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Sample records for hypomorphic nemo mutation

  1. Hypomorphic PCNA mutation underlies a human DNA repair disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baple, Emma L; Chambers, Helen; Cross, Harold E; Fawcett, Heather; Nakazawa, Yuka; Chioza, Barry A; Harlalka, Gaurav V; Mansour, Sahar; Sreekantan-Nair, Ajith; Patton, Michael A; Muggenthaler, Martina; Rich, Phillip; Wagner, Karin; Coblentz, Roselyn; Stein, Constance K; Last, James I; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Jackson, Andrew P; Ogi, Tomoo; Lehmann, Alan R; Green, Catherine M; Crosby, Andrew H

    2014-07-01

    Numerous human disorders, including Cockayne syndrome, UV-sensitive syndrome, xeroderma pigmentosum, and trichothiodystrophy, result from the mutation of genes encoding molecules important for nucleotide excision repair. Here, we describe a syndrome in which the cardinal clinical features include short stature, hearing loss, premature aging, telangiectasia, neurodegeneration, and photosensitivity, resulting from a homozygous missense (p.Ser228Ile) sequence alteration of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). PCNA is a highly conserved sliding clamp protein essential for DNA replication and repair. Due to this fundamental role, mutations in PCNA that profoundly impair protein function would be incompatible with life. Interestingly, while the p.Ser228Ile alteration appeared to have no effect on protein levels or DNA replication, patient cells exhibited marked abnormalities in response to UV irradiation, displaying substantial reductions in both UV survival and RNA synthesis recovery. The p.Ser228Ile change also profoundly altered PCNA's interaction with Flap endonuclease 1 and DNA Ligase 1, DNA metabolism enzymes. Together, our findings detail a mutation of PCNA in humans associated with a neurodegenerative phenotype, displaying clinical and molecular features common to other DNA repair disorders, which we showed to be attributable to a hypomorphic amino acid alteration.

  2. Hypomorphic mutations identified in the candidate Leber congenital amaurosis gene CLUAP1.

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    Soens, Zachry T; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Li; Eblimit, Aiden; Dharmat, Rachayata; Li, Yumei; Chen, Yiyun; Naqeeb, Mohammed; Fajardo, Norma; Lopez, Irma; Sun, Zhaoxia; Koenekoop, Robert K; Chen, Rui

    2016-10-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an early-onset form of retinal degeneration. Six of the 22 known LCA genes encode photoreceptor ciliary proteins. Despite the identification of 22 LCA genes, the genetic basis of ~30% of LCA patients remains unknown. We sought to investigate the cause of disease in the remaining 30% by examining cilia-associated genes. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on an LCA cohort of 212 unsolved probands previously screened for mutations in known retinal-disease genes. Immunohistochemistry using mouse retinas was used to confirm protein localization and zebrafish were used to perform rescue experiments. A homozygous nonsynonymous mutation was found in a single proband in CLUAP1, a gene required for ciliogenesis and cilia maintenance. Cluap1 knockout zebrafish exhibit photoreceptor cell death as early as 5 days after fertilization, and rescue experiments revealed that our proband's mutation is significantly hypomorphic. Consistent with the knowledge that CLUAP1 plays an important role in cilia function and that cilia are critical to photoreceptor function, our results indicate that hypomorphic mutations in CLUAP1 can result in dysfunctional photoreceptors without systemic abnormalities. This is the first report linking mutations in CLUAP1 to human disease and establishes CLUAP1 as a candidate LCA gene.Genet Med 18 10, 1044-1051.

  3. Hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 in human results in a late onset immunodeficiency and no autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Capucine; Dogniaux, Stéphanie; Chemin, Karine; Maciorowski, Zofia; Lim, Annick; Mazerolles, Fabienne; Rieux-Laucat, Frédéric; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Debre, Marianne; Magny, Jean-Paul; Le Deist, Françoise; Fischer, Alain; Hivroz, Claire

    2009-07-01

    Complete lack of function of the tyrosine kinase ZAP70 in humans results in a severe immunodeficiency, characterized by a lack of mature CD8(+) T cells and non-functional CD4(+) T cells. We report herein an immunodeficiency with an inherited hypomorphic mutation of ZAP70 due to a single G-to-A substitution in a non-coding intron. This mutation introduces a new acceptor splice site and allows low levels of normal alternative splicing and of WT ZAP70 expression. This partial deficiency results in a compromised TCR signaling that was totally restored by increased expression of ZAP70, demonstrating that defective activation of the patient T cells was indeed caused by the low level of ZAP70 expression. This partial ZAP70 deficiency was associated with an attenuated clinical and immunological phenotype as compared with complete ZAP70 deficiency. CD4(+) helper T-cell populations including, follicular helper T cells, Th1, Th17 and Treg were detected in the blood. Finally, the patient had no manifestation of autoimmunity suggesting that the T-cell tolerogenic functions were not compromised, in contrast to what has been observed in mice carrying hypomorphic mutations of Zap70. This report extends the phenotype spectrum of ZAP70 deficiency with a residual function of ZAP70.

  4. A Rare Form of Retinal Dystrophy Caused by Hypomorphic Nonsense Mutations in CEP290.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosing, Susanne; Cremers, Frans P M; Riemslag, Frans C C; Zonneveld-Vrieling, Marijke N; Talsma, Herman E; Klessens-Godfroy, Francoise J M; den Hollander, Anneke I; van den Born, L Ingeborgh

    2017-08-22

    To identify the gene defect and to study the clinical characteristics and natural course of disease in a family originally diagnosed with oligocone trichromacy (OT), a rare congenital cone dysfunction syndrome. Extensive clinical and ophthalmologic assessment was performed on two siblings with OT and long-term follow up data were analyzed. Subsequently, whole exome sequencing (WES) and Sanger sequence analysis of CEP290 was performed in the two siblings. Additionally, the identified CEP290 mutations were analyzed in persons with achromatopsia (ACHM) (n = 23) and autosomal recessive or isolated cone dystrophy (CD; n = 145). In the first decade of life, the siblings were diagnosed with OT based on low visual acuity, photophobia, nystagmus, and absent cone response on electroretinography , but with normal color discrimination. Over time, the phenotype of OT evolved to a progressive degenerative disease without any CEP290-associated non-ocular features. In both siblings, two nonsense mutations (c.451C>T; p.(Arg151*) and c.4723A>T; p.(Lys1575*)) in CEP290 were found. Previously, p.(Arg151*) was demonstrated to induce nonsense-mediated alternative splicing events leading to intact open reading frames of the resulting mRNA products (p.(Leu148_Glu165del) and p.(Leu148_Lys172del)). mRNA analysis for p.(Lys1575*) confirmed a suspected hypomorphic character, as exon 36 skipping was observed in a small fraction of CEP290 mRNA, resulting in a 36 aa in-frame deletion (p.(Glu1569_Trp1604del)). No additional cases carrying these variants were identified in the ACHM and CD cohorts. Compound heterozygous hypomorphic mutations in CEP290 may lead to a rare form of cone-dominated retinal dystrophy, a novel phenotype belonging to the CEP290-associated spectrum of ciliopathies. These findings provide insight into the effect of CEP290 mutations on the clinical phenotype.

  5. Multiple sulfatase deficiency is due to hypomorphic mutations of the SUMF1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Ida; Bouchè, Valentina; Lombardi, Alessia; Settembre, Carmine; Ballabio, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    Sulfatases catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate ester bonds from a wide variety of substrates and are implicated in several human inherited diseases. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the simultaneous deficiency of all known sulfatases. MSD is caused by mutations in the Sulfatase Modifying Factor 1 (SUMF1) gene encoding the alpha-formylglycine generating enzyme (FGE), which is responsible for the post-translational modification of sulfatases. In all MSD patients, residual sulfatase activities are detectable, at variable levels. To correlate the nature of the residual sulfatase activities detected in MSD patients with residual FGE activity, four FGE mutants (i.e. p.S155P, p.R224W, p.R345C, p.R349W) found in homozygosis in MSD patients were analyzed. Using viral-mediated gene delivery, these mutants were over-expressed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from a recently developed Sumf1 KO mouse line which is completely devoid of all sulfatase activities. The results obtained indicate that mutant SUMF1 cDNAs encode stable SUMF1 proteins which are of the appropriate molecular weight and are properly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of these cDNAs in Sumf1-/- MEFs results in partial rescue of sulfatase activities. These data indicate that MSD is due to hypomorphic SUMF1 mutations and suggest that complete loss of SUMF1 function is likely to be lethal in humans. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Super-resolution microscopy reveals a preformed NEMO lattice structure that is collapsed in incontinentia pigmenti

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholefield, Janine

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available to injury and infection, as well as cell proliferation, differentiation and survival1. Indeed, several genetic diseases result from the functional alteration of key components of NF-kB signalling2. Among these are the various rare X-linked human diseases... that hypomorphic mutations in NEMO that lead to impairment, but not abolition of NF-kB signalling, are associated with the less clinically severe anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia syndrome, whereas amorphic NEMO mutations that completely abolish NF-kB activation...

  7. Novel Hypomorphic Mutation in FANCD2 Gene Observed in a Fetus with Multiple Congenital Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radoslava Vazharova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital anomalies affect 1% to 2% of the newborns. The urinary tract and the kidneys are involved in 4-5% of the cases while upper-extremities abnormalities are present in 10%. Certain anomalies occur in isolation, whereas others are associated with systemic conditions. The prenatal detection of fetal anomalies compatible with life is a challenge for both the parents and the physician. The prognosis for the fetus/newborn and the reproductive decisions of the family largely depend on the causes underlying the disease. The reported case is of a G2P1 pregnant woman referred for routine ultrasound scan at 24 weeks of gestation (w.g.. The fetus had growth retardation, right kidney agenesis, bilateral absence of radial bones and thumbs, radial deviation of the wrists, and short humeri. Nuchal fold thickness was 5 mm and there was a single umbilical artery. After termination of pregnancy, SNP array genotyping and next-generation sequencing of targeted candidate-genes were performed trying to clarify the etiology of the fetal polymalformative syndrome. A new hypomorphic mutation in FANCD2 gene was found to underlie this fetal anomaly. The case illustrates that patients/families affected by rare monogenic disorders may benefit from application of modern technologies like microarrays and NGS.

  8. Hypomorphic mutations in PGAP2, encoding a GPI-anchor-remodeling protein, cause autosomal-recessive intellectual disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Tawamie, Hasan; Murakami, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    mutations in six genes (PIGA, PIGL, PIGM, PIGV, PIGN, and PIGO) in the ER-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway have been reported, and all are associated with phenotypes extending from malformation and lethality to severe intellectual disability, epilepsy, minor dysmorphisms, and elevated...... alkaline phosphatase (ALP). We performed autozygosity mapping and ultra-deep sequencing followed by stringent filtering and identified two homozygous PGAP2 alterations, p.Tyr99Cys and p.Arg177Pro, in seven offspring with nonspecific autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from two consanguineous...... rescue when we used strong promoters before the mutant cDNAs, suggesting a hypomorphic effect of the mutations. We report on alterations in the Golgi-located part of the GPI-anchor-biosynthesis pathway and extend the phenotypic spectrum of the GPI-anchor deficiencies to isolated intellectual disability...

  9. Immune deficiency caused by impaired expression of nuclear factor-κB essential modifier (NEMO) because of a mutation in the 5′ untranslated region of the NEMO gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooster, Jana L.; Cancrini, Caterina; Simonetti, Alessandra; Rossi, Paolo; Matteo, Gigliola Di; Romiti, Maria Luisa; Cesare, Silvia Di; Notarangelo, Luigi; Geha, Raif S.; McDonald, Douglas R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a key transcription factor that regulates both innate and adaptive immunity as well as ectodermal development. Mutations in the coding region of the IκB kinase γ/NF-κB essential modifier (NEMO) gene cause X-linked ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency. Objective To determine the genetic cause of recurrent sinopulmonary infections and dysgammaglobulinemia in a patient with a normal NEMO coding sequence and his affected brother. Methods TNF-α and IFN-α production in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation was analyzed by ELISA, NEMO mRNA levels were measured by quantitative PCR, and NEMO protein expression was measured by Western blotting. NF-κB activation was assessed by nuclear translocation of p65 and luciferase reporter gene assays. Results TLR-induced TNF-α and IFN-α production by PBMCs was impaired in the patient and his brother. Sequencing of the patient’s NEMO gene revealed a novel mutation in the 5′ untranslated region, which was also present in the brother, resulting in abnormally spliced transcripts and a 4-fold reduction in mRNA levels. NEMO protein levels in EBV transformed B cells and fibroblasts from the index patient were 8-fold lower than normal controls. NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in the patient’s EBV B cells after TLR7 ligation was defective. NF-κB–dependent luciferase gene expression in IL-1–stimulated fibroblasts from the patient was impaired. Conclusion This is the first description of immune deficiency resulting from low expression of a normal NEMO protein. PMID:20542322

  10. Compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations cause non-syndromic LHON-like optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Sylvie; Ding, Martina G; Gérard, Xavier; Zwicker, Klaus; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Rio, Marlène; Serre, Valérie; Hanein, Sylvain; Munnich, Arnold; Rotig, Agnès; Bianchi, Lucas; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Elpeleg, Orly; Kaplan, Josseline; Brandt, Ulrich; Rozet, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathy (HON) has been ascribed to mutations in mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics genes, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory enzyme genes or nuclear genes of poorly known mitochondrial function. However, the disease causing gene remains unknown in many families. The objective of the present study was to identify the molecular cause of non-syndromic LHON-like disease in siblings born to non-consanguineous parents of French origin. We used a combination of genetic analysis (gene mapping and whole-exome sequencing) in a multiplex family of non-syndromic HON and of functional analyses in patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts and the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica. We identified compound heterozygote NDUFS2 disease-causing mutations (p.Tyr53Cys; p.Tyr308Cys). Studies using patient-derived cultured skin fibroblasts revealed mildly decreased NDUFS2 and complex I abundance but apparently normal respiratory chain activity. In the yeast Y. lipolytica ortholog NUCM, the mutations resulted in absence of complex I and moderate reduction in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase activity, respectively. Biallelism for NDUFS2 mutations causing severe complex I deficiency has been previously reported to cause Leigh syndrome with optic neuropathy. Our results are consistent with the view that compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations can cause non-syndromic HON. This observation suggests a direct correlation between the severity of NDUFS2 mutations and that of the disease and further support that there exist a genetic overlap between non-syndromic and syndromic HON due to defective mitochondrial function. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Hypomorphic mutations in POLR3A are a frequent cause of sporadic and recessive spastic ataxia.

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    Minnerop, Martina; Kurzwelly, Delia; Wagner, Holger; Soehn, Anne S; Reichbauer, Jennifer; Tao, Feifei; Rattay, Tim W; Peitz, Michael; Rehbach, Kristina; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Pyle, Angela; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Timmann, Dagmar; Karaca, Ilker; Lennarz, Martina; Baets, Jonathan; Hengel, Holger; Synofzik, Matthis; Atasu, Burcu; Feely, Shawna; Kennerson, Marina; Stendel, Claudia; Lindig, Tobias; Gonzalez, Michael A; Stirnberg, Rüdiger; Sturm, Marc; Roeske, Sandra; Jung, Johanna; Bauer, Peter; Lohmann, Ebba; Herms, Stefan; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Nicholson, Garth; Mahanjah, Muhammad; Sharkia, Rajech; Carloni, Paolo; Brüstle, Oliver; Klopstock, Thomas; Mathews, Katherine D; Shy, Michael E; de Jonghe, Peter; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita; Kohlhase, Jürgen; Schmitt, Ina; Wolf, Michael; Greschus, Susanne; Amunts, Katrin; Maier, Wolfgang; Schöls, Ludger; Nürnberg, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan; Klockgether, Thomas; Ramirez, Alfredo; Schüle, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Despite extensive efforts, half of patients with rare movement disorders such as hereditary spastic paraplegias and cerebellar ataxias remain genetically unexplained, implicating novel genes and unrecognized mutations in known genes. Non-coding DNA variants are suspected to account for a substantial part of undiscovered causes of rare diseases. Here we identified mutations located deep in introns of POLR3A to be a frequent cause of hereditary spastic paraplegia and cerebellar ataxia. First, whole-exome sequencing findings in a recessive spastic ataxia family turned our attention to intronic variants in POLR3A, a gene previously associated with hypomyelinating leukodystrophy type 7. Next, we screened a cohort of hereditary spastic paraplegia and cerebellar ataxia cases (n = 618) for mutations in POLR3A and identified compound heterozygous POLR3A mutations in ∼3.1% of index cases. Interestingly, >80% of POLR3A mutation carriers presented the same deep-intronic mutation (c.1909+22G>A), which activates a cryptic splice site in a tissue and stage of development-specific manner and leads to a novel distinct and uniform phenotype. The phenotype is characterized by adolescent-onset progressive spastic ataxia with frequent occurrence of tremor, involvement of the central sensory tracts and dental problems (hypodontia, early onset of severe and aggressive periodontal disease). Instead of the typical hypomyelination magnetic resonance imaging pattern associated with classical POLR3A mutations, cases carrying c.1909+22G>A demonstrated hyperintensities along the superior cerebellar peduncles. These hyperintensities may represent the structural correlate to the cerebellar symptoms observed in these patients. The associated c.1909+22G>A variant was significantly enriched in 1139 cases with spastic ataxia-related phenotypes as compared to unrelated neurological and non-neurological phenotypes and healthy controls (P = 1.3 × 10-4). In this study we demonstrate that (i) autosomal

  12. A hypomorphic mutation in Lpin1 induces progressively improving neuropathy and lipodystrophy in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mul, J.D.; Nadra, K.; Jagalur, N.B.; Nijman, I.J.; Toonen, P.W.; Medard, J.J.; Gres, S.; de Bruin, A.; Han, G.S.; Brouwers, J.F.; Carman, G.M.; Saulnier-Blache, J.S.; Meijer, D.; Chrast, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Lpin1 gene encodes the phosphatidate phosphatase (PAP1) enzyme Lipin 1, which plays a critical role in lipid metabolism. In this study we describe the identification and characterization of a rat model with a mutated Lpin1 gene (Lpin1(1Hubr)), generated by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis.

  13. Two CGD Families with a Hypomorphic Mutation in the Activation Domain of p67(phox)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Dirk; van Buul, Jaap D.; Tool, Anton Tj; Matute, Juan D.; Marchal, Christophe M.; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Köker, M. Yavuz; de Boer, Martin; van Leeuwen, Karin; Segal, Anthony W.; Pick, Edgar; Dinauer, Mary C.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a rare immunodeficiency caused by a defect in the leukocyte NADPH oxidase. This enzyme generates superoxide, which is needed for the killing of bacteria and fungi by phagocytic leukocytes. Most CGD patients have mutations in CYBB, the X-linked gene that encodes

  14. A single aspartate mutation in the conserved catalytic site of Rev3L generates a hypomorphic phenotype in vivo and in vitro.

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    Fritzen, Rémi; Delbos, Frédéric; De Smet, Annie; Palancade, Benoît; Canman, Christine E; Aoufouchi, Said; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Storck, Sébastien

    2016-10-01

    Rev3, the catalytic subunit of yeast DNA polymerase ζ, is required for UV resistance and UV-induced mutagenesis, while its mammalian ortholog, REV3L, plays further vital roles in cell proliferation and embryonic development. To assess the contribution of REV3L catalytic activity to its in vivo function, we generated mutant mouse strains in which one or two Ala residues were substituted to the Asp of the invariant catalytic YGDTDS motif. The simultaneous mutation of both Asp (ATA) phenocopies the Rev3l knockout, which proves that the catalytic activity is mandatory for the vital functions of Rev3L, as reported recently. Surprisingly, although the mutation of the first Asp severely impairs the enzymatic activity of other B-family DNA polymerases, the corresponding mutation of Rev3 (ATD) is hypomorphic in yeast and mouse, as it does not affect viability and proliferation and moderately impacts UVC-induced cell death and mutagenesis. Interestingly, Rev3l hypomorphic mutant mice display a distinct, albeit modest, alteration of the immunoglobulin gene mutation spectrum at G-C base pairs, further documenting its role in this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Female heterozygotes for the hypomorphic R40H mutation can have ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency and present in early adolescence: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Edwin P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency is the most common hereditary urea cycle defect. It is inherited in an X-linked manner and classically presents in neonates with encephalopathy and hyperammonemia in males. Females and males with hypomorphic mutations present later, sometimes in adulthood, with episodes that are frequently fatal. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl presented with progressive encephalopathy, hyperammonemic coma and lactic acidosis. She had a history of intermittent regular episodes of nausea and vomiting from seven years of age, previously diagnosed as abdominal migraines. At presentation she was hyperammonemic (ammonia 477 μmol/L with no other biochemical indicators of hepatic dysfunction or damage and had grossly elevated urinary orotate (orotate/creatinine ratio 1.866 μmol/mmol creatinine, reference range A mutation was identified in the ornithine transcarbamylase gene (OTC in our patient confirming the first symptomatic female shown heterozygous for the R40H mutation. A review of the literature and correspondence with authors of patients with the R40H mutation identified one other symptomatic female patient who died of hyperammonemic coma in her late teens. Conclusions This report expands the clinical spectrum of presentation of ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency to female heterozygotes for the hypomorphic R40H OTC mutation. Although this mutation is usually associated with a mild phenotype, females with this mutation can present with acute decompensation, which can be fatal. Ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained acute confusion, even without a suggestive family history.

  16. Mutation of Non-Essential Cysteines Shows that NF-κB Essential Modulator (NEMO) Forms a Constitutive Noncovalent Dimer that Binds IκB Kinase-β (IKKβ) with High Affinity

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    Cote, Shaun M.; Gilmore, Thomas D.; Shaffer, Robert; Weber, Urs; Bollam, Rishitha; Golden, Mary S.; Glover, Kimberley; Herscovitch, Melanie; Ennis, Thomas; Allen, Karen N.; Whitty, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) associates with the catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ to form the IκB kinase (IKK) complex, and is a key regulator of NF-κB pathway signaling. Biochemical and structural characterization of NEMO has been challenging, however, leading to conflicting data on basic biochemical properties such as the oligomeric state of active NEMO and its binding affinity for IKKβ. We show that up to seven of NEMO’s 11 cysteine residues can be mutated to generate recombinant full-length NEMO that is highly soluble and active. Using a fluorescence anisotropy binding assay we show that full-length NEMO binds a 44-mer peptide encompassing residues 701-745 of IKKβ with KD = 2.2 ± 0.8 nM. The IKKβ binding affinities of mutants with five and seven Cys-to-Ala substitutions are indistinguishable from that of wild-type NEMO. Moreover, when expressed in NEMO −/− fibroblasts, the 5xAla and 7xAla NEMO mutants can interact with cellular IKKβ and restore NF-κB signaling to provide protection against TNFα-induced cell death. Treatment of the NEMO-reconstituted cells with H2O2 led to formation of covalent dimers for wild-type NEMO and the 5xAla mutant, but not for the 7xAla mutant, confirming that Cys54 and/or Cys347 can mediate inter-chain disulfide bonding. However, the IKKβ binding affinity of NEMO is unaffected by the presence or absence of inter-chain disulfide bonding at Cys54 – which lies within the IKKβ binding domain of NEMO – or at Cys347, indicating that NEMO exists as a noncovalent dimer independent of the redox state of its cysteines. This conclusion was corroborated by the observation that the secondary structure content of NEMO and its thermal stability were independent of the presence or absence of inter-chain disulfide bonds. PMID:24266532

  17. Compound heterozygosity for severe and hypomorphic NDUFS2 mutations cause non-syndromic LHON-like optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerber, S.; Ding, M.G.; Gerard, X.; Zwicker, K.; Zanlonghi, X.; Rio, M. del; Serre, V.; Hanein, S.; Munnich, A.; Rotig, A.; Bianchi, L.; Amati-Bonneau, P.; Elpeleg, O.; Kaplan, J.; Brandt, U.; Rozet, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-syndromic hereditary optic neuropathy (HON) has been ascribed to mutations in mitochondrial fusion/fission dynamics genes, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA-encoded respiratory enzyme genes or nuclear genes of poorly known mitochondrial function. However, the disease causing gene remains

  18. Finding NEMO in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowicz, Agata; Hejduk, Paulina; Pietrucha, Tadeusz; Nowakowska, Magdalena; Płuciennik, Elżbieta; Pospiech, Karolina; Gach, Agnieszka; Rybak-Krzyszkowska, Magda; Sakowicz, Bartosz; Kaminski, Marek; Krasomski, Grzegorz; Biesiada, Lidia

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of preeclampsia and its way of inheritance are still a mystery. Biochemical and immunochemical studies reveal a substantial increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6 concentrations in the blood of women with preeclampsia. The level of these factors is regulated by nuclear facxtor-kappa B, whose activation in a classical pathway requires inhibitory kappa B kinase gamma (known as NEMO or IKBKG). Moreover, NEMO can schedule between cytoplasma and the nucleus. In the nucleus, IKBKG interacts with other proteins, and thus, it is implicated in the regulation of different gene expressions, which are related to cell cycle progression, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. This is the first study investigating the association between the level of NEMO gene expression and the presence of preeclampsia. We tested the hypothesis that the simultaneous increase in NEMO gene expression both in the mother and her fetus may be responsible for the preeclampsia development. Moreover, the relationships between clinical risk factors of preeclampsia and the levels of NEMO gene expression in blood, umbilical cord blood, and placentas were investigated. A total of 91 women (43 preeclamptic women and 48 controls) and their children were examined. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess the amount total NEMO messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) content and the mRNA level of each NEMO transcript from exons 1A, 1B, and 1C in maternal blood, umbilical cord blood, and placentas. Univariate analyses and correlation tests were performed to examine the association between NEMO gene expression and preeclampsia. Newborn weight and height, maternal platelet number, and gestational age (week of delivery) were lower in the group of women with preeclampsia than controls. NEMO gene expression level was found to be almost 7 times higher in the group of women with preeclampsia than healthy controls. The correlation

  19. RedNemo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkan, Ferhat; Erten, Cesim

    2017-01-01

    tested on small-scale networks thus far and when applied on large-scale networks of popular PPI databases, the executions require unreasonable amounts of time, or may even crash without producing any output for some instances even after several months of execution. We provide an algorithm, Red...... better with RedNemo than with the alternatives under most of the experimented removal/rewiring ratios. Furthermore, through extensive tests on databases of varying sizes, we show that RedNemo achieves these results with much better running time performances. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Supplementary...

  20. A mitochondrial DNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase specifically impairs male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulik R; Miriyala, Ganesh K; Littleton, Aimee J; Yang, Heiko; Trinh, Kien; Young, Janet M; Kennedy, Scott R; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pallanck, Leo J; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    Due to their strict maternal inheritance in most animals and plants, mitochondrial genomes are predicted to accumulate mutations that are beneficial or neutral in females but harmful in males. Although a few male-harming mtDNA mutations have been identified, consistent with this ‘Mother’s Curse’, their effect on females has been largely unexplored. Here, we identify COIIG177S, a mtDNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase II, which specifically impairs male fertility due to defects in sperm development and function without impairing other male or female functions. COIIG177S represents one of the clearest examples of a ‘male-harming’ mtDNA mutation in animals and suggest that the hypomorphic mtDNA mutations like COIIG177S might specifically impair male gametogenesis. Intriguingly, some D. melanogaster nuclear genetic backgrounds can fully rescue COIIG177S -associated sterility, consistent with previously proposed models that nuclear genomes can regulate the phenotypic manifestation of mtDNA mutations. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16923.001 PMID:27481326

  1. Loss of Function of Evc2 in Dental Mesenchyme Leads to Hypomorphic Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Takeda, H; Tsuji, T; Kamiya, N; Kunieda, T; Mochida, Y; Mishina, Y

    2017-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal-recessive skeletal dysplasia, characterized by short stature and postaxial polydactyly. A series of dental abnormalities, including hypomorphic enamel formation, has been reported in patients with EvC. Despite previous studies that attempted to uncover the mechanism leading to abnormal tooth development, little is known regarding how hypomorphic enamel is formed in patients with EvC. In the current study, using Evc2/ Limbin mutant mice we recently generated, we analyzed enamel formation in the mouse incisor. Consistent with symptoms in human patients, we observed that Evc2 mutant mice had smaller incisors with enamel hypoplasia. Histologic observations coupled with ameloblast marker analyses suggested that Evc2 mutant preameloblasts were capable of differentiating to secretory ameloblasts; this process, however, was apparently delayed, due to delayed odontoblast differentiation, mediated by a limited number of dental mesenchymal stem cells in Evc2 mutant mice. This concept was further supported by the observation that dental mesenchymal-specific deletion of Evc2 phenocopied the tooth abnormalities in Evc2 mutants. Overall, our findings suggest that mutations in Evc2 affect dental mesenchymal stem cell homeostasis, which further leads to hypomorphic enamel formation.

  2. Double hit of NEMO gene in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowicz, Agata; Pietrucha, Tadeusz; Rybak-Krzyszkowska, Magda; Huras, Hubert; Gach, Agnieszka; Sakowicz, Bartosz; Banaszczyk, Mateusz; Grzesiak, Mariusz; Biesiada, Lidia

    2017-01-01

    The precise etiology of preeclampsia is unknown. Family studies indicate that both genetic and environmental factors influence its development. One of these factors is NFkB, whose activation depends on NEMO (NFkB essential modulator. This is the first study to investigate the association between the existence of single nucleotide variant of the NEMO gene and the appearance of preeclampsia. A total of 151 women (72 preeclamptic women and 79 controls) and their children were examined. Sanger sequencing was performed to identify variants in the NEMO gene in the preeclamptic mothers. The maternal identified variants were then sought in the studied groups of children, and in the maternal and child controls, using RFLP-PCR. Real-time RT-PCR was performed to assess NEMO gene expression in maternal blood, umbilical cord blood and placentas. The sequencing process indicated the existence of two different variants in the 3'UTR region of the NEMO gene of preeclamptic women (IKBKG:c.*368C>A and IKBKG:c.*402C>T). The simultaneous occurrence of the TT genotype in the mother and the TT genotype in the daughter or a T allele in the son increased the risk of preeclampsia development 2.59 fold. Additionally, we found that the configuration of maternal/fetal genotypes (maternal TT/ daughter TT or maternal TT/son T) of IKBKG:c.*402C/T variant is associated with the level of NEMO gene expression. Our results showed that, the simultaneous occurrence of the maternal TT genotype (IKBKG:c.*402C>T variants) and TT genotype in the daughter or T allele in the son correlates with the level of NEMO gene expression and increases the risk of preeclampsia development. Our observations may offer a new insight into the genetic etiology and pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

  3. NEMO is essential for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded vFLIP K13-induced gene expression and protection against death receptor-induced cell death, and its N-terminal 251 residues are sufficient for this process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolani, Bhairavi; Matta, Hittu; Gopalakrishnan, Ramakrishnan; Punj, Vasu; Chaudhary, Preet M

    2014-06-01

    activate the NF-κB pathway by binding to adaptor protein NEMO/IKKγ. However, whether K13 can also induce gene expression independently of NEMO and the minimum region of NEMO that is sufficient for supporting K13-induced NF-κB remain to be delineated. Furthermore, the contribution of NEMO and NF-κB to the protective effect of K13 against death receptor-induced apoptosis is not clear. We demonstrate that NEMO is required for modulation of K13-induced genes and its N-terminal 251 amino acids are sufficient for supporting K13-induced NF-κB. The ability of K13 to protect against TNF-α-induced cell death is critically dependent on its ability to interact with NEMO and activate NF-κB. Our results suggest that K13-based gene therapy approaches may have utility for the treatment of patients with NEMO mutations and immunodeficiency.

  4. PORFIDO on the NEMO Phase 2 tower

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaffoni, Orlando; Cordelli, Marco; Habel, Roberto; Martini, Agnese; Trasatti, Luciano [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (RM) (Italy)

    2014-11-18

    We have designed and built an underwater measurement system, PORFIDO (Physical Oceanography by RFID Outreach) to gather oceanographic data from the Optical Modules of a neutrino telescope with a minimum of disturbance to the main installation. PORFIDO is composed of a sensor glued to the outside of an Optical Module, in contact with seawater, and of a reader placed inside the sphere, facing the sensor. Data are transmitted to the reader through the glass by RFID and to shore in real time for periods of years. The sensor gathers power from the radio frequency, thus eliminating the need for batteries or connectors through the glass. We have deployed four PORFIDO probes measuring temperatures with the NEMO-KM3Net-Italy Phase 2 tower in april 2013. The four probes are operative and are transmitting temperature data from 3500 m depth.

  5. Cellular defects caused by hypomorphic variants of the Bloom syndrome helicase gene BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Vivek M; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extraordinary cancer incidence early in life and an average life expectancy of ~27 years. Premature stop codons in BLM, which encodes a DNA helicase that functions in DNA double-strand-break repair, make up the vast majority of Bloom syndrome mutations, with only 13 single amino acid changes identified in the syndrome. Sequencing projects have identified nearly one hundred single nucleotide variants in BLM that cause amino acid changes of uncertain significance. Here, in addition to identifying five BLM variants incapable of complementing certain defects of Bloom syndrome cells, making them candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, we characterize a new class of BLM variants that cause some, but not all, cellular defects of Bloom syndrome. We find elevated sister-chromatid exchanges, a delayed DNA damage response and inefficient DNA repair. Conversely, hydroxyurea sensitivity and quadriradial chromosome accumulation, both characteristic of Bloom syndrome cells, are absent. These intermediate variants affect sites in BLM that function in ATP hydrolysis and in contacting double-stranded DNA. Allele frequency and cellular defects suggest candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, and intermediate BLM variants that are hypomorphic which, instead of causing Bloom syndrome, may increase a person's risk for cancer or possibly other Bloom-syndrome-associated disorders, such as type-2 diabetes.

  6. Multfilm "V poiskah Nemo" delajet detei ubiitsami rõbok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Animafilm "Kalapoeg Nemo" : režissöör Andrew Stanton : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2003. Filmi vaatamise järgselt on tuhanded lapsed lasknud oma akvaariumikalad vabadusse, põhjustades sellega nende huku või keskkonnaprobleeme

  7. Measurement of double-beta-decay—experiments TGV and NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štekl, I.

    2001-06-01

    A description of the aim and present status of the experiments NEMO and TGV are presented. The NEMO collaboration developed the detector NEMO-2 to investigate double-beta ( ββ) decay of 100Mo, 116Cd, 82Se and 96Zr. The results obtained for the above mentioned isotopes are given. The new detector NEMO-3, which is approximately 20 times larger than NEMO-2, is under construction. The NEMO-3 detector should allow the study of 0 νββ decays of 100Mo (or other isotopes) with half-life ˜10 25years, corresponding to neutrino masses of 0.1- 0.3 eV. The TGV I collaboration has studied the ββ decay of 48Ca. The result T 2 νββ1/2=(4.2 +3.3-1.3)×10 19 years has been found. Experiment TGV II is devoted to measurement of the ββ decay (β +β +, β +/ EC, EC/ EC) of 106Cd, particularly the 2 νEC/EC mode.

  8. Data transmission and acquisition in NEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunkheila, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), sez. Roma 1, Marconi Building, University of Rome ' La Sapienza' , P.le Aldo Moro 2 - 00185 (Italy)]. E-mail: gabriele.bunkheila@gmail.com

    2006-11-15

    A comprehensive system for data transmission and acquisition has been developed for an 'a la NEMO' underwater neutrino telescope based on Cerenkov light detection using photomultipliers (PMTs) as sensors. Signals generated by each sensor are triggered, sampled and tagged by an electronics board, called Front End Module (FEM). Data streams from up to eight FEMs located on one tower floor are collected by a concentration board called Floor Control Module (FCM) and sent to a twin FCM board-located at the onshore station and plugged into an interface machine (FCM Interface, or FCMI) via a PCI bus-through a DWDM-compliant optical fiber and using a self-synchronous serial protocol. All sensor data reach the onshore lab through FCMI where they are made available to subsequent elaboration processes, such as time-wise alignment and muon track event-triggering. To meet requirements of the latter, onshore data unpacking is carried out with respect to their topological origin. The system promised, and keeps on showing, very light charges on power consumption and infrastructure complexity, while having recently proved to behave at high performance levels in its optical part.

  9. Expanding the substantial interactome of NEMO using protein microarrays.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fenner, Beau J

    2010-01-01

    Signal transduction by the NF-kappaB pathway is a key regulator of a host of cellular responses to extracellular and intracellular messages. The NEMO adaptor protein lies at the top of this pathway and serves as a molecular conduit, connecting signals transmitted from upstream sensors to the downstream NF-kappaB transcription factor and subsequent gene activation. The position of NEMO within this pathway makes it an attractive target from which to search for new proteins that link NF-kappaB signaling to additional pathways and upstream effectors. In this work, we have used protein microarrays to identify novel NEMO interactors. A total of 112 protein interactors were identified, with the most statistically significant hit being the canonical NEMO interactor IKKbeta, with IKKalpha also being identified. Of the novel interactors, more than 30% were kinases, while at least 25% were involved in signal transduction. Binding of NEMO to several interactors, including CALB1, CDK2, SAG, SENP2 and SYT1, was confirmed using GST pulldown assays and coimmunoprecipitation, validating the initial screening approach. Overexpression of CALB1, CDK2 and SAG was found to stimulate transcriptional activation by NF-kappaB, while SYT1 overexpression repressed TNFalpha-dependent NF-kappaB transcriptional activation in human embryonic kidney cells. Corresponding with this finding, RNA silencing of CDK2, SAG and SENP2 reduced NF-kappaB transcriptional activation, supporting a positive role for these proteins in the NF-kappaB pathway. The identification of a host of new NEMO interactors opens up new research opportunities to improve understanding of this essential cell signaling pathway.

  10. Intestinal microbiota sustains inflammation and autoimmunity induced by hypomorphic RAG defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoni, Rosita; Fontana, Elena; Guglielmetti, Simone; Fosso, Bruno; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Maina, Virginia; Taverniti, Valentina; Castiello, Maria Carmina; Mantero, Stefano; Pacchiana, Giovanni; Musio, Silvia; Pedotti, Rosetta; Selmi, Carlo; Mora, J. Rodrigo; Pesole, Graziano; Vezzoni, Paolo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is caused by hypomorphic Rag mutations and characterized by a profound immunodeficiency associated with autoimmune-like manifestations. Both in humans and mice, OS is mediated by oligoclonal activated T and B cells. The role of microbial signals in disease pathogenesis is debated. Here, we show that Rag2R229Q knock-in mice developed an inflammatory bowel disease affecting both the small bowel and colon. Lymphocytes were sufficient for disease induction, as intestinal CD4 T cells with a Th1/Th17 phenotype reproduced the pathological picture when transplanted into immunocompromised hosts. Moreover, oral tolerance was impaired in Rag2R229Q mice, and transfer of wild-type (WT) regulatory T cells ameliorated bowel inflammation. Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency in the gut resulted in enhanced absorption of microbial products and altered composition of commensal communities. The Rag2R229Q microbiota further contributed to the immunopathology because its transplant into WT recipients promoted Th1/Th17 immune response. Consistently, long-term dosing of broad-spectrum antibiotics (ABXs) in Rag2R229Q mice ameliorated intestinal and systemic autoimmunity by diminishing the frequency of mucosal and circulating gut-tropic CCR9+ Th1 and Th17 T cells. Remarkably, serum hyper-IgE, a hallmark of the disease, was also normalized by ABX treatment. These results indicate that intestinal microbes may play a critical role in the distinctive immune dysregulation of OS. PMID:26926994

  11. Neutrino Physics without Neutrinos: Recent results from the NEMO-3 experiment and plans for SuperNEMO

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    The observation of neutrino oscillations has proved that neutrinos have mass. This discovery has renewed and strengthened the interest in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments which provide the only practical way to determine whether neutrinos are Majorana or Dirac particles. The recently completed NEMO-3 experiment, located in the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane in the Frejus Tunnel, was an experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decays using a powerful technique for detecting a two-electron final state by employing an apparatus combining tracking, calorimetry, and the time-of-flight measurements. We will present latest results from NEMO-3 and will discuss the status of SuperNEMO, the next generation experiment that will exploit the same experimental technique to extend the sensitivity of the current search.

  12. Mutation of nonessential cysteines shows that the NF-κB essential modulator forms a constitutive noncovalent dimer that binds IκB kinase-β with high affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Shaun M; Gilmore, Thomas D; Shaffer, Robert; Weber, Urs; Bollam, Rishitha; Golden, Mary S; Glover, Kimberley; Herscovitch, Melanie; Ennis, Thomas; Allen, Karen N; Whitty, Adrian

    2013-12-23

    NEMO (NF-κB essential modulator) associates with catalytic subunits IKKα and IKKβ to form the IκB kinase (IKK) complex and is a key regulator of NF-κB pathway signaling. Biochemical and structural characterization of NEMO has been challenging, however, leading to conflicting data about basic biochemical properties such as the oligomeric state of active NEMO and its binding affinity for IKKβ. We show that up to seven of NEMO's 11 cysteine residues can be mutated to generate recombinant full-length NEMO that is highly soluble and active. Using a fluorescence anisotropy binding assay, we show that full-length NEMO binds a 44-mer peptide encompassing residues 701-745 of IKKβ with a K(D) of 2.2 ± 0.8 nM. The IKKβ binding affinities of mutants with five and seven Cys-to-Ala substitutions are indistinguishable from that of wild-type NEMO. Moreover, when expressed in NEMO -/- fibroblasts, the five-Ala and seven-Ala NEMO mutants can interact with cellular IKKβ and restore NF-κB signaling to provide protection against tumor necrosis factor α-induced cell death. Treatment of the NEMO-reconstituted cells with H₂O₂ led to the formation of covalent dimers for wild-type NEMO and the five-Ala mutant, but not for the seven-Ala mutant, confirming that Cys54 and/or Cys347 can mediate interchain disulfide bonding. However, the IKKβ binding affinity of NEMO is unaffected by the presence or absence of interchain disulfide bonding at Cys54, which lies within the IKKβ binding domain of NEMO, or at Cys347, indicating that NEMO exists as a noncovalent dimer independent of the redox state of its cysteines. This conclusion was corroborated by the observation that the secondary structure content of NEMO and its thermal stability were independent of the presence or absence of interchain disulfide bonds.

  13. Mutations in IFT172 cause isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bujakowska, K.M; Zhang, Q; Siemiatkowska, A.M; Liu, Q; Place, E; Falk, M.J; Consugar, M; Lancelot, M.E; Antonio, A; Lonjou, C; Carpentier, W; Mohand-Said, S; Hollander, A.I. den; Cremers, F.P.M; Leroy, B.P; Gai, X; Sahel, J.A; Born, L.I. van den; Collin, R.W.J; Zeitz, C; Audo, I; Pierce, E.A

    2015-01-01

    ...)] that underlie an isolated retinal degeneration and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Extensive functional analyses of the identified mutations in cell culture, rat retina and in zebrafish demonstrated their hypomorphic or null nature...

  14. Quantification of cellular NEMO content and its impact on NF-κB activation by genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byounghoon Hwang

    Full Text Available NF-κB essential modulator, NEMO, plays a key role in canonical NF-κB signaling induced by a variety of stimuli, including cytokines and genotoxic agents. To dissect the different biochemical and functional roles of NEMO in NF-κB signaling, various mutant forms of NEMO have been previously analyzed. However, transient or stable overexpression of wild-type NEMO can significantly inhibit NF-κB activation, thereby confounding the analysis of NEMO mutant phenotypes. What levels of NEMO overexpression lead to such an artifact and what levels are tolerated with no significant impact on NEMO function in NF-κB activation are currently unknown. Here we purified full-length recombinant human NEMO protein and used it as a standard to quantify the average number of NEMO molecules per cell in a 1.3E2 NEMO-deficient murine pre-B cell clone stably reconstituted with full-length human NEMO (C5. We determined that the C5 cell clone has an average of 4 x 10(5 molecules of NEMO per cell. Stable reconstitution of 1.3E2 cells with different numbers of NEMO molecules per cell has demonstrated that a 10-fold range of NEMO expression (0.6-6x10(5 molecules per cell yields statistically equivalent NF-κB activation in response to the DNA damaging agent etoposide. Using the C5 cell line, we also quantified the number of NEMO molecules per cell in several commonly employed human cell lines. These results establish baseline numbers of endogenous NEMO per cell and highlight surprisingly normal functionality of NEMO in the DNA damage pathway over a wide range of expression levels that can provide a guideline for future NEMO reconstitution studies.

  15. Large Scale Simulations of Nanoelectronic devices with NEMO3-D on the Teragrid

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Hansang; Clark, Steve; Klimeck, Gerhard; Lee, Sunhee; Naumov, Maxim; Saied, Faisal

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes recent progress in large scale numerical simulations for computational nano-electronics using the NEMO3-D package. NEMO3-D is a parallel analysis tool for nano-electronic devices such as quantum dots. The atomistic model used in NEMO3-D leads to large scale computations in two main phases: strain and electronic structure. This paper focuses primarily on the electronic structure phase of the computations. The eigenvalue problem associated with the Hamiltonian matrix is cha...

  16. Structural Basis for Recognition of Diubiquitins by NEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Y.C.; Lin, S.C.; Rospigliosi, C.C.; Conze, D.B.; Wu, C.J.; Ashwell, J.D.; Eliezer, D.; Wu, H.; (Cornell); (NIH)

    2009-03-27

    NEMO is the regulatory subunit of the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) in NF-{kappa}B activation, and its CC2-LZ region interacts with Lys63 (K63)-linked polyubiquitin to recruit IKK to receptor signaling complexes. In vitro, CC2-LZ also interacts with tandem diubiquitin. Here we report the crystal structure of CC2-LZ with two dimeric coiled coils representing CC2 and LZ, respectively. Surprisingly, mutagenesis and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments reveal that the binding sites for diubiquitins at LZ are composites of both chains and that each ubiquitin in diubiquitins interacts with symmetrical NEMO asymmetrically. For tandem diubiquitin, the first ubiquitin uses the conserved hydrophobic patch and the C-terminal tail, while the second ubiquitin uses an adjacent surface patch. For K63-linked diubiquitin, the proximal ubiquitin uses its conserved hydrophobic patch, while the distal ubiquitin mostly employs the C-terminal arm including the K63 linkage residue. These studies uncover the energetics and geometry for mutual recognition of NEMO and diubiquitins.

  17. A Hypomorphic PALB2 Allele Gives Rise to an Unusual Form of FA-N Associated with Lymphoid Tumour Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Byrd

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Patients with biallelic truncating mutations in PALB2 have a severe form of Fanconi anaemia (FA-N, with a predisposition for developing embryonal-type tumours in infancy. Here we describe two unusual patients from a single family, carrying biallelic PALB2 mutations, one truncating, c.1676_1677delAAinsG;(p.Gln559ArgfsTer2, and the second, c.2586+1G>A; p.Thr839_Lys862del resulting in an in frame skip of exon 6 (24 amino acids. Strikingly, the affected individuals did not exhibit the severe developmental defects typical of FA-N patients and initially presented with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The expressed p.Thr839_Lys862del mutant PALB2 protein retained the ability to interact with BRCA2, previously unreported in FA-N patients. There was also a large increased chromosomal radiosensitivity following irradiation in G2 and increased sensitivity to mitomycin C. Although patient cells were unable to form Rad51 foci following exposure to either DNA damaging agent, U2OS cells, in which the mutant PALB2 with in frame skip of exon 6 was induced, did show recruitment of Rad51 to foci following damage. We conclude that a very mild form of FA-N exists arising from a hypomorphic PALB2 allele.

  18. Cdc20 hypomorphic mice fail to counteract de novo synthesis of cyclin B1 in mitosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malureanu, L.; Jeganathan, K.B.; Jin, F.; Baker, D.J.; Ree, J.H.; Gullon, O.; Chen, Z.; Henley, J.R.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2010-01-01

    Cdc20 is an activator of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome that initiates anaphase onset by ordering the destruction of cyclin B1 and securin in metaphase. To study the physiological significance of Cdc20 in higher eukaryotes, we generated hypomorphic mice that express small amounts of this

  19. A mitochondrial DNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase specifically impairs male fertility in Drosophila melanogaster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patel, Maulik R; Miriyala, Ganesh K; Littleton, Aimee J; Yang, Heiko; Trinh, Kien; Young, Janet M; Kennedy, Scott R; Yamashita, Yukiko M; Pallanck, Leo J; Malik, Harmit S

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we identify COII(G177S), a mtDNA hypomorph of cytochrome oxidase II, which specifically impairs male fertility due to defects in sperm development and function without impairing other male or female functions. COII(G177S...

  20. Nano-electromechanical oscillators (NEMOs) for RF technologies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Czaplewski, David A.; Gibson, John Murray (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Webster, James R.; Carton, Andrew James; Keeler, Bianca Elizabeth Nelson; Carr, Dustin Wade; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Tallant, David Robert; Boyce, Brad Lee; Sullivan, John Patrick; Dyck, Christopher William; Chen, Xidong (Cedarville University, Cedarville, OH)

    2004-12-01

    Nano-electromechanical oscillators (NEMOs), capacitively-coupled radio frequency (RF) MEMS switches incorporating dissipative dielectrics, new processing technologies for tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films, and scientific understanding of dissipation mechanisms in small mechanical structures were developed in this project. NEMOs are defined as mechanical oscillators with critical dimensions of 50 nm or less and resonance frequencies approaching 1 GHz. Target applications for these devices include simple, inexpensive clocks in electrical circuits, passive RF electrical filters, or platforms for sensor arrays. Ta-C NEMO arrays were used to demonstrate a novel optomechanical structure that shows remarkable sensitivity to small displacements (better than 160 fm/Hz {sup 1/2}) and suitability as an extremely sensitive accelerometer. The RF MEMS capacitively-coupled switches used ta-C as a dissipative dielectric. The devices showed a unipolar switching response to a unipolar stimulus, indicating the absence of significant dielectric charging, which has historically been the major reliability issue with these switches. This technology is promising for the development of reliable, low-power RF switches. An excimer laser annealing process was developed that permits full in-plane stress relaxation in ta-C films in air under ambient conditions, permitting the application of stress-reduced ta-C films in areas where low thermal budget is required, e.g. MEMS integration with pre-existing CMOS electronics. Studies of mechanical dissipation in micro- and nano-scale ta-C mechanical oscillators at room temperature revealed that mechanical losses are limited by dissipation associated with mechanical relaxation in a broad spectrum of defects with activation energies for mechanical relaxation ranging from 0.35 eV to over 0.55 eV. This work has established a foundation for the creation of devices based on nanomechanical structures, and outstanding critical research areas that need

  1. Hypomorphic Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of NSDHL Cause CK Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W.; Severson, Tesa M.; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W.; Kratz, Lisa E.; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D.; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E.; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N.; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E.; Merkens, Louise S.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Waters, Paula J.; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S.; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E.; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R.; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I.; Herman, Gail E.; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I.; Jones, Steven J.M.; Steiner, Robert D.; Raymond, F. Lucy; Marra, Marco A.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.

    2010-01-01

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. PMID:21129721

  2. Nemo-3 experiment assets and limitations. Perspective for the double {beta} physics; Experience Nemo 3 avantage et limitations. Prospective pour la physique double {beta}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augier, C

    2005-06-15

    After an introduction to this report in Chapter 1, I present a status of our knowledge in neutrino physics in Chapter 2. Then, I detail in Chapter 3 all the choices made for the design and realisation of the NEMO 3 detector for the research of double beta decay process. Performance of the detector is presented, concerning both the capacity of the detector to identify the backgrounds and the ability to study all the {beta}{beta} process. I also explain the methods chosen by the NEMO collaboration to reduce the radon activity inside the detector and to make this background negligible today. This chapter, which is written in English, is the 'Technical report of the NEMO 3 detector' and forms an independent report for the NEMO collaborators. I finish this report in Chapter 4 with a ten years prospect for experimental projects in physics, with both the SuperNEMO project and its experiment program, and also by comparing the most interesting experiments, CUORE and GERDA, showing as an example the effect of nuclear matrix elements on the neutrino effective mass measurement. (author)

  3. Coarsening of physics for biogeochemical model in NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricaud, Clement; Le Sommer, Julien; Madec, Gurvan; Deshayes, Julie; Chanut, Jerome; Perruche, Coralie

    2017-04-01

    Ocean mesoscale and submesoscale turbulence contribute to ocean tracer transport and to shaping ocean biogeochemical tracers distribution. Representing adequately tracer transport in ocean models therefore requires to increase model resolution so that the impact of ocean turbulence is adequately accounted for. But due to supercomputers power and storage limitations, global biogeochemical models are not yet run routinely at eddying resolution. Still, because the "effective resolution" of eddying ocean models is much coarser than the physical model grid resolution, tracer transport can be reconstructed to a large extent by computing tracer transport and diffusion with a model grid resolution close to the effective resolution of the physical model. This observation has motivated the implementation of a new capability in NEMO ocean model (http://www.nemo-ocean.eu/) that allows to run the physical model and the tracer transport model at different grid resolutions. In a first time, we present results obtained with this new capability applied to a synthetic age tracer in a global eddying model configuration. In this model configuration, ocean dynamic is computed at ¼° resolution but tracer transport is computed at 3/4° resolution. The solution obtained is compared to 2 reference setup ,one at ¼° resolution for both physics and passive tracer models and one at 3/4° resolution for both physics and passive tracer model. We discuss possible options for defining the vertical diffusivity coefficient for the tracer transport model based on information from the high resolution grid. We describe the impact of this choice on the distribution and one the penetration of the age tracer. In a second time we present results obtained by coupling the physics with the biogeochemical model PISCES. We look at the impact of this methodology on some tracers distribution and dynamic. The method described here can found applications in ocean forecasting, such as the Copernicus Marine

  4. GeNemo: a search engine for web-based functional genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqing; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-07-08

    A set of new data types emerged from functional genomic assays, including ChIP-seq, DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq and others. The results are typically stored as genome-wide intensities (WIG/bigWig files) or functional genomic regions (peak/BED files). These data types present new challenges to big data science. Here, we present GeNemo, a web-based search engine for functional genomic data. GeNemo searches user-input data against online functional genomic datasets, including the entire collection of ENCODE and mouse ENCODE datasets. Unlike text-based search engines, GeNemo's searches are based on pattern matching of functional genomic regions. This distinguishes GeNemo from text or DNA sequence searches. The user can input any complete or partial functional genomic dataset, for example, a binding intensity file (bigWig) or a peak file. GeNemo reports any genomic regions, ranging from hundred bases to hundred thousand bases, from any of the online ENCODE datasets that share similar functional (binding, modification, accessibility) patterns. This is enabled by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based maximization process, executed on up to 24 parallel computing threads. By clicking on a search result, the user can visually compare her/his data with the found datasets and navigate the identified genomic regions. GeNemo is available at www.genemo.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Epithelial NEMO links innate immunity to chronic intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenci, Arianna; Becker, Christoph; Wullaert, Andy; Gareus, Ralph; van Loo, Geert; Danese, Silvio; Huth, Marion; Nikolaev, Alexei; Neufert, Clemens; Madison, Blair; Gumucio, Deborah; Neurath, Markus F; Pasparakis, Manolis

    2007-03-29

    Deregulation of intestinal immune responses seems to have a principal function in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. The gut epithelium is critically involved in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis-acting as a physical barrier separating luminal bacteria and immune cells, and also expressing antimicrobial peptides. However, the molecular mechanisms that control this function of gut epithelial cells are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcription factor NF-kappaB, a master regulator of pro-inflammatory responses, functions in gut epithelial cells to control epithelial integrity and the interaction between the mucosal immune system and gut microflora. Intestinal epithelial-cell-specific inhibition of NF-kappaB through conditional ablation of NEMO (also called IkappaB kinase-gamma (IKKgamma)) or both IKK1 (IKKalpha) and IKK2 (IKKbeta)-IKK subunits essential for NF-kappaB activation-spontaneously caused severe chronic intestinal inflammation in mice. NF-kappaB deficiency led to apoptosis of colonic epithelial cells, impaired expression of antimicrobial peptides and translocation of bacteria into the mucosa. Concurrently, this epithelial defect triggered a chronic inflammatory response in the colon, initially dominated by innate immune cells but later also involving T lymphocytes. Deficiency of the gene encoding the adaptor protein MyD88 prevented the development of intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that Toll-like receptor activation by intestinal bacteria is essential for disease pathogenesis in this mouse model. Furthermore, NEMO deficiency sensitized epithelial cells to tumour-necrosis factor (TNF)-induced apoptosis, whereas TNF receptor-1 inactivation inhibited intestinal inflammation, demonstrating that TNF receptor-1 signalling is crucial for disease induction. These findings demonstrate that a primary NF-kappaB signalling defect in intestinal epithelial cells disrupts immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract

  6. Novel Hypomorphic Alleles of the Mouse Tyrosinase Gene Induced by CRISPR-Cas9 Nucleases Cause Non-Albino Pigmentation Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Challa

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase is a key enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. Mutations in the gene encoding tyrosinase (Tyr cause oculocutaneous albinism (OCA1 in humans. Alleles of the Tyr gene have been useful in studying pigment biology and coat color formation. Over 100 different Tyr alleles have been reported in mice, of which ≈24% are spontaneous mutations, ≈60% are radiation-induced, and the remaining alleles were obtained by chemical mutagenesis and gene targeting. Therefore, most mutations were random and could not be predicted a priori. Using the CRISPR-Cas9 system, we targeted two distinct regions of exon 1 to induce pigmentation changes and used an in vivo visual phenotype along with heteroduplex mobility assays (HMA as readouts of CRISPR-Cas9 activity. Most of the mutant alleles result in complete loss of tyrosinase activity leading to an albino phenotype. In this study, we describe two novel in-frame deletion alleles of Tyr, dhoosara (Sanskrit for gray and chandana (Sanskrit for sandalwood. These alleles are hypomorphic and show lighter pigmentation phenotypes of the body and eyes. This study demonstrates the utility of CRISPR-Cas9 system in generating domain-specific in-frame deletions and helps gain further insights into structure-function of Tyr gene.

