggests that novel targeted-therapy can be implemented by using flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST‑312 for improved cancer prognosis.

  3. Combination treatment with flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 reduces cancer stem cell traits by targeting STAT3 and telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seyung S.; Oliva, Bryant; Dwabe, Sami; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide. The malignant CRC that undergoes metastasis in the advanced stage is usually refractory to existing chemotherapy and shows a poor prognosis. However, to date, efficient targeted-therapy for metastatic CRC is ill-defined. We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment of flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 may reduce the cancer stem cell (CSC) traits. To characterize CSC phenotype, we performed the CD133/CD44 subpopulation profiling, tumorsphere formation assay, cell invasion assay and wound healing assay. We have examined the augmenting effects of the combined treatment of morin and MST-312 for 5-FU (5-fluorouracil) efficacy in human colorectal cancer. Morin and MST-312 combined treatment reduced CD133 (+) and CD44 (+) subpopulations in human colorectal and breast cancer cells, respectively. Tumorsphere formation and cell invasiveness were decreased with the morin and MST-312 combination treatment. Consistent with these data, morin and MST-312 treatment decreased the wound healing capacity of human breast cancer cells. Stress and apoptosis antibody arrays revealed that there were specific upregulated and downregulated proteins resulting from different treatments. Phosphorylation levels of BAD, p53 and Chk1 were enhanced upon morin/MST-312 treatments in HT-29 cells, whereas caspase-3 cleavage level and expression of IκBα were down-regulated by combined morin/MST-312 treatment in SW620 cells. Finally, morin and MST-312 co-treatment further augmented the 5-FU efficacy, chemosensitizing the 5-FU resistant human colorectal cancer cells. Taken together, our study suggests that novel targeted-therapy can be implemented by using flavonoid morin and telomerase inhibitor MST-312 for improved cancer prognosis. PMID:27279256

  4. Hsp90-binding immunophilin FKBP51 forms complexes with hTERT enhancing telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadari, Mariana; Zgajnar, Nadia R; Gallo, Luciana I; Galigniana, Mario D

    2016-08-01

    FK506-binding proteins are members of the immunophilin family of proteins. Those immunophilins associated to the 90-kDa-heat-shock protein, Hsp90, have been proposed as potential modulators of signalling cascade factors chaperoned by Hsp90. FKBP51 and FKBP52 are the best characterized Hsp90-bound immunophilins first described associated to steroid-receptors. The reverse transcriptase subunit of telomerase, hTERT, is also an Hsp90 client-protein and is highly expressed in cancer cells, where it is required to compensate the loss of telomeric DNA after each successive cell division. Because FKBP51 is also a highly expressed protein in cancer tissues, we analyzed its potential association with hTERT·Hsp90 complexes and its possible biological role. In this study it is demonstrated that both immunophilins, FKBP51 and FKBP52, co-immunoprecipitate with hTERT. The Hsp90 inhibitor radicicol disrupts the heterocomplex and favors the partial cytoplasmic relocalization of hTERT in similar manner as the overexpression of the TPR-domain peptide of the immunophilin. While confocal microscopy images show that FKBP51 is primarily localized in mitochondria and hTERT is totally nuclear, upon the onset of oxidative stress, FKBP51 (but not FKBP52) becomes mostly nuclear colocalizing with hTERT, and longer exposure times to peroxide favors hTERT export to mitochondria. Importantly, telomerase activity of hTERT is significantly enhanced by FKBP51. These observations support the emerging role assigned to FKBP51 as antiapoptotic factor in cancer development and progression, and describe for the first time the potential role of this immunophilin favoring the clonal expansion by enhancing telomerase activity. Copyright © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. A natural product telomerase activator as part of a health maintenance program: metabolic and cardiovascular response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, Calvin B; Liu, Weimin; Flom, Peter L; Raffaele, Joseph M

    2013-10-01

    A short average telomere length is associated with low telomerase activity and certain degenerative diseases. Studies in animals and with human cells confirm a causal mechanism for cell or tissue dysfunction triggered by critically short telomeres, suggesting that telomerase activation may be an approach to health maintenance. Previously, we reported on positive immune remodeling in humans taking a commercial health maintenance program, PattonProtocol-1, composed of TA-65® (a natural product-derived telomerase activator) and other dietary supplements. In over a 5-year period and an estimated 7000 person-years of use, no adverse events or effects have been attributed to TA-65 by physicians licensed to sell the product. Here we report on changes in metabolic markers measured at baseline (n=97-107 subjects) and every 3-6 months (n=27-59 subjects) during the first 12 months of study. Rates of change per year from baseline determined by a multi-level model were -3.72 mg/dL for fasting glucose (p=0.02), -1.32 mIU/mL for insulin (p=0.01), -13.2 and -11.8 mg/dL for total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (p=0.002, p=0.002, respectively), -17.3 and -4.2 mmHg for systolic and diastolic blood pressure (p=0.007 and 0.001, respectively), and -3.6 μmole/L homocysteine (p=0.001). In a subset of individuals with bone mineral density (BMD) measured at baseline and 12 months, density increased 2.0% in the spine (p=0.003). We conclude that in addition to apparent positive immune remodeling, PattonProtocol-1 may improve markers of metabolic, bone, and cardiovascular health.

  6. Severe early onset retinitis pigmentosa in a Moroccan patient with Heimler syndrome due to novel homozygous mutation of PEX1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratbi, Ilham; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Elorch, Hamza; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Berraho, Amina; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. It is the mildest form known to date of peroxisome biogenesis disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. We report on a second Moroccan family with Heimler syndrome with early onset, severe visual impairment and important phenotypic overlap with Usher syndrome. The patient carried a novel homozygous missense variant c.3140T > C (p.Leu1047Pro) of PEX1 gene. As standard biochemical screening of blood for evidence of a peroxisomal disorder did not provide a diagnosis in the individuals with HS, patients with SNHL and retinal pigmentation should have mutation analysis of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. MST-312 induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in APL cells through inhibition of telomerase activity and suppression of NF-κB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemi, Ahmad; Safa, Majid; Kazemi, Ahmad

    2015-11-01

    Telomerase-targeted therapy for cancer has received great attention because telomerase is expressed in almost all cancer cells but is inactive in most normal somatic cells. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of telomerase inhibitor MST-312, a chemically modified derivative of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), on acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cells. Our results showed that MST-312 exerted a dose-dependent short-term cytotoxic effect on APL cells, with G2/M cell cycle arrest. Moreover, MST-312 induced apoptosis of APL cells in caspase-mediated manner. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay revealed significant reduction in telomerase activity of APL cells following short-term exposure to MST-312. Interestingly, MST-312-induced telomerase inhibition was coupled with suppression of NF-κB activity as evidenced by inhibition of IκBα phosphorylation and its degradation and decreased NF-κB DNA binding activity. In addition, gene expression analysis showed downregulation of genes regulated by NF-κB, such as antiapoptotic (survivin, Bcl-2, Mcl-1), proliferative (c-Myc), and telomerase-related (hTERT) genes. Importantly, MST-312 did not show any apoptotic effect in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). In conclusion, our data suggest that dual inhibition of telomerase activity and NF-κB pathway by MST-312 represents a novel treatment strategy for APL.

  8. Impact of telomerase ablation on organismal viability, aging, and tumorigenesis in mice lacking the DNA repair proteins PARP-1, Ku86, or DNA-PKcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejel, Silvia; Klatt, Peter; Murcia, Josiane Ménissier-de; Martín-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M.; Taccioli, Guillermo; de Murcia, Gilbert; Blasco, María A.

    2004-01-01

    The DNA repair proteins poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), Ku86, and catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs) have been involved in telomere metabolism. To genetically dissect the impact of these activities on telomere function, as well as organismal cancer and aging, we have generated mice doubly deficient for both telomerase and any of the mentioned DNA repair proteins, PARP-1, Ku86, or DNA-PKcs. First, we show that abrogation of PARP-1 in the absence of telomerase does not affect the rate of telomere shortening, telomere capping, or organismal viability compared with single telomerase-deficient controls. Thus, PARP-1 does not have a major role in telomere metabolism, not even in the context of telomerase deficiency. In contrast, mice doubly deficient for telomerase and either Ku86 or DNA-PKcs manifest accelerated loss of organismal viability compared with single telomerase-deficient mice. Interestingly, this loss of organismal viability correlates with proliferative defects and age-related pathologies, but not with increased incidence of cancer. These results support the notion that absence of telomerase and short telomeres in combination with DNA repair deficiencies accelerate the aging process without impacting on tumorigenesis. PMID:15545322

  9. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-10-23

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  10. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockerham John

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Methods Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. Results We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. Conclusion We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  11. PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emma A; Nahorski, Michael S; Murray, Lyndsay M; Shaheen, Ranad; Perkins, Emma; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Kristaryanto, Yosua; Jones, Ross A; Vogt, Julie; Rivagorda, Manon; Handley, Mark T; Mali, Girish R; Quidwai, Tooba; Soares, Dinesh C; Keighren, Margaret A; McKie, Lisa; Mort, Richard L; Gammoh, Noor; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Davey, Tracey; Vermeren, Matthieu; Walsh, Diana; Budd, Peter; Aligianis, Irene A; Faqeih, Eissa; Quigley, Alan J; Jackson, Ian J; Kulathu, Yogesh; Jackson, Mandy; Ribchester, Richard R; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Woods, C Geoffrey; Maher, Eamonn R; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-05-04

    During neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles undergo multiple rounds of exo-endocytosis, involving recycling and/or degradation of synaptic proteins. While ubiquitin signaling at synapses is essential for neural function, it has been assumed that synaptic proteostasis requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We demonstrate here that turnover of synaptic membrane proteins via the endolysosomal pathway is essential for synaptic function. In both human and mouse, hypomorphic mutations in the ubiquitin adaptor protein PLAA cause an infantile-lethal neurodysfunction syndrome with seizures. Resulting from perturbed endolysosomal degradation, Plaa mutant neurons accumulate K63-polyubiquitylated proteins and synaptic membrane proteins, disrupting synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmission. Through characterization of this neurological intracellular trafficking disorder, we establish the importance of ubiquitin-mediated endolysosomal trafficking at the synapse. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. HDAC inhibitor, scriptaid, induces glioma cell apoptosis through JNK activation and inhibits telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vivek; Koul, Nitin; Joseph, Christy; Dixit, Deobrat; Ghosh, Sadashib; Sen, Ellora

    2010-08-01

    The present study identified a novel mechanism of induction of apoptosis in glioblastoma cells by scriptaid - a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Scriptaid reduced glioma cell viability by increasing Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Although scriptaid induced activation of both p38MAPK and JNK, it was the inhibition of JNK that attenuated scriptaid-induced apoptosis significantly. Scriptaid also increased the expression of (i) p21 and p27 involved in cell-cycle regulation and (ii) γH2AX associated with DNA damage response in a JNK-dependent manner. Treatment with scriptaid increased Ras activity in glioma cells, and transfection of cells with constitutively active RasV12 further sensitized glioma cells to scriptaid-induced apoptosis. Scriptaid also inhibited telomerase activity independent of JNK. Taken together, our findings indicate that scriptaid (i) induces apoptosis and reduces glioma cell proliferation by elevating JNK activation and (ii) also decreases telomerase activity in a JNK-independent manner. © 2009 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Eribulin mesylate targets human telomerase reverse transcriptase in ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoko Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Treatment of advanced ovarian cancer involves platinum-based chemotherapy. However, chemoresistance is a major obstacle. Cancer stem cells (CSCs are thought to be one of the causes of chemoresistance, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Recently, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT has been reported to promote CSC-like traits. In this study, we found that a mitotic inhibitor, eribulin mesylate (eribulin, effectively inhibited growth of platinum-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines. Eribulin-sensitive cells showed a higher efficiency for sphere formation, suggesting that these cells possess an enhanced CSC-like phenotype. Moreover, these cells expressed a higher level of hTERT, and suppression of hTERT expression by siRNA resulted in decreased sensitivity to eribulin, suggesting that hTERT may be a target for eribulin. Indeed, we found that eribulin directly inhibited RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP activity, but not telomerase activity of hTERT in vitro. We propose that eribulin targets the RdRP activity of hTERT and may be an effective therapeutic option for CSCs. Furthermore, hTERT may be a useful biomarker to predict clinical responses to eribulin.

