WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypogravity compatible methods

  1. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Lacquaniti

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person.

  2. Human Locomotion in Hypogravity: From Basic Research to Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Ivanenko, Yury P.; Sylos-Labini, Francesca; La Scaleia, Valentina; La Scaleia, Barbara; Willems, Patrick A.; Zago, Myrka

    2017-01-01

    We have considerable knowledge about the mechanisms underlying compensation of Earth gravity during locomotion, a knowledge obtained from physiological, biomechanical, modeling, developmental, comparative, and paleoanthropological studies. By contrast, we know much less about locomotion and movement in general under sustained hypogravity. This lack of information poses a serious problem for human space exploration. In a near future humans will walk again on the Moon and for the first time on Mars. It would be important to predict how they will move around, since we know that locomotion and mobility in general may be jeopardized in hypogravity, especially when landing after a prolonged weightlessness of the space flight. The combination of muscle weakness, of wearing a cumbersome spacesuit, and of maladaptive patterns of locomotion in hypogravity significantly increase the risk of falls and injuries. Much of what we currently know about locomotion in hypogravity derives from the video archives of the Apollo missions on the Moon, the experiments performed with parabolic flight or with body weight support on Earth, and the theoretical models. These are the topics of our review, along with the issue of the application of simulated hypogravity in rehabilitation to help patients with deambulation problems. We consider several issues that are common to the field of space science and clinical rehabilitation: the general principles governing locomotion in hypogravity, the methods used to reduce gravity effects on locomotion, the extent to which the resulting behavior is comparable across different methods, the important non-linearities of several locomotor parameters as a function of the gravity reduction, the need to use multiple methods to obtain reliable results, and the need to tailor the methods individually based on the physiology and medical history of each person. PMID:29163225

  3. Deformation compatibility control for engineering structures methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hanhua; Chen, Mengchong; Deng, Jianliang

    2017-01-01

    This book presents essential methods of deformation compatibility control, and explicitly addresses the implied conditions on the methods’ deformation compatibility. Consequently, these conditions can be considered in engineering structure design, while the conditions on stable equilibrium can be taken into account in the design method. Thus, the designed deformation and the actual deformation of the respective structure are approximately identical, guaranteeing both the flexibility of the construction material in force transmission and the equilibrium of force in the structure. Though equilibrium theory in engineering structures has been extensively studied, there has been comparatively little research on compatibility. In the limited researches available, the topics are primarily the theories and assumptions on the deformation compatibility, while few systematic works focus on the mechanical theoretical principles and methods of deformation compatibility control. As such, the flexibility of the constructi...

  4. Studies on compatibility of energetic materials by thermal methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice Carvalho Mazzeu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The chemical compatibility of explosives, pyrotechnics and propellants with those materials is studied to evaluate potential hazards when in contact with other materials during production, storage and handling. Compatibility can be studied by several thermal methods as DSC (differential scanning calorimetry, TG (Thermogravimetry, VST (Vacuum stability test and others. The test methods and well defined criteria are the most important elements when a compatibility study is being accomplished. In this paper, the compatibility of two very important high explosives used in ammunition, RDX (Cyclo-1,3,5-trimethylene-2,4,6-trinitramine and HMX (Cyclotetramethylene tetranitramine was studied with the materials: fluoroelastomer (Viton and powdered aluminum (Al, using DSC and VST methods. The criteria to judge the compatibility between materials is based on a standardization agreement (STANAG 4147, 2001, and the final conclusion is that explosives and this materials are compatible, but in DSC it was observed that the peak of decomposition temperature of the admixture of RDX with Al decreased in 3º C and another peak appeared after the decomposition peak.

  5. Microgravity Compatible Gas-Liquid Separation using Capillary Pressure Gradients Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative microgravity and hypogravity compatible Gas-Liquid Separator (GLS) is proposed. This novel GLS consists of an ordered array of variable sized water...

  6. Microfluidics and multielectrode array-compatible organotypic slice culture method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Sabolek, Helen; Levine, John B.; Staley, Kevin J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2009-01-01

    Organotypic brain slice cultures are used for a variety of molecular, electrophysiological, and imaging studies. However, the existing culture methods are difficult or expensive to apply in studies requiring long-term recordings with multielectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel method to maintain organotypic cultures of rodent hippocampus for several weeks on standard MEAs in an unmodified tissue culture incubator is described. Polydimethylsiloxane (Sylgard) mini-wells were used to stabilize organotypic cultures on glass and MEA surfaces. Hippocampus slices were successfully maintained within PDMS mini-wells for multiple weeks, with preserved pyramidal layer organization, connectivity, and activity. MEAs were used to record the development of spontaneous activity in an organotypic cultures for four weeks. This method is compatible with integration of microchannels into the culture substrate. Microchannels were incorporated into the mini-wells and applied to the guidance of axons originating within the slice, paving the way for studies of axonal sprouting using organotypic slices. PMID:19100768

  7. Gender influence on the performance of chest compressions in simulated hypogravity and microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordi, Mehdi; Kluge, Nicholas; Kloeckner, Mariana; Russomano, Thais

    2012-07-01

    In the event of a cardiac arrest during microgravity exposure, external chest compressions (ECCs) which form the main part of basic life support should be carried out while the advanced life support equipment is being deployed. This study was aimed to determine if there was any gender difference in the effectiveness of performing ECCs using a body suspension device to simulate lunar and Martian hypogravity and microgravity. The volunteers performed ECCs during simulated microgravity (using the Evetts-Russomano method): lunar, Martian, and Earth/Control. Each volunteer performed 3 sets of 30 compressions with 6 s rest in between. The volunteers had their increase in heart rate measured and used the Borg scale to rate the intensity of work after each protocol. The mean depth compressions for men during all gravitational simulations were higher than the women, but both sexes performed effective ECCs during the two tested hypogravity states. During simulated microgravity, men performed significantly deeper ECCs (mean +/- SD of 45.07 +/- 4.75 mm) than women (mean +/- SD of 30.37 +/- 4.75 mm). None of the women achieved the required mean depth of ECCs. Though the increase in heart rate was higher in women, no significant difference was seen in the Borg scale scores between genders during or after the performance of ECCs in microgravity. The results suggest both genders can perform effective ECCs during simulated hypogravity. Women, however, cannot perform effective ECCs during microgravity simulation. These findings suggest that there is a gender difference when performing the Evetts-Russomano method.

  8. Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for pathogenic endospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, S; Schumacher, W; Meisel, S; Elschner, M; Rösch, P; Popp, J

    2010-05-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is a fast and sensitive tool for the detection, classification, and identification of biological organisms. The vibrational spectrum inherently serves as a fingerprint of the biochemical composition of each bacterium and thus makes identification at the species level, or even the subspecies level, possible. Therefore, microorganisms in areas susceptible to bacterial contamination, e.g., clinical environments or food-processing technology, can be sensed. Within the scope of point-of-care-testing also, detection of intentionally released biosafety level 3 (BSL-3) agents, such as Bacillus anthracis endospores, or their products is attainable. However, no Raman spectroscopy-compatible inactivation method for the notoriously resistant Bacillus endospores has been elaborated so far. In this work we present an inactivation protocol for endospores that permits, on the one hand, sufficient microbial inactivation and, on the other hand, the recording of Raman spectroscopic signatures of single endospores, making species-specific identification by means of highly sophisticated chemometrical methods possible. Several physical and chemical inactivation methods were assessed, and eventually treatment with 20% formaldehyde proved to be superior to the other methods in terms of sporicidal capacity and information conservation in the Raman spectra. The latter fact has been verified by successfully using self-learning machines (such as support vector machines or artificial neural networks) to identify inactivated B. anthracis-related endospores with adequate accuracies within the range of the limited model database employed.

  9. Compatibility of global environmental assessment methods of buildings with an Egyptian energy code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Kamal Mohamed Shamseldin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Several environmental assessment methods of buildings had emerged over the world to set environmental classifications for buildings, such as the American method “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED the most widespread one. Several countries decided to put their own assessment methods to catch up with the previous orientation, such as Egypt. The main goal of putting the Egyptian method was to impose the voluntary local energy efficiency codes. Through a local survey, it was clearly noted that many of the construction makers in Egypt do not even know the local method, and whom are interested in the environmental assessment of buildings seek to apply LEED rather than anything else. Therefore, several questions appear about the American method compatibility with the Egyptian energy codes – that contain the most exact characteristics and requirements and give the outmost credible energy efficiency results for buildings in Egypt-, and the possibility of finding another global method that gives closer results to those of the Egyptian codes, especially with the great variety of energy efficiency measurement approaches used among the different assessment methods. So, the researcher is trying to find the compatibility of using non-local assessment methods with the local energy efficiency codes. Thus, if the results are not compatible, the Egyptian government should take several steps to increase the local building sector awareness of the Egyptian method to benefit these codes, and it should begin to enforce it within the building permits after a proper guidance and feedback.

  10. Application of Biosphere Compatibility Indicator for Assessment of the Effectiveness of Environmental Protection Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakaeva, N. V.; Vorobyov, S. A.; Chernyaeva, I. V.

    2017-11-01

    The article is devoted to the issue of using the biosphere compatibility indicator to assess the effectiveness of environmental protection methods. The indicator biosphere compatibility was proposed by the vice-president of RAASN (Russian Academy of Architecture and Building Sciences), Doctor of Technical Sciences, Professor V.I. Ilyichev. This indicator allows one to assess not only qualitatively but also quantitatively the degree of urban areas development from the standpoint of preserving the biosphere in urban ecosystems while performing the city’s main functions. The integral biosphere compatibility indicator allows us to assess not only the current ecological situation in the territory under consideration but also to plan the forecast of its changes for the new construction projects implementation or for the reconstruction of the existing ones. The biosphere compatibility indicator, which is a mathematical expression of the tripartite balance (technosphere, biosphere and population of this area), allows us to quantify the effectiveness degree of different methods for environment protection to choose the most effective one under these conditions.

  11. Screening Methods for Agent Compatibility with People, Materials, and the Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    the environment was held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology on November 14 and 15, 1997, which was attended by approximately 40 representatives from government, academia, and industry. The participants were asked to assess currently used screening methods for each of the following properties of candidate fire suppressants: environmental impact (including ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, and atmospheric lifetime); materials compatibility (including long-term storage stability, the interaction of the agent with metals, gaskets and

  12. [Compatibility regularity of compound traditional Chinese medicine patents based on association principle and entropy method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xiang-jun; He, Qing-yong

    2015-02-01

    To analyze the compatibility regularity of compound traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) patents for treating dyslipidemia, and provide basis for the clinical development and research of new TCM for treating dyslipidemia. Totally 243 compound traditional Chinese medicine patents for treating dyslipidemia were collected from the national patent database from September 1985 to March 2014 and analyzed by using drug frequency, association rules, complex network and entropy method of Traditional Chinese Medicine Inheritance System (V1.1). The commonest single medicine in the treatment of dyslipidemia is Crataegi Fructus 109 (44.86%). The commonest pair medicine is Crataegi Fructus-Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma 53 (21.81%). The commonest corner drug is Crataegi Fructus-Cassiae Semen-Polygoni Multiflori Radix 25 (10.29%). The common prescriptions on basis of association rules are Prunellae Spica-->Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma (0.833), Rhei Radix et Rhizoma, Alismatis Rhizoma-->Polygoni Multiflori Radix (1.00), Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma, Cassiae Semen, Alismatis Rhizoma-->Polygoni Multiflori Radix (0.929). The core drugs based on complex networks are Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma and Crataegi Fructus. The new prescriptions extracted by entropy method are Atractylodis Macrocephalae Rhizoma-Glycyrrhizae Radix et Rhizoma-Platycladi Semen-Stephaniae Tetrandrae Radix; Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium-Poria-Coicis Semen-Pinelliae Rhizoma. This study shows the regularity in the compatibility of compound TCM patents treating dyslipidemia, suggesting that future studies on new traditional Chinese medicines treating dyslipidemia should focus on the following six aspects: (1) Single medicine should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus; (2) Pair medicines should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus-Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix et Rhizoma; (3) Corner drugs should be preferred: e. g. Crataegi Fructus, Cassiae Semen, Polygoni Multiflori Radix; (4) The

  13. Vertical slice modelling of nonlinear Eady waves using a compatible finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroe; Shipton, Jemma; Cullen, Michael J. P.; Mitchell, Lawrence; Cotter, Colin J.

    2017-08-01

    A vertical slice model is developed for the Euler-Boussinesq equations with a constant temperature gradient in the direction normal to the slice (the Eady-Boussinesq model). The model is a solution of the full three-dimensional equations with no variation normal to the slice, which is an idealised problem used to study the formation and subsequent evolution of weather fronts. A compatible finite element method is used to discretise the governing equations. To extend the Charney-Phillips grid staggering in the compatible finite element framework, we use the same node locations for buoyancy as the vertical part of velocity and apply a transport scheme for a partially continuous finite element space. For the time discretisation, we solve the semi-implicit equations together with an explicit strong-stability-preserving Runge-Kutta scheme to all of the advection terms. The model reproduces several quasi-periodic lifecycles of fronts despite the presence of strong discontinuities. An asymptotic limit analysis based on the semi-geostrophic theory shows that the model solutions are converging to a solution in cross-front geostrophic balance. The results are consistent with the previous results using finite difference methods, indicating that the compatible finite element method is performing as well as finite difference methods for this test problem. We observe dissipation of kinetic energy of the cross-front velocity in the model due to the lack of resolution at the fronts, even though the energy loss is not likely to account for the large gap on the strength of the fronts between the model result and the semi-geostrophic limit solution.

  14. Feasibility of an electromagnetic compatibility method for MRgFUS using a wire mesh screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yazhu

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated an electromagnetic compatibility method for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in an MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery using a conductive wire mesh screen. This screen has a good ultrasound transmission and shielding effectiveness. A hybrid acoustic simulation method was developed to analyze the effects of mesh parameters and the HIFU working frequency on the acoustic field. Experiments were performed to measure both acoustic pressure profile and radiated electromagnetic noise. With the proposed mesh screen, the electromagnetic radiation emission was reduced by 14dB at 128MHz while the acoustic focal intensity was reduced by less than 11% using one screen. This shielding method is easy to implement and requires no additional phase correction method. This method also improves the quality of MR images. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [Compatibilities and incompatibilities between gamma rays and ethylene oxide as consecutive sterilization methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Rafael Queiroz; Graziano, Kazuko Uchikawa

    2010-12-01

    The doubt regarding the re-sterilization of articles made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) sterilized with gamma radiation (GR) and subsequently with ethylene oxide (EO) persists to date. Through a systematic literature review, this article analyzed studies that demonstrated compatibilities and incompatibilities between the sterilization processes with GR and EO, when used as consecutive sterilization methods. Seven studies were analyzed. It was verified that there is a multifactor influence regarding the safety of the procedure and that the chromatography analytical method employed by most studies yielded controversial results. This fact indicates the need for further studies on the issue, using more sensitive analytical methods than gas chromatography, such as the biological reactivity test in cell cultures, in an attempt to clarify the chronic doubt regarding the adequacy or inadequacy of sterilizing previously gamma-irradiated materials with EtO.

  16. Drug-Drug/Drug-Excipient Compatibility Studies on Curcumin using Non-Thermal Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moorthi Chidambaram

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenol isolated from dried rhizome of turmeric. Clinical usefulness of curcumin in the treatment of cancer is limited due to poor aqueous solubility, hydrolytic degradation, metabolism, and poor oral bioavailability. To overcome these limitations, we proposed to fabricate curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin and curcumin-silibinin loaded polymeric nanoformulation. However, unfavourable combinations of drug-drug and drug-excipient may result in interaction and rises the safety concern. Hence, the present study was aimed to assess the interaction of curcumin with excipients used in nanoformulations. Methods: Isothermal stress testing method was used to assess the compatibility of drug-drug/drug-excipient. Results: The combination of curcumin-piperine, curcumin-quercetin, curcumin-silibinin and the combination of other excipients with curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin have not shown any significant physical and chemical instability. Conclusion: The study concludes that the curcumin, piperine, quercetin and silibinin is compatible with each other and with other excipients.

  17. Streaming video-based 3D reconstruction method compatible with existing monoscopic and stereoscopic endoscopy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Henri; van der Mark, Wannes; Eendebak, Pieter T.; Landsmeer, Sander H.; van Eekeren, Adam W. M.; ter Haar, Frank B.; Wieringa, F. Pieter; van Basten, Jean-Paul

    2012-06-01

    Compared to open surgery, minimal invasive surgery offers reduced trauma and faster recovery. However, lack of direct view limits space perception. Stereo-endoscopy improves depth perception, but is still restricted to the direct endoscopic field-of-view. We describe a novel technology that reconstructs 3D-panoramas from endoscopic video streams providing a much wider cumulative overview. The method is compatible with any endoscope. We demonstrate that it is possible to generate photorealistic 3D-environments from mono- and stereoscopic endoscopy. The resulting 3D-reconstructions can be directly applied in simulators and e-learning. Extended to real-time processing, the method looks promising for telesurgery or other remote vision-guided tasks.

  18. Globally Conservative, Hybrid Self-Adjoint Angular Flux and Least-Squares Method Compatible with Void

    CERN Document Server

    Laboure, Vincent M; Wang, Yaqi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we derive a method for the second-order form of the transport equation that is both globally conservative and compatible with voids, using Continuous Finite Element Methods (CFEM). The main idea is to use the Least-Squares (LS) form of the transport equation in the void regions and the Self-Adjoint Angular Flux (SAAF) form elsewhere. While the SAAF formulation is globally conservative, the LS formulation need a correction in void. The price to pay for this fix is the loss of symmetry of the bilinear form. We first derive this Conservative LS (CLS) formulation in void. Second we combine the SAAF and CLS forms and end up with an hybrid SAAF-CLS method, having the desired properties. We show that extending the theory to near-void regions is a minor complication and can be done without affecting the global conservation of the scheme. Being angular discretization agnostic, this method can be applied to both discrete ordinates (SN) and spherical harmonics (PN) methods. However, since a globally conse...

  19. Comparison of point-of-care-compatible lysis methods for bacteria and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiniger, Erin K; Buser, Joshua R; Mireles, Lillian; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ladd, Paula D; Lutz, Barry R; Yager, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Nucleic acid sample preparation has been an especially challenging barrier to point-of-care nucleic acid amplification tests in low-resource settings. Here we provide a head-to-head comparison of methods for lysis of, and nucleic acid release from, several pathogenic bacteria and viruses-methods that are adaptable to point-of-care usage in low-resource settings. Digestion with achromopeptidase, a mixture of proteases and peptidoglycan-specific hydrolases, followed by thermal deactivation in a boiling water bath, effectively released amplifiable nucleic acid from Staphylococcus aureus, Bordetella pertussis, respiratory syncytial virus, and influenza virus. Achromopeptidase was functional after dehydration and reconstitution, even after eleven months of dry storage without refrigeration. Mechanical lysis methods proved to be effective against a hard-to-lyse Mycobacterium species, and a miniature bead-mill, the AudioLyse, is shown to be capable of releasing amplifiable DNA and RNA from this species. We conclude that point-of-care-compatible sample preparation methods for nucleic acid tests need not introduce amplification inhibitors, and can provide amplification-ready lysates from a wide range of bacterial and viral pathogens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. UNIFIED VERIFICATION METHOD OF ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY BETWEEN ROLLING STOCK AND TRAIN DETECTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bialon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Axle counters are more and more often applied in train detection systems. The wheel sensor is a main part of each axle counter system. In parallel, more and more complex railway vehicles, especially traction ones, are a potential source of interferences influencing the operation of these train detection systems. It is the reason to verify the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC between the signalling equipment, particularly train detection systems and new vehicles in the process of obtaining the permission for their exploitation. The measurement of interfering magnetic fields generated by vehicles is one of tests to be carried out. Methodology. For the simplification and unification purpose of the applied interference test methods the EN 50238 standard and TS 50238-3 technical specification were developed. The specification defines unified testing procedures. However, it is necessary to verify if it may replace different testing methods used in particular European states. It is the goal of the European research project financed from the TEN-T network resources. Findings and originality. This project is part of the larger project of facilitation and speeding up the ERTMS system deployment. One of nine measurement campaigns planned in the frame of this project was conducted in Poland by Railway Research Institute.

  1. Determining the Most Compatible Method for Estimating Infiltration Parameters in Mathematical Furrow Irrigation Models

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    samira akhavan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surface irrigation is still the most used method. For accessing to high efficiency, irrigation requires careful design and correct implementation. In addition, the design and evaluation of these systems require the identification of the advance, recession, and infiltration curves. Infiltration is the most important and difficult parameter to evaluate surface irrigation systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate five different methods to estimate infiltration parameters (two-point method of Elliott and Walker, recycling furrow infiltrometer, Singh and Yu method, Shepard one-point method and modified Shepard et al. two-point method and to determine the most compatible method with design and evaluation models of furrow irrigation (hydrodynamic, kinematic wave and zero inertia by applying SIRMOD software. Materials and Methods: For the simulation of the surface irrigation, the continuity and momentum equations (Sant-Venant equations used. SIRMOD simulation model is one of the models for the management and design of surface irrigation systems. The software package, hydraulic hydrodynamic models, zero inertia and kinetic wave have been placed. These models are resolvent of the Sant-Venant equations based on various assumptions. In this study, two-point method of Elliott and Walker, recycling furrow infiltrometer, Singh and Yu method (to calculate the coefficients of Kostiakov-Louis equation, Shepard one-point method and modified Shepard et al. two-point method (to calculate the coefficients of Philip equation, were used for estimating infiltration parameters. For this purpose, three field data sets were used. The total infiltrated water volume and advance time were predicted in each infiltration method and irrigation simulation model. In order to compare and evaluate the mentioned methods, the relative and standard errors were calculated. Results and Discussion: According to the five methods (two-point method of Elliott and

  2. Study of electromagnetic compatibility requirements of spacecrafts in magnetized plasma with FDTD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, T.; Amagasu, Y.; Maeda, H.; Okada, T.; Ishisaka, K.

    2006-12-01

    Spacecrafts have many sensors and instruments onboard themselves to observe various scientific data in space plasma. It is very important for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) requirements of spacecrafts to identify the propagation characteristics of electromagnetic noises emitted from instruments onboard themselves. To solve this problem of EMC requirements of spacecraft, we developed a FDTD simulation code which can treat wave propagations in magnetized plasma, and performed FDTD simulations of electromagnetic noises which propagate in space plasma. Though we need to perform full particle simulations in order to recognize complete characteristic of waves propagating in space plasma, FDTD simulations can be performed with much less computer resources than those necessary for full particle simulations, in memories as well as cpu time. In providing EMC requirements of spacecrafts, we have to perform many simulations with various conditions, therefore, FDTD simulation is a very effective method. In this study, we study about sheilding effects of the conductive hood onboard spacecraft in preventing electromagnetic noises emitted from the spacecraft itself. Especially, we focus on the influences of the angle of the conductive hood and the direction of the ambient magnetic fields. We performed a series of three-dimensional FDTD simulations of electromagnetic noises around spacecraft in magnetized plasma, and confirmed shielding effects of the conductive hood onboard spacecraft. We input gaussian pulses as a wave source of electromagnetic noises. At first, we assume the ambient mangetic field parallel to the z-axis. Since FDTD simulations can be performed with less computer resources, we can perform many simulation experiments with various conditions. In this study, we perform a series of simulations with varying the shape of conductive hood and the direction of the ambient magnetic field. This method with FDTD simulations is very effective tool for providing EMC

  3. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Teemu Myllylä; Vesa Korhonen; Erkki Vihriälä; Hannu Sorvoja; Tuija Hiltunen; Osmo Tervonen; Vesa Kiviniemi

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG) measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the ...

  4. Effects of Simulated Hypogravity and Diet on Estrous Cycling in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tou, Janet C.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Baer, Lisa A.; Wade, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental factors can disrupt ovulatory cycles. The study objective was to determine the effect of diet and simulated hypogravity on rat estrous cycles. Age 50 d Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to he fed either a purified or chow diet. Only normal cycling rats were used. Experimental rats (n=9-10/group) were kept as ambulatory controls (AC) or subjected to 40 d simulated hypogravity using a disuse atrophy hindlimb suspension (HLS) model. There was no effect on estrous cycles of AC fed either diet. At day 18, HLS rats fed either diet, had lengthened estrous cycles due to prolonged diestrus. HLS rats fed purified diet also had reduced time in estrus. Plasma estradiol was reduced in HLS rats fed purified diet but there was no effect on progesterone. This may have occurred because blood was collected from rats in estrus. Urinary progesterone collected during initial HLS was elevated in rats fed purified diet. In AC, corticosterone was elevated in chow vs purified diet fed rats. Differences were particularly striking following the application of a stressor with HLS/chow-fed rats displaying an enhanced stress response. Results emphasize the importance of diet selection when measuring endocrine-sensitive endpoints. HLS is a useful model for investigating the effects of environment on reproduction and providing insight about the impact extreme environment such as spaceflight on female reproductive health.

  5. The constitutive compatibility method for identification of material parameters based on full-field measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Moussawi, Ali

    2013-10-01

    We revisit here the concept of the constitutive relation error for the identification of elastic material parameters based on image correlation. An additional concept, so called constitutive compatibility of stress, is introduced defining a subspace of the classical space of statically admissible stresses. The key idea is to define stresses as compatible with the observed deformation field through the chosen class of constitutive equation. This makes possible the uncoupling of the identification of stress from the identification of the material parameters. As a result, the global cost of the identification is strongly reduced. This uncoupling also leads to parametrized solutions in cases where the solution is non-unique as demonstrated on 2D numerical examples. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Mechanisms of spinal motoneurons survival in rats under simulated hypogravity on earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islamov, R. R.; Mishagina, E. A.; Tyapkina, O. V.; Shajmardanova, G. F.; Eremeev, A. A.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Nikolskij, E. E.; Grigorjev, A. I.

    2011-05-01

    It was previously shown that different cell types in vivo and in vitro may die via apoptosis under weightlessness conditions in space as well as in simulated hypogravity on the Earth. We assessed survivability of spinal motoneurons of rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Following weight bearing, unloading the total protein content in lumbar spinal cord is dropped by 21%. The electrophysiological studies of m. gastrocnemius revealed an elevated motoneurons' reflex excitability and conduction disturbances in the sciatic nerve axons. The number of myelinated fibers in the ventral root of experimental animals was insignificantly increased by 35-day of antiorthostatic hind limb suspension, although the retrograde axonal transport was significantly decreased during the first week of simulated hypogravity. The results of the immunohistochemical assay with antibodies against proapoptotic protein caspase 9 and cytotoxicity marker neuron specific nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and the TUNEL staining did not reveal any signs of apoptosis in motoneurons of suspended and control animals. To examine the possible adaptation mechanisms activated in motoneurons in response to simulated hypogravity we investigated immunoexpression of Hsp25 and Hsp70 in lumbar spinal cord of the rats after 35-day antiorthostatic hind limb suspension. Comparative analysis of the immunohistochemical reaction with anti-Hsp25 antibodies revealed differential staining of motoneurons in intact and experimental animals. The density of immunoprecipitate with anti-Hsp25 antibodies was substantially higher in motoneurons of the 35-day suspended than control rats and the more intensive precipitate in this reaction was observed in motoneuron neuritis. Quantitative analysis of Hsp25 expression demonstrated an increase in the Hsp25 level by 95% in experimental rats compared to the control. The immunoexpression of Hsp70 found no qualitative and quantitative differences in control and experimental

  7. Human Heart Pulse Wave Responses Measured Simultaneously at Several Sensor Placements by Two MR-Compatible Fibre Optic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Myllylä

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental measurements conducted using two noninvasive fibre optic methods for detecting heart pulse waves in the human body. Both methods can be used in conjunction with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. For comparison, the paper also performs an MRI-compatible electrocardiogram (ECG measurement. By the simultaneous use of different measurement methods, the propagation of pressure waves generated by each heart pulse can be sensed extensively in different areas of the human body and at different depths, for example, on the chest and forehead and at the fingertip. An accurate determination of a pulse wave allows calculating the pulse transit time (PTT of a particular heart pulse in different parts of the human body. This result can then be used to estimate the pulse wave velocity of blood flow in different places. Both measurement methods are realized using magnetic resonance-compatible fibres, which makes the methods applicable to the MRI environment. One of the developed sensors is an extraordinary accelerometer sensor, while the other one is a more common sensor based on photoplethysmography. All measurements, involving several test patients, were performed both inside and outside an MRI room. Measurements inside the MRI room were conducted using a 3-Tesla strength closed MRI scanner in the Department of Diagnostic Radiology at the Oulu University Hospital.

  8. Compatible validated spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods for determination of vildagliptin and saxagliptin by factorial design experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Omar; Ayad, Miriam F.; Tadros, Mariam M.

    2015-04-01

    Simple, selective and reproducible spectrofluorimetric and spectrophotometric methods have been developed for the determination of vildagliptin and saxagliptin in bulk and their pharmaceutical dosage forms. The first proposed spectrofluorimetric method is based on the dansylation reaction of the amino group of vildagliptin with dansyl chloride to form a highly fluorescent product. The formed product was measured spectrofluorimetrically at 455 nm after excitation at 345 nm. Beer's law was obeyed in a concentration range of 100-600 μg ml-1. The second proposed spectrophotometric method is based on the charge transfer complex of saxagliptin with tetrachloro-1,4-benzoquinone (p-chloranil). The formed charge transfer complex was measured spectrophotometrically at 530 nm. Beer's law was obeyed in a concentration range of 100-850 μg ml-1. The third proposed spectrophotometric method is based on the condensation reaction of the primary amino group of saxagliptin with formaldehyde and acetyl acetone to form a yellow colored product known as Hantzsch reaction, measured at 342.5 nm. Beer's law was obeyed in a concentration range of 50-300 μg ml-1. All the variables were studied to optimize the reactions' conditions using factorial design. The developed methods were validated and proved to be specific and accurate for quality control of vildagliptin and saxagliptin in their pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  9. A Discontinuous Galerkin Method Compatible with the BSSN Formulation of the Einstein Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jonah; Schnetter, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The BSSN formulation of the Einstein equations has repeatedly demonstrated its robustness. The formulation is not only stable but allows for puncture-type evolutions of black hole systems. Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element (DGFE) methods offer a mathematically beautiful, computationally efficient, and highly parallelizable way to solve hyperbolic PDEs. These properties make them highly desirable for numerical relativity. To-date no one has been able to solve the full (3+1)-dimensional BSSN equations using DGFE methods. This is partly because DGFE discretization often occurs at the level of the equations, not the derivative operator, and partly because DGFE methods are traditionally formulated for manifestly flux-conservative systems. By discretizing the derivative operator, we generalize a particular flavor of DGFE methods, Local DG methods, to solve arbitrary second-order hyperbolic equations. This generalization allows us to solve the BSSN equations. The authors acknowledge support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and from the National Science Foundation of the USA (OCI 0905046, PHY 1212401).

  10. A GPU-accelerated nodal discontinuous Galerkin method with high-order absorbing boundary conditions and corner/edge compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modave, A.; Atle, A.; Chan, J.; Warburton, T.

    2017-12-01

    Discontinuous Galerkin finite element schemes exhibit attractive features for accurate large-scale wave-propagation simulations on modern parallel architectures. For many applications, these schemes must be coupled with non-reflective boundary treatments to limit the size of the computational domain without losing accuracy or computational efficiency, which remains a challenging task. In this paper, we present a combination of a nodal discontinuous Galerkin method with high-order absorbing boundary conditions (HABCs) for cuboidal computational domains. Compatibility conditions are derived for HABCs intersecting at the edges and the corners of a cuboidal domain. We propose a GPU implementation of the computational procedure, which results in a multidimensional solver with equations to be solved on 0D, 1D, 2D and 3D spatial regions. Numerical results demonstrate both the accuracy and the computational efficiency of our approach.

  11. A multimaterial bioink method for 3D printing tunable, cell-compatible hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutz, Alexandra L; Hyland, Kelly E; Jakus, Adam E; Burghardt, Wesley R; Shah, Ramille N

    2015-03-04

    A multimaterial bio-ink method using polyethylene glycol crosslinking is presented for expanding the biomaterial palette required for 3D bioprinting of more mimetic and customizable tissue and organ constructs. Lightly crosslinked, soft hydrogels are produced from precursor solutions of various materials and 3D printed. Rheological and biological characterizations are presented, and the promise of this new bio-ink synthesis strategy is discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. CMOS-compatible method for doping of buried vertical polysilicon structures by solid phase diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkulets, Yury [Micron Semiconductor Israel Ltd., Qiryat Gat 82109 (Israel); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501 (Israel); Silber, Amir; Ripp, Alexander; Sokolovsky, Mark [Micron Semiconductor Israel Ltd., Qiryat Gat 82109 (Israel); Shalish, Ilan, E-mail: shalish@bgu.ac.il [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 8410501 (Israel)

    2016-03-28

    Polysilicon receives attention nowadays as a means to incorporate 3D-structured photonic devices into silicon processes. However, doping of buried layers of a typical 3D structure has been a challenge. We present a method for doping of buried polysilicon layers by solid phase diffusion. Using an underlying silicon oxide layer as a dopant source facilitates diffusion of dopants into the bottom side of the polysilicon layer. The polysilicon is grown on top of the oxide layer, after the latter has been doped by ion implantation. Post-growth heat treatment drives in the dopant from the oxide into the polysilicon. To model the process, we studied the diffusion of the two most common silicon dopants, boron (B) and phosphorus (P), using secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles. Our results show that shallow concentration profiles can be achieved in a buried polysilicon layer using the proposed technique. We present a quantitative 3D model for the diffusion of B and P in polysilicon, which turns the proposed method into an engineerable technique.

  13. Specific entrustable professional activities for undergraduate medical internships: a method compatible with the academic curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia; Monterrosas-Rojas, Ana María; Ortiz-Montalvo, Armando; Flores-Morones, Felipe; Torruco-García, Uri; Navarrete-Martínez, Andrea; Arrioja-Guerrero, Araceli

    2017-08-25

    Competency-based education has been considered the most important pedagogical trend in Medicine in the last two decades. In clinical contexts, competencies are implemented through Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) which are observable and measurable. The aim of this paper is to describe the methodology used in the design of educational tools to assess students´ competencies in clinical practice during their undergraduate internship (UI). In this paper, we present the construction of specific APROCs (Actividades Profesionales Confiables) in Surgery (S), Gynecology and Obstetrics (GO) and Family Medicine (FM) rotations with three levels of performance. The study considered a mixed method exploratory type design, a qualitative phase followed by a quantitative validation exercise. In the first stage data was obtained from three rotations (FM, GO and S) through focus groups about real and expected activities of medical interns. Triangulation with other sources was made to construct benchmarks. In the second stage, narrative descriptions with the three levels were validated by professors who teach the different subjects using the Delphi technique. The results may be described both curricular and methodological wise. From the curricular point of view, APROCs were identified in three UI rotations within clinical contexts in Mexico City, benchmarks were developed by levels and validated by experts' consensus. In regard to methodological issues, this research contributed to the development of a strategy, following six steps, to build APROCs using mixed methods. Developing benchmarks provides a regular and standardized language that helps to evaluate student's performance and define educational strategies efficiently and accurately. The university academic program was aligned with APROCs in clinical contexts to assure the acquisition of competencies by students.

  14. A reliable and controllable graphene doping method compatible with current CMOS technology and the demonstration of its device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonyeong; Shin, Somyeong; Kim, Taekwang; Du, Hyewon; Song, Minho; Kim, Ki Soo; Cho, Seungmin; Lee, Sang Wook; Seo, Sunae

    2017-04-01

    The modulation of charge carrier concentration allows us to tune the Fermi level (E F) of graphene thanks to the low electronic density of states near the E F. The introduced metal oxide thin films as well as the modified transfer process can elaborately maneuver the amounts of charge carrier concentration in graphene. The self-encapsulation provides a solution to overcome the stability issues of metal oxide hole dopants. We have manipulated systematic graphene p-n junction structures for electronic or photonic application-compatible doping methods with current semiconducting process technology. We have demonstrated the anticipated transport properties on the designed heterojunction devices with non-destructive doping methods. This mitigates the device architecture limitation imposed in previously known doping methods. Furthermore, we employed E F-modulated graphene source/drain (S/D) electrodes in a low dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide field effect transistor (TMDFET). We have succeeded in fulfilling n-type, ambipolar, or p-type field effect transistors (FETs) by moving around only the graphene work function. Besides, the graphene/transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) junction in either both p- and n-type transistor reveals linear voltage dependence with the enhanced contact resistance. We accomplished the complete conversion of p-/n-channel transistors with S/D tunable electrodes. The E F modulation using metal oxide facilitates graphene to access state-of-the-art complimentary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology.