  7. Epithelial NEMO/IKKγ limits fibrosis and promotes regeneration during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Kwan; Gerstenlauer, Melanie; Konukiewitz, Björn; Steiger, Katja; Weichert, Wilko; Wirth, Thomas; Maier, Harald Jakob

    2017-11-01

    Inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but its precise function has remained controversial. Here, we analyse the contribution of IKK/NF-κB signalling in epithelial cells to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis by targeting the IKK subunit NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) (IKKγ), which is essential for canonical NF-κB activation. Mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO in the pancreas were subjected to caerulein pancreatitis. Pancreata were examined at several time points and analysed for inflammation, fibrosis, cell death, cell proliferation, as well as cellular differentiation. Human samples were used to corroborate findings established in mice. In acute pancreatitis, NEMO deletion in the pancreatic parenchyma resulted in minor changes during the early phase but led to the persistence of inflammatory and fibrotic foci in the recovery phase. In chronic pancreatitis, NEMO deletion aggravated inflammation and fibrosis, inhibited compensatory acinar cell proliferation, and enhanced acinar atrophy and acinar-ductal metaplasia. Gene expression analysis revealed sustained activation of profibrogenic genes and the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the absence of epithelial NEMO. In human chronic pancreatitis samples, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was activated as well, with CXCR4 expression correlating with the degree of fibrosis. The aggravating effects of NEMO deletion were attenuated by the administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Our results suggest that NEMO in epithelial cells exerts a protective effect during pancreatitis by limiting inflammation and fibrosis and improving acinar cell regeneration. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is an important mediator of that effect and may also be of importance in human chronic pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. NEMO 2 - Be aware: Wind and solar are coming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Finnish research and development is well placed with respect to new renewable energy technologies in that there exists considerable expertise in specialized areas. For example, over 20 % of all power transmission equipment and generators used in wind energy systems world-wide are manufactured in Finland, while advanced instruments for monitoring wind speed are also highly regarded internationally. Moreover, unique wind technology for complex windy and freezing conditions have been developed. Finland has a 10 % share in the European photovoltaic market, and has competitive advantages in photovoltaic systems and applications, thin film solar cells, and automated electronic controlling systems. A unique solar energy storage system based on hydrogen technology demonstrates skills on overcoming the summer-winter syndrome of large-scale solar energy utilization. The annual turnover of the Finnish industries on solar and wind energy has increased from 5 million ECU in 1988 to almost 50 million ECU in 1996. The national R and D and D from 1988 onwards has played an important role in this context. Most of the research and development into new and renewable energy technologies in Finland has been carried out through the Advanced New Energy Systems and Technologies Research Programme (NEMO2) of Tekes

  9. Cascading off Davis Strait as seen from a NEMO simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Juliana M.; Myers, Paul G.; Hu, Xianmin; Petrie, Brian; Azetsu-Scott, Kumiko; Lee, Craig

    2017-04-01

    Cascading occurs when dense waters form and accumulate on the continental shelf, eventually sliding down the slope and reaching intermediate and deep layers of the ocean. It is an important process for ventilating the deep ocean and capturing carbon from the atmosphere. Although observed in several different locations, especially at high latitudes, cascading has never been reported for the western Greenland shelf. We use the results from a 2002-2014 NEMO ocean model simulation to show that cascading could happen sporadically at Davis Strait. Over the time span of the model run, cascading occurred during five winters with each event starting around February and persisting until the end of May. The occurrence of those events seems to be dependent on (1) the balance between sea ice formation and melting in the region; (2) the amount of freshwater coming from the Arctic through Fram Strait; (3) the presence of West Greenland Irminger Water on the shelf. The cascading water primarily flows into deep Baffin Bay, although not at a sufficient rate to be a primary source of Baffin Bay Deep Water. The simulation's temperature and salinity interannual variability in Davis Strait agrees reasonably with observations (CTD profiles and moorings) but overestimates the peak salinity and density and consequently the strength of the cascade process. Nonetheless, the model simulation indicates that this phenomenon has the potential to occur in this location.

  10. NEMO Inhibits Programmed Necrosis in an NFκB-Independent Manner by Restraining RIP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, Diana; Ting, Adrian T.

    2012-01-01

    TNF can trigger two opposing responses: cell survival and cell death. TNFR1 activates caspases that orchestrate apoptosis but some cell types switch to a necrotic death when treated with caspase inhibitors. Several genes that are required to orchestrate cell death by programmed necrosis have been identified, such as the kinase RIP1, but very little is known about the inhibitory signals that keep this necrotic cell death pathway in check. We demonstrate that T cells lacking the regulatory subunit of IKK, NFκB essential modifier (NEMO), are hypersensitive to programmed necrosis when stimulated with TNF in the presence of caspase inhibitors. Surprisingly, this pro-survival activity of NEMO is independent of NFκB-mediated gene transcription. Instead, NEMO inhibits necrosis by binding to ubiquitinated RIP1 to restrain RIP1 from engaging the necrotic death pathway. In the absence of NEMO, or if ubiquitination of RIP1 is blocked, necrosis ensues when caspases are blocked. These results indicate that recruitment of NEMO to ubiquitinated RIP1 is a key step in the TNFR1 signaling pathway that determines whether RIP1 triggers a necrotic death response. PMID:22848449

  11. Porcine deltacoronavirus nsp5 inhibits interferon-β production through the cleavage of NEMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Yang, Yuting; Chen, Jiyao; Ye, Xu; Foda, Mohamed Frahat; Xiao, Shaobo

    2017-02-01

    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) causes acute enteric disease and mortality in seronegative neonatal piglets. Previously we have demonstrated that PDCoV infection suppresses the production of interferon-beta (IFN-β), while the detailed mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that nonstructural protein 5 (nsp5) of PDCoV, the 3C-like protease, significantly inhibits Sendai virus (SEV)-induced IFN-β production by targeting the NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO), confirmed by the diminished function of NEMO cleaved by PDCoV. The PDCoV nsp5 cleavage site in the NEMO protein was identified as glutamine 231, and was identical to the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus nsp5 cleavage site, revealing the likelihood of a common target in NEMO for coronaviruses. Furthermore, this cleavage impaired the ability of NEMO to activate the IFN response and downstream signaling. Taken together, our findings reveal PDCoV nsp5 to be a newly identified IFN antagonist and enhance the understanding of immune evasion by deltacoronaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction and commissioning of the tracker module for the SuperNEMO experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascella, Michele; Chopra, Ashwin; Dawson, Lauren; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The SuperNEMO experiment will search for neutrinoless double-beta decay in the Modane Underground Laboratory. This decay mode, if observed, confirms that neutrinos are Majorana fermions. It would be a new lepton violating process, and would provide a measurement of the absolute neutrino mass. The SuperNEMO experiment is designed to reach a half-life sensitivity of 1026 years corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. The SuperNEMO demonstrator module is the first stage of the experiment, containing 7kg of 82Se, with an expected sensitivity of T½ (0ν) > 6.5×1024 y after 2.5 years. Full topological event reconstruction is achieved through the use of a wire tracker operating in Geiger mode combined with scintillator calorimeter modules. Construction of the demonstrator module is well underway. We present the design of the tracker, and the current status of the construction and commissioning efforts.

  13. Comparing sea ice, hydrography and circulation between NEMO3.6 LIM3 and LIM2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotila, Petteri; Iovino, Doroteaciro; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Lensu, Mikko; Rousset, Clement

    2017-03-01

    A set of hindcast simulations with the new version 3.6 of the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) ocean-ice model in the ORCA1 configuration and forced by the DRAKKAR Forcing Set version 5.2 (DFS5.2) atmospheric data was performed from 1958 to 2012. Simulations differed in their sea-ice component: the old standard version Louvain-la-Neuve Sea Ice Model (LIM2) and its successor LIM3. Main differences between these sea-ice models are the parameterisations of sub-grid-scale sea-ice thickness distribution, ice deformation, thermodynamic processes, and sea-ice salinity. Our main objective was to analyse the response of the ocean-ice system sensitivity to the change in sea-ice physics. Additional sensitivity simulations were carried out for the attribution of observed differences between the two main simulations.In the Arctic, NEMO-LIM3 compares better with observations by realistically reproducing the sea-ice extent decline during the last few decades due to its multi-category sea-ice thickness. In the Antarctic, NEMO-LIM3 more realistically simulates the seasonal evolution of sea-ice extent than NEMO-LIM2. In terms of oceanic properties, improvements are not as evident, although NEMO-LIM3 reproduces a more realistic hydrography in the Labrador Sea and in the Arctic Ocean, including a reduced cold temperature bias of the Arctic Intermediate Water at 250 m. In the extra-polar regions, the oceanographic conditions of the two NEMO-LIM versions remain relatively similar, although they slowly drift apart over decades. This drift is probably due to a stronger deep water formation around Antarctica in LIM3.

  14. Withaferin A disrupts ubiquitin-based NEMO reorganization induced by canonical NF-κB signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Shawn S. [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6159 Wisconsin Institute for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Oberley, Christopher [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6159 Wisconsin Institute for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Hooper, Christopher P. [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6159 Wisconsin Institute for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Cellular and Molecular Biology Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Grindle, Kreg [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Wuerzberger-Davis, Shelly [McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 6159 Wisconsin Institute for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); Wolff, Jared [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705 (United States); and others

    2015-02-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors regulates numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation and survival responses. The constitutive activation of NF-κB has also emerged as an important oncogenic driver in many malignancies, such as activated B-cell like diffuse large B cell lymphoma, among others. In this study, we investigated the impact and mechanisms of action of Withaferin A, a naturally produced steroidal lactone, against both signal-inducible as well as constitutive NF-κB activities. We found that Withaferin A is a robust inhibitor of canonical and constitutive NF-κB activities, leading to apoptosis of certain lymphoma lines. In the canonical pathway induced by TNF, Withaferin A did not disrupt RIP1 polyubiquitination or NEMO–IKKβ interaction and was a poor direct IKKβ inhibitor, but prevented the formation of TNF-induced NEMO foci which colocalized with TNF ligand. While GFP-NEMO efficiently formed TNF-induced foci, a GFP-NEMO{sup Y308S} mutant that is defective in binding to polyubiquitin chains did not form foci. Our study reveals that Withaferin A is a novel type of IKK inhibitor which acts by disrupting NEMO reorganization into ubiquitin-based signaling structures in vivo. - Highlights: • Withaferin A, a NF-κB inhibitor, disrupts signaling induced NEMO localization, a novel point of inhibition. • NEMO can be localized to distinct signaling foci after treatment with TNF. • ABC-type DLCBL cells can be sensitized to apoptosis after treatment with Withaferin A.

  15. Background constrains of the SuperNEMO experiment for neutrinoless double beta-decay searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Povinec, Pavel P.

    2017-02-11

    The SuperNEMO experiment is a new generation of experiments dedicated to the search for neutrinoless double beta-decay, which if observed, would confirm the existence of physics beyond the Standard Model. It is based on the tracking and calorimetry techniques, which allow the reconstruction of the final state topology, including timing and kinematics of the double beta-decay transition events, offering a powerful tool for background rejection. While the basic detection strategy of the SuperNEMO detector remains the same as of the NEMO-3 detector, a number of improvements were accomplished for each of detector main components. Upgrades of the detector technologies and development of low-level counting techniques ensure radiopurity control of construction parts of the SuperNEMO detector. A reference material made of glass pellets has been developed to assure quality management and quality control of radiopurity measurements. The first module of the SuperNEMO detector (Demonstrator) is currently under construction in the Modane underground laboratory. No background event is expected in the neutrinoless double beta-decay region in 2.5 years of its operation using 7 kg of {sup 82}Se. The half-life sensitivity of the Demonstrator is expected to be >6.5·10{sup 24} y, corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass sensitivity of |0.2−0.4| eV (90% C.L.). The full SuperNEMO experiment comprising of 20 modules with 100 kg of {sup 82}Se source should reach an effective Majorana neutrino mass sensitivity of |0.04−0.1| eV, and a half-life limit 1·10{sup 26} y. - Highlights: • SuperNEMO detector for 2β0ν-decay of {sup 82}Se should reach half-life limit of 10{sup 26} y. • Radiopurity of the SuperNEMO internal detector parts was checked down to 0.1 mBq/kg. • Reference material of glass pellets was developed for underground γ-spectrometry.

  16. Microdeletion/duplication at the Xq28 IP locus causes a de novo IKBKG/NEMO/IKKgamma exon4_10 deletion in families with Incontinentia Pigmenti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Francesca; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Pescatore, Alessandra; Lioi, Maria Brigida; Ayuso, Carmen; Faravelli, Francesca; Gentile, Mattia; Zollino, Marcella; D'Urso, Michele; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2009-09-01

    The Incontinentia Pigmenti (IP) locus contains the IKBKG/NEMO/IKKgamma gene and its truncated pseudogene copy, IKBKGP/deltaNEMO. The major genetic defect in IP is a heterozygous exon4_10 IKBKG deletion (IKBKGdel) caused by a recombination between two consecutive MER67B repeats. We analyzed 91 IP females carrying the IKBKGdel, 59 of whom carrying de novo mutations (65%). In eight parents, we found two recurrent nonpathological variants of IP locus, which were also present as rare polymorphism in control population: the IKBKGPdel, corresponding to the exon4_10 deletion in the pseudogene, and the MER67Bdup, that replicates the exon4_10 region downstream of the normal IKBKG gene. Using quantitative DNA analysis and microsatellite mapping, we established that both variants might promote the generation of the pathological IKBKGdel. Indeed, in family IP-516, the exon4_10 deletion was repositioned in the same allele from the pseudogene to the gene, whereas in family IP-688, the MER67Bdup generated the pathological IKBKGdel by recombination between two direct nonadjacent MER67Bs. Moreover, we found an instance of somatic recombination in a MER67Bdup variant, creating the IKBKGdel in an IP male. Our data suggest that the IP locus undergoes recombination producing recurrent variants that might be "at risk" of generating de novo IKBKGdel by NAHR during either meiotic or mitotic division.

  17. NEMO educational kit on micro-optics at the secondary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Arias, M. T.; Bao-Varela, Carmen

    2014-07-01

    NEMO was the "Network of Excellence in Micro-Optics" granted in the "Sixth Framework Program" of the European Union. It aimed at providing Europe with a complete Micro-Optics food-chain, by setting up centers for optical modeling and design; measurement and instrumentation; mastering, prototyping and replication; integration and packaging and reliability and standardization. More than 300 researchers from 30 groups in 12 countries participated in the project. One of the objectives of NEMO was to spread excellence and disseminate knowledge on micro-optics and micro-photonics. To convince pupils, already from secondary school level on, about the crucial role of light and micro-optics and the opportunities this combination holds, several partners of NEMO had collaborate to create this Educational Kit. In Spain the partner involved in this aim was the "Microoptics and GRIN Optics Group" at the University of Santiago of Compostela (USC). The educational kits provided to the Secondary School were composed by two plastic cards with the following microoptical element: different kinds of diffractive optical elements or DOES and refractive optical elements or ROEs namely arrays of micro-lenses. The kit also included a DVD with a handbook for performing the experiments as well as a laser pointer source. This kit was distributed free of charge in the countries with partners in NEMO. In particular in Spain was offered to around 200 Secondary School Centers and only 80 answered accepting evaluate the kit.

  18. Design of the optical Raman amplifier for the shore station of NEMO phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amico, A., E-mail: damico@lns.infn.i [LNS-INFN, Via S. Sofia 62 I-95123, Catania (Italy)

    2011-01-21

    A distributed Raman amplifier system for the NEMO phase 2 project has been simulated. The simulation goal was to optimize the Raman pump wavelengths in order to maximize the gain in the spectral region extending between 1530 and 1563 nm, where the DWDM channels of the data transport system are allocated. The results of the simulated gain will be shown.

  19. NEMO: a tool for analyzing gene and chromosome territory distributions from 3D-FISH experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuccelli, E; Mompart, F; Gellin, J; Lahbib-Mansais, Y; Yerle, M; Boudier, T

    2010-03-01

    Three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization (3D-FISH) is used to study the organization and the positioning of chromosomes or specific sequences such as genes or RNA in cell nuclei. Many different programs (commercial or free) allow image analysis for 3D-FISH experiments. One of the more efficient open-source programs for automatically processing 3D-FISH microscopy images is Smart 3D-FISH, an ImageJ plug-in designed to automatically analyze distances between genes. One of the drawbacks of Smart 3D-FISH is that it has a rather basic user interface and produces its results in various text and image files thus making the data post-processing step time consuming. We developed a new Smart 3D-FISH graphical user interface, NEMO, which provides all information in the same place so that results can be checked and validated efficiently. NEMO gives users the ability to drive their experiments analysis in either automatic, semi-automatic or manual detection mode. We also tuned Smart 3D-FISH to better analyze chromosome territories. NEMO is a stand-alone Java application available for Windows and Linux platforms. The program is distributed under the creative commons licence and can be freely downloaded from https://www-lgc.toulouse.inra.fr/nemo

  20. Advanced energy systems and technologies (NEMO 2). Final report 1993-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, P.; Konttinen, P. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    NEMO2 has been the major Finnish energy research programme on advanced energy systems and technologies during 1993-1998. The main objective of the programme has been to support industrial technology development but also to increase the utilisation of wind and solar energy in Finland. The main technology fields covered are wind and solar energy. In addition, the programme has supported projects on energy storage and other small-scale energy technologies such as fuel cells that support the main technology fields chosen. NEMO2 is one of the energy research programmes of the Technology Development Centre of Finland (TEKES). The total R and D funding over the whole programme period was FIM 130 million (ECU 22 million). The public funding of the total programme costs has been 43 %. The industrial participation has been strong. International co-operation has been an important aspect in NEMO2: the programme has stimulated 24 EU-projects and participation in several IEA co-operative tasks. International funding adds nearly 20 % to the NEMO2 R and D funding. (orig.)

  1. Surface Wave Effects in the NEMO Ocean Model: Forced and Coupled Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Balmaseda, Magdalena Alonso; Janssen, Peter A E M

    2015-01-01

    The NEMO general circulation ocean model is extended to incorporate three physical processes related to ocean surface waves, namely the surface stress (modified by growth and dissipation of the oceanic wave field), the turbulent kinetic energy flux from breaking waves, and the Stokes-Coriolis force. Experiments are done with NEMO in ocean-only (forced) mode and coupled to the ECMWF atmospheric and wave models. Ocean-only integrations are forced with fields from the ERA-Interim reanalysis. All three effects are noticeable in the extra-tropics, but the sea-state dependent turbulent kinetic energy flux yields by far the largest difference. This is partly because the control run has too vigorous deep mixing due to an empirical mixing term in NEMO. We investigate the relation between this ad hoc mixing and Langmuir turbulence and find that it is much more effective than the Langmuir parameterization used in NEMO. The biases in sea surface temperature as well as subsurface temperature are reduced, and the total oce...

  2. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.W. Kuijpers (Taco W.); E.M.M. van Leeuwen (Ester); B.H. Barendregt (Barbara); P. Klarenbeek (Paul); D.J. Aan de Kerk (Daan); P.A. Baars (Paul); M.H. Jansen (Machiel H.); N. de Vries (Nicolette); R.A.W. van Lier (Rene); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B+T-NK-X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined

  3. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijpers, Taco W.; van Leeuwen, Ester M. M.; Barendregt, Barbara H.; Klarenbeek, Paul; Aan de Kerk, Daan J.; Baars, Paul A.; Jansen, Machiel H.; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A. W.; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined

  4. Analyses of Tomato Fruit Brightness Mutants Uncover Both Cutin-Deficient and Cutin-Abundant Mutants and a New Hypomorphic Allele of GDSL Lipase[C][W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants. PMID:24357602

  5. Analyses of tomato fruit brightness mutants uncover both cutin-deficient and cutin-abundant mutants and a new hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Johann; Bres, Cécile; Just, Daniel; Garcia, Virginie; Mauxion, Jean-Philippe; Marion, Didier; Bakan, Bénédicte; Joubès, Jérôme; Domergue, Frédéric; Rothan, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    The cuticle is a protective layer synthesized by epidermal cells of the plants and consisting of cutin covered and filled by waxes. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit, the thick cuticle embedding epidermal cells has crucial roles in the control of pathogens, water loss, cracking, postharvest shelf-life, and brightness. To identify tomato mutants with modified cuticle composition and architecture and to further decipher the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle in tomato, we screened an ethyl methanesulfonate mutant collection in the miniature tomato cultivar Micro-Tom for mutants with altered fruit brightness. Our screen resulted in the isolation of 16 glossy and 8 dull mutants displaying changes in the amount and/or composition of wax and cutin, cuticle thickness, and surface aspect of the fruit as characterized by optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy. The main conclusions on the relationships between fruit brightness and cuticle features were as follows: (1) screening for fruit brightness is an effective way to identify tomato cuticle mutants; (2) fruit brightness is independent from wax load variations; (3) glossy mutants show either reduced or increased cutin load; and (4) dull mutants display alterations in epidermal cell number and shape. Cuticle composition analyses further allowed the identification of groups of mutants displaying remarkable cuticle changes, such as mutants with increased dicarboxylic acids in cutin. Using genetic mapping of a strong cutin-deficient mutation, we discovered a novel hypomorphic allele of GDSL lipase carrying a splice junction mutation, thus highlighting the potential of tomato brightness mutants for advancing our understanding of cuticle formation in plants.

  6. Generation of a hypomorphic model of propionic acidemia amenable to gene therapy testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzel, Adam J; Hofherr, Sean E; Hillestad, Matthew; Barry, Mary; Weaver, Eric; Venezia, Sarah; Kraus, Jan P; Matern, Dietrich; Barry, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a recessive genetic disease that results in an inability to metabolize certain amino acids and odd-chain fatty acids. Current treatment involves restricting consumption of these substrates or liver transplantation. Deletion of the Pcca gene in mice mimics the most severe forms of the human disease. Pcca(-) mice die within 36 hours of birth, making it difficult to test intravenous systemic therapies in them. We generated an adult hypomorphic model of PA in Pcca(-) mice using a transgene bearing an A138T mutant of the human PCCA protein. Pcca(-/-)(A138T) mice have 2% of wild-type PCC activity, survive to adulthood, and have elevations in propionyl-carnitine, methylcitrate, glycine, alanine, lysine, ammonia, and markers associated with cardiomyopathy similar to those in patients with PA. This adult model allowed gene therapy testing by intravenous injection with adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) and adeno-associated virus 2/8 (AAV8) vectors. Ad5-mediated more rapid increases in PCCA protein and propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC) activity in the liver than AAV8 and both vectors reduced propionylcarnitine and methylcitrate levels. Phenotypic correction was transient with first generation Ad whereas AAV8-mediated long-lasting effects. These data suggest that this PA model may be a useful platform for optimizing systemic intravenous therapies for PA.

  7. Spironolactone ameliorates PIT1-dependent vascular osteoinduction in klotho-hypomorphic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Jakob; Alesutan, Ioana; Leibrock, Christina B; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Kuhn, Volker; Feger, Martina; Mia, Sobuj; Ahmed, Mohamed S E; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Kuro-O, Makoto; Lang, Florian

    2013-02-01

    Klotho is a potent regulator of 1,25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] formation and calcium-phosphate metabolism. Klotho-hypomorphic mice (kl/kl mice) suffer from severe growth deficits, rapid aging, hyperphosphatemia, hyperaldosteronism, and extensive vascular and soft tissue calcification. Sequelae of klotho deficiency are similar to those of end-stage renal disease. We show here that the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist spironolactone reduced vascular and soft tissue calcification and increased the life span of kl/kl mice, without significant effects on 1,25(OH)2D3, FGF23, calcium, and phosphate plasma concentrations. Spironolactone also reduced the expression of osteoinductive Pit1 and Tnfa mRNA, osteogenic transcription factors, and alkaline phosphatase (Alpl) in calcified tissues of kl/kl mice. In human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs), aldosterone dose-dependently increased PIT1 mRNA expression, an effect paralleled by increased expression of osteogenic transcription factors and enhanced ALP activity. The effects of aldosterone were reversed by both spironolactone treatment and PIT1 silencing and were mitigated by FGF23 cotreatment in HAoSMCs. In conclusion, aldosterone contributes to vascular and soft tissue calcification, an effect due, at least in part, to stimulation of spironolactone-sensitive, PIT1-dependent osteoinductive signaling.

  8. NEMO: un ambiente object-oriented per problemi di meccanica del continuo

    OpenAIRE

    Filippone, Salvatore; Bella, Gino; Rorro, Marco

    2009-01-01

    NEMO (Numerical Engine for Multiphysics Operators) is a support library designed to build applications in the field of continuum mechanics; its basic design principle is to enable an application structure that closely follows the structure of the differential equations describing the problem on hand, exploiting the availability of “objects” representing fields and equations, and the differential operators acting on them, normally assuming a finite volume discretization scheme. The library mak...

  9. A Spectrum Handoff Scheme for Optimal Network Selection in NEMO Based Cognitive Radio Vehicular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available When a mobile network changes its point of attachments in Cognitive Radio (CR vehicular networks, the Mobile Router (MR requires spectrum handoff. Network Mobility (NEMO in CR vehicular networks is concerned with the management of this movement. In future NEMO based CR vehicular networks deployment, multiple radio access networks may coexist in the overlapping areas having different characteristics in terms of multiple attributes. The CR vehicular node may have the capability to make call for two or more types of nonsafety services such as voice, video, and best effort simultaneously. Hence, it becomes difficult for MR to select optimal network for the spectrum handoff. This can be done by performing spectrum handoff using Multiple Attributes Decision Making (MADM methods which is the objective of the paper. The MADM methods such as grey relational analysis and cost based methods are used. The application of MADM methods provides wider and optimum choice among the available networks with quality of service. Numerical results reveal that the proposed scheme is effective for spectrum handoff decision for optimal network selection with reduced complexity in NEMO based CR vehicular networks.

  10. Development of an optical simulation for the SuperNEMO calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Arnaud; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The SuperNEMO double beta decay project is a modular tracker-calorimeter based experiment. The aim of this project is to reach a sensitivity of the order of 1026 years concerning the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life, corresponding to a Majorana neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. The main calorimeter of the SuperNEMO demonstrator is based on 520 Optical Modules made of large volume plastic scintillators (10L) coupled with large area photomultipliers (Hamamatsu R5912-MOD and R6594). The design of the calorimeter is optimized for the double beta decay detection and allows gamma tagging for background rejection. In large volumes of scintillators, a similar deposited energy by electrons or photons will give different visible energy and signal shapes due to different interactions inside the scintillator. The aim of the optical simulation, developed for SuperNEMO, is to model the Optical Module response on the energy and time performances, regarding the particle type.

  11. NEMO, a Transcriptional Target of Estrogen and Progesterone, Is Linked to Tumor Suppressor PML in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsarraj, Hanan S; Valdez, Kelli E; Hong, Yan; Grimm, Sandra L; Ricci, Lawrence R; Fan, Fang; Tawfik, Ossama; May, Lisa; Cusick, Therese; Inciardi, Marc; Redick, Mark; Gatewood, Jason; Winblad, Onalisa; Hilsenbeck, Susan; Edwards, Dean P; Hagan, Christy R; Godwin, Andrew K; Fabian, Carol; Behbod, Fariba

    2017-07-15

    The beneficial versus detrimental roles of estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) in breast cancer remains controversial. Here we report a beneficial mechanism of E+P treatment in breast cancer cells driven by transcriptional upregulation of the NFκB modulator NEMO, which in turn promotes expression of the tumor suppressor protein promyelocytic leukemia (PML). E+P treatment of patient-derived epithelial cells derived from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) increased secretion of the proinflammatory cytokine IL6. Mechanistic investigations indicated that IL6 upregulation occurred as a result of transcriptional upregulation of NEMO, the gene that harbored estrogen receptor (ER) binding sites within its promoter. Accordingly, E+P treatment of breast cancer cells increased ER binding to the NEMO promoter, thereby increasing NEMO expression, NFκB activation, and IL6 secretion. In two mouse xenograft models of DCIS, we found that RNAi-mediated silencing of NEMO increased tumor invasion and progression. This seemingly paradoxical result was linked to NEMO-mediated regulation of NFκB and IL6 secretion, increased phosphorylation of STAT3 on Ser727, and increased expression of PML, a STAT3 transcriptional target. In identifying NEMO as a pivotal transcriptional target of E+P signaling in breast cancer cells, our work offers a mechanistic explanation for the paradoxical antitumorigenic roles of E+P in breast cancer by showing how it upregulates the tumor suppressor protein PML. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3802-13. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Advanced energy systems and technologies research in Finland. NEMO 2 annual report 1994-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Advanced energy technologies were linked to the national energy research in beginning of 1988 when energy research was reorganised in Finland. The Ministry of Trade and Industry set up many energy research programmes and NEMO was one of them. Major objectives of the programme were to assess the potential of new energy systems for the national energy supply system and to promote industrial activities. Within the NEMO 2 programme for the years 1993-1998, research was focused on technological solutions. In the beginning of the 1995, the national energy research activities were passed on to the Technology Development Centre TEKES. The NEMO 2 programme is directed towards those areas that have particular potential for commercial exploitation or development. Emphasis is placed particularly on solar and wind energy, as well as supporting technologies such as energy storage and hydrogen technology. Resources has been focused on three specific areas: Arctic wind technology, wind turbine components, and the integration of solar energy into applications (including thin film solar cells). It seems that in Finland the growth of the new energy technology industry is focused on these areas. The sales of the industry have been growing considerable due to the national research activities and support of technology development. The sales have increased 6 - 7 times compared to the year 1987 and is now over 200 million FIM. The support to industries and their involvement in the program has grown more than 15 times compared to 1988. The total funding of the NEMO 2 program me was 30 million FIM in 1994 and 21 million FIM in 1995. The programme consists of 20 research projects, 15 joint development projects, and 5 EU projects. In this report, the essential research projects of the programme in 1994-1995 are described. The total funding for these projects was about 25 million FIM, of which the TEKES`s share was about half. When the research projects and joint development projects are

  13. Advanced energy systems and technologies research in Finland. NEMO-2 Programme Annual Report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    Advanced energy technologies were linked to the national energy research in the beginning of 1988 when energy research was reorganised in Finland. The Ministry of Trade and Industry established several energy research programmes and NEMO was one of them. Major objectives of the programme were to assess the potential of new energy systems for the national energy supply system and to promote industrial activities. Within the NEMO 2 programme for the years 1993-1998, research was focused on a few promising technological solutions. In the beginning of 1995, the national energy research activities were passed on to the Technology Development Centre TEKES. The NEMO 2 programme is directed towards those areas that have particular potential for commercial exploitation or development. Emphasis is placed particularly on solar and wind energy, as well as supporting technologies, such as energy storage and hydrogen technology. Resources have been focused on three specific areas: arctic wind technology, wind turbine components, and the integration of solar energy into applications (including thin film solar cells). In Finland, the growth of the new energy technology industry is concentrated on these areas. The turnover of the Finnish industry has been growing considerably due to the national research activities and support of technology development. The sales have increased more than 10 times compared with the year 1987 and is now over 300 million FIM. The support to industries and their involvement in the program has grown considerably. In this report, the essential research projects of the programme during 1996-1997 are described. The total funding for these projects was about 30 million FIM per year, of which the TEKES`s share was about 40 per cent. The programme consists of 10 research projects, some 15 joint development projects, and 9 EU projects. In case the research projects and joint development projects are acting very closely, the description of the project is

  14. Hypomorphism of Fto and Rpgrip1l causes obesity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratigopoulos, George; Burnett, Lisa Cole; Rausch, Richard; Gill, Richard; Penn, David Barth; Skowronski, Alicja A; LeDuc, Charles A; Lanzano, Anthony J; Zhang, Pumin; Storm, Daniel R; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2016-05-02

    Noncoding polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene represent common alleles that are strongly associated with effects on food intake and adiposity in humans. Previous studies have suggested that the obesity-risk allele rs8050136 in the first intron of FTO alters a regulatory element recognized by the transcription factor CUX1, thereby leading to decreased expression of FTO and retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator-interacting protein-1 like (RPGRIP1L). Here, we evaluated the effects of rs8050136 and another potential CUX1 element in rs1421085 on expression of nearby genes in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived (iPSC-derived) neurons. There were allele-dosage effects on FTO, RPGRIP1L, and AKT-interacting protein (AKTIP) expression, but expression of other vicinal genes, including IRX3, IRX5, and RBL2, which have been implicated in mediating functional effects, was not altered. In vivo manipulation of CUX1, Fto, and/or Rpgrip1l expression in mice affected adiposity in a manner that was consistent with CUX1 influence on adiposity via remote effects on Fto and Rpgrip1l expression. In support of a mechanism, mice hypomorphic for Rpgrip1l exhibited hyperphagic obesity, as the result of diminished leptin sensitivity in Leprb-expressing neurons. Together, the results of this study indicate that the effects of FTO-associated SNPs on energy homeostasis are due in part to the effects of these genetic variations on hypothalamic FTO, RPGRIP1L, and possibly other genes.

  15. Reduced Ca2+ entry and suicidal death of erythrocytes in PDK1 hypomorphic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, Michael; Mahmud, Hasan; Koka, Saisudha; Lang, Florian

    2008-02-01

    The phosphoinositide-dependent kinase PDK1 is a key element in the phosphoinositol-3-kinase signalling pathway, which is involved in the regulation of ion channels, transporters, cell volume and cell survival. Eryptosis, the suicidal death of erythrocytes, is characterized by decrease in cell volume, cell membrane blebbing and phospholipids scrambling with phosphatidylserine exposure at the cell surface. Oxidative stress, osmotic shock or Cl- removal trigger eryptosis by activation of Ca2+-permeable cation channels and subsequent increase in cytosolic Ca2+ activity. To explore the impact of PDK1 for erythrocyte survival, eryptosis was analysed in hypomorphic mice (pdk1hm) expressing only some 25% of PDK1 and in their wild-type littermates (pdk1wt). Cell volume was estimated from forward scatter and phosphatidylserine exposure from annexin-V binding in fluorescence activated cell sorter analysis. Forward scatter was smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Oxidative stress (100 microM tert-butylhydroperoxide), osmotic shock (+300 mM sucrose) and Cl- removal (replacement of Cl- with gluconate) all decreased forward scatter and increased the percentage of annexin-V-binding erythrocytes from both pdk1hm and pdk1wt mice. After treatment, the forward scatter was similar in both genotypes, but the percentage of annexin-V binding was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. According to Fluo-3 fluorescence, cytosolic Ca2+ activity was significantly smaller in pdk1hm than in pdk1wt erythrocytes. Treatment with Ca2+-ionophore ionomycin (1 microM) was followed by an increase in annexin-V binding to similar levels in pdk1hm and pdk1wt erythrocytes. The experiments reveal that PDK1 deficiency is associated with decreased Ca2+ entry into erythrocytes and thus with blunted eryptotic effects of oxidative stress, osmotic shock and Cl- removal.

  16. Late-Onset Non-HLH Presentations of Growth Arrest, Inflammatory Arachnoiditis, and Severe Infectious Mononucleosis, in Siblings with Hypomorphic Defects in UNC13D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Edgar Gray

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi-allelic null mutations affecting UNC13D, STXBP2, or STX11 result in defects of lymphocyte cytotoxic degranulation and commonly cause familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL in early life. Patients with partial loss of function are increasingly being diagnosed after presenting with alternative features of this disease, or with HLH later in life. Here, we studied two sisters with lymphocyte degranulation defects secondary to compound heterozygote missense variants in UNC13D. The older sibling presented aged 11 with linear growth arrest and delayed puberty, 2 years prior to developing transient ischemic attacks secondary to neuroinflammation and hypogammaglobulinemia, but no FHL symptoms. Her geno-identical younger sister was initially asymptomatic but then presented at the same age with severe EBV-driven infectious mononucleosis, which was treated aggressively and did not progress to HLH. The sisters had similar natural killer cell degranulation; however, while cytotoxic activity was moderately reduced in the asymptomatic patient, it was completely absent in both siblings during active disease. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at the age of 15, the older child has completely recovered NK cell cytotoxicity, is asymptomatic, and has experienced an exceptional compensatory growth spurt. Her younger sister was also successfully transplanted and is currently disease free. The current study reveals previously unappreciated manifestations of FHL in patients who inherited hypomorphic gene variants and also raises the important question of whether a threshold of minimum NK function can be defined that should protect a patient from serious disease manifestations such as HLH.

  17. Search for Neutrinoless Quadruple-β Decay of ^{150}Nd with the NEMO-3 Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, R; Augier, C; Barabash, A S; Basharina-Freshville, A; Blondel, S; Blot, S; Bongrand, M; Boursette, D; Brudanin, V; Busto, J; Caffrey, A J; Calvez, S; Cascella, M; Cerna, C; Cesar, J P; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Chopra, A; Dawson, L; Duchesneau, D; Durand, D; Egorov, V; Eurin, G; Evans, J J; Fajt, L; Filosofov, D; Flack, R; Garrido, X; Gómez, H; Guillon, B; Guzowski, P; Hodák, R; Huber, A; Hubert, P; Hugon, C; Jullian, S; Klimenko, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; Lemière, Y; Le Noblet, T; Liptak, Z; Liu, X R; Loaiza, P; Lutter, G; Macko, M; Macolino, C; Mamedov, F; Marquet, C; Mauger, F; Morgan, B; Mott, J; Nemchenok, I; Nomachi, M; Nova, F; Nowacki, F; Ohsumi, H; Patrick, C; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Povinec, P; Přidal, P; Ramachers, Y A; Remoto, A; Reyss, J L; Riddle, C L; Rukhadze, E; Saakyan, R; Salazar, R; Sarazin, X; Shitov, Yu; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Smetana, A; Smolek, K; Smolnikov, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Soulé, B; Štefánik, D; Štekl, I; Suhonen, J; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V; Torre, S; Tretyak, Vl I; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vanushin, I; Vilela, C; Vorobel, V; Waters, D; Xie, F; Žukauskas, A

    2017-07-28

    We report the results of a first experimental search for lepton number violation by four units in the neutrinoless quadruple-β decay of ^{150}Nd using a total exposure of 0.19 kg yr recorded with the NEMO-3 detector at the Modane Underground Laboratory. We find no evidence of this decay and set lower limits on the half-life in the range T_{1/2}>(1.1-3.2)×10^{21}  yr at the 90% C.L., depending on the model used for the kinematic distributions of the emitted electrons.

  18. Radon Mitigation Strategy and Results for the SuperNEMO Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin Ran; SuperNEMO Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SuperNEMO is a modern neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) experiment with a design capability to reach half-life sensitivity of T1/2(0ν) >1026 years, equivalent to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of [mββ ] radon activity within the tracker. To minimise radon levels all internal detector components were screened for radon emanation, which was then confirmed through direct measurement of the gaseous tracker. First measurements of tracker indicated that target radon levels of <0.15 mBq/m3 can be achieved.

  19. The km sup 3 Mediterranean neutrino observatory - the NEMO.RD project

    CERN Document Server

    De Marzo, C N

    2001-01-01

    The NEMO.RD Project is a feasibility study of a km sup 3 underwater telescope for high energy astrophysical neutrinos to be located in the Mediterranean Sea. Results on various issues of this project are presented on: i) Monte Carlo simulation study of the capabilities of various arrays of phototubes in order to determine the detector geometry that can optimize performance and cost; ii) oceanographic survey of various sites in search of the optimal one; iii) feasibility study of mechanics, deployment, connections and maintenance of such a detector. Parameters of a site near Capo Passero, Sicily, where depth, transparency and other water parameters seem optimal are shown.

  20. Teuvincenone F Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammation and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Attenuating NEMO Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xibao; Pu, Debing; Zhao, Zizhao; Zhu, Huihui; Li, Hongrui; Shen, Yaping; Zhang, Xingjie; Zhang, Ruihan; Shen, Jianzhong; Xiao, Weilie; Chen, Weilin

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation causes many diseases that are serious threats to human health. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of inflammation and inflammasome activation are not fully understood which has delayed the discovery of new anti-inflammatory drugs of urgent clinic need. Here, we found that the natural compound Teuvincenone F, which was isolated and purified from the stems and leaves of Premna szemaoensis, could significantly inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results showed that Teuvincenone F attenuated K63-linked ubiquitination of NF-κB-essential modulator (NEMO, also known as IKKγ) to suppress LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, and inhibited mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and NLRP3. In addition, we found that decreased NLRP3 expression by Teuvincenone F suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β/IL-18 maturation. In vivo, we revealed that Teuvincenone F treatment relieved LPS-induced inflammation. In conclusion, Teuvincenone F is a highly effective natural compound to suppress LPS-induced inflammation by attenuating K63-linked ubiquitination of NEMO, highlighting that Teuvincenone F may be a potential new anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of inflammatory and NLRP3 inflammasome-driven diseases.

  1. Teuvincenone F Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammation and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation by Attenuating NEMO Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xibao Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation causes many diseases that are serious threats to human health. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of inflammation and inflammasome activation are not fully understood which has delayed the discovery of new anti-inflammatory drugs of urgent clinic need. Here, we found that the natural compound Teuvincenone F, which was isolated and purified from the stems and leaves of Premna szemaoensis, could significantly inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS–induced pro-inflammatory cytokines production and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results showed that Teuvincenone F attenuated K63-linked ubiquitination of NF-κB-essential modulator (NEMO, also known as IKKγ to suppress LPS-induced phosphorylation of NF-κB, and inhibited mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and NLRP3. In addition, we found that decreased NLRP3 expression by Teuvincenone F suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β/IL-18 maturation. In vivo, we revealed that Teuvincenone F treatment relieved LPS-induced inflammation. In conclusion, Teuvincenone F is a highly effective natural compound to suppress LPS-induced inflammation by attenuating K63-linked ubiquitination of NEMO, highlighting that Teuvincenone F may be a potential new anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of inflammatory and NLRP3 inflammasome-driven diseases.

  2. Sounds of silence : A research into the relationship between administrative supervision, criminal investigation and the nemo-tenetur principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peçi, I.

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the relationship between administrative supervision, criminal investigation and the nemo-tenetur principle. The point of departure is the distinction made in Dutch law and doctrine between administrative supervision and criminal investigation. Such a distinction is

  3. Study of tracking detector of NEMO3 experiment - simulation of the measurement of the ultra low {sup 208}Tl radioactivity in the source foils used as neutrinoless double beta decay emitters in NEMO3 experiment; Etude du detecteur de traces de l'experience NEMO3. Simulation de la mesure de l'ultra-faible radioactivite en {sup 208}Tl des sources de l'experience NEMO3 candidates a la double desintegration {beta} sans emission de neutrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errahmane, K

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of NEMO3 experiment is the research of the neutrinoless double beta decay. This low energy process can sign the massive and Majorana nature of neutrino. This experiment, with a very low radioactive background and containing 10 kg of enriched isotopes, studies mainly {sup 100}Mo. Installed at the Frejus underground laboratory, NEMO3 is a cylindrical detector, which consists in very thin central source foils, in a tracking detector made up of vertical drift cells operating in Geiger mode, in a calorimeter and in a suitable shielding. This thesis is divided in two different parts. The first part is a full study of the features of the tracking detector. With a prototype composed of 9 drift cells, we characterised the longitudinal and transverse reconstruction of position of the ionisation created by a LASER. With the first 3 modules under operation, we used radioactive external neutron sources to measure the transverse resolution of ionisation position in a drift cell for high energy electrons. To study the vertex reconstruction on the source foil, sources of {sup 207}Bi, which produced conversion electrons, were used inside the 3 modules. The second part of this thesis, we show, with simulations, that we can measure, with NEMO3 detector itself, the ultra low level of contamination in {sup 208}Tl of the source foil, which comes from the natural radioactive chain of thorium. Using electron-photons channels, we can obtain the {sup 208}Tl activity in the sources. With an analysis on the energy and on the time of flight of particles, NEMO3 is able to reach a sensitivity of 20{mu}Bq/kg after only 2 months of measurement. This sensitivity is the maximum {sup 208}Tl activity, which we accepted for the sources in the NEMO3 proposal. (author)

  4. Neutrons in NEMO 3: tests and developments of MICAP/GEANT code; Les neutrons dans NEMO 3: tests et developpements du code MICAP/GEANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piquemal, F.; Eschbach, R.; Auduc, S.; Marquet, Ch.; Hubert, Ph. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Steckl, I.; Vorobel, V. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); NEMO Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    In order to optimize the neutron shieldings in the NEMO 3 detector we plan to use the MICAP/GEANT code. To study the reliability of this code different experiments have been performed in Bordeaux and Prague using Ge detectors. The germanium detector was placed inside of different types of shieldings (iron, lead, polyethylene) to record the {gamma}-rays emitted in the interactions of the neutrons provided by a {sup 252}Cf source. The high energy resolution of the Ge diode allows identifying the photons coming from inelastic scattering (n,n`{gamma}) and capture reactions (n,{gamma}). In order to understand the neutron behaviour the neutron simulation code MICAP/GEANT which permits the study of the neutron interactions from 10{sup -5} eV up to 20 MeV was used. By comparing the simulations with the experimental data the processes of thermalization and capture in light (polyethylene) and heavy (iron and lead) materials was tested. Following these tests a new library taking into account the decay schemes of the states excited by the (n,{gamma}) or (n,n`{gamma}) has been developed as well as an interface between this library and the MICAP library. The first results obtained show a good agreement between experiment and simulation

  5. NEMO medium voltage converter factory acceptance, operational and final integration tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocimano, Rosanna; NEMO Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The NEMO Collaboration, as part of the KM3NeT EU-funded consortium, is developing technical solutions for the construction of a cubic-kilometer scale neutrino telescope in the Mediterranean sea several kilometers below the sea level and far from the shore. In this framework, after years of design, development, assembly and testing the Alcatel deep sea medium voltage power converter (MVC) is ready for deployment at 100 km from the Capo Passero shore station. The MVC converts the 10 kV to an instrument-friendly 375 V for a 10 kW power. The MVC will be presented with focus on the factory acceptance, operational and final integration tests that recently have been carried out.

  6. Jules Verne's Captain Nemo and French Revolutionary Gustave Flourens:A Hidden Character Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonidas Kallivretakis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article treats the recent assumption made by Vernian specialist William Butcher that Jules Verne's most famous character, Captain Nemo, is based on the French revolutionary intellectual Gustave Flourens (1838-1871, son of the eminent physiologist J. P. M. Flourens. Gustave Flourens fought in the Cretan insurrection of 1866-1868, later participated in the republican opposition against Napoleon III's imperial regime, eventually became a friend of Karl Marx and was finally killed as a general of the Paris Commune. By comparing step-by-step Verne's inspiration and writing procedures with Flourens' unfolding activities and fame, it is concluded that there is little basis for such an assumption. The article includes also a brief account of the Cretan question in the nineteenth century and of the deep discord between Marx's and Flourens' respective analyses of the Eastern Question.

  7. Feasibility Studies for a Mediterranean Neutrino Observatory - The NEMO.RD Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Marzo, C.; Ambriola, M.; Bellotti, R.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Ciacio, F.; Circella, M.; de Marzo, C.; Montaruli, T.; Falchieri, D.; Gabrielli, A.; Gandolfi, E.; Masetti, M.; Vitullo, C.; Zanarini, G.; Habel, R.; Usai, I.; Aiello, S.; Burrafato, G.; Caponetto, L.; Costanzo, E.; Lopresti, D.; Pappalardo, L.; Petta, C.; Randazzo, N.; Russo, G. V.; Troia, O.; Barnà, R.; D'Amico, V.; de Domenico, E.; de Pasquale, D.; Giacobbe, S.; Italiano, A.; Migliardo, F.; Salvato, G.; Trafirò, A.; Trimarchi, M.; Ameli, F.; Bonori, M.; Bottai, S.; Capone, A.; Desiati, P.; Massa, F.; Masullo, R.; Salusti, E.; Vicini, M.; Coniglione, R.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Riccobene, R.; Sapienza, P.; Cordelli, M.; Trasatti, L.; Valente, V.; de Marchis, G.; Piccari, L.; Accerboni, E.; Mosetti, R.; Astraldi, M.; Gasparini, G. P.; Ulzega, A.; Orrù, P.

    2000-06-01

    The NEMO.RD Project is a feasibility study of a km3 underwater telescope for high energy astrophysical neutrinos to be located in the Mediterranea Sea. At present this study concerns: i) Monte Carlo simulation study of the capabilities of various arrays of phototubes in order to determine the detector geometry that can optimize performance and cost; ii) design of low power consumption electronic cards for data acquisition and transmission to shore; iii) feasibility study of mechanics, deployment, connection and maintenance of such a detector in collaboration with petrol industries having experience of undersea operations; iv) oceanographic exploration of various sites in search for the optimal one. A brief report on the status of points i) and iv) is presented here

  8. Relationships between Arctic sea ice drift and strength modelled by NEMO-LIM3.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docquier, David; Massonnet, François; Barthélemy, Antoine; Tandon, Neil F.; Lecomte, Olivier; Fichefet, Thierry

    2017-12-01

    Sea ice cover and thickness have substantially decreased in the Arctic Ocean since the beginning of the satellite era. As a result, sea ice strength has been reduced, allowing more deformation and fracturing and leading to increased sea ice drift speed. We use the version 3.6 of the global ocean-sea ice NEMO-LIM model (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean coupled to the Louvain-la-Neuve sea Ice Model), satellite, buoy and submarine observations, as well as reanalysis data over the period from 1979 to 2013 to study these relationships. Overall, the model agrees well with observations in terms of sea ice extent, concentration and thickness. The seasonal cycle of sea ice drift speed is reasonably well reproduced by the model. NEMO-LIM3.6 is able to capture the relationships between the seasonal cycles of sea ice drift speed, concentration and thickness, with higher drift speed for both lower concentration and lower thickness, in agreement with observations. Model experiments are carried out to test the sensitivity of Arctic sea ice drift speed, thickness and concentration to changes in sea ice strength parameter P*. These show that higher values of P* generally lead to lower sea ice deformation and lower sea ice thickness, and that no single value of P* is the best option for reproducing the observed drift speed and thickness. The methodology proposed in this analysis provides a benchmark for a further model intercomparison related to the relationships between sea ice drift speed and strength, which is especially relevant in the context of the upcoming Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6).

  9. Nemo-like kinase (NLK) expression in osteoblastic cells and suppression of osteoblastic differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nifuji, Akira, E-mail: nifuji-a@tsurumi-u.ac.jp [Transcriptome profiling group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Department of Pharmacology, Tsurumi University School of Dental Medicine, Yokohama (Japan); Ideno, Hisashi [Transcriptome profiling group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Ohyama, Yoshio [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Takanabe, Rieko; Araki, Ryoko; Abe, Masumi [Transcriptome profiling group, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Noda, Masaki [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Shibuya, Hiroshi [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Medical Research Institute and School of Biomedical Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) regulate proliferation and differentiation in osteoblasts. The vertebral homologue of nemo, nemo-like kinase (NLK), is an atypical MAPK that targets several signaling components, including the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/Lef1) transcription factor. Recent studies have shown that NLK forms a complex with the histone H3-K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 and suppresses peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma:: action in the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Here we investigated whether NLK regulates osteoblastic differentiation. We showed that NLK mRNA is expressed in vivo in osteoblasts at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) mouse calvariae. By using retrovirus vectors, we performed forced expression of NLK in primary calvarial osteoblasts (pOB cells) and the mesenchymal cell line ST2. Wild-type NLK (NLK-WT) suppressed alkaline phosphatase activity and expression of bone marker genes such as alkaline phosphatase, type I procollagen, runx2, osterix, steopontin and osteocalcin in these cells. NLK-WT also decreased type I collagen protein expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Furthermore, mineralized nodule formation was reduced in pOB cells overexpressing NLK-WT. In contrast, kinase-negative form of NLK (NLK-KN) did not suppress or partially suppress ALP activity and bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. NLK-KN did not suppress nodule formation in pOB cells. In addition to forced expression, suppression of endogenous NLK expression by siRNA increased bone marker gene expression in pOB and ST2 cells. Finally, transcriptional activity analysis of gene promoters revealed that NLK-WT suppressed Wnt1 activation of TOP flash promoter and Runx2 activation of the osteocalcin promoter. Taken together, these results suggest that NLK negatively regulates osteoblastic differentiation.

  10. NEMO on the shelf: assessment of the Iberia–Biscay–Ireland configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Maraldi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the design and validation of a high-resolution (1/36° ocean forecasting model over the "Iberian–Biscay–Irish" (IBI area. The system has been set-up using the NEMO model (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean. New developments have been incorporated in NEMO to make it suitable to open- as well as coastal-ocean modelling. In this paper, we pursue three main objectives: (1 to give an overview of the model configuration used for the simulations; (2 to give a broad-brush account of one particular aspect of this work, namely consistency verification; this type of validation is conducted upstream of the implementation of the system before it is used for production and routinely validated; it is meant to guide model development in identifying gross deficiencies in the modelling of several key physical processes; and (3 to show that such a regional modelling system has potential as a complement to patchy observations (an integrated approach to give information on non-observed physical quantities and to provide links between observations by identifying broader-scale patterns and processes. We concentrate on the year 2008. We first provide domain-wide consistency verification results in terms of barotropic tides, transports, sea surface temperature and stratification. We then focus on two dynamical subregions: the Celtic shelves and the Bay of Biscay slope and deep regions. The model–data consistency is checked for variables and processes such as tidal currents, tidal fronts, internal tides and residual elevation. We also examine the representation in the model of a seasonal pattern of the Bay of Biscay circulation: the warm extension of the Iberian Poleward Current along the northern Spanish coast (Navidad event in the winter of 2007–2008.

  11. Sea-ice evaluation of NEMO-Nordic 1.0: a NEMO-LIM3.6-based ocean-sea-ice model setup for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, Per; Löptien, Ulrike; Hordoir, Robinson; Höglund, Anders; Schimanke, Semjon; Axell, Lars; Haapala, Jari

    2017-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is a seasonally ice-covered marginal sea in northern Europe with intense wintertime ship traffic and a sensitive ecosystem. Understanding and modeling the evolution of the sea-ice pack is important for climate effect studies and forecasting purposes. Here we present and evaluate the sea-ice component of a new NEMO-LIM3.6-based ocean-sea-ice setup for the North Sea and Baltic Sea region (NEMO-Nordic). The setup includes a new depth-based fast-ice parametrization for the Baltic Sea. The evaluation focuses on long-term statistics, from a 45-year long hindcast, although short-term daily performance is also briefly evaluated. We show that NEMO-Nordic is well suited for simulating the mean sea-ice extent, concentration, and thickness as compared to the best available observational data set. The variability of the annual maximum Baltic Sea ice extent is well in line with the observations, but the 1961-2006 trend is underestimated. Capturing the correct ice thickness distribution is more challenging. Based on the simulated ice thickness distribution we estimate the undeformed and deformed ice thickness and concentration in the Baltic Sea, which compares reasonably well with observations.

  12. Complete genetic suppression of polyp formation and reduction of CpG-island hypermethylation in Apc(Min/+) Dnmt1-hypomorphic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, Cindy A; Nickel, Andrea E; Laird, Peter W

    2002-03-01

    Promoter CpG island hypermethylation of critical genes is thought to play an important role in human colorectal tumorigenesis. In this study, we show that low levels of CpG island methylation occur in the normal intestinal mucosa of Apc(Min/+) mice and are increased in Multiple Intestinal Metaplasia (Min) polyps. We examined the interaction between CpG island hypermethylation and tumorigenesis by genetically modulating expression levels of the predominant DNA methyltransferase, Dnmt1, in Apc(Min/+) mice. We show that a combination of Dnmt1 hypomorphic alleles results in the complete suppression of polyp formation and an accompanying reduction in the frequency of CpG island methylation in both the normal intestinal mucosa and intestinal adenomas. These results suggest that sufficient DNA methyltransferase expression is a prerequisite for polyp formation and that hypomorphic alleles of Dnmt1 are not merely genetic modifiers but the first identified true genetic suppressors of the Min phenotype.

  13. NUMBL Interacts with TAK1, TRAF6 and NEMO to Negatively Regulate NF-κB Signaling During Osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnkar, Gaurav; Chen, Tim Hung-Po; Arra, Manoj; Nasir, Amjad M; Mbalaviele, Gabriel; Abu-Amer, Yousef

    2017-10-03

    NF-κB signaling is essential for osteoclast differentiation and skeletal homeostasis. We have reported recently that NUMB-like (NUMBL) protein modulates osteoclastogenesis by down regulating NF-κB activation. Herein, we decipher the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. We found that whereas NUMBL mRNA expression decreases upon stimulation of wild type (WT) bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) with RANKL, TAK1 deficiency in these cells leads to increased NUMBL and decreased TRAF6 and NEMO expression. These changes were restored upon WT-TAK1 expression, but not with catalytically inactive TAK1-K63W, suggesting that TAK1 enzymatic activity is required for these events. Forced expression of NUMBL inhibits osteoclast differentiation and function as evident by reduction in all hallmarks of osteoclastogenesis. Conversely, NUMBL-null BMMs, show increased osteoclast differentiation and mRNA expression of osteoclast marker genes. Post-translationally, K48-linked poly-ubiquitination of NUMBL is diminished in TAK1-null BMMs compared to elevated K48-poly-ubiquitination in WT cells, indicating increased stability of NUMBL in TAK1-null conditions. Further, our studies show that NUMBL directly interacts with TRAF6 and NEMO, and induces their K48-poly-ubiquitination mediated proteasomal degradation. Collectively, our data suggest that NUMBL and TAK1 are reciprocally regulated and that NUMBL acts as an endogenous regulator of NF-κB signaling and osteoclastogenesis by targeting the TAK1-TRAF6-NEMO axis.