  14. Telomerase antagonist imetelstat increases radiation sensitivity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuping; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Sijun; Kuang, Zhihui; Tan, Guolei; Yang, Gang; Wei, Qichun; Guo, Zhigang

    2017-02-21

    The morbidity and mortality of esophageal cancer is one of the highest around the world and the principal therapeutic method is radiation. Thus, searching for sensitizers with lower toxicity and higher efficiency to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy is critical essential. Our research group has previously reported that imetelstat, the thio-phosphoramidate oligonucleotide inhibitor of telomerase, can decrease cell proliferation and colony formation ability as well as increase DNA breaks induced by radiation in esophageal cancer cells. Further study in this project showed that imetelstat significantly sensitized esophageal cancer cells to radiation in vitro. Later study showed that imetelstat leads to increased cell apoptosis. We also measured the expression level of several DNA repair and apoptosis signaling proteins. pS345 CHK1, γ-H2AX, p53 and caspase3 expression were up-regulated in imetelstat treated cells, identifying these factors as molecular markers. Mouse in vivo model using imetelstat at clinically achievable concentrations and fractionated irradiation scheme yielded results demonstrating radiosensitization effect. Finally, TUNEL assay, caspase 3 and Ki67 staining in tumor tissue proved that imetelstat sensitized esophageal cancer to radiation in vivo through promoting cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. Our study supported imetelstat increase radiation sensitivity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma through inducing cell apoptosis and the specific inhibitor of telomerase might serve as a potential novel therapeutic tool for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma therapy.

  15. Molecular inhibition of telomerase recruitment using designer peptides: an in silico approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Amit; Lakshmi, P T V

    2015-01-01

    Telomere holds special mechanism for solving end repair problems and maintaining genomic stability. Protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) which belongs to shelterin family is identified as a key protein that recruits telomerase by interacting with telomere repeat binding factors (TRB1-3). Since, deciphering the mechanism through which POT assembles telomerase is of great interest, computational approaches have been undertaken to understand the mechanism in a well- developed model system - Arabidopsis thaliana. As a first step, an untraditional approach was mediated to locate the active site residues on modeled AtPOT1b protein by interaction studies using molecular docking. To keep in trend with the recent developments, peptide construction and validation was promoted as the next step via molecular dynamics simulation studies. Finally, the validated peptides based on propensity score was evaluated for its efficacy as a potent inhibitor for POT and TRB1-3 interactions. The best peptide, namely, (1-2-d) out of 30 designed peptides, was proved to be vital inhibitor by weakening the interacting complexes.

  16. Salinomycin Abolished STAT3 and STAT1 Interactions and Reduced Telomerase Activity in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seyung S; Adekoya, Debbie; Enenmoh, Ikechukwu; Clarke, Orette; Wang, Piwen; Sarkyssian, Marianna; Wu, Yong; Vadgama, Jaydutt V

    2017-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in most developed countries. This mortality is mainly due to the metastatic progression to the liver with frequent recurrence. Colorectal cancer remains a therapeutic challenge and this has intensified the search for new drug targets. In an effort to establish a novel targeted-therapy, we studied the molecular mechanisms of cancer stem cell inhibitor salinomycin. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to examine STAT3-STAT1 protein interactions. Telomerase activity was measured by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ELISA assays. Apoptosis and cell stress arrays were analyzed to identify key proteins responding to salinomycin treatments. IL-6 and TNF-α induced STAT3 and STAT1 interactions, however the interactions were abolished by salinomycin challenge. Salinomycin reduced cancer stem cell phenotype and decreased telomerase activity of colorectal cancer cells. Our work uncovers a new mechanism through which salinomycin inhibits cancer stemness suggesting a novel targeted-therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  17. Telomerase activity in patients with stage 2–5D chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Kidir

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular mechanisms of increased cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD associated with biological age are not well understood. Recent studies support the hypothesis that common factors responsible for this phenomenon are cellular aging and telomere dysfunction. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between telomerase activity and CKD stages. Methods: The study included 120 patients who were followed-up for CKD stage 2–5D, composed of 30 patients of each stage and 30 healthy volunteers without any known disease who were admitted to our hospital for routine check-ups. Telomerase activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was measured using the TRAP assay. Results: A significant difference was observed for telomerase activity in PBMC between groups. The detected levels were lowest in the healthy control group (0.15 ± 0.02, and highest in CKD stage 5D patients (0.23 ± 0.04. In CKD patients, telomerase activity in PBMC was positively correlated with the CKD stage, serum creatinine, potassium and parathormone levels, and negatively correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, body mass index (BMI, platelet count and serum calcium levels. According to the linear regression analysis, independent predictors for high telomerase activity in CKD patients were eGFR and BMI. Conclusion: Telomerase activity in PBMC increases with advancing CKD stage in CKD patients. Increased telomerase activity in PBMC is associated with eGFR and BMI. Resumen: Antecedentes: Los mecanismos moleculares responsables del aumento de la mortalidad cardiovascular en la enfermedad renal crónica (ERC asociada a la edad biológica no se conocen bien. Los estudios recientes apoyan la hipótesis de que los factores comunes responsables de este fenómeno son el envejecimiento celular y la disfunción telomérica. Objetivos: El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar

  18. The methylation status and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase is significantly high in oral carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Kazuya; Yada, Naomi; Sato, Shinobu; Habu, Manabu; Hayakawa, Mana; Takahashi, Osamu; Sasaguri, Masaaki; Takenaka, Shigeori; Yoshioka, Izumi; Matsuo, Kou; Tominaga, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-01

    Telomerase activity is present in most cancers and is tightly regulated by the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Hypermethylation in the promoter region of hTERT contributes to the regulation of hTERT expression. In this study, we investigated the methylation and expression of hTERT in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), oral leukoplakia, and normal oral mucosa. Furthermore, we investigated the significance of hTERT to the clinicopathological findings of OSCC. 35 OSCC, 50 oral leukoplakia (epithelial dysplasia n = 25, squamous cell hyperplasia n = 25), and 10 normal oral mucosa samples were investigated through methylation-specific PCR. Immunohistochemistry was analyzed in 35 OSCC, 50 oral leukoplakia, and 4 normal oral mucosa samples. The methylation and expression of hTERT increased from normal oral mucosa to oral leukoplakia to OSCC. In OSCC, all samples were methylated. However, partial methylation (20%) or unmethylation (80%), but never complete methylation, was observed in normal oral mucosa. Additionally, hTERT expression correlated with cervical lymph node metastasis. These results suggested that the methylation and expression of hTERT is high in oral carcinogenesis and may play an important role in oral cancer. hTERT expression may also be predictive of cervical lymph node metastasis. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Evaluation of an oral telomerase activator for early age-related macular degeneration - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Coad Thomas; Harley, Calvin B

    2016-01-01

    Telomere attrition and corresponding cellular senescence of the retinal pigment epithelium contribute to the changes of age-related macular degeneration. Activation of the enzyme telomerase can add telomeric DNA to retinal pigment epithelium chromosomal ends and has been proposed as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration. We report the use of a small molecule, oral telomerase activator (TA)-65 in early macular degeneration. This study, focusing on early macular degeneration, provides a model for the use of TAs in age-related disease. Thirty-eight (38) patients were randomly assigned to a 1-year, double-blinded, placebo-controlled interventional study with arms for oral TA-65 or placebo. Macular functions via micro-perimetry were the primary measured outcomes. The macular function in the arm receiving the TA-65 showed significant improvement relative to the placebo control. The improvement was manifest at 6 months and was maintained at 1 year: macular threshold sensitivity (measured as average dB [logarithmic decibel scale of light attenuation]) improved 0.97 dB compared to placebo (P-value 0.02) and percent reduced thresholds lessened 8.2% compared to the placebo arm (P-value 0.04). The oral TA significantly improved the macular function of treatment subjects compared to controls. Although this study was a pilot and a larger study is being planned, it is noteworthy in that it is, to our knowledge, the first randomized placebo-controlled study of a TA supplement.

  20. Conditional Knockout of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase in Mesenchymal Cells Impairs Mouse Pulmonary Fibrosis.

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    Tianju Liu

    Full Text Available Telomerase is typically expressed in cellular populations capable of extended replication, such as germ cells, tumor cells, and stem cells, but is also induced in tissue injury, repair and fibrosis. Its catalytic component, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT is induced in lung fibroblasts from patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease and in rodents with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. To evaluate the fibroblast specific role of TERT in pulmonary fibrosis, transgenic mice bearing a floxed TERT allele were generated, and then crossed with an inducible collagen α2(I-Cre mouse line to generate fibroblast specific TERT conditional knockout mice. TERT-specific deficiency in mesenchymal cells caused attenuation of pulmonary fibrosis as manifested by reduced lung hydroxyproline content, type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin mRNA levels. The TERT-deficient mouse lung fibroblasts displayed decreased cell proliferative capacity and higher susceptibility to induced apoptosis compared with control cells. Additionally TERT deficiency was associated with heightened α-smooth muscle actin expression indicative of myofibroblast differentiation. However the impairment of cell proliferation and increased susceptibility to apoptosis would cause a reduction in the myofibroblast progenitor population necessary to mount a successful myofibroblast-dependent fibrotic response. These findings identified a key role for TERT in fibroblast proliferation and survival essential for pulmonary fibrosis.

  1. Telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA) and telomerase are components of telomeres during mammalian gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig-Viader, Rita; Vila-Cejudo, Marta; Vitelli, Valerio; Buscà, Rafael; Sabaté, Montserrat; Giulotto, Elena; Caldés, Montserrat Garcia; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2014-05-01

    Telomeres are ribonucleoprotein structures at the end of chromosomes composed of telomeric DNA, specific-binding proteins, and noncoding RNA (TERRA). Despite their importance in preventing chromosome instability, little is known about the cross talk between these three elements during the formation of the germ line. Here, we provide evidence that both TERRA and the telomerase enzymatic subunit (TERT) are components of telomeres in mammalian germ cells. We found that TERRA colocalizes with telomeres during mammalian meiosis and that its expression progressively increases during spermatogenesis until the beginning of spermiogenesis. While both TERRA levels and distribution would be regulated in a gender-specific manner, telomere-TERT colocalization appears to be regulated based on species-specific characteristics of the telomeric structure. Moreover, we found that TERT localization at telomeres is maintained throughout spermatogenesis as a structural component without affecting telomere elongation. Our results represent the first evidence of colocalization between telomerase and telomeres during mammalian gametogenesis. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  2. Extra-nuclear telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) regulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Fozia; Grammatopoulos, Dimitris K; Müller, Jürgen; Zammit, Victor A; Lehnert, Hendrik

    2014-09-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is a key component of the telomerase complex. By lengthening telomeres in DNA strands, TERT increases senescent cell lifespan. Mice that lack TERT age much faster and exhibit age-related conditions such as osteoporosis, diabetes and neurodegeneration. Accelerated telomere shortening in both human and animal models has been documented in conditions associated with insulin resistance, including T2DM. We investigated the role of TERT, in regulating cellular glucose utilisation by using the myoblastoma cell line C2C12, as well as primary mouse and human skeletal muscle cells. Inhibition of TERT expression or activity by using siRNA (100nM) or specific inhibitors (100nM) reduced basal 2-deoxyglucose uptake by ~50%, in all cell types, without altering insulin responsiveness. In contrast, TERT over-expression increased glucose uptake by 3.25-fold. In C2C12 cells TERT protein was mostly localised intracellularly and stimulation of cells with insulin induced translocation to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitation experiments in C2C12 cells showed that TERT was constitutively associated with glucose transporters (GLUTs) 1, 4 and 12 via an insulin insensitive interaction that also did not require intact PI3-K and mTOR pathways. Collectively, these findings identified a novel extra-nuclear function of TERT that regulates an insulin-insensitive pathway involved in glucose uptake in human and mouse skeletal muscle cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A dual-colored ratiometric-fluorescent oligonucleotide probe for the detection of human telomerase RNA in cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Dianhua; He, Changtian; Liu, Zhengjie; Liu, Cui; Wu, Qilong; Zhao, TingTing; Liu, Renyong

    2017-05-21

    Human telomerase RNA (hTR), which is one component of telomerase, was deemed to be a biomarker to monitor tumor cells due to its different expression levels in tumor cells and normal somatic cells. Thus far, plentiful fluorescent probes have been designed to investigate nucleic acids. However, most of them are limited since they are time-consuming, require professional operators and even result in false positive signals in the cellular environment. Herein, we report a dual-colored ratiometric-fluorescent oligonucleotide probe to achieve the reliable detection of human telomerase RNA in cell extracts. The probe is constructed using a dual-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide hybridized with target-complemented Dabcyl-labeled oligonucleotide. In the presence of the target, the dual-labeled fluorescent oligonucleotide translates into a hairpin structure, which leads to the generation of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) phenomenon under UV excitation. Compared to conventional methods, this strategy could effectively avoid false positive signals, and it not only possesses the advantages of simplicity and high specificity but also has the merits of signal stability and distinguishable color variation. Moreover, the quantitative assay of hTR would have a far-reaching impact on the telomerase mechanism and even tumor diagnosis research.