  15. Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaic Modules Fabricated via Halogen-Free Solvent System with Roll-to-Roll Compatible Scalable Printing Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Youn-Jung; Jung, Yen-Sook; Hwang, Kyeongil; Kim, Jueng-Eun; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Lee, Sehyun; Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Donmin; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-11-15

    For the first time, the photovoltaic modules composed of small molecule were successfully fabricated by using roll-to-roll compatible printing techniques. In this study, blend films of small molecules, BTR and PC 71 BM were slot-die coated using a halogen-free solvent system. As a result, high efficiencies of 7.46% and 6.56% were achieved from time-consuming solvent vapor annealing (SVA) treatment and roll-to-roll compatible solvent additive approaches, respectively. After successful verification of our roll-to-roll compatible method on small-area devices, we further fabricated large-area photovoltaic modules with a total active area of 10 cm 2 , achieving a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 4.83%. This demonstration of large-area photovoltaic modules through roll-to-roll compatible printing methods, even based on a halogen-free solvent, suggests the great potential for the industrial-scale production of organic solar cells (OSCs).

  16. Generic roll-to-roll compatible method for insolubilizing and stabilizing conjugated active layers based on low energy electron irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgesen, Martin; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Helt-Hansen, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    compatible with thin plastic foils of one to two hundreds of microns typical of devices explored in organic electronics. We demonstrate here that active layers and complete devices can be subjected to electron irradiation‐induced cross‐linking thus facilitating multilayer solvent processing and morphological...

  17. Hypogravity Research and Educational Parabolic Flight Activities Conducted in Barcelona: a new Hub of Innovation in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Poch, Antoni; González, Daniel Ventura; López, David

    2016-12-01

    We report on different research and educational activities related to parabolic flights conducted in Barcelona since 2008. We use a CAP10B single-engine aerobatic aircraft flying out of Sabadell Airport and operating in visual flight conditions providing up to 8 seconds of hypogravity for each parabola. Aside from biomedical experiments being conducted, different student teams have flown in parabolic flights in the framework of the international contest `Barcelona Zero-G Challenge', and have published their results in relevant symposiums and scientific journals. The platform can certainly be a good testbed for a proof-of-concept before accessing other microgravity platforms, and has proved to be excellent for motivational student campaigns.

  18. [Perinatal model of human transition from hypogravity to the earth's gravity based on the electromyogram nonlinear characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meĭgal, A Iu; Voroshilov, A S

    2009-01-01

    Interferential electromyogram (iEMG) was analyzed in healthy newborn infants (n=29) during the first 24 hours of life as a model of transition from hypogravity (intrauterine immersion) to the Earth's gravity (postnatal period). Nonlinear instruments of iEMG analysis (correlation dimension, entropy and fractal dimension) reflected the complexity, chaotic character and predictability of signals from the leg and arm antagonistic muscles. Except for m. gastrocnemius, in all other musles iEMG fractal dimension was shown to grow as the postnatal period extended. Low fractal and correlation dimensions and entropy marked flexor muscles, particularly against low iEMG amplitude suggesting a better congenital programming for the flexors as compared to the extensors. It is concluded that the early ontogenesis model can be practicable in studying the evolution and states of antigravity functions.

  19. In vitro Cyto and Blood Compatibility of Titanium Containing Diamond-Like Carbon Prepared by Hybrid Sputtering Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy Navaneetha, Pandiyaraj; Jan, Heeg; Andreas, Lampka; Fabian, Junge; Torsten, Barfels; Marion, Wienecke; Young, Ha Rhee; Hyoung, Woo Kim

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, diamond-like carbon films (DLC) have been given more attention in research in the biomedical industry due to their potential application as surface coating on biomedical materials such as metals and polymer substrates. There are many ways to prepare metal containing DLC films deposited on polymeric film substrates, such as coatings from carbonaceous precursors and some means that incorporate other elements. In this study, we investigated both the surface and biocompatible properties of titanium containing DLC (Ti-DLC) films. The Ti-DLC films were prepared on the surface of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET) film as a function of the deposition power level using reactive sputtering technique. The films' hydrophilicity was studied by contact angle and surface energy tests. Their surface morphology was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Their elemental chemical composition was analyzed using energy dispersive X-spectra (EDX) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Their blood and cell compatibility was studied by in vitro tests, including tests on platelet adhesion, thrombus formation, whole blood clotting time and osteoblast cell compatibility. Significant changes in the morphological and chemical composition of the Ti-DLC films were observed and found to be a function of the deposition level. These morphological and chemical changes reduced the interfacial tension between Ti-DLC and blood proteins as well as resisted the adhesion and activation of platelets on the surface of the Ti-DLC films. The cell compatibility results exhibited significant growth of osteoblast cells on the surface of Ti incorporated DLC film compared with that of DLC film surface.

  20. Comparison of a commercial blood cross-matching kit to the standard laboratory method for establishing blood transfusion compatibility in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Leo Roa; Streeter, Elizabeth; Malandra, Allison

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of a commercial blood transfusion cross-match kit when compared to the standard laboratory method for establishing blood transfusion compatibility. A prospective observational in intro study performed from July 2009 to July 2013. Private referral veterinary center. Ten healthy dogs, 11 anemic dogs, and 24 previously transfused dogs. None. Forty-five dogs were enrolled in a prospective study in order to compare the standard blood transfusion cross-match technique to a commercial blood transfusion cross-matching kit. These dogs were divided into 3 different groups that included 10 healthy dogs (control group), 11 anemic dogs in need of a blood transfusion, and 24 sick dogs that were previously transfused. Thirty-five dogs diagnosed with anemia secondary to multiple disease processes were cross-matched using both techniques. All dogs cross-matched via the kit had a compatible major and minor result, whereas 16 dogs out of 45 (35%) had an incompatible cross-match result when the standard laboratory technique was performed. The average time to perform the commercial kit was 15 minutes and this was 3 times shorter than the manual cross-match laboratory technique that averaged 45-50 minutes to complete. While the gel-based cross-match kit is quicker and less technically demanding than standard laboratory cross-match procedures, microagglutination and low-grade hemolysis are difficult to identify by using the gel-based kits. This could result in transfusion reactions if the gel-based kits are used as the sole determinant of blood compatibility prior to transfusion. Based on our results, the standard manual cross-match technique remains the gold standard test to determine blood transfusion compatibility. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  1. A new sample preparation method compatible with capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence for improving detection of low levels of beta-lactoglobulin in infant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaez-Lorenzo, Cristina; Diez-Masa, Jose Carlos; Vasallo, Isabel; de Frutos, Mercedes

    2009-09-07

    Beta-lactoglobulin (betaLG) is the main allergenic protein in cow's milk and can cause allergy even when present at very low concentration. The aim of this work is to develop an innovative sample preparation method fully compatible with capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced fluorescence detection for improving the sensitivity when analyzing betaLG. Different types of baby food were on purpose contaminated with diverse dairy desserts and submitted to thermal treatment to simulate potential contamination at production. Sample preparation prior to CE analysis was performed by the classical extraction method and by the innovative one, and the results were compared. Analysis was performed by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection. The innovative method permitted to detect contaminations as low as 1 part of yoghurt in 10,000 parts of baby food.

  2. Comparison of excitability parameters and sodium channel behavior of fast- and slow-twitch rat skeletal muscles for the study of the effects of hindlimb suspension, a model of hypogravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaphy, J F; Pierno, S; Liantonio, A; De Luca, A; Leoty, C; Conte Camerino, D

    1998-07-01

    When mammals are constrained to hypogravity, their neuromuscular apparatus undergoes modifications which rend difficult postural maintenance and muscular activity upon the return to normal gravitational conditions. Muscle atrophy and differetial gene expression are particularly evident in slow-twitch antigravity muscles such as the soleus. During hypogravity, most of the metabolic and contractile properties characteristic of slow-twitch muscles shift toward to those of fast-twitch muscles. For example, the expression of the fast isoforms of both the myosin heavy-chain and the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium pump increases in slow-twitch muscle during hypogravity. Thus, modifications of the contractile machinery and calcium handling are likely to be involved in the hypogravity-induced slow-twitch muscle impariment. Fast- and slow-twitch muscles differ also in their electrical properties. Resting membrane potential (RMP) is more negative by about 10 mV in fast muscles compared to slow ones. Differences in action potential (AP) shape as well as in the number of elicitable APs have been also observed between both muscle types, which may reslut from the reported differences in chloride conductance and sodium current. Little is known about the potential modification fo muscle electrical properties during hypogravity, apart a negative shift of the RMP in soleus muscle. Thus this study was performed at the aim to compare the excitability parameters and sodium channel behavior of rat fast-twitch and slow-twitch muscle fibers. The characterization of these properties specific for each muscle-type will give us the basis for the study of the effect of hypogravity.

  3. Optimization of environment compatible analysis methods for mineral hydrocarbons in the soil; Optimierung umweltvertraeglicher Analysenverfahren fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe im Boden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flachowsky, J.; Borsdorf, H. [eds.] [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Loehmannsroeben, H.G.; Roch, T. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany); Leopom, P. [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany); Reimers, C. [Technische Univ. Hamburg-Harburg, Hamburg (Germany); Matz, G.; Kuebler, J. [MOBILAB GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Christall, B. [SOFIA GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Hahn, M.; Matschiner, H. [Elektrochemie Halle GmbH (Germany); Baermann, A. [Dr. Baermann und Partner Mikroanalytik, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes several analytical methods for the quantitative chemical analysis of mineral oil hydrocarbons in soils. The measuring methods are investigated on accuracy, errors, sample preparation methods, analysis of reference materials and real materials. (SR) [Deutsch] Mit dieser Schrift praesentiert die Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt der Oeffentlichkeit Ergebnisse zu alternativen umweltvertraeglichen Bestimmungsmethoden fuer Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffe in Boeden. Es war in erster Linie das Ziel aller beteiligten Forscher und Entwickler, die heute noch in der Anwendung befindliche Vorschrift nach DIN 38409 H18 zur Analytik von Mineraloelkohlenwasserstoffen durch eine sowohl umweltfreundliche als auch insgesamt aussagekraeftige Methode zu substituieren. (orig.)

  4. DUPIC fuel compatibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Rho, G. H.; Park, J. W. [and others

    2000-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the compatibility of DUPIC(Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel in CANDU Reactors) fuel with the current CANDU 6 reactor, which is one of the technology being developed to utilize the spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The phase 1 study of this project includes the feasibility analysis on applicability of the current core design method, the feasibility analysis on operation of the DUPIC fuel core, the compatibility analysis on individual reactor system, the sensitivity analysis on the fuel composition, and the economic analysis on DUPIC fuel cycle. The results of the validation calculations have confirmed that the current core analysis system is acceptable for the feasibility study of the DUPIC fuel compatibility analysis. The results of core simulations have shown that both natural uranium and DUPIC fuel cores are almost the same from the viewpoint of the operational performance. For individual reactor system including reactively devices, the functional requirements of each system are satisfied in general. However, because of the pronounced power flattening in the DUPIC core, the radiation damage on the critical components increases, which should be investigated more in the future. The DUPIC fuel composition heterogeneity dose not to impose any serious effect on the reactor operation if the fuel composition is adjusted. The economics analysis has been performed through conceptual design studies on the DUPIC fuel fabrication, fuel handling in a plant, and spent fuel disposal, which has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable to the once-trough fuel cycle considering uncertainties associated with unit costs of the fuel cycle components. The results of Phase 1 study have shown that it is feasible to use the DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactors without major changes in hardware. However further studies are required to confirm the safety of the reactor under accident condition.

  5. A protein extraction method for low protein concentration solutions compatible with the proteomic analysis of rubber particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Sun, Yong; Tong, Zheng; Yang, Qian; Chang, Lili; Meng, Xueru; Wang, Limin; Tian, Weimin; Wang, Xuchu

    2016-11-01

    The extraction of high-purity proteins from the washing solution (WS) of rubber particles (also termed latex-producing organelles) from laticifer cells in rubber tree for proteomic analysis is challenging due to the low concentration of proteins in the WS. Recent studies have revealed that proteins in the WS might play crucial roles in natural rubber biosynthesis. To further examine the involvement of these proteins in natural rubber biosynthesis, we designed an efficiency method to extract high-purity WS proteins. We improved our current borax and phenol-based method by adding reextraction steps with phenol (REP) to improve the yield from low protein concentration samples. With this new method, we extracted WS proteins that were suitable for proteomics. Indeed, compared to the original borax and phenol-based method, the REP method improved both the quality and quantity of isolated proteins. By repeatedly extracting from low protein concentration solutions using the same small amount of phenol, the REP method yielded enough protein of sufficiently high-quality from starting samples containing less than 0.02 mg of proteins per milliliter. This method was successfully applied to extract the rubber particle proteins from the WS of natural rubber latex samples. The REP-extracted WS proteins were resolved by 2DE, and 28 proteins were positively identified by MS. This method has the potential to become widely used for the extraction of proteins from low protein concentration solutions for proteomic analysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Compatibility improvement method of empty fruit bunch fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded boards: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullah, Hayana; Abidin Akasah, Zainal; Zaini Nik Soh, Nik Mohd; Mangi, Sajjad Ali

    2017-11-01

    The utilization of oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fibre on bio-composite product has been introduced to replace current material mainly wood fibre. OPEFB is widely available as palm oil is one of the major agricultural crops in Malaysia. EFB fibre are lignocellulosic materials that could replace other natural fibre product especially cement bonded board. However, the contains of residual oil and sugar in EFB fibre has been detected to be the reason for incompatibility issue between EFB fibre and cement mixtures. Regarding on the issue, a study has been conducted widely on finding the suitable pre-treatment method for EFB fibre to remove carbohydrate contained in the said fibre that are known to inhibit cement hydration. Aside from that, cement accelerator was introduced to enhance the hydration of cement when it was mixed with natural fibre. Hence, this paper will summaries the previous findings and in-depth study on the use of EFB fibre as a replacement material in cement bonded fibre boards.

  7. Electromagnetic compatibility in power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa , François; Revol , Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Scientists largely attribute the recent deterioration of the electromagnetic environment to power electronics. This realization has spurred the study of methodical approaches to electromagnetic compatibility designs as explored in this text. The book addresses major challenges, such as handling numerous parameters vital to predicting electro magnetic effects and achieving compliance with line-harmonics norms, while proposing potential solutions.

  8. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  9. ASPIC: a novel method to predict the exon-intron structure of a gene that is optimally compatible to a set of transcript sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesole Graziano

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Currently available methods to predict splice sites are mainly based on the independent and progressive alignment of transcript data (mostly ESTs to the genomic sequence. Apart from often being computationally expensive, this approach is vulnerable to several problems – hence the need to develop novel strategies. Results: We propose a method, based on a novel multiple genome-EST alignment algorithm, for the detection of splice sites. To avoid limitations of splice sites prediction (mainly, over-predictions due to independent single EST alignments to the genomic sequence our approach performs a multiple alignment of transcript data to the genomic sequence based on the combined analysis of all available data. We recast the problem of predicting constitutive and alternative splicing as an optimization problem, where the optimal multiple transcript alignment minimizes the number of exons and hence of splice site observations. We have implemented a splice site predictor based on this algorithm in the software tool ASPIC (Alternative Splicing PredICtion. It is distinguished from other methods based on BLAST-like tools by the incorporation of entirely new ad hoc procedures for accurate and computationally efficient transcript alignment and adopts dynamic programming for the refinement of intron boundaries. ASPIC also provides the minimal set of non-mergeable transcript isoforms compatible with the detected splicing events. The ASPIC web resource is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl and Unigene databases and also implements an upload facility. Conclusion: Extensive bench marking shows that ASPIC outperforms other existing methods in the detection of novel splicing isoforms and in the minimization of over-predictions. ASPIC also requires a lower computation time for processing a single gene and an EST cluster. The ASPIC web resource is available at http://aspic.algo.disco.unimib.it/aspic-devel/.

  10. Electromagnetic compatibility engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Henry W

    2009-01-01

    Praise for Noise Reduction Techniques IN electronic systems ""Henry Ott has literally 'written the book' on the subject of EMC. . . . He not only knows the subject, but has the rare ability to communicate that knowledge to others.""-EE Times Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineering is a completely revised, expanded, and updated version of Henry Ott's popular book Noise Reduction Techniques in Electronic Systems. It reflects the most recent developments in the field of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and noise reduction¿and their practical applications t

  11. Introduction to electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Clayton R.

    A formal and extensive treatment of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is presented. Basic principles are reviewed in detail, including reasons for EMC in electronic design. Also discussed are: nonideal behavior of components, signal spectra, radiated emission and susceptibility, conducted emissions and susceptibility, crosstalk, shielding, electrostatic discharge, and system design for EMC.

  12. Electromagnetic compatibility overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, K. C.

    1980-01-01

    An assessment of the electromagnetic compatibility impact of the Satellite Power System is discussed. The discussion is divided into two parts: determination of the emission expected from SPS including their spatial and spectral distributions, and evaluation of the impact of such emissions on electromagnetic systems including considerations of means for mitigating effects.

  13. Electromagnetic theory for electromagnetic compatibility engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Toh, Tze-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Engineers and scientists who develop and install electronic devices and circuits need to have a solid understanding of electromagnetic theory and the electromagnetic behavior of devices and circuits. In particular, they must be well-versed in electromagnetic compatibility, which minimizes and controls the side effects of interconnected electric devices. Designed to entice the practical engineer to explore some worthwhile mathematical methods, and to reorient the theoretical scientist to industrial applications, Electromagnetic Theory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Engineers is based on the

  14. Psychological compatibility of women's handball team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalar O.G.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of study of psychological compatibility of womanish handball commands are presented. The psychological climate of command is investigational. Certain and adapted methods of estimation of psychological compatibility in the command playing types of sport. Psychological tests allow to expose the strong and weak sides of psychology of sportsmen. These information can be used for more effective program of psychological preparation of sportsmen development. It is necessary to improve determination of separate individual qualities of personality of sportsmen.

  15. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-06-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  16. Aircraft electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Clifton A.; Larsen, William E.

    1987-01-01

    Illustrated are aircraft architecture, electromagnetic interference environments, electromagnetic compatibility protection techniques, program specifications, tasks, and verification and validation procedures. The environment of 400 Hz power, electrical transients, and radio frequency fields are portrayed and related to thresholds of avionics electronics. Five layers of protection for avionics are defined. Recognition is given to some present day electromagnetic compatibility weaknesses and issues which serve to reemphasize the importance of EMC verification of equipment and parts, and their ultimate EMC validation on the aircraft. Proven standards of grounding, bonding, shielding, wiring, and packaging are laid out to help provide a foundation for a comprehensive approach to successful future aircraft design and an understanding of cost effective EMC in an aircraft setting.

  17. An Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography Photodiode Array Detection Tandem Mass Spectrometric Method for Simultaneous Determination of Seven Major Bioactive Constituents in Xiaochaihutang and Its Application to Fourteen Compatibilities Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Wu, Chunfu; Zhao, Longshan; Lu, Xiumei; Wang, Fang; Yang, Jingyu; Xiong, Zhili

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography photodiode array detection tandem mass spectrometric method (UPLC-PDA-MS-MS) was developed and validated to simultaneously determine seven major bioactive constituents in the formula of traditional Chinese medicines Xiaochaihutang (XCHT). To investigate the discipline of compatibility in XCHT, 14 kinds of compatibilities designed by orthogonal array were also analyzed. The separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPLC™ BEH C18 column (100 × 2.1 mm, 1.7 µm) using gradient elution with a mobile phase of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. Two detection techniques of PDA detector and MS-MS detector were proposed, respectively. The concentrations of baicalin and wogonoside were high enough for PDA detection while low-concentration bioactive constituents including saikosaponin a, ginsenoside Rg1, liquiritin, baicalein and wogonin were quantified by MS-MS detection. The proposed method was fully validated in terms of sensitivity, linearity, specificity, precision, repeatability and recovery. This is the first report on the simultaneous determination of the major bioactive constituents of XCHT by UPLC-PDA-MS-MS, which could be used to evaluate the quality of XCHT and to investigate the discipline of compatibility in XCHT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  19. Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Douglas, N, ed.

    2004-11-25

    From May 11--15, 2004, the Institute for Mathematics and its Applications held a hot topics workshop on Compatible Spatial Discretizations for Partial Differential Equations. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is a fundamental task in science and engineering. The goal of the workshop was to bring together a spectrum of scientists at the forefront of the research in the numerical solution of PDEs to discuss compatible spatial discretizations. We define compatible spatial discretizations as those that inherit or mimic fundamental properties of the PDE such as topology, conservation, symmetries, and positivity structures and maximum principles. A wide variety of discretization methods applied across a wide range of scientific and engineering applications have been designed to or found to inherit or mimic intrinsic spatial structure and reproduce fundamental properties of the solution of the continuous PDE model at the finite dimensional level. A profusion of such methods and concepts relevant to understanding them have been developed and explored: mixed finite element methods, mimetic finite differences, support operator methods, control volume methods, discrete differential forms, Whitney forms, conservative differencing, discrete Hodge operators, discrete Helmholtz decomposition, finite integration techniques, staggered grid and dual grid methods, etc. This workshop seeks to foster communication among the diverse groups of researchers designing, applying, and studying such methods as well as researchers involved in practical solution of large scale problems that may benefit from advancements in such discretizations; to help elucidate the relations between the different methods and concepts; and to generally advance our understanding in the area of compatible spatial discretization methods for PDE. Particular points of emphasis included: + Identification of intrinsic properties of PDE models that are critical for the fidelity of numerical

  20. Compatibility Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, James Allen

    2016-01-01

    In support of ground system development for the Space Launch System (SLS), engineers are tasked with building immense engineering models of extreme complexity. The various systems require rigorous analysis of pneumatics, hydraulic, cryogenic, and hypergolic systems. There are certain standards that each of these systems must meet, in the form of pressure vessel system (PVS) certification reports. These reports can be hundreds of pages long, and require many hours to compile. Traditionally, each component is analyzed individually, often utilizing hand calculations in the design process. The objective of this opportunity is to perform these analyses in an integrated fashion with the parametric CADCAE environment. This allows for systems to be analyzed on an assembly level in a semi-automated fashion, which greatly improves accuracy and efficiency. To accomplish this, component specific parameters were stored in the Windchill database to individual Creo Parametric models based on spec control drawings. These parameters were then accessed by using the Prime Analysis within Creo Parametric. MathCAD Prime spreadsheets were created that automatically extracted these parameters, performed calculations, and generated reports. The reports described component compatibility based on local conditions such as pressure, temperature, density, and flow rates. The reports also determined component pairing compatibility, such as properly sizing relief valves with regulators. The reports stored the input conditions that were used to determine compatibility to increase traceability of component selection. The desired workflow for using this tool would begin with a Creo Schematics diagram of a PVS system. This schematic would store local conditions and locations of components. The schematic would then populate an assembly within Creo Parametric, using Windchill database parts. These parts would have their attributes already assigned, and the MathCAD spreadsheets could begin running

  1. Fertilization compatibility of spawning corals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes experimental results of fertilization assays to characterize genetic compatibility between individual parental genotypes. Targeted species...

  2. Compatibility Between Electric Components in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdyk, Andrzej; Holbøll, Joachim; Arana Aristi, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes a method for investigation of the compatibility between electric components in wind farms by identifying critical resonances at different points of an offshore wind farm (OWF), based on systematic variation of critical parameters. In this way, the design of future OWF can...

  3. Globalisation and international compatibility - a challenge to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The contexts of institutions for higher education are in flux with consequent learning challenges. One of these challenges is that of globalisation and the need for international compatibility. Another challenge is that Mode 2 learning programmes, material and methods need to be relevant to the specific context in which they ...

  4. Compatible quantum theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, R; Hohenberg, P C

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of quantum mechanics (QM) can be characterized as realistic, operationalist, or a combination of the two. In this paper a realistic theory is defined as describing a closed system entirely by means of entities and concepts pertaining to the system. An operationalist theory, on the other hand, requires in addition entities external to the system. A realistic formulation comprises an ontology, the set of (mathematical) entities that describe the system, and assertions, the set of correct statements (predictions) the theory makes about the objects in the ontology. Classical mechanics is the prime example of a realistic physical theory. A straightforward generalization of classical mechanics to QM is hampered by the inconsistency of quantum properties with classical logic, a circumstance that was noted many years ago by Birkhoff and von Neumann. The present realistic formulation of the histories approach originally introduced by Griffiths, which we call 'compatible quantum theory (CQT)', consists of a 'microscopic' part (MIQM), which applies to a closed quantum system of any size, and a 'macroscopic' part (MAQM), which requires the participation of a large (ideally, an infinite) system. The first (MIQM) can be fully formulated based solely on the assumption of a Hilbert space ontology and the noncontextuality of probability values, relying in an essential way on Gleason's theorem and on an application to dynamics due in large part to Nistico. Thus, the present formulation, in contrast to earlier ones, derives the Born probability formulas and the consistency (decoherence) conditions for frameworks. The microscopic theory does not, however, possess a unique corpus of assertions, but rather a multiplicity of contextual truths ('c-truths'), each one associated with a different framework. This circumstance leads us to consider the microscopic theory to be physically indeterminate and therefore incomplete, though logically coherent. The completion of the theory

  5. Space agriculture: the effect of micro- and hypo-gravity on soil hydraulics and biogeochemistry in a bioregenerative soil-based cropping unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, F.; Pallud, C. E.

    2010-12-01

    Abstract Increasing interest has developed towards growing plants in soil-based cropping modules as a long-term bioregenerative life support system in space and planetary explorations. Contrary to hydroponics, zeoponics and aeroponics, soil-based cropping would offer an effective approach to sustain food and oxygen production, decompose organic wastes, sequester carbon dioxide, and filter water for the crew. The hydraulic and biogeochemical functioning are highly complex in soil-based systems but such systems provide a self-sustainable microcosm that potentially offers compactness, low energy demand, near-ambient reactor temperatures and pressure, reliability, forgiveness of operational errors or neglect, and a rich biodiversity of microorganisms, all features which are fundamental for the sustainability and reliability of long-term manned space missions. However, the hydraulics and biogeochemical functioning of soil systems exposed to gravities lower than the Earth’s are still unknown. Since gravity is crucial in driving water flow, hypogravity will affect nutrient and oxygen transport in the liquid and gaseous phases, and could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, and emissions of toxic gases. A highly mechanistic model coupling soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry previously tested on soils on Earth (g = 9.806 m s-2) is used to highlight the effects of gravity on the functioning of cropping units on Mars (0.38g), the Moon (0.16g), and in the international space station (ISS, nearly 0g). For each scenario, we have compared the net leaching of water, the leaching of NH3, NH4+, NO2- and NO3- solutes, the emissions of NH3, CO2, N2O, NO and N2 gases, the concentrations profiles of O2, CO2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil, the pH, and the dynamics of various microbial functional groups within the root zone against the same control variables in the soil under terrestrial gravity. The tested hypo- and micro-gravity resulted in 90

  6. Development of an Efficient Protein Extraction Method Compatible with LC-MS/MS for Proteome Mapping in Two Australian Seagrasses Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhijian; Kumar, Manoj; Padula, Matthew P.; Pernice, Mathieu; Kahlke, Tim; Kim, Mikael; Ralph, Peter J.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of the first complete genome sequence of the marine flowering plant Zostera marina (commonly known as seagrass) in early 2016, is expected to significantly raise the impact of seagrass proteomics. Seagrasses are marine ecosystem engineers that are currently declining worldwide at an alarming rate due to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Seagrasses (especially species of the genus Zostera) are compromised for proteomic studies primarily due to the lack of efficient protein extraction methods because of their recalcitrant cell wall which is rich in complex polysaccharides and a high abundance of secondary metabolites in their cells. In the present study, three protein extraction methods that are commonly used in plant proteomics i.e., phenol (P); trichloroacetic acid/acetone/SDS/phenol (TASP); and borax/polyvinyl-polypyrrolidone/phenol (BPP) extraction, were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively based on two dimensional isoelectric focusing (2D-IEF) maps and LC-MS/MS analysis using the two most abundant Australian seagrass species, namely Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis. All three tested methods produced high quality protein extracts with excellent 2D-IEF maps in P. australis. However, the BPP method produces better results in Z. muelleri compared to TASP and P. Therefore, we further modified the BPP method (M-BPP) by homogenizing the tissue in a modified protein extraction buffer containing both ionic and non-ionic detergents (0.5% SDS; 1.5% Triton X-100), 2% PVPP and protease inhibitors. Further, the extracted proteins were solubilized in 0.5% of zwitterionic detergent (C7BzO) instead of 4% CHAPS. This slight modification to the BPP method resulted in a higher protein yield, and good quality 2-DE maps with a higher number of protein spots in both the tested seagrasses. Further, the M-BPP method was successfully utilized in western-blot analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC—a key enzyme for carbon metabolism

  7. Development of an Efficient Protein Extraction Method Compatible with LC-MS/MS for Proteome Mapping in Two Australian Seagrasses Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijian Jiang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The availability of the first complete genome sequence of the marine flowering plant Zostera marina (commonly known as seagrass in early 2016, is expected to significantly raise the impact of seagrass proteomics. Seagrasses are marine ecosystem engineers that are currently declining worldwide at an alarming rate due to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Seagrasses (especially species of the genus Zostera are compromised for proteomic studies primarily due to the lack of efficient protein extraction methods because of their recalcitrant cell wall which is rich in complex polysaccharides and a high abundance of secondary metabolites in their cells. In the present study, three protein extraction methods that are commonly used in plant proteomics i.e., phenol (P; trichloroacetic acid/acetone/SDS/phenol (TASP; and borax/polyvinyl-polypyrrolidone/phenol (BPP extraction, were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively based on two dimensional isoelectric focusing (2D-IEF maps and LC-MS/MS analysis using the two most abundant Australian seagrass species, namely Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis. All three tested methods produced high quality protein extracts with excellent 2D-IEF maps in P. australis. However, the BPP method produces better results in Z. muelleri compared to TASP and P. Therefore, we further modified the BPP method (M-BPP by homogenizing the tissue in a modified protein extraction buffer containing both ionic and non-ionic detergents (0.5% SDS; 1.5% Triton X-100, 2% PVPP and protease inhibitors. Further, the extracted proteins were solubilized in 0.5% of zwitterionic detergent (C7BzO instead of 4% CHAPS. This slight modification to the BPP method resulted in a higher protein yield, and good quality 2-DE maps with a higher number of protein spots in both the tested seagrasses. Further, the M-BPP method was successfully utilized in western-blot analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC—a key enzyme for carbon

  8. Development of an Efficient Protein Extraction Method Compatible with LC-MS/MS for Proteome Mapping in Two Australian Seagrasses Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhijian; Kumar, Manoj; Padula, Matthew P; Pernice, Mathieu; Kahlke, Tim; Kim, Mikael; Ralph, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    The availability of the first complete genome sequence of the marine flowering plant Zostera marina (commonly known as seagrass) in early 2016, is expected to significantly raise the impact of seagrass proteomics. Seagrasses are marine ecosystem engineers that are currently declining worldwide at an alarming rate due to both natural and anthropogenic disturbances. Seagrasses (especially species of the genus Zostera) are compromised for proteomic studies primarily due to the lack of efficient protein extraction methods because of their recalcitrant cell wall which is rich in complex polysaccharides and a high abundance of secondary metabolites in their cells. In the present study, three protein extraction methods that are commonly used in plant proteomics i.e., phenol (P); trichloroacetic acid/acetone/SDS/phenol (TASP); and borax/polyvinyl-polypyrrolidone/phenol (BPP) extraction, were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively based on two dimensional isoelectric focusing (2D-IEF) maps and LC-MS/MS analysis using the two most abundant Australian seagrass species, namely Zostera muelleri and Posidonia australis. All three tested methods produced high quality protein extracts with excellent 2D-IEF maps in P. australis. However, the BPP method produces better results in Z. muelleri compared to TASP and P. Therefore, we further modified the BPP method (M-BPP) by homogenizing the tissue in a modified protein extraction buffer containing both ionic and non-ionic detergents (0.5% SDS; 1.5% Triton X-100), 2% PVPP and protease inhibitors. Further, the extracted proteins were solubilized in 0.5% of zwitterionic detergent (C7BzO) instead of 4% CHAPS. This slight modification to the BPP method resulted in a higher protein yield, and good quality 2-DE maps with a higher number of protein spots in both the tested seagrasses. Further, the M-BPP method was successfully utilized in western-blot analysis of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC-a key enzyme for carbon metabolism

  9. Efficacy and compatibility with mass spectrometry of methods for elution of proteins from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and polyvinyldifluoride membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.S.; Jagd, M.; Sørensen, B.K.

    2004-01-01

    and removal of SDS. Comparison of different electroblotting methods verified that the different membranes and buffers were equally efficient for transfer of proteins in the range 20-100 kDa. Elution front polyvinyldifluoride membranes was most efficient using either concentrated Solutions of trifluoroacetic...

  10. A Fmoc-compatible Method for the Solid-Phase Synthesis of Peptide C-Terminal (alpha)-Thioesters based on the Safety-Catch Hydrazine Linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Hackel, B J; de Yoreo, J J; Mitchell, A R

    2003-11-22

    C-terminal peptide thioesters are key intermediates for the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins and for the production of cyclic peptides by native chemical ligation. They can be synthetically prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) methods or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. Until recently, the chemical synthesis of C-terminal a-thioester peptides by SPPS was largely restricted to the Boc/Benzyl methodology because of the poor stability of the thioester bond to the basic conditions employed for the deprotection of the N{sup {alpha}}-Fmoc group. In the present work, we describe a new method for the SPPS of C-terminal thioesters by Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazide linker, which is totally stable to the Fmoc-SPPS conditions. Once the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker can be achieved by mild oxidation. This step transforms the hydrazide group into a highly reactive diazene intermediate which can react with different H-AA-SEt to yield the corresponding {alpha}-thioester peptide in good yields. This method has been successfully used for the generation of different thioester peptides, circular peptides and a fully functional SH3 protein domain.

  11. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzika Aria

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. Methods This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device. A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a an ERF based resistive element; b a gearbox; c two handles and d two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Results Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed

  12. Tone compatibility between HDR displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bist, Cambodge; Cozot, Rémi; Madec, Gérard; Ducloux, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) is the latest trend in television technology and we expect an in ux of HDR capable consumer TVs in the market. Initial HDR consumer displays will operate on a peak brightness of about 500-1000 nits while in the coming years display peak brightness is expected to go beyond 1000 nits. However, professionally graded HDR content can range from 1000 to 4000 nits. As with Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) content, we can expect HDR content to be available in variety of lighting styles such as low key, medium key and high key video. This raises concerns over tone-compatibility between HDR displays especially when adapting to various lighting styles. It is expected that dynamic range adaptation between HDR displays uses similar techniques as found with tone mapping and tone expansion operators. In this paper, we survey simple tone mapping methods of 4000 nits color-graded HDR content for 1000 nits HDR displays. We also investigate tone expansion strategies when HDR content graded in 1000 nits is displayed on 4000 nits HDR monitors. We conclude that the best tone reproduction technique between HDR displays strongly depends on the lighting style of the content.

  13. Method and software to solution of inverse and inverse design fluid flow and heat transfer problems is compatible with CFD-software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krukovsky, P.G. [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1997-12-31

    The description of method and software FRIEND which provide a possibility of solution of inverse and inverse design problems on the basis of existing (base) CFD-software for solution of direct problems (in particular, heat-transfer and fluid-flow problems using software PHOENICS) are presented. FRIEND is an independent additional module that widens the operational capacities of the base software unified with this module. This unifying does not require any change or addition to the base software. Interfacing of FRIEND and the base software takes place through input and output files of the base software. A brief description of the computational technique applied for the inverse problem solution, same detailed information on the interfacing of FRIEND and CFD-software and solution results for testing inverse and inverse design problems, obtained using the tandem CFD-software PHOENICS and FRIEND, are presented. (author) 9 refs.