  14. Long term monitoring of the optical background in the Capo Passero deep-sea site with the NEMO tower prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adrian-Martinez, S.; Ardid, M.; Llorens Alvarez, C.D.; Saldana, M. [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Instituto de Investigacion para la Gestion Integrada de las Zonas Costeras, Gandia (Spain); Aiello, S.; Giordano, V.; Leonora, E.; Longhitano, F.; Randazzo, N.; Sipala, V.; Ventura, C. [INFN Sezione Catania, Catania (Italy); Ameli, F.; Biagioni, A.; De Bonis, G.; Fermani, P.; Lonardo, A.; Nicolau, C.A.; Simeone, F.; Vicini, P. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Anghinolfi, M.; Hugon, C.; Musico, P.; Orzelli, A.; Sanguineti, M. [INFN Sezione Genova, Genoa (Italy); Barbarino, G.; Barbato, F.C.T.; De Rosa, G.; Di Capua, F.; Garufi, F.; Vivolo, D. [INFN Sezione Napoli, Naples (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche Universita di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Barbarito, E. [INFN Sezione Bari, Bari (Italy); Dipartimento Interateneo di Fisica Universita di Bari, Bari (Italy); Beverini, N.; Calamai, M.; Maccioni, E.; Marinelli, A.; Terreni, G. [INFN Sezione Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Pisa (Italy); Biagi, S.; Cacopardo, G.; Cali, C.; Caruso, F.; Cocimano, R.; Coniglione, R.; Costa, M.; Cuttone, G.; D' Amato, C.; De Luca, V.; Distefano, C.; Gmerk, A.; Grasso, R.; Imbesi, M.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Leismueller, K.P.; Litrico, P.; Migneco, E.; Miraglia, A.; Musumeci, M.; Orlando, A.; Papaleo, R.; Pulvirenti, S.; Riccobene, G.; Rovelli, A.; Sapienza, P.; Sciacca, V.; Speziale, F.; Spitaleri, A.; Trovato, A.; Viola, S. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Bouhadef, B.; Flaminio, V.; Raffaelli, F. [INFN Sezione Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Pisa (Italy); Bozza, C.; Grella, G.; Stellacci, S.M. [INFN Gruppo Collegato di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Salerno, Fisciano (Italy); Calvo, D.; Real, D. [CSIC-Universitat de Valencia, IFIC-Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Capone, A.; Masullo, R.; Perrina, C. [INFN Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Universita ' ' Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Ceres, A.; Circella, M.; Mongelli, M.; Sgura, I. [INFN Sezione Bari, Bari (Italy); Chiarusi, T. [INFN Sezione Bologna, Bologna (Italy); D' Amico, A. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Nikhef, Science Park, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deniskina, N.; Migliozzi, P.; Mollo, C.M. [INFN Sezione Napoli, Naples (Italy); Enzenhoefer, A.; Lahmann, R. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Ferrara, G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Fusco, L.A.; Margiotta, A.; Pellegrino, C.; Spurio, M. [INFN Sezione Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia Universita di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Lo Presti, D.; Pugliatti, C. [INFN Sezione Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Martini, A.; Trasatti, L. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Morganti, M. [INFN Sezione Pisa, Polo Fibonacci, Pisa (Italy); Accademia Navale di Livorno, Livorno (Italy); Pellegriti, M.G. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (IT); Piattelli, P. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (IT); Taiuti, M. [INFN Sezione Genova, Genoa (IT); Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Genova, Genoa (IT)

    2016-02-15

    The NEMO Phase-2 tower is the first detector which was operated underwater for more than 1 year at the ''record'' depth of 3500 m. It was designed and built within the framework of the NEMO (NEutrino Mediterranean Observatory) project. The 380 m high tower was successfully installed in March 2013 80 km offshore Capo Passero (Italy). This is the first prototype operated on the site where the Italian node of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be built. The installation and operation of the NEMO Phase-2 tower has proven the functionality of the infrastructure and the operability at 3500 m depth. A more than 1 year long monitoring of the deep water characteristics of the site has been also provided. In this paper the infrastructure and the tower structure and instrumentation are described. The results of long term optical background measurements are presented. The rates show stable and low baseline values, compatible with the contribution of {sup 40}K light emission, with a small percentage of light bursts due to bioluminescence. All these features confirm the stability and good optical properties of the site. (orig.)

  15. Requirement of FADD, NEMO, and BAX/BAK for Aberrant Mitochondrial Function in Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Necrosis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrinki, Krishna M.; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Thapa, Roshan J.; Chandramoorthy, Harish C.; Smith, Frank J.; Jog, Neelakshi R.; Gandhirajan, Rajesh Kumar; Kelsen, Steven G.; Houser, Steven R.; May, Michael J.; Balachandran, Siddharth; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2011-01-01

    Necroptosis represents a form of alternative programmed cell death that is dependent on the kinase RIP1. RIP1-dependent necroptotic death manifests as increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in mitochondria and is accompanied by loss of ATP biogenesis and eventual dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Here, we show that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-induced necroptosis requires the adaptor proteins FADD and NEMO. FADD was found to mediate formation of the TNF-α-induced pronecrotic RIP1-RIP3 kinase complex, whereas the IκB Kinase (IKK) subunit NEMO appears to function downstream of RIP1-RIP3. Interestingly, loss of RelA potentiated TNF-α-dependent necroptosis, indicating that NEMO regulates necroptosis independently of NF-κB. Using both pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that the overexpression of antioxidants alleviates ROS elevation and necroptosis. Finally, elimination of BAX and BAK or overexpression of Bcl-xL protects cells from necroptosis at a later step. These findings provide evidence that mitochondria play an amplifying role in inflammation-induced necroptosis. PMID:21746883

  16. Increasing vertical mixing to reduce Southern Ocean deep convection in NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, C.; Ridley, J. K.; Calvert, D.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.

    2015-03-01

    Most CMIP5 models unrealistically form Antarctic Bottom Water by open ocean deep convection in the Weddell and Ross Seas. To identify the triggering mechanisms leading to Southern Ocean deep convection in models, we perform sensitivity experiments on the ocean model NEMO forced by prescribed atmospheric fluxes. We vary the vertical velocity scale of the Langmuir turbulence, the fraction of turbulent kinetic energy transferred below the mixed layer, and the background diffusivity and run short simulations from 1980. All experiments exhibit deep convection in the Riiser-Larsen Sea in 1987; the origin is a positive sea ice anomaly in 1985, causing a shallow anomaly in mixed layer depth, hence anomalously warm surface waters and subsequent polynya opening. Modifying the vertical mixing impacts both the climatological state and the associated surface anomalies. The experiments with enhanced mixing exhibit colder surface waters and reduced deep convection. The experiments with decreased mixing are warmer, open larger polynyas and have deep convection across the Weddell Sea until the simulations end. Extended experiments reveal an increase in the Drake Passage transport of 4 Sv each year deep convection occurs, leading to an unrealistically large transport at the end of the simulation. North Atlantic deep convection is not significantly affected by the changes in mixing parameters. As new climate model overflow parameterisations are developed to form Antarctic Bottom Water more realistically, we argue that models would benefit from stopping Southern Ocean deep convection, for example by increasing their vertical mixing.

  17. Performance and results of the high-resolution biogeochemical model PELAGOS025 within NEMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicoco, I.; Mocavero, S.; Macchia, F.; Vichi, M.; Lovato, T.; Masina, S.; Aloisio, G.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims at evaluating the scalability performance of a high-resolution global ocean biogeochemistry model (PELAGOS025) on massive parallel architectures and the benefits in terms of the time-to-solution reduction. PELAGOS025 is an on-line coupling between the physical ocean model NEMO and the BFM biogeochemical model. Both the models use a parallel domain decomposition along the horizontal dimension. The parallelisation is based on the message passing paradigm. The performance analysis has been done on two parallel architectures, an IBM BlueGene/Q at ALCF (Argonne Leadership Computing Facilities) and an IBM iDataPlex with Sandy Bridge processors at CMCC (Euro Mediterranean Center on Climate Change). The outcome of the analysis demonstrated that the lack of scalability is due to several factors such as the I/O operations, the memory contention, the load unbalancing due to the memory structure of the BFM component and, for the BlueGene/Q, the absence of a hybrid parallelisation approach.

  18. The hypomorphic TERT A1062T variant is associated with increased treatment-related toxicity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Anna; Krauter, Jürgen; Damm, Frederik; Thol, Felicitas; Göhring, Gudrun; Heuser, Michael; Ottmann, Oliver; Lübbert, Michael; Wattad, Mohammed; Kanz, Lothar; Schlimok, Günter; Raghavachar, Aruna; Fiedler, Walter; Kirchner, Hartmut; Brugger, Wolfram; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Heil, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Wagner, Katharina

    2017-06-01

    Hypomorphic germline variants in TERT, the gene encoding the reverse transcriptase component of the human telomerase complex, occur with a frequency of 3-5% in acute myeloid leukemia. We analyzed the clinical and prognostic impact of the most common TERT A1062T variant in younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia intensively treated within two prospective multicenter trials. Four hundred and twenty patients (age 17-60 years) were analyzed for the TERT A1062T variant by direct sequencing. Fifteen patients (3.6%) carried the TERT A1062T variant. Patients with the TERT A1062T variant had a trend towards less favorable and more intermediate 2/adverse karyotypes/genotypes according to the European Leukemia Net classification. In univariate and multivariate analysis, patients with the TERT A1062T variant had a significantly inferior overall survival compared to wild-type patients (6-year overall survival 20 vs. 41%, p = 0.005). Patients with the TERT A1062T variant showed a high rate of treatment-related mortality: 5/15 (33%) died during induction therapy or in complete remission as compared to 62/405 (15%) of the wild-type patients. In patients with the TERT variant, 14/15 (93%) suffered from non-hematological/non-infectious grade 3/4 adverse events (mostly hepatic and/or mucosal) as compared to 216/405 (53%) wild-type patients (p = 0.006). In multivariate analysis, the TERT A1062T variant was an independent risk factor predicting for adverse events during induction chemotherapy. In conclusion, the TERT A1062T variant is an independent negative prognostic factor in younger patients with acute myeloid leukemia and seems to predispose those patients to treatment-related toxicity.

  19. 5'UTR mutations of ENG cause hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanovich Kristy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is a vascular disorder characterized by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations, and telangiectases. The majority of the patients have a mutation in the coding region of the activin A receptor type II-like 1 (ACVRL1 or Endoglin (ENG gene. However, in approximately 15% of cases, sequencing analysis and deletion/duplication testing fail to identify mutations in the coding regions of these genes. Knowing its vital role in transcription and translation control, we were prompted to investigate the 5'untranslated region (UTR of ENG. Methods and Results We sequenced the 5'UTR of ENG for 154 HHT patients without mutations in ENG or ACVRL1 coding regions. We found a mutation (c.-127C > T, which is predicted to affect translation initiation and alter the reading frame of endoglin. This mutation was found in a family with linkage to the ENG, as well as in three other patients, one of which had an affected sibling with the same mutation. In vitro expression studies showed that a construct with the c.-127C > T mutation alters the translation and decreases the level of the endoglin protein. In addition, a c.-9G > A mutation was found in three patients, one of whom was homozygous for this mutation. Expression studies showed decreased protein levels suggesting that the c.-9G > A is a hypomorphic mutation. Conclusions Our results emphasize the need for the inclusion of the 5'UTR region of ENG in clinical testing for HHT.

  20. Explicit representation and parametrised impacts of under ice shelf seas in the z∗ coordinate ocean model NEMO 3.6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mathiot

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Ice-shelf–ocean interactions are a major source of freshwater on the Antarctic continental shelf and have a strong impact on ocean properties, ocean circulation and sea ice. However, climate models based on the ocean–sea ice model NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean currently do not include these interactions in any detail. The capability of explicitly simulating the circulation beneath ice shelves is introduced in the non-linear free surface model NEMO. Its implementation into the NEMO framework and its assessment in an idealised and realistic circum-Antarctic configuration is described in this study. Compared with the current prescription of ice shelf melting (i.e. at the surface, inclusion of open sub-ice-shelf cavities leads to a decrease in sea ice thickness along the coast, a weakening of the ocean stratification on the shelf, a decrease in salinity of high-salinity shelf water on the Ross and Weddell sea shelves and an increase in the strength of the gyres that circulate within the over-deepened basins on the West Antarctic continental shelf. Mimicking the overturning circulation under the ice shelves by introducing a prescribed meltwater flux over the depth range of the ice shelf base, rather than at the surface, is also assessed. It yields similar improvements in the simulated ocean properties and circulation over the Antarctic continental shelf to those from the explicit ice shelf cavity representation. With the ice shelf cavities opened, the widely used three equation ice shelf melting formulation, which enables an interactive computation of melting, is tested. Comparison with observational estimates of ice shelf melting indicates realistic results for most ice shelves. However, melting rates for the Amery, Getz and George VI ice shelves are considerably overestimated.

  1. Simulation of snowbands in the Baltic Sea area with the coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice model COSMO-CLM/NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Van Pham

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wind-parallel bands of snowfall over the Baltic Sea area are common during late autumn and early winter. This phenomenon occurs when cold air flows over the warm water surface, enhancing convection and leading to heavy snow fall. Six snowband events from 1985 to 2010 are simulated by using the coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice model COSMO-CLM/NEMO. The model resolution is reasonably high to capture the snowbands; the atmospheric model COSMO-CLM has a horizontal grid-spacing of approximately 25 km and the ocean sea-ice model NEMO has a horizontal grid-spacing of approximately 3 km. The model results show that the coupled system COSMO-CLM/NEMO successfully reproduced the snowband events with a high contrast of temperatures between the surface and the atmosphere, sharp bands of precipitation over the sea, as well as the enormous heat fluxes released by the ocean to the atmosphere during the days when snowbands occurred. In the two cases when radar data are available, the model precipitation is shown to be in satisfactory agreement. The precipitation patterns closely follow the cloud shapes on satellite images. When not coupled with the ocean model, the atmospheric stand-alone model provided acceptable results if forced by high-quality sea surface temperatures (SSTs from reanalysis data. However, COSMO-CLM forced with lower quality SSTs could not recreate the snowbands. The results indicate the need of an atmospheric model with high SST skill or a coupled ocean model when extreme event climatology is the primary aim in the Baltic Sea area.

  2. Novel molecular changes induced by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interaction in adolescence: a hippocampal proteomic study in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrah R Spencer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin 1 (NRG1 is linked to an increased risk of developing schizophrenia and cannabis dependence. Mice that are hypomorphic for Nrg1 (Nrg1 HET mice display schizophrenia-relevant behavioural phenotypes and aberrant expression of serotonin and glutamate receptors. Nrg1 HET mice also display idiosyncratic responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC. To gain traction on the molecular pathways disrupted by Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions we conducted a proteomic study. Adolescent wildtype (WT and Nrg1 HET mice were exposed to repeated injections of vehicle or THC and their hippocampi were submitted to 2D gel proteomics. Comparison of WT and Nrg1 HET mice identified proteins linked to molecular changes in schizophrenia that have not been previously associated with Nrg1. These proteins are involved in vesicular release of neurotransmitters such as SNARE proteins; enzymes impacting serotonergic neurotransmission, and; proteins affecting growth factor expression. Nrg1 HET mice treated with THC expressed a distinct protein expression signature compared to WT mice. Replicating prior findings, THC caused proteomic changes in WT mice suggestive of greater oxidative stress and neurodegeneration. We have previously observed that THC selectively increased hippocampal NMDA receptor binding of adolescent Nrg1 HET mice. Here we observed outcomes consistent with heightened NMDA-mediated glutamatergic neurotransmission. This included differential expression of proteins involved in NMDA receptor trafficking to the synaptic membrane; lipid raft stabilization of synaptic NMDA receptors; and homeostatic responses to dampen excitotoxicity. These findings uncover for the first time novel proteins altered in response to Nrg1 hypomorphism and Nrg1-cannabinoid interactions that improves our molecular understanding of Nrg1 signaling and Nrg1-mediated genetic vulnerability to the neurobehavioural effects

  3. Increasing vertical mixing to reduce Southern Ocean deep convection in NEMO3.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, C.; Ridley, J. K.; Calvert, D.; Stevens, D. P.; Heywood, K. J.

    2015-10-01

    Most CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5) models unrealistically form Antarctic Bottom Water by open ocean deep convection in the Weddell and Ross seas. To identify the mechanisms triggering Southern Ocean deep convection in models, we perform sensitivity experiments on the ocean model NEMO3.4 forced by prescribed atmospheric fluxes. We vary the vertical velocity scale of the Langmuir turbulence, the fraction of turbulent kinetic energy transferred below the mixed layer, and the background diffusivity and run short simulations from 1980. All experiments exhibit deep convection in the Riiser-Larsen Sea in 1987; the origin is a positive sea ice anomaly in 1985, causing a shallow anomaly in mixed layer depth, hence anomalously warm surface waters and subsequent polynya opening. Modifying the vertical mixing impacts both the climatological state and the associated surface anomalies. The experiments with enhanced mixing exhibit colder surface waters and reduced deep convection. The experiments with decreased mixing give warmer surface waters, open larger polynyas causing more saline surface waters and have deep convection across the Weddell Sea until the simulations end. Extended experiments reveal an increase in the Drake Passage transport of 4 Sv each year deep convection occurs, leading to an unrealistically large transport at the end of the simulation. North Atlantic deep convection is not significantly affected by the changes in mixing parameters. As new climate model overflow parameterisations are developed to form Antarctic Bottom Water more realistically, we argue that models would benefit from stopping Southern Ocean deep convection, for example by increasing their vertical mixing.

  4. Failure of the Nemo trial: bumetanide is a promising agent to treat many brain disorders but not newborn seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehezkel eBen-Ari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The diuretic bumetanide failed to treat acute seizures due to hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in newborn babies and was associated with hearing loss (NEMO trial; 1. On the other hand, clinical and experimental observations suggest that the diuretic might provide novel therapy for many brain disorders including autistic spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, Rett syndrome and Parkinson disease. Here, we discuss the differences between the pathophysiology of severe recurrent seizures in the neonates and neurological and psychiatric disorders stressing the uniqueness of severe seizures in newborn in comparison to other disorders.

  5. Gene Targeted Mice with Conditional Knock-In (-Out) of NMDAR Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprengel, Rolf; Eltokhi, Ahmed; Single, Frank N

    2017-01-01

    the germ line of mice as hypomorphic Grin alleles. By breeding these hypomorphic Grin gene targeted mice with Cre recombinase expressing mice, the hypomorphic Grin allele can be activated at specific time points in specific cell types, and the function of the mutated NMDAR can be analyzed in these - so called - conditional mouse models. In this method chapter, we describe in detail the different methodical steps for successful gene targeting and generation of conditional NMDAR mutant mouse lines. Within the last 20 years, several students in our Department of Molecular Neurobiology in Heidelberg used these techniques several times to generate different mouse lines with mutated NMDARs.

  6. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel MA; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin AM; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-01-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication, and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify DONSON as a novel fork protection factor, and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilises forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATR-dependent signalling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity, and potentiating chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in patient cells, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we identify mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism, and establish DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability. PMID:28191891

  7. Nemo Solus Satis Sapit: Trends of Research Collaborations in the Vietnamese Social Sciences, Observing 2008–2017 Scopus Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Hoang Vuong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available “Nemo solus satis sapit”—no one can be wise enough on his own. This is particularly true when it comes to collaborations in scientific research. Concerns over this issue in Vietnam, a developing country with limited academic resources, led to an in-depth study on Vietnamese social science research, using Google Scholar and Scopus, during 2008–2017. The results showed that more than 90% of scientists had worked with colleagues to publish, and they had collaborated 13 times on average during the time limit of the data sample. These collaborations, both domestic and international, mildly boosted author performance. On the other hand, the modest number of publications by Vietnamese authors was reportedly linked to Vietnamese social scientists’ heavy reliance on collaborative work as non-leading co-authors: for an entire decade (2008–2017, the average author assumes the leading role merely in two articles, and hardly ever published alone. This implies that policy-makers ought to consider promoting institutional collaborations while also encouraging authors to acquire the experience of publishing solo.

  8. The NEMO-AROME WMED high-resolution air-sea coupled system: impact on dense water formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Fabien; Lebeaupin Brossier, Cindy; Giordani, Hervé; Arsouze, Thomas; Beuvier, Jonathan; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Ducrocq, Véronique; Fourrié, Nadia

    2016-04-01

    The North-Western Mediterranean Sea is a key location where intense air-sea exchanges occur, especially during winter when the succession of strong northerly and north-westerly wind boosts the dense water formation. The second Special Observation Period (SOP2) of the HyMeX program, which took place between 1st February and 15th March 2013, was dedicated to the observation of the dense water formation and ocean deep convection processes. During this period, several platforms sampled the area, providing a unique dataset to better identify the coupled processes leading to dense water formation. This study investigates the impacts of the fine scale ocean-atmosphere coupled processes on dense water formation during winter 2012-2013. We developed the coupling between the NEMO-WMED36 ocean model (1/36° resolution) and the AROME-WMED numerical weather prediction model (2.5 km resolution) and ran the high-resolution air-sea coupled system over SOP2. The coupled simulation is compared to an ocean-only simulation forced by AROME-WMED operational forecasts and to air-sea observations collected during the HyMeX SOP2. The results show small differences in term of surface fluxes. Dense water formation is slightly changed in the coupled simulation, whereas fine-scale ocean processes are significantly modified.

  9. Proteins that bind to IKK{gamma} (NEMO) and down-regulate the activation of NF-{kappa}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shifera, Amde Selassie, E-mail: shiferaa@vision.ucsf.edu [Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143 (United States)

    2010-06-04

    Inhibitor of {kappa}B kinase (IKK) gamma (IKK{gamma}), also referred to as nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) essential modulator (NEMO), is an important component of the IKK complex. Following the exposure of cells to NF-{kappa}B-inducing stimuli, the IKK complex catalyzes the phosphorylation of inhibitor of {kappa}B (I{kappa}B) proteins, which is a critical step that leads to the activation of NF-{kappa}B via the canonical pathway. The exact functions of IKK{gamma} as part of the IKK complex have not been fully elucidated. A number of proteins have been identified as directly interacting with IKK{gamma} and modulating the activity of the IKK complex. This mini review covers eight proteins that have been reported to bind to IKK{gamma} and lead to the suppression of the activities of the IKK complex and hence result in the down-regulation of the activation of NF-{kappa}B. The reported mechanisms by which these interactions suppress the activation of the IKK complex include the deubiquitination of IKK{gamma} and competition with upstream activators for binding to IKK{gamma}.

  10. Novel FGF8 Mutations Associated with Recessive Holoprosencephaly, Craniofacial Defects, and Hypothalamo-Pituitary Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mark J.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Tziaferi, Vaitsa; Gregory, Louise C.; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Signore, Massimo; Puelles, Eduardo; Gerrelli, Dianne; Farooqi, I. Sadaf; Raza, Jamal; Walker, Joanna; Kavanaugh, Scott I.; Tsai, Pei-San; Pitteloud, Nelly; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Context: Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 8 is important for GnRH neuronal development with human mutations resulting in Kallmann syndrome. Murine data suggest a role for Fgf8 in hypothalamo-pituitary development; however, its role in the etiology of wider hypothalamo-pituitary dysfunction in humans is unknown. Objective: The objective of this study was to screen for FGF8 mutations in patients with septo-optic dysplasia (n = 374) or holoprosencephaly (HPE)/midline clefts (n = 47). Methods: FGF8 was analyzed by PCR and direct sequencing. Ethnically matched controls were then screened for mutated alleles (n = 480–686). Localization of Fgf8/FGF8 expression was analyzed by in situ hybridization in developing murine and human embryos. Finally, Fgf8 hypomorphic mice (Fgf8loxPNeo/−) were analyzed for the presence of forebrain and hypothalamo-pituitary defects. Results: A homozygous p.R189H mutation was identified in a female patient of consanguineous parentage with semilobar HPE, diabetes insipidus, and TSH and ACTH insufficiency. Second, a heterozygous p.Q216E mutation was identified in a female patient with an absent corpus callosum, hypoplastic optic nerves, and Moebius syndrome. FGF8 was expressed in the ventral diencephalon and anterior commissural plate but not in Rathke's pouch, strongly suggesting early onset hypothalamic and corpus callosal defects in these patients. This was consolidated by significantly reduced vasopressin and oxytocin staining neurons in the hypothalamus of Fgf8 hypomorphic mice compared with controls along with variable hypothalamo-pituitary defects and HPE. Conclusion: We implicate FGF8 in the etiology of recessive HPE and potentially septo-optic dysplasia/Moebius syndrome for the first time to our knowledge. Furthermore, FGF8 is important for the development of the ventral diencephalon, hypothalamus, and pituitary. PMID:21832120

  11. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  12. Measurement of the Double-Beta Decay Half-Life and Search for the Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$ with the NEMO-3 Detector

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Augier, C; Bakalyarov, A M; Baker, J D; Barabash, A S; Basharina-Freshville, A; Blondel, S; Blot, S; Bongrand, M; Brudanin, V; Busto, J; Caffrey, A J; Calvez, S; Cascella, M; Cerna, C; Cesar, J P; Chapon, A; Chauveau, E; Chopra, A; Duchesneau, D; Durand, D; Egorov, V; Eurin, G; Evans, J J; Fajt, L; Filosofov, D; Flack, R; Garrido, X; Gómez, H; Guillon, B; Guzowski, P; Hodák, R; Huber, A; Hubert, P; Hugon, C; Jullian, S; Klimenko, A; Kochetov, O; Konovalov, S I; Kovalenko, V; Lalanne, D; Lang, K; Lebedev, V I; Lemière, Y; Noblet, T Le; Liptak, Z; Liu, X R; Loaiza, P; Lutter, G; Mamedov, F; Marquet, C; Mauger, F; Morgan, B; Mott, J; Nemchenok, I; Nomachi, M; Nova, F; Nowacki, F; Ohsumi, H; Pahlka, R B; Perrot, F; Piquemal, F; Povinec, P; Přidal, P; Ramachers, Y A; Remoto, A; Reyss, J L; Richards, B; Riddle, C L; Rukhadze, E; Rukhadze, N I; Saakyan, R; Salazar, R; Sarazin, X; Shitov, Yu; Simard, L; Šimkovic, F; Smetana, A; Smolek, K; Smolnikov, A; Söldner-Rembold, S; Soulé, B; Štekl, I; Suhonen, J; Sutton, C S; Szklarz, G; Thomas, J; Timkin, V; Torre, S; Tretyak, Vl I; Tretyak, V I; Umatov, V I; Vanushin, I; Vilela, C; Vorobel, V; Waters, D; Zhukov, S V; Žukauskas, A

    2016-01-01

    The NEMO-3 experiment at the Modane Underground Laboratory has investigated the double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$. Using $5.25$\\,yr of data recorded with a $6.99\\,{\\rm g}$ sample of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$, approximately $150$ double-$\\beta$ decay candidate events have been selected with a signal-to-background ratio greater than $3$. The half-life for the two-neutrino double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}{\\rm Ca}$ has been measured to be \\mbox{$T^{2\

  13. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessendorf, Petra [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany); Vijg, Jan [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Michael F. Price Center, 1301 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 (United States); Nussenzweig, André [Laboratory of Genome Integrity, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, 37 Convent Drive, Room 1106, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Digweed, Martin, E-mail: martin.digweed@charite.de [Institute of Medical and Human Genetics, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Augustenburger Platz 1, D-13353 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin.

  14. Comparative study of sea ice dynamics simulations with a Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology and the elastic-viscous-plastic rheology in NEMO-LIM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulier, Jonathan; Dansereau, Véronique; Fichefet, Thierry; Legat, Vincent; Weiss, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice is a highly dynamical environment characterized by a dense mesh of fractures or leads, constantly opening and closing over short time scales. This characteristic geomorphology is linked to the existence of linear kinematic features, which consist of quasi-linear patterns emerging from the observed strain rate field of sea ice. Standard rheologies used in most state-of-the-art sea ice models, like the well-known elastic-viscous-plastic rheology, are thought to misrepresent those linear kinematic features and the observed statistical distribution of deformation rates. Dedicated rheologies built to catch the processes known to be at the origin of the formation of leads are developed but still need evaluations on the global scale. One of them, based on a Maxwell elasto-brittle formulation, is being integrated in the NEMO-LIM3 global ocean-sea ice model (www.nemo-ocean.eu; www.elic.ucl.ac.be/lim). In the present study, we compare the results of the sea ice model LIM3 obtained with two different rheologies: the elastic-viscous-plastic rheology commonly used in LIM3 and a Maxwell elasto-brittle rheology. This comparison is focused on the statistical characteristics of the simulated deformation rate and on the ability of the model to reproduce the existence of leads within the ice pack. The impact of the lead representation on fluxes between ice, atmosphere and ocean is also assessed.

  15. NEMO-SN1 seafloor observatory at EMSO Western Ionian Sea site: a multidisciplinary approach for geophysical, oceanographic and environmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embriaco, Davide; Marinaro, Giuditta; Monna, Stephen; Lo Bue, Nadia; Giovanetti, Gabriele; De Caro, Mariagrazia; De Santis, Angelo; Sgroi, Tiziana; Frugoni, Francesco; Montuori, Caterina; Riccobene, Giorgio; Viola, Salvo; Sciacca, Virginia; Pulvirenti, Sara; Caruso, Francesco; Simeone, Francesco; Chierici, Francesco; D'Amico, Antonio; Beranzoli, Laura; Favali, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    The Western Ionian Sea is one of the sites of the European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water-column Observatory Research Infrastructure (EMSO). A prototype of a cabled deep-sea observatory (NEMO-SN1) was set up and has been operational in real-time since 2005 at 2100 m depth, 25 km off the harbour of Catania. In 2012 the observatory was upgraded to a fully integrated system for multidisciplinary deep-sea science, capable to transmit and distribute data in real time to the scientific community and to the general public. NEMO-SN1 hosts a large number of sensors to monitor and study oceanographic, environmental parameters (CTD, ADCP, current meter), and geophysical phenomena (hydrophones, accelerometer, gravity meter, magnetometers, seismometer, pressure gauges). Ocean noise monitoring and identification of biological acoustic sources in deep sea have also been possible with hydrophones working at low and high frequencies. The whole system was connected and powered from shore, by means of the electro-optical cable net installed at the East Sicily Site Infrastructure, and synchronised with GPS time. Sensors data sampling is performed underwater and transmitted via optical fibre link. A dedicated computing and networking infrastructure for data acquisition, storage and distribution through the internet has been also operative. Some examples of seafloor data analyses will be described to show the importance of such an integrated multidisciplinary infrastructure to geophysical, oceanographic and environmental studies.

  16. Results of the BiPo-1 prototype for radiopurity measurements for the SuperNEMO double beta decay source foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyriades, J. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay (France); Arnold, R. [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Augier, C. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay (France); Baker, J. [INL, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Barabash, A.S. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117259 Moscow (Russian Federation); Basharina-Freshville, A. [University College London, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom); Bongrand, M.; Bourgeois, C.; Breton, D.; Briere, M.; Broudin-Bay, G. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay (France); Brudanin, V.B. [Joint Institute for Neear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Caffrey, A.J. [INL, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Carcel, S. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Cebrian, S. [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas Energias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Chapon, A. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, F-14032 Caen (France); Chauveau, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); Dafni, Th. [Instituto de Fisica Nuclear y Altas Energias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Diaz, J. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC, Universidad de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Durand, D. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, F-14032 Caen (France)

    2010-10-01

    The development of BiPo detectors is dedicated to the measurement of extremely high radiopurity in {sup 208}Tl and {sup 214}Bi for the SuperNEMO double beta decay source foils. A modular prototype, called BiPo-1, with 0.8 m{sup 2} of sensitive surface area, has been running in the Modane Underground Laboratory since February, 2008. The goal of BiPo-1 is to measure the different components of the background and in particular the surface radiopurity of the plastic scintillators that make up the detector. The first phase of data collection has been dedicated to the measurement of the radiopurity in {sup 208}Tl. After more than one year of background measurement, a surface activity of the scintillators of A({sup 208}Tl)=1.5{mu}Bq/m{sup 2} is reported here. Given this level of background, a larger BiPo detector having 12 m{sup 2} of active surface area, is able to qualify the radiopurity of the SuperNEMO selenium double beta decay foils with the required sensitivity of A({sup 208}Tl)<2{mu}Bq/kg (90% C.L.) with a six month measurement.

  17. Cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of nibrin by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Gina; Cilli, Domenica; Berardinelli, Francesco; Viganotti, Mara; Ascenzi, Paolo; Tanzarella, Caterina; Antoccia, Antonio; di Masi, Alessandra

    2012-10-01

    The Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a genetic disorder caused by mutations in NBN gene and characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to ionizing radiations (IR). The N-terminus of nibrin (NBN) contains a tandem breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) carboxy-terminal (BRCT) domain that represents one of the major mediators of phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions in processes related to cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair functions. Patients with NBS compound heterozygous for the 657del5 hypomorphic mutation and for the Arg215Trp missense mutation (corresponding to the 643C>T gene mutation) display a clinical phenotype more severe than that of patients homozygous for the 657del5 mutation. Here, we show that both the 657del5 and Arg215Trp mutations, occurring within the tandem BRCT domains of NBN, although not altering the assembly of the MRE11/RAD50/NBN (MRN) complex, affect the MRE11 IR-induced nuclear foci (IRIF) formation and the DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling via the phosphorylation of both ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM downstream targets (e.g., SMC1 and p53). Remarkably, data obtained indicate that the cleavage of the BRCT tandem domains of NBN by the 657del5 mutation affects the DNA damage response less than the Arg215Trp mutation. Indeed, the 70-kDa NBN fragment, arising from the 657del5 mutation, maintains the capability to interact with MRE11 and γ-H2AX and to form IRIF. Altogether, the role of the tandem BRCT domains of NBN in the localization of the MRN complex at the DNA DSB and in the activation of the damage response is highlighted. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The Opdc missense mutation of Pax2 has a milder than loss-of-function phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Sally H; McKie, Lisa; West, Katrine; Coghill, Emma L; Favor, Jack; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Brown, Steve D M; Jackson, Ian J

    2011-01-15

    Renal-coloboma syndrome, also known as papillorenal syndrome, is an autosomal dominant human disorder in which optic disc coloboma is associated with kidney abnormalities. Mutations in the paired domain transcription factor PAX2 have been found to be the underlying cause of this disease. Disease severity varies between patients, and in some cases, renal hypoplasia has been found in the absence of any retinal defects. Here we report an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutation, Opdc, which is an isoleucinetothreonine missense mutation, I40T, in the first α-helix of the Pax2 paired domain. The mutant protein binds target DNA sequences less strongly than the wild-type protein and acts poorly to transactivate target promoters in culture. The phenotypic consequence of this mutation on the development of the eye and ear is similar to that reported for null alleles of Pax2. However, in homozygotes, cerebellar development is normal on a genetic background in which loss of Pax2 results in failure of cerebellar formation. Moreover, there is a genetic background effect on the heterozygous phenotype such that on some strain backgrounds, kidney development is unaffected. Opdc is the first hypomorphic mutation reported for Pax2 that differs in phenotype from loss-of-function mutations. These results suggest that PAX2 is a strong candidate gene for cases in which human patients have optic disc coloboma not associated with renal dysplasia.

  19. The cumulative number of micro-haemorrhages and micro-thromboses in nailfold videocapillaroscopy is a good indicator of disease activity in systemic sclerosis: a validation study of the NEMO score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andracco, Romina; Irace, Rosaria; Zaccara, Eleonora; Vettori, Serena; Maglione, Wanda; Riccardi, Antonella; Pignataro, Francesca; Ferrara, Roberta; Sambataro, Domenico; Sambataro, Gianluca; Vitali, Claudio; Valentini, Gabriele; Del Papa, Nicoletta

    2017-06-13

    Some abnormalities in nailfold videocapillaroscopy (NVC), such as the presence of micro-haemorrhages (MHEs), micro-thromboses (MTs), giant capillaries (GCs) and reduction in the number of capillaries (nCs), suggest a disease activity (DA) phase in systemic sclerosis (SSc). In a previous paper, we showed that the number of micro-haemorrhages and micro-thromboses (the so-called NEMO score) was the NVC feature more closely associated with DA. The present study was aimed at validating the NEMO score as a measure of DA in patients with SSc. Two cohorts of 122 and 97 patients with SSc who were referred to two different rheumatology units, one in Milan and one in Naples, respectively, constituted the validation cohorts. The NEMO score, the total number of GCs and the mean nCs per digit were the parameters defined in each patient by eight-finger NVC. An expert operator analysed the NVCs in each of the participating units. The European Scleroderma Study Group (ESSG) index was used to define the DA level in each patient at the time of NVC examination. The NEMO score was the NVC parameter more strictly correlated with the ESSG score in both the Milan and Naples cohorts (p < 0.0001), and it was the only one among the NVC variables that gave a significant contribution in a logistic model where the ESSG score represented the dependent variable. ROC curve analysis confirmed that the NEMO score had the best performance in measuring DA. The AUC of the NEMO score was significantly greater than the AUCs obtained by plotting the sensitivity and specificity of the number of GCs and the mean nCs (p < 0.0001 in all cases). The NEMO score values that showed the best sensitivity-specificity balance in capturing patients with a relevant DA level were slightly higher in the Naples cohort than in the Milan cohort. This study confirms that the presence of a certain number of MHEs and MTs in NVC may be considered a strong warning signal of a current phase of DA in patients with SSc.

  20. A mutation in TGFB3 associated with a syndrome of low muscle mass, growth retardation, distal arthrogryposis and clinical features overlapping with Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rienhoff, Hugh Young; Yeo, Chang-Yeol; Morissette, Rachel; Khrebtukova, Irina; Melnick, Jonathan; Luo, Shujun; Leng, Nan; Kim, Yeon-Jin; Schroth, Gary; Westwick, John; Vogel, Hannes; McDonnell, Nazli; Hall, Judith G; Whitman, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    The transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) family of growth factors are key regulators of mammalian development and their dysregulation is implicated in human disease, notably, heritable vasculopathies including Marfan (MFS, OMIM #154700) and Loeys-Dietz syndromes (LDS, OMIM #609192). We described a syndrome presenting at birth with distal arthrogryposis, hypotonia, bifid uvula, a failure of normal post-natal muscle development but no evidence of vascular disease; some of these features overlap with MFS and LDS. A de novo mutation in TGFB3 was identified by exome sequencing. Several lines of evidence indicate the mutation is hypomorphic suggesting that decreased TGF-β signaling from a loss of TGFB3 activity is likely responsible for the clinical phenotype. This is the first example of a mutation in the coding portion of TGFB3 implicated in a clinical syndrome suggesting TGFB3 is essential for both human palatogenesis and normal muscle growth. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study of the background of the neutrinoless double {beta} decay with the detector NEMO 2: contribution arising from the radon diffusion and internal pollution of the source {sup 214}Bi have been estimated; Etude du bruit de fond de la double-desintegration {beta} sans emission de neutrino dans le detecteur NEMO 2: contribution du radon ambiant et mesure de la pollution interne de la source en {sup 214}Bi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauger, F.

    1995-02-01

    The NEMO experiment is designed to understand the nature of the neutrino by studying the double beta decay of Mo-100 which is related to the Majorana neutrino effective mass. In this kind of experiment a good understanding of the different sources of background is crucial as only few events are expected per year at the required level of sensitivity. In this thesis we present the main theoretical and experimental aspects of the measurement of the neutrinoless double beta decay of Mo-100 with the prototype detector NEMO2. The goal of this study is to obtain a realistic interpretation of the few events detected at high energy in the two-electron channel as a background to neutrinoless double beta decay. In particular, the contribution arising from Bi-214 has been investigated. These events have been selected and analysed by means of the beta-alpha decays of Bi-214 into Pb-210. The events are characterized by a delayed track in the wire chamber and the corresponding signal is rather clean. The study has demonstrated the diffusion of Rn-222 into the detector and its contribution to Bi-214 pollution has been estimated. A measurement of the Bi-214 internal contamination of the source has been made as well as an estimation of the Bi-214 deposit due to Rn-222. As a result of this study it appears that, under the conditions of the NEMO2 experiment, the Bi and Rn contributions are of the same order of magnitude as the background induced at high energy by two-neutrino double beta decay. In conclusion, the backgrounds of the neutrinoless double beta decay of Mo-100 are well understood in the NEMO2 experiment leading to an extrapolation for the NEMO3 experiment. (authors).

  2. Association of nuclear-localized Nemo-like kinase with heat-shock protein 27 inhibits apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Shaw-Hallgren

    Full Text Available Nemo-like kinase (NLK, a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase regulated by phosphorylation, can be localized in the cytosol or in the nucleus. Whether the localization of NLK can affect cell survival or cell apoptosis is yet to be disclosed. In the present study we found that NLK was mainly localized in the nuclei of breast cancer cells, in contrast to a cytosolic localization in non-cancerous breast epithelial cells. The nuclear localization of NLK was mediated through direct interaction with Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 which further protected cancer cells from apoptosis. The present study provides evidence of a novel mechanism by which HSP27 recognizes NLK in the breast cancer cells and prevents NLK-mediated cell apoptosis.

  3. Development from the seafloor to the sea surface of the cabled NEMO-SN1 observatory in the Western Ionian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparnocchia, Stefania; Beranzoli, Laura; Borghini, Mireno; Durante, Sara; Favali, Paolo; Giovanetti, Gabriele; Italiano, Francesco; Marinaro, Giuditta; Meccia, Virna; Papaleo, Riccardo; Riccobene, Giorgio; Schroeder, Katrin

    2015-04-01

    A prototype of cabled deep-sea observatory has been operating in real-time since 2005 in Southern Italy (East Sicily, 37°30' N - 15°06'E), at 2100 m water depth, 25 km from the harbor of the city of Catania. It is the first-established real-time node of the "European Multidisciplinary Seafloor and water column Observatory" (EMSO, http://www.emso-eu.org) a research infrastructure of the Sector Environment of ESFRI. In the present configuration it consists of two components: the multi-parametric station NEMO-SN1 (TSN branch) equipped with geophysical and environmental sensors for measurements at the seafloor, and the NEMO-OνDE station (TSS branch) equipped with 4 wideband hydrophones. A 28 km long electro-optical cable connects the observatory to a shore laboratory in the Catania harbor, hosting the data acquisition system and supplying power and data transmission to the underwater instrumentation. The NEMO-SN1 observatory is located in an area particularly suited to multidisciplinary studies. The site is one of the most seismically active areas of the Mediterranean (some of the strongest earthquakes occurred in 1169, 1693 and 1908, also causing very intense tsunami waves) and is close to Mount Etna, one of the largest and most active volcanoes in Europe. The deployment area is also a key site for monitoring deep-water dynamics in the Ionian Sea, connecting the Levantine basin to the southern Adriatic basin where intermediate and deep waters are formed, and finally to the western Mediterranean Sea via the Strait of Sicily. The observatory is being further developed under EMSO MedIT (http://www.emso-medit.it/en/), a structural enhancement project contributing to the consolidation and enhancement of the European research infrastructure EMSO in Italian Convergence Regions. In this framework, a new Junction Box will be connected to the TSN branch and will provide wired and wireless (acoustic connections) for seafloor platforms and moorings. This will allow the

  4. Error dynamics in a coastal configuration of NEMO using stochastic modeling: first steps towards Data Assimilation in the Bay of Biscay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrocchi, G.; Testut, C.-E.; Ayoub, N.; De Mey, P.; Reffray, G.; Chanut, J.; Drillet, Y.

    2012-04-01

    At present, several high-resolution models are widely used in coastal ocean configuration with prediction purposes. In this context the choice of the ad hoc data assimilation (DA) method, that will ensure the "best" estimate of the ocean state through a combination of model forecast and observations, is decisive and it needs to be assessed on a case-by-case basis. The design of a DA system, based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter and the ocean model NEMO, is currently involving the french research teams of MERCATOR-OCEAN and of LEGOS (CNRS, Toulouse), within the MyOcean project. As a key step towards DA, we present sensitive experiments devoted to the evaluation of the model errors and their dynamic, primarily due to the uncertainties in the atmospheric forcing. More particularly, the ensemble experiments are carried out in the ocean model NEMO, in its coastal configuration in the Bay of Biscay, and they are performed within a winter period ranging from 01.12.2007 to 29.02.2008 (initial conditions are provided at 01.12.2007 by a longer reference run). For each member of the ensemble and every five days of integration of the ocean model, a perturbed wind anomaly, composed by a linear combination of five random normally distributed values and five temporal and spatial EOFs, is added to the unperturbed wind. As the result of such experiences the errors evolution is depicted by the analysis of high-order statistical moments as well as the computation of the error covariance and the representers. Comparisons to other stochastic modeling experiments (by LEGOS/CNRS, PREVIMER/IFREMER) are carried out with the aim to better understand the observed error subspace structures and with the common objective of accompany the development of operational oceanography in coastal areas and more specifically in the Bay of Biscay.

  5. Implementation of the NEMO model for estimating the spread of leakage from chemical munitions in the Baltic Sea - the first approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejewski, Jan

    2017-04-01

    After the Second World War, during the Potsdam Conference a decision about demilitarization of Germany was made, and as a consequence, ammunition including chemical warfare agents (CWA) was dumped into the basins of the Baltic Sea. This type of weapon was stored in metal barrels that were under strong influence of electrochemical oxidation, also known as corrosion. Several tens years later, scientists were wondering what consequences for marine ecosystem could a leakage from this weapon bring. Although over 70 years passed since the Second World War, the influence of potential leakage of the CWA has not been properly estimated. Thus, the main goal of this work is to estimate dangerous area caused by potential leakage using the NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean) ocean model. The NEMO ocean model is developed by the European Consortium including research institutes from France, England and Italy. The first step of this work is to implement the model for the area of the Baltic Sea. It requires generation of horizontal and vertical grid, bathymetry, atmospheric forces and lateral boundary conditions. Implemented model will have to be checked - it means it will have to pass a validation process. The Baltic Sea is one of the best measured sea in the World - as a consequence a lot of data are freely available for researchers. After validation and tuning up the model, implementation of passive tracer is planned. Passive tracer is the prognostic variable that could represent concentration of potential leakage and does not have influence on the density of the model. Based on distribution of the passive tracer, dangerous areas in the locations of dumpsites will be assessed. The research work was funded by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund) under the Interreg Baltic Sea Region Programme 2014-2020, project #R013 DAIMON (Decision Aid for Marine Munitions).

  6. AGRO100 inhibits activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) by forming a complex with NF-kappaB essential modulator (NEMO) and nucleolin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Allicia C; Teng, Yun; Casson, Lavona K; Thomas, Shelia D; Jüliger, Simone; Ball, Mark W; Klein, Jon B; Pierce, William M; Barve, Shirish S; Bates, Paula J

    2006-07-01

    AGRO100, also known as AS1411, is an experimental anticancer drug that recently entered human clinical trials. It is a member of a novel class of antiproliferative agents known as G-rich oligonucleotides (GRO), which are non-antisense, guanosine-rich phosphodiester oligodeoxynucleotides that form stable G-quadruplex structures. The biological activity of GROs results from their binding to specific cellular proteins as aptamers. One important target protein of GROs has been previously identified as nucleolin, a multifunctional protein expressed at high levels by cancer cells. Here, we report that AGRO100 also associates with nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) essential modulator (NEMO), which is a regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkappaB) kinase (IKK) complex, and also called IKKgamma. In the classic NF-kappaB pathway, the IKK complex is required for phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha and subsequent activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB. We found that treatment of cancer cells with AGRO100 inhibits IKK activity and reduces phosphorylation of IkappaBalpha in response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulation. Using a reporter gene assay, we showed that AGRO100 blocks both tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced and constitutive NF-kappaB activity in human cancer cell lines derived from cervical, prostate, breast, and lung carcinomas. In addition, we showed that, in AGRO100-treated cancer cells, NEMO is coprecipitated by nucleolin, indicating that both proteins are present in the same complex. Our studies suggest that abrogation of NF-kappaB activity may contribute to the anticancer effects of AGRO100 and that nucleolin may play a previously unknown role in regulating the NF-kappaB pathway.

  7. A spontaneous mutation in contactin 1 in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davisson, Muriel T; Bronson, Roderick T; Tadenev, Abigail L D; Motley, William W; Krishnaswamy, Arjun; Seburn, Kevin L; Burgess, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1) cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these ends, we have analyzed a new, spontaneous mutation in the mouse Cntn1 gene that arose in a BALB/c genetic background. The overt phenotype is very similar to the knockout of Cntn1, with affected animals having reduced body weight, a failure to thrive, locomotor abnormalities, and a lifespan of 2-3 weeks. Mice homozygous for the new allele have CNTN1 protein undetectable by western blotting, suggesting that it is a null or very severe hypomorph. In an analysis of neuromuscular function, neuromuscular junctions had normal morphology, consistent with previous studies in knockout mice, and the muscles were able to generate appropriate force when normalized for their reduced size in late stage animals. Therefore, the Cntn1 mutant mice do not show evidence for a myopathy, but instead the phenotype is likely to be caused by dysfunction in the nervous system. Given the similarity of CNTN1 to other Ig-superfamily proteins such as DSCAMs, we also characterized the expression and localization of Cntn1 in the retinas of mutant mice for developmental defects. Despite widespread expression, no anomalies in retinal anatomy were detected histologically or using a battery of cell-type specific antibodies. We therefore conclude that the phenotype of the Cntn1 mice arises from dysfunction in the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system, and is similar in either a BALB/c or B6;129;Black Swiss background, raising a possible discordance between the mouse and human phenotypes resulting from Cntn

  8. A spontaneous mutation in contactin 1 in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel T Davisson

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the immunoglobulin-superfamily member cell adhesion molecule contactin1 (CNTN1 cause lethal congenital myopathy in human patients and neurodevelopmental phenotypes in knockout mice. Whether the mutant mice provide an accurate model of the human disease is unclear; resolving this will require additional functional tests of the neuromuscular system and examination of Cntn1 mutations on different genetic backgrounds that may influence the phenotype. Toward these ends, we have analyzed a new, spontaneous mutation in the mouse Cntn1 gene that arose in a BALB/c genetic background. The overt phenotype is very similar to the knockout of Cntn1, with affected animals having reduced body weight, a failure to thrive, locomotor abnormalities, and a lifespan of 2-3 weeks. Mice homozygous for the new allele have CNTN1 protein undetectable by western blotting, suggesting that it is a null or very severe hypomorph. In an analysis of neuromuscular function, neuromuscular junctions had normal morphology, consistent with previous studies in knockout mice, and the muscles were able to generate appropriate force when normalized for their reduced size in late stage animals. Therefore, the Cntn1 mutant mice do not show evidence for a myopathy, but instead the phenotype is likely to be caused by dysfunction in the nervous system. Given the similarity of CNTN1 to other Ig-superfamily proteins such as DSCAMs, we also characterized the expression and localization of Cntn1 in the retinas of mutant mice for developmental defects. Despite widespread expression, no anomalies in retinal anatomy were detected histologically or using a battery of cell-type specific antibodies. We therefore conclude that the phenotype of the Cntn1 mice arises from dysfunction in the brain, spinal cord or peripheral nervous system, and is similar in either a BALB/c or B6;129;Black Swiss background, raising a possible discordance between the mouse and human phenotypes

  9. Severe early onset retinitis pigmentosa in a Moroccan patient with Heimler syndrome due to novel homozygous mutation of PEX1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratbi, Ilham; Jaouad, Imane Cherkaoui; Elorch, Hamza; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Elalloussi, Mustapha; Lyahyai, Jaber; Berraho, Amina; Newman, William G; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2016-10-01

    Heimler syndrome (HS) is a rare recessive disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), amelogenesis imperfecta, nail abnormalities, and occasional or late-onset retinal pigmentation. It is the mildest form known to date of peroxisome biogenesis disorder caused by hypomorphic mutations of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. We report on a second Moroccan family with Heimler syndrome with early onset, severe visual impairment and important phenotypic overlap with Usher syndrome. The patient carried a novel homozygous missense variant c.3140T > C (p.Leu1047Pro) of PEX1 gene. As standard biochemical screening of blood for evidence of a peroxisomal disorder did not provide a diagnosis in the individuals with HS, patients with SNHL and retinal pigmentation should have mutation analysis of PEX1 and PEX6 genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the excited 0{sub 1}{sup +} state in the NEMO3 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vala, L

    2003-09-01

    The NEMO3 detector was designed for the study of double beta decay and in particular to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay process (0{nu}{beta}{beta}). The intended sensitivity in terms of a half-life limit for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay is of the order of 10{sup 25} y which corresponds to an effective neutrino mass m{sub {nu}} on the level of (0.3 - 0.1) eV. The 0{nu}{beta}{beta} process is today the most promising test of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. The detector was constructed in the Modane Underground Laboratory (LSM) in France by an international collaboration including France, Russia, the Czech Republic, the USA, the UK, Finland, and Japan. The experiment has been taking data since May 2002. The quantity of {sup 100}Mo in the detector (7 kg) allows an efficient measurement of the two-neutrino double beta decay (2{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 100}Mo to the excited 0{sub 1}{sup +} state (eeN{gamma} channel). Monte-Carlo simulations of the effect and of all the relative sources of background have been produced in order to define a set of appropriate selection criteria. Both Monte-Carlo simulations and special runs with sources of {sup 208}Tl and {sup 214}Bi showed that the only significant background in the eeN{gamma} channel comes from radon that penetrated inside the wire chamber of NEMO3. The experimental data acquired from May 2002 to May 2003 have been analysed in order to determine the signal from the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay of {sup 100}Mo to the excited 0{sub 1}{sup +} state and the corresponding background level. The physical result, which was obtained at the level of four standard deviations, is given in the form of an interval of half-life values at 95% confidence level: [5.84*10{sup 20}, 2.26*10{sup 21}] y for method A and [5.83*10{sup 20}, 1.71*10{sup 21}] y for method B. (author)

  11. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucan, Hakan; Gül, Davut; Sapp, Julie C; Cockerham, John; Johnston, Jennifer J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2008-10-23

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  12. Extending the spectrum of Ellis van Creveld syndrome: a large family with a mild mutation in the EVC gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cockerham John

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly, dysplastic nails and teeth and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. We report a family with complex septal cardiac defects, rhizomelic limb shortening, and polydactyly, without the typical lip, dental, and nail abnormalities of EvC. The phenotype was inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with one instance of pseudodominant inheritance. Methods Because of the phenotypic overlap with EvC, microsatellite markers were used to test for linkage to the EVC/EVC2 locus. The results did not exclude linkage, so samples were sequenced for mutations. Results We identified a c.1868T>C mutation in EVC, which predicts p.L623P, and was homozygous in affected individuals. Conclusion We conclude that this EVC mutation is hypomorphic and that such mutations can cause a phenotype of cardiac and limb defects that is less severe than typical EvC. EVC mutation analysis should be considered in patients with cardiac and limb malformations, even if they do not manifest typical EvC syndrome.

  13. PLAA Mutations Cause a Lethal Infantile Epileptic Encephalopathy by Disrupting Ubiquitin-Mediated Endolysosomal Degradation of Synaptic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Emma A; Nahorski, Michael S; Murray, Lyndsay M; Shaheen, Ranad; Perkins, Emma; Dissanayake, Kosala N; Kristaryanto, Yosua; Jones, Ross A; Vogt, Julie; Rivagorda, Manon; Handley, Mark T; Mali, Girish R; Quidwai, Tooba; Soares, Dinesh C; Keighren, Margaret A; McKie, Lisa; Mort, Richard L; Gammoh, Noor; Garcia-Munoz, Amaya; Davey, Tracey; Vermeren, Matthieu; Walsh, Diana; Budd, Peter; Aligianis, Irene A; Faqeih, Eissa; Quigley, Alan J; Jackson, Ian J; Kulathu, Yogesh; Jackson, Mandy; Ribchester, Richard R; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Woods, C Geoffrey; Maher, Eamonn R; Mill, Pleasantine

    2017-05-04

    During neurotransmission, synaptic vesicles undergo multiple rounds of exo-endocytosis, involving recycling and/or degradation of synaptic proteins. While ubiquitin signaling at synapses is essential for neural function, it has been assumed that synaptic proteostasis requires the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). We demonstrate here that turnover of synaptic membrane proteins via the endolysosomal pathway is essential for synaptic function. In both human and mouse, hypomorphic mutations in the ubiquitin adaptor protein PLAA cause an infantile-lethal neurodysfunction syndrome with seizures. Resulting from perturbed endolysosomal degradation, Plaa mutant neurons accumulate K63-polyubiquitylated proteins and synaptic membrane proteins, disrupting synaptic vesicle recycling and neurotransmission. Through characterization of this neurological intracellular trafficking disorder, we establish the importance of ubiquitin-mediated endolysosomal trafficking at the synapse. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design and development of nEMoS, an all-in-one, low-cost, web-connected and 3D-printed device for environmental analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Francesco; Belussi, Lorenzo; Danza, Ludovico; Ghellere, Matteo; Meroni, Italo

    2015-06-04

    The Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) refers to the quality of the environment in relation to the health and well-being of the occupants. It is a holistic concept, which considers several categories, each related to a specific environmental parameter. This article describes a low-cost and open-source hardware architecture able to detect the indoor variables necessary for the IEQ calculation as an alternative to the traditional hardware used for this purpose. The system consists of some sensors and an Arduino board. One of the key strengths of Arduino is the possibility it affords of loading the script into the board's memory and letting it run without interfacing with computers, thus granting complete independence, portability and accuracy. Recent works have demonstrated that the cost of scientific equipment can be reduced by applying open-source principles to their design using a combination of the Arduino platform and a 3D printer. The evolution of the 3D printer has provided a new means of open design capable of accelerating self-directed development. The proposed nano Environmental Monitoring System (nEMoS) instrument is shown to have good reliability and it provides the foundation for a more critical approach to the use of professional sensors as well as for conceiving new scenarios and potential applications.

  15. Design and Development of nEMoS, an All-in-One, Low-Cost, Web-Connected and 3D-Printed Device for Environmental Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Salamone

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ refers to the quality of the environment in relation to the health and well-being of the occupants. It is a holistic concept, which considers several categories, each related to a specific environmental parameter. This article describes a low-cost and open-source hardware architecture able to detect the indoor variables necessary for the IEQ calculation as an alternative to the traditional hardware used for this purpose. The system consists of some sensors and an Arduino board. One of the key strengths of Arduino is the possibility it affords of loading the script into the board’s memory and letting it run without interfacing with computers, thus granting complete independence, portability and accuracy. Recent works have demonstrated that the cost of scientific equipment can be reduced by applying open-source principles to their design using a combination of the Arduino platform and a 3D printer. The evolution of the 3D printer has provided a new means of open design capable of accelerating self-directed development. The proposed nano Environmental Monitoring System (nEMoS instrument is shown to have good reliability and it provides the foundation for a more critical approach to the use of professional sensors as well as for conceiving new scenarios and potential applications.

  16. NEMO. A novel techno-economic tool suite for simulating and optimizing solutions for grid integration of electric vehicles and charging stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erge, Thomas; Stillahn, Thies; Dallmer-Zerbe, Kilian; Wille-Haussmann, Bernhard [Frauenhofer Institut for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Freiburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    With an increasing use of electric vehicles (EV) grid operators need to predict energy flows depending on electromobility use profiles to accordingly adjust grid infrastructure and operation control accordingly. Tools and methodologies are required to characterize grid problems resulting from the interconnection of EV with the grid. The simulation and optimization tool suite NEMO (Novel E-MObility grid model) was developed within a European research project and is currently being tested using realistic showcases. It is a combination of three professional tools. One of the tools aims at a combined techno-economic design and operation, primarily modeling plants on contracts or the spot market, at the same time participating in balancing markets. The second tool is designed for planning grid extension or reinforcement while the third tool is mainly used to quickly discover potential conflicts of grid operation approaches through load flow analysis. The tool suite is used to investigate real showcases in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands. First studies show that significant alleviation of stress on distribution grid lines could be achieved by few but intelligent restrictions to EV charging procedures.