  4. Dihydropyrazole derivatives as telomerase inhibitors: Structure-based design, synthesis, SAR and anticancer evaluation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Cheng, Fei Xiong; Yuan, Xiao Long; Tang, Wen Jian; Shi, Jing Bo; Liao, Chen Zhong; Liu, Xin Hua

    2016-04-13

    It is of our interest to generate and identify novel compounds with regulation telomerase for cancer therapy. In order to carry out more rational design, based on structure-based drug design, several series of N-substituted-dihydropyrazole derivatives, totally 78 compounds as potential human telomerase inhibitors were designed and synthesized. The results demonstrated that some compounds had potent anticancer activity against four tumor cell lines, and showed good selectivity on tumor cells over somatic cells. By the modified TRAP assay, compound 13i exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity against telomerase with an IC50 value of 0.98 μM. In vivo evaluation results indicated that compound 13i could inhibit growth of S180 and HepG2 tumor-bearing mice, and it also significantly enhanced the survival rate of EAC tumor-bearing mice. The further results in vivo confirmed that it could significantly improve pathological changes of N,N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced rat hepatic tumor. These data support further studies to assess rational design of more efficient telomerase inhibitors in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of human telomerase inhibitors having the core of N-acyl-4,5-dihydropyrazole with anticancer effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Ni, Yong; Jia, Ying-Ming; Zheng, Min; Xu, Han-Fei; Xu, Jun; Liao, Chenzhong

    2016-03-15

    Eight human telomerase inhibitors (5a-5h) having the core of N-acyl-4,5-dihydropyrazole with anticancer effects were identified in this study. Biological results revealed that a few compounds had potent anticancer activities against three common tumor cell lines (SGC-7901, HepG2 and MGC-803). Among them, compound 5c, with a molecular weight of only 272.2 Da, had antiproliferative activities against SGC-7901 and MGC-803 with EC50 values of 2.06 ± 0.17 and 2.89 ± 0.62 μM, respectively, better than 5-Fluorouracil. Compound 5c inhibited the enzyme of telomerase with an IC50 value of 1.86 ± 0.51 μM, surpassing the control compound, ethidium bromide. Modeling study showed that this compound can reside in the binding pocket of the telomerase/TNA:DNA hairpin complex. When the moiety of N-acyl was changed to N-sulfonyl, the gotten compounds (8a-8i) had deteriorative activities against both these three cancer cell lines and the enzyme of telomerase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ectopic expression of telomerase enhances osteopontin and osteocalcin expression during osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells from elder donors

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    Machado CB

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Age related bone loss is one of the most prevalent diseases in the elder population. The osteoblasts are the effectors cells of bone formation and regeneration. With the aging the osteoblasts become senescent reducing their ability to produce bone. Cellular replicative senescence is triggered by telomers shortening. Telomerase elongate the telomers length and maintain the cell proliferative capacity. Here, we demonstrated that the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by an adenovirus vector increases the levels of osteopontin and osteocalcin mRNA during the in vitro osteogenic differentiation of elderly human mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow human mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from old donors (>65 years and induced to differentiate into osteoblasts for 14 days. The levels of mRNA of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, osteopontin and osteocalcin during the differentiation were assessed by semi-quantitative PCR before and during the differentiation on days 7 and 14. Infected cells showed 1.5 fold increase in telomerase expression. Also telomerized cells exhibit 1.5 fold increase in osteopontin and 0.5 fold increase in osteocalcin expression compared to primary osteoblasts isolated from the same donors. The transformed cells were not able to form tumours in NUDE mice.

  7. Investigation of Telomerase/Telomeres system in Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells derived from IPF and RA-UIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniou Katerina M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Rheumatoid Arthritis associated usual interstitial pneumonia seem to have the same poor outcome as there is not an effective treatment. The aim of the study is to explore the reparative ability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by evaluating the system telomerase/telomeres and propose a novel therapeutic approach. Methods BM-MSCs were studied in 6 IPF patients, 7 patients with RA-UIP and 6 healthy controls. We evaluated the telomere length as well as the mRNA expression of both components of telomerase (human telomerase reverse transcriptase, h-TERT and RNA template complementary to the telomeric loss DNA, h-TERC. Results We found that BM-MSCs from IPF, RA-UIP cases do not present smaller telomere length than the controls (p = 0.170. There was no significant difference regarding the expression of both h-TERT and h-TERC genes between patients and healthy controls (p = 0.107 and p = 0.634 respectively. Conclusions We demonstrated same telomere length and telomerase expression in BM-MSCs of both IPF and RA-UIP which could explain similarities in pathogenesis and prognosis. Maintenance of telomere length in these cells could have future implication in cell replacement treatment with stem cells of these devastating lung disorders.

  8. Effects of reverse transcriptase inhibitors on telomere length and telomerase activity in two immortalized human cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahl, C; Blackburn, E H

    1996-01-01

    The ribonucleoprotein telomerase, a specialized cellular reverse transcriptase, synthesizes one strand of the telomeric DNA of eukaryotes. We analyzed telomere maintenance in two immortalized human cell lines: the B-cell line JY616 and the T-cell line Jurkat E6-1, and determined whether known inhibitors of retroviral reverse transcriptases could perturb telomere lengths and growth rates of these cells in culture. Dideoxyguanosine (ddG) caused reproducible, progressive telomere shortening over several weeks of passaging, after which the telomeres stabilized and remained short. However, the prolonged passaging in ddG caused no observable effects on cell population doubling rates or morphology. Azidothymidine (AZT) caused progressive telomere shortening in some but not all T- and B-cell cultures. Telomerase activity was present in both cell lines and was inhibited in vitro by ddGTP and AZT triphosphate. Prolonged passaging in arabinofuranyl-guanosine, dideoxyinosine (ddI), dideoxyadenosine (ddA), didehydrothymidine (d4T), or phosphonoformic acid (foscarnet) did not cause reproducible telomere shortening or decreased cell growth rates or viabilities. Combining AZT, foscarnet, and/or arabinofuranyl-guanosine with ddG did not significantly augment the effects of ddG alone. Strikingly, with or without inhibitors, telomere lengths were often highly unstable in both cell lines and varied between parallel cell cultures. We propose that telomere lengths in these T- and B-cell lines are determined by both telomerase and telomerase-independent mechanisms.

  9. Telomerase: a target for therapeutic effects of curcumin and a curcumin derivative in Aβ1-42 insult in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijian Xiao

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate whether telomerase was involved in the neuroprotective effect of curcumin and Cur1. Alzheimer's disease is a consequence of an imbalance between the generation and clearance of amyloid-beta peptide in the brain. In this study, we used Aβ1-42 (10 µg/ml to establish a damaged cell model, and curcumin and Cur1 were used in treatment groups. We measured cell survival and cell growth, intracellular oxidative stress and hTERT expression. After RNA interference, the effects of curcumin and Cur1 on cells were verified. Exposure to Aβ1-42 resulted in significant oxidative stress and cell toxicity, and the expression of hTERT was significantly decreased. Curcumin and Cur1 both protected SK-N-SH cells from Aβ1-42 and up-regulated the expression of hTERT. Furthermore, Cur1 demonstrated stronger protective effects than curcumin. However, when telomerase was inhibited by TERT siRNA, the neuroprotection by curcumin and Cur1 were ceased. Our study indicated that the neuroprotective effects of curcumin and Cur1 depend on telomerase, and thus telomerase may be a target for therapeutic effects of curcumin and Cur1.

  10. Anti-aging effect of estrogen on telomerase activity in ovariectomised rats--animal model for menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Jiaping; Zhang, Hongyan; Liu, Yuanwei; Deng, Miao; Tang, Shanshan; Liu, Wenhua; Zhang, Zhifen

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-aging effects of exogenous estrogen on telomerase activity in ovariectomized female Sprague-Dawley rats. Thirty-three 12-week-old female rats were divided into three groups: the ovariectomized-Treated group (Treated, n = 11), the ovariectomized control group (OVX, n = 11) and the Sham-operated group (Sham, n = 11). The rats in the Treated group were given 0.21 mg/kg estradiol valerate intragastric administration while other two groups were given the amount of physiological saline daily. All of the animals were euthanized 12 weeks after treatment, and abdominal aortic blood samples were taken to assess the level of estradiol (E2), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). Telomerase activity and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) mRNA expression in the heart, liver, brain tissues of all rats were measured by reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Compared to the OVX and Sham group, telomerase activity and TERT mRNA levels were significantly increased in the heart, liver and brain tissues of rats in the Treated group (p anti-aging.

  11. Study of Prostate Specific Antigen Gene Expression and Telomerase in Breast Cancer Patients: Relationship to Steroid Hormone Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Zarghami

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Breast cancer is the most common disease in women. In the expansion and progression of breast tumors combination of tumor markers including prostate specific antigen (PSA and telomerase are engaged. The aim of this study was to evaluate relationship between telomerase activity and prostate specific antigen gene expression with steroid hormone receptors in breast cancer patients. Materials & Methods: This study was a case-control and consisted of 50 women diagnosed with breast benign tumors as control and 50 women having malignant tumors as cases. Telomerase activity was measured in tumor cytosol of samples by telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay. PSA protein was measured using ultra sensitive immunoflourometric assay and PSA mRNA expression was carried out using RT-PCR technique in all tumor tissues. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were stained using immunohistochemistry technique in tumor tissues. Data analysis was carried out by using SPSS software version 11.6 and paired t-student test. Results: Using TRAP assay, presence of the telomerase activity was positive in all of the breast cancer patients. The difference of relative telomerase activity (RTA values between stages and also all grades were more statistically significant (p<0.05. The mRNA of PSA was detected only in benign tumors and stage I and grade I malignant tumor cytosols. Difference of tumor cytosol PSA levels between the cases and control groups and also between all grades and stages of diseases were significant (p <0.05. In all, there was an inverse significant correlation between the RTA and PSA protein levels in the case groups. (r=-0.42, p<0.05.There was a statistically difference between steroid hormone receptors (ER and PR positive and negative on PSA and telomerase gene expression in breast tumor tissues (p<0.05. Conclusion: It is speculated that differential expression of PSA and telomerase genes in breast tumors are under

  12. Novel mutations affecting the Na, K ATPase alpha model complex neurological diseases and implicate the sodium pump in increased longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Lesley J; Hrizo, Stacy L; Paul, Sarah M; Van Voorhies, Wayne A; Beitel, Greg J; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Mutations affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit have been implicated in at least two distinct human diseases, rapid-onset dystonia Parkinsonism (RDP), and familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). Over 40 mutations have been mapped to the human ATP1A2 and ATP1A3 genes and are known to result in RDP, FHM or a variant of FHM with neurological complications. To develop a genetically tractable model system for investigating the role of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase in neural pathologies we performed genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster to isolate loss-of-function alleles affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit. Flies heterozygous for these mutations all exhibit reduced respiration, consistent with a loss-of-function in the major ATPase. However, these mutations do not affect all functions of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha protein since embryos homozygous for these mutations have normal septate junction paracellular barrier function and tracheal morphology. Importantly, all of these mutations cause neurological phenotypes and, akin to the mutations that cause RDP and FHM, these new alleles are missense mutations. All of these alleles exhibit progressive stress-induced locomotor impairment suggesting neuromuscular dysfunction, yet neurodegeneration is observed in an allele-specific manner. Surprisingly, studies of longevity demonstrate that mild hypomorphic mutations in the sodium pump significantly improve longevity, which was verified using the Na(+), K(+) ATPase antagonist ouabain. The isolation and characterization of a series of new missense alleles of ATPalpha in Drosophila provides the foundation for further studies of these neurological diseases and the role of sodium pump impairment in animal longevity.