  14. fMRI-compatible rehabilitation hand device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanicheh, Azadeh; Muto, Andrew; Triantafyllou, Christina; Weinberg, Brian; Astrakas, Loukas; Tzika, Aria; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2006-10-06

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used in studying human brain functions and neurorehabilitation. In order to develop complex and well-controlled fMRI paradigms, interfaces that can precisely control and measure output force and kinematics of the movements in human subjects are needed. Optimized state-of-the-art fMRI methods, combined with magnetic resonance (MR) compatible robotic devices for rehabilitation, can assist therapists to quantify, monitor, and improve physical rehabilitation. To achieve this goal, robotic or mechatronic devices with actuators and sensors need to be introduced into an MR environment. The common standard mechanical parts can not be used in MR environment and MR compatibility has been a tough hurdle for device developers. This paper presents the design, fabrication and preliminary testing of a novel, one degree of freedom, MR compatible, computer controlled, variable resistance hand device that may be used in brain MR imaging during hand grip rehabilitation. We named the device MR_CHIROD (Magnetic Resonance Compatible Smart Hand Interfaced Rehabilitation Device). A novel feature of the device is the use of Electro-Rheological Fluids (ERFs) to achieve tunable and controllable resistive force generation. ERFs are fluids that experience dramatic changes in rheological properties, such as viscosity or yield stress, in the presence of an electric field. The device consists of four major subsystems: a) an ERF based resistive element; b) a gearbox; c) two handles and d) two sensors, one optical encoder and one force sensor, to measure the patient induced motion and force. The smart hand device is designed to resist up to 50% of the maximum level of gripping force of a human hand and be controlled in real time. Laboratory tests of the device indicate that it was able to meet its design objective to resist up to approximately 50% of the maximum handgrip force. The detailed compatibility tests demonstrated that there is

  15. Handbook of electromagnetic compatibility

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This""know-how""book gives readers a concise understanding of the fundamentals of EMC, from basic mathematical and physical concepts through present, computer-age methods used in analysis, design, and tests. With contributions from leading experts in their fields, the text provides a comprehensive overview. Fortified with information on how to solve potential electromagnetic interference (EMI) problems that may arise in electronic design, practitioners will be betterable to grasp the latest techniques, trends, and applications of this increasingly important engineering discipline.Handbook of E

  16. New method for evaluation of the manson-coffin-basquin and ramberg-osgood equations with respect to compatibility; Neue Auswertungsmethode zur Bestimmung der Kennwerte der Dehnungswoehlerlinie und der Spannungs-Dehnungs-Kurve unter Beruecksichtigung der Kompatibilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dsoki, C. el [Bauteilgebundenes Werkstoffverhalten, Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit, Darmstadt (Germany); Nieslony, A. [Opole University of Technology (Poland); Kaufmann, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Betriebsfestigkeit und Systemzuverlaessigkeit LBF (Germany); Krug, P. [PEAK Werkstoff GmbH in Velbert (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    A new method for determining the stress-strain and strain-life curves for metals is presented. The method involves fitting the curve to experimental data points in a three-dimensional strain-stress-life space. With the plastic part of strain, stress and fatigue life as coordinates, a straight line is used for fitting the experimental data points. The material constants are calculated directly from the directional vector R and the coordinates of the point P, which determines the fitted straight line. It is shown that the assumption of equality of the plastic and elastic components in Manson-Coffin-Basquin and Ramberg-Osgood equations leads to the so called compatibility condition. This new method retains the mathematical and physical relationships between the considered curves. The results obtained from this new method using high-strength aluminium alloys subjected to different manufacturing conditions and different test temperatures are presented. These results are compared to results obtained with a conventional method for determining the fatigue parameters. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Es wird eine Methode zur Auswertung dehnungsgeregelter Versuche vorgeschlagen. Sie beinhaltet eine Regressionsrechnung auf Basis der Versuchsergebnisse im 3-Dimensionalen Raum. Dabei wird jeder Versuchspunkt genau einer Spannungsamplitude, einer Dehnungsamplitude und einer Schwingspielzahl zugeordnet. Die gesuchten zyklischen Konstanten und Exponenten werden direkt aus dem Richtungsvektor R und dem Stuetzpunkt P aus der Regressionsrechnung bestimmt. Weiterhin wird anhand der 3D-Methode gezeigt, wie die Kompatibilitaetsbedingung, d. h. die Gleichsetzung der elastischen und plastischen Anteile aus der Ramberg-Osgood- und der Coffin-Manson-Basquin-Gleichung, sowohl die mathematischen als auch die physikalischen Zusammenhaenge beibehaelt. Anhand von Versuchsdaten, die an spruehkompaktierten Aluminiumlegierungen mit unterschiedlichen Fertigungs- und

  17. Standards for compatibility of printed circuit and component lead materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Study of packaging of microminiature electronic components reveals methods of improving compatibility of lead materials, joining techniques, transfer molding concepts, printed circuit board materials, and process and material specifications.

  18. Atuarfitsialak: Greenland's Cultural Compatible Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Tasha R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2002, Greenlandic reform leaders launched a comprehensive, nation-wide reform to create culturally compatible education. Greenland's reform work spans the entire educational system and includes preschool through higher education. To assist their efforts, reform leaders adopted the Standards for Effective Pedagogy developed at the Center for…

  19. Compatibility of Ohio trail users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger E. McCay; George H. Moeller

    1976-01-01

    Compatibility indexes show how Ohio trail users feel about meeting each other on the trail. All four of the major types of trail users-hikers, horseback riders, bicycle riders, and motorcycle riders-enjoy meeting their own kind. But they also feel antagonism toward the faster, more mechanized trail users; e.g., everyone likes hikers, but few like motorcycle riders....

  20. Design optimization for car compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nastic, T.; Schoofs, A.J.G.; Mooi, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Nowadays traffic safety and occupant protection get a lot of attention due to the large number of fatalities and injuries in car accidents. The occupant protection in two-vehicle crashes can be improved by car-to-car compatibility, which means well balanced crashworthiness characteristics of both

  1. Rate-Compatible Protograph LDPC Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy V. (Inventor); Nosratinia, Aria (Inventor); Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Digital communication coding methods resulting in rate-compatible low density parity-check (LDPC) codes built from protographs. Described digital coding methods start with a desired code rate and a selection of the numbers of variable nodes and check nodes to be used in the protograph. Constraints are set to satisfy a linear minimum distance growth property for the protograph. All possible edges in the graph are searched for the minimum iterative decoding threshold and the protograph with the lowest iterative decoding threshold is selected. Protographs designed in this manner are used in decode and forward relay channels.

  2. An MR-compatible neonatal incubator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, M N J; Hart, A R; Lait, M; Griffiths, P D

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To develop a neonatal MR-compatible incubator for transporting babies between a neonatal intensive care unit and an MRI unit that is within the same hospital but geographically separate. Methods The system was strapped to a standard MR-compatible patient trolley, which provides space for resuscitation outside the incubator. A constant-temperature exothermic heat pad was used to maintain temperature together with a logging fluoro-optic temperature monitor and alarm system. The system has been designed to accommodate standard knee-sized coils from the major MR manufacturers. The original incubator was constructed from carbon fibre, but this required modification to prevent radiofrequency shading artefacts due to the conducting properties of the carbon fibre. A high-tensile polyester material was used, which combined light weight with high impact strength. The system could be moved onto the patient bed with the coils and infant in place by one technologist. Results Studies in eight neonatal patients produced high quality 1.5 T MR images with low motion artefacts. The incubator should also be compatible with imaging in 3 T MR systems, although further work is required to establish this. Images were acquired using both rapid and high-resolution sequences, including three-dimensional volumes, proton spectra and diffusion weighting. Conclusion The incubator provides a safe, quiet environment for neonates during transport and imaging, at low cost. PMID:22167517

  3. Development and Validation of a Chromatography Method Using Tandem UV/Charged Aerosol Detector for Simultaneous Determination of Amlodipine Besylate and Olmesartan Medoxomil: Application to Drug-Excipient Compatibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondi, Ariadne M; Garcia, Jerusa S; Trevisan, Marcello G

    2017-01-01

    A study was carried out to investigate compatibility of amlodipine besylate and olmesartan medoxomil with a variety of pharmaceutical excipients. Both drugs are antihypertensive agents that can be administered alone, in monotherapy, or in pharmaceutical association. The studies were performed using binary and ternary mixtures, and samples were stored for 3 and 6 months at 40°C under 75% relative humidity and dry conditions. For this study, a method based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of amlodipine besylate and olmesartan medoxomil in samples from pharmaceutical preformulation studies using diode array detector (DAD) and charged aerosol detector (CAD). The runtime per sample was 10 min with retention time of 7.926 min and 4.408 min for amlodipine and olmesartan, respectively. The validation was performed according to ICH guidelines. The calibration curve presents linear dynamic range from 12 to 250  μ g mL -1 for amlodipine and from 25 to 500  μ g mL -1 for olmesartan with coefficient of determination ( R 2  ≥ 0.9908) while repeatability and reproducibility (expressed as relative standard deviation) were lower than 1.0%. The excipients such as corn starch, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, polyvinyl alcohol, talc, polyvinylpyrrolidone, lactose monohydrate, and polyethylene glycol showed potential incompatibilities after accelerated stability testing.

  4. Development and Validation of a Chromatography Method Using Tandem UV/Charged Aerosol Detector for Simultaneous Determination of Amlodipine Besylate and Olmesartan Medoxomil: Application to Drug-Excipient Compatibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadne M. Brondi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to investigate compatibility of amlodipine besylate and olmesartan medoxomil with a variety of pharmaceutical excipients. Both drugs are antihypertensive agents that can be administered alone, in monotherapy, or in pharmaceutical association. The studies were performed using binary and ternary mixtures, and samples were stored for 3 and 6 months at 40°C under 75% relative humidity and dry conditions. For this study, a method based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of amlodipine besylate and olmesartan medoxomil in samples from pharmaceutical preformulation studies using diode array detector (DAD and charged aerosol detector (CAD. The runtime per sample was 10 min with retention time of 7.926 min and 4.408 min for amlodipine and olmesartan, respectively. The validation was performed according to ICH guidelines. The calibration curve presents linear dynamic range from 12 to 250 μg mL−1 for amlodipine and from 25 to 500 μg mL−1 for olmesartan with coefficient of determination (R2 ≥ 0.9908 while repeatability and reproducibility (expressed as relative standard deviation were lower than 1.0%. The excipients such as corn starch, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, polyvinyl alcohol, talc, polyvinylpyrrolidone, lactose monohydrate, and polyethylene glycol showed potential incompatibilities after accelerated stability testing.

  5. Multiparty Compatibility for Concurrent Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roly Perera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objects and actors are communicating state machines, offering and consuming different services at different points in their lifecycle. Two complementary challenges arise when programming such systems. When objects interact, their state machines must be "compatible", so that services are requested only when they are available. Dually, when objects refine other objects, their state machines must be "compliant", so that services are honoured whenever they are promised. In this paper we show how the idea of multiparty compatibility from the session types literature can be applied to both of these problems. We present an untyped language in which concurrent objects are checked automatically for compatibility and compliance. For simple objects, checking can be exhaustive and has the feel of a type system. More complex objects can be partially validated via test cases, leading to a methodology closer to continuous testing. Our proof-of-concept implementation is limited in some important respects, but demonstrates the potential value of the approach and the relationship to existing software development practices.

  6. Development of a chromatographic method for the study of the stability and compatibility of Mexican fuel oils; Desarrollo de un metodo cromatografico para el estudio de estabilidad y compatibilidad de combustoleos mexicanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blass Amador, Georgina; Panama Tirado, Luz Angelica [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1992-11-01

    In Mexico, the largest part of the generated electric energy comes from the use of residual heavy oils known as fuel oils which have suffered quality degradation due to a combination of factors, among which stands out the changes in the refining process. It is necessary to develop methods capable of indicating the instability (formation of sediment or viscosity increase during storage or heating) or incompatibility (formation of sediment in mixing two or more fuel oils) of the fuel oils employed in fossil fuel power plants. This work objective was to develop an alternative test for the study of the compatibility and/or stability of Mexican fuel oils using high resolution liquid chromatography (CLAR) and so to determine structural aspects of the fuel oil that determine its stability. Since the formation of sediments occurs when the dissolving ability of the fuel is inadequate to keep the asphaltenes in solution, it is important to know the solvent power degree or aromaticity of the diluent; so, in the first part of this work the attention was centered in the determination of the profile of aromatic compounds of the fuel oil diluents, the other part was dedicated to the determination of the distribution profile the molecular weights of the asphaltenes present in the fuel oils. The profiles of the aromatic fraction, as well as of the molecular weight distribution were determined using liquid chromatography, in which a variety of columns and solvents were used. A combination of routine tests was accomplished, such as asphaltenes content, toluene equivalence, viscosity, etc., in order to obtain correlation with the chromatographic method developed. In this article it is only discussed the section corresponding to the obtainment of the profile of aromatics content in the fuel oils. It has been found a correlation among the asphaltenes content, toluene equivalence, aromaticity profiles and stability. As a direct consequence, it is expected to be able to predict the

  7. Compatibility Determination : [Crescent Lake NWR 2003 hunting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Compatibility Determination states that hunting deer and upland birds at Crescent Lake National Wildlife Refuge is compatible with Refuge purposes.

  8. [Compatibility determinations Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides two compatibility determinations; one stated that the proposed agricultural practices (row crop farming) are compatible with Refuge objectives...

  9. Community–groundwater compatibility assessments: An approach ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data processing and analyses include the statistical processing of the collected data to assess the comprehensive measure of groundwater compatibility per area, and the individual indicators of the groundwater-compatibility index are given a relative score. This enables the different indicators for groundwater compatibility ...

  10. Electromagnetic compatibility principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Weston, David A

    2001-01-01

    This totally revised and expanded reference/text provides comprehensive, single-source coverage of the design, problem solving, and specifications of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) into electrical equipment/systems-including new information on basic theories, applications, evaluations, prediction techniques, and practical diagnostic options for preventing EMI through cost-effective solutions. Offers the most recent guidelines, safety limits, and standards for human exposure to electromagnetic fields! Containing updated data on EMI diagnostic verification measurements, as well as over 900 drawings, photographs, tables, and equations-500 more than the previous edition

  11. Settlement-Compatible Lunar Transporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenthaler, G.

    Over the past few years we have published papers in this forum identifying, characterizing and advocating settlement-compatible transportation architectures for Mars. In the present paper, we do the same for the Moon and show evolutionary potentials for growth of lunar architectures into Mars architectures of the types discussed in our previous papers. The essence of a settlement-compatible architecture is that it yields a low recurring transportation cost and that the elements of the architecture are enduring, i.e., fully reusable with lifetimes on the order of Earth-based capital investments. Our previous papers have shown that extension of human habitation to other bodies in our Solar System is probably unaffordable with any other approach. The design of a settlement-compatible architecture begins with Earth launch. In our prior papers, we simply identified the Earth launch option as a fully reusable system with roughly Shuttle (or Atlas 5 or Delta 4 or Sea Launch or Ariane 5) capability, i.e. about 20 metric t. to low Earth orbit and a payload bay of dimensions about 5 m diameter x 15 to 20 m length. This is what the commercial market needs; this is where the traffic demand is; this is approximately the design point for a next-generation (after Shuttle) reusable launch vehicle. We continue in that vein for the present paper. Human mission advocates may argue it isn't big enough; that they need 80 metric t. payload to orbit. We answer that to achieve our cost criteria, there isn't much of a choice, and that the savings in launch cost will far outweigh the added expense for on-orbit assembly. Lunar transportation is considerably less demanding than Mars transportation. The main difference is in trip time. Because lunar trips are short, the crew habitat can be small, a la the Apollo Command Module, and the propulsion system to move it is also small by comparison. We analyze and depict a lunar transportation system based on crew elements adapted from the

  12. Electromagnetic compatibility and interference metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, M. T.; Kanda, M.

    1986-07-01

    The material included in the report is intended for a short course on electromagnetic compatibility/interference (EMC/EM) metrology. The entire course is presented in nine chapters with the introductory part given as Chapter 1. The particular measurement topics to be covered are: (1) open sites (Chapters 2 and 6), (2) transverse electromagnetic cells (Chapter 3), (3) techniques for measuring the electromagnetic shielding of materials (Chapter 4), (4) anechoic chambers (Chapter 5), and (5) reverberating chambers (Chapter 8). In addition, since small probe antennas play an important role in some of the EMC/EMI measurements discussed, a separate chapter on various probe systems developed at NBS is given in Chapter 7. Selected contemporary EMI topics such as the characterization and measurement of a complex EM environment, interferences in the form of out-of-band receptions to an antenna, and some conducted EMI problems are also briefly discussed (Chapter 9).

  13. A tailored approach to electromagnetic compatibility requirements in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javor, Ken; Nave, Mark

    1991-01-01

    An approach is outlined which defines the requirements for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) between NASA and military technologies with attention given to electromagnetic interference (EMI) requirements. In order to minimize the cost and weight impact of the changes needed for compatibility the plan emphasizes the incorporation of off-the-shelf technology with current nonstandard methods. NASA designs are structured to meet EMI requirements rather than processing waivers against military-type specifications. The NASA-wide EMI requirements can be documented in three sections: requirements, test methods, and tailoring guidelines. It is shown that a NASA-wide EMC specification would decrease the costs of achieving compatibility by increasing efficiency and optimizing the relationship between EMC design and performance and cost.

  14. Toward Clinically Compatible Phase-Contrast Mammography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Scherer

    Full Text Available Phase-contrast mammography using laboratory X-ray sources is a promising approach to overcome the relatively low sensitivity and specificity of clinical, absorption-based screening. Current research is mostly centered on identifying potential diagnostic benefits arising from phase-contrast and dark-field mammography and benchmarking the latter with conventional state-of-the-art imaging methods. So far, little effort has been made to adjust this novel imaging technique to clinical needs. In this article, we address the key points for a successful implementation to a clinical routine in the near future and present the very first dose-compatible and rapid scan-time phase-contrast mammograms of both a freshly dissected, cancer-bearing mastectomy specimen and a mammographic accreditation phantom.

  15. Vacuum Compatible Percussive Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Honeybee Robotics proposes to develop a vacuum compatible percussive dynamic cone penetrometer (PDCP), for establishing soil bin characteristics, with the ultimate...

  16. [Application of Doehlert design for compatibility research of Dachengqi decoction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhen; Cao, Cheng; Zeng, Yuaner; Jiang, Bin

    2009-05-01

    To study the compatibility of dosage change of Zhishi, Houpo and Mangxiao affecting the yields of Anthraquinone components in Dachengqi decoction. Response surface methodology (RSM) with Doehlert design was adopted to evaluate the yields of Anthraquinone components in Dachengqi decoction by dosage change of Zhishi, Houpo and Mangxiao and the analysis time was shorten through a desirability function. Results show that Anthraquinone components were got a high yields when the dosage ratio of Dachengqi decoction were compatible as follows: Dahuang-Zhishi-Houpo-Mangxiao (1:4:2. 31:2). The Doehlert design with a desirability function, which allow a sequential response methodology, is a good methods, and, of cause, the mathematical model can be further extended and applied to the compatibility research of Chinese material medicine.

  17. 32 CFR 552.95 - Compatible use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Compatible use. 552.95 Section 552.95 National... CEMETERIES REGULATIONS AFFECTING MILITARY RESERVATIONS Fort Lewis Land Use Policy § 552.95 Compatible use. (a... closed. (4) Motorized infantry operations that will use the majority of the road net in a training area...

  18. Common fixed points for weakly compatible maps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The purpose of this paper is to prove a common fixed point theorem, from the class of compatible continuous maps to a larger class of maps having weakly compatible maps without appeal to continuity, which generalized the results of Jungck [3], Fisher [1], Kang and Kim [8], Jachymski [2], and Rhoades [9].

  19. Is Religious Education Compatible with Science Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education, challenges the popular view that science and religion are compatible or complementary. Discusses differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological, and attitudinal levels. Argues that religious education should be kept…

  20. Evaluating the compatibility of multi-functional and intensive urban land uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taleai, M.; Sharifi, A.; Sliuzas, R.; Mesgari, M.

    2007-12-01

    This research is aimed at developing a model for assessing land use compatibility in densely built-up urban areas. In this process, a new model was developed through the combination of a suite of existing methods and tools: geographical information system, Delphi methods and spatial decision support tools: namely multi-criteria evaluation analysis, analytical hierarchy process and ordered weighted average method. The developed model has the potential to calculate land use compatibility in both horizontal and vertical directions. Furthermore, the compatibility between the use of each floor in a building and its neighboring land uses can be evaluated. The method was tested in a built-up urban area located in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. The results show that the model is robust in clarifying different levels of physical compatibility between neighboring land uses. This paper describes the various steps and processes of developing the proposed land use compatibility evaluation model (CEM).

  1. DOD Offshore Wind Mission Compatibility Assessments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set represents the results of analyses conducted by the Department of Defense to assess the compatibility of offshore wind development with military assets...

  2. Morgantown People Mover Electromagnetic Compatibility Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) of a transit system is the absence of interference between all parts of the system, and between the system and the community which it serves. This report documents the EMC experience obtained during the design and ...

  3. Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated Laundry System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An Advanced Microgravity Compatible, Integrated laundry System (AMCILS) is proposed that uses a two phase water / water vapor system to allow good agitation of...

  4. Compatibility studies for the waste packaging program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullam, H.T.

    1969-03-01

    A program is now underway by Battelle-Northwest to develop the technology required for a waste packaging plant. Cesium chloride and strontium fluoride have been selected as the prime candidates for packaging. Cesium diuranate and strontium pyrophosphate have been selected as backup compounds for packaging in case either or both of the prime candidates should be rejected for any reason. No detailed studies of CsCl compatibility have been reported and long term data are needed. As in the case with CsCl, no detailed studies have been made on SrF{sub 2} compatibility. As a result of the lack of pertinent compatibility data, it is readily apparent that detailed studies are required on CsCl and SrF{sub 2} compatibility and at least scouting studies must be made on the compatibility of the backup packaging compounds. This report summarizes the compatibility studies that are underway at PNL using non-radioactive compounds. Capsule fabrication procedures and tests schedules are outlined.

  5. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is...

  6. Advanced Capabilities Medical Suction Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A compact microgravity and hypogravity compatible vacuum device is proposed to provide medical suction and containment of extracted fluids. The proposed aspirator...

  7. A Zeroth Law Compatible Model to Kerr Black Hole Thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor G. Czinner; Hideo Iguchi

    2017-01-01

    We consider the thermodynamic and stability problem of Kerr black holes arising from the nonextensive/nonadditive nature of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula. Nonadditive thermodynamics is often criticized by asserting that the zeroth law cannot be compatible with nonadditive composition rules, so in this work we follow the so-called formal logarithm method to derive an additive entropy function for Kerr black holes also satisfying the zeroth law’s requirement. Starting from the most gen...

  8. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Guag Joshua W; Seidman Seth J; Pantchenko Oxana S; Witters Donald M; Sponberg Curt L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, inco...

  9. Space agriculture in micro- and hypo-gravity: A comparative study of soil hydraulics and biogeochemistry in a cropping unit on Earth, Mars, the Moon and the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Federico; Pallud, Céline

    2010-12-01

    Increasing interest is developing towards soil-based agriculture as a long-term bioregenerative life support during space and planetary explorations. Contrary to hydroponics and aeroponics, soil-based cropping would offer an effective approach to sustain food and oxygen production, decompose organic wastes, sequester carbon dioxide, and filter water. However, the hydraulics and biogeochemical functioning of soil systems exposed to gravities lower than the Earth's are still unknown. Since gravity is crucial in driving water flow, hypogravity will affect nutrient and oxygen transport in the liquid and gaseous phases, and could lead to suffocation of microorganisms and roots, and emissions of toxic gases. A highly mechanistic model coupling soil hydraulics and nutrient biogeochemistry previously tested on soils on Earth ( g=9.806 m s -2) is used to highlight the effects of gravity on the functioning of cropping units on Mars (0.38 g), the Moon (0.16 g), and in the international space station (ISS, nearly 0 g). For each scenario, we have compared the net leaching of water, the leaching of NH 3, NH 4+, NO 2- and NO 3- solutes, the emissions of NH 3, CO 2, N 2O, NO and N 2 gases, the concentrations profiles of O 2, CO 2 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in soil, the pH, and the dynamics of various microbial functional groups within the root zone against the same control variables in the soil under terrestrial gravity. The response of the soil ecodynamics was relatively linear; gravitational accelerations lower than the Earth's resulted in 90-100% lower water leaching rates, 95-100% lower nutrient leaching rates, and lower emissions of NH 3 and NO gases (80-95% and 30-40%, respectively). Lower N loss through leaching resulted in 60-100% higher concentration of the microbial biomass, but did not alter the vertical stratification of the microbial functional groups with respect to the stratification on Earth. However, the higher biomass concentration produced higher

  10. A Zeroth Law Compatible Model to Kerr Black Hole Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor G. Czinner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider the thermodynamic and stability problem of Kerr black holes arising from the nonextensive/nonadditive nature of the Bekenstein–Hawking entropy formula. Nonadditive thermodynamics is often criticized by asserting that the zeroth law cannot be compatible with nonadditive composition rules, so in this work we follow the so-called formal logarithm method to derive an additive entropy function for Kerr black holes also satisfying the zeroth law’s requirement. Starting from the most general, equilibrium compatible, nonadditive entropy composition rule of Abe, we consider the simplest non-parametric approach that is generated by the explicit nonadditive form of the Bekenstein–Hawking formula. This analysis extends our previous results on the Schwarzschild case, and shows that the zeroth law-compatible temperature function in the model is independent of the mass–energy parameter of the black hole. By applying the Poincaré turning point method, we also study the thermodynamic stability problem in the system.

  11. Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel and skeletal muscle myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wei; Zhang Li; Sun Liang; Wang Chengyue [Jinzhou Central Hospital, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Fan Ming; Liu Shuhong, E-mail: Weiwang_Ly@yahoo.com.c [Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Academy of Military Medical Science, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Compatibility of hyaluronic acid hydrogel (HAH) and skeletal muscle myoblasts has been investigated for the first time in the present paper. Skeletal muscle myoblasts were separated from skeletons of rats and incubated with a HAH-containing culture medium. Cell morphology, hydrophilicity and cell adhesion of the HAH scaffold were investigated using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Hoechest33258 fluorescent staining, the immunocytochemistry method and water adsorption rate measurement. It was found that at a proper concentration (around 0.5%) of hyaluronic acid, the hydrogel possessed good compatibility with skeletal muscle myoblasts. The hydrogel can create a three-dimensional structure for the growth of skeletal muscle myoblasts and benefit cell attachment to provide a novel scaffold material for the tissue engineering of skeletal muscle.

  12. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  13. Electromagnetic Compatibility for the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Space Shuttle electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). It includes an overview of the design of the shuttle with the areas that are of concern for the electromagnetic compatibility. It includes discussion of classical electromagnetic interference (EMI) and the work performed to control the electromagnetic interference. Another area of interest is electrostatic charging and the threat of electrostatic discharge and the attempts to reduce damage to the Shuttle from these possible hazards. The issue of electrical bonding is als reviewed. Lastly the presentation reviews the work performed to protect the shuttle from lightning, both in flight and on the ground.

  14. Compatibility and testing of electronic components

    CERN Document Server

    Jowett, C E

    2013-01-01

    Compatibility and Testing of Electronic Components outlines the concepts of component part life according to thresholds of failure; the advantages that result from identifying such thresholds; their identification; and the various tests used in their detection. The book covers topics such as the interconnection of miniature passive components; the integrated circuit compatibility and its components; the semiconductor joining techniques; and the thin film hybrid approach in integrated circuits. Also covered are topics such as thick film resistors, conductors, and insulators; thin inlays for el

  15. 46 CFR 150.150 - Exceptions to the compatibility chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to the compatibility chart. 150.150 Section... CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES § 150.150 Exceptions to the compatibility chart. The Commandant (G-MSO... 1, the Compatibility Chart. ...

  16. Screening for attractants compatible with entomopathogenic fungus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several thrips attractants were screened for compatibility with Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) and a subset of these for attraction to Megalurothrips sjostedti Trybom (Thysanoptera: Thripidae). Conidial germination and germ tube length of M. anisopliae were used as indicators of ...

  17. Electromagnetic compatibility design guideline for STADAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowdell, R. B.; Hill, J. S.; Senn, J. C.; Shifman, J. C.; Skaggs, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    Procedures for achieving electromagnetic compatibility in electronic and electrical equipment for aerospace ground stations are investigated. The application of shielding theory to good design is treated and standards of good practice are outlined for bonding, grounding, wiring, and cabling. Some aspects of filter design are explained, and suggestions are given for the application of filters to electronic and electrical equipment.

  18. Plasmonic Modulator Using CMOS Compatible Material Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Kinsey, Nathaniel; Naik, Gururaj V.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a design of ultra-compact plasmonic modulator is proposed and numerically analyzed. The device l ayout utilizes alternative plas monic materials such as tr ansparent conducting oxides and titanium nitride which potentially can be applied for CMOS compatible process. The modulation...

  19. Energetic materials standards – Chemical compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuukkanen, I.M.; Bouma, R.H.B.

    2014-01-01

    Subgroup A Energetic Materials Team, SG/A (EMT), develops and maintains standards that are relevant to all life-cycle phases of ammunition/weapon systems. STANAG 4147 is the standard regarding chemical compatibility of explosives with munition components, and is a document of prime importance.

  20. Compatibility of Motion Facilitates Visuomotor Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hove, Michael J.; Spivey, Michael J.; Krumhansl, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Prior research indicates that synchronized tapping performance is very poor with flashing visual stimuli compared with auditory stimuli. Three finger-tapping experiments compared flashing visual metronomes with visual metronomes containing a spatial component, either compatible, incompatible, or orthogonal to the tapping action. In Experiment 1,…

  1. Catholic Educator Perceptions about Brain Compatible Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenen, Amie

    2009-01-01

    This document reports the findings of a doctoral project regarding the perceptions held by administrators and teachers of comprehensive Catholic schools in one Midwestern diocese. With the recent explosion of research in the area of the brain and brain compatible instruction it is valuable to know and understand the perceptions held by current…

  2. Improvement of crash compatibility between cars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, J.A.H.M.; Faerber, E.; Cesari, D.; Hobbs, A.C.; Kampen, B. van; Paez, J.; Wykes, N.J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the research work of the European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC) in the field of crash compatibility between passenger cars. Since July 1997 the EC Commission is partly funding the research work of EEVC. The running period of this project will be two

  3. Improvement of crash compatibility between cars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faerber, E. Cesari, D. Hobbs, A.C. Huibers, J. Kampen, B. van Paez, J. & Wykes, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the research work of the European Enhanced Vehicle-safety Committee (EEVC) in the field of crash compatibility between passenger cars. Since July 1997 the EC Commission is partly funding the research work of EEVC. The running period of this project will be two

  4. Are Naturalism and Moral Realism Compatible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peels, H.D.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper, Alvin Plantinga has argued that there is good reason to think that naturalism and moral realism are incompatible. He has done so by arguing that the most important argument for the compatibility of these two theses, which has been provided by Frank Jackson, fails and that any

  5. The Construal (In)compatibility Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ringberg, Torsten; Mao, Huifang

    2011-01-01

    incompatible with their mental construal, while ad claims construed at a level compatible with consumers' mental construal are more effective for those who possess a less creative mindset. We document that such differences in persuasion are driven by the fact that consumers with a creative (less creative) mind...

  6. Compatibility of Calamus deerratus and Lacosperma secundiflorum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An investigation was conducted to determine the optimum water to cement ratio for a locally manufactured Portland cement for use in wood composites. The effects of pre-processing and calcium chloride (CaCl2) on the compatibility of two rattan canes (Calamus deerratus and Lacosperma secundiflorum) with cement were ...

  7. Compatibility analysis of 3D printer resin for biological applications

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-08-30

    The salient features of microfluidics such as reduced cost, handling small sample and reagent volumes and less time required to fabricate the devices has inspired the present work. The incompatibility of three-dimensional printer resins in their native form and the method to improve their compatibility to many biological processes via surface modification are reported. The compatibility of the material to build microfluidic devices was evaluated in three different ways: (i) determining if the ultraviolet (UV) cured resin inhibits the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), i.e. testing devices for PCR compatibility; (ii) observing agglutination complex formed on the surface of the UV cured resin when anti-C-reactive protein (CRP) antibodies and CRP proteins were allowed to agglutinate; and (iii) by culturing human embryonic kidney cell line cells and testing for its attachment and viability. It is shown that only a few among four in its native form could be used for fabrication of microchannels and that had the least effect on biological molecules that could be used for PCR and protein interactions and cells, whereas the others were used after treating the surface. Importance in building lab-on-chip/micrototal analysis systems and organ-on-chip devices is found.

  8. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant E. faecalis Strains from Pigs of Local Origin by ADSRRS-Fingerprinting and MALDI -TOF MS; Evaluation of the Compatibility of Methods Employed for Multidrug Resistance Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Nowakiewicz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains from pigs of local origin and to analyse the relationship between resistance and genotypic and proteomic profiles by amplification of DNA fragments surrounding rare restriction sites (ADSRRS-fingerprinting and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI -TOF MS. From the total pool of Enterococcus spp. isolated from 90 pigs, we selected 36 multidrug resistant E. faecalis strains, which represented three different phenotypic resistance profiles. Phenotypic resistance to tetracycline, macrolides, phenicols, and lincomycin and high-level resistance to aminoglycosides were confirmed by the occurrence of at least one corresponding resistance gene in each strain. Based on the analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic resistance of the strains tested, five distinct resistance profiles were generated. As a complement of this analysis, profiles of virulence genes were determined and these profiles corresponded to the phenotypic resistance profiles. The demonstration of resistance to a wide panel of antimicrobials by the strains tested in this study indicates the need of typing to determine the spread of resistance also at the local level. It seems that in the case of E. faecalis, type and scope of resistance strongly determines the genotypic pattern obtained with the ADSRRS-fingerprinting method. The ADSRRS-fingerprinting analysis showed consistency of the genetic profiles with the resistance profiles, while analysis of data with the use of the MALDI- TOF MS method did not demonstrate direct reproduction of the clustering pattern obtained with this method. Our observations were confirmed by statistical analysis (Simpson's index of diversity, Rand and Wallace coefficients. Even though the MALDI -TOF MS method showed slightly higher discrimination power than ADSRRS-fingerprinting, only the latter method allowed reproduction of the

  9. Selection of excipients for extended release formulations of glipizide through drug-excipient compatibility testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Rajan K; Garg, Sanjay

    2005-07-15

    For the development of extended release formulations of glipizide, techniques of thermal and isothermal stress testing (IST) were used to assess the compatibility of glipizide with selected excipients. Initially, differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) was used to evaluate the compatibility. IR spectrum of drug-excipient mixture was also compared with that of pure drug and excipient. Compatibility of excipients defined in the prototype formula was tested using IST. Based on the DSC results alone, magnesium stearate, meglumine, TRIS buffer, and lactose, were found to exhibit interaction with glipizide. Stressed binary mixtures (stored at 50 degrees C for 3 weeks) of glipizide and meglumine showed yellow coloration indicating potential incompatibility. Based on the results of DSC, IR, and/or HPLC, excipients defined in the prototype formula were found to be compatible with glipizide. The optimized formulation developed using the compatible excipients were found to be stable after 3 months of accelerated stability studies (40 degrees C and 75% RH). Overall, compatibility of excipients with glipizide was successfully evaluated using the combination of thermal and IST methods and the formulations developed using the compatible excipients was found to be stable.

  10. Construction of Rate-Compatible LDPC Codes Utilizing Information Shortening and Parity Puncturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Christopher R

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method for constructing rate-compatible low-density parity-check (LDPC codes. The construction considers the problem of optimizing a family of rate-compatible degree distributions as well as the placement of bipartite graph edges. A hybrid approach that combines information shortening and parity puncturing is proposed. Local graph conditioning techniques for the suppression of error floors are also included in the construction methodology.

  11. Physical Compatibility of Propofol-Sufentanil Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbytovská, Jarmila; Gallusová, Jana; Vidlářová, Lucie; Procházková, Kamila; Šimek, Jan; Štěpánek, František

    2017-03-01

    Combined infusions of propofol and sufentanil preparations are frequently used in clinical practice to induce anesthesia and analgesia. However, the stability of propofol emulsions can be affected by dilution with another preparation, sometimes leading to particle coalescence and enlargement. Such unwanted effects can lead to fat embolism syndrome after intravenous application. This study describes the physical stability of 5 commercially available propofol preparations mixed with sufentanil citrate solutions. Two common markers of emulsion stability were used in this study; namely, the zeta potential and size distribution of the emulsion droplets. Both were measured using dynamic light scattering. The data for the pure propofol preparations and their mixtures with sufentanil citrate solution were compared. The absolute value of zeta potential decreased in 4 of the 5 propofol preparations after they had been mixed with sufentanil citrate. This effect indicates a lowering of repulsive interactions between the emulsion droplets. Although this phenomenon tends to cause agglomeration, none of the studied mixtures displayed a substantial increase in droplet size within 24 hours of blending. However, our long-term stability study revealed the instability of some of the propofol-sufentanil samples. Two of the 5 studied mixtures displayed a continual increase in particle size. The same 2 preparations showed the greatest reductions in the absolute value of zeta potential, thereby confirming the correlation of both measurement methods. The increase in particle size was more distinct in the samples stored at higher temperatures and with higher sufentanil concentrations. To ensure the microbial stability of an emulsion infusion preparation, clinical regulations require that such preparations should be applied to patients within 12 hours of opening. In this respect, we can confirm that during this period, none of the studied propofol-sufentanil mixtures displayed any physical

  12. Surface Deposition and Coalescence and Coacervation Phase Separation Methods: In Vitro Study and Compatibility Analysis of Eudragit RS30D, Eudragit RL30D, and Carbopol-PLA Loaded Metronidazole Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irin Dewan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole (MTZ has extremely broad spectrum of protozoal and antimicrobial activity and is clinically effective in trichomoniasis, amoebic colitis, and giardiasis. This study was performed to formulate and evaluate the MTZ loaded microspheres by coacervation phase separation and surface deposition and coalescence methods using different polymers like Gelatin, Carbopol 934P, Polylactic Acid (PLA, Eudragit RS30D, and Eudragit RL30D to acquire sustained release of drug. In vitro dissolution studies were carried out in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 for 8 hours according to USP paddle method. The maximum and minimum release of MTZ from microspheres observed were 84.81% and 76.6% for coacervation and 95.07% and 80.07% for surface deposition method, respectively, after 8 hours. Release kinetics was studied in different mathematical release models. The SEM and FTIR studies confirm good spheres and smooth surface as well as interaction between drug and polymers. Though release kinetic is uncertain, the best fit was obtained with the Korsmeyer kinetic model with release exponent (n lying between 0.45 and 0.89. In vitro studies showed that MTZ microspheres with different polymers might be a good candidate as sustained drug delivery system to treat bacterial infections.