  17. New coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice system COSMO-CLM/NEMO: assessing air temperature sensitivity over the North and Baltic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Van Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a newly established coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice system with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM and the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO for the North and Baltic Seas. These two models are linked via the OASIS3 coupler. Experiments with the new coupled system and with the stand-alone COSMO-CLM model forced by ERA-Interim re-analysis data over the period from 1985 to 1994 for the CORDEX Europe domain are carried out. The evaluation results of the coupled system show 2-m temperature biases in the range from -2.5 to 3 K. Simulated 2-m temperatures are generally colder in the coupled than in the uncoupled system, and temperature differences vary by season and space. The coupled model shows an improvement compared with the stand-alone COSMO-CLM in terms of simulating 2-m temperature. The difference in 2-m temperature between the two experiments are explained as downwind cooling by the colder North and Baltic Seas in the coupled system.

  18. New coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice system COSMO-CLM/NEMO: assessing air temperature sensitivity over the North and Baltic Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Van Pham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a newly established coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice system with the regional climate model COSMO-CLM and the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO for the North and Baltic Seas. These two models are linked via the OASIS3 coupler. Experiments with the new coupled system and with the stand-alone COSMO-CLM model forced by ERA-Interim re-analysis data over the period from 1985 to 1994 for the CORDEX Europe domain are carried out. The evaluation results of the coupled system show 2-m temperature biases in the range from −2.5 to 3 K. Simulated 2-m temperatures are generally colder in the coupled than in the uncoupled system, and temperature differences vary by season and space. The coupled model shows an improvement compared with the stand-alone COSMO-CLM in terms of simulating 2-m temperature. The difference in 2-m temperature between the two experiments are explained as downwind cooling by the colder North and Baltic Seas in the coupled system.

  19. Measurement of the double-β decay half-life and search for the neutrinoless double-β decay of 48Ca with the NEMO-3 detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, David; Vilela, Cristóvão; NEMO-3 Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Neutrinoless double-β decay is a powerful probe of lepton number violating processes that may arise from Majorana terms in neutrino masses, or from supersymmetric, left-right symmetric, and other extensions of the Standard Model. Of the candidate isotopes for the observation of this process, 48Ca has the highest Qββ -value, resulting in decays with energies significantly above most naturally occurring backgrounds. The nucleus also lends itself to precise matrix element calculations within the nuclear shell model. We present the world’s best measurement of the two-neutrino double-β decay of 48Ca, obtained by the NEMO-3 collaboration using 5.25 yr of data recorded with a 6.99 g sample of isotope, yielding ≈ 150 events with a signal to background ratio larger than 3. Neutrinoless modes of double-β decay are also investigated, with no evidence of new physics. Furthermore, these results indicate that two-neutrino double-β decay would be the main source of background for similar future searches using 48Ca with significantly larger exposures.

  20. Novel mutations affecting the Na, K ATPase alpha model complex neurological diseases and implicate the sodium pump in increased longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashmore, Lesley J; Hrizo, Stacy L; Paul, Sarah M; Van Voorhies, Wayne A; Beitel, Greg J; Palladino, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Mutations affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit have been implicated in at least two distinct human diseases, rapid-onset dystonia Parkinsonism (RDP), and familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM). Over 40 mutations have been mapped to the human ATP1A2 and ATP1A3 genes and are known to result in RDP, FHM or a variant of FHM with neurological complications. To develop a genetically tractable model system for investigating the role of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase in neural pathologies we performed genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster to isolate loss-of-function alleles affecting the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha subunit. Flies heterozygous for these mutations all exhibit reduced respiration, consistent with a loss-of-function in the major ATPase. However, these mutations do not affect all functions of the Na(+), K(+) ATPase alpha protein since embryos homozygous for these mutations have normal septate junction paracellular barrier function and tracheal morphology. Importantly, all of these mutations cause neurological phenotypes and, akin to the mutations that cause RDP and FHM, these new alleles are missense mutations. All of these alleles exhibit progressive stress-induced locomotor impairment suggesting neuromuscular dysfunction, yet neurodegeneration is observed in an allele-specific manner. Surprisingly, studies of longevity demonstrate that mild hypomorphic mutations in the sodium pump significantly improve longevity, which was verified using the Na(+), K(+) ATPase antagonist ouabain. The isolation and characterization of a series of new missense alleles of ATPalpha in Drosophila provides the foundation for further studies of these neurological diseases and the role of sodium pump impairment in animal longevity.

  1. A novel splice-site mutation in the GJB2 gene causing mild postlingual hearing impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gandía

    Full Text Available The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connexin-26 [corrected] gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset, though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connexin-26 [corrected] encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects.

  2. SMC6 is an essential gene in mice, but a hypomorphic mutant in the ATPase domain has a mild phenotype with a range of subtle abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Limei; Wing, Jonathan; Taylor, Elaine; Brandt, Renata; Slijepcevic, Predrag; Horsch, Marion; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rácz, Ildikó; Becker, Lore; Hans, Wolfgang; Adler, Thure; Beckers, Johannes; Rozman, Jan; Klingenspor, Martin; Wolf, Eckhard; Zimmer, Andreas; Klopstock, Thomas; Busch, Dirk H; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; van der Horst, Gilbertus; Lehmann, Alan R

    2013-05-01

    Smc5-6 is a highly conserved protein complex related to cohesin and condensin involved in the structural maintenance of chromosomes. In yeasts the Smc5-6 complex is essential for proliferation and is involved in DNA repair and homologous recombination. siRNA depletion of genes involved in the Smc5-6 complex in cultured mammalian cells results in sensitivity to some DNA damaging agents. In order to gain further insight into its role in mammals we have generated mice mutated in the Smc6 gene. A complete knockout resulted in early embryonic lethality, demonstrating that this gene is essential in mammals. However, mutation of the highly conserved serine-994 to alanine in the ATP hydrolysis motif in the SMC6 C-terminal domain, resulted in mice with a surprisingly mild phenotype. With the neo gene selection marker in the intron following the mutation, resulting in reduced expression of the SMC6 gene, the mice were reduced in size, but fertile and had normal lifespans. When the neo gene was removed, the mice had normal size, but detailed phenotypic analysis revealed minor abnormalities in glucose tolerance, haematopoiesis, nociception and global gene expression patterns. Embryonic fibroblasts derived from the ser994 mutant mice were not sensitive to killing by a range of DNA damaging agents, but they were sensitive to the induction of sister chromatid exchanges induced by ultraviolet light or mitomycin C. They also accumulated more oxidative damage than wild-type cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ArcNEMO, a spatially distributed nutrient emission model developed in Python to quantify losses of nitrogen and phosphorous from agriculture to surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Opstal, Mattias; Tits, Mia; Beckers, Veronique; Batelaan, Okke; Van Orshoven, Jos; Elsen, Annemie; Diels, Jan; D'heygere, Tom; Van Hoof, Kor

    2014-05-01

    Pollution of surface water bodies with nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) from agricultural sources is a major problem in areas with intensive agriculture in Europe. The Flemish Environment Agency requires information on how spatially explicit policy measures on manure and fertilizer use, and changes in land use and soil management affect the N and P concentration in the surface waters in the region of Flanders, Belgium. To assist in this, a new spatially distributed, mechanistic nutrient emission model was developed in the open-source language Python. The model is called ArcNEMO (Nutrient Emission MOdel). The model is fully integrated in ArcGIS, but could be easily adapted to work with open-source GIS software. In Flanders, detailed information is available each year on the delineation of each agricultural parcel and the crops grown on them. Parcels are linked to farms, and for each farm yearly manure and fertilizer use is available. To take full advantage of this information and to be able to simulate nutrient losses to the high-density surface water network, the model makes use of grid cells of 50 by 50m. A fertilizer allocation model was developed to calculate from the yearly parcel and farm data the fertilizer and manure input per grid cell for further use in the ArcNEMO-model. The model architecture was chosen such that the model can be used to simulate spatially explicit monthly discharge and losses of N and P to the surface water for the whole of Flanders (13,500 km²) over periods of 10-20 years. The extended time period is necessary because residence times in groundwater and the rates of organic matter turnover imply that water quality reacts slowly to changes of land use and fertilization practices. Vertical water flow and nutrient transport in the unsaturated zone are described per grid cell using a cascading bucket-type model with daily time steps. Groundwater flow is described by solving the 2D-groundwater flow equation using an explicit numerical

  4. Disease: H01127 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited GPI deficiency. Inherited metabolic disease hsa00563...is A Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency. Nat Med

  5. Disease: H01127 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available thrombosis and epilepsy. Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGN causes this disorder. Inherited metabolic dis...radimitris A ... TITLE ... Hypomorphic promoter mutation in PIGM causes inherited g

  6. A targeted constitutive mutation in the APC tumor suppressor gene underlies mammary but not intestinal tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Gaspar

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC gene are responsible for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP, an autosomal dominant hereditary predisposition to the development of multiple colorectal adenomas and of a broad spectrum of extra-intestinal tumors. Moreover, somatic APC mutations play a rate-limiting and initiating role in the majority of sporadic colorectal cancers. Notwithstanding its multifunctional nature, the main tumor suppressing activity of the APC gene resides in its ability to regulate Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Notably, genotype-phenotype correlations have been established at the APC gene between the length and stability of the truncated proteins encoded by different mutant alleles, the corresponding levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity they encode for, and the incidence and distribution of intestinal and extra-intestinal tumors. Here, we report a novel mouse model, Apc1572T, obtained by targeting a truncated mutation at codon 1572 in the endogenous Apc gene. This hypomorphic mutant allele results in intermediate levels of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activation when compared with other Apc mutations associated with multifocal intestinal tumors. Notwithstanding the constitutive nature of the mutation, Apc(+/1572T mice have no predisposition to intestinal cancer but develop multifocal mammary adenocarcinomas and subsequent pulmonary metastases in both genders. The histology of the Apc1572T primary mammary tumours is highly heterogeneous with luminal, myoepithelial, and squamous lineages and is reminiscent of metaplastic carcinoma of the breast in humans. The striking phenotype of Apc(+/1572T mice suggests that specific dosages of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling activity differentially affect tissue homeostasis and initiate tumorigenesis in an organ-specific fashion.

  7. A high frequency of XO offspring from X(Paf)Y* male mice: evidence that the Paf mutation involves an inversion spanning the X PAR boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, P S; Evans, E P

    2000-01-01

    It has previously been reported that 19% of the daughters of males carrying the X-linked mutation patchy fur (Paf) are XO with a maternally derived X chromosome. We now report that hemizygous Paf males that also carry the variant Y chromosome Y*, show a much increased XO production ( approximately 40% of daughters). We hypothesize that the Paf mutation is associated with an inversion spanning the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) boundary, and that this leads to preferential crossing over between the resulting inverted region of PAR and an equivalent inverted PAR region within the compound Y* PAR. This would lead to the production of dicentric X and acentric Y products and consequent sex chromosome loss. This interpretation is supported by analysis of the sex chromosome complements at the second meiotic metaphase, which revealed a high incidence of dicentrics. Another curious feature of the Paf mutation is that mice that are homozygous Paf have more hair than mice that are hemizygous Paf. This can be explained if the Paf mutation is a hypomorphic mutation that escapes X inactivation because, unlike the wild type allele, it is now located within the PAR. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  8. Sea-ice evaluation of NEMO-Nordic 1.0: a NEMO–LIM3.6-based ocean–sea-ice model setup for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pemberton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Baltic Sea is a seasonally ice-covered marginal sea in northern Europe with intense wintertime ship traffic and a sensitive ecosystem. Understanding and modeling the evolution of the sea-ice pack is important for climate effect studies and forecasting purposes. Here we present and evaluate the sea-ice component of a new NEMO–LIM3.6-based ocean–sea-ice setup for the North Sea and Baltic Sea region (NEMO-Nordic. The setup includes a new depth-based fast-ice parametrization for the Baltic Sea. The evaluation focuses on long-term statistics, from a 45-year long hindcast, although short-term daily performance is also briefly evaluated. We show that NEMO-Nordic is well suited for simulating the mean sea-ice extent, concentration, and thickness as compared to the best available observational data set. The variability of the annual maximum Baltic Sea ice extent is well in line with the observations, but the 1961–2006 trend is underestimated. Capturing the correct ice thickness distribution is more challenging. Based on the simulated ice thickness distribution we estimate the undeformed and deformed ice thickness and concentration in the Baltic Sea, which compares reasonably well with observations.

  9. Impact of miR-208 and its Target Gene Nemo-Like Kinase on the Protective Effect of Ginsenoside Rb1 in Hypoxia/Ischemia Injuried Cardiomyocytes

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    Xu Yan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ginsenoside Rb1 (GS-Rb1 is one of the most important active pharmacological extracts of the Traditional Chinese Medicine ginseng, with extensive evidence of its cardioprotective properties. Mir-208 has been shown to act as a biomarker of acute myocardial infarction in vivo studies including man. However the impact of miR-208 on the protective effect of GS-Rb1 in hypoxia/ischemia injured cardiomyocytes remains unclear. The current study aims to investigate the target gene of miR-208 and the impact on the protective effect of GS-Rb1 in hypoxia/ischemia (H/I injuried cardiomyocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary cultures of neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCMs was subjected to the H/I conditions with or without GS-Rb1. Cell viability was calculated by MTT assay and confirmed by flow cytometry analysis. Mir-208 was then detected by qRT-PCR. Luciferase reporter assay was carried out to detect the target gene of Mir-208. Then the NRCMs were transfected with miR-208 mimics and inhibitors to evaluate the impact on cardioprotective properties of Rb1. Results: The miR-208 expression level was clearly upregulated in the H/I treated NRCMs accompanied by the percentage of the apoptotic cells which could be reversed by GS-Rb1 pretreatment. The nemo-like kinase (NLK mRNA and protein expression levels were decreased in H/I group measured by RT-PCR and western blotting. Luciferase activity assay was then carried out to identify that NLK may be a direct target of mir-208. MTT assay showed that miR-208 inhibitor slightly decreased the protective effect of Rb1 on the H/I impaired NRCMs. However, results showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: These findings proved that NLK was a direct target of mir-208 and miR-208 act indirectly during Rb1 protecting H/I impaired NRCMs and further researches were needed to explore the relationship that microRNAs and other signal pathways in the protective effect of GS-Rb1 on the hypoxia/ischemia injuries in

  10. Evaluation of an operational ocean model configuration at 1/12° spatial resolution for the Indonesian seas (NEMO2.3/INDO12) - Part 1: Ocean physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchant, Benoît; Reffray, Guillaume; Greiner, Eric; Nugroho, Dwiyoga; Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Gaspar, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    INDO12 is a 1/12° regional version of the NEMO physical ocean model covering the whole Indonesian EEZ (Exclusive Economic Zone). It has been developed and is now running every week in the framework of the INDESO (Infrastructure Development of Space Oceanography) project implemented by the Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries. The initial hydrographic conditions as well as open-boundary conditions are derived from the operational global ocean forecasting system at 1/4° operated by Mercator Océan. Atmospheric forcing fields (3-hourly ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast) analyses) are used to force the regional model. INDO12 is also forced by tidal currents and elevations, and by the inverse barometer effect. The turbulent mixing induced by internal tides is taken into account through a specific parameterisation. In this study we evaluate the model skill through comparisons with various data sets including outputs of the parent model, climatologies, in situ temperature and salinity measurements, and satellite data. The biogeochemical model results assessment is presented in a companion paper (Gutknecht et al., 2015). The simulated and altimeter-derived Eddy Kinetic Energy fields display similar patterns and confirm that tides are a dominant forcing in the area. The volume transport of the Indonesian throughflow (ITF) is in good agreement with the INSTANT estimates while the transport through Luzon Strait is, on average, westward but probably too weak. Compared to satellite data, surface salinity and temperature fields display marked biases in the South China Sea. Significant water mass transformation occurs along the main routes of the ITF and compares well with observations. Vertical mixing is able to modify the South and North Pacific subtropical water-salinity maximum as seen in T-S diagrams. In spite of a few weaknesses, INDO12 proves to be able to provide a very realistic simulation of the ocean circulation and water mass

  11. Assessment of the sea-ice carbon pump: Insights from a three-dimensional ocean-sea-ice biogeochemical model (NEMO-LIM-PISCES

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    Sébastien Moreau

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of sea ice in the carbon cycle is minimally represented in current Earth System Models (ESMs. Among potentially important flaws, mentioned by several authors and generally overlooked during ESM design, is the link between sea-ice growth and melt and oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and total alkalinity (TA. Here we investigate whether this link is indeed an important feature of the marine carbon cycle misrepresented in ESMs. We use an ocean general circulation model (NEMO-LIM-PISCES with sea-ice and marine carbon cycle components, forced by atmospheric reanalyses, adding a first-order representation of DIC and TA storage and release in/from sea ice. Our results suggest that DIC rejection during sea-ice growth releases several hundred Tg C yr−1 to the surface ocean, of which < 2% is exported to depth, leading to a notable but weak redistribution of DIC towards deep polar basins. Active carbon processes (mainly CaCO3 precipitation but also ice-atmosphere CO2 fluxes and net community production increasing the TA/DIC ratio in sea-ice modified ocean-atmosphere CO2 fluxes by a few Tg C yr−1 in the sea-ice zone, with specific hemispheric effects: DIC content of the Arctic basin decreased but DIC content of the Southern Ocean increased. For the global ocean, DIC content increased by 4 Tg C yr−1 or 2 Pg C after 500 years of model run. The simulated numbers are generally small compared to the present-day global ocean annual CO2 sink (2.6 ± 0.5 Pg C yr−1. However, sea-ice carbon processes seem important at regional scales as they act significantly on DIC redistribution within and outside polar basins. The efficiency of carbon export to depth depends on the representation of surface-subsurface exchanges and their relationship with sea ice, and could differ substantially if a higher resolution or different ocean model were used.

  12. Introducing Pitt-Hopkins syndrome-associated mutations of TCF4 to Drosophila daughterless

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    Laura Tamberg

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS is caused by haploinsufficiency of Transcription factor 4 (TCF4, one of the three human class I basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors called E-proteins. Drosophila has a single E-protein, Daughterless (Da, homologous to all three mammalian counterparts. Here we show that human TCF4 can rescue Da deficiency during fruit fly nervous system development. Overexpression of Da or TCF4 specifically in adult flies significantly decreases their survival rates, indicating that these factors are crucial even after development has been completed. We generated da transgenic fruit fly strains with corresponding missense mutations R578H, R580W, R582P and A614V found in TCF4 of PTHS patients and studied the impact of these mutations in vivo. Overexpression of wild type Da as well as human TCF4 in progenitor tissues induced ectopic sensory bristles and the rough eye phenotype. By contrast, overexpression of DaR580W and DaR582P that disrupt DNA binding reduced the number of bristles and induced the rough eye phenotype with partial lack of pigmentation, indicating that these act dominant negatively. Compared to the wild type, DaR578H and DaA614V were less potent in induction of ectopic bristles and the rough eye phenotype, respectively, suggesting that these are hypomorphic. All studied PTHS-associated mutations that we introduced into Da led to similar effects in vivo as the same mutations in TCF4 in vitro. Consequently, our Drosophila models of PTHS are applicable for further studies aiming to unravel the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  13. A genetic screen for modifiers of Drosophila decapentaplegic signaling identifies mutations in punt, Mothers against dpp and the BMP-7 homologue, 60A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y; Riese, M J; Killinger, M A; Hoffmann, F M

    1998-05-01

    decapentaplegic (dpp) is a Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta)-related growth factor that controls multiple developmental processes in Drosophila. To identify components involved in dpp signaling, we carried out a genetic screen for dominant enhancer mutations of a hypomorphic allele of thick veins (tkv), a type I receptor for dpp. We recovered new alleles of tkv, punt, Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Medea (Med), all of which are known to mediate dpp signaling. We also recovered mutations in the 60A gene which encodes another TGF-beta-related factor in Drosophila. DNA sequence analysis established that all three 60A alleles were nonsense mutations in the prodomain of the 60A polypeptide. These mutations in 60A caused defects in midgut morphogenesis and fat body differentiation. We present evidence that when dpp signaling is compromised, lowering the level of 60A impairs several dpp-dependent developmental processes examined, including the patterning of the visceral mesoderm, the embryonic ectoderm and the imaginal discs. These results provide the first in vivo evidence for the involvement of 60A in the dpp pathway. We propose that 60A activity is required to maintain optimal signaling capacity of the dpp pathway, possibly by forming biologically active heterodimers with Dpp proteins.

  14. mus309 mutation, defective in DNA double-strand break repair, affects intergenic but not intragenic meiotic recombination in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2005-12-01

    The effect was investigated of the hypomorphic DNA double-strand break repair, notably synthesis-dependent strand annealing, deficient mutation mus309 on the third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster on intergenic and intragenic meiotic recombination in the X chromosome. The results showed that the mutation significantly increases the frequency of intergenic crossing over in two of three gene intervals of the X chromosome studied. Interestingly the increase was most prevalent in the tip of the X chromosome where crossovers normally are least frequent per physical map unit length. In particular crossing over interference was also affected, indicating that the effect of the mus309 mutation involves preconditions of crossing over but not the event of crossing over itself. On the other hand, the results also show that most probably the mutation does not have any effect on intragenic recombination, i.e. gene conversion. These results are fully consistent with the present molecular models of meiotic crossing over initiated by double-strand breaks of DNA followed by formation of a single-end-invasion intermediate, or D-loop, which is subsequently processed to generate either crossover or non-crossover products involving formation of a double Holliday junction. In particular the results suggest that the mus309 gene is involved in resolution of the D-loop, thereby affecting the choice between double-strand-break repair (DSBR) and synthesis-dependent strand annealing (SDSA) pathways of meiotic recombination.

  15. Analysis method for the search for neutrinoless double beta decay in the NEMO3 experiment: study of the background and first results; Methode d'analyse pour la recherche de la double desintegration {beta} sans emission de neutrinos dans l'experience NEMO3. Etude du bruit de fond et premiers resultats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etienvre, A.I

    2003-04-15

    The NEMO3 detector, installed in the Frejus Underground Laboratory, is dedicated to the study of neutrinoless double beta decay: the observation of this process would sign the massive and Majorana nature of neutrino. The experiment consists in very thin central source foils (the total mass is equal to 10 kg), a tracking detector made of drift cells operating in Geiger mode, a calorimeter made of plastic scintillators associated to photomultipliers, a coil producing a 30 gauss magnetic field and two shields, dedicated to the reduction of the {gamma}-ray and neutron fluxes. In the first part, I describe the implications of several mechanisms, related to trilinear R-parity violation, on double beta decay. The second part is dedicated to a detailed study of the tracking detector of the experiment: after a description of the different working tests, I present the determination of the characteristics of the tracking reconstruction (transverse and longitudinal resolution, by Geiger cell and precision on vertex determination, charge recognition). The last part corresponds to the analysis of the data taken by the experiment. On the one hand, an upper limit on the Tl{sup 208} activity of the sources has been determined: it is lower than 68 mBq/kg, at 90% of confidence level. On the other hand, I have developed and tested on these data a method in order to analyse the neutrinoless double beta decay signal; this method is based on a maximum of likelihood using all the available information. Using this method, I could determine a first and very preliminary upper limit on the effective mass of the neutrino. (author)

  16. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  17. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-04

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  18. UV Signature Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  19. Mutations in complement regulatory proteins predispose to preeclampsia: a genetic analysis of the PROMISSE cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E Salmon

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE or antiphospholipid antibodies (APL Ab--autoimmune conditions characterized by complement-mediated injury--is associated with increased risk of preeclampsia and miscarriage. Our previous studies in mice indicate that complement activation targeted to the placenta drives angiogenic imbalance and placental insufficiency.We use PROMISSE, a prospective study of 250 pregnant patients with SLE and/or APL Ab, to test the hypothesis in humans that impaired capacity to limit complement activation predisposes to preeclampsia. We sequenced genes encoding three complement regulatory proteins--membrane cofactor protein (MCP, complement factor I (CFI, and complement factor H (CFH--in 40 patients who had preeclampsia and found heterozygous mutations in seven (18%. Five of these patients had risk variants in MCP or CFI that were previously identified in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease characterized by endothelial damage. One had a novel mutation in MCP that impairs regulation of C4b. These findings constitute, to our knowledge, the first genetic defects associated with preeclampsia in SLE and/or APL Ab. We confirmed the association of hypomorphic variants of MCP and CFI in a cohort of non-autoimmune preeclampsia patients in which five of 59 were heterozygous for mutations.The presence of risk variants in complement regulatory proteins in patients with SLE and/or APL Ab who develop preeclampsia, as well as in preeclampsia patients lacking autoimmune disease, links complement activation to disease pathogenesis and suggests new targets for treatment of this important public health problem.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00198068.

  20. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  1. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-08-07

    The metabolism of solid tumors is associated with high lactate production while growing in oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) suggesting that tumors may have defects in mitochondrial function. The mitochondria produce cellular energy by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by-product, and regulate apoptosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate. In humans, severe mtDNA mutations result in multisystem disease, while some functional population-specific polymorphisms appear to have permitted humans to adapt to new environments. Mutations in the nDNA-encoded mitochondrial genes for fumarate hydratase and succinate dehydrogenase have been linked to uterine leiomyomas and paragangliomas, and cancer cells have been shown to induce hexokinase II which harnesses OXPHOS adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production to drive glycolysis. Germline mtDNA mutations at nucleotides 10398 and 16189 have been associated with breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Tumor mtDNA somatic mutations range from severe insertion-deletion and chain termination mutations to mild missense mutations. Surprisingly, of the 190 tumor-specific somatic mtDNA mutations reported, 72% are also mtDNA sequence variants found in the general population. These include 52% of the tumor somatic mRNA missense mutations, 83% of the tRNA mutations, 38% of the rRNA mutations, and 85% of the control region mutations. Some associations might reflect mtDNA sequencing errors, but analysis of several of the tumor-specific somatic missense mutations with population counterparts appear legitimate. Therefore, mtDNA mutations in tumors may fall into two main classes: (1) severe mutations that inhibit OXPHOS, increase ROS production and promote tumor

  2. Molecular identification of collagen 17a1 as a major genetic modifier of laminin gamma 2 mutation-induced junctional epidermolysis bullosa in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Sproule

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB encompasses a spectrum of mechanobullous disorders caused by rare mutations that result in structural weakening of the skin and mucous membranes. While gene mutated and types of mutations present are broadly predictive of the range of disease to be expected, a remarkable amount of phenotypic variability remains unaccounted for in all but the most deleterious cases. This unexplained variance raises the possibility of genetic modifier effects. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model that recapitulates a non-Herlitz form of junctional EB (JEB owing to the hypomorphic jeb allele of laminin gamma 2 (Lamc2. By varying normally asymptomatic background genetics, we document the potent impact of genetic modifiers on the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion and on the clinical severity of JEB in the context of the Lamc2(jeb mutation. Through an unbiased genetic approach involving a combination of QTL mapping and positional cloning, we demonstrate that Col17a1 is a strong genetic modifier of the non-Herlitz JEB that develops in Lamc2(jeb mice. This modifier is defined by variations in 1-3 neighboring amino acids in the non-collagenous 4 domain of the collagen XVII protein. These allelic variants alter the strength of dermal-epidermal adhesion in the context of the Lamc2(jeb mutation and, consequentially, broadly impact the clinical severity of JEB. Overall the results provide an explanation for how normally innocuous allelic variants can act epistatically with a disease causing mutation to impact the severity of a rare, heritable mechanobullous disorder.

  3. Hypo- and hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations in dominant glaucoma: transactivation and phenotypic variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Medina-Trillo

    Full Text Available Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3% were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG or hypomorphic (p.I126S alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability.

  4. A mutation in Nischarin causes otitis media via LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Crompton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, inflammation of the middle ear (ME, is a common cause of conductive hearing impairment. Despite the importance of the disease, the aetiology of chronic and recurrent forms of middle ear inflammatory disease remains poorly understood. Studies of the human population suggest that there is a significant genetic component predisposing to the development of chronic OM, although the underlying genes are largely unknown. Using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis we identified a recessive mouse mutant, edison, that spontaneously develops a conductive hearing loss due to chronic OM. The causal mutation was identified as a missense change, L972P, in the Nischarin (NISCH gene. edison mice develop a serous or granulocytic effusion, increasingly macrophage and neutrophil rich with age, along with a thickened, inflamed mucoperiosteum. We also identified a second hypomorphic allele, V33A, with only modest increases in auditory thresholds and reduced incidence of OM. NISCH interacts with several proteins, including ITGA5 that is thought to have a role in modulating VEGF-induced angiogenesis and vascularization. We identified a significant genetic interaction between Nisch and Itga5; mice heterozygous for Itga5-null and homozygous for edison mutations display a significantly increased penetrance and severity of chronic OM. In order to understand the pathological mechanisms underlying the OM phenotype, we studied interacting partners to NISCH along with downstream signalling molecules in the middle ear epithelia of edison mouse. Our analysis implicates PAK1 and RAC1, and downstream signalling in LIMK1 and NF-κB pathways in the development of chronic OM.

  5. Minkowski Polynomials and Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akhtar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Given a Laurent polynomial f, one can form the period of f: this is a function of one complex variable that plays an important role in mirror symmetry for Fano manifolds. Mutations are a particular class of birational transformations acting on Laurent polynomials in two variables; they preserve the period and are closely connected with cluster algebras. We propose a higher-dimensional analog of mutation acting on Laurent polynomials f in n variables. In particular we give a combinatorial description of mutation acting on the Newton polytope P of f, and use this to establish many basic facts about mutations. Mutations can be understood combinatorially in terms of Minkowski rearrangements of slices of P, or in terms of piecewise-linear transformations acting on the dual polytope P* (much like cluster transformations. Mutations map Fano polytopes to Fano polytopes, preserve the Ehrhart series of the dual polytope, and preserve the period of f. Finally we use our results to show that Minkowski polynomials, which are a family of Laurent polynomials that give mirror partners to many three-dimensional Fano manifolds, are connected by a sequence of mutations if and only if they have the same period.

  6. Exome sequencing identifies DYNC2H1 mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidts, Miriam; Arts, Heleen H; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yap, Zhimin; Oud, Machteld M; Antony, Dinu; Duijkers, Lonneke; Emes, Richard D; Stalker, Jim; Yntema, Jan-Bart L; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Forsythe, Elisabeth; Lausch, Ekkehart; Veltman, Joris A; Roeleveld, Nel; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Elçioğlu, Nursel; van Maarle, Merel C; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Smithson, Sarah F; Wellesley, Diana; Verbeek, Nienke E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kayserili, Hulya; Scambler, Peter J; Beales, Philip L; Knoers, Nine VAM; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-01-01

    Background Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) is a rare, often lethal, recessively inherited chondrodysplasia characterised by shortened ribs and long bones, sometimes accompanied by polydactyly, and renal, liver and retinal disease. Mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes cause JATD, including the IFT dynein-2 motor subunit gene DYNC2H1. Genetic heterogeneity and the large DYNC2H1 gene size have hindered JATD genetic diagnosis. Aims and methods To determine the contribution to JATD we screened DYNC2H1 in 71 JATD patients JATD patients combining SNP mapping, Sanger sequencing and exome sequencing. Results and conclusions We detected 34 DYNC2H1 mutations in 29/71 (41%) patients from 19/57 families (33%), showing it as a major cause of JATD especially in Northern European patients. This included 13 early protein termination mutations (nonsense/frameshift, deletion, splice site) but no patients carried these in combination, suggesting the human phenotype is at least partly hypomorphic. In addition, 21 missense mutations were distributed across DYNC2H1 and these showed some clustering to functional domains, especially the ATP motor domain. DYNC2H1 patients largely lacked significant extra-skeletal involvement, demonstrating an important genotype–phenotype correlation in JATD. Significant variability exists in the course and severity of the thoracic phenotype, both between affected siblings with identical DYNC2H1 alleles and among individuals with different alleles, which suggests the DYNC2H1 phenotype might be subject to modifier alleles, non-genetic or epigenetic factors. Assessment of fibroblasts from patients showed accumulation of anterograde IFT proteins in the ciliary tips, confirming defects similar to patients with other retrograde IFT machinery mutations, which may be of undervalued potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:23456818

  7. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  8. Severe congenital lipodystrophy and a progeroid appearance: Mutation in the penultimate exon of FBN1 causing a recognizable phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenouchi, Toshiki; Hida, Mariko; Sakamoto, Yoshiaki; Torii, Chiharu; Kosaki, Rika; Takahashi, Takao; Kosaki, Kenjiro

    2013-12-01

    Recently, three marfanoid patients with congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance were reported. Although their phenotype was distinct from that of classic Marfan syndrome, they all had a truncating mutation in the penultimate exon, i.e., exon 64, of FBN1, the causative gene for Marfan syndrome. These patients might represent a new entity, but the exact phenotypic and genotypic spectrum remains unknown. Here, we report on a girl born prematurely who exhibited severe congenital lipodystrophy and a neonatal progeroid appearance. The patient exhibited a characteristic growth pattern consisting of an accelerated growth in height with a discrepant poor weight gain. She had a characteristic facial appearance with craniosynostosis. A mutation analysis identified c.8175_8182del8bp, p.Arg2726Glufs*9 in exon 64 of the FBN1 gene. A review of similar, recently reported patients revealed that the cardinal features of these patients include (1) congenital lipodystrophy, (2) premature birth with an accelerated linear growth disproportionate to the weight gain, and (3) a progeroid appearance with distinct facial features. Lines of molecular evidence suggested that this new progeroid syndrome represents a neomorphic phenotype caused by truncated transcripts with an extremely charged protein motif that escapes from nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, altering FBN1-TGF beta signaling, rather than representing the severe end of the hypomorphic phenotype of the FBN1-TGF beta disorder spectrum. We propose that this marfanoid entity comprised of congenital lipodystrophy, a neonatal progeroid appearance, and a peculiar growth profile and caused by rare mutations in the penultimate exon of FBN1, be newly referred to as marfanoid-progeroid syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Brief Report: Peripheral Osteolysis in Adults Linked to ASAH1 (Acid Ceramidase) Mutations: A New Presentation of Farber's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafé, Luisa; Kariminejad, Ariana; Li, Jia; Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Garcia, Virginie; Mahdavi, Shokouholsadat; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Lachman, Ralph L; Mittaz-Crettol, Lauréane; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Unger, Sheila; Rivolta, Carlo; Levade, Thierry; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    To establish a diagnosis and provide counseling and treatment for 3 adult patients from one family presenting with peripheral osteolysis. Following clinical and radiographic assessment, exome sequencing, targeted gene resequencing, and determination of enzyme activity in cultured fibroblasts were performed. The proband (age 40 years) had a history of episodic fever and pain in childhood that subsided around puberty. He and 2 of his older sisters (ages 58 and 60 years, respectively) showed adult-onset progressive shortening of fingers and toes with redundancy of the overlying skin. Radiographs showed severe osteolysis of the distal radius and ulna, carpal bones, metacarpal bones, and phalanges. Sequencing of the known genes for recessively inherited osteolysis, MMP2 and MMP14, failed to show pathogenic mutations. Exome sequencing revealed compound heterozygosity for mutations c.505T>C (p.Trp169Arg) and c.760A>G (p.Arg254Gly) in ASAH1, the gene coding for acid ceramidase. Sanger sequencing confirmed correct segregation in the family, and enzyme activity in fibroblast cultures from the patients was reduced to ∼8% of that in controls, confirming a diagnosis of Farber's disease. Our findings indicate that hypomorphic mutations in ASAH1 may result in an osteoarticular phenotype with a juvenile phase resembling rheumatoid arthritis that evolves to osteolysis as the final stage in the absence of neurologic signs. This observation delineates a novel type of recessively inherited peripheral osteolysis and illustrates the long-term skeletal manifestations of acid ceramidase deficiency (Farber's disease) in what appear to be the oldest affected individuals known so far. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  10. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  11. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Mou, Beiquan

    2012-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic stu...

  12. Furosemide loading test in a case of homozygous solute carrier family 12, member 1 (SLC12A1) mutation (g.62382825G>A, p.Pro372Leu) in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kiyotoshi; Sasaki, Shinji; Sakamoto, Yoichi; Takano, Akifumi; Takayama, Megumi; Higashi, Tomoko; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Yasuda, Yasuaki

    2017-10-01

    Hydrallantois is the excessive accumulation of fluid in the allantoic cavity in a pregnant animal and is associated with fetal death. We recently identified a recessive missense mutation in the solute carrier family 12, member 1 (SLC12A1) gene (g.62382825G>A, p.Pro372Leu) that is associated with hydrallantois in Japanese Black cattle. Unexpectedly, we found a case of the homozygous risk-allele for SLC12A1 in a calf, using a PCR-based direct DNA sequencing test. The homozygote was outwardly healthy up to 3 months of age and the mother did not exhibit any clinical symptoms of hydrallantois. In order to validate these observations, we performed confirmation tests for the genotype and a diuretic loading test using furosemide, which inhibits the transporter activity of the SLC12A1 protein. The results showed that the calf was really homozygous for the risk-allele. In the homozygous calf, administration of furosemide did not alter urinary Na + or Cl - levels, in contrast to the heterozygote and wild-type calves in which these were significantly increased. These results demonstrate that the SLC12A1 (g.62382825G>A, p.Pro372Leu) is a hypomorphic or loss-of-function mutation and the hydrallantois with this mutation shows incomplete penetrance in Japanese Black cattle. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  13. Detecting clusters of mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Zhou

    Full Text Available Positive selection for protein function can lead to multiple mutations within a small stretch of DNA, i.e., to a cluster of mutations. Recently, Wagner proposed a method to detect such mutation clusters. His method, however, did not take into account that residues with high solvent accessibility are inherently more variable than residues with low solvent accessibility. Here, we propose a new algorithm to detect clustered evolution. Our algorithm controls for different substitution probabilities at buried and exposed sites in the tertiary protein structure, and uses random permutations to calculate accurate P values for inferred clusters. We apply the algorithm to genomes of bacteria, fly, and mammals, and find several clusters of mutations in functionally important regions of proteins. Surprisingly, clustered evolution is a relatively rare phenomenon. Only between 2% and 10% of the genes we analyze contain a statistically significant mutation cluster. We also find that not controlling for solvent accessibility leads to an excess of clusters in terminal and solvent-exposed regions of proteins. Our algorithm provides a novel method to identify functionally relevant divergence between groups of species. Moreover, it could also be useful to detect artifacts in automatically assembled genomes.

  14. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  15. A reversion of an IL2RG mutation in combined immunodeficiency providing competitive advantage to the majority of CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijpers, Taco W; van Leeuwen, Ester M M; Barendregt, Barbara H; Klarenbeek, Paul; aan de Kerk, Daan J; Baars, Paul A; Jansen, Machiel H; de Vries, Niek; van Lier, René A W; van der Burg, Mirjam

    2013-07-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (γc, CD132, encoded by the IL2RG gene) can lead to B(+)T(-)NK(-) X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency, as a consequence of unresponsiveness to γc-cytokines such as interleukins-2, -7 and -15. Hypomorphic mutations in CD132 may cause combined immunodeficiencies with a variety of clinical presentations. We analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a 6-year-old boy with normal lymphocyte counts, who suffered from recurrent pneumonia and disseminated mollusca contagiosa. Since proliferative responses of T cells and NK cells to γc -cytokines were severely impaired, we performed IL2RG gene analysis, showing a heterozygous mutation in the presence of a single X-chromosome. Interestingly, an IL2RG reversion to normal predominated in both naïve and antigen-primed CD8(+) T cells and increased over time. Only the revertant CD8(+) T cells showed normal expression of CD132 and the various CD8(+) T cell populations had a different T-cell receptor repertoire. Finally, a fraction of γδ(+) T cells and differentiated CD4(+)CD27(-) effector-memory T cells carried the reversion, whereas NK or B cells were repeatedly negative. In conclusion, in a patient with a novel IL2RG mutation, gene-reverted CD8(+) T cells accumulated over time. Our data indicate that selective outgrowth of particular T-cell subsets may occur following reversion at the level of committed T progenitor cells.

  16. ALS2 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  17. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  18. Are There Mutator Polymerases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garcia-Diaz

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are involved in different cellular events, including genome replication and DNA repair. In the last few years, a large number of novel DNA polymerases have been discovered, and the biochemical analysis of their properties has revealed a long list of intriguing features. Some of these polymerases have a very low fidelity and have been suggested to play mutator roles in different processes, like translesion synthesis or somatic hypermutation. The current view of these processes is reviewed, and the current understanding of DNA polymerases and their role as mutator enzymes is discussed.

  19. Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Factor V Leiden Mutation and PT 20210 Mutation Send Us ... As Activated Protein C Resistance APC Resistance Factor V R506Q PT G20210A Factor II 20210 Factor II ...

  20. Msx1 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  1. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-01-01

    ...). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate...

  2. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  3. The feelgood mutation in zebrafish dysregulates COPII-dependent secretion of select extracellular matrix proteins in skeletal morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Melville

    2011-11-01

    Craniofacial and skeletal dysmorphologies account for the majority of birth defects. A number of the disease phenotypes have been attributed to abnormal synthesis, maintenance and composition of extracellular matrix (ECM, yet the molecular and cellular mechanisms causing these ECM defects remain poorly understood. The zebrafish feelgood mutant manifests a severely malformed head skeleton and shortened body length due to defects in the maturation stage of chondrocyte development. In vivo analyses reveal a backlog of type II and type IV collagens in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER similar to those found in coat protein II complex (COPII-deficient cells. The feelgood mutation hinders collagen deposition in the ECM, but trafficking of small cargos and other large ECM proteins such as laminin to the extracellular space is unaffected. We demonstrate that the zebrafish feelgood mutation causes a single amino acid substitution within the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor Creb3l2. We show that Creb3l2 selectively regulates the expression of genes encoding distinct COPII proteins (sec23a, sec23b and sec24d but find no evidence for its regulation of sec24c expression. Moreover, we did not detect activation of ER stress response genes despite intracellular accumulation of collagen and prominent skeletal defects. Promoter trans-activation assays show that the Creb3l2 feelgood variant is a hypomorphic allele that retains approximately 50% of its transcriptional activity. Transgenic rescue experiments of the feelgood phenotype restore craniofacial development, illustrating that a precise level of Creb3l2 transcriptional activity is essential for skeletogenesis. Our results indicate that Creb3l2 modulates the availability of COPII machinery in a tissue- and cargo-specific manner. These findings could lead to a better understanding of the etiology of human craniofacial and skeletal birth defects as well as adult-onset diseases that are linked to dysregulated ECM deposition

  4. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social conflict, in the form of intraspecific selfish "cheating" has been observed in a number of natural systems. However, a formal, evolutionary genetic theory of social cheating that provides an explanatory, predictive framework for these observations is lacking. Here we derive the kin...... selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfied, selection is never strong enough to eliminate recurrent cheater mutants from a population, but cheater...... lineages are transient and do not invade. Instead, cheating lineages are eliminated by kin selection but are constantly reintroduced by mutation, maintaining a stable equilibrium frequency of cheaters. The presence of cheaters at equilibrium creates a "cheater load" that selects for mechanisms of cheater...

  5. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  6. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  7. BRAF mutations in conjunctival melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann-Cathrine; Dahl, Christina; Dahmcke, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate incidence, clinicopathological features and prognosis of BRAF-mutated conjunctival melanoma in Denmark. Furthermore, to determine BRAF mutations in paired premalignant lesions and evaluate immunohistochemical BRAF V600E oncoprotein detection. Methods: Data from 139 patients...... with conjunctival melanoma (1960–2012) were collected. Archived conjunctival melanoma samples and premalignant lesions were analysed for BRAF mutations using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results were associated with clinicopathological features and compared with BRAF V600E oncoprotein stainings...... with atypia. BRAF mutations were identified in 39 of 111 (35%) cases. The rate ratio of BRAF-mutated versus BRAF-wild-type melanoma did not change over time. BRAF mutations were associated with T1 stage (p = 0.007), young age (p = 0.001), male gender (p = 0.02), sun-exposed location (p = 0.01), mixed...

  8. RAD51C germline mutations in breast and ovarian cancer cases from high-risk families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Clague

    Full Text Available BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most well-known breast cancer susceptibility genes. Additional genes involved in DNA repair have been identified as predisposing to breast cancer. One such gene, RAD51C, is essential for homologous recombination repair. Several likely pathogenic RAD51C mutations have been identified in BRCA1- and BRCA2-negative breast and ovarian cancer families. We performed complete sequencing of RAD51C in germline DNA of 286 female breast and/or ovarian cancer cases with a family history of breast and ovarian cancers, who had previously tested negative for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2. We screened 133 breast cancer cases, 119 ovarian cancer cases, and 34 with both breast and ovarian cancers. Fifteen DNA sequence variants were identified; including four intronic, one 5' UTR, one promoter, three synonymous, and six non-synonymous variants. None were truncating. The in-silico SIFT and Polyphen programs were used to predict possible pathogenicity of the six non-synonomous variants based on sequence conservation. G153D and T287A were predicted to be likely pathogenic. Two additional variants, A126T and R214C alter amino acids in important domains of the protein such that they could be pathogenic. Two-hybrid screening and immunoblot analyses were performed to assess the functionality of these four non-synonomous variants in yeast. The RAD51C-G153D protein displayed no detectable interaction with either XRCC3 or RAD51B, and RAD51C-R214C displayed significantly decreased interaction with both XRCC3 and RAD51B (p<0.001. Immunoblots of RAD51C-Gal4 activation domain fusion peptides showed protein levels of RAD51C-G153D and RAD51C-R214C that were 50% and 60% of the wild-type, respectively. Based on these data, the RAD51C-G153D variant is likely to be pathogenic, while the RAD51C- R214C variant is hypomorphic of uncertain pathogenicity. These results provide further support that RAD51C is a rare breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene.

  9. Mutation in Aldosterone Producing Adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Jhong Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Discoveries of somatic mutations permit the recognition of subtypes of aldosterone-producing adenomas (APAs with distinct clinical presentations and pathological features. Catenin β1 (CTNNB1 mutation in APAs has been recently described and discussed in the literature. However, significant knowledge gaps still remain regarding the prevalence, clinical characteristics, pathophysiology, and outcomes in APA patients harboring CTNNB1 mutations. Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway will further modulate tumorigenesis. We also discuss the recent knowledge of CTNNB1 mutation in adrenal adenomas.

  10. SDH mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardella, Chiara; Pollard, Patrick J; Tomlinson, Ian

    2011-11-01

    The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD genes encode the four subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH; mitochondrial complex II), a mitochondrial enzyme involved in two essential energy-producing metabolic processes of the cell, the Krebs cycle and the electron transport chain. Germline loss-of-function mutations in any of the SDH genes or assembly factor (SDHAF2) cause hereditary paraganglioma/phaeochromocytoma syndrome (HPGL/PCC) through a mechanism which is largely unknown. Owing to the central function of SDH in cellular energy metabolism it is important to understand its role in tumor suppression. Here is reported an overview of genetics, clinical and molecular progress recently performed in understanding the basis of HPGL/PCC tumorigenesis. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Plant mutation breeding and biotechnology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shu, Q. Y; Forster, Brian P; Nakagawa, H

    2012-01-01

    ... (FAO / IAEA) Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, with its global coordinating and synergistic roles, that plant mutation breeding became a common tool available to plant breeders worldwide. Since these early days the Joint Division continues to play a considerable role in fostering the use of mutation techni...

  12. MPL mutations in myeloproliferative disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beer, Philip A.; Campbell, Peter J.; Scott, Linda M.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations of MPL exon 10 have been described in a minority of patients with idiopathic myelofibrosis (IMF) or essential thrombocythemia (ET), but their prevalence and clinical significance are unclear. Here we demonstrate that MPL mutations outside exon 10 are uncommon in platelet c......DNA and identify 4 different exon 10 mutations in granulocyte DNA from a retrospective cohort of 200 patients with ET or IMF. Allele-specific polymerase chain reaction was then used to genotype 776 samples from patients with ET entered into the PT-1 studies. MPL mutations were identified in 8.5% of JAK2 V617F......(-) patients and a single V617F(+) patient. Patients carrying the W515K allele had a significantly higher allele burden than did those with the W515L allele, suggesting a functional difference between the 2 variants. Compared with V617F(+) ET patients, those with MPL mutations displayed lower hemoglobin...

  13. Evolutionary Accessibility of Mutational Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Jasper; Klözer, Alexander; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Krug, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Functional effects of different mutations are known to combine to the total effect in highly nontrivial ways. For the trait under evolutionary selection (‘fitness’), measured values over all possible combinations of a set of mutations yield a fitness landscape that determines which mutational states can be reached from a given initial genotype. Understanding the accessibility properties of fitness landscapes is conceptually important in answering questions about the predictability and repeatability of evolutionary adaptation. Here we theoretically investigate accessibility of the globally optimal state on a wide variety of model landscapes, including landscapes with tunable ruggedness as well as neutral ‘holey’ landscapes. We define a mutational pathway to be accessible if it contains the minimal number of mutations required to reach the target genotype, and if fitness increases in each mutational step. Under this definition accessibility is high, in the sense that at least one accessible pathway exists with a substantial probability that approaches unity as the dimensionality of the fitness landscape (set by the number of mutational loci) becomes large. At the same time the number of alternative accessible pathways grows without bounds. We test the model predictions against an empirical 8-locus fitness landscape obtained for the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. By analyzing subgraphs of the full landscape containing different subsets of mutations, we are able to probe the mutational distance scale in the empirical data. The predicted effect of high accessibility is supported by the empirical data and is very robust, which we argue reflects the generic topology of sequence spaces. Together with the restrictive assumptions that lie in our definition of accessibility, this implies that the globally optimal configuration should be accessible to genome wide evolution, but the repeatability of evolutionary trajectories is limited owing to the presence of a

  14. A Splicing Mutation in the Novel Mitochondrial Protein DNAJC11 Causes Motor Neuron Pathology Associated with Cristae Disorganization, and Lymphoid Abnormalities in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioakeimidis, Fotis; Ott, Christine; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Violitzi, Foteini; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Eliopoulos, Elias; Fasseas, Costas; Kollias, George; Douni, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial structure and function is emerging as a major contributor to neuromuscular disease, highlighting the need for the complete elucidation of the underlying molecular and pathophysiological mechanisms. Following a forward genetics approach with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we identified a novel mouse model of autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease caused by a splice-site hypomorphic mutation in a novel gene of unknown function, DnaJC11. Recent findings have demonstrated that DNAJC11 protein co-immunoprecipitates with proteins of the mitochondrial contact site (MICOS) complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial cristae and cristae junctions. Homozygous mutant mice developed locomotion defects, muscle weakness, spasticity, limb tremor, leucopenia, thymic and splenic hypoplasia, general wasting and early lethality. Neuropathological analysis showed severe vacuolation of the motor neurons in the spinal cord, originating from dilatations of the endoplasmic reticulum and notably from mitochondria that had lost their proper inner membrane organization. The causal role of the identified mutation in DnaJC11 was verified in rescue experiments by overexpressing the human ortholog. The full length 63 kDa isoform of human DNAJC11 was shown to localize in the periphery of the mitochondrial outer membrane whereas putative additional isoforms displayed differential submitochondrial localization. Moreover, we showed that DNAJC11 is assembled in a high molecular weight complex, similarly to mitofilin and that downregulation of mitofilin or SAM50 affected the levels of DNAJC11 in HeLa cells. Our findings provide the first mouse mutant for a putative MICOS protein and establish a link between DNAJC11 and neuromuscular diseases. PMID:25111180

  15. Lithium-Responsive Seizure-Like Hyperexcitability Is Caused by a Mutation in the Drosophila Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Gene paralytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, Junko; Ueda, Atsushi; Iyengar, Atulya; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Shudderer (Shu) is an X-linked dominant mutation in Drosophila melanogaster identified more than 40 years ago. A previous study showed that Shu caused spontaneous tremors and defects in reactive climbing behavior, and that these phenotypes were significantly suppressed when mutants were fed food containing lithium, a mood stabilizer used in the treatment of bipolar disorder (Williamson, 1982). This unique observation suggested that the Shu mutation affects genes involved in lithium-responsive neurobiological processes. In the present study, we identified Shu as a novel mutant allele of the voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channel gene paralytic (para). Given that hypomorphic para alleles and RNA interference–mediated para knockdown reduced the severity of Shu phenotypes, Shu was classified as a para hypermorphic allele. We also demonstrated that lithium could improve the behavioral abnormalities displayed by other Nav mutants, including a fly model of the human generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. Our electrophysiological analysis of Shu showed that lithium treatment did not acutely suppress Nav channel activity, indicating that the rescue effect of lithium resulted from chronic physiological adjustments to this drug. Microarray analysis revealed that lithium significantly alters the expression of various genes in Shu, including those involved in innate immune responses, amino acid metabolism, and oxidation-reduction processes, raising the interesting possibility that lithium-induced modulation of these biological pathways may contribute to such adjustments. Overall, our findings demonstrate that Nav channel mutants in Drosophila are valuable genetic tools for elucidating the effects of lithium on the nervous system in the context of neurophysiology and behavior. PMID:27844061

  16. Mutational meltdown in laboratory yeast populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyl, C.; Mizesko, M.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    In small or repeatedly bottlenecked populations, mutations are expected to accumulate by genetic drift, causing fitness declines. In mutational meltdown models, such fitness declines further reduce population size, thus accelerating additional mutation accumulation and leading to extinction. Because

  17. Monoallelic mutation analysis (MAMA) for identifying germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, N; Leach, F S; Kinzler, K W; Vogelstein, B

    1995-09-01

    Dissection of germline mutations in a sensitive and specific manner presents a continuing challenge. In dominantly inherited diseases, mutations occur in only one allele and are often masked by the normal allele. Here we report the development of a sensitive and specific diagnostic strategy based on somatic cell hybridization termed MAMA (monoallelic mutation analysis). We have demonstrated the utility of this strategy in two different hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes, one caused by a defective tumour suppressor gene on chromosome 5 (familial adenomatous polyposis, FAP) and the other caused by a defective mismatch repair gene on chromosome 2 (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, HNPCC).

  18. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Ideally, familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is diagnosed by testing for mutations that decrease the catabolism of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; however, genetic testing is not universally available. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and predictors of FH...... causing mutations in 98 098 participants from the general population, the Copenhagen General Population Study. METHODS AND RESULTS: We genotyped for LDLR[W23X;W66G;W556S] and APOB[R3500Q] accounting for 38.7% of pathogenic FH mutations in Copenhagen. Clinical FH assessment excluded mutation information....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH...

  19. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  20. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  1. Radiation mutation breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hi Sup; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    1998-04-01

    In order to develop an advanced technical knowledge for the selection of better mutants, some of the crops were irradiated and the mutation rate, the survival rate and the method for selction of a mutant were studied. Furthermore, this study aimed to obtain basic data applicable to the development of genetic resources by evaluation and analysis the specific character for selection of the superior mutant and its plant breeding. 1. selection of the mutant with a superior resistance against environment in the principal crops 1) New varieties of mutant rices such as Wonpyeongbyeo, Wongwangbyeo, Winmibyeo, and heogseon chalbeyeo (sticky forma) were registered in the national variety list and made an application to crop variety protection right. They are under review now. 2) We also keep on studying on the number of a grain of 8 lines of excellent mutant rice for the purpose of improvement of breeding . 3) We selected 3 lines which have a resistance to pod and stem blight in large soybean, 31 lines with small grain size and higher yield, 112 lines of soybean of cooking, 7 lines of low lipoxygenase content, and 12 lines with decreased phytic acid content by 20 % compared to the previous level. 2. Selection of advanced Mugunwha (Rose of Sharon) mutant 1) Bagseul, a new variety of mutant, was developed and 30 plantlets of it are being proliferated. 2) Fifty-three lines of a mutant having a various morphologies were selected.

  2. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  3. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  4. Markov models for accumulating mutations

    CERN Document Server

    Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2007-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a waiting time model for the accumulation of genetic changes. The continuous time conjunctive Bayesian network is defined by a partially ordered set of mutations and by the rate of fixation of each mutation. The partial order encodes constraints on the order in which mutations can fixate in the population, shedding light on the mutational pathways underlying the evolutionary process. We study a censored version of the model and derive equations for an EM algorithm to perform maximum likelihood estimation of the model parameters. We also show how to select the maximum likelihood poset. The model is applied to genetic data from different cancers and from drug resistant HIV samples, indicating implications for diagnosis and treatment.

  5. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  6. Gene mutations in hepatocellular adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raft, Marie B; Jørgensen, Ernö N; Vainer, Ben

    2015-01-01

    is associated with bi-allelic mutations in the TCF1 gene and morphologically has marked steatosis. β-catenin activating HCA has increased activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and is associated with possible malignant transformation. Inflammatory HCA is characterized by an oncogene-induced inflammation due....... This review offers an overview of the reported gene mutations associated with hepatocellular adenomas together with a discussion of the diagnostic and prognostic value....

  7. HFE mutations in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Gavin; Wimperis, Jennie Z; Smith, Katy; Fellows, Ian W; Jennings, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Most individuals diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis have mutations in both copies of the HFE gene, with such mutations being common in populations of north European origin. The number of individuals currently diagnosed and treated for hemochromatosis is small relative to the number carrying two HFE mutations. Studies searching for undiagnosed hemochromatosis cases among disease cohorts have generally failed to find the number of cases that would be expected if disease were the commonest outcome for individuals with two C282Y HFE mutations. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with two HFE mutations would be under-represented in an elderly population because many would have died from disease caused by hemochromatosis before they reached old age. This is a cross-sectional study of elderly patients referred for full blood counts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. We screened blood samples from 1,000 elderly men (aged 85 and over) and women (aged 89 and over) for the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations of the HFE gene. We also analyzed any recent laboratory data relevant to signs of hemochromatosis. None of the ten possible genotypes was significantly under- or over-represented compared to the expected frequency calculated from the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Four C282Y homozygotes were found. There were few significant differences in the laboratory findings between the genotypes. Our data suggest that most people with HFE mutations survive to old age and do not suffer from signs of iron overload and hemochromatosis.