  13. Human endometrial epithelial telomerase is important for epithelial proliferation and glandular formation with potential implications in endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, A J; Saretzki, G; Tempest, N; Critchley, H O D; Hapangama, D K

    2015-12-01

    How does regulation of telomerase activity (TA) in human endometrial epithelial cells (EEC) by ovarian hormones impact on telomere lengths (TL) and cell proliferation? Healthy endometrial epithelial cell proliferation is characterized by high TA and endometrial TL changes according to the ovarian hormone cycle, with shortest TL observed in the progesterone dominant mid-secretory phase, when TA is lowest, implicating progesterone in the negative regulation of TA and TL. Critical shortening of telomeres may result in permanent cell cycle arrest while the enzyme telomerase maintains telomere length (TL) and replicative capacity of cells. Telomerase expression and activity change in the human endometrium with the ovarian hormone cycle, however the effect of this on endometrial TL and cell growth is not known. A prospective observational study, which included endometrial and blood samples collected from 196 women. We studied endometrial samples from five different groups of women. Endometrial and matched blood TL and circulating steroid hormones were studied in samples collected from 85 women (Group 1). Fresh epithelial and stromal cell isolation and culture in vitro for TL and TA was done on endometrial biopsies collected from a further 74 healthy women not on hormonal therapy (Group 2) and from 5 women on medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) for contraception (Group 3). The epithelial TL and telomerase protein expression was examined in active, peritoneal, ectopic endometriotic and matched uterine (eutopic) endometrial samples collected from 10 women with endometriosis (Group 4); the in vivo effect of mifepristone on telomerase protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) was examined in endometrium from 22 healthy women in mid-secretory phase before (n = 8), and after administering 200 mg mifepristone (n = 14) (Group 5). TA was measured by telomere repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay; TL by qPCR, and Q-FISH; cell proliferation was assessed by immunoblotting

  14. A novel splice-site mutation in the GJB2 gene causing mild postlingual hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gandía

    Full Text Available The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connexin-26 [corrected] gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset, though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connexin-26 [corrected] encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects.

  15. SMC6 is an essential gene in mice, but a hypomorphic mutant in the ATPase domain has a mild phenotype with a range of subtle abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Limei; Wing, Jonathan; Taylor, Elaine; Brandt, Renata; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rácz, Ildikó; Becker, Lore; Hans, Wolfgang; Adler, Thure; Beckers, Johannes; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Zimmer, Andreas; Klopstock, Thomas; Busch, Dirk H; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; van der Horst, Gilbertus; Lehmann, Alan R

    2013-05-01

    Smc5-6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin involved in the structural maintenance of chromosomes. In yeasts the Smc5-6 complex is essential for proliferation and is involved in DNA repair and homologous recombination. siRNA depletion of genes involved in the Smc5-6 complex in cultured mammalian cells results in sensitivity to some DNA damaging agents. In order to gain further insight into its role in mammals we have generated mice mutated in the Smc6 gene. A complete knockout resulted in early embryonic lethality, demonstrating that this gene is essential in mammals. However, mutation of the highly conserved serine-994 to alanine in the ATP hydrolysis motif in the SMC6 C-terminal domain, resulted in mice with a surprisingly mild phenotype. With the neo gene selection marker in the intron following the mutation, resulting in reduced expression of the SMC6 gene, the mice were reduced in size, but fertile and had normal lifespans. When the neo gene was removed, the mice had normal size, but detailed phenotypic analysis revealed minor abnormalities in glucose tolerance, haematopoiesis, nociception and global gene expression patterns. Embryonic fibroblasts derived from the ser994 mutant mice were not sensitive to killing by a range of DNA damaging agents, but they were sensitive to the induction of sister chromatid exchanges induced by ultraviolet light or mitomycin C. They also accumulated more oxidative damage than wild-type cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT, perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold. Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT, DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold. DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease. Together, our data supports a

  17. Inhibition of telomerase using BIBR1532 enhances doxorubicin-induced apoptosis in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashash, Davood; Zareii, Mohadeseh; Safaroghli-Azar, Ava; Omrani, Mir Davood; Ghaffari, Seyed H

    2017-07-01

    Interest into targeting telomerase in cancer has increased by the recent disclosure that elevated telomerase activity is associated with disease recurrence and poor outcome in cancers. In addition, cellular acquisition of unlimited replicative potential, which is closely related to the maintenance of telomeres mostly via the reactivation of telomerase, has been shown to confer loss of sensitivity to a wide range of anti-neoplastic agents. To evaluate whether telomerase inhibition using non-nucleosidic inhibitor of telomerase BIBR1532 could enhance cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Nalm-6 pre-B ALL cells were subjected to combination treatment and subsequent cell viability, growth kinetics, caspase-3 activity, and transcriptional alteration of p73, p21, FOXO3a, c-Myc, hTERT, and other apoptosis-related target genes were investigated. Combination of BIBR1532 with doxorubicin produced a synergistic anticancer effect probably through induction of p73. Transcription factor p73 not only suppressed the proliferative capacity of the cells through induction of p21-mediated G1 arrest, but also down-regulated the mRNA level of hTERT and c-Myc. Our results also report that BIBR1532 induced a caspase-dependent apoptosis, at least partially, through heightened ROS levels, and noteworthy enhanced the pro-oxidant property of doxorubicin. In harmony, transcriptional repression of survivin could be a probable underlying mechanism for the induction of apoptosis through shifting the ratio of death promoters to death repressors via alteration of Bax and Bcl2 expression. Overall, it seems that combination of BIBR1532 and doxorubicin could be a novel therapeutic strategy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia that may be clinically accessible in the near future.

  18. Modeling pulmonary fibrosis by abnormal expression of telomerase/apoptosis/collagen V in experimental usual interstitial pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, E.R.; Pincelli, M.S. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Teodoro, W.R.; Velosa, A.P.P. [Disciplina de Reumatologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Martins, V.; Rangel, M.P.; Barbas-Filho, J.V.; Capelozzi, V.L. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-06-04

    Limitations on tissue proliferation capacity determined by telomerase/apoptosis balance have been implicated in pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In addition, collagen V shows promise as an inductor of apoptosis. We evaluated the quantitative relationship between the telomerase/apoptosis index, collagen V synthesis, and epithelial/fibroblast replication in mice exposed to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) at high oxygen concentration. Two groups of mice were analyzed: 20 mice received BHT, and 10 control mice received corn oil. Telomerase expression, apoptosis, collagen I, III, and V fibers, and hydroxyproline were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ detection of apoptosis, electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, and histomorphometry. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of increased alveolar epithelial cells type 1 (AEC1) in apoptosis. Immunostaining showed increased nuclear expression of telomerase in AEC type 2 (AEC2) between normal and chronic scarring areas of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Control lungs and normal areas from UIP lungs showed weak green birefringence of type I and III collagens in the alveolar wall and type V collagen in the basement membrane of alveolar capillaries. The increase in collagen V was greater than collagens I and III in scarring areas of UIP. A significant direct association was found between collagen V and AEC2 apoptosis. We concluded that telomerase, collagen V fiber density, and apoptosis evaluation in experimental UIP offers the potential to control reepithelization of alveolar septa and fibroblast proliferation. Strategies aimed at preventing high rates of collagen V synthesis, or local responses to high rates of cell apoptosis, may have a significant impact in pulmonary fibrosis.

  19. A gene expression signature classifying telomerase and ALT immortalization reveals an hTERT regulatory network and suggests a mesenchymal stem cell origin for ALT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafferty-Whyte, K; Cairney, C J; Will, M B

    2009-01-01

    Telomere length is maintained by two known mechanisms, the activation of telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). The molecular mechanisms regulating the ALT phenotype are poorly understood and it is unknown how the decision of which pathway to activate is made at the cellular...... level. We have shown earlier that active repression of telomerase gene expression by chromatin remodelling of the promoters is one mechanism of regulation; however, other genes and signalling networks are likely to be required to regulate telomerase and maintain the ALT phenotype. Using gene expression...... this signature revealed a regulatory signalling network consistent with a model of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) repression in ALT cell lines and liposarcomas. This network expands on our existing knowledge of hTERT regulation and provides a platform to understand differential regulation of h...

  20. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  1. Designed modulation of sex steroid signaling inhibits telomerase activity and proliferation of human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Sharma, Siddharth; Bishnoi, Ajay Kumar [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Chandra, Vishal; Maikhuri, J.P.; Dwivedi, Anila [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Kumar, Atul [Division of Medicinal and Process Chemistry, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Gupta, Gopal, E-mail: g_gupta@cdri.res.in [Division of Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226 031 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The predominant estrogen-receptor (ER)-β signaling in normal prostate is countered by increased ER-α signaling in prostate cancer (CaP), which in association with androgen-receptor (AR) signaling results in pathogenesis of the disease. However CaP treatments mostly target AR signaling which is initially effective but eventually leads to androgen resistance, hence simultaneous targeting of ERs has been proposed. A novel series of molecules were designed with multiple sex-steroid receptor modulating capabilities by coalescing the pharmacophores of known anti-CaP molecules that act via modulation of ER(α/β) and/or AR, viz. 3,3′diindolylmethane (DIM), mifepristone, toremifene, tamoxifen and raloxifene. N,N-diethyl-4-((2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl) aniline (DIMA) was identified as the most promising structure of this new series. DIMA increased annexin-V labelling, cell-cycle arrest and caspase-3 activity, and decreased expression of AR and prostate specific antigen in LNCaP cells, in vitro. Concurrently, DIMA increased ER-β, p21 and p27 protein levels in LNCaP cells and exhibited ∼ 5 times more selective binding for ER-β than ER-α, in comparison to raloxifene. DIMA exhibited a dose-dependent ER-β agonism and ER-α antagonism in classical gene reporter assay and decreased hTERT (catalytic subunit of telomerase) transcript levels in LNCaP at 3.0 μM (P < 0.05). DIMA also dose-dependently decreased telomerase enzyme activity in prostate cancer cells. It is thus concluded that DIMA acts as a multi-steroid receptor modulator and effectively inhibits proliferation of prostate cancer cells through ER-β mediated telomerase inhibition, by countering actions of ER-α and AR. Its unique molecular design can serve as a lead structure for generation of potent agents against endocrine malignancies like the CaP.

  2. PCB153 reduces telomerase activity and telomere length in immortalized human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) but not in human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, P.K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Robertson, L.W. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Ludewig, G., E-mail: Gabriele-ludewig@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), ubiquitous environmental pollutants, are characterized by long term-persistence in the environment, bioaccumulation, and biomagnification in the food chain. Exposure to PCBs may cause various diseases, affecting many cellular processes. Deregulation of the telomerase and the telomere complex leads to several biological disorders. We investigated the hypothesis that PCB153 modulates telomerase activity, telomeres and reactive oxygen species resulting in the deregulation of cell growth. Exponentially growing immortal human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and normal human foreskin keratinocytes (NFK) were incubated with PCB153 for 48 and 24 days, respectively, and telomerase activity, telomere length, superoxide level, cell growth, and cell cycle distribution were determined. In HaCaT cells exposure to PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity, telomere length, cell growth and increased intracellular superoxide levels from day 6 to day 48, suggesting that superoxide may be one of the factors regulating telomerase activity, telomere length and cell growth compared to untreated control cells. Results with NFK cells showed no shortening of telomere length but reduced cell growth and increased superoxide levels in PCB153-treated cells compared to untreated controls. As expected, basal levels of telomerase activity were almost undetectable, which made a quantitative comparison of treated and control groups impossible. The significant down regulation of telomerase activity and reduction of telomere length by PCB153 in HaCaT cells suggest that any cell type with significant telomerase activity, like stem cells, may be at risk of premature telomere shortening with potential adverse health effects for the affected organism. -- Highlights: ► Human immortal (HaCaT) and primary (NFK) keratinocytes were exposed to PCB153. ► PCB153 significantly reduced telomerase activity and telomere length in HaCaT. ► No effect on telomere length and

  3. Cellular functions of the dual-targeted catalytic subunit of telomerase, telomerase reverse transcriptase--potential role in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale-Agha, Niloofar; Dyballa-Rukes, Nadine; Jakob, Sascha; Altschmied, Joachim; Haendeler, Judith