  13. One-Way Compatibility, Two-Way Compatibility and Entry in Network Industries

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio Maria Manenti; Ernesto Somma

    2002-01-01

    We study the strategic choice of compatibility between two initially incompatible network goods in a two-stage game played by an incumbent and an entrant firm. Compatibility may be achieved by means of a converter. We derive a number of results under different assumptions about the nature of the converter (one-way vs two-way), the existence of property rights and the possibility of side payments. With incompatibility, entry deterrence occurs for sufficiently strong network effects. In the cas...

  14. Automation of electromagnetic compatability (EMC) test facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    Efforts to automate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center are discussed. The present facility is used to accomplish a battery of nine standard tests (with limited variations) deigned to certify EMC of Shuttle payload equipment. Prior to this project, some EMC tests were partially automated, but others were performed manually. Software was developed to integrate all testing by means of a desk-top computer-controller. Near real-time data reduction and onboard graphics capabilities permit immediate assessment of test results. Provisions for disk storage of test data permit computer production of the test engineer's certification report. Software flexibility permits variation in the tests procedure, the ability to examine more closely those frequency bands which indicate compatibility problems, and the capability to incorporate additional test procedures.

  15. Paleogeographical reconstructions compatible with Earth dilatation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Scalera

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research concerns the study of the possibility of an increase in the size of the Earthbecause of a still unknown process. After a previous recognition of the existence in the Pacific of shape conformities in a number of pairs of continental and oceanic boundaries (Scalera, 1991, 1993a, a search for compatibility of these results with independent data sets, paleomagnetic and geological and paleontological was undertaken. The conclusion is that the Earth's dilatation is compatible with the used data, while nothing can be affirmed with certainty about the dilatation process or its continuity or discontinuity through geological time. A tentative model of the evolution of the trench-arc-backarc systems has been provided, tuning it in agreement with a dilatational planet.

  16. Migration and sustainability - compatible or contradictory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    2006-01-01

    When the migration issue is discussed in a sustainability perspective, two questions are vital: 1) What is the relationship between migration and the global population growth? 2) What is the relationship between migration and consumption growth, and how does migration influence the distribution o...... of consumption possibilities both between and within industrialized and developing countries? Based on responses to these questions, it is argued that reasonably managed migration will be compatible with sustainable development....

  17. Group Discounts Compatible with Buyer Privacy

    OpenAIRE

    Domingo-Ferrer, Josep; Blanco-Justicia, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We show how group discounts can be offered without forcing buyers to surrender their anonymity, as long as buyers can use their own computing devices (e.g. smartphone, tablet or computer) to perform a purchase. Specifically, we present a protocol for privacy-preserving group discounts. The protocol allows a group of buyers to prove how many they are without disclosing their identities. Coupled with an anonymous payment system, this makes group discounts compatible with buyer privacy (that is,...

  18. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  19. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  20. Technical Basis for Electromagnetic Compatibility Regulatory Guidance Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Paul D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Korsah, Kofi [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wood, Richard Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mays, Gary T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this report is to serve as the technical basis document for the next, planned revision of this RG that highlights and provides the rationale for the recommended changes. The structure of this document follows and summarizes the several assessment activities undertaken during the course of this project to evaluate new and updated electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) standards, testing methods and limits, and relevant technology developments being incorporated into plant activities that may have EMI/RFI implications, as well as other specific issues, including impacts of electrostatic discharge (ESD) on safety equipment and impacts on increased usage of wireless devices in nuclear power plants.

  1. Rate-Compatible LDPC Codes with Linear Minimum Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Jones, Christopher; Dolinar, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed method of constructing protograph-based low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes provides for low iterative decoding thresholds and minimum distances proportional to block sizes, and can be used for various code rates. A code constructed by this method can have either fixed input block size or fixed output block size and, in either case, provides rate compatibility. The method comprises two submethods: one for fixed input block size and one for fixed output block size. The first mentioned submethod is useful for applications in which there are requirements for rate-compatible codes that have fixed input block sizes. These are codes in which only the numbers of parity bits are allowed to vary. The fixed-output-blocksize submethod is useful for applications in which framing constraints are imposed on the physical layers of affected communication systems. An example of such a system is one that conforms to one of many new wireless-communication standards that involve the use of orthogonal frequency-division modulation

  2. Calcium chloride in neonatal parenteral nutrition: compatibility studies using laser methodology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Huston

    Full Text Available We have previously reported results of precipitation studies for neonatal parenteral nutrition solutions containing calcium chloride and sodium phosphate using visual methods to determine compatibility. The purpose of this study was to do further testing of compatibility for solutions containing calcium chloride using more sensitive methods.Solutions of Trophamine (Braun Medical Inc, Irvine, CA and Premasol (Baxter Pharmaceuticals, Deerfield, IL were compounded with calcium chloride and potassium phosphate. Controls contained no calcium or phosphate. After incubation at 37° for 24 hours solutions without visual precipitation were analyzed to determine mean particle size using dynamic light scattering from a laser light source.Particle sizes were similar for control solutions and those without visual precipitation and a mean particle size <1000 nm. Compatible solutions were defined as those with added calcium and phosphate with no visual evidence of precipitation and mean particle size <1000 nm. In solutions containing 2.5-3% amino acids and 10 mmol/L of calcium chloride the maximum amount of potassium phosphate that was compatible was 7.5 mmol/L.Maximum amounts of phosphate that could be added to parenteral nutrition solutions containing Trophamine and calcium chloride were about 7.5-10 mmol/L less for a given concentration of calcium based upon laser methodology compared to visual techniques to determine compatibility. There were minor differences in compatibility when adding calcium chloride and potassium phosphate to Premasol versus Trophamine.

  3. [Miscellaneous Compatibility Determinations : Rocky Mountain Arsenal NWR : 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Linked through this record are compatibility determinations from the Rocky Mountain Arsenal between the years 2005 and 2014. Included is a 2005 Compatibility...

  4. 46 CFR Figure 1 to Part 150 - Compatibility Chart

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility Chart 1 Figure 1 to Part 150 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES COMPATIBILITY OF CARGOES Pt. 150, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 150—Compatibility Chart EC02FE91.079 ...

  5. 47 CFR 68.4 - Hearing aid-compatible telephones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... if it provides internal means for effective use with hearing aids that are designed to be compatible... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hearing aid-compatible telephones. 68.4 Section... (CONTINUED) CONNECTION OF TERMINAL EQUIPMENT TO THE TELEPHONE NETWORK General § 68.4 Hearing aid-compatible...

  6. The Effect of Birth Order on Roommate Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, John H.; Williams, Ondre J.

    1977-01-01

    A group of students were matched on the basis of compatible birth order; another was matched on the basis of conflicting birth order. After a month's experience in a residence hall their compatibility was examined. Students with conflicting birth order were more compatible than those with the same birth order. (Author)

  7. A low-cost MRI compatible keyboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Snejbjerg; Heggli, Ole Adrian; Alves da Mota, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging is a powerful tool to explore how and why humans engage in music. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has allowed us to identify brain networks and regions implicated in a range of cognitive tasks including music perception and performance. However, MRI-scanners are noisy and cramped......, presenting a challenging environment for playing an instrument. Here, we present an MRI-compatible polyphonic keyboard with a materials cost of 850 $, designed and tested for safe use in 3T (three Tesla) MRI-scanners. We describe design considerations, and prior work in the field. In addition, we provide...

  8. A new assessment method for car to truck compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koike, A.; Coo, P.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Frontal collisions between cars and trucks lead to high fatality rate of the car driver. Therefore the Japanese road administration announced a directive like ECE-R 93 (2000/40/EC), compulsory since September 1st, 2011. As known, this directive describes a ‘rigid’ Front Underrun Proctection (FUP)

  9. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Matrix Converter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fligl

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper deals with matrix converters pulse width modulation strategies design with emphasis on the electromagnetic compatibility. Matrix converters provide an all-silicon solution to the problem of converting AC power from one frequency to another, offering almost all the features required of an ideal static frequency changer. They possess many advantages compared to the conventional voltage or current source inverters. A matrix converter does not require energy storage components as a bulky capacitor or an inductance in the DC-link, and enables the bi-directional power flow between the power supply and load. The most of the contemporary modulation strategies are able to provide practically sinusoidal waveforms of the input and output currents with negligible low order harmonics, and to control the input displacement factor. The perspective of matrix converters regarding EMC in comparison with other types of converters is brightly evident because it is no need to use any equipment for power factor correction and current and voltage harmonics reduction. Such converter with proper control is properly compatible both with the supply mains and with the supplied load. A special digital control system was developed for the realized experimental test bed which makes it possible to achieve greater throughput of the digital control system and its variability.

  10. Is religious education compatible with science education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahner, Martin; Bunge, Mario

    1996-04-01

    This paper tackles a highly controversial issue: the problem of the compatibility of science and religion, and its bearing on science and religious education respectively. We challenge the popular view that science and religion are compatible or even complementary. In order to do so, we give a brief characterization of our conceptions of science and religion. Conspicuous differences at the doctrinal, metaphysical, methodological and attitudinal level are noted. Regarding these aspects, closer examination reveals that science and religion are not only different but in fact incompatible. Some consequences of our analysis for education as well as for education policy are explored. We submit that a religious education, particularly at an early age, is an obstacle to the development of a scientific mentality. For this and other reasons, religious education should be kept away from public schools and universities. Instead of promoting a religious world view, we should teach our children what science knows about religion, i.e., how science explains the existence of religion in historical, biological, psychological and sociological terms.

  11. Electromagnetic compatibility management for fast diagnostic design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimbourg, J.

    2004-10-01

    This article presents an overview of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) management for fast diagnostic design. We will present and detail the classical approach in EMC. This approach can be successfully applied for installations where a single engineering entity has the authority to prescribe and enforce a certain compatibility level. Most of the time, strict application of generic standards is required for fast diagnostics. Nethertheless, the pulse perturbation must be synchronized to the fast diagnostic operation. Some "traditional" techniques, such as star-earthing and bonding cable screens at one end, have been shown to be inadequate for fast diagnostic design. Our laser facility, the LIL, will be able to focus up to 60 kJ into a volume of less than 1 mm3. We have to evaluate the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) where diagnostics, cables, and oscilloscopes will be installed. We performed electromagnetic measurements inside and outside the OMEGA target chamber. The electromagnetic pulse generated by the target chamber contains very high frequency components above 1 GHz. The electric field is around a few kV/m outside and goes up to 20 kV/m inside the target. We designed a specific electromagnetic probe for pulse measurement with a rise time down to 100 ps. An ultrashort rise time EMP bench test was built to test apparatus before installation around a target chamber. It produces an electric field higher than 5 kV/m with a rise time under 100 ps.

  12. Integrated environmentally compatible soldering technologies. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosking, F.M.; Frear, D.R.; Iman, R.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Lopez, E.P.; Peebles, H.C.; Sorensen, N.R.; Vianco, P.T.

    1994-05-01

    Chemical fluxes are typically used during conventional electronic soldering to enhance solder wettability. Most fluxes contain very reactive, hazardous constituents that require special storage and handling. Corrosive flux residues that remain on soldered parts can severely degrade product reliability. The residues are removed with chlorofluorocarbon (CFC), hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC), or other hazardous solvents that contribute to ozone depletion, release volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere, or add to the solvent waste stream. Alternative materials and processes that offer the potential for the reduction or elimination of cleaning are being developed to address these environmental issues. Timing of the effort is critical, since the targeted chemicals will soon be heavily taxed or banned. DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (DOE/EM) has supported Sandia National Laboratories` Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID). Part of the ECM program involves the integration of several environmentally compatible soldering technologies for assembling electronics devices. Fluxless or {open_quotes}low-residue/no clean{close_quotes} soldering technologies (conventional and ablative laser processing, controlled atmospheres, ultrasonic tinning, protective coatings, and environmentally compatible fluxes) have been demonstrated at Sandia (SNL/NM), the University of California at Berkeley, and Allied Signal Aerospace-Kansas City Division (AS-KCD). The university demonstrations were directed under the guidance of Sandia staff. Results of the FY93 Soldering ID are presented in this report.

  13. Development of hazard-compatible building fragility and vulnerability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, E.; Luco, N.

    2008-01-01

    We present a methodology for transforming the structural and non-structural fragility functions in HAZUS into a format that is compatible with conventional seismic hazard analysis information. The methodology makes use of the building capacity (or pushover) curves and related building parameters provided in HAZUS. Instead of the capacity spectrum method applied in HAZUS, building response is estimated by inelastic response history analysis of corresponding single-degree-of-freedom systems under a large number of earthquake records. Statistics of the building response are used with the damage state definitions from HAZUS to derive fragility models conditioned on spectral acceleration values. Using the developed fragility models for structural and nonstructural building components, with corresponding damage state loss ratios from HAZUS, we also derive building vulnerability models relating spectral acceleration to repair costs. Whereas in HAZUS the structural and nonstructural damage states are treated as if they are independent, our vulnerability models are derived assuming "complete" nonstructural damage whenever the structural damage state is complete. We show the effects of considering this dependence on the final vulnerability models. The use of spectral acceleration (at selected vibration periods) as the ground motion intensity parameter, coupled with the careful treatment of uncertainty, makes the new fragility and vulnerability models compatible with conventional seismic hazard curves and hence useful for extensions to probabilistic damage and loss assessment.

  14. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  15. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawel, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moore, D. [USCAR

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  16. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  17. fMRI-Compatible Electromagnetic Haptic Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riener, R; Villgrattner, T; Kleiser, R; Nef, T; Kollias, S

    2005-01-01

    A new haptic interface device is suggested, which can be used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The basic component of this 1 DOF haptic device are two coils that produce a Lorentz force induced by the large static magnetic field of the MR scanner. A MR-compatible optical angular encoder and a optical force sensor enable the implementation of different control architectures for haptic interactions. The challenge was to provide a large torque, and not to affect image quality by the currents applied in the device. The haptic device was tested in a 3T MR scanner. With a current of up to 1A and a distance of 1m to the focal point of the MR-scanner it was possible to generate torques of up to 4 Nm. Within these boundaries image quality was not affected.

  18. Developing 2 C-compatible investment criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeser, Frauke [NewClimate - Institute for Climate Policy and Global Sustainability gGmbH, Bonn (Germany); Weischer, Lutz [Germanwatch e.V., Koeln (Germany); Thomae, Jakob [2degrees Investing Initiative, New York, NY (United States); Hoehne, Niklas; Hagemann, Markus; El Alaoui, Alexander; Bals, Christoph; Eckstein, David; Kreft, Soenke; Rosse, Morten

    2015-11-30

    This report studies the development of criteria for assessing the compatibility of financial investments with the international goal to limit global temperature increase to below 2 C above pre-industrial levels. The findings are intended as a starting point and a key input for a longer term process to develop consensus-based 2 C investing criteria. The focus here is placed on investments in projects and physical assets, in particular of development and climate finance organisations. In order to limit global temperature increase to 2 C, global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions will have to be reduced significantly, eventually to zero, during the course of this century. This requires shifting capital from high to low carbon investments as well as significant capital mobilisation for investments in 2 C-compatible infrastructure. Given the long lifetime of physical assets, and the urgency of decarbonisation over the coming decades, this needs to begin today. Public financial institutions can play a prominent role in contributing to aligning investment flows with the 2 C limit, as well as in closing the current infrastructure investment gap, responding to their explicit or implicit climate mandates and leadership role in the finance sector. The majority of international financial institutions integrate climate considerations into their finance decisions to some degree, and are familiar with different types of criteria, including positive and negative lists, qualitative and quantitative benchmarks, and the use of shadow carbon pricing. However, current approaches do not link to the 2 C limit. 2 C investment criteria are therefore needed to guide investors in this regard. Such criteria may also support other purposes, including an understanding of climate risks and improved reporting and accountability.

  19. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexander; Windbacher, Thomas; Sverdlov, Viktor; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    For many decades CMOS devices have been successfully scaled down to achieve higher speed and increased performance of integrated circuits at lower cost. Today’s charge-based CMOS electronics encounters two major challenges: power dissipation and variability. Spintronics is a rapidly evolving research and development field, which offers a potential solution to these issues by introducing novel ‘more than Moore’ devices. Spin-based magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) is already recognized as one of the most promising candidates for future universal memory. Magnetic tunnel junctions, the main elements of MRAM cells, can also be used to build logic-in-memory circuits with non-volatile storage elements on top of CMOS logic circuits, as well as versatile compact on-chip oscillators with low power consumption. We give an overview of CMOS-compatible spintronics applications. First, we present a brief introduction to the physical background considering such effects as magnetoresistance, spin-transfer torque (STT), spin Hall effect, and magnetoelectric effects. We continue with a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art spintronic devices for memory applications (STT-MRAM, domain wall-motion MRAM, and spin-orbit torque MRAM), oscillators (spin torque oscillators and spin Hall nano-oscillators), logic (logic-in-memory, all-spin logic, and buffered magnetic logic gate grid), sensors, and random number generators. Devices with different types of resistivity switching are analyzed and compared, with their advantages highlighted and challenges revealed. CMOS-compatible spintronic devices are demonstrated beginning with predictive simulations, proceeding to their experimental confirmation and realization, and finalized by the current status of application in modern integrated systems and circuits. We conclude the review with an outlook, where we share our vision on the future applications of the prospective devices in the area.

  20. Genetic differentiation among sexually compatible relatives of Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipan Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of gene flow between Brassica napus L. and its sexually compatible relatives that could be found in the wild in Slovenia was performed by microsatellite analysis using fifteen selected primer pairs. Genotypes included in the study were obtained from the field survey of sexually compatible relatives of B. napus in natural habitats around Slovenia and from reference collections. Two different wild species of all the presented sexually compatible relatives of B. napus were found in Slovenia, B. rapa and Sinapis arvensis. The reference genotypes included varieties and wild forms from internal collections as marketable seeds or from gene banks. Reference genotypes were represented by the following species and subspecies: B. napus ssp. napobrassica, B. napus ssp. napus, B. nigra, B. oleracea, B. rapa ssp. oleifera, Diplotaxis muralis; D. tenuifolia, Raphanus raphanistrum, R. sativus, R. sativus var. oleiformis, Rapistrum rugosum, S. alba and S. arvensis. Estimation of gene flow described by average number of migrants was 0.72 followed by 0.20 migrants. Due to the observed gene migrations, genetic drift and selection, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was not met. The mean number of alleles over all loci was 16.9, the average polymorphic information content was 0.43. We found four highly divergent and polymorphic loci (Na12-C08, Na10-A08, Ni3-G04b and BRMS-050 at statistically significant level (p<0.05 of gene flow detected. Over all gene diversity intra-individual among populations (0.55 was lower than inter-individual among population (0.77. The results of genetic linkages based standard genetic distance and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean clustering method, generally divided the genotypes in three divergent groups. Similar results were obtained by principal coordinate analysis where three main groups were constructed according to three factors. A real number of genetic clusters demonstrated a clear separation between populations

  1. Ion implantation of graphene-toward IC compatible technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangert, U; Pierce, W; Kepaptsoglou, D M; Ramasse, Q; Zan, R; Gass, M H; Van den Berg, J A; Boothroyd, C B; Amani, J; Hofsäss, H

    2013-10-09

    Doping of graphene via low energy ion implantation could open possibilities for fabrication of nanometer-scale patterned graphene-based devices as well as for graphene functionalization compatible with large-scale integrated semiconductor technology. Using advanced electron microscopy/spectroscopy methods, we show for the first time directly that graphene can be doped with B and N via ion implantation and that the retention is in good agreement with predictions from calculation-based literature values. Atomic resolution high-angle dark field imaging (HAADF) combined with single-atom electron energy loss (EEL) spectroscopy reveals that for sufficiently low implantation energies ions are predominantly substitutionally incorporated into the graphene lattice with a very small fraction residing in defect-related sites.

  2. Polyurethane Organosilicate Nanocomposites as Blood Compatible Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson H. Y. Chung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Polymer clay nanocomposites (NCs show remarkable potential in the field of drug delivery due to their enhanced barrier properties. It is hypothesised that well dispersed clay particles within the polymer matrix create a tortuous pathway for diffusing therapeutic molecules, thereby resulting in more sustained release of the drug. As coatings for medical devices, these materials can simultaneously modulate drug release and improve the mechanical performance of an existing polymer system without introducing additional materials with new chemistries that can lead to regulatory concerns. In this study, polyurethane organosilicate nanocomposites (PUNCs coated onto stainless steel wires were evaluated for their feasibility as blood compatible coatings and as drug delivery systems. Heparin was selected as the model drug to examine the impact of silicate loading and modifier chain length in modulating release. Findings revealed that better dispersion was achieved from samples with lower clay loadings and longer alkyl chains. The blood compatibility of PUNCs as assessed by thrombin generation assays showed that the addition of silicate particles did not significantly decrease the thrombin generation lag time (TGT, p = 0.659 or the peak thrombin (p = 0.999 of polyurethane (PU. PUNC coatings fabricated in this research were not cytotoxic as examined by the cell growth inhibition assay and were uniformly intact, but had slightly higher growth inhibition compared to PU possibly due to the presence of organic modifiers (OM. The addition of heparin into PUNCs prolonged the TGT, indicating that heparin was still active after the coating process. Cumulative heparin release profiles showed that the majority of heparin released was from loosely attached residues on the surface of coils. The addition of heparin further prolonged the TGT as compared to coatings without added heparin, but a slight decrease in heparin activity was observed in the NCs

  3. EVA-Compatible Microbial Swab Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    When we send humans to search for life on Mars, we'll need to know what we brought with us versus what may already be there. To ensure our crewed spacecraft meet planetary protection requirements—and to protect our science from human contamination—we'll need to know whether micro-organisms are leaking/venting from our ships and spacesuits. This is easily done by swabbing external vents and suit surfaces for analysis, but requires a specialized tool for the job. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) recently developed an Extravehicular Activity (EVA)-compatible swab tool that can be used to sample current space suits and life support systems. Data collected now will influence Mars life support and EVA hardware early in the planning process, before design changes become difficult and expensive.NASA’s EVA swab tool pairs a Space Shuttle-era tool handle with a commercially available swab tip mounted into a custom-designed end effector. A glove-compatible release mechanism allows the handle to quickly switch between swab tips, much like a shaving razor handle can snap onto a disposable blade cartridge. Swab tips are stowed inside individual sterile containers, each fitted with a microbial filter that allows the container to equalize atmospheric pressure, but prevents cabin contaminants from rushing into the container when passing from the EVA environment into a pressurized cabin. A bank of containers arrayed inside a tool caddy allows up to six individual samples to be collected during a given spacewalk.NASA plans to use the tool in 2016 to collect samples from various spacesuits during ground testing to determine what (if any) human-borne microbial contamination leaks from the suit under simulated thermal vacuum conditions. Next, the tool will be used on board the International Space Station to assess the types of microbial contaminants found on external environmental control and life support system vents. Data will support

  4. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING COMPATIBLE ROBOTIC SYSTEM FOR FULLY AUTOMATED BRACHYTHERAPY SEED PLACEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Bagga, Herman; Kavoussi, Louis; Cleary, Kevin; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To introduce the development of the first magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-compatible robotic system capable of automated brachytherapy seed placement. Methods An MRI-compatible robotic system was conceptualized and manufactured. The entire robot was built of nonmagnetic and dielectric materials. The key technology of the system is a unique pneumatic motor that was specifically developed for this application. Various preclinical experiments were performed to test the robot for precision and imager compatibility. Results The robot was fully operational within all closed-bore MRI scanners. Compatibility tests in scanners of up to 7 Tesla field intensity showed no interference of the robot with the imager. Precision tests in tissue mockups yielded a mean seed placement error of 0.72 ± 0.36 mm. Conclusions The robotic system is fully MRI compatible. The new technology allows for automated and highly accurate operation within MRI scanners and does not deteriorate the MRI quality. We believe that this robot may become a useful instrument for image-guided prostate interventions. PMID:17169653

  5. Micro-Arc Oxidation Enhances the Blood Compatibility of Ultrafine-Grained Pure Titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine-grained pure titanium prepared by equal-channel angular pressing has favorable mechanical performance and does not contain alloy elements that are toxic to the human body. It has potential clinical value in applications such as cardiac valve prostheses, vascular stents, and hip prostheses. To overcome the material’s inherent thrombogenicity, surface-coating modification is a crucial pathway to enhancing blood compatibility. An electrolyte solution of sodium silicate + sodium polyphosphate + calcium acetate and the micro-arc oxidation (MAO technique were employed for in situ oxidation of an ultrafine-grained pure titanium surface. A porous coating with anatase- and rutile-phase TiO2 was generated and wettability and blood compatibility were examined. The results showed that, in comparison with ultrafine-grained pure titanium substrate, the MAO coating had a rougher surface, smaller contact angles for distilled water and higher surface energy. MAO modification effectively reduced the hemolysis rate; extended the dynamic coagulation time, prothrombin time (PT, and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT; reduced the amount of platelet adhesion and the degree of deformation; and enhanced blood compatibility. In particular, the sample with an oxidation time of 9 min possessed the highest surface energy, largest PT and APTT values, smallest hemolysis rate, less platelet adhesion, a lesser degree of deformation, and more favorable blood compatibility. The MAO method can significantly enhance the blood compatibility of ultrafine-grained pure titanium, increasing its potential for practical applications.

  6. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Technical progress report, 1 April 1995--30 June 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-08-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The AirConditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  7. Electromagnetic Compatibility in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, P.D.; Kercel, S.W.; Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T.

    1999-08-29

    Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) has long been a key element of qualification for mission critical instrumentation and control (I&C) systems used by the U.S. military. The potential for disruption of safety-related I&C systems by electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio-frequency interference (RFI), or power surges is also an issue of concern for the nuclear industry. Experimental investigations of the potential vulnerability of advanced safety systems to EMI/RFI, coupled with studies of reported events at nuclear power plants (NPPs) that are attributed to EMI/RFI, confirm the safety significance of EMC for both analog and digital technology. As a result, Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in the development of the technical basis for guidance that addresses EMC for safety-related I&C systems in NPPs. This research has involved the identification of engineering practices to minimize the potential impact of EMI/RFI and power surges and an evaluation of the ambient electromagnetic environment at NPPs to tailor those practices for use by the nuclear industry. Recommendations for EMC guidance have been derived from these research findings and are summarized in this paper.

  8. [Safety and electromagnetic compatibility in sanitary field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, M; Feroldi, P; Ferri, C; Ignesti, A; Olmi, R; Priori, S; Riminesi, C; Tobia, L

    2012-01-01

    In sanitary field and especially in a hospital, multiple sources of non ionizing radiation are used for diagnostic and therapeutic aims. In sanitary sector both workers and users are present at the same time, and in some cases general population could need higher protection than workers in relationship to the exposition to electromagnetic fields. In order to protect health and safety of patients, general population and workers of hospitals and with the aim to identify, analyze, evaluate and study its level of significance, electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic sources Research Italian project Si.C.E.O. (Safety And Electromagnetic Compatibility In Sanitary Field) was instituted. Target of our research project was to deepen risk of exposition elements with analysis of outdoor (e.g. power lines, transmission cabinets) and indoor (e.g. equipment for physical therapy) sources, located in sanitary structures and to verify the level exposition of workers and common population end the respect of specific regulation, and finally to define technical and organizational measures really useful for protection and reduction of risk.

  9. A magnetic field compatible graphene transmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, James G.; Uilhoorn, Willemijn; de Jong, Damaz; Borsoi, Francesco; van der Enden, Kian; Goswami, Srijit; Cassidy, Maja; Kouwenhoven, Leo. P.

    Hybrid circuit QED is a key tool for readout and scaling of both semiconductor-based spin and topological quantum computing schemes. However, traditional approaches to circuit QED are incompatible with the strong external magnetic fields required for these qubits. Here we present measurements of a hybrid graphene-based transmon operating at 1 T. The device consists of coplanar waveguide resonators where the NbTiN thin film is patterned with a dense anti-dot lattice to trap Abriskov vortices, resulting in internal quality factors Qi >10^5 up to 6 T. Furthermore, the atomically thin nature of graphene in combination with the high critical field of its superconducting contacts makes it an ideal system for tolerating strong parallel magnetic fields. We combine these circuit elements to realize a magnetic field compatible transmon qubit. An external gate allows us to change the Josephson energy, and study the corresponding change in the resonator-qubit interaction in the dispersive regime. Two tone spectroscopy reveals a gate-tunable qubit peak at 1T. These experiments open up the possibility of fast charge parity measurements in high magnetic fields for readout of Majorana qubits..

  10. MRI compatible head phantom for ultrasound surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menikou, Georgios; Dadakova, Tetiana; Pavlina, Matt; Bock, Michael; Damianou, Christakis

    2015-03-01

    Develop a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible head phantom with acoustic attenuation closely matched to the human attenuation, and suitable for testing focused ultrasound surgery protocols. Images from an adult brain CT scan were used to segment the skull bone from adjacent cerebral tissue. The segmented model was manufactured in a 3-D printer using (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) ABS plastic. The cerebral tissue was mimicked by an agar-evaporated milk-silica gel (2% w/v-25% v/v-1.2% w/v) which was molded inside a skull model. The measured attenuation of the ABS skull was 16 dB/cm MHz. The estimated attenuation coefficient of the gel replicating brain tissue was 0.6 dB/cm MHz. The estimated agar-silica gel's T1 and T2 relaxation times in a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field were 852 ms and 66 ms respectively. The effectiveness of the skull to reduce ultrasonic heating was demonstrated using MRI thermometry. Due to growing interest in using MRI guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) for treating brain cancer and its application in sonothrombolysis, the proposed head phantom can be utilized as a very useful tool for evaluating ultrasonic protocols, thus minimizing the need for animal models and cadavers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Compatibility and Marital Satisfaction in Disabled Couples Compared to Healthy Ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Abed

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of current study was the evaluation and comparison of compatibility and marital satisfaction between handicapped couples and healthy ones. Methods: In this study, 50 handicapped couples and 50 healthy couples were examined with Enrich’s marital satisfaction questionnaire and Bell’s adjustment questionnaire. The data were analyzed, using SPSS 15, correlation tests and ANOVA. Results: The results showed that there was no significant difference between handicapped and healthy couples in compatibility and marital satisfaction. Discussion: It is concluded that people who were handicapped before their marriage and those who decided to marry them were suitably aware of the issue, therefore accepting a handicapped person was not so hard. What is important in marital compatibility is accepting a partner.

  12. IDMS: A System to Verify Component Interface Completeness and Compatibility for Product Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areeprayolkij, Wantana; Limpiyakorn, Yachai; Gansawat, Duangrat

    The growing approach of Component-Based software Development has had a great impact on today system architectural design. However, the design of subsystems that lacks interoperability and reusability can cause problems during product integration. At worst, this may result in project failure. In literature, it is suggested that the verification of interface descriptions and management of interface changes are factors essential to the success of product integration process. This paper thus presents an automation approach to facilitate reviewing component interfaces for completeness and compatibility. The Interface Descriptions Management System (IDMS) has been implemented to ease and fasten the interface review activities using UML component diagrams as input. The method of verifying interface compatibility is accomplished by traversing the component dependency graph called Component Compatibility Graph (CCG). CCG is the visualization of which each node represents a component, and each edge represents communications between associated components. Three case studies were studied to subjectively evaluate the correctness and usefulness of IDMS.

  13. Compatibility of pedigree-based and marker-based relationships for single-step genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2012-01-01

    Single-step methods for genomic prediction have recently become popular because they are conceptually simple and in practice such a method can completely replace a pedigree-based method for routine genetic evaluation. An issue with single-step methods is compatibility between the marker...... that it may be important that a single-step method is based on a model conditional on the observed markers. When data are from routine evaluation systems, selection affects the allele frequencies, and therefore both observed markers and observed phenotypes contain information about allele frequencies...... in the base population. Here, two ideas are explored. The first idea is to instead adjust the pedigree-based relationship matrix to be compatible to the marker-based relationship matrix, whereas the second idea is to include the likelihood for the observed markers. A single-step method is used where...

  14. Feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible manipulator for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bomers, J.G.R.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Tigelaar, G.H.; Sabisch, J.; Futterer, J.J.; Yakar, D.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility of a 2nd generation MR-compatible, remote-controlled manipulator (RCM) as an aid to perform MR-guided transrectal prostate biopsy in males with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: This prospective phase I study was approved by the local ethical

  15. Feasibility of a pneumatically actuated MR-compatible robot for transrectal prostate biopsy guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakar, D.; Schouten, M.G.; Bosboom, D.G.H.; Barentsz, J.O.; Scheenen, T.W.J.; Futterer, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the feasibility of using a remote-controlled, pneumatically actuated magnetic resonance (MR)-compatible robotic device to aid transrectal biopsy of the prostate performed with real-time 3-T MR imaging guidance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This prospective study was approved by the

  16. Highly efficient and compatible shampoo for use after hair transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schweiger D

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dorothea Schweiger,1 Andrea M Schoelermann,1 Alexander Filbry,1 Tina Hamann,1 Claudia Moser,2 Frank Rippke1 1Research and Development, Beiersdorf AG, Hamburg, Germany; 2Moser Medical, Clinics for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Vienna, Austria Background: Sensitive or hyperreactive skin is a common condition defined by prickling, burning, pain, and pruritus. Although this skin problem was initially described on the face, the scalp is often affected. A sensitive scalp can react with irritation to harsh surfactants or other additives which are often present in shampoos. For this reason, we developed a new rinse-off hypertolerant shampoo specifically designed for the hypersensitive and problematic scalp.Methods: The shampoo formulation is based on an extremely mild surfactant system and contains bisabolol, an anti-irritant and anti-inflammatory ingredient of chamomile. The shampoo is free of additives such as perfumes, silicones, colorants, parabens, paraffins, and betaine. Since skin can remain in a hyperreactive state after wounding, the status after hair transplantation was chosen as a model system to test the shampoo. Scalp condition and compatibility of each volunteer were analyzed by a plastic surgeon directly after hair transplant and after stitch removal. The plastic surgeons also rated whether they would recommend the further use of the test shampoo. Additionally, volunteers completed a self-assessment questionnaire.Results: Following hair transplantation, regular use of the shampoo resulted in a significant reduction in the extent of scabbing and erythema. This was confirmed by dermatological scalp examinations performed by the plastic surgeon as well as in volunteers' self-assessments. The plastic surgeon highly recommended the further use of the test shampoo after hair transplant to all study participants.Conclusion: Application of the test shampoo demonstrated excellent skin compatibility and product efficacy after hair transplant. The test

  17. Tear fluid-eye drops compatibility assessment using surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotujac Grgurević, Martina; Juretić, Marina; Hafner, Anita; Lovrić, Jasmina; Pepić, Ivan

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the compatibility of commercially available eye drop surface tension with the tear film physiological range and to characterize commonly used ophthalmic excipients in terms of their surface activity under eye-biorelevant conditions. There are a number of quality requirements for the eye drops (e.g. tonicity, pH, viscosity, refractive index) that needs to comply with the physiological parameters of the eye surface. However, the adjustment of surface tension properties of the eye drops to the normal range of surface tension at the air/tear fluid interface (40-46 mN/m) has received rather less attention thus far. Yet, the surface tension at the air/tear fluid interface is of vital importance for the normal function of the eye surface. The surface tension compatibility of the isotonic aqueous solutions of commonly used ophthalmic excipients as well as 18 approved eye drops with the tear fluid have been evaluated using surface tension method. Each ophthalmic ingredient including the preservatives, solubilizing agents and thickening agents can influence the surface tension of the final formulation. In case of complex ophthalmic formulations one should also consider the possible interactions among excipients and consequent impact on overall surface activity. Out of 18 evaluated eye drops, three samples were within, 12 samples were below and three samples were above the physiological range of the tear fluid surface tension. Our results provide a rationale for clinical studies aiming to assess the correlation between the eye drops surface tension and the tear film (in)stability.

  18. LED lamps in shipboard lighting systems: Aspects of electromagnetic compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beley V. F.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Trends in the development of different types of light sources and their energy characteristics have been described in the paper. Analysis of regulatory documents has been given. The results of experimental studies of a number of modern LED lamps have been described. Investigation has been made for a number of LED lamps produced by Philips, Xavax and Melitec. The experimental data have been obtained with the complex of devices: the dual-channel oscilloscope (GDS-71042, the power quality analyzer (Fluke-434 and the multi-function device EcoLight-01 (light-, pulse- and luminance meter. It has been shown that operation of LED lamps is characterized by emission of higher current harmonics and reactive power consumption, which depends on the type and design of the lamp driver. It has been found that the value of luminance created by LED lamps in case of acceptable (for ships prolonged deviation of voltage (–10 % is reduced by 3 %; in case of permissible short-term voltage deviation (–20 % luminance is reduced by 7 %. For incandescent lamps this indicator is characterized by a decrease in luminance by 40 % and 60 %, respectively. Despite the low sensitivity to voltage changes (in comparison with other types of lamps, the operation of LED lamps is also associated with the appearance of flicker. Absence of limitations for fluctuations of the light flux in shipboard lighting systems and imperfection of methods for determining the flicker make it difficult to ensure electromagnetic compatibility of LED lamps. Therefore due to reliability, environmental friendliness, energy efficiency and lumen maintenance LED lamps have prospects for introduction into shipboard lighting systems. However, to ensure electromagnetic compatibility of LED lighting systems it is necessary to conduct a detailed study of energy characteristics of LED lamps and to develop appropriate regulatory requirements and technical solutions.