  8. Common Β- Thalassaemia Mutations in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Azarfam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: β –Thalassaemia was first explained by Thomas Cooly as Cooly’s anaemia in 1925. The β- thalassaemias are hereditary autosomal disorders with decreased or absent β-globin chain synthesis. The most common genetic defects in β-thalassaemias are caused by point mutations, micro deletions or insertions within the β-globin gene. Material and Methods: In this research , 142 blood samples (64 from childrens hospital of Tabriz , 15 samples from Shahid Gazi hospital of Tabriz , 18 from Urumia and 45 samples from Aliasghar hospital of Ardebil were taken from thalassaemic patients (who were previously diagnosed .Then 117 non-familial samples were selected . The DNA of the lymphocytes of blood samples was extracted by boiling and Proteinase K- SDS procedure, and mutations were detected by ARMS-PCR methods. Results: From the results obtained, eleven most common mutations,most of which were Mediterranean mutations were detected as follows; IVS-I-110(G-A, IVS-I-1(G-A ،IVS-I-5(G-C ,Frameshift Codon 44 (-C,( codon5(-CT,IVS-1-6(T-C, IVS-I-25(-25bp del ,Frameshift 8.9 (+G ,IVS-II-1(G-A ,Codon 39(C-T, Codon 30(G-C the mutations of the samples were defined. The results showed that Frameshift 8.9 (+G, IVS-I-110 (G-A ,IVS-II-I(G-A, IVS-I-5(G-C, IVS-I-1(G-A , Frameshift Codon 44(-C , codon5(-CT , IVS-1-6(T-C , IVS-I-25(-25bp del with a frequency of 29.9%, 25.47%,17.83%, 7.00%, 6.36% , 6.63% , 3.8% , 2.5% , 0.63% represented the most common mutations in North - west Iran. No mutations in Codon 39(C-T and Codon 30(G-C were detected. Cunclusion: The frequency of the same mutations in patients from North - West of Iran seems to be different as compared to other regions like Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon and Fars province of Iran. The pattern of mutations in this region is more or less the same as in the Mediterranean region, but different from South west Asia and East Asia.

  9. SQSTM1 Mutations and Glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd E Scheetz

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is the most common cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. One subset of glaucoma, normal tension glaucoma (NTG occurs in the absence of high intraocular pressure. Mutations in two genes, optineurin (OPTN and TANK binding kinase 1 (TBK1, cause familial NTG and have known roles in the catabolic cellular process autophagy. TKB1 encodes a kinase that phosphorylates OPTN, an autophagy receptor, which ultimately activates autophagy. The sequestosome (SQSTM1 gene also encodes an autophagy receptor and also is a target of TBK1 phosphorylation. Consequently, we hypothesized that mutations in SQSTM1 may also cause NTG. We tested this hypothesis by searching for glaucoma-causing mutations in a cohort of NTG patients (n = 308 and matched controls (n = 157 using Sanger sequencing. An additional 1098 population control samples were also analyzed using whole exome sequencing. A total of 17 non-synonymous mutations were detected which were not significantly skewed between cases and controls when analyzed separately, or as a group (p > 0.05. These data suggest that SQSTM1 mutations are not a common cause of NTG.

  10. Canavan disease: a novel mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Harald; Luetschg, Juerg; Hoeliner, Isabella; Kalb, Stefanie; Simma, Burkhard

    2011-10-01

    Canavan disease, an autosomal recessive inherited leukodystrophy caused by an aspartoacylase deficiency, is common among children of Ashkenazi Jewish descent. We report on a non-Jewish female infant who presented at age 6 months with progressive macrocephaly and developmental delay. A sequence analysis of the aspartoacylase gene revealed compound heterozygosity for a known mutation and for the mutation c.432G>A in exon 2, which has not yet been described in Canavan disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A hypomorphic Cbx3 allele causes prenatal growth restriction and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sub-department of Evolution & Development, Center for Evolutionary Biology, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18A, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden; Center for ... for Biological Signalling Studies, Schänzlestrasse 18, 79104 Freiburg, Germany; School of Natural Sciences and Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University, ...

  12. A hypomorphic Cbx3 allele causes prenatal growth restriction and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... one half was frozen on dry ice for nucleic acid or protein extraction, while the .... guide. DNase treatment was performed prior to cDNA syn- thesis with .... E12 and E19 of gestation; values are shown as x±S.D. (d) Diagram of the weight increase of Cbx3hypo/hypo, Cbx3+/− and Cbx3+/+ fetuses between E12 ...

  13. Analysis of the fitness effect of compensatory mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liqing; Watson, Layne T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends previous work on the Darwinian evolutionary fitness effect of the fixation of deleterious mutations by incorporating compensatory mutations, which are mutations (deleterious by themselves) that ameliorate other deleterious mutations, thus reducing the genetic load of populations. Since having compensatory mutations essentially changes the distributional shapes of deleterious mutations, the effect of compensatory mutations is studied by comparing distributions of deleterious...

  14. Domain landscapes of somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehrt, Nathan L; Peterson, Thomas A; Park, DoHwan; Kann, Maricel G

    2012-06-18

    Large-scale tumor sequencing projects are now underway to identify genetic mutations that drive tumor initiation and development. Most studies take a gene-based approach to identifying driver mutations, highlighting genes mutated in a large percentage of tumor samples as those likely to contain driver mutations. However, this gene-based approach usually does not consider the position of the mutation within the gene or the functional context the position of the mutation provides. Here we introduce a novel method for mapping mutations to distinct protein domains, not just individual genes, in which they occur, thus providing the functional context for how the mutation contributes to disease. Furthermore, aggregating mutations from all genes containing a specific protein domain enables the identification of mutations that are rare at the gene level, but that occur frequently within the specified domain. These highly mutated domains potentially reveal disruptions of protein function necessary for cancer development. We mapped somatic mutations from the protein coding regions of 100 colon adenocarcinoma tumor samples to the genes and protein domains in which they occurred, and constructed topographical maps to depict the "mutational landscapes" of gene and domain mutation frequencies. We found significant mutation frequency in a number of genes previously known to be somatically mutated in colon cancer patients including APC, TP53 and KRAS. In addition, we found significant mutation frequency within specific domains located in these genes, as well as within other domains contained in genes having low mutation frequencies. These domain "peaks" were enriched with functions important to cancer development including kinase activity, DNA binding and repair, and signal transduction. Using our method to create the domain landscapes of mutations in colon cancer, we were able to identify somatic mutations with high potential to drive cancer development. Interestingly, the

  15. DNA methyltransferase 3B (DNMT3B) mutations in ICF syndrome lead to altered epigenetic modifications and aberrant expression of genes regulating development, neurogenesis and immune function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bilian; Tao, Qian; Peng, Jinrong; Soo, Hui Meng; Wu, Wei; Ying, Jianming; Fields, C Robert; Delmas, Amber L; Liu, Xuefeng; Qiu, Jingxin; Robertson, Keith D

    2008-03-01

    Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns are established and maintained by the coordinated action of three DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), DNMT1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B. DNMT3B hypomorphic germline mutations are responsible for two-thirds of immunodeficiency, centromere instability, facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome cases, a rare recessive disease characterized by immune defects, instability of pericentromeric satellite 2-containing heterochromatin, facial abnormalities and mental retardation. The molecular defects in transcription, DNA methylation and chromatin structure in ICF cells remain relatively uncharacterized. In the present study, we used global expression profiling to elucidate the role of DNMT3B in these processes using cell lines derived from ICF syndrome and normal individuals. We show that there are significant changes in the expression of genes critical for immune function, development and neurogenesis that are highly relevant to the ICF phenotype. Approximately half the upregulated genes we analyzed were marked with low-level DNA methylation in normal cells that was lost in ICF cells, concomitant with loss of repressive histone modifications, particularly H3K27 trimethylation, and gains in transcriptionally active H3K9 acetylation and H3K4 trimethylation marks. In addition, we consistently observed loss of binding of the SUZ12 component of the PRC2 polycomb repression complex and DNMT3B to derepressed genes, including a number of homeobox genes critical for immune system, brain and craniofacial development. We also observed altered global levels of certain histone modifications in ICF cells, particularly ubiquitinated H2AK119. Therefore, this study provides important new insights into the role of DNMT3B in modulating gene expression and chromatin structure and reveals new connections between DNMT3B and polycomb-mediated repression.

  16. THE RATE OF SPONTANEOUS MUTATION

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Rate of Spontaneous Mutation of a Human Gene. (Published on 1935 J. Genet. 31, 317-326). J. B. S. Haldane. J. Genet. Classic Volume 83 Issue 3 December 2004 pp 235-244. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jgen/083/03/0235-0244. Author Affiliations.

  17. Causative mutations in FKBP10

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to the current project, contact was made with medical colleagues in other centres in SA, and they were offered molecular genetic screening for mutations in their patients with OI-3 by the. Division of Human Genetics at UCT. The clinicians caring for affected persons with OI-3 and their families submitted blood or saliva.

  18. Thalassemia mutations in Gaziantep, Turkey

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-22

    Feb 22, 2010 ... thalassemia mutation (3.7 single gene deletions in 1 patient, anti-3.7 gene triplication in 4 patients) was determined at the same time. Finally ... inherited disorder of hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis in the world, with gene ..... Peykar DP, Akhavan-Niaki H, Tamaddoni A, Ghawidel-Parsa S, Naieni. KH, Rahmani M ...

  19. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  20. identification of a novel mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in children and it mostly affects the liver, muscle and heart. (Koshy et al. 2006). GSDs can be differentiated ... novel mutation; Azeri Turkish sequencing. Journal of Genetics, DOI 10.1007/s12041-016-0734-y, Vol. ... patients were screened by their physicians at a children's hospital in Tabriz between February 2011 and July ...

  1. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-04-25

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers.

  2. Prevalent mutations in fatty acid oxidation disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Andresen, B S; Bross, P

    2000-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The mutational spectrum in a given disease-associated gene is often comprised of a large number of different mutations, of which a single or a few are present in a large proportion of diseased individuals. Such prevalent mutations are known in four genes of the fatty acid oxidation...... carrying the prevalent 985A > G mutation are at risk of developing life-threatening attacks. In SCAD/ethylmalonic aciduria, on the other hand, the presence of the prevalent susceptibility variations, 625A and 511T, in the SCAD gene seems to require additional genetic and cellular factors to be present...... in order to result in a phenotype. For the prevalent mutations in the LCHAD and CPT II genes further data are needed to evaluate the penetrance and risk of manifest disease when carrying these mutations. CONCLUSION: Assessment of the prevalence of a prevalent mutation in the mutation spectrum...

  3. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  4. Mutation Rates of STR Systems in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Emil; Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Christensen, Susanne

    rates on different STR loci. In the cases where mutations had occured, we found no interaction between kits, STRA loci or sexes. However, we found differences in the mutation rates between the sexes, meaning that the differences in male and female mutation rates can be assumed constant over STR loci...... and kits. Sex and STR locus specific mutation rates were estimated with 95% confidence limits by the method of Clopper and Pearson (1934)....

  5. Adaptive mutation: has the unicorn landed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, P L

    1998-01-01

    Reversion of an episomal Lac- allele during lactose selection has been studied as a model for adaptive mutation. Although recent results show that the mutations that arise during selection are not "adaptive" in the original sense, the mutagenic mechanism that produces these mutations may nonetheless be of evolutionary significance. In addition, a transient mutational state induced in a subpopulation of starving cells could provide a species with a mechanism for adaptive evolution. PMID:9560365

  6. Biological evolution model with conditional mutation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saakian, David B.; Ghazaryan, Makar; Bratus, Alexander; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2017-05-01

    We consider an evolution model, in which the mutation rates depend on the structure of population: the mutation rates from lower populated sequences to higher populated sequences are reduced. We have applied the Hamilton-Jacobi equation method to solve the model and calculate the mean fitness. We have found that the modulated mutation rates, directed to increase the mean fitness.

  7. DNA evolved to minimize frameshift mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Agoni, Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Point mutations can surely be dangerous but what is worst than to lose the reading frame?! Does DNA evolved a strategy to try to limit frameshift mutations?! Here we investigate if DNA sequences effectively evolved a system to minimize frameshift mutations analyzing the transcripts of proteins with high molecular weights.

  8. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    patient education Fact Sheet PFS007: BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations OCTOBER 2017 BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations Cancer is caused by several different factors. A ... parent to child. Changes in genes are called mutations . Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is ...

  9. Heterogeneity within AML with CEBPA mutations; only CEBPA double mutations, but not single CEBPA mutations are associated with favourable prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pabst, T; Eyholzer, M; Fos, J; Mueller, B U

    2009-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA) mutations in AML are associated with favourable prognosis and are divided into N- and C-terminal mutations. The majority of AML patients have both types of mutations. We assessed the prognostic significance of single (n=7) and double (n=12) CEBPA mutations among 224 AML patients. Double CEBPA mutations conferred a decisively favourable overall (P=0.006) and disease-free survival (P=0.013). However, clinical outcome of patients with single CEBPA mut...

  10. PAX6 mutations: genotype-phenotype correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanson Isabel M

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PAX6 protein is a highly conserved transcriptional regulator that is important for normal ocular and neural development. In humans, heterozygous mutations of the PAX6 gene cause aniridia (absence of the iris and related developmental eye diseases. PAX6 mutations are archived in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database, which currently contains 309 records, 286 of which are mutations in patients with eye malformations. Results We examined the records in the Human PAX6 Allelic Variant Database and documented the frequency of different mutation types, the phenotypes associated with different mutation types, the contribution of CpG transitions to the PAX6 mutation spectrum, and the distribution of chain-terminating mutations in the open reading frame. Mutations that introduce a premature termination codon into the open reading frame are predominantly associated with aniridia; in contrast, non-aniridia phenotypes are typically associated with missense mutations. Four CpG dinucleotides in exons 8, 9, 10 and 11 are major mutation hotspots, and transitions at these CpG's account for over half of all nonsense mutations in the database. Truncating mutations are distributed throughout the PAX6 coding region, except for the last half of exon 12 and the coding part of exon 13, where they are completely absent. The absence of truncating mutations in the 3' part of the coding region is statistically significant and is consistent with the idea that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles. Conclusion The PAX6 Allelic Variant Database is a valuable resource for studying genotype-phenotype correlations. The consistent association of truncating mutations with the aniridia phenotype, and the distribution of truncating mutations in the PAX6 open reading frame, suggests that nonsense-mediated decay acts on PAX6 mutant alleles.

  11. Mutation Clusters from Cancer Exome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakushadze, Zura; Yu, Willie

    2017-08-15

    We apply our statistically deterministic machine learning/clustering algorithm *K-means (recently developed in https://ssrn.com/abstract=2908286) to 10,656 published exome samples for 32 cancer types. A majority of cancer types exhibit a mutation clustering structure. Our results are in-sample stable. They are also out-of-sample stable when applied to 1389 published genome samples across 14 cancer types. In contrast, we find in- and out-of-sample instabilities in cancer signatures extracted from exome samples via nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF), a computationally-costly and non-deterministic method. Extracting stable mutation structures from exome data could have important implications for speed and cost, which are critical for early-stage cancer diagnostics, such as novel blood-test methods currently in development.

  12. Mutation models for DVI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, F; Slooten, K

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the use of DNA data for personal identification has become a crucial feature for forensic applications such as disaster victim identification (DVI). Computational methods to cope with these kinds of problems must be designed to handle large scale events with a high number of victims, obtaining likelihood ratios and posterior odds with respect to different identification hypotheses. Trying to minimize identification error rates (i.e., false negatives and false positives), a number of computational methods, based either on the choice between alternative mutation models or on the adoption of a different strategy, are proposed and evaluated. Using simulation of DNA profiles, our goal is to suggest which is the most appropriate way to address likelihood ratio computation in DVI cases, especially to be able to efficiently deal with complicating issues such as mutations or null alleles, considering that data about these latter are limited and fragmentary. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA point mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Litvinova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell energy metabolic disorders, the basis for which is mitochondrial insufficiency caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA point mutations, give rise to a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations so the purpose of this review is to analyze the recent publications on the relationship of mtDNA point mutations to mitochondrial diseases, which unveil the importance of development of molecular diagnosis. The presence of A3243G, T3271C, T3291C, C3256T, A8344G, G8356A, A3260G, СЗЗОЗТ, and A4300Gmutations in mtDNA may suggest that there are multiorgan dysfunctions and multisystem disorders, the clinical signs and symptoms of which can vary with time, which emphasizes the importance of comprehensive genetic studies if the mitochondrial disease is assumed to be clinical.

  14. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guannan Wang

    Full Text Available Angiosarcomas (AS are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA, that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma.Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3 demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage.Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  15. Actionable mutations in canine hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guannan; Wu, Ming; Maloneyhuss, Martha A; Wojcik, John; Durham, Amy C; Mason, Nicola J; Roth, David B

    2017-01-01

    Angiosarcomas (AS) are rare in humans, but they are a deadly subtype of soft tissue sarcoma. Discovery sequencing in AS, especially the visceral form, is hampered by the rarity of cases. Most diagnostic material exists as archival formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue which serves as a poor source of high quality DNA for genome-wide sequencing. We approached this problem through comparative genomics. We hypothesized that exome sequencing a histologically similar tumor, hemangiosarcoma (HSA), that occurs in approximately 50,000 dogs per year, may lead to the identification of potential oncogenic drivers and druggable targets that could also occur in angiosarcoma. Splenic hemangiosarcomas are common in dogs, which allowed us to collect a cohort of archived matched tumor and normal tissue samples suitable for whole exome sequencing. Mapping of the reads to the latest canine reference genome (Canfam3) demonstrated that >99% of the targeted exomal regions were covered, with >80% at 20X coverage and >90% at 10X coverage. Sequence analysis of 20 samples identified somatic mutations in PIK3CA, TP53, PTEN, and PLCG1, all of which correspond to well-known tumor drivers in human cancer, in more than half of the cases. In one case, we identified a mutation in PLCG1 identical to a mutation observed previously in this gene in human visceral AS. Activating PIK3CA mutations present novel therapeutic targets, and clinical trials of targeted inhibitors are underway in human cancers. Our results lay a foundation for similar clinical trials in canine HSA, enabling a precision medicine approach to this disease.

  16. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  17. Mutation Frequency and Spectrum of Mutations Vary at Different Chromosomal Positions of Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurik, Triinu; Ilves, Heili; Teras, Riho; Ilmjärv, Tanel; Tavita, Kairi; Ukkivi, Kärt; Teppo, Annika; Mikkel, Katren; Kivisaar, Maia

    2012-01-01

    It is still an open question whether mutation rate can vary across the bacterial chromosome. In this study, the occurrence of mutations within the same mutational target sequences at different chromosomal locations of Pseudomonas putida was monitored. For that purpose we constructed two mutation detection systems, one for monitoring the occurrence of a broad spectrum of mutations and transposition of IS element IS1411 inactivating LacI repressor, and another for detecting 1-bp deletions. Our results revealed that both the mutation frequency and the spectrum of mutations vary at different chromosomal positions. We observed higher mutation frequencies when the direction of transcription of the mutational target gene was opposite to the direction of replisome movement in the chromosome and vice versa, lower mutation frequency was accompanied with co-directional transcription and replication. Additionally, asymmetry of frameshift mutagenesis at homopolymeric and repetitive sequences during the leading and lagging-strand replication was found. The transposition frequency of IS1411 was also affected by the chromosomal location of the target site, which implies that regional differences in chromosomal topology may influence transposition of this mobile element. The occurrence of mutations in the P. putida chromosome was investigated both in growing and in stationary-phase bacteria. We found that the appearance of certain mutational hot spots is strongly affected by the chromosomal location of the mutational target sequence especially in growing bacteria. Also, artificial increasing transcription of the mutational target gene elevated the frequency of mutations in growing bacteria. PMID:23119042

  18. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Four hundred and eighty eight patients with advanced NSCLC were included. The mutation status was assessed using the cobas EGFR Mutation Test. Erlotinib was administrated (150 mg/d) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicities occurred. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival....... Secondary endpoints were overall survival and response. RESULTS: Biopsies were retrieved from 467 patients, and mutation results obtained for 462. We identified 57 (12%) patients with EGFR mutations: 33 exon 19 deletions, 13 exon 21 mutations, 5 exon 18 mutations, 3 exon 20 insertions, 1 exon 20 point...

  19. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  20. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-01-04

    Jan 4, 2010 ... About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTA-.

  1. Rare and unexpected beta thalassemic mutations in Qazvin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    About 13 beta-globin mutations encompass 70 - 90% of mutation spectrum in Iran. These mutations are called common beta-globin mutations. The rest are rare or unknown mutations. The objective of this study was to identify and describe rare or unknown beta-globin mutations in Qazvin province. EDTAcontaining venous ...

  2. Oncogene mutational profile in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang ZC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Zi-Chen Zhang,1,* Sha Fu,1,* Fang Wang,1 Hai-Yun Wang,1 Yi-Xin Zeng,2 Jian-Yong Shao11Department of Molecular Diagnostics, 2Department of Experimental Research, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is a common tumor in Southern China, but the oncogene mutational status of NPC patients has not been clarified. Using time-of-flight mass spectrometry, 238 mutation hotspots in 19 oncogenes were examined in 123 NPC patients. The relationships between mutational status and clinical data were assessed with a χ2 or Fisher's exact test. Survival analysis was performed using the Kaplan–Meier method with the log-rank test. In 123 patients, 21 (17.1% NPC tumors were positive for mutations in eight oncogenes: six patients had PIK3CA mutations (4.9%, five NRAS mutations (4.1%, four KIT mutations (3.3%, two PDGFRA mutations (1.6%, two ABL mutations (1.6%, and one with simultaneous mutations in HRAS, EGFR, and BRAF (1%. Patients with mutations were more likely to relapse or develop metastasis than those with wild-type alleles (P=0.019. No differences or correlations were found in other clinical characteristics or in patient survival. No mutations were detected in oncogenes AKT1, AKT2, CDK, ERBB2, FGFR1, FGFR3, FLT3, JAK2, KRAS, MET, and RET. These results demonstrate an association between NPC and mutations in NRAS, KIT, PIK3CA, PDGFRA, and ABL, which are associated with patient relapse and metastasis. Keywords: NPC, oncogene, mutation

  3. Mutation analysis of Swedish haemophilia B families - high frequency of unique mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson, A; Letelier, A; Halldén, C; Ljung, R

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilia B is caused by a heterogeneous spectrum of mutations. Mutation characterization is important in genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and to predict risk of inhibitor development. To study the mutation spectrum, frequency of unique recurrent mutations, genotype-phenotype association and inhibitor development in a population-based study of the complete Swedish haemophilia B population. The study included, facilitated by centralized DNA diagnostics, the complete registered Swedish haemophilia B population (113 families: 47 severe, 22 moderate and 44 mild), each represented by a single patient. Mutation characterization was performed by conventional sequencing of all exons and haplotyping by genotyping of single nucleotide variants and microsatellites. A mutation was found in every family: eight had large deletions, three had small deletions (mutations were found and were predicted to be deleterious. Sixteen mutations (one total gene deletion, 14 substitutions and one acceptor splice site) were present in more than one family. Of the single nucleotide mutations (37/102), 36% arose at CpG sites. Haplotyping of families with identical mutations and present analyses showed that the frequency of unique mutations was at least 65%. Inhibitors developed in 9/47 (19%) patients with severe haemophilia B. The spectrum of haemophilia B mutations reveals at least 65% of the families carry a unique mutation, but with more inhibitor patients than reported internationally, probably as a result of many 'null' mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparison of uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). But little is known about the response to EGFR TKIs and the prognostic role of compound mutations. This study compared the uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation to characterize EGFR compound mutations and investigated their response to EGFR TKI treatment. We retrospectively screened 799 non-small-cell lung cancer patients from August 1, 2009 to June 1, 2012 by EGFR mutation testing. EGFR mutations were detected in 443 patients, with 22 (4.97%) compound mutations. Subsequently, six patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations and 18 paired patients with single L858R mutation were well characterized. Finally, we also analyzed the EGFR TKI treatment response and patients' outcomes of compound or single L858R mutations. There was no differential treatment effect on the disease control rate and objective response rate between the L858R compound mutations and single mutation groups. No significant difference in overall survival or progression-free survival of these two groups was found by log-rank test. In conclusion, we demonstrated that no significant difference was detected in the response to EGFR TKIs and patients' outcomes in the compound and single mutation groups.

  5. Cataract mutations and lens development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, J

    1999-03-01

    The lens plays an essential role for proper eye development. Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. Moreover, using mutations in particular genes the process of eye and lens development can be dissected into distinct steps. Therefore, three mouse mutants will be described in detail and discussed affecting three essential stages: formation of the lens vesicle, initiation of secondary lens fiber cell formation, and terminal differentiation of the secondary fiber cells. The mutant aphakia (ak) has been characterized by bilaterally apakic eyes [Varnum and Stevens (1968) J. Hered. 59, 147-150], and the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 [Varnum and Stevens (1975) Mouse News Letters 53, 35]. Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage 0.6 +/- 0.3 N cm proximal to the microsatellite marker D19Mit10. The linked gene Pax2, responsible for proper development of the posterior part of the eye and the optic nerve, was excluded as candidate gene by sequence analysis. Histological analysis of the homozygous ak mutants revealed a persisting lens stalk and subsequently the formation of lens rudiments. The lens defects led to irregular iris development and retinal folding. Congenital aphakia is known as a rare human anomaly. Besides a corneal dystrophy (CDTB), no corresponding disease is localized at the homologous region of human chromosome 10q23. The Cat3 mutations are characterized by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the beginning of secondary lens fiber cell differentiation at embryonic day 12.5. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and the iris, but the retina remains unaffected. Two mutant alleles of the Cat3 locus have been mapped to mouse chromosome 10 very close to the microsatellite markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95 (less than 0.3 cM). Since Cat3 is mapped to a position, which is homologous to human chromosome 12q21-24, the disorder cornea plana congenita can be considered

  6. Impacts of mutation effects and population size on mutation rate in asexual populations: a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In any natural population, mutation is the primary source of genetic variation required for evolutionary novelty and adaptation. Nevertheless, most mutations, especially those with phenotypic effects, are harmful and are consequently removed by natural selection. For this reason, under natural selection, an organism will evolve to a lower mutation rate. Overall, the action of natural selection on mutation rate is related to population size and mutation effects. Although theoretical work has intensively investigated the relationship between natural selection and mutation rate, most of these studies have focused on individual competition within a population, rather than on competition among populations. The aim of the present study was to use computer simulations to investigate how natural selection adjusts mutation rate among asexually reproducing subpopulations with different mutation rates. Results The competition results for the different subpopulations showed that a population could evolve to an "optimum" mutation rate during long-term evolution, and that this rate was modulated by both population size and mutation effects. A larger population could evolve to a higher optimum mutation rate than could a smaller population. The optimum mutation rate depended on both the fraction and the effects of beneficial mutations, rather than on the effects of deleterious ones. The optimum mutation rate increased with either the fraction or the effects of beneficial mutations. When strongly favored mutations appeared, the optimum mutation rate was elevated to a much higher level. The competition time among the subpopulations also substantially shortened. Conclusions Competition at the population level revealed that the evolution of the mutation rate in asexual populations was determined by both population size and mutation effects. The most striking finding was that beneficial mutations, rather than deleterious mutations, were the

  7. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2017-04-01

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design. Copyright © 2016 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Somatic mutations in aging, cancer and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott R; Loeb, Lawrence A; Herr, Alan J

    2012-04-01

    The somatic mutation theory of aging posits that the accumulation of mutations in the genetic material of somatic cells as a function of time results in a decrease in cellular function. In particular, the accumulation of random mutations may inactivate genes that are important for the functioning of the somatic cells of various organ systems of the adult, result in a decrease in organ function. When the organ function decreases below a critical level, death occurs. A significant amount of research has shown that somatic mutations play an important role in aging and a number of age related pathologies. In this review, we explore evidence for increases in somatic nuclear mutation burden with age and the consequences for aging, cancer, and neurodegeneration. We then review evidence for increases in mitochondrial mutation burden and the consequences for dysfunction in the disease processes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is The Ribosome Targeted By Adaptive Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimenez Fernandez, Alicia; Molin, Søren; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2015-01-01

    degree of evolutionary conservation of the cellular MMSM tend to support this view. However, under certain selective conditions the machinery itself may be targeted by adaptive mutations, which result in fitness-increasing phenotypic changes. Here we investigate and characterize the role of ribosomal...... mutations in adaptive evolution. Methods: Several mutations in ribosomal genes have been identified in the genome analysis of nearly 700 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from infected cystic fibrosis patients. Among these mutations we have repeatedly identified insertions, deletions and substitutions...... in specific ribosomal genes. The bacterial phenotypes of the mutated strains will be investigated. Results: Preliminary assays show that mutant strains have reduced growth rate and an altered antibiotic resistance pattern. The selection for mutations in ribosomal protein genes is partly explainable...

  10. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Simon, Ronald; Aguiar, Jennifer A.; Alkallas, Rached; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Zhang, Junyan; Watson, John D.; Chua, Melvin L. K.; Fraser, Michael; Favero, Francesco; Lawerenz, Chris; Plass, Christoph; Sauter, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer patients, and identify a median of one mitochondrial single-nucleotide variant (mtSNV) per patient. Some of these mtSNVs occur in recurrent mutational hotspots and associate with aggressive disease. Young...

  11. A new mutation in blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Cengiz; Basbozkurt, Gokalp; Gul, Davut; Demirkaya, Erkan; Gok, Faysal

    2015-01-01

    Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2-13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  12. The Mutational Robustness of Influenza A Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Visher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A virus' mutational robustness is described in terms of the strength and distribution of the mutational fitness effects, or MFE. The distribution of MFE is central to many questions in evolutionary theory and is a key parameter in models of molecular evolution. Here we define the mutational fitness effects in influenza A virus by generating 128 viruses, each with a single nucleotide mutation. In contrast to mutational scanning approaches, this strategy allowed us to unambiguously assign fitness values to individual mutations. The presence of each desired mutation and the absence of additional mutations were verified by next generation sequencing of each stock. A mutation was considered lethal only after we failed to rescue virus in three independent transfections. We measured the fitness of each viable mutant relative to the wild type by quantitative RT-PCR following direct competition on A549 cells. We found that 31.6% of the mutations in the genome-wide dataset were lethal and that the lethal fraction did not differ appreciably between the HA- and NA-encoding segments and the rest of the genome. Of the viable mutants, the fitness mean and standard deviation were 0.80 and 0.22 in the genome-wide dataset and best modeled as a beta distribution. The fitness impact of mutation was marginally lower in the segments coding for HA and NA (0.88 ± 0.16 than in the other 6 segments (0.78 ± 0.24, and their respective beta distributions had slightly different shape parameters. The results for influenza A virus are remarkably similar to our own analysis of CirSeq-derived fitness values from poliovirus and previously published data from other small, single stranded DNA and RNA viruses. These data suggest that genome size, and not nucleic acid type or mode of replication, is the main determinant of viral mutational fitness effects.

  13. Prevalent mutations in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jin-Tang

    2006-02-15

    Quantitative and structural genetic alterations cause the development and progression of prostate cancer. A number of genes have been implicated in prostate cancer by genetic alterations and functional consequences of the genetic alterations. These include the ELAC2 (HPC2), MSR1, and RNASEL (HPC1) genes that have germline mutations in familial prostate cancer; AR, ATBF1, EPHB2 (ERK), KLF6, mitochondria DNA, p53, PTEN, and RAS that have somatic mutations in sporadic prostate cancer; AR, BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2 (RAD53), CYP17, CYP1B1, CYP3A4, GSTM1, GSTP1, GSTT1, PON1, SRD5A2, and VDR that have germline genetic variants associated with either hereditary and/or sporadic prostate cancer; and ANXA7 (ANX7), KLF5, NKX3-1 (NKX3.1), CDKN1B (p27), and MYC that have genomic copy number changes affecting gene function. More genes relevant to prostate cancer remain to be identified in each of these gene groups. For the genes that have been identified, most need additional genetic, functional, and/or biochemical examination. Identification and characterization of these genes will be a key step for improving the detection and treatment of prostate cancer. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Mutational analysis of Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-01-01

    DNA helicases are biomolecular motors that convert the chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphate (usually ATP) into mechanical energy to unwind double-stranded DNA. The unwinding of double-stranded DNA is an essential process for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. Mutations in human RecQ helicases result in inherent human disease including Bloom's syndrome, Werner's syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a strong predisposition to a wide range of cancers commonly affecting the general population. In order to understand the molecular basis of BS pathology and the mechanism underlying the function of Bloom helicase, we have analyzed BS-causing missense mutations by a combination of structural modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and biochemical and biophysical approaches. Here, we describe the methods and protocols for measuring ATPase, ATP and DNA binding, DNA strand annealing, and DNA unwinding activities of Bloom protein and its mutant variants. These approaches should be applicable and useful for studying other helicases.

  15. Copy number variation and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  16. Mutational remodeling of enzyme specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, R; Agard, D A

    1991-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering techniques has come the ability to modify proteins as desired. Given this stunning capability, the question remains what residues should be altered, and how should they be changed to achieve a particular specificity pattern. The goals of such modifications are likely to fall into either of two categories: probing the function of a protein or attempting to alter its properties. In either case, our understanding of the consequences of a mutation, as ascertained by our ability to predict the results, is currently quite limited. The problem is extraordinarily complex; our understanding of how to calculate the energetics involved is still incomplete, and we are just beginning to accumulate experimental data which may help guide us. On the positive side, theoretical methods are now being developed and refined that should prove useful in the drive to engineer enzyme specificity. What may be most important at this juncture is to expand the experimental database interrelating sequence, function, and structure. That is, there should be a concerted effort to combine functional analysis of mutant proteins with structural analysis. Only from this combined examination of the effects of mutations can sufficient data be accumulated to test and improve both qualitative and quantitative approaches or methods for remodeling enzyme specificity.

  17. A frequent splicing mutation and novel missense mutations color the updated mutational spectrum of classic galactosemia in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Ana I; Ramos, Ruben; Gaspar, Ana; Costa, Cláudia; Oliveira, Anabela; Diogo, Luísa; Garcia, Paula; Paiva, Sandra; Martins, Esmeralda; Teles, Elisa Leão; Rodrigues, Esmeralda; Cardoso, M Teresa; Ferreira, Elena; Sequeira, Sílvia; Leite, Margarida; Silva, Maria João; de Almeida, Isabel Tavares; Vicente, João B; Rivera, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficient galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT) activity. Patients develop symptoms in the neonatal period, which can be ameliorated by dietary restriction of galactose. Many patients develop long-term complications, with a broad range of clinical symptoms whose pathophysiology is poorly understood. The high allelic heterogeneity of GALT gene that characterizes this disorder is thought to play a determinant role in biochemical and clinical phenotypes. We aimed to characterize the mutational spectrum of GALT deficiency in Portugal and to assess potential genotype-phenotype correlations. Direct sequencing of the GALT gene and in silico analyses were employed to evaluate the impact of uncharacterized mutations upon GALT functionality. Molecular characterization of 42 galactosemic Portuguese patients revealed a mutational spectrum comprising 14 nucleotide substitutions: ten missense, two nonsense and two putative splicing mutations. Sixteen different genotypic combinations were detected, half of the patients being p.Q188R homozygotes. Notably, the second most frequent variation is a splicing mutation. In silico predictions complemented by a close-up on the mutations in the protein structure suggest that uncharacterized missense mutations have cumulative point effects on protein stability, oligomeric state, or substrate binding. One splicing mutation is predicted to cause an alternative splicing event. This study reinforces the difficulty in establishing a genotype-phenotype correlation in classic galactosemia, a monogenic disease whose complex pathogenesis and clinical features emphasize the need to expand the knowledge on this "cloudy" disorder.

  18. APC mutation spectrum of Norwegian familial adenomatous polyposis families: high ratio of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Per Arne; Heimdal, Ketil; Aaberg, Kristin; Eklo, Katrine; Eklo, Kristin; Ariansen, Sarah; Silye, Alexandra; Fausa, Olav; Aabakken, Lars; Aretz, Stefan; Eide, Tor J; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias

    2009-10-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease caused by mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene. Massive formation of colorectal adenomas, of which some will inevitably develop into adenocarcinomas, is the hallmark of the disease. Characterization of causative APC mutations allows presymptomatic diagnosis, close follow-up and prophylactic intervention in families. To date more than 900 different germline mutations have been characterized worldwide demonstrating allelic heterogeneity. The germline mutation spectrum of APC identified in 69 apparently unrelated Norwegian FAP families are presented and discussed with reference to clinical phenotype and novel mutation rate. Different methods have been used over the years. However, all mutations were confirmed detectable by an implemented denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography screening approach. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was employed for potential gross rearrangements. Fifty-three distinctive mutations were detected, of which 22 have been detected in Norway exclusively. Except for two major deletion mutations encompassing the entire APC, all mutations resulted in premature truncation of translation caused by non-sense (31%) or change in reading frame (69%). A high ratio of novel APC mutations continues to contribute to APC mutation heterogeneity causing FAP. This is the first comprehensive report of APC germline mutation spectrum in Norway.

  19. FKRP mutations, including a founder mutation, cause phenotype variability in Chinese patients with dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaona; Yang, Haipo; Wei, Cuijie; Jiao, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Yang, Yanling; Han, Chunxi; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-12-01

    Mutations in the fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene have been associated with dystroglycanopathies, which are common in Europe but rare in Asia. Our study aimed to retrospectively analyze and characterize the clinical, myopathological and genetic features of 12 Chinese patients with FKRP mutations. Three patients were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy type 1C (MDC1C) and nine patients were diagnosed with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I). Three muscle biopsy specimens had dystrophic changes and reduced glycosylated α-dystroglycan staining, and two showed reduced expression of laminin α2. Two known and 13 novel mutations were identified in our single center cohort. Interestingly, the c.545A>G mutation was found in eight of the nine LGMD2I patients as a founder mutation and this founder mutation in Chinese patients differs from the one seen in European patients. Moreover, patients homozygous for the c.545A>G mutation were clinically asymptomatic, a less severe phenotype than in compound heterozygous patients with the c.545A>G mutation. The 13 novel mutations of FKRP significantly expanded the mutation spectrum of MDC1C and LGMD2I, and the different founder mutations indicate the ethnic difference in FKRP mutations.

  20. Studies of human mutation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neel, J.V.

    1990-01-01

    November 1989, marked the beginning of a new three-year cycle of DOE grant support, in connection with which the program underwent a major reorganization. This document presents the progress on the three objectives of the present program which are: to isolate by the technique of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-D PAGE), proteins of special interest because of the relative mutability of the corresponding gene, establish the identity of the protein, and, for selected proteins, move to a characterization of the corresponding gene; to develop a more efficient approach, based on 2-D PAGE, for the detection of variants in DNA, with special reference to the identification of mutations in the parents of the individual whose DNA is being examined; and, to continue an effective interface with the genetic studies on the children of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, with reference to both the planning and implementation of new studies at the molecular level.

  1. 'A' by Aspergillus terreus through mutation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest drug yielding isolate FCBP-58 was subjected to both physical and chemical mutation to increase the biosynthetic capabilities of Cyclosporin 'A'. In this study, mutation was carried out by ultraviolet radiation (254 nm) and alkylating agent ethylmethane sulphonate (EMS). UV 5 min time treatment was proved to be ...

  2. De novo mutations in human genetic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Brunner, H.G.

    2012-01-01

    New mutations have long been known to cause genetic disease, but their true contribution to the disease burden can only now be determined using family-based whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing approaches. In this Review we discuss recent findings suggesting that de novo mutations play a prominent

  3. The unfolding clinical spectrum of POLG mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M. J.; van den Bosch, B. J.; Jongen, E.; Hendrickx, A.; de Die-Smulders, C. E.; Hoogendijk, J. E.; Brusse, E.; de Visser, M.; Poll-The, B. T.; Bierau, J.; de Coo, I. F.; Smeets, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene are a major cause of clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases, associated with mtDNA depletion and multiple deletions. OBJECTIVE: To determine the spectrum of POLG mutations in our Dutch patient cohort, to evaluate the

  4. The unfolding clinical spectrum of POLG mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, M.J.; Bosch, B.J.; Jongen, E.; Hendrickx, A.; de Die-Smulders, C.E.; Hoogendijk, J.E.; Brusse, E.; de Visser, M.; Poll-The, B.T.; Bierau, J.; de Coo, I.F.; Smeets, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the DNA polymerase-gamma (POLG) gene are a major cause of clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial diseases, associated with mtDNA depletion and multiple deletions. Objective: To determine the spectrum of POLG mutations in our Dutch patient cohort, to evaluate the

  5. The mutation rate to Huntington's chorea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michael; Caro, Adrian

    1982-01-01

    The problems of estimating the mutation rate to Huntington's chorea, or the proportion of new mutants among all sufferers, are discussed. The available survey data are reviewed. The prevalence of sporadic phenotypes, which include new mutations, is probably less than 2·5%. New mutants probably make up around 0·1% or less of all sufferers. PMID:6213773

  6. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: mutations, functions and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Sancak (Ozgur)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the development of hamartomas in multiple organs and tissues. TSC is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. We searched for mutations in both genes in a cohort of 490 patients diagnosed

  7. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer pati...

  8. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... Three IOW-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene mutations were previously shown to cause familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) in up to 90% of affected. Afrikaners. Association of each mutation with a single chromosomal background provided molecular genetic evidence that the proposed 'founder ...

  9. Mutation of human cells by kerosene soot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skopek, T.R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA); Liber, H.L.; Kaden, D.A.; Hites, R.A.; Thilly, W.G.

    1979-08-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fraction of a kerosene soot induced forward mutation in human diploid lymphoblasts when coincubated with coincubated with Sprague-Dawley rat liver postmitochondrial supematant. Two components of the kerosene soot extract, benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and cyclopenta(cd)pyrene (CP), were also tested. BP was not mutagenic at the concentration found in the soot extract, although it was active at higher concentrations. The amount of CP present could account for approximately 8% of the total mutation observed with the soot. The results were compared to data obtained previously in a similar mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium. the protocol described permits the facile assay of mutation at the hgprt locus in human lymphoblasts; such mutation is induced by compounds or complex mixtures requiring mixed-function oxygenase activity for metabolism to genetically active derivatives.

  10. Hypomyelinating Leukodystrophy due to HSPD1 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusk, Maria Schioldan; Damgaard, Bodil; Risom, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    The hypomyelinating leukodystrophies (HMLs) encompass the X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) caused by PLP1 mutations and known as the classical form of HML as well as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease (PMLD) (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man [OMIM] 608804 and OMIM 260600) due to GJC2...... mutations. In addition, mutations in at least 10 other genes are known to cause HMLs. In 2008, an Israeli family with clinical and neuroimaging findings similar to those found in PMD was reported. The patients were found to have a homozygous missense mutation in HSPD1, encoding the mitochondrial heat......-shock protein 60 (Hsp60), and the disorder was defined as the autosomal recessive mitochondrial Hsp60 chaperonopathy (MitCHAP-60) disease. We here report the first case of this severe neurodegenerative disease since it was first described. Given the fact that the families carried the same mutation our patient...

  11. Latex allergy and filaggrin null mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Berit C; Meldgaard, Michael; Hamann, Dathan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Natural rubber latex (NRL) contains over 200 proteins of which 13 have been identified as allergens and the cause of type I latex allergy. Health care workers share a high occupational risk for developing latex allergy. Filaggrin null mutations increase the risk of type I sensitizations...... to aeroallergens and it is possible that filaggrin null mutations also increase the risk of latex allergy. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between filaggrin null mutations and type I latex allergy. Methods Twenty latex allergic and 24 non-latex allergic dentists and dental assistants......, occupationally exposed to latex, were genotyped for filaggrin null mutations R501X and 2282del4. Latex allergy was determined by a positive reaction or a historical positive reaction to a skin prick test with NRL. Results 41 individuals were successfully genotyped. Three individuals were filaggrin mutation...

  12. MT-CYB mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagen, Christian M; Aidt, Frederik H; Havndrup, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a characteristic of heart failure. Mutations in mitochondrial DNA, particularly in MT-CYB coding for cytochrome B in complex III (CIII), have been associated with isolated hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We hypothesized that MT-CYB mutations might play an important...... and m.15482T>C; p.S246P were identified. Modeling showed that the p.C93Y mutation leads to disruption of the tertiary structure of Cytb by helix displacement, interfering with protein-heme interaction. The p.S246P mutation induces a diproline structure, which alters local secondary structure and induces...... of HCM patients. We propose that further patients with HCM should be examined for mutations in MT-CYB in order to clarify the role of these variants....

  13. Somatic mutations in cerebral cortical malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamuar, Saumya S; Lam, Anh-Thu N; Kircher, Martin; D'Gama, Alissa M; Wang, Jian; Barry, Brenda J; Zhang, Xiaochang; Hill, Robert Sean; Partlow, Jennifer N; Rozzo, Aldo; Servattalab, Sarah; Mehta, Bhaven K; Topcu, Meral; Amrom, Dina; Andermann, Eva; Dan, Bernard; Parrini, Elena; Guerrini, Renzo; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Leventer, Richard J; Shen, Yiping; Wu, Bai Lin; Barkovich, A James; Sahin, Mustafa; Chang, Bernard S; Bamshad, Michael; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Poduri, Annapurna; Yu, Timothy W; Walsh, Christopher A

    2014-08-21

    Although there is increasing recognition of the role of somatic mutations in genetic disorders, the prevalence of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disease and the optimal techniques to detect somatic mosaicism have not been systematically evaluated. Using a customized panel of known and candidate genes associated with brain malformations, we applied targeted high-coverage sequencing (depth, ≥200×) to leukocyte-derived DNA samples from 158 persons with brain malformations, including the double-cortex syndrome (subcortical band heterotopia, 30 persons), polymicrogyria with megalencephaly (20), periventricular nodular heterotopia (61), and pachygyria (47). We validated candidate mutations with the use of Sanger sequencing and, for variants present at unequal read depths, subcloning followed by colony sequencing. Validated, causal mutations were found in 27 persons (17%; range, 10 to 30% for each phenotype). Mutations were somatic in 8 of the 27 (30%), predominantly in persons with the double-cortex syndrome (in whom we found mutations in DCX and LIS1), persons with periventricular nodular heterotopia (FLNA), and persons with pachygyria (TUBB2B). Of the somatic mutations we detected, 5 (63%) were undetectable with the use of traditional Sanger sequencing but were validated through subcloning and subsequent sequencing of the subcloned DNA. We found potentially causal mutations in the candidate genes DYNC1H1, KIF5C, and other kinesin genes in persons with pachygyria. Targeted sequencing was found to be useful for detecting somatic mutations in patients with brain malformations. High-coverage sequencing panels provide an important complement to whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing in the evaluation of somatic mutations in neuropsychiatric disease. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others.).

  14. The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) mutation list: a new online resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Amanda B; Miller, Connie H; Kelly, Fiona M; Michael Soucie, J; Craig Hooper, W

    2013-02-01

    Genotyping efforts in hemophilia A (HA) populations in many countries have identified large numbers of unique mutations in the Factor VIII gene (F8). To assist HA researchers conducting genotyping analyses, we have developed a listing of F8 mutations including those listed in existing locus-specific databases as well as those identified in patient populations and reported in the literature. Each mutation was reviewed and uniquely identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards for coding DNA and predicted protein changes as well as traditional nomenclature based on the mature, processed protein. Listings also include the associated hemophilia severity classified by International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) criteria, associations of the mutations with inhibitors, and reference information. The mutation list currently contains 2,537 unique mutations known to cause HA. HA severity caused by the mutation is available for 2,022 mutations (80%) and information on inhibitors is available for 1,816 mutations (72%). The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations for download and search and will be updated quarterly based on periodic literature reviews and submitted reports. Published 2012. This Article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. HPMV: human protein mutation viewer - relating sequence mutations to protein sequence architecture and function changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Westley Arthur; Kuchibhatla, Durga Bhavani; Limviphuvadh, Vachiranee; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2015-10-01

    Next-generation sequencing advances are rapidly expanding the number of human mutations to be analyzed for causative roles in genetic disorders. Our Human Protein Mutation Viewer (HPMV) is intended to explore the biomolecular mechanistic significance of non-synonymous human mutations in protein-coding genomic regions. The tool helps to assess whether protein mutations affect the occurrence of sequence-architectural features (globular domains, targeting signals, post-translational modification sites, etc.). As input, HPMV accepts protein mutations - as UniProt accessions with mutations (e.g. HGVS nomenclature), genome coordinates, or FASTA sequences. As output, HPMV provides an interactive cartoon showing the mutations in relation to elements of the sequence architecture. A large variety of protein sequence architectural features were selected for their particular relevance to mutation interpretation. Clicking a sequence feature in the cartoon expands a tree view of additional information including multiple sequence alignments of conserved domains and a simple 3D viewer mapping the mutation to known PDB structures, if available. The cartoon is also correlated with a multiple sequence alignment of similar sequences from other organisms. In cases where a mutation is likely to have a straightforward interpretation (e.g. a point mutation disrupting a well-understood targeting signal), this interpretation is suggested. The interactive cartoon can be downloaded as standalone viewer in Java jar format to be saved and viewed later with only a standard Java runtime environment. The HPMV website is: http://hpmv.bii.a-star.edu.sg/ .

  16. The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List: a New Online Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Amanda B.; Miller, Connie H.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Soucie, J. Michael; Hooper, W. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping efforts in hemophilia A (HA) populations in many countries have identified large numbers of unique mutations in the Factor VIII gene (F8). To assist HA researchers conducting genotyping analyses, we have developed a listing of F8 mutations including those listed in existing locus-specific databases as well as those identified in patient populations and reported in the literature. Each mutation was reviewed and uniquely identified using Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) nomenclature standards for coding DNA and predicted protein changes as well as traditional nomenclature based on the mature, processed protein. Listings also include the associated hemophilia severity classified by International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) criteria, associations of the mutations with inhibitors, and reference information. The mutation list currently contains 2,537 unique mutations known to cause HA. HA severity caused by the mutation is available for 2,022 mutations (80%) and information on inhibitors is available for 1,816 mutations (72%). The CDC Hemophilia A Mutation Project (CHAMP) Mutation List is available at http://www.cdc.gov/hemophiliamutations for download and search and will be updated quarterly based on periodic literature reviews and submitted reports. PMID:23280990

  17. Mutation profiling of adenoid cystic carcinomas from multiple anatomical sites identifies mutations in the RAS pathway, but no KIT mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterskog, Daniel; Wilkerson, Paul M; Rodrigues, Daniel N; Lambros, Maryou B; Fritchie, Karen; Andersson, Mattias K; Natrajan, Rachael; Gauthier, Arnaud; Di Palma, Silvana; Shousha, Sami; Gatalica, Zoran; Töpfer, Chantal; Vukovic, Vesna; A’Hern, Roger; Weigelt, Britta; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Stenman, Göran; Rubin, Brian P; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2016-01-01

    Aims The majority of adenoid cystic carcinomas (AdCCs), regardless of anatomical site, harbour the MYB–NFIB fusion gene. The aim of this study was to characterize the repertoire of somatic genetic events affecting known cancer genes in AdCCs. Methods and results DNA was extracted from 13 microdissected breast AdCCs, and subjected to a mutation survey using the Sequenom OncoCarta Panel v1.0. Genes found to be mutated in any of the breast AdCCs and genes related to the same canonical molecular pathways, as well as KIT, a proto-oncogene whose protein product is expressed in AdCCs, were sequenced in an additional 68 AdCCs from various anatomical sites by Sanger sequencing. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY platform and Sanger sequencing, mutations in BRAF and HRAS were identified in three and one cases, respectively (breast, and head and neck). KIT, which has previously been reported to be mutated in AdCCs, was also investigated, but no mutations were identified. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that mutations in genes pertaining to the canonical RAS pathway are found in a minority of AdCCs, and that activating KIT mutations are either absent or remarkably rare in these cancers, and unlikely to constitute a driver and therapeutic target for patients with AdCC. PMID:23398044

  18. Fitness is strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect in a microbial mutation accumulation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Karl; Toll-Riera, Macarena; Kojadinovic, Mila; MacLean, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary consequences of mutation relies heavily on estimates of the rate and fitness effect of spontaneous mutations generated by mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. We performed a classic MA experiment in which frequent sampling of MA lines was combined with whole genome resequencing to develop a high-resolution picture of the effect of spontaneous mutations in a hypermutator (ΔmutS) strain of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After ∼644 generations of mutation accumulation, MA lines had accumulated an average of 118 mutations, and we found that average fitness across all lines decayed linearly over time. Detailed analyses of the dynamics of fitness change in individual lines revealed that a large fraction of the total decay in fitness (42.3%) was attributable to the fixation of rare, highly deleterious mutations (comprising only 0.5% of fixed mutations). Furthermore, we found that at least 0.64% of mutations were beneficial and probably fixed due to positive selection. The majority of mutations that fixed (82.4%) were base substitutions and we failed to find any signatures of selection on nonsynonymous or intergenic mutations. Short indels made up a much smaller fraction of the mutations that were fixed (17.4%), but we found evidence of strong selection against indels that caused frameshift mutations in coding regions. These results help to quantify the amount of natural selection present in microbial MA experiments and demonstrate that changes in fitness are strongly influenced by rare mutations of large effect. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. Dynamics and Fate of Beneficial Mutations Under Lineage Contamination by Linked Deleterious Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pénisson, Sophie; Singh, Tanya; Sniegowski, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Beneficial mutations drive adaptive evolution, yet their selective advantage does not ensure their fixation. Haldane’s application of single-type branching process theory showed that genetic drift alone could cause the extinction of newly arising beneficial mutations with high probability. With linkage, deleterious mutations will affect the dynamics of beneficial mutations and might further increase their extinction probability. Here, we model the lineage dynamics of a newly arising beneficial mutation as a multitype branching process. Our approach accounts for the combined effects of drift and the stochastic accumulation of linked deleterious mutations, which we call lineage contamination. We first study the lineage-contamination phenomenon in isolation, deriving dynamics and survival probabilities (the complement of extinction probabilities) of beneficial lineages. We find that survival probability is zero when U≳sb, where U is deleterious mutation rate and sb is the selective advantage of the beneficial mutation in question, and is otherwise depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by ∼1−U/sb. We then put the lineage contamination phenomenon into the context of an evolving population by incorporating the effects of background selection. We find that, under the combined effects of lineage contamination and background selection, ensemble survival probability is never zero but is depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by e−εU/s¯b, where s¯b is mean selective advantage of beneficial mutations, and ε=1−e−1≈0.63. This factor, and other bounds derived from it, are independent of the fitness effects of deleterious mutations. At high enough mutation rates, lineage contamination can depress fixation probabilities to values that approach zero. This fact suggests that high mutation rates can, perhaps paradoxically, (1) alleviate competition among beneficial mutations, or (2) potentially even shut

  20. In vivo transgenic mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybaud, Véronique; Dean, Stephen; Nohmi, Takehiko; de Boer, Johan; Douglas, George R; Glickman, Barry W; Gorelick, Nancy J; Heddle, John A; Heflich, Robert H; Lambert, Iain; Martus, Hans-Jörg; Mirsalis, Jon C; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yajima, Nobuhiro

    2003-10-07

    Transgenic rodent gene-mutation models provide relatively quick and statistically reliable assays for gene mutations in the DNA from any tissue. This report summarizes those issues that have been agreed upon at a previous IWGT meeting [Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 35 (2000) 253], and discusses in depth those issues for which no consensus was reached before. It was previously agreed that for regulatory applications, assays should be based upon neutral genes, be generally available in several laboratories, and be readily transferable. For phage-based assays, five to ten animals per group should be analyzed, assuming a spontaneous mutant frequency (MF) of approximately 3x10(-5) mutants/locus and 125,000-300,000 plaque or colony forming units (pfu or cfu) per tissue per animal. A full set of data should be generated for a vehicle control and two dose groups. Concurrent positive control animals are only necessary during validation, but positive control DNA must be included in each plating. Tissues should be processed and analyzed in a blocked design, where samples from negative control, positive control and each treatment group are processed together. The total number of pfus or cfus and the MF for each tissue and animal are reported. Statistical tests should consider the animal as the experimental unit. Nonparametric statistical tests are recommended. A positive result is a statistically significant dose-response and/or statistically significant increase in any dose group compared to concurrent negative controls using an appropriate statistical model. A negative result is a statistically non-significant change, with all mean MFs within two standard deviations of the control. During the current workshop, a general protocol was agreed in which animals are treated daily for 28 consecutive days and tissues sampled 3 days after the final treatment. This recommendation could be modified by reducing or increasing the number of treatments or the length of the treatment period, when

  1. Spontaneous deleterious mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, S T; Lynch, M; Willis, J H

    1999-09-28

    The frequency and selective impact of deleterious mutations are fundamental parameters in evolutionary theory, yet they have not been directly measured in a plant species. To estimate these quantities, we allowed spontaneous mutations to accumulate for 10 generations in 1,000 inbred lines of the annual, self-fertilizing plant Arabidopsis thaliana and assayed fitness differences between generations 0 and 10 in a common garden. Germination rate, fruit set, and number of seeds per fruit each declined by less than 1% per generation in the mutation lines, and total fitness declined by 0.9% per generation. Among-line variances increased in the mutation lines for all traits. Application of an equal-effects model suggests a downwardly biased genomic deleterious mutation rate of 0.1 and a upwardly biased effect of individual mutations on total fitness of 20%. This genomic deleterious mutation rate is consistent with estimates of nucleotide substitution rates in flowering plants, the genome size of Arabidopsis, and the equilibrium inbreeding depression observed in this highly selfing plant species.

  2. Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aalt D J van Dijk

    Full Text Available Mutational robustness of gene regulatory networks refers to their ability to generate constant biological output upon mutations that change network structure. Such networks contain regulatory interactions (transcription factor-target gene interactions but often also protein-protein interactions between transcription factors. Using computational modeling, we study factors that influence robustness and we infer several network properties governing it. These include the type of mutation, i.e. whether a regulatory interaction or a protein-protein interaction is mutated, and in the case of mutation of a regulatory interaction, the sign of the interaction (activating vs. repressive. In addition, we analyze the effect of combinations of mutations and we compare networks containing monomeric with those containing dimeric transcription factors. Our results are consistent with available data on biological networks, for example based on evolutionary conservation of network features. As a novel and remarkable property, we predict that networks are more robust against mutations in monomer than in dimer transcription factors, a prediction for which analysis of conservation of DNA binding residues in monomeric vs. dimeric transcription factors provides indirect evidence.