    2014-08-01

    Over the last 40 years it has become clear that telomeres, the end of the chromosomes, and the enzyme telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), which is required to counteract their shortening, play a pivotal role in senescence and aging. However, over the last years several studies demonstrated that TERT belongs to the group of dual-targeted proteins. It contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal as well as a mitochondrial targeting sequence and, under physiological conditions, is found in both organelles in several cell types including terminally differentiated, post-mitotic cells. The canonical function of TERT is to prevent telomere erosion and thereby the development of replicative senescence and genetic instability. Besides telomere extension, TERT exhibits other non-telomeric activities such as cell cycle regulation, modulation of cellular signaling and gene expression, augmentation of proliferative lifespan as well as DNA damage responses. Mitochondrial TERT is able to reduce reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial DNA damage and apoptosis. Because of the localization of TERT in the nucleus and in the mitochondria, it must have different functions in the two organelles as mitochondrial DNA does not contain telomeric structures. However, the organelle-specific functions are not completely understood. Strikingly, the regulation by phosphorylation of TERT seems to reveal multiple parallels. This review will summarize the current knowledge about the cellular functions and post-translational regulation of the dual-targeted protein TERT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Visual detection of telomerase activity with a tunable dynamic range by using a gold nanoparticle probe-based hybridization protection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiasi; Wu, Li; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-01-01

    We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs.We developed a novel telomere complementary (TC) oligonucleotide modified AuNP probe (TC-AuNPs) for colorimetric analysis of telomerase activity. The mechanism of this method is that the telomerase reaction products (TRP), which can hybridize with the TC-AuNPs, are able to protect the AuNPs from the aggregation induced by salt. It is demonstrated that the colorimetric method enabled the analysis of the telomerase activity in 1000 HeLa cells with the naked eye, and down to 100 HeLa cells with the aid of UV-Vis spectroscopy. This strategy is not only convenient and sensitive, but also has a tunable dynamic range. The platform is also applicable for the initial screening of a telomerase inhibitor to discover new anticancer drugs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr05185d

  5. Zinc sulfate contributes to promote telomere length extension via increasing telomerase gene expression, telomerase activity and change in the TERT gene promoter CpG island methylation status of human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Farahzadi

    Full Text Available The use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for cell therapy and regenerative medicine has received widespread attention over the past few years, but their application can be complicated by factors such as reduction in proliferation potential, the senescent tendency of the MSCs upon expansion and their age-dependent decline in number and function. It was shown that all the mentioned features were accompanied by a reduction in telomerase activity and telomere shortening. Furthermore, the role of epigenetic changes in aging, especially changes in promoter methylation, was reported. In this study, MSCs were isolated from the adipose tissue with enzymatic digestion. In addition, immunocytochemistry staining and flow cytometric analysis were performed to investigate the cell-surface markers. In addition, alizarin red-S, sudan III, toluidine blue, and cresyl violet staining were performed to evaluate the multi-lineage differentiation of hADSCs. In order to improve the effective application of MSCs, these cells were treated with 1.5 × 10-8 and 2.99 × 10-10 M of ZnSO4 for 48 hours. The length of the absolute telomere, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene expression, telomerase activity, the investigation of methylation status of the hTERT gene promoter and the percentage of senescent cells were analyzed with quantitative real-time PCR, PCR-ELISA TRAP assay, methylation specific PCR (MSP, and beta-galactosidase (SA-β-gal staining, respectively. The results showed that the telomere length, the hTERT gene expression, and the telomerase activity had significantly increased. In addition, the percentage of senescent cells had significantly decreased and changes in the methylation status of the CpG islands in the hTERT promoter region under treatment with ZnSO4 were seen. In conclusion, it seems that ZnSO4 as a proper antioxidant could improve the aging-related features due to lengthening of the telomeres, increasing the telomerase gene expression

  6. Effects of Lifestyle Modification on Telomerase Gene Expression in Hypertensive Patients: A Pilot Trial of Stress Reduction and Health Education Programs in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duraimani, Shanthi; Schneider, Robert H; Randall, Otelio S; Nidich, Sanford I; Xu, Shichen; Ketete, Muluemebet; Rainforth, Maxwell A; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W; Fagan, John

    2015-01-01

    African Americans suffer from disproportionately high rates of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Psychosocial stress, lifestyle and telomere dysfunction contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This study evaluated effects of stress reduction and lifestyle modification on blood pressure, telomerase gene expression and lifestyle factors in African Americans. Forty-eight African American men and women with stage I hypertension who participated in a larger randomized controlled trial volunteered for this substudy. These subjects participated in either stress reduction with the Transcendental Meditation technique and a basic health education course (SR) or an extensive health education program (EHE) for 16 weeks. Primary outcomes were telomerase gene expression (hTERT and hTR) and clinic blood pressure. Secondary outcomes included lifestyle-related factors. Data were analyzed for within-group and between-group changes. Both groups showed increases in the two measures of telomerase gene expression, hTR mRNA levels (SR: pstress reduction (Transcendental Meditation technique plus health education) and extensive health education groups demonstrated increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP. The association between increased telomerase gene expression and reduced BP observed in this high-risk population suggest hypotheses that telomerase gene expression may either be a biomarker for reduced BP or a mechanism by which stress reduction and lifestyle modification reduces BP. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00681200.

  7. A convergent total synthesis of the telomerase inhibitor (±)-γ-rubromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsdorf, Michael; Reissig, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-04-22

    The total synthesis of the human telomerase inhibitor γ-rubromycin in its racemic form was accomplished in 3.8 % overall yield. The key feature of this synthesis is an efficient acid-catalyzed spiroketalization for the construction of the spiroketal core. The required electronically well-balanced spiroketal precursor was obtained by the convergent assembly of a naphthyl-substituted aldehyde, an α-methoxyallyl-γ-silyl-substituted phosphonate as the central C3 building block, and a highly functionalized aryl Grignard reagent. Another key feature is the late-stage construction of the isocoumarin moiety and a simultaneous protodesilylation furnishing the known methyl aryl ether protected precursor of γ-rubromycin. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Effects of water extract of Curcuma longa (L.) roots on immunity and telomerase function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Min-Hsiung; Wu, Jia-Ching; Ho, Chi-Tang; Badmaev, Vladimir

    2017-05-12

    Background Immunity and Longevity Methods A water extract of Curcuma longa (L.) [vern. Turmeric] roots (TurmericImmune™) standardized for a minimum 20 % of turmeric polysaccharides ukonan A, B, C and D was evaluated for its biological properties in in vitro tissue culture studies. Results The water extract of turmeric (TurP) exhibited induced-nitric oxide (NO) production in RAW264.7 macrophages. These results suggested the immunomodulatory effects of TurP. In addition, the polysaccharides up-regulated function of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) equally to the phenolic compound from turmeric, curcumin. Conclusions The ukonan family of polysaccharides may assist in promoting cellular immune responses, tissue repair and lifespan by enhancing immune response and telomere function.

  9. Tissue distribution and engraftment of human mesenchymal stem cells immortalized by human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, J F; Stenderup, K; Hansen, F D

    2005-01-01

    Engraftment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in peripheral tissues for replenishing of local stem cell function has been proposed as a therapeutic approach to degenerative diseases. We have previously reported the development of an immortalized human telomerase reverse transcriptase transduced MSC...... line (hMSC-TERT). In the present study, we co-transduced hMSC-TERT with enhanced green fluorescent protein gene, and studied tissue distribution, engraftment, and cell survival after intracardiac and intravenous injections in immunodeficient mice. The pattern of organ distribution suggested...... that infused cells were efficiently arrested in microvasculature during first-pass, but only for a fraction of the infused cells was arrest followed by vascular emigration and tissue engraftment. Few engrafted cells in lungs, heart, and kidney glomeruli remained after 4 weeks. These observations are consistent...

  10. Sulforaphane modulates telomerase activity via epigenetic regulation in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ata; Hall, J Adam; Patterson, William L; Ho, Emily; Hsu, Anna; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Georgel, Philippe T

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed that diets rich in sulforaphane (SFN), an isothiocyanate present in cruciferous vegetables, are associated with a marked decrease in prostate cancer incidence. The chemo-preventive role of SFN is associated with its histone de-acetylase inhibitor activity. However, the effect of SFN on chromatin composition and dynamic folding, especially in relation to HDAC inhibitor activity, remains poorly understood. In this study, we found that SFN can inhibit the expression and activity of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), the catalytic subunit of telomerase, in 2 prostate cancer cell lines. This decrease in gene expression is correlated with SFN-induced changes in chromatin structure and composition. The SFN-mediated changes in levels of histone post-translational modifications, more specifically acetylation of histone H3 lysine 18 and di-methylation of histone H3 lysine 4, 2 modifications linked with high risk of prostate cancer recurrence, were associated with regulatory elements within the hTERT promoter region. Chromatin condensation may also play a role in SFN-mediated hTERT repression, since expression and recruitment of MeCP2, a known chromatin compactor, were altered in SFN treated prostate cancer cells. Chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) of MeCP2 showed enrichment over regions of the hTERT promoter with increased nucleosome density. These combined results strongly support a role for SFN in the mediation of epigenetic events leading to the repression of hTERT in prostate cancer cells. This ability of SFN to modify chromatin composition and structure associated with target gene expression provides a new model by which dietary phytochemicals may exert their chemoprevention activity.

  11. Artemisinin Represses Telomerase Subunits and Induces Apoptosis in HPV-39 Infected Human Cervical Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Anushree; Chatterji, Urmi

    2015-09-01

    Artemisinin, a plant-derived antimalarial drug with relatively low toxicity on normal cells in humans, has selective anticancer activities in various types of cancers, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, we have investigated the anticancer effects of artemisinin in human cervical cancer cells, with special emphasis on its role in inducing apoptosis and repressing cell proliferation by inhibiting the telomerase subunits, ERα which is essential for maintenance of the cervix, and downstream components like VEGF, which is known to activate angiogenesis. Effects of artemisinin on apoptosis of ME-180 cells were measured by flow cytometry, DAPI, and annexin V staining. Expression of genes and proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis was quantified both at the transcriptional and translational levels by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Our findings demonstrated that artemisinin significantly downregulated the expression of ERα and its downstream component, VEGF. Antiproliferative activity was also supported by decreased telomerase activity and reduced expression of hTR and hTERT subunits. Additionally, artemisinin reduced the expression of the HPV-39 viral E6 and E7 components. Artemisinin-induced apoptosis was confirmed by FACS, nuclear chromatin condensation, annexin V staining. Increased expression of p53 with concomitant decrease in expression of the p53 inhibitor Mdm2 further supported that artemisinin-induced apoptosis was p53-dependent. The results clearly indicate that artemisinin induces antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in HPV-39-infected ME-180 cells, and warrants further trial as an effective anticancer drug. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Telomerase deficiency delays renal recovery in mice after ischemia-reperfusion injury by impairing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Huifang; Fan, Xiaofeng; Lawson, William E; Paueksakon, Paisit; Harris, Raymond C

    2015-07-01

    The aged population suffers increased morbidity and higher mortality in response to episodes of acute kidney injury (AKI). Aging is associated with telomere shortening, and both telomerase reverse transcriptase (TerT) and RNA (TerC) are essential to maintain telomere length. To define a role of telomerase deficiency in susceptibility to AKI, we used ischemia/reperfusion injury in wild-type mice or mice with either TerC or TerT deletion. Injury induced similar renal impairment at day 1 in each genotype, as assessed by azotemia, proteinuria, acute tubular injury score, and apoptotic tubular epithelial cell index. However, either TerC or TerT knockout significantly delayed recovery compared with wild-type mice. Electron microscopy showed increased autophagosome formation in renal tubular epithelial cells in wild-type mice but a significant delay of their development in TerC and TerT knockout mice. There were also impeded increases in the expression of the autophagosome marker LC3 II, prolonged accumulation of the autophagosome protein P62, an increase of the cell cycle regulator p16, and greater activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, partially restored the ischemia/reperfusion-induced autophagy response, without a significant effect on either p16 induction or tubule epithelial cell proliferation. Thus, muting the maintenance of normal telomere length in mice impaired recovery from AKI, owing to an increase in tubule cell senescence and impairment of mTOR-mediated autophagy.