  19. Brain-Compatible Music Teaching Part 2: Teaching "Nongame" Songs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In the previous issue of "General Music Today," the Early Childhood column explored brain-compatible ways of teaching action songs and singing games. This article illustrates the application of brain-compatible ways to teach songs that do not lend themselves to actions or games. There are two ways of teaching songs. One is based on the assumption…

  20. Topological spaces with a coarsest compatible quasi-uniformity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some equivalent forms of the condition for the existence of a coarsest compatible (transitive) quasi-uniformity are presented. The T2 case is also discussed. As a tool we use an interesting description of the compatible transitive totally bounded quasi-uniformities. Quaestiones Mathematicae 23(2000), 67–75 ...

  1. 47 CFR 76.630 - Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. 76.630 Section 76.630 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST... Compatibility with consumer electronics equipment. (a) Cable system operators shall not scramble or otherwise...

  2. Compatibility Rate of Clinical and Histopathologic Diagnosis of Oral Lesions in Zahedan Dental School during 1999-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Saravani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Different oral lesions have clinical characteristics which in some cases are similar. Therefore, in these cases histopathological examination for correct diagnosis is necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility rate of clinical and histopathological diagnosis of oral lesions in Zahedan School of dentistry. Methods: In this retrospective study, determination of the compatibility of clinical and histopathological diagnosis was done using 631 available records in department of pathology, Zahedan School of dentistry, during 1999- 2015. Type of the lesions (neoplastic and non-neoplastic, and demographic data including age, gender, location of lesions (intraosseous or soft tissue, and clinician’s specialty was extracted from patients records and data were analyzed using SPSS (V.21 software and Chi- Square test. Results: Total compatibility rate between clinical and histopathological diagnosis was 70.1%. The most accurate clinical diagnosis was related to lichenoid lesions (100% and leukoplakia (100% and verrucous carcinoma had the least diagnostic compatibility (20%. There was no significant relationship between compatibility of histopathological and clinical diagnosis with age range, gender, location, and clinician’s specialty. Also non-neoplastic lesions with compatible histopathological and clinical diagnoses were three times more than neoplastic lesions. (P=0.03. Conclusion: Although there was a great compatibility between clinical and histopathological diagnosis, many records had no clinical diagnosis and the inconsistency was also significant. Therefore, more attention to clinical signs and effective cooperation between the clinician and pathologist for correct and more accurate diagnosis and treatment is recommended

  3. HLW Flexible jumper materials compatibility evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-13

    H-Tank Farm Engineering tasked SRNL/Materials Science & Technology (MS&T) to evaluate the compatibility of Goodyear Viper® chemical transfer hose with HLW solutions. The hose is proposed as a flexible Safety Class jumper for up to six months service. SRNL/MS&T performed various tests to evaluate the effects of radiation, high pH chemistry and elevated temperature on the hose, particularly the inner liner. Test results suggest an upper dose limit of 50 Mrad for the hose. Room temperature burst pressure values at 50 Mrad are estimated at 600- 800 psi, providing a safety factor of 4.0-5.3X over the anticipated operating pressure of 150 psi and a safety factor of 3.0-4.0X over the working pressure of the hose (200 psi), independent of temperature effects. Radiation effects are minimal at doses less than 10 Mrad. Doses greater than 50 Mrad may be allowed, depending on operating conditions and required safety factors, but cannot be recommended at this time. At 250 Mrad, burst pressure values are reduced to the hose working pressure. At 300 Mrad, burst pressures are below 150 psi. At a bounding continuous dose rate of 57,870 rad/hr, the 50 Mrad dose limit is reached within 1.2 months. Actual dose rates may be lower, particularly during non-transfer periods. Refined dose calculations are therefore recommended to justify longer service. This report details the tests performed and interpretation of the results. Recommendations for shelf-life/storage, component quality verification, and post-service examination are provided.

  4. Compatibility of Fluorinert, FC-72, with selected materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue

    2006-02-01

    Removable encapsulants have been developed as replacement materials for electronic encapsulation. They can be removed from an electronic assembly in a fairly benign manner. Encapsulants must satisfy a limited number of criteria to be useful. These include processing ease, certain mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties, adhesion to common clean surfaces, good aging characteristics, and compatibility. This report discusses one aspect of the compatibility of removable blown epoxy foams with electronic components. Of interest is the compatibility of the blowing agent, Fluorinert{trademark} (FC-72) electronic fluid with electronic parts, components, and select materials. Excellent compatibility is found with most of the investigated materials. A few materials, such as Teflon{reg_sign} that are comprised of chemicals very similar to FC-72 show substantial absorption of FC-72. No compatibility issues have yet been identified even for the few materials that show substantial absorption.

  5. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the

  6. Comparative evidence for the correlated evolution of polyploidy and self-compatibility in Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Kelly; Goldberg, Emma E; Igić, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Breakdown of self-incompatibility occurs repeatedly in flowering plants with important evolutionary consequences. In plant families in which self-incompatibility is mediated by S-RNases, previous evidence suggests that polyploidy may often directly cause self-compatibility through the formation of diploid pollen grains. We use three approaches to examine relationships between self-incompatibility and ploidy. First, we test whether evolution of self-compatibility and polyploidy is correlated in the nightshade family (Solanaceae), and find the expected close association between polyploidy and self-compatibility. Second, we compare the rate of breakdown of self-incompatibility in the absence of polyploidy against the rate of breakdown that arises as a byproduct of polyploidization, and we find the former to be greater. Third, we apply a novel extension to these methods to show that the relative magnitudes of the macroevolutionary pathways leading to self-compatible polyploids are time dependent. Over small time intervals, the direct pathway from self-incompatible diploids is dominant, whereas the pathway through self-compatible diploids prevails over longer time scales. This pathway analysis is broadly applicable to models of character evolution in which sequential combinations of rates are compared. Finally, given the strong evidence for both irreversibility of the loss of self-incompatibility in the family and the significant association between self-compatibility and polyploidy, we argue that ancient polyploidy is highly unlikely to have occurred within the Solanaceae, contrary to previous claims based on genomic analyses. © 2010 The Author(s). Evolution© 2010 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics Moving Away from the Trial and Error Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Laurila, Tomi; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi; Turunen, Markus; Mattila, Toni T; Kivilahti, Jorma

    2012-01-01

    Interfaces between dissimilar materials are met everywhere in microelectronics and microsystems. In order to ensure faultless operation of these highly sophisticated structures, it is mandatory to have fundamental understanding of materials and their interactions in the system. In this difficult task, the “traditional” method of trial and error is not feasible anymore; it takes too much time and repeated efforts. In Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics, an alternative approach is introduced. In this revised method four fundamental disciplines are combined: i) thermodynamics of materials ii) reaction kinetics iii) theory of microstructures and iv) stress and strain analysis. The advantages of the method are illustrated in Interfacial Compatibility in Microelectronics which includes: •solutions to several common reliability issues in microsystem technology, •methods to understand and predict failure mechanisms at interfaces between dissimilar materials and •an approach to DFR based on deep un...

  8. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloy, Thomas P.; Marshall, John; Hecht, Michael

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Sponsored by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, MECA's goal is to evaluate potential geochemical and environmental hazards that may confront future martian explorers, and to guide HEDS scientists in the development of high fidelity Mars soil simulants. In addition to objectives related to human exploration, the MECA data set will be rich in information relevant to basic geology, paleoclimate, and exobiology issues. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatics of the soil and its environment, and arrays of material patches to study the abrasive and adhesive properties of soil grains. MECA is allocated a mass of 10 kg and a peak power usage of 15 W within an enclosure of 35 x 25 x 15 cm (figures I and 2). The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) consists of four identical cells that will accept samples from surface and subsurface regions accessible to the Lander's robotic arm, mix them with water, and perform extensive analysis of the solution. Using an array of ion-specific electrodes (ISEs), cyclic voltammetry, and electrochemical techniques, the chemistry cells will wet soil samples for measurement of basic soil properties of pH, redox potential, and conductivity. Total dissolved material, as well as targeted ions will be detected to the ppm level, including important exobiological ions such as Na, K+, Ca++, Mg++, NH4+, Cl, S04-, HC03, as well as more toxic ions such as Cu++, Pb++, Cd++, Hg++, and C104-. MECA's microscopy station combines optical and atomic-force microscopy (AFM) to image dust and soil particles from millimeters to nanometers in size. Illumination by red, green, and blue LEDs is augmented by an ultraviolet LED intended to excite

  9. Testing of Some Canine Blood Types in Transfusion Compatibility Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ognean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood types were determined using SHIGETA (n=136 and DEA1.1 (n=25 kits, in two groups of dogs, consisting of patients that underwent blood transfusions and healthy donors. The tests were conducted in accordance with the procedures established by the manufacturers, using specific monoclonal antibodies kits, heparinized blood for the tube agglutination (TUBE and slide (SLIDE methods, and EDTA treated blood for the CARD and chromatographic (CHROM methods. The clear expression of tube agglutination reaction in the SHIGETA kit provided a good detection of antigens. Positive reactions with anti-DEA1.1 were clear and evident with the CHROM test. SHIGETA tests revealed a predominance 1.1B (47.05% of blood type, common in Rotweilers (81.81% and Romanian Shepherds (73.68% and group 1(-B (24.26%, frequently found in German Shepherds (54.16%, these also representing an important source of compatible blood. DEA1.1 type test, revealed a high frequency of positive dogs (75%, associated with lower number of potential donors. Extrapolation of SHIGETA groups into the DEA system, confirmed the 1(-B positive dogs as DEA 1.1 negative, and their prevalence in German Shepherds also confirmed their known tendency to be “ideal donors”. The CHROME test showed a good efficiency in auto agglutination control and detecting DEA1.1 positive dogs, including patients with severe forms of anemia.

  10. Development and evaluation of a test program for Y-site compatibility testing of total parenteral nutrition and intravenous drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Staven, Vigdis; Wang, Siri; Gr?nlie, Ingrid; Tho, Ingunn

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no standardized procedure or consensus to which tests should be performed to judge compatibility/incompatibility of intravenous drugs. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a test program of methods suitable for detection of physical incompatibility in Y-site administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and drugs. Methods Eight frequently used methods (dynam...

  11. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International’s (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young’s moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most

  12. A multi-scale residual-based anti-hourglass control for compatible staggered Lagrangian hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, M.; Scovazzi, G.; Shashkov, M.; Loubère, R.

    2018-02-01

    Hourglassing is a well-known pathological numerical artifact affecting the robustness and accuracy of Lagrangian methods. There exist a large number of hourglass control/suppression strategies. In the community of the staggered compatible Lagrangian methods, the approach of sub-zonal pressure forces is among the most widely used. However, this approach is known to add numerical strength to the solution, which can cause potential problems in certain types of simulations, for instance in simulations of various instabilities. To avoid this complication, we have adapted the multi-scale residual-based stabilization typically used in the finite element approach for staggered compatible framework. In this paper, we describe two discretizations of the new approach and demonstrate their properties and compare with the method of sub-zonal pressure forces on selected numerical problems.

  13. Generalized Metric Spaces Do Not Have the Compatible Topology

    OpenAIRE

    Tomonari Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    We study generalized metric spaces, which were introduced by Branciari (2000). In particular, generalized metric spaces do not necessarily have the compatible topology. Also we prove a generalization of the Banach contraction principle in complete generalized metric spaces.

  14. Compatibility of Functionalized Graphene with Polyethylene and Its Copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon Myeong Seo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The compatibility of polyethylene (PE with a functionalized graphene sheet (FGS, which was prepared by the thermal reduction of graphite oxide, was examined in this study. The dispersion of the FGS in the PE was improved as the molecular weight of the PE was decreased. The PE copolymers containing polar comonomers such as maleic anhydride or acrylic acid exhibited better compatibility with FGS than the PE homopolymers. The compatibility of the FGS with PE copolymers containing small amounts of comonomers, which have a solubility parameter slightly larger [up to approximately 0.5 (J/cm31/2] than that of PE itself, was better than the compatibility of both the PE and PE copolymers containing larger amounts of comonomers. The morphology, electric conductivity, and tensile properties of FGS/PE copolymer/PE nanocomposites showed that the copolymers with a solubility parameter slightly larger than that of PE effectively served as a compatibilizer in FGS/PE nanocomposites.

  15. Preformulation compatibility screening of dika fat-drug mixtures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dika fat was found to be compatible with aspirin, ascorbic acid, paracetamol, sulphanilamide, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride, bromopheniramine maleate, chlorpheniramire maleate, diazepam, phenobarbital, phenobarbital sodium, phenylpropanolamine hydrochloride and propranolol hydrochloride. It appears that ...

  16. Metric Compatible or Noncompatible Finsler--Ricci Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Vacaru, Sergiu I

    2011-01-01

    There were elaborated different models of Finsler geometry using the Cartan (metric compatible), or Berwald and Chern (metric non-compatible) connections, the Ricci flag curvature etc. In a series of works, we studied (non)commutative metric compatible Finsler and nonholonomic generalizations of the Ricci flow theory [see S. Vacaru, J. Math. Phys. 49 (2008) 043504; 50 (2009) 073503 and references therein. The goal of this work is to prove that there are some models of Finsler gravity and geometric evolution theories with generalized Perelman's functionals, and correspondingly derived nonholonomic Hamilton evolution equations, when metric noncompatible Finsler connections are involved. Following such an approach, we have to consider distortion tensors, uniquely defined by the Finsler metric, from the Cartan and/or the canonical metric compatible connections. We conclude that, in general, it is not possible to elaborate self-consistent models of geometric evolution with arbitrary Finsler metric noncompatible co...

  17. Compatibility of entomopathogenic fungi with extracts of plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The compatibility of some commercial botanicals (Biospark, Phytophrate, Exodos, Biodos and Neemgold) and of solvent extracts of Syndrella nodiflora, Premna tomentosa, Vitex negundo, Ipomea carnea, Pteridium aquilinum (leaves) and Annona squomosa (seeds) with Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuil., Isaria ...

  18. Examining self-compatibility in plum (Prunus domestica L. by fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-compatibility in 18 European plum cultivars was examined using the method of fluorescence microscopy. According to selfcompatibility, cultivars were divided into two groups: self-compatible and self-incompatible. In self-compatible cultivars the number of pistils, where pollen tubes reached the base of the style varied from 32.00% (Anna Späth to 91.18% (Wangenheims Frühzwetsche. Mean number of pollen tubes at the base of style in these cultivars ranged from 0.52 to 3.97. Cultivars were considered self-incompatible if pollen tubes stopped their growth in the style along with forming characteristic swellings at their tips. Of the studied cultivars, 13 were found to be self-compatible: Wangenheims Frühzwetsche, Cacanska Lepotica, Valjevka, California Blue, Cacanska Rodna, Italian Prune, Stanley, Požegaca, Herman, Bluefre, Jelica, Ruth Gerstetter and Anna Späth, while 5 were found to be self-incompatible: Cacanska Rana, Zimmers Frühzwetsche, Cacanska Najbolja, Pacific and President.

  19. Blood compatibility assessment of graft copolymer (NR-g-DMAA) tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzak, Mirzan T.; Otsuhata, Kazushige; Tabata, Yoneho; Ohashi, Fumio; Takeuchi, Atsuki

    Graft copolymer (NR-g-DMAA) tubes have been prepared by using simultaneous radiation-induced grafting of N,N-dimethyl-acrylamide, CH 2CHCON(CH 3) 2, (DMAA) onto natural rubber (NR) tubes. The blood compatibility of the NR-g-DMAA tubes was assessed with three methods, namely in vitro test, ex vivo once through test and ex vivo loops test. In the case of the in vitro test, a simple whole blood contacting procedure has been employed. The ex vivo once through test involves the exposing of NR-g-DMAA tubes with once through flow of fresh canine blood and then it was inspected for any evidence of clot. In the case of ex vivo loops test, the NR-g-DMAA tube was implanted at external jugular vein of a mongrel canine and the blood flow in the NR-g-DMAA tube was detected with an ultrasonic flow meter. It was found that the blood compatibility of NR-g-DMAA tubes is improved significantly with the increasing degree of grafting. All the NR-g-DMAA tubes having a degree of grafting of about 30 wt % or more exhibit good blood compatibility. It was also found that the blood compatibility of the NR-g-DMAA tube is better than that of a medical grade silicon rubber (SiR) tube.

  20. Compatibilidades e incompatibilidades entre radiação gama e óxido de etileno como métodos sucessivos de esterilização Compatibilidades e incompatibilidades entre rayos gama y óxido de etileno como métodos sucesivos de esterilización Compatibilities and incompatibilities between gamma rays and ethylene oxide as consecutive sterilization methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Queiroz de Souza

    2010-12-01

    nuestro medio la crónica duda de la compatibilidad o incompatibilidad de esterilizar en EO materiales previamente irradiados con Rayos Gamma.The doubt regarding the re-sterilization of articles made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC sterilized with gamma radiation (GR and subsequently with ethylene oxide (EO persists to date. Through a systematic literature review, this article analyzed studies that demonstrated compatibilities and incompatibilities between the sterilization processes with GR and EO, when used as consecutive sterilization methods. Seven studies were analyzed. It was verified that there is a multifactor influence regarding the safety of the procedure and that the chromatography analytical method employed by most studies yielded controversial results. This fact indicates the need for further studies on the issue, using more sensitive analytical methods than gas chromatography, such as the biological reactivity test in cell cultures, in an attempt to clarify the chronic doubt regarding the adequacy or inadequacy of sterilizing previously gamma-irradiated materials with EtO.

  1. Incentive-Compatible Interdomain Routing with Linear Utilities

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Alexander; Nikolova, Evdokia; Papadimitriou, Christos

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the problem of incentive-compatible interdomain routing, examining the quite realistic special case in which the utilities of autonomous systems (ASes) are linear functions of the traffic in the incident links and the traffic leaving each AS. We show that incentive-compatibility toward maximizing total welfare is achievable efficiently, and in the uncapacitated case, by an algorithm that can be easily implemented by the border gateway protocol (BGP), the standard ...

  2. CMOS compatible thin-film ALD tungsten nanoelectromechanical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Bradley Darren

    This research focuses on the development of a novel, low-temperature, CMOS compatible, atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) enabled NEMS fabrication process for the development of ALD Tungsten (WALD) NEMS devices. The devices are intended for use in CMOS/NEMS hybrid systems, and NEMS based micro-processors/controllers capable of reliable operation in harsh environments not accessible to standard CMOS technologies. The majority of NEMS switches/devices to date have been based on carbon-nano-tube (CNT) designs. The devices consume little power during actuation, and as expected, have demonstrated actuation voltages much smaller than MEMS switches. Unfortunately, NEMS CNT switches are not typically CMOS integrable due to the high temperatures required for their growth, and their fabrication typically results in extremely low and unpredictable yields. Thin-film NEMS devices offer great advantages over reported CNT devices for several reasons, including: higher fabrication yields, low-temperature (CMOS compatible) deposition techniques like ALD, and increased control over design parameters/device performance metrics, i.e., device geometry. Furthermore, top-down, thin-film, nano-fabrication techniques are better capable of producing complicated device geometries than CNT based processes, enabling the design and development of multi-terminal switches well-suited for low-power hybrid NEMS/CMOS systems as well as electromechanical transistors and logic devices for use in temperature/radiation hard computing architectures. In this work several novel, low-temperature, CMOS compatible fabrication technologies, employing WALD as a structural layer for MEMS or NEMS devices, were developed. The technologies developed are top-down nano-scale fabrication processes based on traditional micro-machining techniques commonly used in the fabrication of MEMS devices. Using these processes a variety of novel WALD NEMS devices have been successfully fabricated and characterized. Using two different

  3. Undergraduate nursing students' compatibility with the nursing profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianati Mansur

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high rate of attrition among nursing students has caused some nursing leaders to think about the necessity of considering students' personality during the process of admission into nursing schools. Due to the lack of studies on Iranian nursing students' personality traits, this study was designed to assess freshmen nursing students' personality characteristics and their compatibility with the demands of the nursing profession. Methods A descriptive study was conducted at Tehran and kashan medical universities and one of the branches of Azad University. Convenience sampling was used and 52 freshmen nursing students were assessed using Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory. Results From the total participants 63.5% were females and 36.5% were males. Based on the Holland's Vocational Interests Inventory 44% did not have appropriate personality characteristics for the nursing profession. 77% of the nursing students participating in the study reported that they lacked information about nursing. Conclusion It seems that personality tests can help to select the best students for nursing schools from those who show good academic capabilities. This would decrease the rate of attrition and could improve the quality of care.

  4. Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Kai; Fang, Hui; Bower, Christopher A.; Song, Enming; Yu, Xinge; Rogers, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to be leveraged for high-performance, water-soluble forms of electronics. The key elements are (i) collections of biodegradable electronic materials (e.g., silicon, tungsten, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide) and device architectures that are compatible with manufacturing procedures currently used in the integrated circuit industry, (ii) release schemes and transfer printing methods for integration of multiple ultrathin components formed in this way onto biodegradable polymer substrates, and (iii) planarization and metallization techniques to yield interconnected and fully functional systems. Various CMOS devices and circuit elements created in this fashion and detailed measurements of their electrical characteristics highlight the capabilities. Accelerated dissolution studies in aqueous environments reveal the chemical kinetics associated with the underlying transient behaviors. The results demonstrate the technical feasibility for using foundry-based routes to sophisticated forms of transient electronic devices, with functional capabilities and cost structures that could support diverse applications in the biomedical, military, industrial, and consumer industries. PMID:28652373

  5. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  6. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  7. Materials and processing approaches for foundry-compatible transient electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jan-Kai; Fang, Hui; Bower, Christopher A.; Song, Enming; Yu, Xinge; Rogers, John A.

    2017-07-01

    Foundry-based routes to transient silicon electronic devices have the potential to serve as the manufacturing basis for “green” electronic devices, biodegradable implants, hardware secure data storage systems, and unrecoverable remote devices. This article introduces materials and processing approaches that enable state-of-the-art silicon complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) foundries to be leveraged for high-performance, water-soluble forms of electronics. The key elements are (i) collections of biodegradable electronic materials (e.g., silicon, tungsten, silicon nitride, silicon dioxide) and device architectures that are compatible with manufacturing procedures currently used in the integrated circuit industry, (ii) release schemes and transfer printing methods for integration of multiple ultrathin components formed in this way onto biodegradable polymer substrates, and (iii) planarization and metallization techniques to yield interconnected and fully functional systems. Various CMOS devices and circuit elements created in this fashion and detailed measurements of their electrical characteristics highlight the capabilities. Accelerated dissolution studies in aqueous environments reveal the chemical kinetics associated with the underlying transient behaviors. The results demonstrate the technical feasibility for using foundry-based routes to sophisticated forms of transient electronic devices, with functional capabilities and cost structures that could support diverse applications in the biomedical, military, industrial, and consumer industries.

  8. [Study on metabolism of Coptis chinensis alkaloids from different compatibility of Wuji Wan in human intestinal flora].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Wei; Chen, Ying; Yang, Qing; Li, Yu-Jie; Gong, Zi-Peng; Weng, Xiao-Gang; Wang, Ya-Jie; Zhang, Rui-Jie; Zhu, Xiao-Xin

    2013-02-01

    To study the metabolism of berberine and palmatine in prescription compatibility of Wuji Wan in human intestinal flora. The L9 (3(4)) orthogonal design was adopted to compare prescription compatibility of nine groups of Wuji Wan composed of Coptis chinensis, Evodiae and fried Radix paeoniae alba into and single ingredient of C. chinensis. They were cultivated with fresh human excrements under anaerobic conditions for 24 h. A HPLC-UV method was adopted for determining berberine and palmatine in bacteria culture medium, in order to compare the metabolism of the two components in different prescription compatibility. Metabolism of berberine was positively correlated with doses, whereas metabolism of palmatine was negatively correlated with doses in extracts from C. chinensis. Compound compatibility speeded up the metabolism of berberine in low dose, which was positively related to the doses of Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix; meanwhile Compound compatibility slowed down the metabolism of berberine in high dose, which was negatively related to the dose of Evodiae. Compound compatibility speeded up the metabolism of palmatine in high dose, which was negatively related to the doses of Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix. The metabolism of the compatibility of Wuji Wan speeds up, when Coptis chinensis components metabolite rapidly in intestinal flora; while the metabolism of the compatibility of Wuji Wan slows down, when C. chinensis components metabolite slowly in intestinal flora. Therefore, they show a balanced effect. Additionally, different proportion of C. chinensis, Evodiae and fried Paeoniae Alba Radix cause difference in metabolism speed of berberine and palmatine to some extent.

  9. Assessing compatibility of direct detection data: halo-independent global likelihood analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.; Huh, Ji-Haeng; Witte, Samuel J.

    2016-10-01

    We present two different halo-independent methods to assess the compatibility of several direct dark matter detection data sets for a given dark matter model using a global likelihood consisting of at least one extended likelihood and an arbitrary number of Gaussian or Poisson likelihoods. In the first method we find the global best fit halo function (we prove that it is a unique piecewise constant function with a number of down steps smaller than or equal to a maximum number that we compute) and construct a two-sided pointwise confidence band at any desired confidence level, which can then be compared with those derived from the extended likelihood alone to assess the joint compatibility of the data. In the second method we define a ``constrained parameter goodness-of-fit'' test statistic, whose p-value we then use to define a ``plausibility region'' (e.g. where p >= 10%). For any halo function not entirely contained within the plausibility region, the level of compatibility of the data is very low (e.g. p < 10%). We illustrate these methods by applying them to CDMS-II-Si and SuperCDMS data, assuming dark matter particles with elastic spin-independent isospin-conserving interactions or exothermic spin-independent isospin-violating interactions.

  10. Assessing Compatibility of Direct Detection Data: Halo-Independent Global Likelihood Analyses

    CERN Document Server

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2016-10-18

    We present two different halo-independent methods utilizing a global maximum likelihood that can assess the compatibility of dark matter direct detection data given a particular dark matter model. The global likelihood we use is comprised of at least one extended likelihood and an arbitrary number of Poisson or Gaussian likelihoods. In the first method we find the global best fit halo function and construct a two sided pointwise confidence band, which can then be compared with those derived from the extended likelihood alone to assess the joint compatibility of the data. In the second method we define a "constrained parameter goodness-of-fit" test statistic, whose $p$-value we then use to define a "plausibility region" (e.g. where $p \\geq 10\\%$). For any halo function not entirely contained within the plausibility region, the level of compatibility of the data is very low (e.g. $p < 10 \\%$). As an example we apply these methods to CDMS-II-Si and SuperCDMS data, assuming dark matter particles with elastic s...

  11. Porcine Tricuspid Valve Anatomy and Human Compatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waziri, Farhad; Lyager Nielsen, Sten; Hasenkam, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    before clinical use. The study aim was to evaluate and compare the tricuspid valve anatomy of porcine and human hearts. METHODS: The anatomy of the tricuspid valve and the surrounding structures that affect the valve during a cardiac cycle were examined in detail in 100 fresh and 19 formalin...

  12. Assessing the bio-compatibility of a click DNA backbone linker

    OpenAIRE

    Sanzone, A Pia

    2013-01-01

    Click chemistry has the potential to be employed for the assembly of large DNA fragments, by purely chemical methods. However to enable this, the bio-compatibility of the resulting click-linked DNA must be examined. Click DNA linkers were incorporated into a plasmid within the gene encoding for an ampicillin resistance marker. The plasmid was transformed into E. coli and resulting colonies found to survive on LB agar plates supplemented with ampicillin. This indicated that the click DNA linke...

  13. ORIGINS OF SUICIDALITY: COMPATIBILITY OF LAY AND EXPERT BELIEFS - QUALITATIVE STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Zadravec, Tina; Grad, Onja

    2013-01-01

    Background: Today there exist different views on origins of suicidal behaviour, which can influence the help-seeking behaviour and the adherence to the treatment of suicidal people. Subjects and methods: The beliefs lay people and patients have about the origins of suicidal behaviour as well as the compatibility of their beliefs with the views of the mental health personnel (general practitioners and psychiatrists) were assessed. 45 semi-structured interviews with the general popu...

  14. In/compatible Imagi(ni)ng

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2012-01-01

    The article thematizes a certain logic of reproduction that follows from a point in art history where the construction of images became a process of assembling or coding discrete signals through systematic methods. A logic which is not concerned with imitation but with creating an interchangeable...... matrix for the structural distribution of units within a field of flux, across different formats, and independent of indexical relations to phenomenal objects and medium-bound materiality....

  15. Development and evaluation of a test program for Y-site compatibility testing of total parenteral nutrition and intravenous drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staven, Vigdis; Wang, Siri; Grønlie, Ingrid; Tho, Ingunn

    2016-03-22

    There is no standardized procedure or consensus to which tests should be performed to judge compatibility/incompatibility of intravenous drugs. The purpose of this study was to establish and evaluate a test program of methods suitable for detection of physical incompatibility in Y-site administration of total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and drugs. Eight frequently used methods (dynamic light scattering, laser diffraction, light obscuration, turbidimetry, zeta potential, light microscopy, pH-measurements and visual examination using Tyndall beams), were scrutinized to elucidate strengths and weaknesses for compatibility testing. The responses of the methods were tested with samples containing precipitation of calcium phosphate and with heat destabilized TPN emulsions. A selection of drugs (acyclovir, ampicillin, ondansetron and paracetamol) was mixed with 3-in-1 TPN admixtures (Olimel® N5E, Kabiven® and SmofKabiven®) to assess compatibility (i.e. potential precipitates and emulsion stability). The obtained compatibility data was interpreted according to theory and compared to existing compatibility literature to further check the validity of the methods. Light obscuration together with turbidimetry, visual inspection and pH-measurements were able to capture signs of precipitations. For the analysis of emulsion stability, light obscuration and estimation of percent droplets above 5 μm (PFAT5) seemed to be the most sensitive method; however laser diffraction and monitoring changes in pH might be a useful support. Samples should always be compared to unmixed controls to reveal changes induced by the mixing. General acceptance criteria are difficult to define, although some limits are suggested based on current experience. The experimental compatibility data was supported by scattered reports in literature, further confirming the suitability of the test program. However, conflicting data are common, which complicates the comparison to existing literature. Testing of

  16. UHV-compatible spectroscopic scanning Kelvin probe for surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baikie, I.; Petermann, U.; Lägel, B.

    1999-08-01

    We have developed an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) compatible scanning Kelvin probe (SKP) to measure local work function ( φ) differences between a conducting sample and a reference metal tip to less than 1 meV. The work function is an extremely sensitive indicator of surface condition and is affected by adsorption, evaporation, surface topography, etc. For example, the increase of φ due to oxidation of Si(111) and polycrystalline rhenium is 1.4 and 1.9 eV, respectively. We have performed SKP work function topographies of metal and semiconductor samples during various UHV cleaning processes to determine if changes in surface work function (Δ φ) can be attributed to chemical contamination, e.g., carbon, or surface structural changes due to thermal processing or ion sputtering. We can, for instance, see major changes in oxidation kinetics due to the type of cleaning mechanism, flash anneal or sputter-anneal, or through as little as 0.6% carbon contamination. The UHV SKP control loop utilises a novel tracking system to maintain constant tip-to-sample spacing during scanning. Combined with the in-house 'Off-Null' detection method we have developed this allows a significantly higher signal-to-noise ratio than alternative detection methods including the lock-in amplifier. Using this system we have performed in situ surface photovoltage spectroscopy during the oxidation of Si(111), illustrating the capability of this technique to probe the local density of states, and surface barrier height spectroscopy during surface processing.

  17. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  18. Conceptual design of CFETR divertor remote handling compatible structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Huaichu, E-mail: yaodm@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China); Yao, Damao; Cao, Lei; Zhou, Zibo; Li, Lei [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Conceptual design for the CFETR divertor have been proposed, especially the divertor remote handling compatible structure. • The degrees of freedom of the divertor are analyzed in order to validate the design the divertor supports structure. • Besides the ITER-like scheme, a new scheme for the divertor remote handling compatible supports is proposed, that is the rack and pinion mechanism. • The installation/removel process is verified through simulation in Delmia in order to check design quality for remote handling requirements. - Abstract: Divertor is one of key components of tokamak fusion reactor. The CFETR is China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor. Its divertor will expose to tritium environment and neutron radiation. Materials of the divertor will be radioactived, and cannot be handled by personnel directly. To develop structure which compatible with robots handle for installation, maintenance and removing is required. This paper introduces a conceptual design of CFETR divertor module which compatible with remote handling end-effectors. The divertor module is confined by inner and outer support. The inner support is only confined divertor module radial, toroidal and vertical moving freedom degrees, but not confined rotating freedom degrees. The outer support is the structure that can confine rotating freedom degrees and should also be compatible with remote handling end-effectors.

  19. The compatibility of fingerprint visualization techniques with immunolabeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Annemieke; Aalders, Maurice C G; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Lambrechts, Saskia A G

    2013-07-01

    The chemical composition of a fingermark potentially holds a wealth of information about the fingermark donor, which can be extracted by immunolabeling. Immunolabeling can be used to detect specific components in fingermarks; however, to be applicable in the forensic field, it should be compatible with commonly used fingerprint visualization techniques. In this study, the compatibility of immunolabeling with two different fingerprint visualization techniques, magnetic powdering and ninhydrin staining, was investigated on fingermarks deposited on glass and on nitrocellulose membranes. With dermcidin as antigen of interest, immunolabeling was performed successfully on all developed fingermarks. We can conclude that immunolabeling is compatible with magnetic powdering and ninhydrin staining, which can be of great forensic value. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Biochemical mechanisms determine the functional compatibility of heterologous genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porse, Andreas; Schou, Thea S.; Munck, Christian

    2018-01-01

    Elucidating the factors governing the functional compatibility of horizontally transferred genes is important to understand bacterial evolution, including the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance, and to successfully engineer biological systems. In silico efforts and work using single-gene...... libraries have suggested that sequence composition is a strong barrier for the successful integration of heterologous genes. Here we sample 200 diverse genes, representing >80% of sequenced antibiotic resistance genes, to interrogate the factors governing genetic compatibility in new hosts. In contrast...... to previous work, we find that GC content, codon usage, and mRNA-folding energy are of minor importance for the compatibility of mechanistically diverse gene products at moderate expression. Instead, we identify the phylogenetic origin, and the dependence of a resistance mechanism on host physiology, as major...

  1. [Study on the compatibility of slip casting aluminous ceramic crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Q B; Xue, M; You, L; Du, C S; Chao, Y L

    1997-03-01

    One of the key factors for a good slip casting aluminous ceramic crown is good compatibility between its core material and the veneering porcelain.The chemical and thermal compatibility of two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems(In-Ceram and GI-I) were investigated by means of SEM and EDAX,thermal shock tests were also performed to evaluate the crazing resistance.The results showed: the crazing resistance of In-Ceram was 158 degrees centigrade,and that of GI-I was degrees centigrade;there existed tightly bonded interfaces between the slip casting aluminous ceramic cores and the veneering porcelains in both of the two systems,where ion transferences were found.The results also suggested good compatibility of the two slip casting aluminous ceramic crown systems.

  2. How Compatible is Clinical Diagnosis with Electrophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakup Turkel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation of the clinical diagnosis of patients referred to the electroneuromyography laboratory with the electrophysiological diagnosis. Material and Method: Eight hundred eighty two patients  were enrolled in the study. Their ages, genders, the clinic that referred the patient, the clinical diagnosis, and the electrophysiological results were registered retrospectively and the results were statistically evaluated. Results: Five hundred twenty four of 882 patients enrolled in the study were women, while 358 of them were men. Four hundred hundred ninety nine (56,6% of the patients were consulted by the Neurology department, 222 (25,2% patients were consulted by the Neurosurgery deparment, 59 (6,7%  patients were consulted by the Physical medicine and rehabilitation  deparment while 61 (6,9% patients were referred by the Orthopedy department and 41 (4,6% by other departments. Carpal tunnel syndrome was the most frequent clinical diagnosis (28,7%. Only in a small group of patients symptoms were assessed rather than the clinical diagnosis (2,9%. In 49,1% of the patients, There was correlation between clinical and electrophysiological diagnosis while 44,7% of patients had normal electroneuromyography results. Discussion: The high rate of the normal electroneuromyography tests and the statistically significant discordance of clinical diagnosis of patients with their electrophysiological test results show that, there are inessential electroneuromyography reguests.