  3. KRAS and BRAF mutations in anal carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup-Hansen, Eva; Linnemann, Dorte; Høgdall, Estrid

    2015-01-01

    The EGF receptor (EGFR) is expressed in most cases of anal carcinomas. Anecdotal benefit from EGFR-targeted therapy has been reported in anal cancer and a negative correlation with Kirsten Ras (KRAS) mutation status has been proposed. The purpose of this retrospective study was to investigate...... the frequency and the prognostic value of KRAS and BRAF mutations in a large cohort of patients with anal cancer. One hundred and ninety-three patients with T1-4N0-3M0-1 anal carcinoma were included in the study. Patients were treated with curative (92%) or palliative intent (8%) between January 2000...... and January 2010. KRAS mutations were detected using Therascreen(®)KRAS real-time PCR assay (Qiagen) and V600E or V600D/K BRAF mutations were uncovered using Pyrosequencing. The frequency of KRAS and BRAF mutations was low; KRAS mutations were detected in 1.6% and BRAF mutations in 4.7% of the biopsies...

  4. RNAmute: RNA secondary structure mutation analysis tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Danny

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAMute is an interactive Java application that calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations, given an RNA sequence, and organizes them into categories according to their similarity with respect to the wild type predicted structure. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. Several alternatives are used for the categorization of single point mutations: Vienna's RNAdistance based on dot-bracket representation, as well as tree edit distance and second eigenvalue of the Laplacian matrix based on Shapiro's coarse grain tree graph representation. Results Selecting a category in each one of the processed tables lists all single point mutations belonging to that category. Selecting a mutation displays a graphical drawing of the single point mutation and the wild type, and includes basic information such as associated energies, representations and distances. RNAMute can be used successfully with very little previous experience and without choosing any parameter value alongside the initial RNA sequence. The package runs under LINUX operating system. Conclusion RNAMute is a user friendly tool that can be used to predict single point mutations leading to conformational rearrangements in the secondary structure of RNAs. In several cases of substantial interest, notably in virology, a point mutation may lead to a loss of important functionality such as the RNA virus replication and translation initiation because of a conformational rearrangement in the secondary structure.

  5. Predicting resistance mutations using protein design algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Kathleen M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Donald, Bruce R; Anderson, Amy C

    2010-08-03

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  6. Benchmarking infrastructure for mutation text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Experimental research on the automatic extraction of information about mutations from texts is greatly hindered by the lack of consensus evaluation infrastructure for the testing and benchmarking of mutation text mining systems. Results We propose a community-oriented annotation and benchmarking infrastructure to support development, testing, benchmarking, and comparison of mutation text mining systems. The design is based on semantic standards, where RDF is used to represent annotations, an OWL ontology provides an extensible schema for the data and SPARQL is used to compute various performance metrics, so that in many cases no programming is needed to analyze results from a text mining system. While large benchmark corpora for biological entity and relation extraction are focused mostly on genes, proteins, diseases, and species, our benchmarking infrastructure fills the gap for mutation information. The core infrastructure comprises (1) an ontology for modelling annotations, (2) SPARQL queries for computing performance metrics, and (3) a sizeable collection of manually curated documents, that can support mutation grounding and mutation impact extraction experiments. Conclusion We have developed the principal infrastructure for the benchmarking of mutation text mining tasks. The use of RDF and OWL as the representation for corpora ensures extensibility. The infrastructure is suitable for out-of-the-box use in several important scenarios and is ready, in its current state, for initial community adoption. PMID:24568600

  7. RET mutations in MEN 2 associated diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstra, R.M.W.; Stelwagen, T.; Stulp, R.P. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) comprises three clinically distinct dominantly inherited cancer syndromes namely MEN 2A, MEN 2B and familial medullary thyroid carcinoma (FMTC). Germline (point) mutations of the RET proto-oncogene have been reported to occur in all these syndromes. In MEN 2A and FMTC patients the mutations occurred within codons specifying cysteine residues in the transition of the RET extracellular and transmembrane domains, while in MEN 2B patients we could detect a single RET mutation in the tyrosine kinase domain in all patients. Also in patients suffering from Hirschsprung`s disease (HSCR), mutations in the RET gene have been found. These mutations are spread all over the gene. Several families have been described in which MEN 2 and HSCR are associated. MEN 2A is also found associated with cutaneous lichen amyloidosis (CLA). It might be that specific RET mutations correlate with these disease associations. We therefore scanned DNA from patients from a family with MEN 2A and HSCR, MEN 2A and CLA and CLA only for RET mutations. Results obtained thus far do not support the existence of specific correlations.

  8. Detailed review of transgenic rodent mutation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Iain B; Singer, Timothy M; Boucher, Sherri E; Douglas, George R

    2005-09-01

    Induced chromosomal and gene mutations play a role in carcinogenesis and may be involved in the production of birth defects and other disease conditions. While it is widely accepted that in vivo mutation assays are more relevant to the human condition than are in vitro assays, our ability to evaluate mutagenesis in vivo in a broad range of tissues has historically been quite limited. The development of transgenic rodent (TGR) mutation models has given us the ability to detect, quantify, and sequence mutations in a range of somatic and germ cells. This document provides a comprehensive review of the TGR mutation assay literature and assesses the potential use of these assays in a regulatory context. The information is arranged as follows. (1) TGR mutagenicity models and their use for the analysis of gene and chromosomal mutation are fully described. (2) The principles underlying current OECD tests for the assessment of genotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, and also nontransgenic assays available for assessment of gene mutation, are described. (3) All available information pertaining to the conduct of TGR assays and important parameters of assay performance have been tabulated and analyzed. (4) The performance of TGR assays, both in isolation and as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term genotoxicity tests, in predicting carcinogenicity is described. (5) Recommendations are made regarding the experimental parameters for TGR assays, and the use of TGR assays in a regulatory context.

  9. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Melanoma: from mutations to medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Hensin; Chin, Lynda; Garraway, Levi A.; Fisher, David E.

    2012-01-01

    Melanoma is often considered one of the most aggressive and treatment-resistant human cancers. It is a disease that, due to the presence of melanin pigment, was accurately diagnosed earlier than most other malignancies and that has been subjected to countless therapeutic strategies. Aside from early surgical resection, no therapeutic modality has been found to afford a high likelihood of curative outcome. However, discoveries reported in recent years have revealed a near avalanche of breakthroughs in the melanoma field—breakthroughs that span fundamental understanding of the molecular basis of the disease all the way to new therapeutic strategies that produce unquestionable clinical benefit. These discoveries have been born from the successful fruits of numerous researchers working in many—sometimes-related, although also distinct—biomedical disciplines. Discoveries of frequent mutations involving BRAF(V600E), developmental and oncogenic roles for the microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) pathway, clinical efficacy of BRAF-targeted small molecules, and emerging mechanisms underlying resistance to targeted therapeutics represent just a sample of the findings that have created a striking inflection in the quest for clinically meaningful progress in the melanoma field. PMID:22661227

  11. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy clinical phenotype is independent of gene mutation and mutation dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Shiv Kumar; Sanders, Heather K; McNamara, James W; Jagadeesan, Aravindakshan; Jahangir, Arshad; Tajik, A Jamil; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2017-01-01

    Over 1,500 gene mutations are known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Previous studies suggest that cardiac β-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) gene mutations are commonly associated with a more severe phenotype, compared to cardiac myosin binding protein-C (MYBPC3) gene mutations with milder phenotype, incomplete penetrance and later age of onset. Compound mutations can worsen the phenotype. This study aimed to validate these comparative differences in a large cohort of individuals and families with HCM. We performed genome-phenome correlation among 80 symptomatic HCM patients, 35 asymptomatic carriers and 35 non-carriers, using an 18-gene clinical diagnostic HCM panel. A total of 125 mutations were identified in 14 genes. MYBPC3 and MYH7 mutations contributed to 50.0% and 24.4% of the HCM patients, respectively, suggesting that MYBPC3 mutations were the most frequent cause of HCM in our cohort. Double mutations were found in only nine HCM patients (7.8%) who were phenotypically indistinguishable from single-mutation carriers. Comparisons of clinical parameters of MYBPC3 and MYH7 mutants were not statistically significant, but asymptomatic carriers had high left ventricular ejection fraction and diastolic dysfunction when compared to non-carriers. The presence of double mutations increases the risk for symptomatic HCM with no change in severity, as determined in this study subset. The pathologic effects of MYBPC3 and MYH7 were found to be independent of gene mutation location. Furthermore, HCM pathology is independent of protein domain disruption in both MYBPC3 and MYH7. These data provide evidence that MYBPC3 mutations constitute the preeminent cause of HCM and that they are phenotypically indistinguishable from HCM caused by MYH7 mutations.

  12. p53 mutations in urinary bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, P; Steineck, G; Adolfsson, J; Hansson, J; Jansson, O; Larsson, P; Sandstedt, B; Wijkstr?m, H; Hemminki, K

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for mutations in exons 5?8 of the p53 gene in a series consisting of 189 patients with urinary bladder neoplasms. 82 (44%) neoplasms were lowly malignant (Ta, G1?G2a) and 106 (56%) were highly malignant (G2b?G4 or ?T1). Only one mutation was in a lowly malignant urinary bladder neoplasm, in total we found p53 mutations in 26 (14%) of the 189 patients. 30% of the samples had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for one or both of the p53 exogenic (CA)n repeat and the p53 intragenic (A...

  13. A New Mutation in Blau Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Zeybek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blau syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant, granulomatous autoinflammatory disease. The classic triad of the disease includes recurrent uveitis, granulomatous dermatitis, and symmetrical arthritis. Blau syndrome is related to mutations located at the 16q12.2–13 gene locus. To date, 11 NOD2 gene mutations causing Blau syndrome have been described. Here, we describe a 5-year-old male patient who presented with Blau syndrome associated with a novel sporadic gene mutation that has not been reported previously.

  14. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  15. Discovery of mutations for Mendelian disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-06-01

    Mendelian mutations are the most medically actionable variants in the human genome and have always played a central role in its functional annotation. Despite the relative ease with which Mendelian mutations are identified compared to other classes of variants, the pace of their discovery has until recently been slow. However, recent technological advances in genomic sequencing have made the prospect of identifying all genes that can harbor Mendelian mutations an achievable near-term goal. The many lessons learned from previous discoveries of Mendelian mutations should inform future studies as I will discuss in this review. Also discussed are some of the challenges that will gain more prominence as we approach the last phase of the effort to map all Mendelian genes.

  16. A new view of genetic mutations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jean-François Picimbon

    2017-01-01

    ...: chemosensory proteins (CSPs) and odour binding protein (OBP) families. It is worthy to note that these RNA variants are not disease-causing mutations but rather an evolutionary mechanism in microorganisms and insects...

  17. Recurrent LDL-receptor mutation causes familial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1995-05-05

    May 5, 1995 ... amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS)" and single- strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method." SSCP analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products amplified with exon 9-specific oligonucleotides. N2 (5'-GCTCCATCGCCTACCTCTIC-3') and A2 (5'-.

  18. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in Parkinson's disease brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David K Simon; Joanne Clark Matott; Janaina Espinosa; Neeta A Abraham

    2017-01-01

    Dear Editors, We read with interest the publication by Wei et al., Mitochondrial DNA Point Mutations and Relative Copy Number in 1363 Disease and Control Human Brains, Acta Neuropathol Commun. 2017; 5: 13 [4...

  20. Geneticists Repair Mutation in Human Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... broke the mutated gene using a technology called CRISPR-Cas9. Essentially, the process uses genetic techniques to target ... like a pair of molecular scissors. Until now, CRISPR-Cas9 has been used as a lab tool to ...

  1. Titin mutation in familial restrictive cardiomyopathy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peled, Yael; Gramlich, Michael; Yoskovitz, Guy; Feinberg, Micha S; Afek, Arnon; Polak-Charcon, Sylvie; Pras, Elon; Sela, Ben-Ami; Konen, Eli; Weissbrod, Omer; Geiger, Dan; Gordon, Paul M K; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Freimark, Dov; Gerull, Brenda; Arad, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ...). Other genes associated with RCM include the desmin and familial amyloidosis genes. In the present study we describe familial RCM with severe heart failure triggered by a de novo mutation in TTN, encoding the huge muscle filament protein titin...

  2. Mutations of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS): An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Bani Bandana; Kadam, N N

    2016-01-01

    The plethora of knowledge gained on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), a heterogeneous pre-malignant disorder of hematopoietic stem cells, through sequencing of several pathway genes has unveiled molecular pathogenesis and its progression to AML. Evolution of phenotypic classification and risk-stratification based on peripheral cytopenias and blast count has moved to five-tier risk-groups solely concerning chromosomal aberrations. Increased frequency of complex abnormalities, which is associated with genetic instability, defines the subgroup of worst prognosis in MDS. However, the independent effect of monosomal karyotype remains controversial. Recent discoveries on mutations in RNA-splicing machinery (SF3B1, SRSF2, ZRSR2, U2AF1, U2AF2); DNA methylation (TET2, DNMT3A, IDH1/2); chromatin modification (ASXL1, EZH2); transcription factor (TP53, RUNX1); signal transduction/kinases (FLT3, JAK2); RAS pathway (KRAS, NRAS, CBL, NF1, PTPN11); cohesin complex (STAG2, CTCF, SMC1A, RAD21); DNA repair (ATM, BRCC3, DLRE1C, FANCL); and other pathway genes have given insights into the independent effects and interaction of co-occurrence of mutations on disease-phenotype. RNA-splicing and DNA methylation mutations appeared to occur early and are reported as 'founder' mutations in over 50% MDS patients. TET2 mutation, through altered DNA methylation, has been found to have independent prognostic response to hypomethylating agents. Moreover, presence of DNMT3A, TET2 and ASXL1 mutations in normal elderly individuals forms the basis of understanding that accumulation of somatic mutations may not cause direct disease-development; however, cooperation with other mutations in the genes that are frequently mutated in myeloid and other hematopoietic cancers might result in clonal expansion through self-renewal and/or proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Identification of small molecules as inhibitors of epigenetic mutations has opened avenues for tailoring targeted drug development. The

  3. Normal mutation rate variants arise in a Mutator (Mut S Escherichia coli population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Carmen Turrientes

    Full Text Available The rate at which mutations are generated is central to the pace of evolution. Although this rate is remarkably similar amongst all cellular organisms, bacterial strains with mutation rates 100 fold greater than the modal rates of their species are commonly isolated from natural sources and emerge in experimental populations. Theoretical studies postulate and empirical studies teort the hypotheses that these "mutator" strains evolved in response to selection for elevated rates of generation of inherited variation that enable bacteria to adapt to novel and/or rapidly changing environments. Less clear are the conditions under which selection will favor reductions in mutation rates. Declines in rates of mutation for established populations of mutator bacteria are not anticipated if such changes are attributed to the costs of augmented rates of generation of deleterious mutations. Here we report experimental evidence of evolution towards reduced mutation rates in a clinical isolate of Escherichia coli with an hyper-mutable phenotype due a deletion in a mismatch repair gene, (ΔmutS. The emergence in a ΔmutS background of variants with mutation rates approaching those of the normal rates of strains carrying wild-type MutS was associated with increase in fitness with respect to ancestral strain. We postulate that such an increase in fitness could be attributed to the emergence of mechanisms driving a permanent "aerobic style of life", the negative consequence of this behavior being regulated by the evolution of mechanisms protecting the cell against increased endogenous oxidative radicals involved in DNA damage, and thus reducing mutation rate. Gene expression assays and full sequencing of evolved mutator and normo-mutable variants supports the hypothesis. In conclusion, we postulate that the observed reductions in mutation rate are coincidental to, rather than, the selective force responsible for this evolution.

  4. Optimal Mutation Rates on Static Fitness Landscpes

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, M.

    2000-01-01

    We study the evolution of mutation rates for an asexual population living on a static fitness landscape, consisting of multiple peaks forming an evolutionary staircase. The optimal mutation rate is found by maximizing the diffusion towards higher fitness. Surprisingly the optimal genomic copying fidelity is given by Q = e^(-1/ln(n)) (where n is the genome length), independent of all other parameters in the model. Simulations confirm this theoretical result. We also discuss the relation betwee...

  5. Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) mutations in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Jiayi; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a persistent inflammatory disorder characterized by destruction of the pancreatic parenchyma, maldigestion, and chronic pain. Mutations in the CTRC gene encoding the digestive enzyme chymotrypsin C have been shown to increase the risk of chronic pancreatitis in European and Asian populations. Here we review the biochemical properties and physiological functions of human CTRC; summarize the functional defects associated with CTRC mutations and discuss mechanistic models...

  6. TILLING to detect induced mutations in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jennifer L; Till, Bradley J; Laport, Robert G; Darlow, Margaret C; Kleffner, Justin M; Jamai, Aziz; El-Mellouki, Tarik; Liu, Shiming; Ritchie, Rae; Nielsen, Niels; Bilyeu, Kristin D; Meksem, Khalid; Comai, Luca; Henikoff, Steven

    2008-01-24

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) is an important nitrogen-fixing crop that provides much of the world's protein and oil. However, the available tools for investigation of soybean gene function are limited. Nevertheless, chemical mutagenesis can be applied to soybean followed by screening for mutations in a target of interest using a strategy known as Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING). We have applied TILLING to four mutagenized soybean populations, three of which were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and one with N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU). We screened seven targets in each population and discovered a total of 116 induced mutations. The NMU-treated population and one EMS mutagenized population had similar mutation density (approximately 1/140 kb), while another EMS population had a mutation density of approximately 1/250 kb. The remaining population had a mutation density of approximately 1/550 kb. Because of soybean's polyploid history, PCR amplification of multiple targets could impede mutation discovery. Indeed, one set of primers tested in this study amplified more than a single target and produced low quality data. To address this problem, we removed an extraneous target by pretreating genomic DNA with a restriction enzyme. Digestion of the template eliminated amplification of the extraneous target and allowed the identification of four additional mutant alleles compared to untreated template. The development of four independent populations with considerable mutation density, together with an additional method for screening closely related targets, indicates that soybean is a suitable organism for high-throughput mutation discovery even with its extensively duplicated genome.

  7. TILLING to detect induced mutations in soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Niels

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. is an important nitrogen-fixing crop that provides much of the world's protein and oil. However, the available tools for investigation of soybean gene function are limited. Nevertheless, chemical mutagenesis can be applied to soybean followed by screening for mutations in a target of interest using a strategy known as Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes (TILLING. We have applied TILLING to four mutagenized soybean populations, three of which were treated with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS and one with N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU. Results We screened seven targets in each population and discovered a total of 116 induced mutations. The NMU-treated population and one EMS mutagenized population had similar mutation density (~1/140 kb, while another EMS population had a mutation density of ~1/250 kb. The remaining population had a mutation density of ~1/550 kb. Because of soybean's polyploid history, PCR amplification of multiple targets could impede mutation discovery. Indeed, one set of primers tested in this study amplified more than a single target and produced low quality data. To address this problem, we removed an extraneous target by pretreating genomic DNA with a restriction enzyme. Digestion of the template eliminated amplification of the extraneous target and allowed the identification of four additional mutant alleles compared to untreated template. Conclusion The development of four independent populations with considerable mutation density, together with an additional method for screening closely related targets, indicates that soybean is a suitable organism for high-throughput mutation discovery even with its extensively duplicated genome.

  8. Homozygous Desmocollin-2 Mutations and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzon, Alessandra; Pilichou, Kalliopi; Rigato, Ilaria; Vazza, Giovanni; De Bortoli, Marzia; Calore, Martina; Occhi, Gianluca; Carturan, Elisa; Lazzarini, Elisabetta; Cason, Marco; Mazzotti, Elisa; Poloni, Giulia; Mostacciuolo, Maria Luisa; Daliento, Luciano; Thiene, Gaetano; Corrado, Domenico; Basso, Cristina; Bauce, Barbara; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-10-15

    Dominant mutations in desmocollin-2 (DSC2) gene cause arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM), a progressive heart muscle disease characterized by ventricular tachyarrhythmias, heart failure, and risk of juvenile sudden death. Recessive mutations are rare and are associated with a cardiac or cardiocutaneous phenotype. Here, we evaluated the impact of a homozygous founder DSC2 mutation on clinical expression of ACM. An exon-by-exon analysis of the DSC2 coding region was performed in 94 ACM index patients. The c.536A>G (p.D179G) mutation was identified in 5 patients (5.3%), 4 of which resulted to be homozygous carriers. The 5 subjects shared a conserved haplotype, strongly indicating a common founder. Genetic and clinical investigation of probands' families revealed that p.D179G homozygous carriers displayed severe forms of biventricular cardiomyopathy without hair or skin abnormalities. The only heterozygous proband, who carried an additional variant of unknown significance in αT-catenin gene, showed a mild form of ACM without left ventricular involvement. All heterozygous family members were clinically asymptomatic. In conclusion, this is the first homozygous founder mutation in DSC2 gene identified among Italian ACM probands. Our findings provide further evidence of the occurrence of recessive DSC2 mutations in patients with ACM predominantly presenting with biventricular forms of the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A novel MERTK mutation causing retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khersan, Hasenin; Shah, Kaanan P; Jung, Segun C; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi K; Grassi, Michael A

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous inherited retinal dystrophy. To date, over 80 genes have been implicated in RP. However, the disease demonstrates significant locus and allelic heterogeneity not entirely captured by current testing platforms. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the underlying mutation in a patient with RP without a molecular diagnosis after initial genetic testing. Whole-exome sequencing of the affected proband was performed. Candidate gene mutations were selected based on adherence to expected genetic inheritance pattern and predicted pathogenicity. Sanger sequencing of MERTK was completed on the patient's unaffected mother, affected brother, and unaffected sister to determine genetic phase. Eight sequence variants were identified in the proband in known RP-associated genes. Sequence analysis revealed that the proband was a compound heterozygote with two independent mutations in MERTK, a novel nonsense mutation (c.2179C > T) and a previously reported missense variant (c.2530C > T). The proband's affected brother also had both mutations. Predicted phase was confirmed in unaffected family members. Our study identifies a novel nonsense mutation in MERTK in a family with RP and no prior molecular diagnosis. The present study also demonstrates the clinical value of exome sequencing in determining the genetic basis of Mendelian diseases when standard genetic testing is unsuccessful.

  10. The Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruti Parvari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiomyopathy is an important cause of heart failure and a major indication for heart transplantation in children and adults. This paper describes the state of the genetic knowledge of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. The identification of the causing mutation is important since presymptomatic interventions of DCM have proven value in preventing morbidity and mortality. Additionally, as in general in genetic studies, the identification of the mutated genes has a direct clinical impact for the families and population involved. Identifying causative mutations immediately amplifies the possibilities for disease prevention through carrier screening and prenatal testing. This often lifts a burden of social isolation from affected families, since healthy family members can be assured of having healthy children. Identification of the mutated genes holds the potential to lead to the understanding of disease etiology, pathophysiology, and therefore potential therapy. This paper presents the genetic variations, or disease-causing mutations, contributing to the pathogenesis of hereditary DCM, and tries to relate these to the functions of the mutated genes.

  11. Apparent directional selection by biased pleiotropic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yoshinari

    2010-07-01

    Pleiotropic effects of deleterious mutations are considered to be among the factors responsible for genetic constraints on evolution by long-term directional selection acting on a quantitative trait. If pleiotropic phenotypic effects are biased in a particular direction, mutations generate apparent directional selection, which refers to the covariance between fitness and the trait owing to a linear association between the number of mutations possessed by individuals and the genotypic values of the trait. The present analysis has shown how the equilibrium mean value of the trait is determined by a balance between directional selection and biased pleiotropic mutations. Assuming that genes act additively both on the trait and on fitness, the total variance-standardized directional selection gradient was decomposed into apparent and true components. Experimental data on mutation bias from the bristle traits of Drosophila and life history traits of Daphnia suggest that apparent selection explains a small but significant fraction of directional selection pressure that is observed in nature; the data suggest that changes induced in a trait by biased pleiotropic mutation (i.e., by apparent directional selection) are easily compensated for by (true) directional selection.

  12. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  13. A DSPP Mutation Causing Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Characterization of the Mutational Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  14. Study of mutations in Jordanian patients with haemophilia A: identification of five novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awidi, A; Ramahi, M; Alhattab, D; Mefleh, R; Dweiri, M; Bsoul, N; Magablah, A; Arafat, E; Barqawi, M; Bishtawi, M; Haddadeen, E; Falah, M; Tarawneh, B; Swaidan, S; Fauori, S

    2010-01-01

    Haemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by mutations in the factor VIII gene (F8), which encodes factor VIII (FVIII) protein, a plasma glycoprotein, that plays an important role in the blood coagulation cascade. In the present study, our aim was to identify F8 gene mutations in HA patients from Jordan. One hundred and seventy-five HA patients from 42 unrelated families were included in this study. Among these patients, 117 (67%) had severe HA, 13 (7%) had moderate HA and 45 (26%) had mild HA. Severe patients were first tested for intron-22 inversion using long range polymerase chain reaction (PCR), then negative patients were tested for intron-1 inversion using PCR. Sequencing for the entire F8 gene was performed for all severe HA patients who were found negative for intron-22 and -1 inversions and it was also performed for moderate and mild HA patients. HA causative mutations were identified in all patients. Intron-22 and -1 inversions were detected in 52% and 2% of families respectively. Beside these two mutations, 19 different mutations were identified, which include 15 missense and four frameshift mutations. Five novel mutations were identified including one frameshift and four missense mutations. No large deletions or nonsense mutations were detected in patients who participated in this study. Only 17 patients with severe HA were found positive for FVIII inhibitors. The data presented will play an important role for genetic counselling and health care of HA patients in Jordan.

  15. Spontaneous Mutation Rate of Measles Virus: Direct Estimation Based on Mutations Conferring Monoclonal Antibody Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Stephanie J.; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.

    1999-01-01

    High mutation rates typical of RNA viruses often generate a unique viral population structure consisting of a large number of genetic microvariants. In the case of viral pathogens, this can result in rapid evolution of antiviral resistance or vaccine-escape mutants. We determined a direct estimate of the mutation rate of measles virus, the next likely target for global elimination following poliovirus. In a laboratory tissue culture system, we used the fluctuation test method of estimating mutation rate, which involves screening a large number of independent populations initiated by a small number of viruses each for the presence or absence of a particular single point mutation. The mutation we focused on, which can be screened for phenotypically, confers resistance to a monoclonal antibody (MAb 80-III-B2). The entire H gene of a subset of mutants was sequenced to verify that the resistance phenotype was associated with single point mutations. The epitope conferring MAb resistance was further characterized by Western blot analysis. Based on this approach, measles virus was estimated to have a mutation rate of 9 × 10−5 per base per replication and a genomic mutation rate of 1.43 per replication. The mutation rates we estimated for measles virus are comparable to recent in vitro estimates for both poliovirus and vesicular stomatitis virus. In the field, however, measles virus shows marked genetic stability. We briefly discuss the evolutionary implications of these results. PMID:9847306

  16. IDH1 mutated low grade astrocytoma occurring in MSH2 mutated Lynch syndrome family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alkhotani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (LS is an autosomal dominant tumour predisposition syndrome caused by a germline mutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes.Patients with these mutations have an increased risk of brain tumours, the vast majority of which are glioblastomas and medulloblastomas, and their occurrence has been termed Turcot Syndrome. The case presented herein of a member of a Lynch syndrome family with an MSH2 mutation expands the spectrum of brain tumours occurring in Lynch syndrome to include low grade astrocytomas, and is the first reported case of an IDH1 (R132H mutated brain tumour occurring in a Lynch syndrome family.

  17. GJB2 mutations in deaf population of Ilam (Western Iran): a different pattern of mutation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Mahmoudi, Hamdollah; Ahmadzadeh, Soleiman; Bakhtiyari, Salar

    2016-05-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory defect caused by heterogeneous factors. Up to now, more than 60 mutations in genes have been documented for nonsyndromic hearing loss. Hence, finding the causal gene in affected families could be a laborious and time-consuming process. GJB2 mutations, here, were investigated among deaf subjects of Ilam for the first time. In this study, we studied 62 unrelated patients with non-syndromic autosomal recessive deafness from 62 families. The most common mutation of GJB2, 35delG was checked, followed by direct sequencing of the GJB2 gene for determination of other mutations. In silico analyses were also performed using available software. In nine families, mutations in the connexin 26 gene were observed. In the studied population, R32H was the most common mutation. 35delG, W24X, and R127H were other mutations found in this study. In silico analyses showed pathogenicity of 35delG, R32H, and W24X but not R127H. Low frequency of GJB2 mutations in this population is probably indicative of the fact that other genes may be involved in nonsyndromic hearing loss in Ilam populations. In the other hand, the vicinity of Ilam and Iraq suggests that GJB2 mutations have likely a low frequency in this population.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: otulipenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I. Biallelic hypomorphic mutations in a linear deubiquitinase define otulipenia, an early-onset autoinflammatory disease. Proc Natl ... What is newborn screening? New Pages type 2 diabetes mitochondrial complex I deficiency mitochondrial complex V deficiency ...

  19. (A review) Mutation and its role in biotechnology | Sudi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mutations is the process by which a gene or chromosome changes; structurally and the end result of that process. All mutations are not harmful' as beneficial mutations occur frequently among various viruses, and bacteria and also in higher organisms. The Biotechnological role of mutations will be reviewed and discussed.

  20. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...

  1. Comprehensive Mutation Analysis in Colorectal Flat Adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Spiertz, Angela J.; Claes, Bart; Mongera, Sandra; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Grabsch, Heike; Kliment, Martin; Rembacken, Bjorn; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Quirke, Philip; Mulder, Chris J. J.; Lambrechts, Diether; van Engeland, Manon; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Flat adenomas are a subgroup of colorectal adenomas that have been associated with a distinct biology and a more aggressive clinical behavior compared to their polypoid counterparts. In the present study, we aimed to compare the mutation spectrum of 14 cancer genes, between these two phenotypes. Methods A consecutive series of 106 flat and 93 polypoid adenomas was analyzed retrospectively for frequently occurring mutations in “hot spot” regions of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS, as well as selected mutations in CTNNB1 (β-catenin), EGFR, FBXW7 (CDC4), PTEN, STK11, MAP2K4, SMAD4, PIK3R1 and PDGFRA using a high-throughput genotyping technique. Additionally, APC was analyzed using direct sequencing. Results APC mutations were more frequent in polypoid adenomas compared to flat adenomas (48.5% versus 30.3%, respectively, p = 0.02). Mutations in KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, FBXW7 and CTNNB1 showed similar frequencies in both phenotypes. Between the different subtypes of flat adenomas (0-IIa, LST-F and LST-G) no differences were observed for any of the investigated genes. Conclusion The lower APC mutation rate in flat adenomas compared to polypoid adenomas suggests that disruption of the Wnt-pathway may occur via different mechanisms in these two phenotypes. Furthermore, in contrast to previous observations our results in this large well-defined sample set indicate that there is no significant association between the different morphological phenotypes and mutations in key genes of the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway. PMID:22848674

  2. Purging deleterious mutations under self fertilization: paradoxical recovery in fitness with increasing mutation rate in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi T Morran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The accumulation of deleterious mutations can drastically reduce population mean fitness. Self-fertilization is thought to be an effective means of purging deleterious mutations. However, widespread linkage disequilibrium generated and maintained by self-fertilization is predicted to reduce the efficacy of purging when mutations are present at multiple loci. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested the ability of self-fertilizing populations to purge deleterious mutations at multiple loci by exposing obligately self-fertilizing populations of Caenorhabditis elegans to a range of elevated mutation rates and found that mutations accumulated, as evidenced by a reduction in mean fitness, in each population. Therefore, purging in obligate selfing populations is overwhelmed by an increase in mutation rate. Surprisingly, we also found that obligate and predominantly self-fertilizing populations exposed to very high mutation rates exhibited consistently greater fitness than those subject to lesser increases in mutation rate, which contradicts the assumption that increases in mutation rate are negatively correlated with fitness. The high levels of genetic linkage inherent in self-fertilization could drive this fitness increase. CONCLUSIONS: Compensatory mutations can be more frequent under high mutation rates and may alleviate a portion of the fitness lost due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations through epistatic interactions with deleterious mutations. The prolonged maintenance of tightly linked compensatory and deleterious mutations facilitated by self-fertilization may be responsible for the fitness increase as linkage disequilibrium between the compensatory and deleterious mutations preserves their epistatic interaction.

  3. New mutations in APOB100 involved in familial hypobetalipoproteinemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brusgaard, Klaus; Kjaersgaard, Lars; Hansen, Anne-Birthe Bo

    2011-01-01

    Familial hypolipoproteinemia (FHBL) is characterized by an inherited low plasma level of apolipoprotein B containing lipoproteins. FHBL may be caused by mutations of APOB. Individuals with FHBL typically have intestinal malabsorption and frequently suffer from a deficiency of fat-soluble vitamins....... Most mutations that cause FHBL are APOB truncating mutations. Here we describe a patient with FHBL caused by a novel truncating mutation together with a novel missense mutation....

  4. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, J.M. de; Luijt, R.B. van der; Pieterman, C.R.; Oostveen, M.P.; Hermus, A.R.; Dekkers, O.M.; Herder, W.W. de; Horst-Schrivers, A.N. van der; Drent, M.L.; Bisschop, P.H.; Havekes, B.; Vriens, M.R.; Valk, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  5. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative patients is

  6. MEN1 redefined, a clinical comparison of mutation-positive and mutation-negative patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Laat, Joanne M.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Pieterman, Carolina R. C.; Oostveen, Maria P.; Hermus, Ad R.; Dekkers, Olaf M.; de Herder, Wouter W.; van der Horst-Schrivers, Anouk N.; Drent, Madeleine L.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Havekes, Bas; Vriens, Menno R.; Valk, Gerlof D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) is diagnosed when two out of the three primary MEN1-associated endocrine tumors occur in a patient. Up to 10-30 % of those patients have no mutation in the MEN1 gene. It is unclear if the phenotype and course of the disease of mutation-negative

  7. Clustered Mutation Signatures Reveal that Error-Prone DNA Repair Targets Mutations to Active Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supek, Fran; Lehner, Ben

    2017-07-27

    Many processes can cause the same nucleotide change in a genome, making the identification of the mechanisms causing mutations a difficult challenge. Here, we show that clustered mutations provide a more precise fingerprint of mutagenic processes. Of nine clustered mutation signatures identified from >1,000 tumor genomes, three relate to variable APOBEC activity and three are associated with tobacco smoking. An additional signature matches the spectrum of translesion DNA polymerase eta (POLH). In lymphoid cells, these mutations target promoters, consistent with AID-initiated somatic hypermutation. In solid tumors, however, they are associated with UV exposure and alcohol consumption and target the H3K36me3 chromatin of active genes in a mismatch repair (MMR)-dependent manner. These regions normally have a low mutation rate because error-free MMR also targets H3K36me3 chromatin. Carcinogens and error-prone repair therefore redistribute mutations to the more important regions of the genome, contributing a substantial mutation load in many tumors, including driver mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving the Performance of Somatic Mutation Identification by Recovering Circulating Tumor DNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Jovelet, Cécile; Filleron, Thomas; Pedrero, Marion; Motté, Nelly; Boursin, Yannick; Luo, Yufei; Massard, Christophe; Campone, Mario; Levy, Christelle; Diéras, Véronique; Bachelot, Thomas; Garrabey, Julie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Lacroix, Ludovic; André, Fabrice; Lefebvre, Celine

    2016-10-15

    DNA extracted from cancer patients' whole blood may contain somatic mutations from circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) fragments. In this study, we introduce cmDetect, a computational method for the systematic identification of ctDNA mutations using whole-exome sequencing of a cohort of tumor and corresponding peripheral whole-blood samples. Through the analysis of simulated data, we demonstrated an increase in sensitivity in calling somatic mutations by combining cmDetect to two widely used mutation callers. In a cohort of 93 breast cancer metastatic patients, cmDetect identified ctDNA mutations in 54% of the patients and recovered somatic mutations in cancer genes EGFR, PIK3CA, and TP53 We further showed that cmDetect detected ctDNA in 89% of patients with confirmed mutated cell-free tumor DNA by plasma analyses (n = 9) within 46 pan-cancer patients. Our results prompt immediate consideration of the use of this method as an additional step in somatic mutation calling using whole-exome sequencing data with blood samples as controls. Cancer Res; 76(20); 5954-61. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Familial hypercholesterolemia mutations in Petrozavodsk: no similarity to St. Petersburg mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarova, Tatiana Yu; Korneva, Victoria A; Kuznetsova, Tatiana Yu; Golovina, Alexandra S; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Mandelshtam, Michail Yu

    2013-12-27

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a human monogenic disease induced by a variety of mutations with striking genetic diversity. Despite this variability recurrent mutations occur in each population studied, which allows both elucidating prevalent mutations and developing DNA diagnostic tools for the disease. Recent research of FH in St. Petersburg, Moscow and Novosibirsk (major cities in Russia) demonstrates that each megapolis has its own FH mutation spectrum sharing only small part of mutations with other populations in Russia and Europe. In order to optimize molecular-genetic diagnostic protocols for FH in Russia we studied mutation spectrum in other regions including Petrozavodsk, a smaller town in relatively close proximity to St. Petersburg. The principal method was automated detection of single-strand conformation polymorphism followed by direct PCR amplified DNA sequencing. Twelve different mutations of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene were detected in the Petrozavodsk sample (80 patients). Out of these twelve mutations, seven have never been described before (c.192_201delinsGGACTTCA, c. 195_196insT, c. 618 T > G, c. 1340C > G, c. 1686_1693delinsT, c. 1936C > A, c. 2191delG). Other five mutations (c. 58G > A, c. 925_931del, c. 1194C > T, c. 1532 T > C, c. 1920C > T) were previously characterized elsewhere. All new mutations are considered to be a probable cause of the FH in their carriers. Direct evidence of the neutral character of c.58G > A or p. (Gly20Arg) is provided for the first time. Each pathogenic mutation was a trait of its own unique pedigree and so far has not been found in other patients. Strikingly, out of twelve mutations characterized in the Petrozavodsk sample only one mutation, c. 925_931del, has previously been found in patients from St. Petersburg and Finland (most closely located studied populations), suggesting some common roots in origin of these populations in the past or limited

  10. Tumor Mutation Burden Forecasts Outcome in Ovarian Cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA...... repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. Methods and Results: The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous...... ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated...

  11. Spectrum of mutations in RARS-T patients includes TET2 and ASXL1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpurka, Hadrian; Jankowska, Anna M; Makishima, Hideki; Bodo, Juraj; Bejanyan, Nelli; Hsi, Eric D; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P

    2010-08-01

    While a majority of patients with refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts and thrombocytosis harbor JAK2V617F and rarely MPLW515L, JAK2/MPL-negative cases constitute a diagnostic problem. 23 RARS-T cases were investigated applying immunohistochemical phospho-STAT5, sequencing and SNP-A-based karyotyping. Based on the association of TET2/ASXL1 mutations with MDS/MPN we studied molecular pattern of these genes. Two patients harbored ASXL1 and another 2 TET2 mutations. Phospho-STAT5 activation was present in one mutated TET2 and ASXL1 case. JAK2V617F/MPLW515L mutations were absent in TET2/ASXL1 mutants, indicating that similar clinical phenotype can be produced by various MPN-associated mutations and that additional unifying lesions may be present in RARS-T. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutation analysis in 54 propionic acidemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, J P; Spector, E; Venezia, S; Estes, P; Chiang, P W; Creadon-Swindell, G; Müllerleile, S; de Silva, L; Barth, M; Walter, M; Walter, K; Meissner, T; Lindner, M; Ensenauer, R; Santer, R; Bodamer, O A; Baumgartner, M R; Brunner-Krainz, M; Karall, D; Haase, C; Knerr, I; Marquardt, T; Hennermann, J B; Steinfeld, R; Beblo, S; Koch, H G; Konstantopoulou, V; Scholl-Bürgi, S; van Teeffelen-Heithoff, A; Suormala, T; Ugarte, M; Sperl, W; Superti-Furga, A; Schwab, K O; Grünert, S C; Sass, J O

    2012-01-01

    Deficiency of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCC), a dodecamer of alpha and beta subunits, causes inherited propionic acidemia. We have studied, at the molecular level, PCC in 54 patients from 48 families comprised of 96 independent alleles. These patients of various ethnic backgrounds came from research centers and hospitals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The thorough clinical characterization of these patients was described in the accompanying paper (Grünert et al. 2012). In all 54 patients, many of whom originated from consanguineous families, the entire PCCB gene was examined by genomic DNA sequencing and in 39 individuals the PCCA gene was also studied. In three patients we found mutations in both PCC genes. In addition, in many patients RT-PCR analysis of lymphoblast RNA, lymphoblast enzyme assays, and expression of new mutations in E.coli were carried out. Eight new and eight previously detected mutations were identified in the PCCA gene while 15 new and 13 previously detected mutations were found in the PCCB gene. One missense mutation, p.V288I in the PCCB gene, when expressed in E.coli, yielded 134% of control activity and was consequently classified as a polymorphism in the coding region. Numerous new intronic polymorphisms in both PCC genes were identified. This study adds a considerable amount of new molecular data to the studies of this disease.

  13. GREMLIN 2 Mutations and Dental Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantaputra, P N; Kaewgahya, M; Hatsadaloi, A; Vogel, P; Kawasaki, K; Ohazama, A; Ketudat Cairns, J R

    2015-12-01

    Isolated or nonsyndromic tooth agenesis or hypodontia is the most common human malformation. It has been associated with mutations in MSX1, PAX9, EDA, AXIN2, EDAR, EDARADD, and WNT10A. GREMLIN 2 (GREM2) is a strong bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonist that is known to regulate BMPs in embryogenesis and tissue development. Bmp4 has been shown to have a role in tooth development. Grem2(-/-) mice have small, malformed maxillary and mandibular incisors, indicating that Grem2 has important roles in normal tooth development. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that GREM2 mutations are associated with human malformations, which include isolated tooth agenesis, microdontia, short tooth roots, taurodontism, sparse and slow-growing hair, and dry and itchy skin. We sequenced WNT10A, WNT10B, MSX1, EDA, EDAR, EDARADD, AXIN2, and PAX9 in all 7 patients to rule out the effects of other ectodermal dysplasias and other tooth-related genes and did not find mutations in any of them. GREM2 mutations exhibit variable expressivity even within the same families. The inheritance is autosomal dominant with incomplete penetrance. The expression of Grem2 during the early development of mouse teeth and hair follicles and the evaluation of the likely effects of the mutations on the protein structure substantiate these new findings. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  14. BRCA1 mutations in Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Javert Lourenço

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BRCA1 mutations are known to be responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers in women with early onset and a family history of the disease. In this paper we present a mutational survey conducted in 47 Brazilian patients with breast/ovarian cancer, selected based on age at diagnosis, family history, tumor laterality, and presence of breast cancer in male patients. All 22 coding exons and intron-exon junctions were sequenced. Constitutional mutations were found in seven families, consisting of one insertion (insC5382 in exon 20 (four patients, one four base-pair deletion (3450-3453delCAAG in exon 11 resulting in a premature stop codon (one patient, one transition (IVS17+2T> C in intron 17 affecting a mRNA splicing site (one patient, and a C> T transition resulting in a stop-codon (Q1135X in exon 11 (one patient. The identification of these mutations which are associated to hereditary breast and ovarian cancers will contribute to the characterization of the mutational spectrum of BRCA1 and to the improvement of genetic counseling for familial breast/ovarian cancer patients in Brazil.

  15. Immunohistochemical Detections of EGFR Mutations in NSCLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang LIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been well known that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with mutations of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR response better to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment. Although DNA-based assays (e.g. DNA sequencing are the most frequently used and a relatively reliable method to detect EGFR mutations, they are complex, time-consuming and relatively expensive for routine use in clinical laboratories, besides they require high quality tumor samples. In contrast, the immunohistochemistry (IHC methods make up fully for the above shortcomings and can serve as screening tests for EGFR mutations. However, there are many factors that can influence the results of IHC methods, such as different staining procedures, different antigen retrieval solutions and different sets of criteria, etc. Thus the IHC methods for detecting EGFR mutations have not been widely used in clinic and only in the research stage. This article reviews the use of IHC methods by different researchers and further discusses how to make the IHC methods work best for the detection of EGFR mutations.

  16. Expanding CEP290 mutational spectrum in ciliopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travaglini, Lorena; Brancati, Francesco; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Audollent, Sophie; Bertini, Enrico; Kaplan, Josseline; Perrault, Isabelle; Iannicelli, Miriam; Mancuso, Brunella; Rigoli, Luciana; Rozet, Jean-Michel; Swistun, Dominika; Tolentino, Jerlyn; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria; Zankl, A; Leventer, R; Grattan-Smith, P; Janecke, A; D'Hooghe, M; Sznajer, Y; Van Coster, R; Demerleir, L; Dias, K; Moco, C; Moreira, A; Kim, C Ae; Maegawa, G; Petkovic, D; Abdel-Salam, G M H; Abdel-Aleem, A; Zaki, M S; Marti, I; Quijano-Roy, S; Sigaudy, S; de Lonlay, P; Romano, S; Touraine, R; Koenig, M; Lagier-Tourenne, C; Messer, J; Collignon, P; Wolf, N; Philippi, H; Kitsiou Tzeli, S; Halldorsson, S; Johannsdottir, J; Ludvigsson, P; Phadke, S R; Udani, V; Stuart, B; Magee, A; Lev, D; Michelson, M; Ben-Zeev, B; Fischetto, R; Benedicenti, F; Stanzial, F; Borgatti, R; Accorsi, P; Battaglia, S; Fazzi, E; Giordano, L; Pinelli, L; Boccone, L; Bigoni, S; Ferlini, A; Donati, M A; Caridi, G; Divizia, M T; Faravelli, F; Ghiggeri, G; Pessagno, A; Briguglio, M; Briuglia, S; Salpietro, C D; Tortorella, G; Adami, A; Castorina, P; Lalatta, F; Marra, G; Riva, D; Scelsa, B; Spaccini, L; Uziel, G; Del Giudice, E; Laverda, A M; Ludwig, K; Permunian, A; Suppiej, A; Signorini, S; Uggetti, C; Battini, R; Di Giacomo, M; Cilio, M R; Di Sabato, M L; Leuzzi, V; Parisi, P; Pollazzon, M; Silengo, M; De Vescovi, R; Greco, D; Romano, C; Cazzagon, M; Simonati, A; Al-Tawari, A A; Bastaki, L; Mégarbané, A; Sabolic Avramovska, V; de Jong, M M; Stromme, P; Koul, R; Rajab, A; Azam, M; Barbot, C; Martorell Sampol, L; Rodriguez, B; Pascual-Castroviejo, I; Teber, S; Anlar, B; Comu, S; Karaca, E; Kayserili, H; Yüksel, A; Akcakus, M; Al Gazali, L; Sztriha, L; Nicholl, D; Woods, C G; Bennett, C; Hurst, J; Sheridan, E; Barnicoat, A; Hennekam, R; Lees, M; Blair, E; Bernes, S; Sanchez, H; Clark, A E; DeMarco, E; Donahue, C; Sherr, E; Hahn, J; Sanger, T D; Gallager, T E; Dobyns, W B; Daugherty, C; Krishnamoorthy, K S; Sarco, D; Walsh, C A; McKanna, T; Milisa, J; Chung, W K; De Vivo, D C; Raynes, H; Schubert, R; Seward, A; Brooks, D G; Goldstein, A; Caldwell, J; Finsecke, E; Maria, B L; Holden, K; Cruse, R P; Swoboda, K J; Viskochil, D

    2009-10-01

    Ciliopathies are an expanding group of rare conditions characterized by multiorgan involvement, that are caused by mutations in genes encoding for proteins of the primary cilium or its apparatus. Among these genes, CEP290 bears an intriguing allelic spectrum, being commonly mutated in Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD), Meckel syndrome (MKS), Senior-Loken syndrome and isolated Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Although these conditions are recessively inherited, in a subset of patients only one CEP290 mutation could be detected. To assess whether genomic rearrangements involving the CEP290 gene could represent a possible mutational mechanism in these cases, exon dosage analysis on genomic DNA was performed in two groups of CEP290 heterozygous patients, including five JSRD/MKS cases and four LCA, respectively. In one JSRD patient, we identified a large heterozygous deletion encompassing CEP290 C-terminus that resulted in marked reduction of mRNA expression. No copy number alterations were identified in the remaining probands. The present work expands the CEP290 genotypic spectrum to include multiexon deletions. Although this mechanism does not appear to be frequent, screening for genomic rearrangements should be considered in patients in whom a single CEP290 mutated allele was identified.

  17. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  18. Oncogene mutation profiling reveals poor prognosis associated with FGFR1/3 mutation in liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengfang; Shen, Yaoyuan; Ren, Yan; Liu, Wei; Li, Man; Liang, Weihua; Liu, Chunxia; Li, Feng

    2016-09-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is one of the most prevalent soft tissue sarcomas. LPS shows a poor response to radiation and chemotherapy. The causes of death in patients with LPS include locally recurrent and metastatic disease. We sought to examine novel gene mutations and pathways in primary and matched recurrent LPSs to identify potential therapeutic targets. We conducted a high-throughput analysis of 238 known mutations in 19 oncogenes using Sequenom MassARRAY technology. Nucleic acids were extracted from 19 primary and recurrent LPS samples, encompassing 9 dedifferentiated LPSs (DDLPS), 9 myxoid/round cell LPSs, and 1 pleomorphic LPS. Mutation screening revealed missense mutations in 21.1% (4/19) of the LPS specimens, including 4 different genes (FGFR1, FGFR3, PIK3CA, and KIT). Based on histologic subtypes, 22.2% DDLPS (2/9) and 22.2% myxoid cell LPS (2/9) contained gene mutations. Specifically, 3 (23.1%) of 13 primary tumors harbored mutations. Furthermore, although gene mutations were identified in 1 (11.1%) of 9 recurrent LPS samples, the difference between the primary and the recurrence was not statistically significant. Analysis of patient survival data indicated that patients harboring FGFR1/3 mutations experienced reduced overall survival (P<.05). Despite the limited number of samples, our findings provide the first evidence of FGFR1/3 mutations in DDLPS, which were associated with poor clinical outcomes. The FGFR pathway may play an important role in the development and progression of DDLPS and warrants further investigation; moreover, PIK3CA mutation is a common event (11.1%) in myxoid cell LPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. HER2 mutations in lung adenocarcinomas: A report from the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Rathi N; Behera, Madhusmita; Berry, Lynne D; Rossi, Mike R; Kris, Mark G; Johnson, Bruce E; Bunn, Paul A; Ramalingam, Suresh S; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2017-11-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) mutations have been reported in lung adenocarcinomas. Herein, the authors describe the prevalence, clinical features, and outcomes associated with HER2 mutations in 1007 patients in the Lung Cancer Mutation Consortium (LCMC). Patients with advanced-stage lung adenocarcinomas were enrolled to the LCMC. Tumor specimens were assessed for diagnosis and adequacy; multiplexed genotyping was performed in Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA)-certified laboratories to examine 10 oncogenic drivers. The LCMC database was queried for patients with HER2 mutations to access demographic data, treatment history, and vital status. An exploratory analysis was performed to evaluate the survival of patients with HER2 mutations who were treated with HER2-directed therapies. A total of 920 patients were tested for HER2 mutations; 24 patients (3%) harbored exon 20 insertion mutations (95% confidence interval, 2%-4%). One patient had a concurrent mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (MET) amplification. The median age of the patients was 62 years, with a slight predominance of females over males (14 females vs 10 males). The majority of the patients were never-smokers (71%) and presented with advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. The median survival for patients who received HER2-targeted therapies (12 patients) was 2.1 years compared with 1.4 years for those who did not (12 patients) (P = .48). Patients with HER2 mutations were found to have inferior survival compared with the rest of the LCMC cohort with other mutations: the median survival was 3.5 years in the LCMC population receiving targeted therapy and 2.4 years for patients not receiving targeted therapy. HER2 mutations were detected in 3% of patients with lung adenocarcinoma in the LCMC. HER2-directed therapies should be investigated in this subgroup of patients. Cancer 2017;123:4099-4105. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Mutation induction in synchronous hamster cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebersold, P.M.

    1975-11-01

    Mutagenesis of synchronous Mutahinese hamster cells by 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) shows pronounced cell cycle dependency. Resistance to 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and ouabain are induced maximally by BUdR at different times early in the DNA synthesis period, suggesting that the genes coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and the (Na/sup +/K/sup +/)-associated ATPase of the plasma membrane are replicated early in the DNA synthesis period. Although BUdR induces mutations in specific genes only when present during their replication, the rate of mutation induction is not linearly related to the amount of BUdR incorporated into DNA. The data show a BUdR concentration threshold for mutation induction, suggesting that BUdR exerts some deterimental allosteric effect on DNA synthesis enzymes.

  1. Selection-Mutation Dynamics of Signaling Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Hofbauer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure of the rest points of signaling games and their dynamic behavior under selection-mutation dynamics by taking the case of three signals as our canonical example. Many rest points of the replicator dynamics of signaling games are not isolated and, therefore, not robust under perturbations. However, some of them attract open sets of initial conditions. We prove the existence of certain rest points of the selection-mutation dynamics close to Nash equilibria of the signaling game and show that all but the perturbed rest points close to strict Nash equilibria are dynamically unstable. This is an important result for the evolution of signaling behavior, since it shows that the second-order forces that are governed by mutation can increase the chances of successful signaling.

  2. Mutations and Antimutagens in Emergency Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Among other negative sequels, hypoxia that is the leading cause of all critical conditions increases the frequency of cell mutations in the patient. Unfortunately, we do not know whether there are available special studies analyzing the frequency of mutations in the germ cells of experimental animals or humans. But those in the somatic cells were reported in various publications more than 30 years ago. Specifically, such phenomena have been described in acute lung injuries and myocardial infarction in both rats and man. But these studies have been sporadic. And the increase in the frequency of somatic mutation affects the incidence of apoptosis, the change in the pattern of immunological processes and, possibly, even the factors of carcinogenesis. Mutagenetic processes can be managed, by modifying their frequency with antimuta-gens. 

  3. Mutations and their use in insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Alan S

    2002-06-01

    Traditional chemically based methods for insect control have been shown to have serious limitations, and many alternative approaches have been developed and evaluated, including those based on the use of different types of mutation. The mutagenic action of ionizing radiation was well known in the field of genetics long before it was realized by entomologists that it might be used to induce dominant lethal mutations in insects, which, when released, could sterilize wild female insects. The use of radiation to induce dominant lethal mutations in the sterile insect technique (SIT) is now a major component of many large and successful programs for pest suppression and eradication. Adult insects, and their different developmental stages, differ in their sensitivity to the induction of dominant lethal mutations, and care has to be taken to identify the appropriate dose of radiation that produces the required level of sterility without impairing the overall fitness of the released insect. Sterility can also be introduced into populations through genetic mechanisms, including translocations, hybrid incompatibility, and inherited sterility in Lepidoptera. The latter phenomenon is due to the fact that this group of insects has holokinetic chromosomes. Specific types of mutations can also be used to make improvements to the SIT, especially for the development of strains for the production of only male insects for sterilization and release. These strains utilize male translocations and a variety of selectable mutations, either conditional or visible, so that at some stage of development, the males can be separated from the females. In one major insect pest, Ceratitis capitata, these strains are used routinely in large operational programs. This review summarizes these developments, including the possible future use of transgenic technology in pest control.

  4. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  5. Deciphering Signatures of Mutational Processes Operative in Human Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The genome of a cancer cell carries somatic mutations that are the cumulative consequences of the DNA damage and repair processes operative during the cellular lineage between the fertilized egg and the cancer cell. Remarkably, these mutational processes are poorly characterized. Global sequencing initiatives are yielding catalogs of somatic mutations from thousands of cancers, thus providing the unique opportunity to decipher the signatures of mutational processes operative in human cancer. However, until now there have been no theoretical models describing the signatures of mutational processes operative in cancer genomes and no systematic computational approaches are available to decipher these mutational signatures. Here, by modeling mutational processes as a blind source separation problem, we introduce a computational framework that effectively addresses these questions. Our approach provides a basis for characterizing mutational signatures from cancer-derived somatic mutational catalogs, paving the way to insights into the pathogenetic mechanism underlying all cancers. PMID:23318258

  6. Driver KIT mutations in melanoma cluster in four hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumaz, Nicolas; André, Jocelyne; Sadoux, Aurélie; Laugier, Florence; Podgorniak, Marie Pierre; Mourah, Samia; Lebbé, Céleste

    2015-02-01

    There has been a great deal of interest in understanding the role of KIT in melanoma since the discovery of KIT mutations in a subset of melanoma. Although a significant proportion of these melanomas respond to KIT inhibitors, the presence of a KIT mutation does not guarantee a response to KIT inhibitors. Because recent data seem to indicate that only melanoma with specific KIT mutations respond to KIT inhibitors, we investigated which KIT mutations are driver mutations in melanoma and are therefore therapeutically relevant. We established that 70% of KIT mutations in melanoma are located in four hotspots (L576, K642, W557-V560, and D816-A829) and that these mutations are oncogenic in melanocytes and are bona-fide driver mutations. Testing for KIT mutations should therefore concentrate on these four hotspots, which can be targeted therapeutically.

  7. Mutations found in the Danish population causing Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    been performing genetic screening of patients and relatives with HHT. The molecular genetic screening serves dual purposes, a) as part of the clinical management as genotype/phenotype correlations exists, b) to identify asymptomatic family members. Materials and Methods Inclusion of patient’s who were....... Results In 61 families we found mutations in either ENG (N=35) or ACVLR1 (N=26). In ENG a total of 22 different mutations were found 16 was unreported. In ACVLR1 24 different mutations were found 13 was unreported. The mutations were mainly of a familial character all though in ENG a single mutation...... is present in 11 families and 2 mutations are represented in 2 families. Likewise in ACVLR1 2 mutations was found in 2 different families. I ENG 1 and in ACVLR1 3 families had major deletions found by MLPA. No mutations were found in MADH4. Conclusion The majority of mutations found during clinical genetic...

  8. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and allele burden in various cells and tissues are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT...... mutations in patients with mastocytosis at diagnosis and during follow-up with sufficient precision and sensitivity in daily practice. In addition, we provide recommendations for sampling and storage of diagnostic material as well as a robust diagnostic algorithm. Using highly sensitive assays, KIT D816V...

  9. On spatial mutation-selection models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratiev, Yuri, E-mail: kondrat@math.uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Kutoviy, Oleksandr, E-mail: kutoviy@math.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: kutovyi@mit.edu [Fakultät für Mathematik, Universität Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Minlos, Robert, E-mail: minl@iitp.ru; Pirogov, Sergey, E-mail: pirogov@proc.ru [IITP, RAS, Bolshoi Karetnyi 19, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    We discuss the selection procedure in the framework of mutation models. We study the regulation for stochastically developing systems based on a transformation of the initial Markov process which includes a cost functional. The transformation of initial Markov process by cost functional has an analytic realization in terms of a Kimura-Maruyama type equation for the time evolution of states or in terms of the corresponding Feynman-Kac formula on the path space. The state evolution of the system including the limiting behavior is studied for two types of mutation-selection models.