  13. Atorvastatin therapy modulates telomerase activity in patients free of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Strazhesko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background— Telomerase activity (TA is considered as the biomarker for cardiovascular aging and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies suggest a link between statins and telomere biology that may be explained by anti-inflammatory actions of statins and their positive effect on TA. Until now this effect has not been investigated in prospective randomized studies.We hypothesized that 12 months of atorvastatin therapy increased TA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells.Methods—In a randomized, placebo-controlled study 100 hypercholesterolemic patients, aged 35–75 years, free of known cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 received 20 mg of atorvastatin daily or placebo for 12 months. TA was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction.Results—At study end 82 patients had sufficient peripheral blood mononuclear cells needed for longitudinal analysis. TA expressed as natural logarithms changed from 0.46±0.05 to 0.68±0.06 (p=0.004 in the atorvastatin group and from 0.67±0.06 to 0.60±0.07 (P=0.477 in the control group. In multiple regression analysis, atorvastatin therapy was the only independent predictor (p=0.05 of the changes in TA independently of markers of chronic inflammation and oxidative stress. Atorvastatin therapy was associated with increases in IL-6 within the normal range and a tendency towards reductionin blood urea.Conclusions—These initial observations suggest atorvastatin can act as telomerase activator and potentially as effective geroprotector.

  14. A common variant in the telomerase RNA component is associated with short telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer T Njajou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres shorten as cells divide. This shortening is compensated by the enzyme telomerase. We evaluated the effect of common variants in the telomerase RNA component (TERC gene on telomere length (TL in the population-based Health Aging and Body Composition (Health ABC Study and in two replication samples (the TwinsUK Study and the Amish Family Osteoporosis Study, AFOS.Five variants were identified in the TERC region by sequence analysis and only one SNP was common (rs2293607, G/A. The frequency of the G allele was 0.26 and 0.07 in white and black, respectively. Testing for association between TL and rs2293607 was performed using linear regression models or variance component analysis conditioning on relatedness among subjects.The adjusted mean TL was significantly shorter in 665 white carriers of the G allele compared to 887 non-carriers from the Health ABC Study (4.69±0.05 kbp vs. 4.86±0.04 kbp, measured by quantitative PCR, p = 0.005. This association was replicated in another white sample from the TwinsUK Study (6.90±0.03 kbp in 301 carriers compared to 7.06±0.03 kbp in 395 non-carriers, measured by Southern blots, p = 0.009. A similar pattern of association was observed in whites from the family-based AFOS and blacks from the Health ABC cohort, although not statistically significant, possibly due to the lower allele frequency in these populations. Combined analysis using 2,953 white subjects from 3 studies showed a significant association between TL and rs2293607 (β = -0.19±0.04 kbp, p = 0.001.Our study shows a significant association between a common variant in TERC and TL in humans, suggesting that TERC may play a role in telomere homeostasis.

  15. Disease: H01127 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited GPI deficiency. Inherited metabolic disease hsa00563...is A Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency. Nat Med

  16. Disease: H01127 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thrombosis and epilepsy. Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGN causes this disorder. Inherited metabolic dis...radimitris A ... TITLE ... Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited g

  17. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  18. Telomerase activity is increased and telomere length shortened in T cells from blood of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Higashi, H; Hansen, E R

    2000-01-01

    We studied telomerase activity and telomere length in PBMC and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from blood obtained from a total of 32 patients with atopic dermatitis, 16 patients with psoriasis, and 30 normal controls. The telomerase activity was significantly increased in PBMC from the patients...... compared with PBMC from normal donors. This increase was most pronounced in the subpopulation of CD4(+) T cells, which were significantly above the activity of the CD8(+) T cells in atopic dermatitis, psoriasis patients, and control persons. The telomere length was significantly reduced in all T cell...... subsets from both atopic dermatitis and psoriasis patients compared with normal individuals. Furthermore, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in CD4(+) memory T cells compared with the CD4(+) naive T cells, and both of the cell subsets from diseases were shown to be of significantly...

  19. Benzophenone-nucleoside derivatives as telomerase inhibitors: Design, synthesis and anticancer evaluation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing Bo; Chen, Liu Zeng; Wang, Yang; Xiou, Cheng; Tang, Wen Jian; Zhou, Hai Pin; Liu, Xin Hua; Yao, Qi Zheng

    2016-11-29

    Based on telomerase, thirteen novel phenstatin moiety linked stavudine derivatives (8a∼8e and 11a∼11f) were synthesized. The structures were determined by NMR and TOF-HRMS. The screening results showed that some compounds had better anti-cancer activity in vivo and in vitro. Among them, Compound 8d showed high inhibitory activity against telomerase and showed good antiproliferative activity against SGC-7901 cell with IC 50 value 0.77 μM by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2 phase. It also could improve SGC-7901 cell apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential assay indicated that the dissipation of MMP might participate in apoptosis induced by title compound. In vivo studies showed that compound 8d displayed potent anticancer activity with inhibition tumor growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Telomerase-Deficient Mice Exhibit Bone Loss Owing to Defects in Osteoblasts and Increased Osteoclastogenesis by Inflammatory Microenvironment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, H.; Abdallah, B. M.; Ditzel, N.

    2011-01-01

    studied the phenotype of telomerase-deficient mice (Terc(-/-)).Terc(-/-) mice exhibited accelerated age-related bone loss starting at 3 months of age and during 12 months of follow-up revealed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometric (DXA) scanning and by micro-computed tomography (mu CT). Bone...... of a large number of proinflammatory genes involved in osteoclast (OC) differentiation. Consistently, serum obtained from Terc(-/-) mice enhanced OC formation of wild-type bone marrow cultures. Our data demonstrate two mechanisms for age-related bone loss caused by telomerase deficiency: intrinsic...... osteoblastic defects and creation of a proinflammatory osteoclast-activating microenvironment. Thus telonnerization of MSCs may provide a novel approach for abolishing age-related bone loss. (C) 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research....

  1. Absence of oncogenic transformation despite acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Björn; Fuchs, Sigrid; Dierlamm, Judith; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Wege, Henning

    2007-10-18

    As a culture model to study hepatocarcinogenesis, telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes were monitored for karyotype changes evolving in long-term culture and development of functional defects in DNA damage response. G-banding revealed acquisition of characteristic karyotype abnormalities, e.g., trisomy 7 and monosomy X, in two independently immortalized and cultured populations after 80-100 population doublings. Interestingly, the detected aneuploidies resemble some of the genetic events observed in hepatocellular cancer. However, these genetic changes were not sufficient to induce oncogenic transformation reflected by absence of anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized cells preserved p53 expression levels and effective p53-mediated damage response.

  2. A high frequency of XO offspring from X(Paf)Y* male mice: evidence that the Paf mutation involves an inversion spanning the X PAR boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, P S; Evans, E P

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been reported that 19% of the daughters of males carrying the X-linked mutation patchy fur (Paf) are XO with a maternally derived X chromosome. We now report that hemizygous Paf males that also carry the variant Y chromosome Y*, show a much increased XO production ( approximately 40% of daughters). We hypothesize that the Paf mutation is associated with an inversion spanning the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) boundary, and that this leads to preferential crossing over between the resulting inverted region of PAR and an equivalent inverted PAR region within the compound Y* PAR. This would lead to the production of dicentric X and acentric Y products and consequent sex chromosome loss. This interpretation is supported by analysis of the sex chromosome complements at the second meiotic metaphase, which revealed a high incidence of dicentrics. Another curious feature of the Paf mutation is that mice that are homozygous Paf have more hair than mice that are hemizygous Paf. This can be explained if the Paf mutation is a hypomorphic mutation that escapes X inactivation because, unlike the wild type allele, it is now located within the PAR. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. TERT promoter mutations contribute to IDH mutations in predicting differential responses to adjuvant therapies in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Ding, Xiao-Jie; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Hong, Christopher S; Chen, Ling-Chao; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Fang-Ping; Wang, Yin; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Zhuang, Zhengping; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yan, Hai; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying

    2015-09-22

    IDH mutations frequently occur in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas and have favorable prognosis compared to wild-type tumors. However, whether IDH mutations in WHO grade II and II diffuse gliomas predict enhanced sensitivity to adjuvant radiation (RT) or chemotherapy (CHT) is still being debated. Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in gliomas. We previously demonstrated that TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers in glioma survival prognostication when combined with IDH mutations. This study analyzed IDH and TERT promoter mutations in 295 WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas treated with or without adjuvant therapies to explore their impact on the sensitivity of tumors to genotoxic therapies. IDH mutations were found in 216 (73.2%) patients and TERT promoter mutations were found in 112 (38%) patients. In multivariate analysis, IDH mutations (p IDH and TERT promoter mutations were not significant prognostic factors in patients who did not receive genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were factors independently impacting PFS (RT p = 0.001, CHT p = 0.026) in IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas but not in IDH wild-type group. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated TERT promoter mutations further stratified IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were significant parameters influencing PFS in the IDH wt/TERT mut subgroup (RT p = 0.015, CHT p = 0.015) but not in the IDH wt/TERT wt subgroup. Our data demonstrated that IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas had better PFS and OS than their IDH wild-type counterparts when genotoxic therapies were administered after surgery. Importantly, we also found that TERT promoter mutations further stratify IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to

  4. Chiral ruthenium(II polypyridyl complexes: stabilization of g-quadruplex DNA, inhibition of telomerase activity and cellular uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Yu

    Full Text Available Two ruthenium(II complexes, Λ-[Ru(phen(2(p-HPIP](2+ and Δ-[Ru(phen(2(p-HPIP](2+, were synthesized and characterized via proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and circular dichroism spectroscopy. This study aims to clarify the anticancer effect of metal complexes as novel and potent telomerase inhibitors and cellular nucleus target drug. First, the chiral selectivity of the compounds and their ability to stabilize quadruplex DNA were studied via absorption and emission analyses, circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence-resonance energy transfer melting assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and polymerase chain reaction stop assay. The two chiral compounds selectively induced and stabilized the G-quadruplex of telomeric DNA with or without metal cations. These results provide new insights into the development of chiral anticancer agents for G-quadruplex DNA targeting. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol reveals the higher inhibitory activity of Λ-[Ru(phen(2(p-HPIP](2+ against telomerase, suggesting that Λ-[Ru(phen(2(p-HPIP](2+ may be a potential telomerase inhibitor for cancer chemotherapy. MTT assay results show that these chiral complexes have significant antitumor activities in HepG2 cells. More interestingly, cellular uptake and laser-scanning confocal microscopic studies reveal the efficient uptake of Λ-[Ru(phen(2(p-HPIP](2+ by HepG2 cells. This complex then enters the cytoplasm and tends to accumulate in the nucleus. This nuclear penetration of the ruthenium complexes and their subsequent accumulation are associated with the chirality of the isomers as well as with the subtle environment of the ruthenium complexes. Therefore, the nucleus can be the cellular target of chiral ruthenium complexes for anticancer therapy.

  5. Inhibition of telomerase activity preferentially targets aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive cancer stem-like cells in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iniesta Pilar

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality rates for advanced lung cancer have not declined for decades, even with the implementation of novel chemotherapeutic regimens or the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Cancer Stem Cells (CSCs are thought to be responsible for resistance to chemo/radiotherapy. Therefore, targeting CSCs with novel compounds may be an effective approach to reduce lung tumor growth and metastasis. We have isolated and characterized CSCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines and measured their telomerase activity, telomere length, and sensitivity to the novel telomerase inhibitor MST312. Results The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH positive lung cancer cell fraction is enriched in markers of stemness and endowed with stem cell properties. ALDH+ CSCs display longer telomeres than the non-CSC population. Interestingly, MST312 has a strong antiproliferative effect on lung CSCs and induces p21, p27 and apoptosis in the whole tumor population. MST312 acts through activation of the ATM/pH2AX DNA damage pathway (short-term effect and through decrease in telomere length (long-term effect. Administration of this telomerase inhibitor (40 mg/kg in the H460 xenograft model results in significant tumor shrinkage (70% reduction, compared to controls. Combination therapy consisting of irradiation (10Gy plus administration of MST312 did not improve the therapeutic efficacy of the telomerase inhibitor alone. Treatment with MST312 reduces significantly the number of ALDH+ CSCs and their telomeric length in vivo. Conclusions We conclude that antitelomeric therapy using MST312 mainly targets lung CSCs and may represent a novel approach for effective treatment of lung cancer.