  3. Perceived Compatibility and the Adoption of B2C E-Commerce by Non-buyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-García, Ángel; Iglesias-Pradas, Santiago; Chaparro-Peláez, Julián; Pascual-Miguel, Félix

    The purpose of this article is to study the factors which affect the intention to buy online for users who have never made any prior purchase using the electronic channel, with special focus to the role of perceived compatibility. To do so, an adoption model for e-commerce was proposed on the basis of the Technology Adoption Model (TAM) and the Innovations Diffusion Theory (IDT). In order to validate the model, data gathered amongst Spanish consumers who had no experience using e-commerce, were analyzed using the partial least squares (PLS) method. The results have demonstrated the importance of perceived compatibility as a significant factor to foster non-buyers' adoption of electronic business-to-consumer e-commerce (eB2C).

  4. Electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) design guidelines for I and C systems for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Koo; Lee, Dong Young; Cha, Kyung Ho; Park, Joo Hyun; Lee, Ki Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    This report describes the research results on Electromagnetic Compatibility technologies for I and C(Instrumentation and Control) systems for nuclear power plants. As the nuclear industries are adopting the digital equipment rather than the conventional analog type equipment for safety I and C systems as well as non-safety systems of nuclear power plants(NPPs), it is necessary to secure compatibility against EMI(electromagnetic interference) for the digital safety I and C systems. EMI qualification, identified as a regulatory compliance item by US NRC and Korean regulatory body, should be performed in accordance with appropriate standards, because the electromagnetic environment is regarded as one of the environmental factors possible to affect the safety functions. As a technical guide on this EMI issue, this report includes description of code and standards scheme, EMI qualification methods, noise reduction strategies, and survey on noise levels in nuclear power plants. 29 refs., 72 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  5. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Mixing Procedures and Materials Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinger, Becky D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sandstrom, Mary M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Warner, Kirstin F. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Sorensen, Daniel N. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Remmers, Daniel L. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Moran, Jesse S. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC-IHD), Indian Head, MD (United States); Shelley, Timothy J. [Air Force Research Lab. (AFRL), Tyndall AFB, FL (United States); Whinnery, LeRoy L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hsu, Peter C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Whipple, Richard E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kashgarian, Michaele [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, John G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-14

    Three mixing procedures have been standardized for the IDCA proficiency test—solid-solid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid. Due to the variety of precursors used in formulating the materials for the test, these three mixing methods have been designed to address all combinations of materials. Hand mixing is recommended for quantities less than 10 grams and Jar Mill mixing is recommended for quantities over 10 grams. Consideration must also be given to the type of container used for the mixing due to the wide range of chemical reactivity of the precursors and mixtures. Eight web site sources from container and chemical manufacturers have been consulted. Compatible materials have been compiled as a resource for selecting containers made of materials stable to the mixtures. In addition, container materials used in practice by the participating laboratories are discussed. Consulting chemical compatibility tables is highly recommended for each operation by each individual engaged in testing the materials in this proficiency test.

  6. CMOS-compatible photonic devices for single-photon generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Chunle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sources of single photons are one of the key building blocks for quantum photonic technologies such as quantum secure communication and powerful quantum computing. To bring the proof-of-principle demonstration of these technologies from the laboratory to the real world, complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS-compatible photonic chips are highly desirable for photon generation, manipulation, processing and even detection because of their compactness, scalability, robustness, and the potential for integration with electronics. In this paper, we review the development of photonic devices made from materials (e.g., silicon and processes that are compatible with CMOS fabrication facilities for the generation of single photons.

  7. Technical compatibility and safety of glass fiber in battery separators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, R. [Schuller International, Toledo, OH (United States); Versen, R. [Schuller International, Littleton, CO (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Nonwovens comprised of glass fibers are both compatible with the relatively harsh chemical environment in lead acid batteries, and yet are safe to handle. The health and safety of glass fibers may seem confusing from a regulatory viewpoint, but are in fact highly tested and well understood scientifically to not cause respiratory disease. Nonwoven separators made from glass fibers are well situated to withstand scientific scrutiny in these times of suspicion of negative health effects ranging from second-hand smoke to tap water. This paper examines technical compatibility of the glass fibers in the battery, the health and safety aspects of glass fibers, and governmental and regulatory interpretation of studies.

  8. Plasmonics Based Harsh Environment Compatible Chemical Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Carpenter

    2012-01-15

    Au-YSZ, Au-TiO{sub 2} and Au-CeO{sub 2} nanocomposite films have been investigated as a potential sensing element for high-temperature plasmonic sensing of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in an oxygen containing environment. The Au-YSZ and Au-TiO{sub 2} films were deposited using PVD methods, while the CeO{sub 2} thin film was deposited by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and Au was implanted into the as-grown film at an elevated temperature followed by high temperature annealing to form well-defined Au nanoclusters. Each of the films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). For the gas sensing experiments, separate exposures to varying concentrations of H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} were performed at a temperature of 500°C in oxygen backgrounds of 5.0, 10, and ~21% O{sub 2}. Changes in the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption peak were monitored during gas exposures and are believed to be the result of oxidation-reduction processes that fill or create oxygen vacancies in the respective metal oxides. This process affects the LSPR peak position either by charge exchange with the Au nanoparticles or by changes in the dielectric constant surrounding the particles. Hyperspectral multivariate analysis was used to gauge the inherent selectivity of the film between the separate analytes. From principal component analysis (PCA), unique and identifiable responses were seen for each of the analytes. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was also used on the Au-CeO{sub 2} results and showed separation between analytes as well as trends in gas concentration. Results indicate that each of the films are is selective towards O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub 2} in separate exposures. However, when the films were analyzed in a sensor array based experiment, ie simultaneous exposures to the target gases, PCA analysis of the combined response showed an even greater selective character towards the target gases. Combined

  9. Molecular cooperativity and compatibility via full atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan Yang, Kenny

    Civil engineering has customarily focused on problems from a large-scale perspective, encompassing structures such as bridges, dams, and infrastructure. However, present day challenges in conjunction with advances in nanotechnology have forced a re-focusing of expertise. The use of atomistic and molecular approaches to study material systems opens the door to significantly improve material properties. The understanding that material systems themselves are structures, where their assemblies can dictate design capacities and failure modes makes this problem well suited for those who possess expertise in structural engineering. At the same time, a focus has been given to the performance metrics of materials at the nanoscale, including strength, toughness, and transport properties (e.g., electrical, thermal). Little effort has been made in the systematic characterization of system compatibility -- e.g., how to make disparate material building blocks behave in unison. This research attempts to develop bottom-up molecular scale understanding of material behavior, with the global objective being the application of this understanding into material design/characterization at an ultimate functional scale. In particular, it addresses the subject of cooperativity at the nano-scale. This research aims to define the conditions which dictate when discrete molecules may behave as a single, functional unit, thereby facilitating homogenization and up-scaling approaches, setting bounds for assembly, and providing a transferable assessment tool across molecular systems. Following a macro-scale pattern where the compatibility of deformation plays a vital role in the structural design, novel geometrical cooperativity metrics based on the gyration tensor are derived with the intention to define nano-cooperativity in a generalized way. The metrics objectively describe the general size, shape and orientation of the structure. To validate the derived measures, a pair of ideal macromolecules

  10. Contrastive Compatibility in Some Arabic Dialects and Their Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadora, Frederic J.

    1976-01-01

    This study assesses and characterizes lexical relationships among the major urban Syro-Lebanese varieties of Arabic. To achieve this quantitative analysis of degrees of similarity or differentiation, an analytical procedure based on lexical compatibility was developed. Secondarily, a classification of these varieties is presented as a by-product…

  11. Creative Commons licenses and design: are the two compatible?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jasserand, C.

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses whether Creative Commons licences are applicable to and compatible with design. The first part focuses on the peculiar and complex nature of a design, which can benefit from a copyright and a design protection. This shows how it can affect the use of Creative Commons licences.

  12. Operation compatibility: a neglected contribution to dual-task costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pannebakker, M.M.; Band, G.P.H.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, dual-task interference has been attributed to the consequences of task load exceeding capacity limitations. However, the current study demonstrates that in addition to task load, the mutual compatibility of the concurrent processes modulates whether 2 tasks can be performed in

  13. Leaders, Leadership and Democracy--Are They Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schostak, John

    2016-01-01

    This article is taken from a talk given by John Schostak at the Co-Operative Head Office, Manchester on 25 September 2015. Question addressed in this paper include: (1) To what extent is leadership needed for a democratic life?; (2) What form of democratic organisation, if any, is compatible with leadership?; and (3) Is democracy undermined by…

  14. Visual land-use compatibility and scenic-resource quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    William G. Hendrix

    1977-01-01

    The effect that land-use relationships have upon perceived quality of the visual landscape is discussed, and a case is made for expansion of fit-misfit theory into what has been called visual land-use compatibility. An assessment methodology that was designed to test people's perceptions of land-use relationships is presented and the results are discussed.

  15. Circuit board design for good electromagnetic compatibility performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearpark, J

    2005-10-01

    Design engineers need to consider the electromagnetic performance of printed circuit boards to adhere to electromagnetic compatibility requirements. This article examines factors that influence performance and outlines techniques to avoid the use of overly expensive screen enclosures in order to comply with the standards.

  16. The impact of the revised electromagnetic compatibility standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozec, Didier; Hayes, Darren J

    2004-10-01

    Electromedical equipment must be tested to the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) standard EN 60601-1-2 to carry the CE mark. The new version of EN 60601-1-2, which becomes mandatory from 1 November 2004, could affect the design of some products. This article summarises the new EMC requirements and provides design tips on how to meet them.

  17. Compatibility of fixed orthodontic appliances with MR environment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk jr., Zenon; Hubálková, H.; Starčuková, Jana; Linetskiy, I.; Bartušek, Karel; Krupa, P.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 19, Suppl. 1 (2006), EPOS 726:1-7 E-ISSN 1352-8661 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8110 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : orthodontic appliance * magnetic resonance * compatibility * dentistry * artifact Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment Impact factor: 0.756, year: 2005 http://posters.webges.com/esmrmb/epos

  18. An IC-compatible polyimide pressure sensor with capacitive readout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedersen, M.; Meijerink, M.G.H.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet

    1997-01-01

    A capacitive differential pressure sensor has been developed. The process used for the fabrication of the sensor is IC-compatible, meaning that the device potentially can be integrated on one chip with a suitable signal-conditioning circuit. A sensor for a differential pressure of ±1 bar has been

  19. Compatibility of the holy Qur'an with sciences: anthropological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thus Allah has encouraged us since more than 14 centuries; to study the past of beings included that of humans and, therefore to found the two other anthropological specialities: the Archaeology and the Paleoanthropology. In other verses Allah designates other important anthropological concepts compatible with the most ...

  20. 77 FR 59702 - Promoting U.S. EC Regulatory Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... to be addressed (including any information on negative effects of these differences and on the... markets and technologies. As we continue in the High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth to examine the... approaches to standards; and An assessment of the effects of enhanced regulatory compatibility (quantified...

  1. The compatibility of fingerprint visualization techniques with immunolabeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, Annemieke; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical composition of a fingermark potentially holds a wealth of information about the fingermark donor, which can be extracted by immunolabeling. Immunolabeling can be used to detect specific components in fingermarks; however, to be applicable in the forensic field, it should be compatible

  2. 47 CFR 68.316 - Hearing aid compatibility: Technical requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-504 Magnetic Field Intensity Criteria for Telephone Compatibility With Hearing Aids Table of Contents... communications since the 1940's. Magnetic pick-ups in hearing-aids have provided for coupling to many, but not... useful to anyone engaged in the manufacture of telephone terminal equipment and hearing-aids and to those...

  3. compatible volume-taper equations for predicting merchantable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: Compatible systems of merchantable total tree cubic volume and stem taper equations are derived by integrating an existing volume equation. The systems are developed to yield volume at any merchantable length, total volume and for any merchantable top diameter. It is also demonstrated that the most ...

  4. Compatible volume-taper equations for predicting merchantable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compatible systems of merchantable total tree cubic volume and stem taper equations are derived by integrating an existing volume equation. The systems are developed to yield volume at any merchantable length, total volume and for any merchantable top diameter. It is also demonstrated that the most common types of ...

  5. 36 CFR 1193.21 - Accessibility, usability, and compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accessibility, usability, and compatibility. 1193.21 Section 1193.21 Parks, Forests, and Public Property ARCHITECTURAL AND TRANSPORTATION BARRIERS COMPLIANCE BOARD TELECOMMUNICATIONS ACT ACCESSIBILITY GUIDELINES General Requirements § 1193.21...

  6. Genetics of wide compatible gene and variability studies in rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia. Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 2. Genetics of wide compatible gene and variability studies in rice (Oryza sativa L.) S. REVATHI K. SAKTHIVEL S. MANONMANI M. UMADEVI R. USHAKUMARI S. ROBIN.

  7. Spectral measurement using IC-compatible linear variable optical filter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emadi, A.; Grabarnik, S.; Wu, H.; De Graaf, G.; Hedsten, K.; Enoksson, P.; Correia, J.H.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the functional and spectral characterization of a microspectrometer based on a CMOS detector array covered by an IC-Compatible Linear Variable Optical Filter (LVOF). The Fabry-Perot LVOF is composed of 15 dielectric layers with a tapered middle cavity layer, which has been

  8. Biocytin: a neuronal tracer compatible with rapid decalcification procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirsig-Wiechmann, C R

    1994-03-01

    The compatibility of neuronal tract-tracing and decalcification procedures was examined in salamander nasal chemosensory systems. Biocytin, but not horseradish peroxidase, retained its labeling capacity following rapid decalcification of the cranial bone. The combination of biocytin tract-tracing and decalcification procedures allows the visualization of labeled neurons and/or their projections within bony regions of intact specimens.

  9. Pollen-pistil compatibility relationships in some Iranian almond ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The identification of pollen-pistil compatibility relationships among almond cultivars and genotypes is very important for breeders and growers. In the present study, PCR based technique was used to identify S-alleles in 10 late blooming almond genotypes. In total, 19 alleles were amplified by five primer pairs in the studied ...

  10. On Incentive Compatibility and Budget Balancedness in Public Decision Making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijs, J.P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Holstroem (1979) showed that Groves' schemes are the unique incentive compatible transfer schemes for public decision making problems if the domain of preferences is smoothly connected. In this paper we will show that this result can be extended to public decision making problems with a connected

  11. Compatibility and economic assessment of sweetpotato and garden ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, sole cropping of NR05/022 variety of Sweetpotato had the best Naira return on investment with a BCR of 3.25. It is therefore recommended that Sweetpotato and garden egg are compatible and intercropping them in a humid ultisol is economically viable. So farmers in the study area are encouraged to intercrop ...

  12. Modelling and optimization of car-to-car compatibility - Modellierung und optimierung von pkw-pkw-kompatibilität

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, H.G.; Nastic, T.; Huibers, J.H.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper simple and more detailed MADYMO multibody models were used to simulate the car structure for improving the car-to-car compatibility of the whole car fleet. As a first step, survey studies were performed to develop a method for the optimization of car design with respect to frontal and

  13. Nimodipine-loaded mixed micelles: formulation, compatibility, pharmacokinetics, and vascular irritability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xu; Jiang, Yu; Ren, Chunjuan; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Tao; Zhang, Zhirong

    2012-01-01

    The clinical application of nimodipine (NIM) is limited by several unfavorable properties, which are induced by its low aqueous solubility. In the present study, nimodipine-loaded egg phosphatidylcholine-sodium glycocholate mixed micelles (NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs) were prepared to improve the water solubility of NIM, thus allowing it to be more applicable for clinical use. NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs were prepared using the coprecipitation method and the factors influencing formulation quality were optimized. After formulation, water solubility, solubilizing efficiency, drug loading, particle size, physical compatibility, pharmacokinetics, and vascular irritability were determined. The mean size of the NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs was 6.099 ± 0.048 nm under optimized conditions. The water solubility of NIM in EPC-SGC-MMs was enhanced 250-fold compared with free NIM. The physical compatibility, pharmacokinetic, and vascular irritability studies showed that, in comparison to the commercially available NIM injections, NIM-EPC-SGC-MMs presented better physical compatibility, the same pharmacokinetic profile, and less risk of local vascular irritation and phlebitis. EPC-SGC-MMs represent a promising new formulation suitable for the intravenous delivery of NIM.

  14. Research on micro-structure and hemo-compatibility of the artificial heart valve surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Xia [Center of Photonics Fabrication, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu Teachers University of Technology, Changzhou 213015 (China); Shao Yunliang [Center of Photonics Fabrication, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhou Ming, E-mail: zm_laser@126.com [Center of Photonics Fabrication, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Li Jian; Cai Lan [Center of Photonics Fabrication, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2009-04-15

    In order to seek the method to improve the hemo-compatibility of artificial mechanical heart valve, the surface of rabbit's heart valve was observed using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that the dual-scale structure which consists of cobblestones-like structure of 8 {mu}m in underside diameter and 3 {mu}m in height, and the fine cilia of about 150 nm in diameter, was helpful to the hemo-compatibility of the heart valve. Therefore, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface with hierarchical micro-structure was fabricated using femtosecond laser fabrication technique and soft lithography. At the same time, the tests of apparent contact angle and platelet adhesion on both smooth and textured PDMS surfaces were carried out to study their wettability and hemo-compatibility. The results demonstrated that the surface with textured structure displayed more excellent wettabililty and anti-coagulation property than that of smooth surface. The apparent contact angle of textured surface enhanced from 113.1 deg. to 163.6 deg. and the amount of adsorbed platelet on such surface was fewer, no distortion and no activation were found.

  15. [Protective Effect of Component Compatibility Sini Decoction on Hypothyroidism Induced Renal Damage in Rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Pei, Miao-rong

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the protective effect of component compatibility Sini Decoction on hypothyroidism induced renal damage in rats. The hypothyroidism model were established by 0.1% propylthiouracil (PTU) solution 10 m/kg for consecutive 15 days. Rats were randomly divided into model group, component compatibility Sini Decoction groups[ CSD 9. 6,4. 8 and 2. 4 g/ (kg · d)] and positive control group [Euthyrox 9 µg/(kg · d)]. Radioimmunoassay was used to determine the serum T3 and T4 levels; serum BUN content was detected by UV spectrophotometer and ELISA method were used to measure the CYS-C content. The kidney was weighed, and the pathological changes of the renal were detected by HE stain. Compared with blank control group, kidney weight coefficient, serum T3 and T4 levels in model group were decreased, while serum BUN and CYS-C contents were increased (P rats. Component compatibility Sini Decoction has a curative effect on hypothyroidism induced renal damage in rats.

  16. [Compatible biomass models for main tree species with measurement error in Heilongjiang Province of Northeast China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-hu; Li, Feng-ri; Jia, Wei-wei; Liu, Fu-xiang; Wang, He-zhi

    2011-10-01

    Based on the biomass data of 516 sampling trees, and by using non-linear error-in-variable modeling approach, the compatible models for the total biomass and the biomass of six components including aboveground part, underground part, stem, crown, branch, and foliage of 15 major tree species (or groups) in Heilongjiang Province were established, and the best models for the total biomass and components biomass were selected. The compatible models based on total biomass were developed by adopting the method of joint control different level ratio function. The heteroscedasticity of the models for total biomass was eliminated with log transformation, and the weighted regression was applied to the models for each individual component. Among the compatible biomass models established for the 15 major species (or groups) , the model for total biomass had the highest prediction precision (90% or more), followed by the models for aboveground part and stem biomass, with a precision of 87.5% or more. The prediction precision of the biomass models for other components was relatively low, but it was still greater than 80% for most test tree species. The modeling efficiency (EF) values of the total, aboveground part, and stem biomass models for all the tree species (or groups) were over 0.9, and the EF values of the underground part, crown, branch, and foliage biomass models were over 0.8.

  17. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible microwave plasma methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  18. Methane Pyrolysis for Hydrogen & Carbon Nanotube Recovery from Sabatier Products Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible catalytic methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  19. The effects of relationship enrichment program on compatibility and marital satisfaction of infertile couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Miri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Infertility as a crisis in couples' life, not only creates psychological problems, but also, it can act as a powerful impact on the relationships between couples. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of relationship enrichment on compatibility and marital satisfaction of infertile couples. Methods: This is a semi experimental study with pre-test and post-test on control group. Statistical population of this study was an infertile couple in Birjand. The couples were randomly divided to control groups (17 couples and experimental groups (15 couples. The research instrument was marital adjustment questionnaire. That completed before, immediately and 3 months after intervention. The intervention consisted of 6 training session. Data were analyzed using SPSS software (version 16. Results: Before the intervention, mean scores were matched the two groups. After the intervention, the experimental group increased average compatibility from 101.5±22/4 to 129.33±10.6 , marital satisfaction from 33/8±8 to 44±4.8 , marital solidarity from12±3.8 to 16.1±2.2 , couples agreement from 44.6±10.5 to 54.8±6.1 , expression of love from 11±3.7 to 14.2± 1.(p<0.05 Conclusion: Relationship enrichment increased the marital compatibility and marital satisfaction. Therefore recommended using relationship enrichment program to increase compatibility and marital satisfaction. Paper Type: Research Article.

  20. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-12-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber.

  1. Mating Compatibility and Restriction Analysis of Ganoderma Isolates from Oil Palm and Other Palm Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Chan Jer; Seman, Idris Abu; Zakaria, Latiffah

    2015-01-01

    Mating compatibility and restriction analyses of Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions were performed to determine the relations between Ganoderma boninense, the most common species associated with basal stem rot in oil palm and Ganoderma isolates from infected oil palm, two ornamental palms, sealing wax palm (Cyrtostachys renda) and MacArthur palm (Ptychosperma macarthurii), an isolate from coconut stump (Cocos nucifera), Ganoderma miniatocinctum, Ganoderma zonatum and Ganoderma tornatum. The results showed that G. boninense was compatible with Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, G. miniatocinctum and G. zonatum, Ganoderma isolates from sealing wax palm, MacArthur palm and coconut stump. G. boninense was not compatible with G. tornatum. Therefore, the results suggested that the G. boninense, G. miniatocinctum, G. zonatum, and Ganoderma isolates from oil palm, ornamental palms and coconut stump could represent the same biological species. In performing a restriction analysis of the ITS regions, variations were observed in which five haplotypes were generated from the restriction patterns. An unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis showed that all the Ganoderma isolates were grouped into five primary groups, and the similarity values of the isolates ranged from 97% to 100%. Thus, a restriction analysis of the ITS regions showed that G. boninense and the Ganoderma isolates from other palm hosts were closely related. On the basis of the mating compatibility test and the restriction analysis of the ITS regions performed in this study, a diverse group of Ganoderma species from oil palm and other palm hosts are closely related, except for G. tornatum and Ganoderma isolates from tea and rubber. PMID:26868709

  2. Applying Standard Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Techniques Within an Agile Framework: Is There a Compatibility Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabney, James B.; Arthur, James Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Agile methods have gained wide acceptance over the past several years, to the point that they are now a standard management and execution approach for small-scale software development projects. While conventional Agile methods are not generally applicable to large multi-year and mission-critical systems, Agile hybrids are now being developed (such as SAFe) to exploit the productivity improvements of Agile while retaining the necessary process rigor and coordination needs of these projects. From the perspective of Independent Verification and Validation (IVV), however, the adoption of these hybrid Agile frameworks is becoming somewhat problematic. Hence, we find it prudent to question the compatibility of conventional IVV techniques with (hybrid) Agile practices.This paper documents our investigation of (a) relevant literature, (b) the modification and adoption of Agile frameworks to accommodate the development of large scale, mission critical systems, and (c) the compatibility of standard IVV techniques within hybrid Agile development frameworks. Specific to the latter, we found that the IVV methods employed within a hybrid Agile process can be divided into three groups: (1) early lifecycle IVV techniques that are fully compatible with the hybrid lifecycles, (2) IVV techniques that focus on tracing requirements, test objectives, etc. are somewhat incompatible, but can be tailored with a modest effort, and (3) IVV techniques involving an assessment requiring artifact completeness that are simply not compatible with hybrid Agile processes, e.g., those that assume complete requirement specification early in the development lifecycle.

  3. Adapting deployed touch screen displays for NVG compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, Claude

    2008-04-01

    As the battlefield becomes "digitized", all arms of the military are deploying COTS displays in the form of Portable Notebooks, Kneeboards, GPS and PDA's in ever greater numbers. Many of these COTS equipments and associated displays use full color LCD's and resistive touch panels as the operator-interface. These displays are a challenge to those who must modify the COTS equipment for NVG compatibility. Traditional NVG filter options have relatively poor color rendering and are too thick or rigid to interface with touch panels. In addition, many of these displays do not have sufficient dimming capabilities to allow covert night-time operations and do not have sufficient luminance for daytime operations. Polymeric materials recently developed by Wamco have been specifically designed for applications where traditional NVG filters have failed. These applications will be discussed and quantified in terms of NVG Compatibility, Color Rendering, Luminance Contrast and Daytime Readability, Touch Screen Sensitivity and Environmental Performance.

  4. Compatibility and stability of valsartan in a solid pharmaceutical formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamíris Amanda Júlio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Valsartan (VAL is a highly selective blocker of the angiotensin II receptor that has been widely used in the treatment of hypertension. Active pharmaceutical ingredient compatibility with excipients (crospovidone, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose and titanium dioxide is usually evaluated in solid pharmaceutical development. Compatibility and stability can be evaluated by liquid chromatography. Studies were performed using binary mixtures of 1:1 (w/w VAL/excipient; samples were stored under accelerated stability test conditions (40 ºC at 75% relative humidity. The results indicate that VAL is incompatible with crospovidone and hypromellose, which reduced the VAL content and gave rise to new peaks in the chromatogram due to degradation products.

  5. Study of IC Compatible On-Chip Thermoelectric Coolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong-Ho; Wijngaards, Davey D. L.; Wolffenbuttel, Reinoud F.

    2005-07-01

    A thin-film-based thermoelectric micro-cooler has been studied and realized using the standard integrated circuit (IC) fabrication technology and bulk micromachining technology in sequence. The whole fabrication process is kept IC compatible by postponing potassium hydroxide (KOH) etching step to the last part of the fabrication sequence. Considering the fabrication compatibility, polycrystalline silicon germanium (polySiGe) is chosen as thermoelectric material even though bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) is one of the most effective thermoelectric materials. The influence of non-idealities on device performance, such as Joule heating due to contact resistance and parasitic heat loss through supporting membrane, is analyzed. The characterized thermoelectric, thermal and electric properties of the fabricated polySiGe thermoelectric material correspond well to those from literatures. Measured cooling performance demonstrates that an on-chip micro-cooler can be applied for thermal stabilization near ambient temperature.

  6. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  7. COSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE COMPATIBILITY BETWEEN LEADERSHIP AND TEAMWORK SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codruta Dana Duda Daianu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The team leader is the author of vision, mentor, guide, motivator, source of encouragement and supportive team. The leader helps team members to focus on the big picture of the project, to give the best of them, to follow the right path and stay united. Leader qualities must necessarily include its ability to work together, to be folded on the processes that describe functional and structural developments in embedded team. The issue of the leader development includes the necessity to concurrently form the skills of tem working. The working paper underlines that these two formative desiderate are compatible, correlative and complementary. So, in the study that we undertake we proposed to determine the degree of compatibility between the two demands of education, as follows: the training of leader capable to exercise also the specific activities of teamwork

  8. Blood compatibility of the jellyfish valve without anticoagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imachi, K; Mabuchi, K; Chinzei, T; Abe, Y; Imanishi, K; Suzukawa, M; Yonezawa, T; Kouno, A; Ono, T; Nozawa, H

    1991-01-01

    The blood compatibility of the jellyfish valve was studied. Artificial heart (AH) blood pumps incorporating jellyfish valves were connected to 18 goats as total artificial hearts (TAHs) and pumped for 1 to 125 days without anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. No thrombus was formed on the valve membrane or around the valve seat. Scanning electron microscopy showed almost no platelet deposition or microfibrin clot formation on the valve membrane, including its central region; the spokes of the valve seat were also free from platelet and microfibrin clots. No calcification was observed during these tests, and plasma free hemoglobin was between 2 and 7 mg/dl. The jellyfish valve revealed good blood compatibility, even without anticoagulant use.

  9. On Rate-Compatible Punctured Turbo Codes Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montorsi Guido

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose and compare some design criteria for the search of good systematic rate-compatible punctured turbo code (RCPTC families. The considerations presented by S. Benedetto et al. (1998 to find the "best" component encoders for turbo code construction are extended to find good rate-compatible puncturing patterns for a given interleaver length . This approach is shown to lead to codes that improve over previous ones, both in the maximum-likelihood sense (using transfer function bounds and in the iterative decoding sense (through simulation results. To find simulation and analytical results, the coded bits are transmitted over an additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN channel using an antipodal binary modulation. The two main applications of this technique are its use in hybrid incremental ARQ/FEC schemes and its use to achieve unequal error protection of an information sequence.

  10. On Compatible Normal Odd Partitions in Cubic Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Fouquet, Jean-Luc

    2012-01-01

    A normal odd partition T of the edges of a cubic graph is a partition into trails of odd length (no repeated edge) such that each vertex is the end vertex of exactly one trail of the partition and internal in some trail. For each vertex v, we can distinguish the edge for which this vertex is pending. Three normal odd partitions are compatible whenever these distinguished edges are distinct for each vertex. We examine this notion and show that a cubic 3 edge-colorable graph can always be provided with three compatible normal odd partitions. The Petersen graph has this property and we can construct other cubic graphs with chromatic index four with the same property. Finally, we propose a new conjecture which, if true, would imply the well known Fan and Raspaud Conjecture

  11. Compatibility of refractory materials for nuclear reactor poison control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Metal-clad poison rods have been considered for the control system of an advanced space power reactor concept studied at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such control rods may be required to operate at temperatures of about 140O C. Selected poison materials (including boron carbide and the diborides of zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum) were subjected to 1000-hour screening tests in contact with candidate refractory metal cladding materials (including tungsten and alloys of tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum) to assess the compatibility of these materials combinations at the temperatures of interest. Zirconium and hafnium diborides were compatible with refractory metals at 1400 C, but boron carbide and tantalum diboride reacted with the refractory metals at this temperature. Zirconium diboride also showed promise as a reaction barrier between boron carbide and tungsten.

  12. On the use of compatible discretizations with the multi-fluid plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sean; Cyr, Eric; Shadid, John; Phillips, Edward

    2017-10-01

    In this presentation, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using compatible discretizations in continuous and discontinuous finite element methods for solving the multi-fluid plasma model. Maxwell's equations, core components to the multi-fluid plasma model, are difficult to accurately represent due to the divergence involutions governed by Gauss' laws. Many methods have been developed to deal with these `divergence errors', notably the generalized Lagrange multiplier methods discussed in Munz et al., 2000 and the vector basis discretization approach in Nedelec 1980. While the Lagrange multiplier cleaning schemes are effective and simple to implement, over long time scales the residual errors can have a large influence on the plasma. Compatible discretizations, such as those that represent the electric and magnetic fields on mixed HCurl `edge' elements and HDiv `face' elements, have been shown to be especially useful in the PIC community, however, their implementation can be complex. The goal of this research is to understand the benefits of using some of these divergence handling schemes and compare them in application to finite element methods with both implicit and explicit time integration.

  13. Performance Assessment of Internal Quality Control (IQC) Products in Blood Transfusion Compatibility Testing in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gui-Ping; Wu, Li-Fang; Li, Jing-Jing; Gao, Qi; Liu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Luo-Chuan; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Li, Jie; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) is a critical component of laboratory quality management, and IQC products can determine the reliability of testing results. In China, given the fact that most blood transfusion compatibility laboratories do not employ IQC products or do so minimally, there is a lack of uniform and standardized IQC methods. To explore the reliability of IQC products and methods, we studied 697 results from IQC samples in our laboratory from 2012 to 2014. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the IQCs in anti-B testing were 100% and 99.7%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the IQCs in forward blood typing, anti-A testing, irregular antibody screening, and cross-matching were all 100%. The reliability analysis indicated that 97% of anti-B testing results were at a 99% confidence level, and 99.9% of forward blood typing, anti-A testing, irregular antibody screening, and cross-matching results were at a 99% confidence level. Therefore, our IQC products and methods are highly sensitive, specific, and reliable. Our study paves the way for the establishment of a uniform and standardized IQC method for pre-transfusion compatibility testing in China and other parts of the world.

  14. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life of Employees in the Healthcare Sector: An Issue in Health Services Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasczik, Matthias; Ahnert, Jutta; Ströbl, Veronika; Vogel, Heiner; Donath, Carolin; Enger, Ilka; Gräßel, Elmar; Heyelmann, Lena; Lux, Heidemarie; Maurer, Jochen; Özbe, Dominik; Spieckenbaum, Stefanie; Voigtländer, Elzbieta; Wildner, Manfred; Zapf, Andreas; Zellner, Angela; Hollederer, Alfons

    2017-05-18

    Background Healthcare professionals are confronted with specific work-related demands that influence work-family relations and might indirectly affect the quality of healthcare. This paper seeks to provide an overview of the current state of research on this topic of relevance to health services research. The overview may serve as a starting point for modifying structures in the healthcare system (especially in rural regions) with the aim of improving work-family compatibility. Methods A systematic national and international literature search was conducted in terms of a scoping review. The following criteria/contents to be covered in publications were defined: work-family compatibility; work-family interface and work-family conflict in employees working in healthcare; healthcare professions in rural areas and links with work-family issues; interventions to improve work-family compatibility. 145 publications were included in the overview. Results The available literature focuses on physicians and nursing staff while publications on other professions are largely lacking. The methodological quality of existing studies is mostly low, including a lack of meta-analyses. Several studies document dissatisfaction in physicians and nursing staff regarding reconciliation of work and family life. Only few intervention studies were found that seek to improve work-life compatibility; few of them focus on employees in healthcare. There are also deficits with respect to linking work-family issues with aspects of healthcare in rural areas. Conclusions There is a shortage of systematic national and international research regarding work-family compatibility, especially when it comes to the evaluation of interventions. The overview provides starting points for improving work-family compatibility in healthcare. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Single-layer HDR video coding with SDR backward compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasserre, S.; François, E.; Le Léannec, F.; Touzé, D.

    2016-09-01

    The migration from High Definition (HD) TV to Ultra High Definition (UHD) is already underway. In addition to an increase of picture spatial resolution, UHD will bring more color and higher contrast by introducing Wide Color Gamut (WCG) and High Dynamic Range (HDR) video. As both Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) and HDR devices will coexist in the ecosystem, the transition from Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) to HDR will require distribution solutions supporting some level of backward compatibility. This paper presents a new HDR content distribution scheme, named SL-HDR1, using a single layer codec design and providing SDR compatibility. The solution is based on a pre-encoding HDR-to-SDR conversion, generating a backward compatible SDR video, with side dynamic metadata. The resulting SDR video is then compressed, distributed and decoded using standard-compliant decoders (e.g. HEVC Main 10 compliant). The decoded SDR video can be directly rendered on SDR displays without adaptation. Dynamic metadata of limited size are generated by the pre-processing and used to reconstruct the HDR signal from the decoded SDR video, using a post-processing that is the functional inverse of the pre-processing. Both HDR quality and artistic intent are preserved. Pre- and post-processing are applied independently per picture, do not involve any inter-pixel dependency, and are codec agnostic. Compression performance, and SDR quality are shown to be solidly improved compared to the non-backward and backward-compatible approaches, respectively using the Perceptual Quantization (PQ) and Hybrid Log Gamma (HLG) Opto-Electronic Transfer Functions (OETF).

  16. Compatibility of RuO2 electrodes with PZT ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ween RuO2 and lead zirconate–titanate (PZT) solid solu- tions. Phase diagrams of the component ternary systems provide a visual summary of compatibility relations. Ther- modynamic data provide the input for the calculations. 2.1 Phase relations. The subsolidus phase diagrams for the system PbO–. RuO2–TiO2 given by ...

  17. An accurate SPICE-compatible circuit model for power FLYMOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galadi, A.; Morancho, F.; Benhida, K.; Hassani, M. M.

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, a new SPICE-compatible circuit model for low voltage, low on-resistance power FLYMOSFETs is presented for the first time. In this new structure, the improvement of the on-resistance has been obtained by inserting floating islands in the lowly doped layer. Our modelling is based on device physics, analytical study and on experimental characterization. The inter-electrode capacitances are modelled accurately as nonlinear functions, and good agreement between simulation and measurements is found.