  10. Towards linked open gene mutations data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background With the advent of high-throughput technologies, a great wealth of variation data is being produced. Such information may constitute the basis for correlation analyses between genotypes and phenotypes and, in the future, for personalized medicine. Several databases on gene variation exist, but this kind of information is still scarce in the Semantic Web framework. In this paper, we discuss issues related to the integration of mutation data in the Linked Open Data infrastructure, part of the Semantic Web framework. We present the development of a mapping from the IARC TP53 Mutation database to RDF and the implementation of servers publishing this data. Methods A version of the IARC TP53 Mutation database implemented in a relational database was used as first test set. Automatic mappings to RDF were first created by using D2RQ and later manually refined by introducing concepts and properties from domain vocabularies and ontologies, as well as links to Linked Open Data implementations of various systems of biomedical interest. Since D2RQ query performances are lower than those that can be achieved by using an RDF archive, generated data was also loaded into a dedicated system based on tools from the Jena software suite. Results We have implemented a D2RQ Server for TP53 mutation data, providing data on a subset of the IARC database, including gene variations, somatic mutations, and bibliographic references. The server allows to browse the RDF graph by using links both between classes and to external systems. An alternative interface offers improved performances for SPARQL queries. The resulting data can be explored by using any Semantic Web browser or application. Conclusions This has been the first case of a mutation database exposed as Linked Data. A revised version of our prototype, including further concepts and IARC TP53 Mutation database data sets, is under development. The publication of variation information as Linked Data opens new perspectives

  11. Clinicopathological characteristics and mutation profiling in primary cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Banu; Akalin, Taner; Kandiloğlu, Gülşen

    2015-05-01

    The incidence of mutations in malignant melanoma varies remarkably according to the subtype of melanoma, and this in itself is affected by racial and geographical factors. Studies screening melanoma case series for different types of mutations are relatively rare. The authors analyzed the frequency of various somatic point mutations of 10 genes in 106 primary cutaneous melanoma cases. The mutations (BRAF, NRAS, KIT, CDKN2A, KRAS, HRAS, PIK3CA, STK11, GNAQ, CTNNB1) were evaluated with real-time PCR-based PCR-Array through allele-specific amplification, and the results were correlated with various clinicopathological characteristics. Mutations were found in 64.2% of the melanomas overall. BRAF (42.5%), NRAS (15.1%), and CDKN2A (13.2%) were the 3 most common mutations. BRAF and NRAS mutations were more frequent in nodular and superficial spreading melanomas (P < 0.001). Associations with BRAF mutation were as follows: male gender [odds ratio (OR) = 2.4], younger age (OR = 2.7), superficial spreading (OR = 15.6) and nodular melanoma (OR = 9.5), trunk localization (OR = 6.3), and intermittent sun exposure (OR = 4.6). A considerable percentage of V600K (44.4%) mutations were found among the BRAF mutations, whereas KIT mutations (3.8%) were less frequent. Multiple mutations were detected in 13.2% of the melanomas. The most common co-occurrences were in the BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A genes. The authors analyzed 10 somatic mutations in the main subtypes of primary cutaneous melanomas from the western region of Turkey. Mutations were found in 64.2% of the melanomas overall. The most common mutations were in the BRAF and NRAS genes. In addition to other less common mutations, a notable number of multiple mutations were encountered. The multiplicity and concurrence of mutations in this study may provide further study areas for personalized targeted therapy.

  12. Confirmation of the mitochondrial ND1 gene mutation G3635A as a primary LHON mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juhua; Zhu, Yihua; Tong, Yi; Chen, Lu; Liu, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Huang, Dinggou; Qiu, Wentong; Zhuang, Shuliu; Ma, Xu

    2009-08-14

    We report the clinical and genetic characterization of two Chinese LHON families who do not carry the primary LHON-mutations. Mitochondrial genome sequence analysis revealed the presence of a homoplasmic ND1 G3635A mutation in both families. In Family LHON-001, 31 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup R11a were identified and in Family LHON-019, 37 other variants belonging to the East Asian haplogroup D4g were determined. The ND1 G3635A mutation changes the conversed serine110 residue to asparagine. This mutation has been previously described in a single Russian LHON family and has been suggested to contribute to increased LHON expressivity. In addition, a mutation in cytochrome c oxidase subunit II at C7868T (COII/L95F) may act in synergy with G3635A, increasing LHON expressivity in Family LHON-001, which had a higher level of LHON penetrance than Family LHON-019. In summary, the G3635A mutation is confirmed as a rare primary pathogenic mutation for LHON.

  13. Mutation distributions and clinical correlations of PIK3CA gene mutations in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirican, Ebubekir; Akkiprik, Mustafa; Özer, Ayşe

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most common cancer and the second cause of death among women. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway has a crucial role in the cellular processes such as cell survival, growth, division, and motility. Moreover, oncogenic mutations in the PI3K pathway generally involve the activation phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase-catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutation which has been identified in numerous BCa subtypes. In this review, correlations between PIK3CA mutations and their clinicopathological parameters on BCa will be described. It is reported that PIK3CA mutations which have been localized mostly on exon 9 and 20 hot spots are detected 25-40 % in BCa. This relatively high frequency can offer an advantage for choosing the best treatment options for BCa. PIK3CA mutations may be used as biomarkers and have been major focus of drug development in cancer with the first clinical trials of PI3K pathway inhibitors currently in progress. Screening of PIK3CA gene mutations might be useful genetic tests for targeted therapeutics or diagnosis. Increasing data about PIK3CA mutations and its clinical correlations with BCa will help to introduce new clinical applications in the near future.

  14. Macular corneal dystrophy: mutational spectrum in German patients, novel mutations and therapeutic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenauer-Kloevekorn, Claudia; Braeutigam, Saskia; Heinritz, Wolfram; Froster, Ursula G; Duncker, Gernot I W

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate genotype-phenotype correlations, the consequences for surgical treatment, and the therapeutical options in patients with macular corneal dystrophy (MCD). We investigated MCD genotype by using polymerase chain reaction followed by direct sequencing in one family and four patients with MCD. Results were confirmed by restriction analysis. Clinical phenotypes, histopathological findings, and therapeutical proceedings of each patient were reported and compared with the molecular genetic results. Five mutations, four missense mutations, and one frameshift mutation, from which three were novel, and one single-nucleotide polymorphism, were identified within the coding region of the CHST6 gene. In three patients, two with a homozygous mutation within the start codon (Met1Leu) and one with a heterozygous mutation (Leu200Arg) and a polymorphism (Arg162Gly), with irregular corneal surface and recurrent erosions a phototherapeutic keratectomy lead to a transient success. An additional fitting of rigid gas permeable contact lenses in one patient could further improve irregular astigmatism. In two patients, one with a frameshift mutation (1734_1735delTG; Arg211Gln) and one with two compound heterozygous mutations (Leu200Arg; Leu173Phe) and an additional polymorphism (Arg162Gly) a penetrating keratoplasty improved BCVA without any recurrence of the opacities within the follow-up time. Different genotypes imply several phenotypes, which influence therapeutical proceedings in MCD patients. Our study shows the wide range of diagnostic findings and therapeutical options in patients suffering from macular corneal dystrophy depending on the genotype.

  15. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  16. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotecha, Udhaya H; Movva, Sireesha; Sharma, Deepak; Verma, Jyotsna; Puri, Ratna Dua; Verma, Ishwar Chander

    2014-07-01

    Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E) substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT) in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  17. Revertant mutation releases confined lethal mutation, opening Pandora's box: a novel genetic pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Ogawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When two mutations, one dominant pathogenic and the other "confining" nonsense, coexist in the same allele, theoretically, reversion of the latter may elicit a disease, like the opening of Pandora's box. However, cases of this hypothetical pathogenic mechanism have never been reported. We describe a lethal form of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome caused by the reversion of the GJB2 nonsense mutation p.Tyr136X that would otherwise have confined the effect of another dominant lethal mutation, p.Gly45Glu, in the same allele. The patient's mother had the identical misssense mutation which was confined by the nonsense mutation. The biological relationship between the parents and the child was confirmed by genotyping of 15 short tandem repeat loci. Haplotype analysis using 40 SNPs spanning the >39 kbp region surrounding the GJB2 gene and an extended SNP microarray analysis spanning 83,483 SNPs throughout chromosome 13 in the family showed that an allelic recombination event involving the maternal allele carrying the mutations generated the pathogenic allele unique to the patient, although the possibility of coincidental accumulation of spontaneous point mutations cannot be completely excluded. Previous reports and our mutation screening support that p.Gly45Glu is in complete linkage disequilibrium with p.Tyr136X in the Japanese population. Estimated from statisitics in the literature, there may be approximately 11,000 p.Gly45Glu carriers in the Japanese population who have this second-site confining mutation, which acts as natural genetic protection from the lethal disease. The reversion-triggered onset of the disesase shown in this study is a previously unreported genetic pathogenesis based on Mendelian inheritance.

  18. Tumor mutation burden forecasts outcome in ovarian cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Kochupurakkal, Bose; Izarzugaza, Jose M G; Eklund, Aron C; Li, Yang; Liu, Joyce; Szallasi, Zoltan; Matulonis, Ursula A; Richardson, Andrea L; Iglehart, J Dirk; Wang, Zhigang C

    2013-01-01

    Increased number of single nucleotide substitutions is seen in breast and ovarian cancer genomes carrying disease-associated mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2. The significance of these genome-wide mutations is unknown. We hypothesize genome-wide mutation burden mirrors deficiencies in DNA repair and is associated with treatment outcome in ovarian cancer. The total number of synonymous and non-synonymous exome mutations (Nmut), and the presence of germline or somatic mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (mBRCA) were extracted from whole-exome sequences of high-grade serous ovarian cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Cox regression and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to correlate Nmut with chemotherapy response and outcome. Higher Nmut correlated with a better response to chemotherapy after surgery. In patients with mBRCA-associated cancer, low Nmut was associated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), independent of other prognostic factors in multivariate analysis. Patients with mBRCA-associated cancers and a high Nmut had remarkably favorable PFS and OS. The association with survival was similar in cancers with either BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In cancers with wild-type BRCA, tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response in patients with no residual disease after surgery. Tumor Nmut was associated with treatment response and with both PFS and OS in patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. In the TCGA cohort, low Nmut predicted resistance to chemotherapy, and for shorter PFS and OS, while high Nmut forecasts a remarkably favorable outcome in mBRCA-associated ovarian cancer. Our observations suggest that the total mutation burden coupled with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer is a genomic marker of prognosis and predictor of treatment response. This marker may reflect the degree of deficiency in BRCA-mediated pathways, or the extent of compensation for the deficiency by alternative

  19. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-05

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. Copyright © 2016 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adaptive synonymous mutations in an experimentally evolved Pseudomonas fluorescens population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Susan; Hinz, Aaron; Kassen, Rees

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that synonymous mutations, nucleotide changes that do not alter the encoded amino acid, have no detectable effect on phenotype or fitness. However, a growing body of evidence from both comparative and experimental studies suggests otherwise. Synonymous mutations have been...... in an experimentally evolved population of Pseudomonas fluorescens. We show experimentally that these mutations increase fitness by an amount comparable to non-synonymous mutations and that the fitness increases stem from increased gene expression. These results provide unequivocal evidence that synonymous mutations...... can drive adaptive evolution and suggest that this class of mutation may be underappreciated as a cause of adaptation and evolutionary dynamics....

  1. Recurrent APC gene mutations in Polish FAP families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pławski Andrzej

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The molecular diagnostics of genetically conditioned disorders is based on the identification of the mutations in the predisposing genes. Hereditary cancer disorders of the gastrointestinal tracts are caused by mutations of the tumour suppressor genes or the DNA repair genes. Occurrence of recurrent mutation allows improvement of molecular diagnostics. The mutation spectrum in the genes causing hereditary forms of colorectal cancers in the Polish population was previously described. In the present work an estimation of the frequency of the recurrent mutations of the APC gene was performed. Eight types of mutations occurred in 19.4% of our FAP families and these constitute 43% of all Polish diagnosed families.

  2. Deep Mutational Scanning: A Highly Parallel Method to Measure the Effects of Mutation on Protein Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita, Lea M; Fields, Stanley

    2015-08-03

    Deep mutational scanning is a method that makes use of next-generation sequencing technology to measure in a single experiment the activity of 10(5) or more unique variants of a protein. Because of this depth of mutational coverage, this strategy provides data that can be analyzed to reveal many protein properties. Deep mutational scanning approaches are particularly amenable to being performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, given the extensive toolkit of reagents and technologies available for this organism. © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  3. Asymptotics of steady states of a selection–mutation equation for small mutation rate

    KAUST Repository

    Calsina, Àngel

    2013-12-01

    We consider a selection-mutation equation for the density of individuals with respect to a continuous phenotypic evolutionary trait. We assume that the competition term for an individual with a given trait depends on the traits of all the other individuals, therefore giving an infinite-dimensional nonlinearity. Mutations are modelled by means of an integral operator. We prove existence of steady states and show that, when the mutation rate goes to zero, the asymptotic profile of the population is a Cauchy distribution. © Royal Society of Edinburgh 2013.

  4. 'A' by Aspergillus terreus through mutation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... been recommended as a mutagen of first choice. The ratio of mutation to lethality is usually high and is a relatively safe mutagen. The intrastrand cyclobutan pyri- midine dimer is the predominant DNA lesion reported to be produced by UV radiation. EMS is an alkylating agent and is known to produce ...

  5. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N P Sarmah

    2017-09-27

    Sep 27, 2017 ... Malaria is a major public health concern in Northeast India with a preponderance of drug-resistant strains. Until recently ... India, were screened for malaria, and of these, 75 were found to be positive for Plasmodium falciparum. Samples ... Double mutation in dhfr gene causes intermediate resistance, while.

  6. Induced mutation to monocotyledony in periwinkle, Catharanthus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A recessive EMS-induced mutation inherited in Mendelian fashion caused monocotyledonous embryo formation and seed germination on high salt medium in Catharanthus roseus. Availability during embryo development of exoge- nously supplied cytokinin kinetin suppressed the mutant phenotype. These observations ...

  7. Analysis of mutations causing familial hypercholesterolaemia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the LDLR (coding region, promoter and intron/exon boundaries), APOB (part of exon 26) and PCSK9 genes (exon 7), using high-resolution melting. Results. Eight LDLR mutations were identified, ... screened by four overlapping PCR fragments and exon 10 (228 bp) by two overlapping fragments. Amplification of most of the ...

  8. Mutation rate at swine microsatellite loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Gen Hua; Beeckmann, Petra; Geldermann, Hermann

    2002-03-01

    During genotyping of 38 microsatellites for QTL (quantitative trait loci) mapping in three F2 swine populations, five mutant alleles were detected in a total of 66,436 parent-offspring transfers of microsatellite alleles, which gives an overall mutation rate of 7.52 x 10(-5) per locus per generation. No significant (P > 0.05) association between mutation rates and other factors (i.e., GC contents in the flanking regions, heterozygosity, and repeat number) was revealed. Detailed sequencing showed that four out of five mutant alleles were caused by insertions of one to five repeats, respectively. The other mutant allele was produced by either an insertion of three repeats or a change of 30 base pairs (a deletion of 16 CT repeats and an insertion of one CA repeat). An insertion of one base pair in the flanking region of a microsatellite was also detected. Together, these data indicate that expansions are more common than contractions among microsatellites and that the mutation processes are very complicated, do not fit with the strict stepwise mutation model and may vary from locus to locus.

  9. [Mutation voice disorders conditioned by psychic factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowska, Anna; Obrebowski, Andrzej; Studzińska, Katarzyna; Swidziński, Piotr

    2010-01-01

    The case of 17 year old boy with mutational falsetto conditioned by a complex of psychic factors particulary with personality disorders and strong emotional bond with his mother was described. Phonation exercises lowered the average voice pitch. The stable results of phoniatric rehabilitation is dependent on effectiveness of psychological therapy of the whole family. Acoustic voice analysis demonstrates objectively the results of rehabilitation.

  10. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  11. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    variants and allows the inclusion of future reports. The database is based on the Leiden Open (source) Variation Database (LOVD) software, and is accessible online at http://www.lovd.nl/porcn. At present, the database contains 106 variants, representing 68 different mutations, scattered along the whole...

  12. Mitochondrial mutations and polymorphisms in psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sequeira (Vasco); M.V. Martin (Maureen); S.M. Rollins; E.A. Moon (Emily); W.E. Bunney (William E); F. MacCiardi (Fabio); S. Lupoli (Sara); G.D. Smith; J. Kelsoe (John); C.N. Magnan (Christophe); M. van Oven (Mannis); P. Baldi (Pierre); D.C. Wallace; M.P. Vawter (Marquis)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMitochondrial deficiencies with unknown causes have been observed in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) in imaging and postmortem studies. Polymorphisms and somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were investigated as potential causes with next generation sequencing of

  13. Chromosomal localization of autosomal mutations in Drosophila ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    We studied two eye colour and two wing mutants (sepia, brown, crossveinless and Curly) in Drosophila nasuta nasuta and four eye colour mutants (brown, carmine, pur- ple and bright eyes) in Drosophila nasuta albomicans. Most mutations were isolated from natural populations whereas two (crossveinless and Curly in D.

  14. Screening of three Mediterranean phenylketonuria mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kaabachi N. 2012 Screening of three Mediterranean phenylketonuria mutations in Tunisian families. J. Genet. 91, 91–94]. Introduction. Phenylketonuria (PKU; OMIM 261600) is an autoso- mal recessive disease caused by the liver phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) enzyme (EC1.14.16.1) deficiency. If untreated, causes ...

  15. Intersex (ix) mutations of Drosophila melanogaster cause ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study on the effect of different intersex mutations on genital disc development provides the following major results: (i) similar range of a characteristic array of morphological structures (from almost double sex terminalia to extreme reduction of terminal appendages) was displayed by the terminalia of XX ix1/ix1, XX ...

  16. Rhodopsin mutations are scarcely implicated in autosomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reem Mebed

    2015-04-23

    Apr 23, 2015 ... Rhodopsin mutations are scarcely implicated in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa: A preliminary study of Egyptian retinitis pigmentosa patients. Reem Mebed a,. *, Yasser B.M. Ali b. , Nahed Solouma c. , Amr Eldib d. ,. Mahmoud Amer e. , Ahmed Osman e,f a National Organization for Research and ...

  17. Mutational Analysis of Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erstad, Derek J. [Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Cusack, James C. Jr., E-mail: jcusack@mgh.harvard.edu [Division of Surgical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114 (United States)

    2014-10-17

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine malignancy that is associated with a poor prognosis. The pathogenesis of MCC is not well understood, and despite a recent plethora of mutational analyses, we have yet to find a set of signature mutations implicated in the majority of cases. Mutations, including TP53, Retinoblastoma and PIK3CA, have been documented in subsets of patients. Other mechanisms are also likely at play, including infection with the Merkel cell polyomavirus in a subset of patients, dysregulated immune surveillance, epigenetic alterations, aberrant protein expression, posttranslational modifications and microRNAs. In this review, we summarize what is known about MCC genetic mutations and chromosomal abnormalities, and their clinical significance. We also examine aberrant protein function and microRNA expression, and discuss the therapeutic and prognostic implications of these findings. Multiple clinical trials designed to selectively target overexpressed oncogenes in MCC are currently underway, though most are still in early phases. As we accumulate more molecular data on MCC, we will be better able to understand its pathogenic mechanisms, develop libraries of targeted therapies, and define molecular prognostic signatures to enhance our clinicopathologic knowledge.

  18. Antifolate drug resistance: Novel mutations and haplotype ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malaria is a major public health concern in Northeast India with a preponderance of drug-resistant strains. Until recently thepartner drug for artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) was sulphadoxine pyrimethamine (SP). Antifolate drug resistancehas been associated with the mutations at dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) and ...

  19. Upper Bounds for Mutations of Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Cruz Morales

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this note we provide a new, algebraic proof of the excessive Laurent phenomenon for mutations of potentials (in the sense of [Galkin S., Usnich A., Preprint IPMU 10-0100, 2010] by introducing to this theory the analogue of the upper bounds from [Berenstein A., Fomin S., Zelevinsky A., Duke Math. J. 126 (2005, 1-52].

  20. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  1. The inheritance of pathogenic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, L M; Samuels, D C; Chinnery, P F

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations cause disease in >1 in 5000 of the population, and approximately 1 in 200 of the population are asymptomatic carriers of a pathogenic mtDNA mutation. Many patients with these pathogenic mtDNA mutations present with a progressive, disabling neurological syndrome that leads to major disability and premature death. There is currently no effective treatment for mitochondrial disorders, placing great emphasis on preventing the transmission of these diseases. An empiric approach can be used to guide genetic counseling for common mtDNA mutations, but many families transmit rare or unique molecular defects. There is therefore a pressing need to develop techniques to prevent transmission based on a solid understanding of the biological mechanisms. Several recent studies have cast new light on the genetics and cell biology of mtDNA inheritance, but these studies have also raised new controversies. Here we compare and contrast these findings and discuss their relevance for the transmission of human mtDNA diseases.

  2. The mutation spectrum in RECQL4 diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siitonen, H. Annika; Sotkasiira, Jenni; Biervliet, Martine; Benmansour, Abdelmadjid; Capri, Yline; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Crandall, Barbara; Hannula-Jouppi, Katariina; Hennekam, Raoul; Herzog, Denise; Keymolen, Kathelijn; Lipsanen-Nyman, Marita; Miny, Peter; Plon, Sharon E.; Riedl, Stefan; Sarkar, Ajoy; Vargas, Fernando R.; Verloes, Alain; Wang, Lisa L.; Kääriäinen, Helena; Kestilä, Marjo

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the RECQL4 gene can lead to three clinical phenotypes with overlapping features. All these syndromes, Rothmund-Thomson (RTS), RAPADILINO and Baller-Gerold (BGS), are characterized by growth retardation and radial defects, but RAPADILINO syndrome lacks the main dermal manifestation,

  3. FINDING NEMO: ESTIMATING IMPORT DEMAND FOR LIVE REEF FOOD FISH

    OpenAIRE

    Petersen, Elizabeth H.; Muldoon, Geoffrey; Johnston, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Reef fish traded alive for table food are high value-to-volume products, with demand centred in Hong Kong and southern mainland China. Import demand functions for live reef food fish are estimated for Hong Kong, in aggregate and for individual fish species. Cross-price, income and population elasticities, and the impact of SARS and Chinese New Year on demand, are estimated. Results show that price has a smaller influence on import demand than expected. The most influential factor is Chinese N...

  4. Mitochondrial mutations in subjects with psychiatric disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Sequeira

    Full Text Available A considerable body of evidence supports the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in psychiatric disorders and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are known to alter brain energy metabolism, neurotransmission, and cause neurodegenerative disorders. Genetic studies focusing on common nuclear genome variants associated with these disorders have produced genome wide significant results but those studies have not directly studied mtDNA variants. The purpose of this study is to investigate, using next generation sequencing, the involvement of mtDNA variation in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, and methamphetamine use. MtDNA extracted from multiple brain regions and blood were sequenced (121 mtDNA samples with an average of 8,800x coverage and compared to an electronic database containing 26,850 mtDNA genomes. We confirmed novel and rare variants, and confirmed next generation sequencing error hotspots by traditional sequencing and genotyping methods. We observed a significant increase of non-synonymous mutations found in individuals with schizophrenia. Novel and rare non-synonymous mutations were found in psychiatric cases in mtDNA genes: ND6, ATP6, CYTB, and ND2. We also observed mtDNA heteroplasmy in brain at a locus previously associated with schizophrenia (T16519C. Large differences in heteroplasmy levels across brain regions within subjects suggest that somatic mutations accumulate differentially in brain regions. Finally, multiplasmy, a heteroplasmic measure of repeat length, was observed in brain from selective cases at a higher frequency than controls. These results offer support for increased rates of mtDNA substitutions in schizophrenia shown in our prior results. The variable levels of heteroplasmic/multiplasmic somatic mutations that occur in brain may be indicators of genetic instability in mtDNA.

  5. Clinical mutation assay of tumors: new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starostik, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Mutation detection in tumors started with classical cytogenetics as the method of choice more than 50 years ago. Karyotyping proved to be sensitive enough to detect deletions or duplications of large chromosome segments, and translocations. Over time, new techniques were developed to detect mutations that are much smaller in scope. The availability of Sanger sequencing and the invention of the PCR improved the discriminatory power of mutation detection to just one base change in the genomic DNA sequence. Techniques derived from PCR (allele-specific PCR, qPCR) and improved or modified sequencing methods (capillary electrophoresis, pyrosequencing) considerably increased the efficiency and sample throughput of mutation detection assays. With the advent of massive parallel sequencing [also called next-generation sequencing (NGS)] in the past decade, a major shift to even higher sample throughput and a significant decrease in cost per sequenced base occurred. The application of the new technology provided a whole slew of novel biomarkers and potential therapy targets to improve diagnosis and treatment. It even led to changes in cancer classification as new information on the mutation profile of tumors became available that characterizes some disease entities better than morphology. NGS, which usually interrogates multiple genes at once and is a prime example of a multianalyte assay, started to replace older single analyte assays focused on analysis of one target, one gene. However, the transition to these extremely complex NGS-based assays is associated with multiple challenges. There are issues with adequate tissue source of nucleic acids, sequencing library preparation, bioinformatics, government regulations and oversight, reimbursement, and electronic medical records that need to be resolved to successfully implement the new technology in a clinical laboratory.

  6. Wolfram Syndrome: New Mutations, Different Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lugani, Francesca; Perri, Katia; Russo, Chiara; Tallone, Ramona; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Lorini, Renata; d'Annunzio, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Background Wolfram Syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by Diabetes Insipidus, Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy, and Deafness identified by the acronym “DIDMOAD”. The WS gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane protein called Wolframin, which recent evidence suggests may serve as a novel endoplasmic reticulum calcium channel in pancreatic β-cells and neurons. WS is a rare disease, with an estimated prevalence of 1/550.000 children, with a carrier frequency of 1/354. The aim of our study was to determine the genotype of WS patients in order to establish a genotype/phenotype correlation. Methodology/Principal Findings We clinically evaluated 9 young patients from 9 unrelated families (6 males, 3 females). Basic criteria for WS clinical diagnosis were coexistence of insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy occurring before 15 years of age. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Molecular sequencing revealed 5 heterozygous compound and 3 homozygous mutations. All of them were located in exon 8, except one in exon 4. In one proband only an heterozygous mutation (A684V) was found. Two new variants c.2663 C>A and c.1381 A>C were detected. Conclusions/Significance Our study increases the spectrum of WFS1 mutations with two novel variants. The male patient carrying the compound mutation [c.1060_1062delTTC]+[c.2663 C>A] showed the most severe phenotype: diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy (visual acuity 5/10), deafness with deep auditory bilaterally 8000 Hz, diabetes insipidus associated to reduced volume of posterior pituitary and pons. He died in bed at the age of 13 years. The other patient carrying the compound mutation [c.409_424dup16]+[c.1381 A>C] showed a less severe phenotype (DM, OA). PMID:22238590

  7. Coherent Somatic Mutation in Autoimmune Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kenneth Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Many aspects of autoimmune disease are not well understood, including the specificities of autoimmune targets, and patterns of co-morbidity and cross-heritability across diseases. Prior work has provided evidence that somatic mutation caused by gene conversion and deletion at segmentally duplicated loci is relevant to several diseases. Simple tandem repeat (STR) sequence is highly mutable, both somatically and in the germ-line, and somatic STR mutations are observed under inflammation. Results Protein-coding genes spanning STRs having markers of mutability, including germ-line variability, high total length, repeat count and/or repeat similarity, are evaluated in the context of autoimmunity. For the initiation of autoimmune disease, antigens whose autoantibodies are the first observed in a disease, termed primary autoantigens, are informative. Three primary autoantigens, thyroid peroxidase (TPO), phogrin (PTPRN2) and filaggrin (FLG), include STRs that are among the eleven longest STRs spanned by protein-coding genes. This association of primary autoantigens with long STR sequence is highly significant (). Long STRs occur within twenty genes that are associated with sixteen common autoimmune diseases and atherosclerosis. The repeat within the TTC34 gene is an outlier in terms of length and a link with systemic lupus erythematosus is proposed. Conclusions The results support the hypothesis that many autoimmune diseases are triggered by immune responses to proteins whose DNA sequence mutates somatically in a coherent, consistent fashion. Other autoimmune diseases may be caused by coherent somatic mutations in immune cells. The coherent somatic mutation hypothesis has the potential to be a comprehensive explanation for the initiation of many autoimmune diseases. PMID:24988487

  8. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer : Identification of mutation carriers and assessing pathogenicity of mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niessen, RC; Sijmons, RH; Berends, MJW; Ou, J; Hofstra, RNW; Kleibeuker, JH

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also referred to as Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by susceptibility to colorectal cancer and extracolonic malignancies, in particular endometrial cancer. HNPCC is caused by pathogenic mutations

  9. AChR deficiency due to ε-subunit mutations: Two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Faber (Carin); P.C. Molenaar (Peter); J.S.H. Vles (Johannes); D.M. Bonifati (Domenic); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.M. Kuks (Jan); J.H.J. Wokke (John); D. Beeson (David); M.H. de Baets (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCongenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine

  10. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients

  11. Preaxial polydactyly associated with a MSX1 mutation and report of two novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanarat, Onnida; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-01-01

    We report two novel heterozygous missense MSX1 mutations in two Thai families (c.739C>T; p.Pro247Ser and c.607G>A; p.Ala203Thr). The p.Ala203Thr mutation was found in a female patient, her sister, and their father and is associated with unilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, and microdontia. The p.Pro247Ser mutation was found in a three-generation Thai family and was associated with bilateral cleft lip and palate, hypodontia, microdontia, and dens invaginatus. The proband also had preaxial polydactyly of the left hand. The role of Msx1 in limb development in mice is discussed. Intrafamilial variability of the phenotypes is clearly evident. This is the first time that a limb anomaly has been reported to be associated with a mutation in MSX1. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. A Naturally Occurring hPMS2 Mutation Can Confer a Dominant Negative Mutator Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaides, Nicholas C.; Littman, Susan J.; Modrich, Paul; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    1998-01-01

    Defects in mismatch repair (MMR) genes result in a mutator phenotype by inducing microsatellite instability (MI), a characteristic of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC) and a subset of sporadic colon tumors. Present models describing the mechanism by which germ line mutations in MMR genes predispose kindreds to HNPCC suggest a “two-hit” inactivation of both alleles of a particular MMR gene. Here we present experimental evidence that a nonsense mutation at codon 134 of the hPMS2 gene is sufficient to reduce MMR and induce MI in cells containing a wild-type hPMS2 allele. These results have significant implications for understanding the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and the ability to generate mammalian cells with mutator phenotypes. PMID:9488480

  13. Gene Mutation in Neonatal Jaundice - Mutations in UGT1A1 and OATP2 Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jiang; Jie, Luo; Caiyun, Yang; Ying, Lin; Xuefang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the correlation of UGT1A1, OATP2 gene mutations and hyperbilirubinemia in newborns in Northern China. Gene mutations were analyzed at the 211 locus of UGT1A1 (Gly71Arg) and 388 locus of OATP2 (Asn130Asp). The 226 enrolled infants were divided into high, moderate, and low risk subgroups according to American Academy of Pediatrics guideline. Blood samples of the enrolled infants were collected for the analysis of the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The genotypes and allele frequencies of the polymorphisms were compared in each group. Both UGT1A1 and OATP2 gene mutations occur more often in high risk group and moderate risk group than in low risk group. The results suggested that Gly71Arg and Asn130Asp mutations in UGT1A1 and OATP2 genes might be involved in the development of hyperbilirubinemia in neonates.

  14. Simulation Study for Transfer of Antibiotic Resistance via Mutator Subpopulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philipsen, Kirsten Riber; Christiansen, Lasse Engbo; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    Evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations is an increasing problem having fatal consequences for treatment of diseases. Therefore it is very important to understand this evolution. Traditionally evolution is considered to happen by single point mutations, where each mutant must...... have a growth advantage over the parent strain and grow to a sufficient number before a second mutation can occur. However, when multiple mutations are necessary for development of resistance, single mutations occurring with a normal mutation rate can not always explain the observed resistance. We...... introduce an alternative hypothesis by which a subpopulation of mutators drives the evolution process. Resistance is acquired by a subpoplution of mutators, for which the mutation rate is much higher than the wild-type. If the resistance is located on a transferable plasmid it can subsequently...

  15. Fundus albipunctatus associated with compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations....

  16. Illness perceptions, risk perception and worry in SDH mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulsteijn, L.T. van; Kaptein, A.A.; Louisse, A.; Biermasz, N.R.; Smit, J.W.; Corssmit, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) mutation carriers are predisposed for developing paragangliomas. This study aimed to explore illness perceptions, risk perception and disease-related worry in these individuals. All consecutive SDHB and SDHD mutation carriers followed at the Department of Endocrinology

  17. Childhood Cancer Radiation May Cause Unwanted Gene Mutation in Some

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 167614.html Childhood Cancer Radiation May Cause Unwanted Gene Mutation in Some That flaw seems to increase risk ... and now researchers say they've found a gene mutation that seems to increase that risk. The researchers ...

  18. Toward a Unique Definition of the Mutation Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi

    2017-04-01

    In around 1943, while writing a classic paper with Luria, Delbrück envisioned two kinds of mutation rates: One was expressed as mutations per bacterium per unit time, the other as mutations per bacterium per division cycle. Due to minor mathematical errors, the precise connection between the two concepts remained elusive for Delbrück. As a result, researchers and educators alike are still grappling with the definition of the mutation rate. Within the context of microbial mutation, the current author proposes an idealized model to bring new clarity to the distinction between the two forms of the mutation rate that Delbrück once attempted to define and characterize. The paper also critiques two incorrect estimators of mutation rates and brings to light two important yet unexplored "invariance" hypotheses about mutation rates.

  19. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia eEmperador

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative.Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal.In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, these species also carry a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA.

  20. A systematic study of gene mutations in urothelial carcinoma; inactivating mutations in TSC2 and PIK3R1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfrid Sjödahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial carcinoma (UC is characterized by frequent gene mutations of which activating mutations in FGFR3 are the most frequent. Several downstream targets of FGFR3 are also mutated in UC, e.g., PIK3CA, AKT1, and RAS. Most mutation studies of UCs have been focused on single or a few genes at the time or been performed on small sample series. This has limited the possibility to investigate co-occurrence of mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed mutation analyses of 16 genes, FGFR3, PIK3CA, PIK3R1 PTEN, AKT1, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, ARAF, RAF1, TSC1, TSC2, APC, CTNNB1, and TP53, in 145 cases of UC. We show that FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations are positively associated. In addition, we identified PIK3R1 as a target for mutations. We demonstrate a negative association at borderline significance between FGFR3 and RAS mutations, and show that these mutations are not strictly mutually exclusive. We show that mutations in BRAF, ARAF, RAF1 rarely occurs in UC. Our data emphasize the possible importance of APC signaling as 6% of the investigated tumors either showed inactivating APC or activating CTNNB1 mutations. TSC1, as well as TSC2, that constitute the mTOR regulatory tuberous sclerosis complex were found to be mutated at a combined frequency of 15%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a significant association between FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations in UC. Moreover, the identification of mutations in PIK3R1 further emphasizes the importance of the PI3-kinase pathway in UC. The presence of TSC2 mutations, in addition to TSC1 mutations, underlines the involvement of mTOR signaling in UC.

  1. Contributions of intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection to levels of de novo HRAS mutations in the paternal germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulatou, Eleni; McVean, Gilean; Taylor, Indira B; McGowan, Simon J; Maher, Geoffrey J; Iqbal, Zamin; Pfeifer, Susanne P; Turner, Isaac; Burkitt Wright, Emma M M; Shorto, Jennifer; Itani, Aysha; Turner, Karen; Gregory, Lorna; Buck, David; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Kerr, Bronwyn; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Goriely, Anne

    2013-12-10

    The RAS proto-oncogene Harvey rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (HRAS) encodes a small GTPase that transduces signals from cell surface receptors to intracellular effectors to control cellular behavior. Although somatic HRAS mutations have been described in many cancers, germline mutations cause Costello syndrome (CS), a congenital disorder associated with predisposition to malignancy. Based on the epidemiology of CS and the occurrence of HRAS mutations in spermatocytic seminoma, we proposed that activating HRAS mutations become enriched in sperm through a process akin to tumorigenesis, termed selfish spermatogonial selection. To test this hypothesis, we quantified the levels, in blood and sperm samples, of HRAS mutations at the p.G12 codon and compared the results to changes at the p.A11 codon, at which activating mutations do not occur. The data strongly support the role of selection in determining HRAS mutation levels in sperm, and hence the occurrence of CS, but we also found differences from the mutation pattern in tumorigenesis. First, the relative prevalence of mutations in sperm correlates weakly with their in vitro activating properties and occurrence in cancers. Second, specific tandem base substitutions (predominantly GC>TT/AA) occur in sperm but not in cancers; genomewide analysis showed that this same mutation is also overrepresented in constitutional pathogenic and polymorphic variants, suggesting a heightened vulnerability to these mutations in the germline. We developed a statistical model to show how both intrinsic mutation rate and selfish selection contribute to the mutational burden borne by the paternal germline.

  2. NF- κB Essential Modulator Deficiency Leading to Disseminated Cutaneous Atypical Mycobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Braue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available NF- κB essential modulator (NEMO is a kinase integral to the macrophage TNF-α pathway, which leads to the intracellular destruction of Mycobacteria species. Defects in the NEMO pathway lead to a spectrum of diseases, including but not limited to ectodermal dysplasia, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases, and incontinentia pigmenti. In addition, paucity of NEMO can lead to the inability to mount a proper immune response against opportunistic pyogenic and mycobacterial infections, leading to dissemination to various organ systems. This manuscript will discuss the numerous clinical manifestations of NEMO deficiency, the differential diagnosis for atypical mycobacterial infections in immunocompetent adults, and feature a case report of rare isolated susceptibility to disseminated atypical mycobacteria due to a mutation in the first exon of the NEMO gene.

  3. Frameshift mutations in dentin phosphoprotein and dependence of dentin disease phenotype on mutation location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Pekka; Papagiannoulis-Lascarides, Lisa; Waltimo-Siren, Janna; Ollila, Päivi; Karjalainen, Sara; Arte, Sirpa; Veerkamp, Jaap; Tallon Walton, Victoria; Chimenos Küstner, Eduard; Siltanen, Tarja; Holappa, Heidi; Lukinmaa, Pirjo-Liisa; Alaluusua, Satu

    2011-04-01

    We describe results from a mutational analysis of the region of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene encoding dentin phosphoprotein (DPP) in 12 families with dominantly inherited dentin diseases. In eight families (five mutations in the N-terminal third of DPP), the clinical and radiologic features were uniform and compatible with dentin dysplasia type II (DD-II) with major clinical signs in the deciduous dentition. In the other families (four mutations in the more C-terminal part), the permanent teeth also were affected, and the diseases could be classified as variants of dentinogenesis imperfecta. Attrition was not prominent, but periapical infections were common. Discoloring with varying intensity was evident, and pulps and root canals were obliterated in the permanent dentition. All mutations caused a frameshift that replaced the Ser-Ser-Asx repeat by a code for a hydrophobic downstream sequence of approximately original length. We conclude that frameshift mutations in DSPP explain a significant part of dentin diseases. Furthermore, we propose that the location of the mutation is reflected in the phenotypic features as a gradient from DD-II to more severe disease that does not conform to the classic definitions of DI-II. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  4. RAS mutations and oncogenesis: not all RAS mutations are created equally

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Steven Miller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutation in RAS proteins is one of the most common genetic alterations observed in human and experimentally induced rodent cancers. In vivo, oncogenic mutations have been shown to occur at exons 12, 13, and 61, resulting in any one of 19 possible point mutations in a given tumor for a specific RAS isoform. While some studies have suggested a possible role of allele-specific mutation in determining tumor severity and phenotype, no general consensus has emerged on the oncogenicity of different mutant alleles in tumor formation and progression. Part of this may be due to a lack of a single, signature pathway that shows significant alterations between different mutations. Rather, it is likely that subtle differences in the activation, or lack thereof, of downstream effectors by different RAS mutant alleles may determine the eventual outcome in terms of tumor phenotype. This paper reviews our current understanding of the potential role of different RAS mutations on tumorigenesis, highlights studies in model cell culture and in vivo systems, and discusses the potential of expression array and computational network modeling to dissect out differences in activated RAS genes in conferring a transforming phenotype.

  5. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutation analysis in Norwegian families with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia: founder mutations in ACVRL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimdal, K; Dalhus, B; Rødningen, O K; Kroken, M; Eiklid, K; Dheyauldeen, S; Røysland, T; Andersen, R; Kulseth, M A

    2016-02-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT, Osler-Weber-Rendu disease) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease defined by the presence of epistaxis and mucocutaneous telangiectasias and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in internal organs. In most families (~85%), HHT is caused by mutations in the ENG (HHT1) or the ACVRL1 (HHT2) genes. Here, we report the results of genetic testing of 113 Norwegian families with suspected or definite HHT. Variants in ENG and ACVRL1 were found in 105 families (42 ENG, 63 ACVRL1), including six novel variants of uncertain pathogenic significance. Mutation types were similar to previous reports with more missense variants in ACVRL1 and more nonsense, frameshift and splice-site mutations in ENG. Thirty-two variants were novel in this study. The preponderance of ACVRL1 mutations was due to founder mutations, specifically, c.830C>A (p.Thr277Lys), which was found in 24 families from the same geographical area of Norway. We discuss the importance of founder mutations and present a thorough evaluation of missense and splice-site variants. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The molecular landscape of ASPM mutations in primary microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, A K; Swanson, E A; Cox, J J; Karbani, G; Malik, S; Springell, K; Hampshire, D; Ahmed, M; Bond, J; Di Benedetto, D; Fichera, M; Romano, C; Dobyns, W B; Woods, C G

    2009-04-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a model disease to study human neurogenesis. In affected individuals the brain grows at a reduced rate during fetal life resulting in a small but structurally normal brain and mental retardation. The condition is genetically heterogeneous with mutations in ASPM being most commonly reported. We have examined this further by studying three cohorts of microcephalic children to extend both the phenotype and the mutation spectrum. Firstly, in 99 consecutively ascertained consanguineous families with a strict diagnosis of MCPH, 41 (41%) were homozygous at the MCPH5 locus and all but two families had mutations. Thus, 39% of consanguineous MCPH families had homozygous ASPM mutations. Secondly, in 27 non-consanguineous, predominantly Caucasian families with a strict diagnosis of MCPH, 11 (40%) had ASPM mutations. Thirdly, in 45 families with a less restricted phenotype including microcephaly and mental retardation, but regardless of other neurological features, only 3 (7%) had an ASPM mutation. This report contains 27 novel mutations and almost doubles the number of MCPH associated ASPM mutations known to 57. All but one of the mutations lead to the use of a premature termination codon, 23 were nonsense mutations, 28 deletions or insertions, 5 splicing, and 1 was a translocation. Seventeen of the 57 mutations were recurrent. There were no definitive missense mutations found nor was there any mutation/phenotype correlation. ASPM mutations were found in all ethnic groups studied. This study confirms that mutations in ASPM are the most common cause of MCPH, that ASPM mutations are restricted to individuals with an MCPH phenotype, and that ASPM testing in primary microcephaly is clinically useful.

  8. Epistatic Mutations And Unpredictable Phenotypes In Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer; Abou Hachem, Maher; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    factors. The phenotypic changes arise from mutations in trans-regulatory elements but are nearly impossible to predict from sequence data alone. Often, the combinatorial effects of few mutations in global regulators give rise to unexpected phenotypes. To understand the epistatic effect and how unexpected...... phenotypes arise from seemingly unrelated mutations, we have studied two mutations in P. aeruginosa transcriptional regulators, sigma factor rpoD and algT....

  9. Fundus albipunctatus associated with compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schatz, Patrik; Preising, Markus; Lorenz, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations.......To describe a family with an 18-year-old woman with fundus albipunctatus and compound heterozygous mutations in RPE65 whose unaffected parents and 1 female sibling harbored single heterozygous RPE65 mutations....

  10. Mutational processes molding the genomes of 21 breast cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Nik-Zainal (Serena); L.B. Alexandrov (Ludmil); D.C. Wedge (David); P. van Loo (Peter); C. Greenman (Chris); J.W. Raine (John); D. Jones (David); J. Hinton (Jonathan); J. Marshall (John); L.A. Stebbings (Lucy); D. Menzies; S. Martin (Sandra); K. Leung (Kenric); L. Chen (Lina); C. Leroy (Catherine); M. Ramakrishna (Manasa); R. Rance (Richard); K.W. Lau (King Wai); L. Mudie (Laura); I. Varela (Ignacio); D.J. McBride (David); G.R. Bignell (Graham); S.L. Cooke (Susanna); A. Shlien (Adam); J. Gamble (John); I. Whitmore (Ian); M. Maddison (Mark); P.S. Tarpey (Patrick); H. Davies (Helen); E. Papaemmanuil (Elli); P.J. Stephens (Philip); S. McLaren (Stuart); A. Butler (Adam); J. Teague (Jon); G. Jönsson (Göran); J. Garber; R.A. Silver (Angus); P. Miron (Penelope); A. Fatima (Aquila); S. Boyault (Sandrine); A. Langerød (Anita); A. Tutt (Andrew); J.W.M. Martens (John); S.A.J.R. Aparicio (Samuel A. J.); Å. Borg (Åke); A.V. Salomon (Anne Vincent); G. Thomas (Gilles); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M.S. Neuberger (Michael); P.A. Futreal (Andrew); P.J. Campbell (Peter); M.R. Stratton (Michael)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAll cancers carry somatic mutations. The patterns of mutation in cancer genomes reflect the DNA damage and repair processes to which cancer cells and their precursors have been exposed. To explore these mechanisms further, we generated catalogs of somatic mutation from 21 breast cancers

  11. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KRAS mutation is widely accepted as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Although KRAS mutation is widely studied in CRC limited data are available about mutation rates and spectrum in CRC from developing countries like Saudi Arabia where epidemiological features of the disease are different. We studied ...

  12. Generation of mutation hotspots in ageing bacterial colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekowska, Agnieszka; Wendel, Sofie; Christian Fischer, Emil

    2016-01-01

    : most mutations were located in just a few hotspots in the genome, and over time, mutations increasingly were consistent with the involvement of 8-oxo-guanosine, formed exclusively on the transcribed strand. This work provides strong support for retromutagenesis as a general process creating adaptive...... mutations during ageing....

  13. Discordant diagnoses obtained by different approaches in antithrombin mutation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Søren; Nybo, Mads

    2014-01-01

    with a negative DHPLC mutation screening, discordant results were found in ten patients (62.5%) when using direct sequencing: Eight had the Basel mutation (c.218C>T), while two had the Cambridge II mutation (c.1246G>T). For seven of the ten patients this meant an altered clinical risk-assessment for future...

  14. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  15. GBA mutations in Gaucher type I Venezuelan patients: ethnic origins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Three geographical foci were identified, displaying mutation heterogeneity. N370S had multiple genetic origins, different from the Ashkenazi's; a single common remote ancestor for this mutation in the country was dismissed, according to the haplotype analysis. All mutations have a likely European Caucasoid descent.

  16. Markov chain for estimating human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2015-12-01

    The Markov chain was proposed to estimate the human mitochondrial DNA mutation pattern. One DNA sequence was taken randomly from 100 sequences in Genbank. The nucleotide transition matrix and mutation transition matrix were estimated from this sequence. We determined whether the states (mutation/normal) are recurrent or transient. The results showed that both of them are recurrent.

  17. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes profoundly increase the risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer among women. To explore the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the development of hereditary breast cancer among Indian women, we carried out mutation analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  18. A new PAX6 mutation in familial aniridia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, I.; Brown, A.; Van Heyningen, V.

    1995-01-01

    Aniridia (lack of iris) is caused by loss of function mutations in one copy of the PAX6 gene. Here we present a new PAX6 splice mutation in a family with autosomal dominant aniridia. The mutation is a single nucleotide change which, although occurring within an exon, affects the splice junction consensus and results in skipping of that exon.

  19. Evolutionary invasion and escape in the presence of deleterious mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Loverdo

    Full Text Available Replicators such as parasites invading a new host species, species invading a new ecological niche, or cancer cells invading a new tissue often must mutate to adapt to a new environment. It is often argued that a higher mutation rate will favor evolutionary invasion and escape from extinction. However, most mutations are deleterious, and even lethal. We study the probability that the lineage will survive and invade successfully as a function of the mutation rate when both the initial strain and an adaptive mutant strain are threatened by lethal mutations. We show that mutations are beneficial, i.e. a non-zero mutation rate increases survival compared to the limit of no mutations, if in the no-mutation limit the survival probability of the initial strain is smaller than the average survival probability of the strains which are one mutation away. The mutation rate that maximizes survival depends on the characteristics of both the initial strain and the adaptive mutant, but if one strain is closer to the threshold governing survival then its properties will have greater influence. These conclusions are robust for more realistic or mechanistic depictions of the fitness landscapes such as a more detailed viral life history, or non-lethal deleterious mutations.

  20. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  1. BEAMing Up Personalized Medicine: Mutation Detection In Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Andrea L.; Iglehart, J. Dirk

    2012-01-01

    BEAMing is a feasible, accurate and sensitive method for detection of PIK3CA mutations in circulating tumor DNA in blood. Mutation status of PIK3CA may change between primary tumor and recurrence. The results suggest a new approach for non-invasive determination of current mutation status in patients with metastatic disease.

  2. Fitness effects of fixed beneficial mutations in microbial populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozen, D.; Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Gerrish, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Beneficial mutations are intuitively relevant to understanding adaptation [1-3], yet not all beneficial mutations are of consequence to the long-term evolutionary outcome of adaptation. Many beneficial mutations - mostly those of small effect - are lost due either to (1) genetic drift [4, 5] or to

  3. Dietary factors and truncating APC mutations in sporadic colorectal adenomas.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  4. Dietary factors and Truncating APC Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, B.; Tiemersma, E.W.; Braam, H.; Muijen, van G.N.P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Kok, F.J.; Kampman, E.

    2005-01-01

    Inactivating mutations in APC are thought to be early, initiating events in colorectal carcinogenesis. To gain insight into the relationship between diet and inactivating APC mutations, we evaluated associations between dietary factors and the occurrence of these mutations in a Dutch case-control

  5. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, exonic substitution and whole-exon deletions identified in genomic DNA of these patients. In addition, this study identified mutations in cases in which no mutations were detectable ...

  6. Rapid detection of RB1 recurrent mutations in retinoblastoma by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mutations in RB1 in patients with retinoblastoma. Materials and methods. Subjects. To investigate recurrent mutations of RB1 in retinoblastoma patients, 121 children with sporadic or familial retinoblastoma. Keywords. retinoblastoma; ARMS-PCR; RB1 gene; recurrent mutation. Journal of Genetics Vol. 92, Online Resources.

  7. Diversity of ARSACS mutations in French-Canadians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiffault, I; Dicaire, M J; Tetreault, M; Huang, K N; Demers-Lamarche, J; Bernard, G; Duquette, A; Larivière, R; Gehring, K; Montpetit, A; McPherson, P S; Richter, A; Montermini, L; Mercier, J; Mitchell, G A; Dupré, N; Prévost, C; Bouchard, J P; Mathieu, J; Brais, B

    2013-01-01

    The growing number of spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (SACS) gene mutations reported worldwide has broadened the clinical phenotype of autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS). The identification of Quebec ARSACS cases without two known SACS mutation led to the development of a multi-modal genomic strategy to uncover mutations in this large gene and explore phenotype variability. Search for SACS mutations by combining various methods on 20 cases with a classical French-Canadian ARSACS phenotype without two mutations and a group of 104 sporadic or recessive spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause. Western blot on lymphoblast protein from cases with different genotypes was probed to establish if they still expressed sacsin. A total of 12 mutations, including 7 novels, were uncovered in Quebec ARSACS cases. The screening of 104 spastic ataxia cases of unknown cause for 98 SACS mutations did not uncover carriers of two mutations. Compounds heterozygotes for one missense SACS mutation were found to minimally express sacsin. The large number of SACS mutations present even in Quebec suggests that the size of the gene alone may explain the great genotypic diversity. This study does not support an expanding ARSACS phenotype in the French-Canadian population. Most mutations lead to loss of function, though phenotypic variability in other populations may reflect partial loss of function with preservation of some sacsin expression. Our results also highlight the challenge of SACS mutation screening and the necessity to develop new generation sequencing methods to ensure low cost complete gene sequencing.

  8. Molecular analyses of novel ASAH1 mutations causing Farber lipogranulomatosis: analyses of exonic splicing enhancer inactivating mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashyam, M D; Chaudhary, A K; Kiran, M; Reddy, V; Nagarajaram, H A; Dalal, A; Bashyam, L; Suri, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Kabra, M; Puri, R D; RamaDevi, R; Kapoor, S; Danda, S

    2014-12-01

    Farber lipogranulomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the ASAH1 gene. In the largest ever study, we identified and characterized ASAH1 mutations from 11 independent Farber disease (FD) families. A total of 13 different mutations were identified including 1 splice, 1 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) deletion and 11 missense mutations. Eleven mutations were exclusive to the Indian population. The IVS6+4A>G splice and IVS5-16delTTTTC PPT deletion mutations resulted in skipping of exon 6 precluding thereby the region responsible for cleavage of enzyme precursor. A missense mutation (p.V198A) resulted in skipping of exon 8 due to inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element. This is the first report of mutations affecting PPT and ESE in the ASAH1 gene resulting in FD. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Expanding the keratin mutation database: novel and recurrent mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in 28 patients with epidermolytic ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arin, M J; Oji, V; Emmert, S; Hausser, I; Traupe, H; Krieg, T; Grimberg, G

    2011-02-01

    Epidermolytic ichthyosis (EI) is a hereditary keratinization disorder caused by mutations in the keratin 1 (KRT1) or keratin 10 (KRT10) genes. In most cases of severe EI, heterozygous single point mutations are found at the highly conserved helix boundary motifs of KRT1 and KRT10 that play a critical role in filament formation. The presence of palmoplantar keratoderma suggests KRT1 mutations, whereas KRT10 mutations in most instances give rise to the nonpalmoplantar variants. To identify the underlying mutations in patients with EI and to correlate genotype and phenotype. Mutation analysis was performed in 28 patients with EI by direct sequencing of KRT1 and KRT10 genes. We identified 14 different mutations, of which four have not been published previously. Identification of novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations in EI allows improved understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as better patient management. © 2011 The Authors. BJD © 2011 British Association of Dermatologists.

  10. Familial Mediterranean fever with a single MEFV mutation: comparison of rare and common mutations in a Turkish paediatric cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylemezoglu, Oguz; Kandur, Yasar; Duzova, Ali; Ozkaya, Ozan; Kasapcopur, Ozgür; Baskin, Esra; Fidan, Kibriya; Yalcinkaya, Fatos

    2015-01-01

    Presence of common MEFV gene mutations strengthened the diagnosis of FMF in addition to the typical clinical characteristics of FMF. However, there are also rare mutations. P369S, A744S, R761H, K695R, F479L are the main rare mutations in Turkish population. We aimed to evaluate FMF patients with a single allele MEFV mutation and to compare patients with common and rare mutations. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of FMF patients with a single allele mutation who were followed up between 2008 and 2013 in six centres. We compared the patients with rare and common mutations for disease severity score, frequent exacerbations ( >1 attack per month), long attack period (>3 day), symptoms, age at the onset of symptoms, gender, consanguinity, and family history. Two hundred and seventeen patients (M/F=101/116) with the diagnosis of FMF and single mutation were included. Heterozygote mutations were defined as common (M694V, V726A, M68OI) and rare mutations (A744S, P369S, K695R, R761H, F479L). Sixty-seven patients (27 males, 40 females) had one single rare mutation and 150 (74 males, 76 females) had one single common mutation. No difference was found between the rare and common mutations with respect to the disease severity score. There was no significant difference between common and rare heterozygote form of mutations in terms of disease severity. Patients with typical characteristics of FMF, with some rare mutations (A744S, P369S) should be treated in the same manner as patients with a common mutation.

  11. FLT3 mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms: the Beaumont experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsay; Kelley, Harlan H; Meng, Xiuling; Prada, Anne; Crisan, Domnita

    2013-09-01

    FLT3 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia. Previous studies have reported FLT3 mutation in as many as 9.2% of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPNs), as well as in chronic myelogenous leukemia, that are negative for the JAK2 V617F gene mutation; no FLT3 mutation has been found in JAK2-positive MPNs, suggesting that the mutations are mutually exclusive. The goal of our study is to evaluate the mutational status of the FLT3 gene in patients with an MPN or MDS/MPN, in correlation with the JAK2 mutational status. Patient specimens were retrospectively identified on the basis of MPN or MDS/MPN diagnosis and JAK2 analysis from February 2006 to December 2011. FLT3 mutation analysis was performed on DNA extracted from 152 patients using polymerase chain reaction amplification and analysis of amplicons by gel electrophoresis for internal tandem duplication mutations and by restriction endonuclease digestion fragment analysis for the D835 point mutation. FLT3 mutation analysis was performed on 90 cases of JAK2-negative MPN or MDS/MPN and 62 cases of JAK2-positive MPN. One FLT3 internal tandem duplication mutation was identified in the JAK2-negative group (1.1%), and none were identified in the JAK2-positive group, confirming the absence of FLT3 mutations in JAK2-positive specimens. The FLT3-positive MPN patient was diagnosed with MPN, unclassifiable, and was later found to have myeloid sarcoma; thus, FLT3 mutation was not seen in the usual types of MPN in our series. Our result of 1.1% FLT3 mutations in JAK2-negative MPN and MDS/MPN cases is lower than the 9.2% previously reported.