  6. Long-term exposure to MST-312 leads to telomerase reverse transcriptase overexpression in MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Karollyne S; Guimarãesb, Ana Flávia R; Ramos, Doralina A R; Silva, Fábio P; de Oliveira, Diêgo M

    2017-08-01

    Telomerase is an enzyme responsible for telomere maintenance in almost all human cancer cells, but generally not expressed in somatic ones. Therefore, antitelomerase therapy is a potentially revolutionary therapeutic strategy, and the antitumor activity of telomerase inhibitors (TI) has been studied extensively recently, mainly for breast cancer. However, the effects expected from treatment with TI will appear only after many cell divisions, but the effects of this long-term approach are unknown. In this work, the consequences of 3120 h exposure of human breast cancer cells to TI MST-312 were investigated. MCF-7 cells were treated with MST-312 at a subtoxic concentration for a long time, and then cell morphology, viability, senescence, and proliferation were analyzed by phase-contrast microscopy, MTT assay, β-galactosidase test, and the trypan blue exclusion assay, respectively. Also, chromosomal stability was evaluated by classical cytogenetic analysis. The average length of telomeres and telomerase reverse transcriptase expression were accessed by real-time PCR and real-time RT-PCR, respectively. The MST-312 showed cytotoxic action and promoted telomere erosion, senescence, and chromosome aberrations, as expected, but in a small proportion. Nevertheless, the proliferation rate of the culture was not affected. As the main effect, the chronic exposure led to cell adaptation by overexpression of telomerase in response to the inhibitor, which is a potential cause of therapeutic failure and may be associated with a poor prognosis. In conclusion, despite the high therapeutic potential of TIs such as MST-312, the molecular outcomes of long-term exposure of tumors on these drugs have to be evaluated when considering their clinical application, especially for breast cancer treatment.

  7. Ectopically hTERT expressing adult human mesenchymal stem cells are less radiosensitive than their telomerase negative counterpart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serakinci, Nedime; Christensen, Rikke; Graakjaer, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    During the past several years increasing evidence indicating that the proliferation capacity of mammalian cells is highly radiosensitive, regardless of the species and the tissue of origin of the cells, has accumulated. It has also been shown that normal bone marrow cells of mice have a similar r...... and high telomerase activity have the advantage of re-establishing the telomeric caps. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Mar-10...

  8. Transcriptional activity of telomerase complex in CD34- stem cells of cord blood in dependence of preparation time.

    OpenAIRE

    M Bojdys-Szyndlar; Dworzecki, T.; G Chromy; Mazurek, U.; J Głogowska-Lingus; Witek, A.; R Stojko; K Machaj; Pojda, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the expression of telomerase subunits encoding genes changes during the process of cord blood preparation. It should establish if the commonly accepted 24 hours time interval in stem cells kriopreservation procedure significantly influences their immortalization and so decreases the "quality" of cord blood stem cells. Investigation includes 69 women. Spontaneous labour was the inclusion condition. The material was collected at birth after clamping...

  9. MiRNA profile associated with replicative senescence, extended cell culture, and ectopic telomerase expression in human foreskin fibroblasts.

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    Laura N Bonifacio

    Full Text Available Senescence is a highly regulated process that limits cellular replication by enforcing a G1 arrest in response to various stimuli. Replicative senescence occurs in response to telomeric DNA erosion, and telomerase expression can offset replicative senescence leading to immortalization of many human cells. Limited data exists regarding changes of microRNA (miRNA expression during senescence in human cells and no reports correlate telomerase expression with regulation of senescence-related miRNAs. We used miRNA microarrays to provide a detailed account of miRNA profiles for early passage and senescent human foreskin (BJ fibroblasts as well as early and late passage immortalized fibroblasts (BJ-hTERT that stably express the human telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit hTERT. Selected miRNAs that were differentially expressed in senescence were assayed for expression in quiescent cells to identify miRNAs that are specifically associated with senescence-associated growth arrest. From this group of senescence-associated miRNAs, we confirmed the ability of miR-143 to induce growth arrest after ectopic expression in young fibroblasts. Remarkably, miR-143 failed to induce growth arrest in BJ-hTERT cells. Importantly, the comparison of late passage immortalized fibroblasts to senescent wild type fibroblasts reveals that miR-146a, a miRNA with a validated role in regulating the senescence associated secretory pathway, is also regulated during extended cell culture independently of senescence. The discovery that miRNA expression is impacted by expression of ectopic hTERT as well as extended passaging in immortalized fibroblasts contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the connections between telomerase expression, senescence and processes of cellular aging.

  10. TERT promoter mutation and its interaction with IDH mutations in glioma: Combined TERT promoter and IDH mutations stratifies lower-grade glioma into distinct survival subgroups-A meta-analysis of aggregate data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Huy Gia; Altibi, Ahmed M A; Duong, Uyen N P; Ngo, Hanh T T; Pham, Thong Quang; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Park, Chul-Kee; Fung, Kar-Ming; Hassell, Lewis

    2017-12-01

    The clinical significance of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutation in glioma remains unclear. The aim of our meta-analysis is to investigate the prognostic impact TERT promoter mutation in glioma patients and its interaction with other molecular markers, particularly Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation from aggregate level data. Relevant articles were searched in four electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Virtual Health Library. Pooled HRs were calculated using random effect model weighted by inverse variance method. From 1010 studies, we finally included 28 studies with 11519 patients for meta-analyses. TERT mutation is significantly associated with compromised overall survival (OS) (HR=1.38; 95% CI=1.15-1.67) and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=1.31; 95% CI=1.06-1.63) in glioma patients. In studying its reaction with IDH, TERT promoter mutation was associated with reduced OS in both IDH-mutant (IDH-mut) and IDH-wild type (IDH-wt) glioblastomas but shown to have inverse effects on IDH-mut and IDH-wt grade II/III tumors. Our analysis categorized WHO grade II/III glioma patients into four distinct survival subgroups with descending survival as follow: TERT-mut/IDH-mut≫TERT-wt/IDH-mut≫TERT-wt/IDH-wt≫TERT-mut/IDH-wt. Prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in gliomas is dependent on tumor grade and the IDH mutational status. With the same tumor grade in WHO grade II and III tumors and the same IDH mutation status, TERT-mut is a prognostic factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effective control of acute myeloid leukaemia and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia progression by telomerase specific adoptive T-cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Sara; De Sanctis, Francesco; Lamolinara, Alessia; Boschi, Federico; Poffe, Ornella; Trovato, Rosalinda; Fiore, Alessandra; Sartori, Sara; Sbarbati, Andrea; Bondanza, Attilio; Cesaro, Simone; Krampera, Mauro; Scupoli, Maria T; Nishimura, Michael I; Iezzi, Manuela; Sartoris, Silvia; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2017-10-20

    Telomerase (TERT) is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that preserves the molecular organization at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Since TERT deregulation is a common step in leukaemia, treatments targeting telomerase might be useful for the therapy of hematologic malignancies. Despite a large spectrum of potential drugs, their bench-to-bedside translation is quite limited, with only a therapeutic vaccine in the clinic and a telomerase inhibitor at late stage of preclinical validation. We recently demonstrated that the adoptive transfer of T cell transduced with an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR), which recognize human TERT with high avidity, controls human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) progression without severe side-effects in humanized mice. In the present report, we show the ability of our approach to limit the progression of more aggressive leukemic pathologies, such as acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL). Together, our findings demonstrate that TERT-based adoptive cell therapy is a concrete platform of T cell-mediated immunotherapy for leukaemia treatment.

  12. TP53-dependent chromosome instability is associated with transient reductions in telomere length in immortal telomerase-positive cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J. L.; Jordan, R.; Liber, H.; Murnane, J. P.; Evans, H. H.

    2001-01-01

    Telomere shortening in telomerase-negative somatic cells leads to the activation of the TP53 protein and the elimination of potentially unstable cells. We examined the effect of TP53 gene expression on both telomere metabolism and chromosome stability in immortal, telomerase-positive cell lines. Telomere length, telomerase activity, and chromosome instability were measured in multiple clones isolated from three related human B-lymphoblast cell lines that vary in TP53 expression; TK6 cells express wild-type TP53, WTK1 cells overexpress a mutant form of TP53, and NH32 cells express no TP53 protein. Clonal variations in both telomere length and chromosome stability were observed, and shorter telomeres were associated with higher levels of chromosome instability. The shortest telomeres were found in WTK1- and NH32-derived cells, and these cells had 5- to 10-fold higher levels of chromosome instability. The primary marker of instability was the presence of dicentric chromosomes. Aneuploidy and other stable chromosome alterations were also found in clones showing high levels of dicentrics. Polyploidy was found only in WTK1-derived cells. Both telomere length and chromosome instability fluctuated in the different cell populations with time in culture, presumably as unstable cells and cells with short telomeres were eliminated from the growing population. Our results suggest that transient reductions in telomere lengths may be common in immortal cell lines and that these alterations in telomere metabolism can have a profound effect on chromosome stability. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Deletion of the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase Gene and Haploinsufficiency of Telomere Maintenance in Cri du Chat Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anju; Zheng, Chengyun; Hou, Mi; Lindvall, Charlotta; Li, Ke-Jun; Erlandsson, Fredrik; Björkholm, Magnus; Gruber, Astrid; Blennow, Elisabeth; Xu, Dawei

    2003-01-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) results from loss of the distal portion of chromosome 5p, where the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene is localized (5p15.33). hTERT is the rate-limiting component for telomerase activity that is essential for telomere-length maintenance and sustained cell proliferation. Here, we show that a concomitant deletion of the hTERT allele occurs in all 10 patients with CdCS whom we examined. Induction of hTERT mRNA in proliferating lymphocytes derived from five of seven patients was lower than that in unaffected control individuals (P<.05). The patient lymphocytes exhibited shorter telomeres than age-matched unaffected individuals (P<.0001). A reduction in replicative life span and a high rate of chromosome fusions were observed in cultured patient fibroblasts. Reconstitution of telomerase activity by ectopic expression of hTERT extended the telomere length, increased the population doublings, and prevented the end-to-end fusion of chromosomes. We conclude that hTERT is limiting and haploinsufficient for telomere maintenance in humans in vivo. Accordingly, the hTERT deletion may be one genetic element contributing to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. PMID:12629597

  14. The putative Leishmania telomerase RNA (LeishTER undergoes trans-splicing and contains a conserved template sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elton J R Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available Telomerase RNAs (TERs are highly divergent between species, varying in size and sequence composition. Here, we identify a candidate for the telomerase RNA component of Leishmania genus, which includes species that cause leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease. Merging a thorough computational screening combined with RNA-seq evidence, we mapped a non-coding RNA gene localized in a syntenic locus on chromosome 25 of five Leishmania species that shares partial synteny with both Trypanosoma brucei TER locus and a putative TER candidate-containing locus of Crithidia fasciculata. Using target-driven molecular biology approaches, we detected a ∼2,100 nt transcript (LeishTER that contains a 5' spliced leader (SL cap, a putative 3' polyA tail and a predicted C/D box snoRNA domain. LeishTER is expressed at similar levels in the logarithmic and stationary growth phases of promastigote forms. A 5'SL capped LeishTER co-immunoprecipitated and co-localized with the telomerase protein component (TERT in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Prediction of its secondary structure strongly suggests the existence of a bona fide single-stranded template sequence and a conserved C[U/C]GUCA motif-containing helix II, representing the template boundary element. This study paves the way for further investigations on the biogenesis of parasite TERT ribonucleoproteins (RNPs and its role in parasite telomere biology.