  18. Improved in Vitro Blood Compatibility of Polycaprolactone Nanowire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are a multitude of polymeric materials currently utilized to prepare a variety of blood-contacting implantable medical devices. These devices include tissue grafts, coronary artery and vascular stents, and orthopedic implants. The thrombogenic nature of such materials can cause serious complications in patients, and ultimately lead to functional failure. To date, there is no truly hemocompatible biomaterial surface. Nanostructured surfaces improve cellular interactions but there is a limited amount of information regarding their blood compatibility. In this study, the in vitro blood compatibility of four different surfaces (control, PCL; nanowire, NW; collagen immobilized control, cPCL; collagen immobilized nanowire, cNW) were investigated for their use as interfaces for blood-contacting implants. The results presented here indicate enhanced in vitro blood compatibility of nanowire surfaces compared control surfaces. Although there were no significant differences in leukocyte adhesion, there was a decrease in platelet adhesion on NW surfaces. Scanning electron microscopy images showed a decrease in platelet/leukocyte complexes on cNW surfaces and no apparent complexes were formed on NW surfaces compared to PCL and cPCL surfaces. The increase in these complexes likely contributed to a higher expression of specific markers for platelet and leukocyte activation on PCL and cPCL surfaces. No significant differences were found in contact and complement activation on any surface. Further, thrombin antithrombin complexes were significantly reduced on NW surfaces. A significant increase in hemolysis and fibrinogen adsorption was identified on PCL surfaces likely caused by its hydrophobic surface. This work shows the improved blood-compatibility of nanostructured surfaces, identifying this specific nanoarchitecture as a potential interface for promoting the long-term success of blood-contacting biomaterials. PMID:25184556

  19. S3c, prototipos de vivienda construidos por componentes compatibles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes González, J. Miguel

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available What is the construction by compatible components about? Which are its plants? Which results and answers does it add? Which consequences and implications does it lead to? To these other questions related with the subject, this work tries to give answer, not by definitions and generalities which would fail in the field of a theoretical disquisition but by a review of determined prototypes and projects of dwellings built during the last ten years, which will lead us, on base of its descriptions, to expose out in particular: — Methodological conditions: "open orders". — Technological conditions: "compatible compounds". — Trade conditions: "open prefabrication". — Transformation conditions: actualization?¿Qué es la construcción por componentes compatibles? ¿En qué consiste? ¿Cuáles son sus planteamientos? ¿Qué resultados y respuestas aporta? ¿Qué consecuencias e implicaciones conlleva? A estas y otras cuestiones relacionadas con el tema tratan de dar respuesta estas páginas, pero recurriendo para ello no a definiciones y generalidades que podrían sucumbir en el mundo de las disquisiciones teóricas, sino haciendo referencia a prototipos y proyectos concretos de vivienda realizados en la última década que servirán para, a partir de su descripción, exponer las particulares condiciones que de los mismos se desprenden: — Metodológicas: ''órdenes abiertos". — Tecnológicas: ''componentes compatibles". — De mercado: "prefabricación abierta". — Transformación: ¿actualización?

  20. Development of Improved LOX-Compatible Laminated Gasket Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-08-01

    Fixture with Liquid Nitrogen Cryostat ........ .. ..................... . 107 71 Quartz Tube Dilatometer ..... .................... 109 72 Total Linear...properties had to be adequate for this application. 3. The materials had to be compatible with LOX, such that there would be no ignition, explosion ...five composite laminate specimens from room temperature to approximately 100°F, -320’F, and -423°F were measured using the vertical tube dilatometer

  1. Compatibility Studies on Elastomers and Polymers with Ethanol Blended Gasoline

    OpenAIRE

    Dhaliwal, J S; M. S. Negi; G. S. Kapur; Shashi Kant

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the compatibility studies of 10% ethanol blended gasoline (E10) with four types of elastomer materials, namely, Neoprene rubber, Nitrile rubber, hydrogenated Nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR), and Polyvinyl chloride/Nitrile butadiene rubber blend (PVC/NBR), and two types of plastic materials, namely, Nylon-66 and Polyoxymethylene (Delrin). These materials have applications in automotives as engine seals, gaskets, fuel system seals and hoses, and so forth. Two types of the eth...

  2. [Compatibility of Work and Family Life: Survey of Physicians in the Munich Metropolitan Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauchart, Meike; Ascher, Philipp; Kesel, Karin; Weber, Sabine; Grabein, Beatrice; Schneeweiss, Bertram; Fischer-Truestedt, Cordula; Schoenberg, Michael; Rogler, Gudrun; Borelli, Claudia

    2017-05-15

    Aim Investigation of the compatibility of work and family life for physicians in the Munich metropolitan area. Methods Survey of a representative sample of 1,800 physicians using a questionnaire. Results Men were less satisfied (7% very satisfied vs. 21%) with compatibility between work and family life than women. The group least satisfied overall was hospital-based physicians (p=0.000, chi-square=122.75). Women rather than men cut back their career due to children, perceived their professional advancement as impaired, desisted from establishing private practice or quit hospital employment altogether. Respondents strove for flexible childcare and makeshift solution if the established service failed. Most did not have that at their disposal. Hospital-based physicians wished for predictable working hours, and would like to have a say in the structure of their schedule. For the majority this was not the case. While for 80% it would be important to participate in the definition of their working hours, this was only possible in 17%. 86% found the opportunity to work part-time important, but many doctors (more than 30%) did not have that option. The biggest help for office-based physicians would be an expedited procedure by the Bavarian Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians (KVB) when applying for a proxy. The second most important would be the ability to hand over on-call duties. 36% of respondents felt that compatibility of work and family life was best achieved outside of patient care, during residency 42% believed this to be the case. Only 6% of physicians felt the best compatibility to be achieved in a hospital. Among the physician owners of practices, 34% considered their model to be the best way to reconcile both aspects of life. Conclusion More flexible options for childcare and more influence on the definition of working hours are necessary in order to better reconcile work and family life. For office-based physicians it must be made easier to

  3. Assessment of DUPIC fuel compatibility with CANDU-6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, H. B.; Roh, G. H.; Jeong, C. J.; Rhee, B. W.; Choi, J. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The compatibility of DUPIC fuel with the existing CANDU reactor was assessed. The technical issues of DUPIC fuel compatibility were chosen based on the CANDU physics design requirements and inherent characteristics of DUPIC fuel. The compatibility was assessed for the reference DUPIC fuel composition which was determined to reduce the composition heterogeneity and improve the spent PWR fuel utilization. Preliminary studies on a CANDU core loaded with DUPIC fuel have shown that the nominal power distribution is flatter than that of a natural uranium core when a 2-bundle shift refueling scheme is used, which reduces the reactivity worths of devices in the core and, therefore, the performance of reactivity devices was assessed. The safety of the core was assessed by a LOCA simulation and it was found that the power pulse upon LOCA can be maintained below that in the natural uranium core when a poison material is used in the DUPIC fuel. For the feasibility of handling DUPIC fuel in the plant, it will be necessary to introduce new equipment to load the DUPIC fuel in the refueling magazine. The radiation effect of DUPIC fuel on both the reactor hardware and the environment will require a quantitative analysis later. (author).

  4. A JPEG backward-compatible HDR image compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, Pavel; Ebrahimi, Touradj

    2012-10-01

    High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging is expected to become one of the technologies that could shape next generation of consumer digital photography. Manufacturers are rolling out cameras and displays capable of capturing and rendering HDR images. The popularity and full public adoption of HDR content is however hindered by the lack of standards in evaluation of quality, file formats, and compression, as well as large legacy base of Low Dynamic Range (LDR) displays that are unable to render HDR. To facilitate wide spread of HDR usage, the backward compatibility of HDR technology with commonly used legacy image storage, rendering, and compression is necessary. Although many tone-mapping algorithms were developed for generating viewable LDR images from HDR content, there is no consensus on which algorithm to use and under which conditions. This paper, via a series of subjective evaluations, demonstrates the dependency of perceived quality of the tone-mapped LDR images on environmental parameters and image content. Based on the results of subjective tests, it proposes to extend JPEG file format, as the most popular image format, in a backward compatible manner to also deal with HDR pictures. To this end, the paper provides an architecture to achieve such backward compatibility with JPEG and demonstrates efficiency of a simple implementation of this framework when compared to the state of the art HDR image compression.

  5. Still seeking for an explanation of the Sequential Compatibility Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Privado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of the Compatibility Effect (CE according to the compatibility of the previous trial (Sequential Compatibility Effect, SCE in three types of attentional tasks is explored. The flankers and spatial Stroop tasks have different degrees of cognitive complexity. In all three tasks it is analyzed whether the SCE varies when the stimuli in consecutive trials are exactly the same (pure replicas or not. The data, collected from three independent samples (total N = 1.159, show the CE in the three tasks. However, SCE only shows up in the spatial Stroop task. The effect is smaller albeit still significant when the pure replica trials are removed, a result inconsistent with those of Mayr et al. (2003 and Hommel (1998 but consistent with the Conflict Theory (Botvinick et al., 2001. Furthermore, we also discuss the importance of cognitive complexity in relation to the perspective of Botvinick et al. (2004. From this point of view more complexity should be reflected in a greater presence of cognitive conflict, and therefore a higher SCE.

  6. Eco-Anthropic Compatibility - a Multidisciplinary Model in Urban Ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANO L. BIANCA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I propose a multidisciplinary model of urban development which goes beyond the notion of ecological sustainability, by building on the concept of eco-anthropic compatibility. First of all I will sketch the historical development of human aggregations and I will underline the difference between ancient and modern aggregations. On the basis of this analysis, I will take into consideration the notion of sustainability and its possible application to present conurbations. I will underline several limits of the notion of sustainable development and I will propose a multidisciplinary model grounded on a broader and new notion: the eco-anthropic compatibility. Using this notion, which includes the idea of sustainability, it is possible to handle, within the model, the human factors and human living conditions inside an urban aggregation. Finally, I will state that the actual urban model is decaying and therefore, sooner or later, we will have to face the end of urban civilization; for this reason we can start imagining new future ways for human aggregations on the planet based on the notion of eco-anthropic compatibility.

  7. Microgrippers: A case study for batch-compatible integration of MEMS with nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardan, Özlem; Alaca, B. Erdem; Yalcinkaya, Arda Deniz

    2007-01-01

    A batch- compatible integration of micro- electro- mechanical systems ( MEMS) with nanoscale objects is demonstrated using the example of a gripping device with nanoscale end- effectors. The proposed nanofabrication technique is based on creating a certain number of nanowires/ ribbons on a planar...... of the simple electrode - nanowire integration. With issues related to yield and end- effector geometry remaining to be studied further, the method proposes a true batch fabrication for nanoscale objects and their integration with MEMS, which does not require the use of nano- lithographic techniques....

  8. Feasibility results of an electromagnetic compatibility test protocol to evaluate medical devices to radio frequency identification exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Seidman, Seth J; Bekdash, Omar; Guag, Joshua; Mehryar, Maryam; Booth, Paul; Frisch, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of radio frequency identification (RFID) systems in healthcare is increasing, and concerns for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) pose one of the biggest obstacles for widespread adoption. Numerous studies have demonstrated that RFID systems can interfere with medical devices; however, the majority of past studies relied on time-consuming and burdensome test schemes based on ad hoc test methods applied to individual RFID systems. Methods This paper presents the results of ...

  9. Thermal behavior and compatibility analysis of the new chemical entity LPSF/FZ4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Salvana Priscylla Manso [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Ramos da Silva, Keyla Emanuelle, E-mail: ramos.keyla@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Instituto de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Amazonas (Brazil); Rocha de Medeiros, Giovanna Christinne; Rolim, Larissa Araujo; Ferreira de Oliveira, Jamerson [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Carmo Alves de Lima, Maria do; Galdino, Suely Lins; Pitta, Ivan da Rocha [Departamento de Antibióticos, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Neto, Pedro Jose Rolim [Departamento de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • We determined the thermal behavior of isolated LPSF/FZ4. • We used the isothermal and non-isothermal methods. • We reported the time of the stability of LPSF/FZ4 was measured in 4 months. • We also performed a compatibility study associated with excipients. • We reported the possible interactions of the prototype with lactose. - Abstract: In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry were employed to determine the thermal behavior of LPSF/FZ4 isolated and associated with excipients (amide, β-cyclodextrin, cellulose, lactose, stearate of magnesium, aerosil, sodium lauryl sulfate, polysorbate and polyvinylpyrrolidone). Thus, the purity of the prototype calculated was 98%. Isothermal and non-isothermal methods were used to determine the kinetic parameters of decomposition, finding a first-reaction order and activation energy (A{sub e}) of 98.22 kJ mol{sup −1}. Also, the time of the stability of LPSF/FZ4 was measured in 4 months. The compatibility study showed possible interactions of the prototype with lactose due to a change in its heat of fusion, a reduction of more than 40 °C in its stability and a reduction of approximately 30% in A{sub e} of its decomposition reaction. The study demonstrated the importance of using thermal analytical methods to characterize new drugs to enable the development and quality control of pharmaceutical products.

  10. Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Fiona W.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid prototyping of microchannel gain lots of attention from researchers along with the rapid development of microfluidic technology. The conventional methods carried few disadvantages such as high cost, time consuming, required high operating pressure and temperature and involve expertise in operating the equipment. In this work, new method adapting xurography method is introduced to replace the conventional method of fabrication of microchannels. The novelty in this study is replacing the adhesion film with clear plastic film which was used to cut the design of the microchannel as the material is more suitable for fabricating more complex microchannel design. The microchannel was then mold using polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS and bonded with a clean glass to produce a close microchannel. The microchannel produced had a clean edge indicating good master mold was produced using the cutting plotter and the bonding between the PDMS and glass was good where no leakage was observed. The materials used in this method is cheap and the total time consumed is less than 5 hours where this method is suitable for rapid prototyping of microchannel.

  11. Design and development of a stable polyherbal formulation based on the results of compatibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhope, Shrinivas G.; Nagore, Dheeraj H.; Kuber, Vinod V.; Gupta, Pankaj K.; Patil, Manohar J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Ayurvedic and herbal medicinal products contain a combination of botanicals; each of these contains a number of chemical compounds that may give the anticipated activity in combination. Therefore, it is very important to analyze and evaluate the compatibility of various active constituents and markers from different medicinal plants for their possible chemical interactions with various excipients at different storage conditions during the development of a stable polyherbal formulation. Objective: To study chemical stability of kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata) and kutki (Picrorhiza kurroa) extract for their active markers andrographolide, kutkoside and picroside-I and to develop stable polyherbal formulation based on the incompatibility studies. Materials and Methods: The compatibility study was carried out on individual ethanolic extracts of these two plants along with the commonly used excipients in the ratio of 1:1 at 40 ± 2°C and 75 ± 5% relative humidity and at a refrigeration temperature of 5 ± 1°C for initial, 7-, 15- and 30-day intervals. The analysis was carried out using the validated reverse phase–high-performance liquid chromatography methods. A stable tablet dosage form was developed based on the results of these studies. Result: The study suggested that the active markers of kutki (kutkoside and picroside-I) were found to be degraded in the presence of the kalmegh extract. However, the active marker of the kalmegh extract (andrographolide) was found to be stable. Both the extracts showed excellent compatibility with all the excipients used in making this formulation. No significant decrease in the kutkoside and picroside-I content from the formulation was observed. Conclusion: By separate granulation process the exposure of both the extracts can be minimized thus avoiding the degradation of active markers. PMID:21772756

  12. Microstructural characterization and chemical compatibility of pulsed laser deposited yttria coatings on high density graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sure, Jagadeesh [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mishra, Maneesha [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Tarini, M. [SRM University, Kattankulathur-603 203 (India); Shankar, A. Ravi; Krishna, Nanda Gopala [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Kuppusami, P. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam-603 102 (India); Mallika, C. [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India); Mudali, U. Kamachi, E-mail: kamachi@igcar.gov.in [Corrosion Science and Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam — 603 102 (India)

    2013-10-01

    Yttria coatings were deposited on high density (HD) graphite substrate by pulsed laser deposition method and subsequently annealing in vacuum at 1373 K was carried out to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. Yttria deposited on HD graphite samples were exposed to molten LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K for 3 h to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the coating for the purpose of pyrochemical reprocessing applications. The microstructure and the corrosion behavior of the yttria coating deposited on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt were evaluated by several characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction and Laser Raman patterns confirmed the presence of cubic phase of yttria in the coating. The surface morphology of yttria coating on HD graphite examined by scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy revealed the agglomeration of oxide particles and formation of clusters. After annealing at 1373 K, no appreciable grain growth of yttria particles could be observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis was carried out for elemental analysis before and after chemical compatibility test of the coated samples in molten LiCl–KCl salt to identify the corrosive elements present on the yttria coatings. The chemical compatibility and thermal stability of the yttria coating on HD graphite in molten LiCl–KCl salt medium have been established. - Highlights: • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on graphite by pulsed laser deposition method. • Chemical compatibility of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in LiCl–KCl salt at 873 K was studied. • Gibbs free energy change was positive for Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} reaction with Cl{sub 2}, U and UCl{sub 3}. • Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating exhibited better corrosion performance in molten LiCl–KCl salt.

  13. Selawik National Wildlife Refuge Compatibility Determination for Semi-Permanent Bridge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compatibility determination finding that construction of a semi-permanent bridge is compatible with Selawik National Wildlife Refuge purposes.

  14. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge Compatibility Determination for Feasibility Study of Proposed Road Construction

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compatibility determination finding that reconnaissance drilling and sampling for proposed road is compatible with Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge purposes.

  15. Kenai National Wildlife Refuge Compatibility Determination for Commercial Sale of Timber Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This compatibility determination states that the commercial sale of timber products, as a part of the Skilak Wildlife Recreation Area Habitat Project, is compatible...

  16. A CMOS-Compatible Hybrid Plasmonic Slot Waveguide With Enhanced Field Confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, Jing; Wei, Qi-Qin; Yang, Daoguo; Zhang, Ping; He, Ning; Zhang, G.Q.; Ren, Tian-Ling; Chen, XP

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of nanophotonics requires plasmonic devices to be fully compatible with semiconductor fabrication techniques. However, very few feasible practical structures exist at present. Here, we propose a CMOS-compatible hybrid plasmonic slot waveguide (HPSW) with enhanced field

  17. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge Compatibility Determination for Aggregated Uses in the Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Compatibility determination finding that aggregated uses are compatible with Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge purposes. Aggregated uses include: boating...

  18. TESTING NEW TYPES OF ROLLING STOCK FOR ELECTROMAGNETIC COMPATIBILITY WITH SIGNALING AND COMMUNICATION DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Havrilyuk

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In the paper there is the comparative analysis of standards and methods of measurements of electromagnetic interference, those are caused by electrical equipment of new types of rolling stock with AC and DC-current electric traction in accordance with the normative documents are adopted in Ukraine and the EU. The development on this basis the measuring method of current interference in traction network, generated by the electrical equipment of electric rolling stock (ERS applicable to testing the new types of rolling stock for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC with different systems of railway signaling is also needed. Methodology. The testing method has been offered. It includes measurements in power circuits of rolling stock, as well as in track devices of signalization systems. Findings. Norms and methods tests of a rolling stock on electromagnetic compatibility with track circuits (TC were analyzed. It was found that a large variety of electricity supply systems, signalization and link in Europe makes it necessary to test new types of electric rolling stock for electromagnetic compatibility with pick up unit in each country separately, taking into account the features used in its systems. It is greatly increases the cost of introducing new types of rolling stock. The test method of electric rolling stock EMC with track circuits has been developed; it includes measurement in power circuits of rolling stock, as well as in track devices of signalization systems. Measurements in accordance with the proposed methodology for electric rolling stock with asynchronous traction drive when driving on sections electrified at AC and DC have been carried out. The values of the interference current in track circuit to all the frequencies of the signal current have been defined. It is shown that under some modes of the train the interference current exceed the permissible values. Originality. The method for measuring interference current generated

  19. method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kimball

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interior point algorithm to solve the multiperiod hydrothermal economic dispatch (HTED. The multiperiod HTED is a large scale nonlinear programming problem. Various optimization methods have been applied to the multiperiod HTED, but most neglect important network characteristics or require decomposition into thermal and hydro subproblems. The algorithm described here exploits the special bordered block diagonal structure and sparsity of the Newton system for the first order necessary conditions to result in a fast efficient algorithm that can account for all network aspects. Applying this new algorithm challenges a conventional method for the use of available hydro resources known as the peak shaving heuristic.

  20. Compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia extract inhibits myocardial fibrosis and ventricular remodeling by regulation of protein kinase D1 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Bingyu; Nuan, Liu; Yang, Lei; Zeng, Xiaotao

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study is to determine the effect of astragalus and salvia extract on the alteration of myocardium in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Methods: A total of 40 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the sham-operated group, the control group, the Astragalus group, the Salvia group, and the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia and group. The cardiac functions were determined at 8 weeks after treatment. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was performed to observe the morphology and arrangement of cardiomyocytes. Masson’s trichrome staining was performed to investigate the distribution of myocardial interstitial collagen. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to determine the expression ofprotein kinase D1 in myocardial tissues. Results: In the sham-operated group, the Astragalus group, the Salvia group, and the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group, the left ventricular systolic pressure and the maximum rate of left ventricular pressure were significantly increased while the left ventricular end diastolic pressure were significantly decreased when compared with those in the control group (P Salvia group. Contents of collagen fibers in myocardial tissues were decreased in the compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia group (P Salvia group. Conclusions: Compatibility of Astragalus and Salvia extract may inhibit myocardial fibrosis and ventricular remodeling by regulation of protein kinase D1 protein in a rat model of myocardial infarction. PMID:26064267

  1. Highly efficient and compatible shampoo for use after hair transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiger, Dorothea; Schoelermann, Andrea M; Filbry, Alexander; Hamann, Tina; Moser, Claudia; Rippke, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive or hyperreactive skin is a common condition defined by prickling, burning, pain, and pruritus. Although this skin problem was initially described on the face, the scalp is often affected. A sensitive scalp can react with irritation to harsh surfactants or other additives which are often present in shampoos. For this reason, we developed a new rinse-off hypertolerant shampoo specifically designed for the hypersensitive and problematic scalp. The shampoo formulation is based on an extremely mild surfactant system and contains bisabolol, an anti-irritant and anti-inflammatory ingredient of chamomile. The shampoo is free of additives such as perfumes, silicones, colorants, parabens, paraffins, and betaine. Since skin can remain in a hyperreactive state after wounding, the status after hair transplantation was chosen as a model system to test the shampoo. Scalp condition and compatibility of each volunteer were analyzed by a plastic surgeon directly after hair transplant and after stitch removal. The plastic surgeons also rated whether they would recommend the further use of the test shampoo. Additionally, volunteers completed a self-assessment questionnaire. Following hair transplantation, regular use of the shampoo resulted in a significant reduction in the extent of scabbing and erythema. This was confirmed by dermatological scalp examinations performed by the plastic surgeon as well as in volunteers' self-assessments. The plastic surgeon highly recommended the further use of the test shampoo after hair transplant to all study participants. Application of the test shampoo demonstrated excellent skin compatibility and product efficacy after hair transplant. The test shampoo significantly reduced the extent of scabs and erythema. Therefore, the shampoo is ideally suited for use after hair transplantation and for the treatment of sensitive scalp. The excellent skin compatibility is because of the mild surfactant system, the calming ingredient bisabolol, and

  2. IEEE 1989 National Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Denver, CO, May 23-25, 1989, Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference discusses topics in the measurement of EM fields, EMI shielding, EMP and lightning effects, EMI immunity testing methods, the modeling of electrostatic fields, open-area test sites, radiation hazards and immunity therefrom, conducted EMI, spectrum and Walsh functions, automotive EMC, field-to-wire compatibility, EMC management for ac lines, computer-radiated emissions, EMI shielding methods, EMI test facilities, and EMI measurements. Attention is given to a theory for optimization of EMI signals detection and measurement, the characterization of a cable and shelter network's EMP response, an assessment methodology for RF effects, a calculation of the energy in transient overvoltages, an innovative method for the quantification of spectrum use, the graphical attenuation-calculation methodology, antenna beamwidth considerations, and the detuning of free-standing towers.

  3. Risperidone – Solid-state characterization and pharmaceutical compatibility using thermal and non-thermal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Josiane Souza Pereira; Veronez, Isabela Pianna; Rodrigues, Larissa Lopes [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Trevisan, Marcello G. [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); National Institute of Bioanalytics Science and Technology – INCTBio, Institute of Chemistry – UNICAMP, 13084-653, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Garcia, Jerusa Simone, E-mail: jerusa.garcia@unifal-mg.edu.br [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: • DSC was used to characterize Risperidone and study its compatibility with excipients. • FT-IR associated with PCA was used to complement DSC data. • LC analyzes confirmed the DSC and FT-IR/PCA results. • Risperidone was incompatible with three among five excipients evaluated. - Abstract: A full solid-state characterization of risperidone was conducted using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine its physicochemical properties and polymorphism. The primary aim of this work was to study the compatibility of risperidone with pharmaceutical excipients using DSC to obtain and compare the curves of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the excipients with their 1:1 (w/w) binary mixtures. These same binary mixtures were turned to room temperature and analyzed by FT-IR combined with principal component analysis (PCA) to evaluate solid-state incompatibilities. The chemical incompatibilities of these samples were verified using a stability-indicating liquid chromatography (LC) method to assay for the API and evaluate the formation of degradation products. All of these methods showed incompatibilities between risperidone and the excipients magnesium stearate, lactose and cellulose microcrystalline.

  4. Neighboring block based disparity vector derivation for multiview compatible 3D-AVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jewon; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Xin; Karczewicz, Marta

    2013-09-01

    3D-AVC being developed under Joint Collaborative Team on 3D Video Coding (JCT-3V) significantly outperforms the Multiview Video Coding plus Depth (MVC+D) which simultaneously encodes texture views and depth views with the multiview extension of H.264/AVC (MVC). However, when the 3D-AVC is configured to support multiview compatibility in which texture views are decoded without depth information, the coding performance becomes significantly degraded. The reason is that advanced coding tools incorporated into the 3D-AVC do not perform well due to the lack of a disparity vector converted from the depth information. In this paper, we propose a disparity vector derivation method utilizing only the information of texture views. Motion information of neighboring blocks is used to determine a disparity vector for a macroblock, so that the derived disparity vector is efficiently used for the coding tools in 3D-AVC. The proposed method significantly improves a coding gain of the 3D-AVC in the multiview compatible mode about 20% BD-rate saving in the coded views and 26% BD-rate saving in the synthesized views on average.

  5. A COMPATIBLE ESTIMATION MODEL OF STEM VOLUME AND TAPER FOR Acacia mangium Willd. PLANTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruni Krisnawati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the establishment of a compatible volume estimation model for Acacia mangium Willd on the basis of 279 felled sample trees collected from the A. mangium plantation stands in South Sumatra, Indonesia. The model comprises of a total volume model and a stem taper model, which is compatible in the sense of the total volume obtained by integration of the taper model being equal to that computed by the total volume model. Several well-known total volume functions were evaluated including constant form factor, combined variable, generalized combine variable, logarithmic, generalized logarithmic and Honer transformed variables. A logarithmic model was determined to be the best and was then used as the basis for deriving the taper model. Appropriate statistical procedures were used in model fitting to account for the problems of heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation that are associated with the construction of volume and taper functions. The simultaneous fitting method of the Seemingly Unrelated Regression (SUR improved the parameter estimates and goodness-of-fit statistics while ensuring numeric consistency among the component models and reducing the total squared error obtained by an independent fitting method. The developed model can be used to estimate total stem volume, merchantable volume to any merchantability diameter limit at any height, and (possibly height of any diameter based on only easily measurable parameters such as diameter at breast height and total tree height for the species analysed.

  6. Our new tornado-compatible aortic valve prosthesis: notable results of hydrodynamic testing and experimental trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leo A. Bockeria

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Aims A shortcoming common to all existing designs of mechanical cardiac valve prostheses is an increased trombogenicity caused, among other factors, by the lack of hydrodynamic compatibility between the luminal part of the prosthesis and the patterned blood flow. The aim of the study is to design and test our new mechanical aortic valve prosthesis to exclude life-long anticoagulation treatment. Materials and methods Standard hydrodynamic tests of the new prosthetic valve have been carried out for comparing with the other existing valve designs. A new method for the heart valve prosthesis testing in a tornado-like flow has been developed. The valve function has been verified in a swine excluding the anticoagulation treatment during the period of time exceeding six months. Results The significant advantage of the new prosthesis in the standard hydrodynamic tests has been demonstrated. The tests in the tornado-like flow have shown that only this prosthesis allows maintaining the pattern, the head and flow rate characteristics of the tornado-like jet. Upon implanting the new prosthesis in the aortic position in a swine, the good performance of the valve without anticoagulation therapy has been confirmed in the course of more than six months. Conclusion Obtained has been the evidence of the merits of the new mechanical aortic valve owing to the due consideration of the hydrodynamic peculiarities of the aortic blood flow and the creation of the design providing the proper hydrodynamic compatibility.

  7. Cross-platform compatibility of de novo-aligned SNPs in a nonmodel butterfly genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Erin O; Davis, Corey S; Dupuis, Julian R; Muirhead, Kevin; Sperling, Felix A H

    2017-11-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods for genotyping genome-wide markers are being rapidly adopted for phylogenetics of nonmodel organisms in conservation and biodiversity studies. However, the reproducibility of SNP genotyping and degree of marker overlap or compatibility between datasets from different methodologies have not been tested in nonmodel systems. Using double-digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing, we sequenced a common set of 22 specimens from the butterfly genus Speyeria on two different Illumina platforms, using two variations of library preparation. We then used a de novo approach to bioinformatic locus assembly and SNP discovery for subsequent phylogenetic analyses. We found a high rate of locus recovery despite differences in library preparation and sequencing platforms, as well as overall high levels of data compatibility after data processing and filtering. These results provide the first application of NGS methods for phylogenetic reconstruction in Speyeria and support the use and long-term viability of SNP genotyping applications in nonmodel systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Laser welding of polymers, compatibility and mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen Erik; Strange, Marianne; Kristensen, Jens Klæstrup

    2013-01-01

    Laser welding of polymers is today a commonly used industrial technology. It has shown obvious advantages compared to e.g. adhesive bonding in terms of higher productivity, better quality and easiness for automation. The ongoing development of lasers tailored for polymer welding in coordination...... for research and development. This paper presents some research results related to laser welding of various polymer materials, including weld compatibility investigations related to the joining of different polymers. Theory for bonding mechanisms, strength development, mechanical properties testing and other...

  9. Compatibility of interspecific Manihot crosses presaged by protein electrophoresis .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, N M A; Bomfim, N; Chaib, A; Abreu, L F A; Gomes, P T C

    2010-01-01

    Cross incompatibility of wild Manihot species with cassava (M. esculenta) can impede their utilization for improving this cultigen. We tested whether compatibility could be determined based on electrophoresis results. Manihot pilosa, M. glaziovii, M. reptans, and M. cearulescens were tested. These species were allowed to hybridize with cassava to determine whether hybridization coincides with the similarity index based on electrophoresis analysis. Gene markers of leaf shape, stem surface, disk color, and fruit shape were used to confirm hybridization. Manihot pilosa and M. glaziovii successfully hybridized with cassava, while the others failed to do so under natural conditions. This result coincided with the similarity index from electrophoresis.

  10. Electromagnetic Compatibility Analysis Group VA-H3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanda, Carlos A.

    2008-01-01

    During the eight weeks working at NASA, I was fortunate enough to work with the Expendable Launch Vehicle's (ELV) Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) Team, who is responsible for the evaluation and analysis of any EMI risk an ELV mission might face. This group of people concern themselves with practically any form of electromagnetic interference that may risk the safety of a rocket, a mission, or even people. Taking this into consideration, the group investigates natural forms of interference, such as lightning, to manmade interferences, such as antennas.

  11. RFID in healthcare environment: electromagnetic compatibility regulatory issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Censi, Federica; Calcagnini, Giovanni; Mattei, Eugenio; Triventi, Michele; Bartolini, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    Several wireless technology applications (RFID, WiFi, GSM, GPRS) have been developed to improve patient care, reaching a significant success and diffusion in healthcare. Given the potential development of such a technology, care must be paid on the potential risks deriving from the use of wireless device in healthcare, among which one of the most important is the electromagnetic interference with medical devices. The analysis of the regulatory issues concerning the electromagnetic compatibility of medical devices is essential to evaluate if and how the application of the current standards allows an effective control of the possible risks associated to the electromagnetic interference on medical devices.

  12. Some remarks on the compatibility between determinism and unpredictability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschelli, Sara

    2012-09-01

    Determinism and unpredictability are compatible since deterministic flows can produce, if sensitive to initial conditions, unpredictable behaviors. Within this perspective, the notion of scenario to chaos transition offers a new form of predictability for the behavior of sensitive to initial condition systems under the variation of a control parameter. In this paper I first shed light on the genesis of this notion, based on a dynamical systems approach and on considerations of structural stability. I then suggest a link to the figure of epigenetic landscape, partially inspired by a dynamical systems perspective, and offering a theoretical framework to apprehend developmental noise. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Safety-Critical Java Technology Compatibility Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Korsholm, Stephan Erbs; Ravn, Anders P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to claim conformance with a given Java Specification Request (JSR), a Java implementation has to pass all tests in an associated Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK). This paper presents development of test cases and tools for the draft Safety-Critical Java (SCJ) specification. In previous...... work we have shown how the Java Modeling Language (JML) is applied to specify conformance constraints for SCJ, and how JML-related tools may assist in generating and executing tests. Here we extend this work with a layout for concrete test cases including checking of results in a simplified version...

  14. A safety-critical java technology compatibility kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Korsholm, Stephan E.; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2014-01-01

    In order to claim conformance with a given Java Specification Request (JSR), a Java implementation has to pass all tests in an associated Technology Compatibility Kit (TCK). This paper presents development of test cases and tools for the draft Safety-Critical Java (SCJ) specification. In previous...... work we have shown how the Java Modeling Language (JML) is applied to specify conformance constraints for SCJ, and how JML-related tools may assist in generating and executing tests. Here we extend this work with a layout for concrete test cases including checking of results in a simplified version...

  15. Investigation of Drug-Polymer Compatibility Using Chemometric-Assisted UV-Spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amir Ibrahim; Abd-Motagaly, Amr Mohamed Elsayed; Ahmed, Osama A A; Amin, Suzan; Mohamed Ali, Alaa Ibrahim

    2017-01-16

    A simple chemometric-assisted UV-spectrophotometric method was used to study the compatibility of clindamycin hydrochloride (HC1) with two commonly used natural controlled-release polymers, alginate (Ag) and chitosan (Ch). Standard mixtures containing 1:1, 1:2, and 1:0.5 w/w drug-polymer ratios were prepared and UV scanned. A calibration model was developed with partial least square (PLS) regression analysis for each polymer separately. Then, test mixtures containing 1:1 w/w drug-polymer ratios with different sets of drug concentrations were prepared. These were UV scanned initially and after three and seven days of storage at 25 °C. Using the calibration model, the drug recovery percent was estimated and a decrease in concentration of 10% or more from initial concentration was considered to indicate instability. PLS models with PC3 (for Ag) and PC2 (for Ch) showed a good correlation between actual and found values with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.00284 and 0.01228, and calibration coefficient (R²) values of 0.996 and 0.942, respectively. The average drug recovery percent after three and seven days was 98.1 ± 2.9 and 95.4 ± 4.0 (for Ag), and 97.3 ± 2.1 and 91.4 ± 3.8 (for Ch), which suggests more drug compatibility with an Ag than a Ch polymer. Conventional techniques including DSC, XRD, FTIR, and in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for (1:1) drug-polymer mixtures were also performed to confirm clindamycin compatibility with Ag and Ch polymers.

  16. Investigation of Drug–Polymer Compatibility Using Chemometric-Assisted UV-Spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amir Ibrahim; Abd-Motagaly, Amr Mohamed Elsayed; Ahmed, Osama A. A.; Amin, Suzan; Mohamed Ali, Alaa Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    A simple chemometric-assisted UV-spectrophotometric method was used to study the compatibility of clindamycin hydrochloride (HC1) with two commonly used natural controlled-release polymers, alginate (Ag) and chitosan (Ch). Standard mixtures containing 1:1, 1:2, and 1:0.5 w/w drug–polymer ratios were prepared and UV scanned. A calibration model was developed with partial least square (PLS) regression analysis for each polymer separately. Then, test mixtures containing 1:1 w/w drug–polymer ratios with different sets of drug concentrations were prepared. These were UV scanned initially and after three and seven days of storage at 25 °C. Using the calibration model, the drug recovery percent was estimated and a decrease in concentration of 10% or more from initial concentration was considered to indicate instability. PLS models with PC3 (for Ag) and PC2 (for Ch) showed a good correlation between actual and found values with root mean square error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.00284 and 0.01228, and calibration coefficient (R2) values of 0.996 and 0.942, respectively. The average drug recovery percent after three and seven days was 98.1 ± 2.9 and 95.4 ± 4.0 (for Ag), and 97.3 ± 2.1 and 91.4 ± 3.8 (for Ch), which suggests more drug compatibility with an Ag than a Ch polymer. Conventional techniques including DSC, XRD, FTIR, and in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for (1:1) drug–polymer mixtures were also performed to confirm clindamycin compatibility with Ag and Ch polymers. PMID:28275214

  17. Would Confucius benefit from psychotherapy? The compatibility of cognitive behaviour therapy and Chinese values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Julie; Oei, Tian P S

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to explore the conceptual compatibility between cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and the common values of Chinese Culture. In order to address such a question, the distinctive processes attributed to CBT (e.g., teaching of skills, emphasis on homework, cognitive processes, present/future focus), as summarized in the meta-analysis by Blagys and Hilsenroth [(2002). Distinctive activities of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of the comparative psychotherapy process literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 22, 671-706], and the core values of Chinese Culture, determined through an integration of The Hofstede Project, [Hofstede, G.H. (1980). Culture's consequences: International differences in work related values. Beverly Hills: Sage]. The Chinese Value Survey [Chinese Culture Connection (1987). Chinese values and the search for culture-free dimensions of culture. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 18, 143-164]. The Schwartz Value Survey [Schwartz, S.H. (1994). Cultural dimensions of values: Towards an understanding of national differences. In Kim, U., Trandis, H.C., Katiticibasi, C., Choi, S.C., & Yoon, G. (eds.), Individualism and collectivism: Theory, method and application (pp. 85-119). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage] were used. A strong degree of compatibility between the two was found and it is argued that rather than developing new indigenized therapies, with some structural changes to the processes of CBT, this therapy can be effective for Chinese clients. It is further proposed that Chinese clients may benefit from challenging their irrational cognitions that are bound up in their strict adherence to social norms. Future recommendations for increasing the compatibility of CBT to Chinese culture are discussed.