  12. Sexual selection, germline mutation rate and sperm competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller AP

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important component of sexual selection arises because females obtain viability benefits for their offspring from their mate choice. Females choosing extra-pair fertilization generally favor males with exaggerated secondary sexual characters, and extra-pair paternity increases the variance in male reproductive success. Furthermore, females are assumed to benefit from 'good genes' from extra-pair sires. How additive genetic variance in such viability genes is maintained despite strong directional selection remains an evolutionary enigma. We propose that sexual selection is associated with elevated mutation rates, changing the balance between mutation and selection, thereby increasing variance in fitness and hence the benefits to be obtained from good genes sexual selection. Two hypotheses may account for such elevated mutation: (1 Increased sperm production associated with sperm competition may increase mutation rate. (2 Mutator alleles increase mutation rates that are revealed by the expression of condition-dependent secondary sexual characters used by choosy females during their mate choice. M Petrie has independently developed the idea that mutator alleles may account for the maintenance of genetic variation in viability despite strong directional selection. Results A comparative study of birds revealed a positive correlation between mutation rate at minisatellite loci and extra-pair paternity, but not between mutation rate and relative testes mass which is a measure of relative sperm production. Minisatellite mutation rates were not related to longevity, suggesting a meiotic rather than a mitotic origin of mutations. Conclusion We found evidence of increased mutation rate in species with more intense sexual selection. Increased mutation was not associated with increased sperm production, and we suggest that species with intense sexual selection may maintain elevated mutation rates because sexual selection continuously

  13. Characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LYU Tingxia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the characteristics of gene mutation in Chinese patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH. MethodsA total of 9 patients with HH who visited Beijing Friendship Hospital, Capital Medical University from January 2013 to December 2015 were enrolled. The genomic DNA was extracted, and PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing were performed for all the exons of four genotypes of HH, i.e., HFE (type Ⅰ, HJV (type ⅡA, HAMP (type ⅡB, TFR2 (type Ⅲ, and SLC40A1 (type Ⅳ to analyze gene mutations. A total of 50 healthy subjects were enrolled as control group to analyze the prevalence of identified gene mutations in a healthy population. ResultsOf all patients, 2 had H63D mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH, 1 had E3D mutation of HJV gene in type ⅡA HH, 2 had I238M mutation of TFR2 gene in type Ⅲ HH, and 1 had IVS 3+10 del GTT splice mutation of SLC40A1 gene in type Ⅳ HH. No patients had C282Y mutation of HFE gene in type Ⅰ HH which was commonly seen in European and American populations. Five patients had no missense mutation or splice mutation. In addition, it was found in a family that a HH patient had E3D mutation of HJV gene, H63D mutation of HFE gene, and I238M mutation of TFR2 gene, but the healthy brother and sister carrying two of these mutations did not had the phenotype of HH. ConclusionHH gene mutations vary significantly across patients of different races, and non-HFE-HH is dominant in the Chinese population. There may be HH genes which are different from known genes, and further investigation is needed.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA mutation load in a family with the m.8344A>G point mutation and lipomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Tina Dysgaard; Al-Hashimi, Noor; Duno, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown that difference in mtDNA mutation load among tissues is a result of postnatal modification. We present five family members with the m.8344A>G with variable phenotypes but uniform intrapersonal distribution of mutation load, indicating that there is no postnatal modification of mt......DNA mutation load in this genotype....

  15. Multiple gene mutations, not the type of mutation, are the modifier of left ventricle hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yubao; Wang, Jizheng; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yilu; Chen, Yi; Sun, Kai; Gao, Shuo; Zhang, Channa; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yin; Feng, Xinxing; Song, Ying; Wu, Yajie; Zhang, Hongju; Jia, Lei; Wang, Hu; Wang, Dong; Yan, Chaowu; Lu, Minjie; Zhou, Xianliang; Song, Lei; Hui, Rutai

    2013-06-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been challenging because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. To determine the mutation profile of Chinese patients with HCM and to correlate genotypes with phenotypes, we performed a systematic mutation screening of the eight most commonly mutated genes encoding sarcomere proteins in 200 unrelated Chinese adult patients using direct DNA sequencing. A total of 98 mutations were identified in 102 mutation carriers. The frequency of mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 was 26.0, 18.0, 4.0 and 3.5 % respectively. Among the 200 genotyped HCM patients, 83 harbored a single mutation, and 19 (9.5 %) harbored multiple mutations. The number of mutations was positively correlated with the maximum wall thickness. We found that neither particular gene nor specific mutation was correlated to clinical phenotype. In summary, the frequency of multiple mutations was greater in Chinese HCM patients than in the Caucasian population. Multiple mutations in sarcomere protein may be a risk factor for left ventricular wall thickness.

  16. [PRRT2 mutation and infantile convulsions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathot, M; Lederer, D; Gerard, S; Gueulette, E; Deprez, M

    2017-10-01

    New genetic techniques have made it possible to better understand the implications of the PRRT2 gene (proline rich transmembrane protein 2) in various neurological disorders. Mutations within this gene are responsible for kinesigenic paroxysmal dyskinesias (PKD) as well as for benign familial infantile epilepsy (BFIE), a disease associating infantile convulsions and choreoathetosis (ICCA), a form of familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM type 4), paroxysmal benign torticollis of childhood, and episodic ataxia. We describe the case of an infant, carrying a mutation of the PRRT2 gene, with a classical presentation. Through her progression over time, we raise the question of systematic use of anti-epileptic drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. AIRE-mutations and autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruserud, Øyvind; Oftedal, Bergithe E; Wolff, Anette B; Husebye, Eystein S

    2016-12-01

    The gene causing the severe organ-specific autoimmune disease autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) was identified in 1997 and named autoimmune regulator (AIRE). AIRE plays a key role in shaping central immunological tolerance by facilitating negative selection of T cells in the thymus, building the thymic microarchitecture, and inducing a specific subset of regulatory T cells. So far, about 100 mutations have been identified. Recent advances suggest that certain mutations located in the SAND and PHD1 domains exert a dominant negative effect on wild type AIRE resulting in milder seemingly common forms of autoimmune diseases, including pernicious anemia, vitiligo and autoimmune thyroid disease. These findings indicate that AIRE also contribute to autoimmunity in more common organ-specific autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  19. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  20. Expanding the clinical and mutational spectrum of Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome with biallelic UBE3B mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yilmaz, Rüstem; Tang, Sha; Reuter, Miriam S; Rahner, Nils; Grange, Dorothy K; Mortenson, Megan; Koty, Patrick; Feenstra, Heather; Farwell Gonzalez, Kelly D; Sticht, Heinrich; Boddaert, Nathalie; Désir, Julie; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Zweier, Christiane; Reis, André; Kubisch, Christian; Jewett, Tamison; Zeng, Wenqi; Borck, Guntram

    2014-07-01

    Biallelic mutations of UBE3B have recently been shown to cause Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome (also reported as blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual disability syndrome), an autosomal recessive condition characterized by hypotonia, developmental delay, intellectual disability, congenital anomalies, characteristic facial dysmorphic features, and low cholesterol levels. To date, six patients with either missense mutations affecting the UBE3B HECT domain or truncating mutations have been described. Here, we report on the identification of homozygous or compound heterozygous UBE3B mutations in six additional patients from five unrelated families using either targeted UBE3B sequencing in individuals with suggestive facial dysmorphic features, or exome sequencing. Our results expand the clinical and mutational spectrum of the UBE3B-related disorder in several ways. First, we have identified UBE3B mutations in individuals who previously received distinct clinical diagnoses: two sibs with Toriello-Carey syndrome as well as the patient reported to have a "new" syndrome by Buntinx and Majewski in 1990. Second, we describe the adult phenotype and clinical variability of the syndrome. Third, we report on the first instance of homozygous missense alterations outside the HECT domain of UBE3B, observed in a patient with mildly dysmorphic facial features. We conclude that UBE3B mutations cause a clinically recognizable and possibly underdiagnosed syndrome characterized by distinct craniofacial features, hypotonia, failure to thrive, eye abnormalities, other congenital malformations, low cholesterol levels, and severe intellectual disability. We review the UBE3B-associated phenotypes, including forms that can mimick Toriello-Carey syndrome, and suggest the single designation "Kaufman oculocerebrofacial syndrome".

  1. Mutation scanning of peach floral genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde H Dayton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutation scanning technology has been used to develop crop species with improved traits. Modifications that improve screening throughput and sensitivity would facilitate the targeted mutation breeding of crops. Technical innovations for high-resolution melting (HRM analysis are enabling the clinic-based screening for human disease gene polymorphism. We examined the application of two HRM modifications, COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR, to the mutation scanning of genes in peach, Prunus persica. The targeted genes were the putative floral regulators PpAGAMOUS and PpTERMINAL FLOWER I. Results HRM analysis of PpAG and PpTFL1 coding regions in 36 peach cultivars found one polymorphic site in each gene. PpTFL1 and PpAG SNPs were used to examine approaches to increase HRM throughput. Cultivars with SNPs could be reliably detected in pools of twelve genotypes. COLD-PCR was found to increase the sensitivity of HRM analysis of pooled samples, but worked best with small amplicons. Examination of QMC-PCR demonstrated that primary PCR products for further analysis could be produced from variable levels of genomic DNA. Conclusions Natural SNPs in exons of target peach genes were discovered by HRM analysis of cultivars from a southeastern US breeding program. For detecting natural or induced SNPs in larger populations, HRM efficiency can be improved by increasing sample pooling and template production through approaches such as COLD-PCR and QMC-PCR. Technical advances developed to improve clinical diagnostics can play a role in the targeted mutation breeding of crops.

  2. ELOVL5 mutations cause spinocerebellar ataxia 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Borroni, Barbara; Giorgio, Elisa; Lacerenza, Daniela; Ferrero, Marta; Lo Buono, Nicola; Ragusa, Neftj; Mancini, Cecilia; Gaussen, Marion; Calcia, Alessandro; Mitro, Nico; Hoxha, Eriola; Mura, Isabella; Coviello, Domenico A; Moon, Young-Ah; Tesson, Christelle; Vaula, Giovanna; Couarch, Philippe; Orsi, Laura; Duregon, Eleonora; Papotti, Mauro Giulio; Deleuze, Jean-François; Imbert, Jean; Costanzi, Chiara; Padovani, Alessandro; Giunti, Paola; Maillet-Vioud, Marcel; Durr, Alexandra; Brice, Alexis; Tempia, Filippo; Funaro, Ada; Boccone, Loredana; Caruso, Donatella; Stevanin, Giovanni; Brusco, Alfredo

    2014-08-07

    Spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders involving the cerebellum and 23 different genes. We mapped SCA38 to a 56 Mb region on chromosome 6p in a SCA-affected Italian family by whole-genome linkage analysis. Targeted resequencing identified a single missense mutation (c.689G>T [p.Gly230Val]) in ELOVL5. Mutation screening of 456 independent SCA-affected individuals identified the same mutation in two further unrelated Italian families. Haplotyping showed that at least two of the three families shared a common ancestor. One further missense variant (c.214C>G [p.Leu72Val]) was found in a French family. Both missense changes affect conserved amino acids, are predicted to be damaging by multiple bioinformatics tools, and were not identified in ethnically matched controls or within variant databases. ELOVL5 encodes an elongase involved in the synthesis of polyunsaturated fatty acids of the ω3 and ω6 series. Arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, two final products of the enzyme, were reduced in the serum of affected individuals. Immunohistochemistry on control mice and human brain demonstrated high levels in Purkinje cells. In transfection experiments, subcellular localization of altered ELOVL5 showed a perinuclear distribution with a signal increase in the Golgi compartment, whereas the wild-type showed a widespread signal in the endoplasmic reticulum. SCA38 and SCA34 are examples of SCAs due to mutations in elongase-encoding genes, emphasizing the importance of fatty-acid metabolism in neurological diseases. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Oncogenic mutations of ALK kinase in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuyan; Takita, Junko; Choi, Young Lim; Kato, Motohiro; Ohira, Miki; Sanada, Masashi; Wang, Lili; Soda, Manabu; Kikuchi, Akira; Igarashi, Takashi; Nakagawara, Akira; Hayashi, Yasuhide; Mano, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Seishi

    2008-10-16

    Neuroblastoma in advanced stages is one of the most intractable paediatric cancers, even with recent therapeutic advances. Neuroblastoma harbours a variety of genetic changes, including a high frequency of MYCN amplification, loss of heterozygosity at 1p36 and 11q, and gain of genetic material from 17q, all of which have been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma. However, the scarcity of reliable molecular targets has hampered the development of effective therapeutic agents targeting neuroblastoma. Here we show that the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), originally identified as a fusion kinase in a subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NPM-ALK) and more recently in adenocarcinoma of lung (EML4-ALK), is also a frequent target of genetic alteration in advanced neuroblastoma. According to our genome-wide scans of genetic lesions in 215 primary neuroblastoma samples using high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping microarrays, the ALK locus, centromeric to the MYCN locus, was identified as a recurrent target of copy number gain and gene amplification. Furthermore, DNA sequencing of ALK revealed eight novel missense mutations in 13 out of 215 (6.1%) fresh tumours and 8 out of 24 (33%) neuroblastoma-derived cell lines. All but one mutation in the primary samples (12 out of 13) were found in stages 3-4 of the disease and were harboured in the kinase domain. The mutated kinases were autophosphorylated and displayed increased kinase activity compared with the wild-type kinase. They were able to transform NIH3T3 fibroblasts as shown by their colony formation ability in soft agar and their capacity to form tumours in nude mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that downregulation of ALK through RNA interference suppresses proliferation of neuroblastoma cells harbouring mutated ALK. We anticipate that our findings will provide new insights into the pathogenesis of advanced neuroblastoma and that ALK-specific kinase inhibitors might improve its clinical outcome.

  4. Distinct pattern of p53 mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruck, C H; Rideout, W M; Olumi, A F

    1993-01-01

    double mutations, four of which were tandem mutations on the same allele. No double mutations were found in tumors from nonsmoking patients. None of the mutations in smokers were G:C-->T:A transversions, which would be anticipated for exposure to the suspected cigarette smoke carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl....... The results suggest that, although cigarette smoke exposure may not significantly alter the kinds of mutations sustained in the p53 gene, it may act to increase the extent of DNA damage per mutagenic event....

  5. Persistence of HIV-1 Transmitted Drug Resistance Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Hannah; Pillay, Deenan; Cane, Patricia; Asboe, David; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Dunn, David T.; Aitken, Celia; Asboe, David; Webster, Daniel; Cane, Patricia; Castro, Hannah; Chadwick, David; Churchill, Duncan; Clark, Duncan; Collins, Simon; Delpech, Valerie; Geretti, Anna Maria; Goldberg, David; Hale, Antony; Hué, Stéphane; Kaye, Steve; Kellam, Paul; Lazarus, Linda; Leigh-Brown, Andrew; Mackie, Nicola; Orkin, Chloe; Rice, Philip; Pillay, Deenan; Smit, Erasmus; Templeton, Kate; Tilston, Peter; Tong, William; Williams, Ian; Zhang, Hongyi; Zuckerman, Mark; Greatorex, Jane; Wildfire, Adrian; O'Shea, Siobhan; Mullen, Jane; Mbisa, Tamyo; Cox, Alison; Tandy, Richard; Hale, Tony; Fawcett, Tracy; Hopkins, Mark; Ashton, Lynn; Garcia-Diaz, Ana; Shepherd, Jill; Schmid, Matthias L; Payne, Brendan; Chadwick, David; Hay, Phillip; Rice, Phillip; Paynter, Mary; Clark, Duncan; Bibby, David; Kaye, Steve; Kirk, Stuart; MacLean, Alasdair; Aitken, Celia; Gunson, Rory

    2013-01-01

    There are few data on the persistence of individual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmitted drug resistance (TDR) mutations in the absence of selective drug pressure. We studied 313 patients in whom TDR mutations were detected at their first resistance test and who had a subsequent test performed while ART-naive. The rate at which mutations became undetectable was estimated using exponential regression accounting for interval censoring. Most thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs) and T215 revertants (but not T215F/Y) were found to be highly stable, with NNRTI and PI mutations being relatively less persistent. Our estimates are important for informing HIV transmission models. PMID:23904291

  6. MUTbase: maintenance and analysis of distributed mutation databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riikonen, P; Vihinen, M

    1999-10-01

    To develop tools for the submission of mutations to databases and maintenance of locus-specific mutation databases. Advanced, integrated computer systems are needed to store and organize the increasing mutation information. The MUTbase program suite provides an easy, interactive and quality-controlled submission of information to mutation databases. For further study of the databases on the World Wide Web, a number of tools are provided. The program package also writes and updates a large number of Web pages, e.g. about the distribution and statistics of disease-causing mutations, and changes in restriction patterns.

  7. Prospects for cellular mutational assays in human populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1984-06-29

    Practical, sensitive, and effective human cellular assays for detecting somatic and germinal mutations would have great value in environmental mutagenesis and carcinogenesis studies. Such assays would fill the void between human mutagenicity and the data that exist from short-term tests and from mutagenicity in other species. This paper discusses the following possible human cellular assays: (1) HPRT (hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase) somatic cell mutation based on 6-thioguanine resistance; (2) hemoglobin somatic cell mutation assay; (3) glycophorin somatic cell mutation assay; and (4) LDH-X sperm cell mutation assay. 18 references.

  8. Human diseases associated with GPR54 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, Milena Gurgel; Silveira, Leticia Ferreira Gontijo; Bianco, Suzy; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) was first described as an orphan receptor in the rat brain one decade ago. At that time, all we knew about this receptor was that it had a high homology with other G protein-coupled receptors, like galanin receptors. Later, its endogenous ligand, kisspeptin, was identified and the kisspeptin-GPR54 system became one of the most important excitatory neuroendocrine regulators of puberty initiation. Several loss-of-function mutations in GPR54 gene were described to be associated with sporadic and familial normosmic isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism phenotype in humans. Consistent with this fact, knockout mice for gpr54(-/-) recapitulated the human phenotype of the lack of reproductive maturation. On the other hand, a unique activating mutation (R386P) was recently described in this receptor in a girl with central precocious puberty. This missense mutation located at carboxy-terminal tail of the GPR54 leads to prolonged activation of intracellular signaling pathways in response to kisspeptin, suggesting an uncommon model of G protein-coupled receptor activation. This chapter will describe the kisspeptin-GPR54 complex physiology and its current role in human diseases. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  10. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia: pathophysiology and gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigae, Hideo; Furuyama, Kazumichi

    2010-10-01

    Sideroblastic anemia is characterized by anemia with the emergence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. Ring sideroblasts are erythroblasts characterized by iron accumulation in perinuclear mitochondria due to impaired iron utilization. There are two forms of sideroblastic anemia, i.e., inherited and acquired sideroblastic anemia. Inherited sideroblastic anemia is a rare and heterogeneous disease caused by mutations of genes involved in heme biosynthesis, iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis, or Fe-S cluster transport, and mitochondrial metabolism. The most common inherited sideroblastic anemia is X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) caused by mutations of the erythroid-specific δ-aminolevulinate synthase gene (ALAS2), which is the first enzyme of heme biosynthesis in erythroid cells. Sideroblastic anemia due to SLC25A38 gene mutations, which is a mitochondrial transporter, is the next most common inherited sideroblastic anemia. Other forms of inherited sideroblastic anemia are very rare, and accompanied by impaired function of organs other than hematopoietic tissue, such as the nervous system, muscle, or exocrine glands due to impaired mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, there are still significant numbers of cases with genetically undefined inherited sideroblastic anemia. Molecular analysis of these cases will contribute not only to the development of effective treatment, but also to the understanding of mitochondrial iron metabolism.

  11. Plant Breeding by Using Radiation Mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Si Yong; Kim, Dong Sub; Lee, Geung Joo (and others)

    2007-06-15

    A mutation breeding is to use physical or chemical mutagens to induce mutagenesis, followed by individual selections with favorable traits. The mutation breeding has many advantages over other breeding methods, which include the usefulness for improving one or two inferior characteristics, applications to broad species with different reproductive systems or to diverse plant materials, native or plant introduction with narrow genetic background, time and cost-effectiveness, and valuable mutant resources for genomic researches. Recent applications of the radiation breeding techniques to developments of flowering plants or food crops with improved functional constituents heightened the public's interests in agriculture and in our genetic resources and seed industries. The goals of this project, therefore, include achieving advances in domestic seed industries and agricultural productivities by developing and using new radiation mutants with favored traits, protecting an intellectual property right of domestic seeds or germplasm, and sharing the valuable mutants and mutated gene information for the genomic and biotech researches that eventually leads to economic benefits.

  12. Painful peripheral neuropathy and sodium channel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-06-02

    Peripheral neuropathy can lead to neuropathic pain in a subset of patients. Painful peripheral neuropathy is a debilitating disorder, reflected by a reduced quality of life. Therapeutic strategies are limited and often disappointing, as in most cases targeted treatment is not available. Elucidating pathogenetic factors for pain might provide a target for optimal treatment. Voltage-gated sodium channels NaV1.7-NaV1.9 are expressed in the small-diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons and their axons. By a targeted gene approach, missense gain-of-function mutations of NaV1.7-NaV1.9 have been demonstrated in painful peripheral neuropathy. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations produce a spectrum of pro-excitatory changes in channel biophysics, with the shared outcome at the cellular level of dorsal root ganglion hyperexcitability. Reduced neurite outgrowth may be another consequence of sodium channel mutations, and possible therapeutic strategies include blockade of sodium channels or block of reverse operation of the sodium-calcium exchanger. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of painful peripheral neuropathy offers new targets that may provide a basis for more effective treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail K Mithani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. METHODOLOGY: The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77% carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6% carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9% with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH complex. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  16. Mitochondrial mutations in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the salivary glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mithani, Suhail K; Shao, Chunbo; Tan, Marietta; Smith, Ian M; Califano, Joseph A; El-Naggar, Adel K; Ha, Patrick K

    2009-12-30

    The MitoChip v2.0 resequencing array is an array-based technique allowing for accurate and complete sequencing of the mitochondrial genome. No studies have investigated mitochondrial mutation in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas. The entire mitochondrial genome of 22 salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACC) of salivary glands and matched leukocyte DNA was sequenced to determine the frequency and distribution of mitochondrial mutations in ACC tumors. Seventeen of 22 ACCs (77%) carried mitochondrial mutations, ranging in number from 1 to 37 mutations. A disproportionate number of mutations occurred in the D-loop. Twelve of 17 tumors (70.6%) carried mutations resulting in amino acid changes of translated proteins. Nine of 17 tumors (52.9%) with a mutation carried an amino acid changing mutation in the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide dehydrogenase (NADH) complex. Mitochondrial mutation is frequent in salivary ACCs. The high incidence of amino acid changing mutations implicates alterations in aerobic respiration in ACC carcinogenesis. D-loop mutations are of unclear significance, but may be associated with alterations in transcription or replication.

  17. Spectrum of K ras mutations in Pakistani colorectal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murtaza, B.N.; Bibi, A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan); Rashid, M.U.; Khan, Y.I. [Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Johar Town, Lahore (Pakistan); Chaudri, M.S. [Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore (Pakistan); Shakoori, A.R. [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Quaid-i-Azam Campus, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2013-11-29

    The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasing daily worldwide. Although different aspects of CRC have been studied in other parts of the world, relatively little or almost no information is available in Pakistan about different aspects of this disease at the molecular level. The present study was aimed at determining the frequency and prevalence of K ras gene mutations in Pakistani CRC patients. Tissue and blood samples of 150 CRC patients (64% male and 36% female) were used for PCR amplification of K ras and detection of mutations by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, and nucleotide sequencing. The K ras mutation frequency was found to be 13%, and the most prevalent mutations were found at codons 12 and 13. A novel mutation was also found at codon 31. The dominant mutation observed was a G to A transition. Female patients were more susceptible to K ras mutations, and these mutations were predominant in patients with a nonmetastatic stage of CRC. No significant differences in the prevalence of K ras mutations were observed for patient age, gender, or tumor type. It can be inferred from this study that Pakistani CRC patients have a lower frequency of K ras mutations compared to those observed in other parts of the world, and that K ras mutations seemed to be significantly associated with female patients.

  18. EGFR Mutation Status in Uighur Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li SHAN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a transmembrane protein, is a member of the tyrosine kinase family. Gefitinib, an EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors, has shown a high response rate in the treatment of lung cancer in patients with EGFR mutation. However, significant differences in EGFR mutations exist among different ethnic groups. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of EGFR mutations in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients by using a rapid and sensitive detection method and to analyze EGFR mutation differences compared with Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Methods We examined lung adenocarcinoma tissues from 138 patients, including 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients, for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20, and 21 by using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR method. The mutation differences between Uighur and Han lung adenocarcinoma were compared by using the chi-square test method. Results EGFR mutations were detected in 43 (31.2% of the 138 lung adenocarcinoma patients. EGFR mutations were detected in 11 (16.2% of the 68 Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and in 32 (45.7% of the 70 Han lung adenocarcinoma patients. Significant differences were observed in the EGFR mutations between Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients and Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (P<0.001. Conclusion Our results indicate that the EGFR mutation in Uighur lung adenocarcinoma patients (16.2% is significantly lower than that in Han lung adenocarcinoma patients (45.7%.

  19. The many faces of alpha-synuclein mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Meike; Klein, Christine

    2013-06-01

    Since the first description of alpha-synuclein (SNCA) mutations in 1997, this gene has probably become the most intensely investigated one associated with monogenic Parkinson disease (PD). Prompted by the finding of a novel SNCA mutation, H50Q, we systematically explored the 145 published SNCA mutation carriers for a possible mutation (type)-specific clinical expression, which appears to be rather unique to SNCA mutations compared with other PD genes. The A53T mutation is associated with an approximately 10-year earlier age at onset than the other 3 known missense mutations, including the new H50Q mutation. Similarly, SNCA triplication carriers have an approximately 10-year earlier onset and a more rapid disease course than duplication carriers, who, overall closely resemble patients with idiopathic PD. Furthermore, higher order SNCA multiplications are associated with additional neurologic features, such as myoclonus. For the nonmotor features, their mere frequency appears less striking than their severity, with an early age of onset of depression or dementia, suicidal ideation, and multimodal hallucinations. We conclude that, (1) although SNCA mutations are a rare cause of PD, it remains worth testing for new mutations in this gene; (2) a differential view of SNCA mutations and variants may allow important pathophysiologic inferences even beyond monogenic PD and is warranted in the context of clinical counseling. Copyright © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.

  20. Mutation at the Human D1S80 Minisatellite Locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuppareddi Balamurugan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the general biology of minisatellites. The purpose of this study is to examine repeat mutations from the D1S80 minisatellite locus by sequence analysis to elucidate the mutational process at this locus. This is a highly polymorphic minisatellite locus, located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome 1. We have analyzed 90,000 human germline transmission events and found seven (7 mutations at this locus. The D1S80 alleles of the parentage trio, the child, mother, and the alleged father were sequenced and the origin of the mutation was determined. Using American Association of Blood Banks (AABB guidelines, we found a male mutation rate of 1.04×10-4 and a female mutation rate of 5.18×10-5 with an overall mutation rate of approximately 7.77×10-5. Also, in this study, we found that the identified mutations are in close proximity to the center of the repeat array rather than at the ends of the repeat array. Several studies have examined the mutational mechanisms of the minisatellites according to infinite allele model (IAM and the one-step stepwise mutation model (SMM. In this study, we found that this locus fits into the one-step mutation model (SMM mechanism in six out of seven instances similar to STR loci.

  1. Screening of sarcomere gene mutations in young athletes with abnormal findings in electrocardiography: identification of a MYH7 mutation and MYBPC3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Chika; Arimura, Takuro; Hayashi, Takeharu; Naruse, Taeko K; Kawai, Sachio; Kimura, Akinori

    2015-10-01

    There is an overlap between the physiological cardiac remodeling associated with training in athletes, the so-called athlete's heart, and mild forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common hereditary cardiac disease. HCM is often accompanied by unfavorable outcomes including a sudden cardiac death in the adolescents. Because one of the initial signs of HCM is abnormality in electrocardiogram (ECG), athletes may need to monitor for ECG findings to prevent any unfavorable outcomes. HCM is caused by mutations in genes for sarcomere proteins, but there is no report on the systematic screening of gene mutations in athletes. One hundred and two genetically unrelated young Japanese athletes with abnormal ECG findings were the subjects for the analysis of four sarcomere genes, MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3. We found that 5 out of 102 (4.9%) athletes carried mutations: a heterozygous MYH7 Glu935Lys mutation, a heterozygous MYBPC3 Arg160Trp mutation and another heterozygous MYBPC3 Thr1046Met mutation, all of which had been reported as HCM-associated mutations, in 1, 2 and 2 subjects, respectively. This is the first study of systematic screening of sarcomere gene mutations in a cohort of athletes with abnormal ECG, demonstrating the presence of sarcomere gene mutations in the athlete's heart.

  2. Mandibulofacial Dysostosis with Microcephaly: Mutation and Database Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Pernille Axel

    2016-01-01

    , we review the molecular basis of MFDM in the 69 individuals described to date, and report mutations in 38 new individuals, bringing the total number of reported individuals to 107 individuals from 94 kindreds. Pathogenic EFTUD2 variants comprise 76 distinct mutations and 7 microdeletions. Among point...... mutations, missense substitutions are infrequent (14/76; 18%) relative to stopgain (29/76; 38%), and splicing (33/76; 43%) mutations. Where known, mutation origin was de novo in 48/64 individuals (75%), dominantly-inherited in 12/64 (19%), and due to proven germline mosaicism in 4/64 (6%). Highly penetrant......-reported anomalies, include vestibular and ossicular malformations, reduced mouth opening, atrophy of cerebral white matter, structural brain malformations, and epibulbar dermoid. All reported EFTUD2 mutations can be found in the EFTUD2 mutation database (http://databases.lovd.nl/shared/genes/EFTUD2). This article...

  3. [Inflammatory fibroid polyps are true neoplasms with PDGFRA mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildhaus, H-U; Büttner, R; Binot, E; Merkelbach-Bruse, S; Wardelmann, E

    2009-12-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFP) are proliferations of CD34-positive spindle cells in the submucosa and mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract with an inflammatory infiltrate. IFP occur in the stomach, small bowel, colon and esophagus. To date, etiology and pathogenesis are unclear. A total of 29 IFP originating in the stomach, small bowel and colon were examined immunohistochemically, and mutational analyses of PDGFRA exons 10, 12, 14 and 18 were conducted. Activating mutations in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18 were found in 20 cases (69%). The mutational types are related to mutations known from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). D842V was the most frequent mutation. No activating mutations were found in exons 10 and 14. The majority of IFP reveal activating PDGFRA mutations. Our data indicate that IFP are true neoplasms (true benign tumors) and not reactive lesions. In terms of pathogenesis, the relationship between PDGFRA-mutant GISTs and IFP remains to be determined.

  4. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  5. IDH1 and IDH2 Mutations in Gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Adam; Holmen, Sheri; Colman, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 and 2, originally discovered in 2009, occur in the vast majority of low grade gliomas and secondary high grade gliomas. These mutations, which occur early in gliomagenesis, change the function of the enzymes, causing them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate, a possible oncometabolite, and to not produce NADPH. IDH mutations are oncogenic, although whether the mechanism is through alterations in hydroxylases, redox potential, cellular metabolism, or gene expression is not clear. The mutations also drive increased methylation in gliomas. Gliomas with mutated IDH1 and IDH2 have improved prognosis compared to gliomas with wild-type IDH. Mutated IDH can now be detected by immunohistochemistry and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. No drugs currently target mutated IDH, although this remains an area of active research. PMID:23532369

  6. Minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrova, Yuri E. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk; Ploshchanskaya, Olga G. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation); Kozionova, Olga S. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation); Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Medgorodok, Chelyabinsk 454076 (Russian Federation); Department of Radiobiology, Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk 454021 (Russian Federation)

    2006-12-01

    Germline mutation at eight minisatellite loci has been studied among the irradiated families from the Techa River population and non-exposed families from the rural area of the Chelyabinsk and Kurgan Oblasts. The groups were matched by ethnicity, parental age, occupation and smoking habit. A statistically significant 1.7-fold increase in mutation rate was found in the germline of irradiated fathers, whereas maternal germline mutation rate in the exposed families was not elevated. Most of the minisatellite loci showed an elevated paternal mutation rate in the exposed group, indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Techa River population. These data suggest that the elevated minisatellite mutation rate can be attributed to radioactive exposure. The spectra of paternal mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable.

  7. OBSCN Mutations Associated with Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Haploinsufficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Marston

    Full Text Available Studies of the functional consequences of DCM-causing mutations have been limited to a few cases where patients with known mutations had heart transplants. To increase the number of potential tissue samples for direct investigation we performed whole exon sequencing of explanted heart muscle samples from 30 patients that had a diagnosis of familial dilated cardiomyopathy and screened for potentially disease-causing mutations in 58 HCM or DCM-related genes.We identified 5 potentially disease-causing OBSCN mutations in 4 samples; one sample had two OBSCN mutations and one mutation was judged to be not disease-related. Also identified were 6 truncating mutations in TTN, 3 mutations in MYH7, 2 in DSP and one each in TNNC1, TNNI3, MYOM1, VCL, GLA, PLB, TCAP, PKP2 and LAMA4. The mean level of obscurin mRNA was significantly greater and more variable in healthy donor samples than the DCM samples but did not correlate with OBSCN mutations. A single obscurin protein band was observed in human heart myofibrils with apparent mass 960 ± 60 kDa. The three samples with OBSCN mutations had significantly lower levels of obscurin immunoreactive material than DCM samples without OBSCN mutations (45±7, 48±3, and 72±6% of control level.Obscurin levels in DCM controls, donor heart and myectomy samples were the same.OBSCN mutations may result in the development of a DCM phenotype via haploinsufficiency. Mutations in the obscurin gene should be considered as a significant causal factor of DCM, alone or in concert with other mutations.

  8. Mutations in the sarcomere gene MYH7 in Ebstein anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Alex V; van Engelen, Klaartje; van de Meerakker, Judith; Rahman, Thahira; Probst, Susanne; Baars, Marieke J H; Bauer, Ulrike; Pickardt, Thomas; Sperling, Silke R; Berger, Felix; Moorman, Antoon F M; Mulder, Barbara J M; Thierfelder, Ludwig; Keavney, Bernard; Goodship, Judith; Klaassen, Sabine

    2011-02-01

    Ebstein anomaly is a rare congenital heart malformation characterized by adherence of the septal and posterior leaflets of the tricuspid valve to the underlying myocardium. An association between Ebstein anomaly with left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC) and mutations in MYH7 encoding β-myosin heavy chain has been shown; in this report, we have screened for MYH7 mutations in a cohort of probands with Ebstein anomaly in a large population-based study. Mutational analysis in a cohort of 141 unrelated probands with Ebstein anomaly was performed by next-generation sequencing and direct DNA sequencing of MYH7. Heterozygous mutations were identified in 8 of 141 samples (6%). Seven distinct mutations were found; 5 were novel and 2 were known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. All mutations except for 1 3-bp deletion were missense mutations; 1 was a de novo change. Mutation-positive probands and family members showed various congenital heart malformations as well as LVNC. Among 8 mutation-positive probands, 6 had LVNC, whereas among 133 mutation-negative probands, none had LVNC. The frequency of MYH7 mutations was significantly different between probands with and without LVNC accompanying Ebstein anomaly (PMYH7 mutation in the pedigrees of 3 of the probands, 1 of which also included another individual with Ebstein anomaly. Ebstein anomaly is a congenital heart malformation that is associated with mutations in MYH7. MYH7 mutations are predominantly found in Ebstein anomaly associated with LVNC and may warrant genetic testing and family evaluation in this subset of patients.

  9. PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with glycogen storage disease type IX: prevalence of deletion mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Rihwa; Park, Hyung-Doo; Kang, Ben; Choi, So Yoon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Kim, Jong-Won; Song, Junghan; Choe, Yon Ho

    2016-04-21

    Molecular diagnosis of glycogen storage diseases (GSDs) is important to enable accurate diagnoses and make appropriate therapeutic plans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD type IX. Thirteen Korean patients were tested for PHKA2 mutations using direct sequencing and a multiplex polymerase chain reaction method. A comprehensive review of the literature on previously reported PHKA2 mutations in other ethnic populations was conducted for comparison. Among 13 patients tested, six unrelated male patients with GSD IX aged 2 to 6 years at the first diagnostic work-up for hepatomegaly with elevated aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) were found to have PHKA2 mutations. These patients had different PHKA2 mutations: five were known mutations (c.537 + 5G > A, c.884G > A [p.Arg295His], c.3210_3212delGAG [p.Arg1072del], exon 8 deletion, and exons 27-33 deletion) and one was a novel mutation (exons 18-33 deletion). Notably, the most common type of mutation was gross deletion, in contrast to other ethnic populations in which the most common mutation type was sequence variant. This study expands our knowledge of the PHKA2 mutation spectrum of GSD IX. Considering the PHKA2 mutation spectrum in Korean patients with GSD IX, molecular diagnostic methods for deletions should be conducted in conjunction with direct sequence analysis to enable accurate molecular diagnosis of this disease in the Korean population.

  10. Clonal mutations in primary human glial tumors: evidence in support of the mutator hypothesis

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    Sarkar Chitra

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A verifiable consequence of the mutator hypothesis is that even low grade neoplasms would accumulate a large number of mutations that do not influence the tumor phenotype (clonal mutations. In this study, we have attempted to quantify the number of clonal mutations in primary human gliomas of astrocytic cell origin. These alterations were identified in tumor tissue, microscopically confirmed to have over 70% neoplastic cells. Methods Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was performed using a set of fifteen 10-mer primers of arbitrary but definite sequences in 17 WHO grade II astrocytomas (low grade diffuse astrocytoma or DA and 16 WHO grade IV astrocytomas (Glioblastoma Multiforme or GBM. The RAPD profile of the tumor tissue was compared with that of the leucocyte DNA of the same patient and alteration(s scored. A quantitative estimate of the overall genomic changes in these tumors was obtained by 2 different modes of calculation. Results The overall change in the tumors was estimated to be 4.24% in DA and 2.29% in GBM by one method and 11.96% and 6.03% in DA and GBM respectively by the other. The difference between high and lower grade tumors was statistically significant by both methods. Conclusion This study demonstrates the presence of extensive clonal mutations in gliomas, more in lower grade. This is consistent with our earlier work demonstrating that technique like RAPD analysis, unbiased for locus, is able to demonstrate more intra-tumor genetic heterogeneity in lower grade gliomas compared to higher grade. The results support the mutator hypothesis proposed by Loeb.

  11. TERT promoter mutations and their association with BRAF V600E mutation and aggressive clinicopathological characteristics of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Qu, Shen; Liu, Rengyun; Sheng, Chunjun; Shi, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Guangwu; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Hongyu; Wang, Yangang; Sun, Hui; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping; Xing, Mingzhao

    2014-06-01

    Promoter mutations chr5:1,295,228C>T and chr5:1,295,250C>T (termed C228T and C250T, respectively) in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been reported in various cancers and need to be further investigated in thyroid cancer. The aim of the study was to explore TERT promoter mutations in various thyroid tumors and examine their relationship with BRAF V600E mutation, iodine intake, and clinicopathological behaviors of thyroid cancer. TERT promoter and BRAF mutations were identified by sequencing genomic DNA of primary thyroid tumors from normal- and high-iodine regions in China, and clinicopathological correlation was analyzed. The C228T mutation was found in 9.6% (39 of 408) of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC), C250T was found in 1.7% (7 of 408) of PTC, and they were collectively found in 11.3% (46 of 408) of PTC. C228T was found in 31.8% (7 of 22) and C250T in 4.6% (1 of 22) of follicular thyroid cancer (FTC), and they were collectively found in 36.4% (8 of 22) of FTC. No TERT mutation was found in 44 benign thyroid tumors. The two mutations occurred in 3.8% (6 of 158) of BRAF mutation-negative PTC vs 16.0% (40 of 250) of BRAF mutation-positive PTC (P = 5.87 × 10(-4)), demonstrating their association. Unlike BRAF mutation, TERT promoter mutations were not associated with high iodine intake, but they were associated with older patient age, larger tumor size, extrathyroidal invasion, and advanced stages III/IV of PTC. Coexisting TERT and BRAF mutations were even more commonly and more significantly associated with clinicopathological aggressiveness. In this large cohort, we found TERT promoter mutations to be common, particularly in FTC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, and associated with aggressive clinicopathological characteristics.

  12. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stattin, Eva-Lena; Boström, Ida Maria; Winbo, Annika; Cederquist, Kristina; Jonasson, Jenni; Jonsson, Björn-Anders; Diamant, Ulla-Britt; Jensen, Steen M; Rydberg, Annika; Norberg, Anna

    2012-10-25

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2) for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52%) index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%), whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the mutations and 3 of 36 selected cases (8%) harboured a mutation in the

  13. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  14. Phenylketonuria mutation analysis in Northern Ireland: A rapid stepwise approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zschocke, J.; Graham, C.A.; Nevin, N.C. [Queen`s Univ., Belfast (Australia)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We present a multistep approach for the rapid analysis of phenylketonuria (PKU) mutations. In the first step, three common mutations and a polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) system are rapidly analyzed with a fluorescent multiplex assay. In the second step, minihaplotypes combining STR and VNTR data are used to determine rare mutations likely to be present in an investigated patient, which are then confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis. The remaining mutations are analyzed with denaturant gradient-gel electrophoresis and sequencing. The first two steps together identify both mutations in 90%-95% of PKU patients, and results can be obtained within 2 d. We have investigated 121 Northern Irish families with hyperphenylalaninemia, including virtually all patients born since 1972, and have found 34 different mutations on 241 of the 242 mutant alleles. Three mutations (R408W, 165T, and F39L) account for 57.5% of mutations, while 14 mutations occur with a frequency of 1%-6%. The present analysis system is efficient and inexpensive and is particularly well suited to routine mutation analysis in a diagnostic setting. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  15. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutation Profile of Well-Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Shin Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to significant insights into the genetic basis of thyroid tumorigenesis. Among the mutations commonly seen in thyroid cancers, the vast majority are associated with the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. B-Raf proto-oncogene (BRAF mutations are the most common mutations observed in papillary thyroid cancers (PTCs, followed by RET/PTC rearrangements and RAS mutations, while follicular thyroid cancers are more likely to harbor RAS mutations or PAX8/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ rearrangements. Beyond these more common mutations, alterations in the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT promoter have recently been associated with clinicopathologic features, disease prognosis, and tumorigenesis in thyroid cancer. While the mutations underlying thyroid tumorigenesis are well known, the frequency of these mutations is strongly associated with geography, with clear differences reported between Asian and Western countries. Of particular interest is the prevalence of BRAF mutations, with Korean patients exhibiting the highest rate of BRAF-associated thyroid cancers in the world. Here, we review the prevalence of each of the most common mutations in Asian and Western countries, and identify the characteristics of well-differentiated thyroid cancer in Asians.

  17. Filaggrin Mutation in Korean Patients with Atopic Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Hye Rang; Lee, Sang Eun; Kim, Song Ee; Hong, Won Jin; Kim, Hyun Jung; Nomura, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shotaro; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kim, Soo Chan

    2017-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing eczematous inflammatory skin disease. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) are major predisposing factors for AD. Ethnic differences exist between Asian and European populations in the frequency and spectrum of FLG mutations. Moreover, a distinct set of FLG mutations has been reported in Asian populations. The aim of this study was to examine the spectrum of FLG mutations in Koreans with AD. We also investigated the association of FLG mutations and clinical features of AD and compared the Korean FLG landscape with that of other East Asian countries. Seventy Korean patients with AD were enrolled in this study. Fourteen FLG mutations previously detected in Korean, Japanese, and Chinese patients were screened by genotyping. Four FLG null mutations (3321delA, K4022X, S3296X, and S2889X) were identified in eleven patients (15.7%). The most commonly detected mutations in Korean patients with AD were 3321delA (n=6, 9.1%) and K4022X (n=3, 4.5%). FLG mutations were significantly associated with elevated IgE (≥200 KIU/L and/or MAST-CLA >3+, p=0.005), palmar hyperlinearity (pKoreans and revealed an association between FLG mutations and AD phenotype.

  18. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  19. Spectrum of rhodopsin mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Joong; Kim, Cinoo; Bok, Jeong; Kim, Kyung-Seon; Lee, Eun-Ju; Park, Sung Pyo; Chung, Hum; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Kimm, Kuchan; Yu, Hyeong Gon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the spectrum and frequency of rhodopsin gene (RHO) mutations in Korean patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to characterize genotype–phenotype correlations in patients with mutations. Methods The RHO mutations were screened by direct sequencing, and mutation prevalence was measured in patients and controls. The impact of missense mutations to RP was predicted by segregation analysis, peptide sequence alignment, and in silico analysis. The severity of disease in patients with the missense mutations was compared by visual acuity, electroretinography, optical coherence tomography, and kinetic visual field testing. Results Five heterozygous mutations were identified in six of 302 probands with RP, including a novel mutation (c.893C>A, p.A298D) and four known mutations (c.50C>T, p.T17M; c.533A>G, p.Y178C; c.888G>T, p.K296N; and c.1040C>T, p.P347L). The allele frequency of missense mutations was measured in 114 ethnically matched controls. p.A298D, newly identified in a sporadic patient, had never been found in controls and was predicted to be pathogenic. Among the patients with the missense mutations, we observed the most severe phenotype in patients with p.P347L, less severe phenotypes in patients with p.Y178C or p.A298D, and a relatively moderate phenotype in a patient with p.T17M. Conclusions The results reveal the spectrum of RHO mutations in Korean RP patients and clinical features that vary according to mutations. Our findings will be useful for understanding these genetic spectra and the genotype–phenotype correlations and will therefore help with predicting disease prognosis and facilitating the development of gene therapy. PMID:21677794

  20. Progranulin null mutations in both sporadic and familial frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Isabelle; van der Zee, Julie; Hannequin, Didier; Gijselinck, Ilse; Campion, Dominique; Puel, Michèle; Laquerrière, Annie; De Pooter, Tim; Camuzat, Agnès; Van den Broeck, Marleen; Dubois, Bruno; Sellal, François; Lacomblez, Lucette; Vercelletto, Martine; Thomas-Antérion, Catherine; Michel, Bernard-François; Golfier, Véronique; Didic, Mira; Salachas, François; Duyckaerts, Charles; Cruts, Marc; Verpillat, Patrice; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Brice, Alexis

    2007-09-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most frequent type of neurodegenerative dementias. Mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN, PGRN) were recently identified in FTDU-17, an FTD subtype characterized by ubiquitin-immunoreactive inclusions and linkage to chromosome 17q21. We looked for PGRN mutations in a large series of 210 FTD patients (52 familial, 158 sporadic) to accurately evaluate the frequency of PGRN mutations in both sporadic and familial FTD, and FTD with associated motoneuron disease (FTD-MND), as well as to study the clinical phenotype of patients with a PGRN mutation. We identified nine novel PGRN null mutations in 10 index patients. The relative frequency of PGRN null mutations in FTD was 4.8% (10/210) and 12.8% (5/39) in pure familial forms. Interestingly, 5/158 (3.2%) apparently sporadic FTD patients carried a PGRN mutation, suggesting the possibility of de novo mutations or incomplete penetrance. In contrast, none of the 43 patients with FTD-MND had PGRN mutations, supporting that FTDU-17 and FTD-MND are genetically distinct. The clinical phenotype of PGRN mutation carriers was particular because of the wide range in onset age and the frequent occurrence of early apraxia (50%), visual hallucinations (30%), and parkinsonism (30%) during the course of the disease. This study supports that PGRN null mutations represent a more frequent cause of FTD than MAPT mutations (4.8% vs. 2.9%) but are not responsible for FTD-MND. It also demonstrates that half of the patients with a PGRN mutation in our series had no apparent family history of dementia. Taking this into account, genetic testing should be now considered more systematically, even in patients without obvious familial history of FTD. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. TKI Resistance for T790M Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong WANG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR the development of orally activesmall molecule inhibitors for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC provides anew treatment plan. EGFR gene mutation in patients with activation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs therapy for the treatment of sensitive, so that a large number of clinical benefit. The first generation of reversible ATP-competitive EGFR-TKIs, gefitinib and erlotinib as first-line, second-line or has the effect of maintenance therapy. Although the initial effect of these drugs have, but most patients will produce drug resistance. Within a year, 50%-60% patients had T790M housekeeping gene mutation associated with. Irreversible EGFR-TKIs recent background: afatinib and dac-omitinib covalent binding and inhibition of multiple ErbB family receptors (EGFR, HER2 and HER4. People evaluate these drugs as first-line treatment of significance, and acquired drug resistance situation significance on the first generation EGFR-TKIs. Afatinib is the first ErbB family approved blocking agent, used to treat with EGFR activatingmutations in patients with non small cell lung cancer; dacomitinib are in the later stages of clinicaldevelopment. EGFR inhibitors specifically targeting T790M resistance mutations (AZD9291, CO-1686, HM61713 are in the early stages of development. As discussed in this paper, the scope of the EGFR-TKIs kinase to target different, EGFR receptor binding was reversible and drug interaction potential is also different. For clinicians, these differences of the multi drug treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with meaning, from the innovative anticancer drug combination therapy strategy point of view, these differences are also of great significance.

  2. Identifying uniformly mutated segments within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinalp, S Cenk; Eichler, Evan; Goldberg, Paul; Berenbrink, Petra; Friedetzky, Tom; Ergun, Funda

    2004-12-01

    Given a long string of characters from a constant size alphabet we present an algorithm to determine whether its characters have been generated by a single i.i.d. random source. More specifically, consider all possible n-coin models for generating a binary string S, where each bit of S is generated via an independent toss of one of the n coins in the model. The choice of which coin to toss is decided by a random walk on the set of coins where the probability of a coin change is much lower than the probability of using the same coin repeatedly. We present a procedure to evaluate the likelihood of a n-coin model for given S, subject a uniform prior distribution over the parameters of the model (that represent mutation rates and probabilities of copying events). In the absence of detailed prior knowledge of these parameters, the algorithm can be used to determine whether the a posteriori probability for n=1 is higher than for any other n>1. Our algorithm runs in time O(l4logl), where l is the length of S, through a dynamic programming approach which exploits the assumed convexity of the a posteriori probability for n. Our test can be used in the analysis of long alignments between pairs of genomic sequences in a number of ways. For example, functional regions in genome sequences exhibit much lower mutation rates than non-functional regions. Because our test provides means for determining variations in the mutation rate, it may be used to distinguish functional regions from non-functional ones. Another application is in determining whether two highly similar, thus evolutionarily related, genome segments are the result of a single copy event or of a complex series of copy events. This is particularly an issue in evolutionary studies of genome regions rich with repeat segments (especially tandemly repeated segments).

  3. Structural Consequences of Calmodulin EF Hand Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Taiakina, Valentina; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, J Guy

    2017-02-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein that serves as a control element for many enzymes. It consists of two globular domains, each containing two EF hand pairs capable of binding Ca(2+), joined by a flexible central linker region. CaM is able to bind and activate its target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+)-binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. These CaM mutant proteins are deficient in binding Ca(2+) in either the N-lobe EF hands (CaM12), C-lobe EF hands (CaM34), or all four EF hands (CaM1234). To investigate potential structural changes these mutations may cause, we performed detailed NMR studies of CaM12, CaM34, and CaM1234 including determining the solution structure of CaM1234. We then investigated if these CaM mutants affected the interaction of CaM with a target protein known to interact with apoCaM by determining the solution structure of CaM34 bound to the iNOS CaM binding domain peptide. The structures provide direct structural evidence of changes that are present in these Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants and show these mutations increase the hydrophobic exposed surface and decrease the electronegative surface potential throughout each lobe of CaM. These Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants may not be a true representation of apoCaM and may not allow for native-like interactions of apoCaM with its target proteins.

  4. Screening for duplications, deletions and a common intronic mutation detects 35% of second mutations in patients with USH2A monoallelic mutations on Sanger sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele-Stallard, Heather B; Le Quesne Stabej, Polona; Lenassi, Eva; Luxon, Linda M; Claustres, Mireille; Roux, Anne-Francoise; Webster, Andrew R; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2013-08-08

    Usher Syndrome is the leading cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is divided into three subtypes, of which the most common is Usher type 2, and the USH2A gene accounts for 75-80% of cases. Despite recent sequencing strategies, in our cohort a significant proportion of individuals with Usher type 2 have just one heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A, or no convincing disease-causing mutations across nine Usher genes. The purpose of this study was to improve the molecular diagnosis in these families by screening USH2A for duplications, heterozygous deletions and a common pathogenic deep intronic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. Forty-nine Usher type 2 or atypical Usher families who had missing mutations (mono-allelic USH2A or no mutations following Sanger sequencing of nine Usher genes) were screened for duplications/deletions using the USH2A SALSA MLPA reagent kit (MRC-Holland). Identification of USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was achieved by Sanger sequencing. Mutations were confirmed by a combination of reverse transcription PCR using RNA extracted from nasal epithelial cells or fibroblasts, and by array comparative genomic hybridisation with sequencing across the genomic breakpoints. Eight mutations were identified in 23 Usher type 2 families (35%) with one previously identified heterozygous disease-causing mutation in USH2A. These consisted of five heterozygous deletions, one duplication, and two heterozygous instances of the pathogenic variant USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G. No variants were found in the 15 Usher type 2 families with no previously identified disease-causing mutations. In 11 atypical families, none of whom had any previously identified convincing disease-causing mutations, the mutation USH2A: c.7595-2144A>G was identified in a heterozygous state in one family. All five deletions and the heterozygous duplication we report here are novel. This is the first time that a duplication in USH2A has been reported as a cause of Usher syndrome. We found that 8 of

  5. Equine diseases caused by known genetic mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finno, Carrie J; Spier, Sharon J; Valberg, Stephanie J

    2009-03-01

    The recent development of equine genome maps by the equine genome community and the complete sequencing of the horse genome performed at the Broad Institute have accelerated the pace of genetic discovery. This review focuses on genetic diseases in the horse for which a mutation is currently known, including hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, severe combined immunodeficiency, overo lethal white syndrome, junctional epidermolysis bullosa, glycogen branching enzyme deficiency, malignant hyperthermia, hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia, and polysaccharide storage myopathy. Emphasis is placed on the prevalence, clinical signs, etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis for each disease.

  6. Heavy ion induced mutation in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Heavy ions, He, C, Ar and Ne were irradiated to the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana for inducing the new mutants. In the irradiated generation (M{sub 1}), germination and survival rate were observed to estimate the relative biological effectiveness in relation to the LET including the inactivation cross section. Mutation frequencies were compared by using three kinds of genetic loci after irradiation with C ions and electrons. Several interesting new mutants were selected in the selfed progenies of heavy ion irradiated seeds. (author)

  7. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  8. Population-based study of BRCA1/2 mutations: family history based criteria identify minority of mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateju, M; Stribrna, J; Zikan, M; Kleibl, Z; Janatova, M; Kormunda, S; Novotny, J; Soucek, P; Petruzelka, L; Pohlreich, P

    2010-01-01

    The two major susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are involved in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome. Early detection of mutation carriers has crucial clinical importance, as it allows identification of women who may benefit from intensive clinical follow-up or prophylactic surgery. Generally accepted inclusion criteria for BRCA1/2 mutation testing are based either upon family history of breast or ovarian cancer or young age at cancer diagnosis. In order to analyze the impact of BRCA1/2 mutations on breast cancer development in the Czech population and to confront the clinical and histopathological data of mutation carriers with current criteria for mutation testing we examined the frequency of mutations in unselected breast cancer cases. Mutational analysis of BRCA1/2 genes performed in 679 unselected female breast cancer patients included all recurrent deleterious alterations previously identified in the Prague area and truncating mutations in the whole exon 11 of BRCA1. Within analyzed gene sequences more than 80% of mutations were identified previously in high-risk patients. A total of 16 breast cancer patients (2.4%) carried a mutation. BRCA1 mutations were identified in 14 (2.1%) whereas BRCA2 in 2 (0.3%) women. Family history of ovarian cancer was a strong predictor of a BRCA1/2 mutation (OR = 8.3; p = 0.01), however, family history of breast cancer was not indicative of carrier status. A significant association between medullary breast cancer and mutation status was observed. Current criteria for BRCA1/2 mutation testing would distinguish only 6 out of 16 (37.5%) carriers identified in our study. Ten breast cancer patients with confirmed BRCA1/2 germ-line mutation exhibited no clinical characteristics that would predict their carrier status. Therefore, we believe that the testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in the Czech Republic may not be restricted only to high-risk patients. Our results indicate that analysis of locally prevalent BRCA1

  9. Interactions between Aβ and mutated Tau lead to polymorphism and induce aggregation of Aβ-mutated tau oligomeric complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Raz

    Full Text Available One of the main hallmarks of the fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17 is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain as an outcome of the aggregation of mutated tau protein. This process occurs due to a number of genetic mutations in the MAPT gene. One of these mutations is the ∆K280 mutation in the tau R2 repeat domain, which promotes the aggregation vis-à-vis that for the wild-type tau. Experimental studies have shown that in Alzheimer's disease Aβ peptide forms aggregates both with itself and with wild-type tau. By analogy, in FTDP-17, it is likely that there are interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated. Thus, to investigate the interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, we constructed fourteen ∆K280 mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes. In seven of the mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited hydrophobic interactions in their core domain, and in the other seven mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited salt-bridge interactions in their core domain. We considered two types of interactions between mutated tau oligomers and Aβ oligomers: interactions of one monomer of the Aβ oligomer with one monomer of the mutated tau oligomer to form a single-layer conformation, and interactions of the entire Aβ oligomer with the entire mutated tau oligomer to form a double-layer conformation. We also considered parallel arrangements of Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers in a single-layer conformation. Our results demonstrate that in the interactions of Aβ and mutated tau oligomers, polymorphic mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes were observed, with a slight preference for the double-layer conformation. Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers constituted a structurally stable confined β-structure, albeit one

  10. Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer Syndrome: CDH1 Mutations and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, Samantha; Kaurah, Pardeep; Li-Chang, Hector; Woo, Michelle; Senz, Janine; Pinheiro, Hugo; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Schaeffer, David F; Shumansky, Karey; Zogopoulos, George; Santos, Teresa Almeida; Claro, Isabel; Carvalho, Joana; Nielsen, Cydney; Padilla, Sarah; Lum, Amy; Talhouk, Aline; Baker-Lange, Katie; Richardson, Sue; Lewis, Ivy; Lindor, Noralane M; Pennell, Erin; MacMillan, Andree; Fernandez, Bridget; Keller, Gisella; Lynch, Henry; Shah, Sohrab P; Guilford, Parry; Gallinger, Steven; Corso, Giovanni; Roviello, Franco; Caldas, Carlos; Oliveira, Carla; Pharoah, Paul D P; Huntsman, David G

    2015-04-01

    E-cadherin (CDH1) is a cancer predisposition gene mutated in families meeting clinically defined hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC). Reliable estimates of cancer risk and spectrum in germline mutation carriers are essential for management. For