  15. Augmented telomerase activity, reduced telomere length and the presence of alternative lengthening of telomere in renal cell carcinoma: plausible predictive and diagnostic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Deeksha; Sharma, Ujjawal; Khajuria, Ragini; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we analyzed 100 cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for telomerase activity, telomere length and alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) using the TRAP assay, TeloTTAGGG assay kit and immunohistochemical analysis of ALT associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies respectively. A significantly higher (P=0.000) telomerase activity was observed in 81 cases of RCC which was correlated with clinicopathological features of tumor for instance, stage (P=0.008) and grades (P=0.000) but not with the subtypes of RCC (P = 0.355). Notwithstanding, no correlation was found between telomerase activity and subtypes of RCC. Strikingly, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in RCC (P=0.000) to that of corresponding normal renal tissues and it is well correlated with grades (P=0.016) but not with stages (P=0.202) and subtypes (P=0.669) of RCC. In this study, telomere length was also negatively correlated with the age of patients (r(2)=0.528; P=0.000) which supports the notion that it could be used as a marker for biological aging. ALT associated PML bodies containing PML protein was found in telomerase negative cases of RCC. It suggests the presence of an ALT pathway mechanism to maintain the telomere length in telomerase negative RCC tissues which was associated with high stages of RCC, suggesting a prevalent mechanism for telomere maintenance in high stages. In conclusion, the telomerase activity and telomere length can be used as a diagnostic as well as a predictive marker in RCC. The prevalence of ALT mechanism in high stages of RCC is warranted for the development of anti-ALT inhibitors along with telomerase inhibitor against RCC as a therapeutic approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Value of endoscopic methylene blue and Lugol's iodine double staining and detection of GST-Pi and telomerase in the early diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuan; Zhang, Shuang-Hong; Zhang, Kun-He; Li, Bi-Ming; Chen, Jiang

    2005-10-21

    To explore the expressions of GST-Pi and telomerase activity in esophageal carcinoma and premalignant lesions and to investigate the value of endoscopic methylene blue (MB) and Lugol's iodine double staining. Seventy-two patients with esophagopathy were sprayed endoscopically with MB and Lugol's iodine in proper order and the areas stained blue and brown, and the area between the blue and brown stains were obtained. Depending on the pattern of mucosal staining, biopsy specimen was obtained. GST-Pi and telomerase activity in specimens were examined by immunohistochemistry and PCR-based silver staining telomeric repeat amplification protocol, respectively. After MB and Lugol's iodine staining, the area between both the colors was obtained in 64 of the 72 patients and the areas were stained blue and brown in all of the 72 patients. Association test of two simultaneous ordinal categorical data showed a correlation between the esophageal mucosal staining and the esophageal histology (PPi and telomerase activity in esophageal carcinoma and premalignant lesions increased. The expression of GST-Pi and telomerase activity in dysplasia and carcinoma was significantly higher than that in normal epithelium (PPi was correlated with that of telomerase activity in dysplasia and carcinoma (phis = 0.4831, PPi and telomerase may be an early event in the carcinogenesis of esophagus. They may play an induced and synergistic role with each other in the carcinogenesis of esophagus. Endoscopic MB and Lugol's iodine double staining and detection of GST-Pi and telomerase activity may contribute to the early diagnosis of esophageal carcinoma.

  17. Real-time quantitative PCR of telomerase mRNA is useful for the differentiation of benign and malignant pancreatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchler, P; Conejo-Garcia, J R; Lehmann, G; Müller, M; Emrich, T; Reber, H A; Büchler, M W; Friess, H

    2001-05-01

    The presence of telomerase activity has been proposed as a specific and sensitive marker for malignant tissue, and positivity rates of up to 95% have been reported in pancreatic cancer. In the present study telomerase activity analysis was reevaluated in 29 pancreatic cancer tissues compared with 36 chronic pancreatitis tissues and 21 normal controls, and a study was made of whether malignant and benign pancreatic disorders can be better differentiated using a novel technique real-time quantitative PCR analysis-analyzing telomerase mRNA expression. Telomerase activity was present in 35% (10 of 29) of pancreatic cancer samples, 3% (one of 36) of chronic pancreatitis samples, and none of the normal pancreatic tissue samples in the TRAP assay. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed the presence of telomerase mRNA expression in 50% (10 of 20) of normal, 86% (31 of 36) of chronic pancreatitis, and 90% (26 of 29) of pancreatic cancer samples. However, quantification of the expression data revealed that the relative increase above normal was 5.5 (range, 3.5-8.6) for chronic pancreatitis and 23.9 (range, 18.6-30.7) for pancreatic cancer samples (p data indicate that detection of telomerase activity using the TRAP assay has limitations in differentiating benign and malignant pancreatic disorders. However, telomerase mRNA analysis by real-time quantitative PCR analysis allows a highly sensitive detection and differentiation of pancreatic cancer from normal pancreas and chronic pancreatitis and thereby may serve as a new reliable, easy, and effective diagnostic tool for cancer diagnosis.

  18. Telomerase inhibition decreases alpha-fetoprotein expression and secretion by hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roula Tahtouh

    Full Text Available Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. Apoptosis was determined through the Annexin V assay using flow cytometry. The concentrations of AFP were measured using ELISA kits. The AFP mRNA expression was evaluated using RT-PCR, and cell migration was evaluated using a Boyden chamber assay. The in vivo effect of costunolide on AFP production was tested in NSG mice. Telomerase inhibition by costunolide and BIBR 1532 at 5 and 10 μM decreased AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by HepG2/C3A cells. The same pattern was obtained with cells treated with hTERT siRNA. This treatment exhibited no apoptotic effect. The AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by PLC/PRF/5 was decreased after treatment with BIBR1532 at 10 μM. In contrast, no effect was obtained for PLC/PRF/5 cells treated with costunolide at 5 or 10 μM. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP concentration. In contrast, the MAPK/ERK pathway appeared to not be involved in HepG2/C3A cells, whereas ERK inhibition decreased the AFP concentration in PLC/PRF/5 cells. Modulation of the AFP concentration was also obtained after the inhibition or activation of PKC. Costunolide (30 mg/kg significantly decreased the AFP serum concentration of NSG mice bearing HepG2/C3A cells. Both the inhibition of telomerase and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP production of HepG2/C3A and PLC/PRF/5 cells, suggesting a relationship between telomerase and AFP expression through the PI3K

  19. Telomerase inhibition decreases alpha-fetoprotein expression and secretion by hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines: in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahtouh, Roula; Azzi, Anne-Sophie; Alaaeddine, Nada; Chamat, Soulaima; Bouharoun-Tayoun, Hasnaa; Wardi, Layal; Raad, Issam; Sarkis, Riad; Antoun, Najibe Abou; Hilal, George

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. Apoptosis was determined through the Annexin V assay using flow cytometry. The concentrations of AFP were measured using ELISA kits. The AFP mRNA expression was evaluated using RT-PCR, and cell migration was evaluated using a Boyden chamber assay. The in vivo effect of costunolide on AFP production was tested in NSG mice. Telomerase inhibition by costunolide and BIBR 1532 at 5 and 10 μM decreased AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by HepG2/C3A cells. The same pattern was obtained with cells treated with hTERT siRNA. This treatment exhibited no apoptotic effect. The AFP mRNA expression and protein secretion by PLC/PRF/5 was decreased after treatment with BIBR1532 at 10 μM. In contrast, no effect was obtained for PLC/PRF/5 cells treated with costunolide at 5 or 10 μM. Inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP concentration. In contrast, the MAPK/ERK pathway appeared to not be involved in HepG2/C3A cells, whereas ERK inhibition decreased the AFP concentration in PLC/PRF/5 cells. Modulation of the AFP concentration was also obtained after the inhibition or activation of PKC. Costunolide (30 mg/kg) significantly decreased the AFP serum concentration of NSG mice bearing HepG2/C3A cells. Both the inhibition of telomerase and the inhibition of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway decreased the AFP production of HepG2/C3A and PLC/PRF/5 cells, suggesting a relationship between telomerase and AFP expression through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  20. TPP1 is a homologue of ciliate TEBP-β and interacts with POT1 to recruit telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Huawei; Liu, Dan; Wan, Ma; Safari, Amin; Kim, Hyeung; Sun, Wen; O'Connor, Matthew S.; Songyang, Zhou

    2007-02-01

    Telomere dysfunction may result in chromosomal abnormalities, DNA damage responses, and even cancer. Early studies in lower organisms have helped to establish the crucial role of telomerase and telomeric proteins in maintaining telomere length and protecting telomere ends. In Oxytricha nova, telomere G-overhangs are protected by the TEBP-α/β heterodimer. Human telomeres contain duplex telomeric repeats with 3' single-stranded G-overhangs, and may fold into a t-loop structure that helps to shield them from being recognized as DNA breaks. Additionally, the TEBP-α homologue, POT1, which binds telomeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), associates with multiple telomeric proteins (for example, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1) to form the six-protein telosome/shelterin and other subcomplexes. These telomeric protein complexes in turn interact with diverse pathways to form the telomere interactome for telomere maintenance. However, the mechanisms by which the POT1-containing telosome communicates with telomerase to regulate telomeres remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that TPP1 is a putative mammalian homologue of TEBP-β and contains a predicted amino-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold. TPP1-POT1 association enhanced POT1 affinity for telomeric ssDNA. In addition, the TPP1 OB fold, as well as POT1-TPP1 binding, seemed critical for POT1-mediated telomere-length control and telomere-end protection in human cells. Disruption of POT1-TPP1 interaction by dominant negative TPP1 expression or RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in telomere-length alteration and DNA damage responses. Furthermore, we offer evidence that TPP1 associates with the telomerase in a TPP1-OB-fold-dependent manner, providing a physical link between telomerase and the telosome/shelterin complex. Our findings highlight the critical role of TPP1 in telomere maintenance, and support a yin-yang model in which TPP1 and POT1 function as a unit to protect human telomeres, by both

  1. Prevalence and implications of TERT promoter mutation in uveal and conjunctival melanoma and in benign and premalignant conjunctival melanocytic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Anna E; Ober, Kimberley; Dubbink, Hendrikus J; Paridaens, Dion; Naus, Nicole C; Belunek, Stephan; Krist, Bart; Post, Edward; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; de Klein, Annelies; Verdijk, Robert M

    2014-08-26

    Hot-spot mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter mutations) occur frequently in cutaneous and conjunctival melanoma and are exceedingly rare in uveal melanoma. No information is available on the presence of these mutations in the conjunctival melanocytic precursor lesion primary acquired melanosis (PAM). We tested a cohort of uveal and conjunctival melanomas as well as conjunctival benign and premalignant melanocytic lesions for TERT promoter mutations in order to elucidate the role of these mutations in tumor progression. TERT promoter mutation analysis on fresh tumor DNA and DNA from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens was performed by SNaPshot analysis in 102 uveal melanomas, 39 conjunctival melanomas, 26 PAM with atypia, 14 PAM without atypia, and 56 conjunctival nevi. Mutations of the TERT promoter were not identified in conjunctival nevi or PAM without atypia, but were detected in 2/25 (8%) of PAM with atypia and 16/39 (41%) of conjunctival melanomas. A single TERT promoter mutation was detected in 102 uveal melanomas (1%). We present the second documented case of TERT promoter mutation in uveal melanoma. In comparison with other types of melanoma, TERT promoter mutations occur at extremely low frequency in uveal melanoma. TERT promoter mutations are frequent in conjunctival melanoma and occur at lower frequency in PAM with atypia but were not detected in benign conjunctival melanocytic lesions. These findings favor a pathogenetic tumor progression role for TERT promoter mutations in conjunctival melanocytic lesions. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  2. Evaluation of intracellular telomerase activity through cascade DNA logic gates† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Sequences used in this study, fluorescence spectroscopy of logic gate activation using synthetic TS oligonucleotide with different numbers of elongation repeats, flow cytometry data, confocal images of counter staining, time course, control samples, and L-02 and Hep G-2 cells. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc01953f Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjing; Huang, Shan; Li, Jingjing; Rui, Kai; Bi, Sai

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase plays a vital role in cancer and aging, and telomerase activity detection has drawn great attention recently. However, a feasible in situ imaging system for intracellular telomerase is still a challenge. Here, we develop a novel approach to image intracellular telomerase activity using DNA-based computation. A cascade nucleic acid logic gate that responded to intracellular telomerase was constructed. A telomerase substrate (TS) probe, extended by intracellular telomerase, worked as an input to initiate computation cascades. In this way, intracellular telomerase could be clearly indicated by fluorophore labeled nucleic acids as the output. Through one-step incubation, evaluation of the intracellular telomerase activity for a HeLa cell line and the ability to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells could be realized. Furthermore, the response of intracellular telomerase activity to a telomerase-inhibiting model drug was observed using the proposed method. Thus, this intracellular telomerase computation device will allow improvements in studying the relationship between telomerase and cancer, and may help to develop telomerase inhibitors. This finding also expands the applications of DNA computational techniques in cells. PMID:28451163

  3. WRN loss induces switching of telomerase-independent mechanisms of telomere elongation.

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    April Renee Sandy Gocha

    Full Text Available Telomere maintenance can occur in the presence of telomerase or in its absence, termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT. ALT adds telomere repeats using recombination-based processes and DNA repair proteins that function in homologous recombination. Our previous work reported that the RecQ-like BLM helicase is required for ALT and that it unwinds telomeric substrates in vitro. WRN is also a RecQ-like helicase that shares many biochemical functions with BLM. WRN interacts with BLM, unwinds telomeric substrates,