  18. Creatinine and cytokines plasma levels related to HLA compatibility in kidney transplant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine V. Alves

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:The success of kidney transplantation depends on prevention of organ rejection by the recipient’s immune system, which recognizes alloantigens present in transplanted tissue. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA typing is one of the tests used in pre-renal transplantation and represents one of the most important factors for a successful procedure.Objective:The present study evaluated creatinine and cytokines plasma levels in kidney transplant patients according to pre-transplant HLA typing.Methods:We assessed 40 renal transplanted patients selected in two transplant centers in Belo Horizonte (MG.Results:Patients were distributed into three groups according to HLA compatibility and, through statistical analysis, the group with more than three matches (H3 was found to have significantly lower post-transplant creatinine levels, compared to groups with three or fewer matches (H2 and H1, respectively. The median plasma levels of cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, and interleukin 10 (IL-10 were evaluated according to the number of matches. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α were significantly higher in groups with lower HLA compatibility. On the other hand, the regulatory cytokine IL-10 had significantly higher plasma levels in the group with greater compatibility between donor and recipient.Conclusion:These findings allow us to infer that pre-transplant HLA typing of donors and recipients can influence post-transplant renal graft function and may contribute to the development and choice of new treatment strategies.

  19. Aluminum nitride on titanium for CMOS compatible piezoelectric transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Joseph C; Petzold, Bryan C; Ninan, Biju; Mullapudi, Ravi; Pruitt, Beth L

    2010-01-01

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used for microscale sensors and actuators but can pose material compatibility challenges. This paper reports a post-CMOS compatible fabrication process for piezoelectric sensors and actuators on silicon using only standard CMOS metals. The piezoelectric properties of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited on titanium (Ti) by reactive sputtering are characterized and microcantilever actuators are demonstrated. The film texture of the polycrystalline Ti and AlN films is improved by removing the native oxide from the silicon substrate in situ and sequentially depositing the films under vacuum to provide a uniform growth surface. The piezoelectric properties for several AlN film thicknesses are measured using laser doppler vibrometry on unpatterned wafers and released cantilever beams. The film structure and properties are shown to vary with thickness, with values of d(33f), d(31) and d(33) of up to 2.9, -1.9 and 6.5 pm V(-1), respectively. These values are comparable with AlN deposited on a Pt metal electrode, but with the benefit of a fabrication process that uses only standard CMOS metals.

  20. Enabling Generic Distributed Computing Infrastructure Compatibility For Workflow Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Kozlowszky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Solving workflow management system’s Distributed Computing Infrastructure (DCI incompatibility and their workflow interoperability issues are very challenging and complex tasks. Workflow management systems (and therefore their workflows, workflow developers and also their end-users are bounded tightly to some limited number of supported DCIs, and efforts required to allow additional DCI support. In this paper we are specifying a concept how to enable generic DCI compatibility for grid workflow management systems (such as ASKALON, MOTEUR, gUSE/WS-PGRADE, etc. on job and indirectly on workflow level. To enable DCI compatibility among the different workflow management systems we have developed the DCI Bridge software solution. In this paper we will describe its internal architecture, provide usage scenarios to show how the developed service resolve the DCI interoperability issues between various middleware types. The generic DCI Bridge service enables the execution of jobs onto the existing major DCI platforms (such as Service Grids (Globus Toolkit 2 and 4, gLite, ARC, UNICORE, Desktop Grids, Web services, or even cloud based DCIs.

  1. Altruism and reward: motivational compatibility in deceased organ donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voo, Teck Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Acts of helping others are often based on mixed motivations. Based on this claim, it has been argued that the use of a financial reward to incentivize organ donation is compatible with promoting altruism in organ donation. In its report Human Bodies: Donation for Medicine and Research, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics uses this argument to justify its suggestion to pilot a funeral payment scheme to incentivize people to register for deceased organ donation in the UK. In this article, I cast a sceptical eye on the above Nuffield report's argument that its proposed funeral payment scheme would prompt deceased organ donations that remain altruistic (as defined by and valued the report). Specifically, I illustrate how this scheme may prompt various forms of mixed motivations which would not satisfy the report's definition of altruism. Insofar as the scheme produces an expectation of the reward, it stands diametrical to promoting an 'altruistic perspective'. My minimal goal in this article is to argue that altruism is not motivationally compatible with reward as an incentive for donation. My broader goal is to argue that if a financial reward is used to incentivize organ donation, then we should recognize that the donation system is no longer aiming to promote altruism. Rewarded donation would not be altruistic but it may be ethical given a persistent organ shortage situation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Compatibility Studies on Elastomers and Polymers with Ethanol Blended Gasoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Dhaliwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the compatibility studies of 10% ethanol blended gasoline (E10 with four types of elastomer materials, namely, Neoprene rubber, Nitrile rubber, hydrogenated Nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR, and Polyvinyl chloride/Nitrile butadiene rubber blend (PVC/NBR, and two types of plastic materials, namely, Nylon-66 and Polyoxymethylene (Delrin. These materials have applications in automotives as engine seals, gaskets, fuel system seals and hoses, and so forth. Two types of the ethanol blended gasoline mixtures were used: (a gasoline containing 5% ethanol (E5, which is commercial form of gasoline available in India, and (b gasoline containing 10% ethanol (E10. The above materials were immersed in E5 and E10 for 500 hrs at 55°C. A set of eight different properties in E5 and E10 (visual inspection, weight change, volume change, tensile strength, percent elongation, flexural strength, impact strength, and hardness were measured after completion of 500 hrs and compared with reference specimens (specimens at 55°C without fuel and specimens at ambient conditions. Variation observed in different materials with respect to the above eight properties has been used to draw inference about the compatibility of these elastomeric/polymer materials with E10 fuel vis-à-vis E5 fuels. The data presented in this study is comparative in nature between the results of E10 and E5.

  3. FUNGIBLE AND COMPATIBLE BIOFUELS: LITERATURE SEARCH, SUMMARY, AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study described in this report is to summarize the various barriers to more widespread distribution of bio-fuels through our common carrier fuel distribution system, which includes pipelines, barges and rail, fuel tankage, and distribution terminals. Addressing these barriers is necessary to allow the more widespread utilization and distribution of bio-fuels, in support of a renewable fuels standard and possible future low-carbon fuel standards. These barriers can be classified into several categories, including operating practice, regulatory, technical, and acceptability barriers. Possible solutions to these issues are discussed; including compatibility evaluation, changes to bio-fuels, regulatory changes, and changes in the distribution system or distribution practices. No actual experimental research has been conducted in the writing of this report, but results are used to develop recommendations for future research and additional study as appropriate. This project addresses recognized barriers to the wider use of bio-fuels in the areas of development of codes and standards, industrial and consumer awareness, and materials compatibility issues.

  4. IDENTIFICATION OF WIDE COMPATIBILITY VARIETIES IN SOME TROPICAL JAPONICA RICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hairmansis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The F1 hybrid sterility in indica/japonica crosses is the major barrier in developing hybrid rice varieties between these two diverse germplasm. The sterility problem in japonica/indica hybrids can be overcome by using wide compatibility genes. The objective of this study was to identify wide compatibility varieties (WCVs in some tropical japonica rice. Twenty five tropical japonica varieties as male parents were crossed with indica (IR64 and japonica (Akitakomachi testers as female parents. The crosses were planted following a randomized complete block design with three replications. Varieties having average spikelet fertility of more than 70% with both the indica and japonica testers were rated as WCVs. Result from this study showed that six tropical japonica varieties were classified as WCVs, i.e., Cabacu, Grogol, Kencana Bali, Klemas, Lampung Lawer, and Napa. Hybrid sterility is caused by partial sterility of male and female gametes. The WCVs from the present study can be used in hybrid rice breeding program to solve hybrid sterility in indica/japonica hybrids.

  5. Mating compatibility between Bactrocera invadens and Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, W; Ahmad, S; Dammalage, T; Tomas, U Sto; Wornoayporn, V; Ul Haq, I; Cáceres, C; Vreysen, M J B; Schutze, M K

    2014-04-01

    The invasive fruit fly, Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White, is a highly polyphagous fruit pest that occurs predominantly in Africa yet has its origins in the Indian subcontinent. It is extremely morphologically and genetically similar to the Oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel); as such the specific relationship between these two species is unresolved. We assessed prezygotic compatibility between B. dorsalis and B. invadens using standardized field cage mating tests, which have proven effectiveness in tephritid cryptic species studies. These tests were followed by an assessment of postzygotic compatibility by examining egg viability, larval and pupal survival, and sex ratios of offspring produced from parental and subsequent F1 crosses to examine for hybrid breakdown as predicted under a two-species hypothesis. B. dorsalis was sourced from two countries (Pakistan and China), and each population was compared with B. invadens from its type locality of Kenya. B. invadens mated randomly with B. dorsalis from both localities, and there were generally high levels of hybrid viability and survival resulting from parental and F1 crosses. Furthermore, all but one hybrid cross resulted in equal sex ratios, with the single deviation in favor of males and contrary to expectations under Haldane's rule. These data support the hypothesis that B. dorsalis and B. invadens represent the same biological species, an outcome that poses significant implications for pest management and international trade for sub-Saharan Africa.

  6. High power compatible internally sensed optical phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lyle E; Ward, Robert L; Francis, Samuel P; Sibley, Paul G; Fleddermann, Roland; Sutton, Andrew J; Smith, Craig; McClelland, David E; Shaddock, Daniel A

    2016-06-13

    The technical embodiment of the Huygens-Fresnel principle, an optical phased array (OPA) is an arrangement of optical emitters with relative phases controlled to create a desired beam profile after propagation. One important application of an OPA is coherent beam combining (CBC), which can be used to create beams of higher power than is possible with a single laser source, especially for narrow linewidth sources. Here we present an all-fiber architecture that stabilizes the relative output phase by inferring the relative path length differences between lasers using the small fraction of light that is back-reflected into the fiber at the OPA's glass-air interface, without the need for any external sampling optics. This architecture is compatible with high power continuous wave laser sources (e.g., fiber amplifiers) up to 100 W per channel. The high-power compatible internally sensed OPA was implemented experimentally using commercial 15 W fiber amplifiers, demonstrating an output RMS phase stability of λ/194, and the ability to steer the beam at up to 10 kHz.

  7. Different domains are critical for oligomerization compatibility of different connexins

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARTÍNEZ, Agustín D.; MARIPILLÁN, Jaime; ACUÑA, Rodrigo; MINOGUE, Peter J.; BERTHOUD, Viviana M.; BEYER, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Oligomerization of connexins is a critical step in gap junction channel formation. Some members of the connexin family can oligomerize with other members and form functional heteromeric hemichannels [e.g. Cx43 (connexin 43) and Cx45], but others are incompatible (e.g. Cx43 and Cx26). To find connexin domains important for oligomerization, we constructed chimaeras between Cx43 and Cx26 and studied their ability to oligomerize with wild-type Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26. HeLa cells co-expressing Cx43, Cx45 or Cx26 and individual chimaeric constructs were analysed for interactions between the chimaeras and the wild-type connexins using cell biological (subcellular localization by immunofluorescence), functional (intercellular diffusion of microinjected Lucifer yellow) and biochemical (sedimentation velocity through sucrose gradients) assays. All of the chimaeras containing the third transmembrane domain of Cx43 interacted with wild-type Cx43 on the basis of co-localization, dominant-negative inhibition of intercellular communication, and altered sedimentation velocity. The same chimaeras also interacted with co-expressed Cx45. In contrast, immunofluorescence and intracellular diffusion of tracer suggested that other domains influenced oligomerization compatibility when chimaeras were co-expressed with Cx26. Taken together, these results suggest that amino acids in the third transmembrane domain are critical for oligomerization with Cx43 and Cx45. However, motifs in different domains may determine oligomerization compatibility in members of different connexin subfamilies. PMID:21348854

  8. Evaluation of an MR-compatible blood sampler for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, J.; Grazioso, R.; Zhang, N.; Schmand, M.; Wienhard, K.

    2010-10-01

    The integration of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) is an upcoming hybrid imaging technique. Prototype scanners for pre-clinical and clinical research have been built and tested. However, the potential of the PET part can be better exploited if the arterial input function (AIF) of the administered tracer is known. This work presents a dedicated MR-compatible blood sampling system for precise measurement of the AIF in an MR-PET study. The device basically consists of an LSO/APD-detector assembly which performs a coincidence measurement of the annihilation photons resulting from positron decays. During the measurement, arterial blood is drawn continuously from an artery and lead through the detector unit. Besides successful tests of the MR compatibility and the detector performance, measurements of the AIF of rats have been carried out. The results show that the developed blood sampling system is a practical and reliable tool for measuring the AIF in MR-PET studies.

  9. Vehicle compatibility in car-to-car collisions : literature review in the framework of the European research project "Improvement of crash compatibility between cars", Workpackage 1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, J. van der

    2000-01-01

    In this report, a literature review is given on the subject of crash compatibility and incompatibility between cars. The study is based on scientific publications on this subject published over the last 15 years. The compatibility problem is described from three points of view: statistical,

  10. EMC '89 - International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Nagoya, Japan, Sept. 8-10, 1989, Proceedings. Vols. 1 & 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference discusses such fields of EM compatibility as EM wave propagation, EMI, seismoelectromagnetism, EMC testing methods, EM in power lines, EM standards and regulations, EM bioeffects, EMC in amateur radio operations, EM coupling, lightning and EMP, shielding and grounding, EM scattering, and EM filtering. Also discussed are EMC in spead-spectrum systems, EM noise filters, EM absorbers, and EM shielding and grounding.

  11. Compatibility of Clinical Manifestation with Skin Prick Test Result and Food Provocation Test in Food Cross Reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lubis, Azwin; Barlianto, Wisnu; Endaryanto, Anang; Harsono, Ariyanto

    2017-01-01

    Background: Subjective diagnostic test of food allergy is hugely biased, resulting in irrational diet avoidance. Additional objective tools by skin prick test following food provocation test resulting more accurate cause and prevalence on population. Purpose: To evaluate the compatibility of clinical symptoms with skin prick test and provocation test for imunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated food allergy in Dr. Soetomo Hospital Surabaya. Methods: Cross sectional observational analytic study. Patient...

  12. Preparation and characterization of polypropylene-graft-thermally reduced graphite oxide with an improved compatibility with polypropylene-based nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Min-Chien; Liao, Shu-Hang; Lin, Yu-Feng; Wang, Chung-An; Pu, Nen-Wen; Tsai, Han-Min; Ma, Chen-Chi M

    2011-04-01

    Polypropylene was successfully covalently grafted onto the surface of thermally reduced graphite oxide (PP-g-TRGO) by taking advantage of the "residual oxygen-containing functional groups" and the "grafting to" method. The PP-g-TRGO obtained showed an improved compatibility, and interfacial interaction, with an isotactic PP (iPP) matrix. The iPP/PP-g-TRGO nanocomposite exhibited a dramatically improved thermal stability compared to that of neat iPP even at low loadings.

  13. IEEE 1988 International Symposium on Electromagnetic Compatibility, Seattle, WA, Aug. 2-4, 1988, Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Various papers on electromagnetic compatibility are presented. Some of the optics considered include: field-to-wire coupling 1 to 18 GHz, SHF/EHF field-to-wire coupling model, numerical method for the analysis of coupling to thin wire structures, spread-spectrum system with an adaptive array for combating interference, technique to select the optimum modulation indices for suppression of undesired signals for simultaneous range and data operations, development of a MHz RF leak detector technique for aircraft harness surveillance, and performance of standard aperture shielding techniques at microwave frequncies. Also discussed are: spectrum efficiency of spread-spectrum systems, control of power supply ripple produced sidebands in microwave transistor amplifiers, an intership SATCOM versus radar electromagnetic interference prediction model, considerations in the design of a broadband E-field sensing system, unique bonding methods for spacecraft, and review of EMC practice for launch vehicle systems.

  14. Compatibility of accounting information systems (AISs with activities in production cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farnaz Vali Moghaddam Zanjani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The intricacies of economic activities and growing increase in competition have made commercial units with the duty of production and financial data processing, orienting themselves with production cycle. This is considered as the heart of organization such that they could be more effective in decision-making. The method adopted in this research is descriptive – survey and it attempts to attain the objectives the researchers based on four independent variables including Production design, Programming, production operations and cost accounting. To test the hypotheses, the study adopts one sample T test method and to investigate uniformity of effects of each variable, Kruscal-Wallis test is employed. The results obtained from the tests indicate that AISs are not compatible with production cycle, where, in turn, has led to rejection of modern costing systems such as activity based costing (ABC.

  15. Doppler ultrasound compatible plastic material for use in rigid flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Emily Y; Thorne, Meghan L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Poepping, Tamie L; Holdsworth, David W

    2008-11-01

    A technique for the rapid but accurate fabrication of multiple flow phantoms with variations in vascular geometry would be desirable in the investigation of carotid atherosclerosis. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of implementing numerically controlled direct-machining of vascular geometries into Doppler ultrasound (DUS)-compatible plastic for the easy fabrication of DUS flow phantoms. Candidate plastics were tested for longitudinal speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic attenuation at the diagnostic frequency of 5 MHz. Teflon was found to have the most appropriate SoS (1376 +/- 40 m s(-1) compared with 1540 m s(-1) in soft tissue) and thus was selected to construct a carotid bifurcation flow model with moderate eccentric stenosis. The vessel geometry was machined directly into Teflon using a numerically controlled milling technique. Geometric accuracy of the phantom lumen was verified using nondestructive micro-computed tomography. Although Teflon displayed a higher attenuation coefficient than other tested materials, Doppler data acquired in the Teflon flow model indicated that sufficient signal power was delivered throughout the depth of the vessel and provided comparable velocity profiles to that obtained in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Our results indicate that Teflon provides the best combination of machinability and DUS compatibility, making it an appropriate choice for the fabrication of rigid DUS flow models using a direct-machining method.

  16. Electromagnetic Compatibility Studies: LTE BS vs. Aeronautical Radionavigation Services in 694-790 MHz Frequency Band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankevičius Evaldas

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the sharing analysis of the 694–790 MHz frequency band for Mobile services IMT and Aeronautical radio-navigation services (ARNS using SEAMCAT (established by CEPT software based on the statistical simulation (Monte-Carlo method. In 2012 the World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-12 decided to allocate the 694–790 MHz frequency band (the so-called 700 MHz band to mobile services IMT (excluding aeronautical mobile after WRC-15 conference. But this agreement raises electromagnetic compatibility problems, which should be solved until WRC-15 [1]. This study was carried out in two phases: first applying theoretical analysis, then statistical Monte-Carlo simulations with SEAMCAT software tool in order to verify results obtained in theoretical approach. Analytical calculations shows that the required protection distances between ARNS stations and the MS base stations are 132 km. The obtained results from SEAMCAT simulations indicate that separation distance should be above 100 km. These results illustrate that the systems are not electromagnetically compatible. The possible mitigation technic could be antenna pattern correction.

  17. A 31-Channel MR Brain Array Coil Compatible with Positron Emission Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Christin Y.; Keil, Boris; Chonde, Daniel B.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Catana, Ciprian; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Simultaneous acquisition of MR and PET images requires the placement of the MR detection coil inside the PET detector ring where it absorbs and scatters photons. This constraint is the principal barrier to achieving optimum sensitivity on each modality. Here, we present a 31-channel PET-compatible brain array coil with reduced attenuation but improved MR sensitivity. Methods A series of component tests were performed to identify tradeoffs between PET and MR performance. Aspects studied include the remote positioning of preamplifiers, coax size, coil trace size/material, and plastic housing. We then maximized PET performance at minimal cost to MR sensitivity. The coil was evaluated for MR performance (SNR, g-factor) and PET attenuation. Results The coil design showed an improvement in attenuation by 190% (average) compared to conventional 32-channel arrays, and no loss in MR SNR. Moreover, the 31-channel coil displayed an SNR improvement of 230% (cortical ROI) compared to a PET-optimized 8-channel array with similar attenuation properties. Implementing attenuation correction of the 31-channel array successfully removed PET artifacts, which were comparable to those of the 8-channel array. Conclusion The design of the 31-channel PET-compatible coil enables higher sensitivity for PET/MR imaging, paving the way for novel applications in this hybrid-imaging domain. PMID:25046699

  18. Mechanical compliance and immunological compatibility of fixative-free decellularized/cryopreserved human pericardium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Vinci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pericardial tissue is commonly used to produce bio-prosthetic cardiac valves and patches in cardiac surgery. The procedures adopted to prepare this tissue consist in treatment with aldehydes, which do not prevent post-graft tissue calcification due to incomplete xeno-antigens removal. The adoption of fixative-free decellularization protocols has been therefore suggested to overcome this limitation. Although promising, the decellularized pericardium has not yet used in clinics, due to the absence of proofs indicating that the decellularization and cryopreservation procedures can effectively preserve the mechanical properties and the immunologic compatibility of the tissue. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present work was to validate a procedure to prepare decellularized/cryopreserved human pericardium which may be implemented into cardiovascular homograft tissue Banks. The method employed to decellularize the tissue completely removed the cells without affecting ECM structure; furthermore, uniaxial tensile loading tests revealed an equivalent resistance of the decellularized tissue to strain, before and after the cryopreservation, in comparison with the fresh tissue. Finally, immunological compatibility, showed a minimized host immune cells invasion and low levels of systemic inflammation, as assessed by tissue transplantation into immune-competent mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate, for the first time, that fixative-free decellularized pericardium from cadaveric tissue donors can be banked according to Tissue Repository-approved procedures without compromising its mechanical properties and immunological tolerance. This tissue can be therefore treated as a safe homograft for cardiac surgery.

  19. Surface modifying of microporous PTFE capillary for bilirubin removing from human plasma and its blood compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin Gu [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, HeFei, 230026 (China)], E-mail: Gjin@ustc.edu.cn; Yao Qizhi; Zhang Shanzi [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, HeFei, 230026 (China); Zhang Lei [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, HeFei, 230026 (China); AnHui Entry Exit Inspection and Quarantine Bureau, HeFei, 230001 (China)

    2008-12-01

    In this study, human serum albumin (HSA) was covalently immobilized onto the inner surface of microporous poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (MPTFE) capillaries for direct bilirubin removal from human plasma. To obtain active binding sites for HSA, the MPTFE capillaries were chemically functionalized by using a coating of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) copolymers. Characterization of grafted MPTFE capillaries was verified by XPS, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Non-specific adsorption on the PVA-GMA coated capillary remains low (< 0.38 mg bilirubin/g), and higher affinity adsorption capacity, of up to 73.6 mg bilirubin/g polymer was obtained after HSA is immobilized. Blood compatibility of the grafted MPTFE capillary was evaluated by SEM and platelet rich plasma (PRP) contacting experiments. The experimental data on blood compatibility indicated that PVA-coated and PVA-GMA-HSA coated PTFE capillary showed a sharp suppress on platelets adhesion. The proposed method has the potential of serving in bilirubin removal in clinical application.

  20. An approach to compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy measurements using a commercial sum frequency generation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Shuji; Wei, Feng

    2011-06-21

    In this paper, we designed a compatible multiple nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy system that can be used for recording infrared-visible sum frequency generation vibrational spectra (SFG) and infrared-infrared-visible three-pump-field four-wave-mixing (IIV-TPF-FWM) spectra using a commercial EKSPLA SFG system. This is the first time IIV-TPF-FWM signals were obtained using picosecond laser pulses. We have applied this compatible system to study the surface and vibrational structures of riboflavin molecules (also known as vitamin B2). The SFG spectra of eight polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The signals with incoming s-polarized IR are relatively weaker than the signals with incoming p-polarized IR. Under the double resonant conditions, the SFG signals of the conjugated tricyclic ring are greatly enhanced. For the IIV-TPF-FWM spectra with incoming p-polarized IR, only the sspp and pppp polarization combinations have non-vanishing signals. The IIV-TPF-FWM spectra show a very strong peak at 1585 cm(-1) that is mainly dominated by the N(5)-C(4a) stretch. The method developed in this study will be helpful for researchers, either using a home-built or commercial (EKSPLA) SFG system, to obtain independent and complementary measurements for SFG spectroscopy and more detailed structural information of interfacial molecules.

  1. Study on Compatibility of Polymer Hydrodynamic Size and Pore Throat Size for Honggang Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Long core flow experiment was conducted to study problems like excessive injection pressure and effective lag of oil wells during the polymer flooding in Honggang reservoir in Jilin oilfield. According to the changes in viscosity and hydrodynamic dimensions before and after polymer solution was injected into porous media, the compatibility of polymer hydrodynamic dimension and the pore throat size was studied in this experiment. On the basis of the median of radius R of pore throats in rocks with different permeability, dynamic light scattering method (DLS was adopted to measure the hydrodynamic size Rh of polymer solution with different molecular weights. The results state that three kinds of 1500 mg/L concentration polymer solution with 2000 × 104, 1500 × 104, and 1000 × 104 molecular weight matched well with the pore throat in rocks with permeability of 300 mD, 180 mD, and 75 mD in sequence. In this case, the ratios of core pore throat radius median to the size of polymer molecular clew R/Rh are 6.16, 5.74, and 6.04. For Honggang oil reservoir in Jilin, when that ratio ranges from 5.5 to 6.0, the compatibility of polymer and the pore structure will be relatively better.

  2. Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Gnatov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently repair and recovery vehicle body operations become more and more popular. A special place here is taken by equipment that provides performance of given repair operations. The most interesting things are methods for recovery of car body panels that allow the straightening without disassembling of car body panels and damaging of existing protective coating. Now, there are several technologies for repair and recovery of car body panels without their disassembly and dismantling. The most perspective is magnetic-pulse technology of external noncontact straightening. Basics of magnetic-pulse attraction, both ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic thin-walled sheet metal, are explored. Inductor system calculation models of magnetic-pulse straightening tools are presented. Final analytical expressions for excited efforts calculation in the tools under consideration are introduced. According to the obtained analytical expressions, numerical evaluations of excited forces were executed. The volumetric epures of the attractive force radial distributions for different types of inductors were built. The practical testing of magnetic-pulse straightening with research tools is given. Using the results of the calculations we can create effective tools for an external magnetic-pulse straightening of car body panels.

  3. Body and Soul: The Natural Affinity Between the Alexander Technique and the Stanislavsky Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Phyllis

    1996-01-01

    Describes the compatibility between the Alexander Technique and the Stanislavsky Method. Explains the basic concept behind both acting methods. Presents ideas for incorporating both methods in classes. (PA)

  4. Electromagnetic environment and telecommunications: towards a cognitive electromagnetic compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeddam, Ahmed; Avril, Gautier; Tlich, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    This article deals with the electromagnetic environment management problem within the context of high speed digital transmissions deployed in wired telecommunication networks. Traditionally, Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is assured by filtering for better electromagnetic immunity, and by cable shielding for emission limitation. However, like cognitive radio, we can also, for high speed wired transmissions, treat the EMC as an intelligent and autonomous system capable of perceiving its environment, interpreting it, making suited decisions, and reacting according to the constraints related to the electromagnetic environment. In this context, some application examples are here given in order to illustrate this evolution towards a cognitive EMC in wired networks. To cite this article: A. Zeddam et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  5. Environmental compatibility of CRYOPLANE the cryogenic-fuel aircraft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klug, H.G. [Daimler Benz Aerospace Airbus, Hamburg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    `CRYOPLANE` is the project name for an aircraft powered by cryogenic fuel, either liquid natural gas (LNG, mainly consisting of methane) or liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}). Emission of CO{sub 2}, unburnt hydrocarbons, soot and sulfur will be completely avoided by hydrogen combustion: LH{sub 2} is an extremely pure liquid. Emission of water as a primary combustion product is increased by a factor of 2.6. Exhaust gases behind hydrogen engines contain more water than behind kerosene engines, and hence can form contrails under a wider range of atmospheric conditions. Liquid hydrogen fueled aircraft promise big advantages relative to kerosene aircraft in terms of environmental compatibility. (R.P.)

  6. Vegetation Use for Resolving Electromagnetic Compatibility and Ecology Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvezdina, M. Yu; Shokova, Yu A.; Cherckesova, L. V.; Golovko, T. M.; Cherskaya, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The wide spread of Information and Communication Technologies and the development of Internet-enabled mobile applications have aggravated electromagnetic compatibility and ecology problems. Inability to excite electromagnetic field of a desired structure and strength with traditional approaches actualizes additional actions, including providing diffraction on propagation path, to resolve these issues. Diffraction on a stand-alone obstacle along the propagation path and the one on set of obstacles near receive antenna location can be considered as the additional actions in ultrashort band. The accomplished studies have shown that one the most effective means to lower electromagnetic field strength is to shield the receive antenna with vegetation from jamming radio equipment. Moreover, vegetation resolves electromagnetic ecology issues, for the energy flux density can be lowered by about two orders of magnitude.

  7. On the fruitful compatibility of religious education and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolnough, Brian E.

    1996-04-01

    In this response the logical positivist approach of the authors is challenged, as is their propagation of the myth of an historical, endemic ‘conflict’ between science and religion. The authors' one dimensional approach to the world is shown to produce a limited world view, eliminating so much of human experience, of art, beauty, and music as well as religion. In contrast an awareness of different types of knowledge, with different criteria for truth, enables a fuller perspective in which science and religion, and art and music and human values, are all compatible. In conclusion, some ways in which Science Education and Religious Education can be taught to their mutual benefit are indicated.

  8. RHETT2/EPDM Hall Thruster Propulsion System Electromagnetic Compatibility Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Charles J.; Sankovic, John M.; Freitas, Joseph; Lynn, Peter R.

    1997-01-01

    Electromagnetic compatibility measurements were obtained as part of the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module (EPDM) flight qualification program. Tests were conducted on a Hall thruster system operating at a nominal 66O W discharge power. Measurements of conducted and radiated susceptibility and emissions were obtained and referenced to MEL-STD-461 C. The power processor showed some conducted susceptibility below 4 kHz for the magnet current and discharge voltage. Radiated susceptibility testing yielded a null result. Conducted emissions showed slight violations of the specified limit for MIL-461C CE03. Radiated emissions exceeded the RE02 standard at low frequencies, below 300 MHz, by up to 40 dB RV/m/MHz.

  9. Testing for EMC (electromagnetic compatibility) in the clinical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paperman, D; David, Y; Martinez, M

    1996-01-01

    Testing for electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in the clinical environment introduces a host of complex conditions not normally encountered under laboratory conditions. In the clinical environment, various radio-frequency (RF) sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI) may be present throughout the entire spectrum of interest. Isolating and analyzing the impact from the sources of interference to medical devices involves a multidisciplinary approach based on training in, and knowledge of, the following: operation of medical devices and their susceptibility to EMI; RF propagation modalities and interaction theory; spectrum analysis systems and techniques (preferably with signature analysis capabilities) and calibrated antennas; the investigation methodology of suspected EMC problems, and testing protocols and standards. Using combinations of standard test procedures adapted for the clinical environment with personnel that have an understanding of radio-frequency behavior increases the probability of controlling, proactively, EMI in the clinical environment, thus providing for a safe and more effective patient care environment.

  10. Is wave-particle objectivity compatible with determinism and locality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionicioiu, Radu; Jennewein, Thomas; Mann, Robert B; Terno, Daniel R

    2014-09-26

    Wave-particle duality, superposition and entanglement are among the most counterintuitive features of quantum theory. Their clash with our classical expectations motivated hidden-variable (HV) theories. With the emergence of quantum technologies, we can test experimentally the predictions of quantum theory versus HV theories and put strong restrictions on their key assumptions. Here, we study an entanglement-assisted version of the quantum delayed-choice experiment and show that the extension of HV to the controlling devices only exacerbates the contradiction. We compare HV theories that satisfy the conditions of objectivity (a property of photons being either particles or waves, but not both), determinism and local independence of hidden variables with quantum mechanics. Any two of the above conditions are compatible with it. The conflict becomes manifest when all three conditions are imposed and persists for any non-zero value of entanglement. We propose an experiment to test our conclusions.

  11. Performance and Compatibility of Phosphonate-Based Superplasticizers for Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Coppola

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the effectiveness of an innovative phosphonate-based superplasticizer (PNH for ready mixed concrete. Concrete specimens were manufactured by considering a constant initial workability, equal to 220 mm slump at the end of the mixing procedure. Workability was measured at 0, 30, and 60 min to evaluate the workability retention performances of the innovative superplasticizer. Compressive tests at 1, 7, and 28 days were carried out to evaluate the influence of the phosphonate-based superplasticizer on concrete setting and hardening. The concrete mixes were designed by considering 13 different cements to assess the superplasticizer-cement compatibility. The PNH-based admixture showed a better performance in terms of water reduction and workability retention with respect to napthalenesulphonate based admixtures (NSF; however, a higher dosage of PNH with respect to polycarboxylate ethers (PCEs was needed to get the same initial fluidity.

  12. Urine-compatible polymer for long-term ureteral stenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardella, J F; Castaneda-Zuniga, W R; Hunter, D W; Hulbert, J C; Amplatz, K

    1986-11-01

    Internal double-J ureteral stents were designed from a urine-compatible polymer (C-Flex), and 35 stents were placed in patients. The overall patency rate for the stents was 80%, with most stent failures occurring before 2 months; the follow-up period ranged from 2 to 16 months, with a mean follow-up for all stents of 5.0 months. Stents were considered patent at last follow-up only if they had been in place for at least 2 months. No migration or fracture of the stents occurred. Physical properties of urine-exposed stents were compared with those of virgin tubing and tubing exposed for 1 year to shelf conditions. Stent patency was optimized by increasing urine flow by increasing the patient's voluntary oral intake, administering prophylactic oral antibiotics, and avoiding placement of stents into grossly bloody or infected collecting systems.

  13. [Cardiac magnetic resonance with a MRI compatible pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesenti-Rossi, D; Alonso, C; Baron, N; Allouch, P; Convers, R; Belliard, O; Galuscan, G; Gibault-Genty, G; Aubert, S

    2013-11-01

    Patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices are usually excluded from MRI examinations due to contraindication for MRI. The MRI-conditional pacemaker system may allow the benefits of MRI (system 1.5T) to be more accessible to pacemaker patients. A 62-year-old man was admitted with acute coronary syndrome and atrial fibrillation. A conventional angiography showed normal coronaries. A cardiac cardioversion revealed a significant sinus node dysfunction and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible dual chamber system was implanted. At 6-week follow-up, a cardiac MRI revealed a typical anterior myocardial infarction with diagnostic quality images despite pacemaker. This is one of the first reports of cardiovascular MRI in a patient with MRI-conditional pacing system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  15. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  16. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  17. Silicon photomultiplier modules for MRI-compatible PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sul, Woo-Suk; Kim, Hyoungtaek; Cho, Gyuseong

    2015-04-01

    Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) modules were developed for use in positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI), which is a hybrid medical imaging technology. A PET-MRI is very efficient in the early diagnosis of representative senile diseases, including cancer, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. SiPMs comprise the core image sensor for MR-compatible PET applications since they have a low operational voltage, high gain, good timing resolution, ruggedness, insensitivity to magnetic fields, compactness, and low cost. In PET systems, SiPM microcells can be optimized by making a trade-off between photon detection efficiency (PDE) and dynamic range. The SiPM modules used in this study were fabricated at the National NanoFab Center (NNFC) of South Korea by using a customized CMOS processes. The SiPM modules were evaluated by first packaging them with a cost-effective PCB package instead of with a conventional ceramic package. Measurements on 1,400 SiPMs indicated a uniform breakdown voltage of 20.54 V with a standard deviation of 0.07 V. Moreover, the SiPM modules present a high and uniform energy resolution of 13.6% with a standard deviation of 0.5% at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 cerium-doped lutetium-yttrium oxyorthosilicate (Lu2(1-x)Y2xSiO5:Ce, LYSO) crystal coupling. These results indicated that the proposed devices offer adequate performance to form the foundation of an image sensor technology for MRI-compatible PET.

  18. A state-of-the-art report on the evaluation technology of the environmental compatibility of nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Gyu; Oh, Won Zin; Cho, Il Hoon; Ahn, Ki Jung; Kim Young Min

    1997-09-01

    In order to evaluate the environmental compatibility of nuclear fuel cycle, the methodologies for quantifying evaluation factors and the global trend of the back-end nuclear fuel cycle is reviewed. The evaluation methods of monetary values of radiation dose are demonstrate. There are Human Capital, Legal Compensation Principles, Insurance Premium Analogies, and Willingness to Pay. It can be considered that the estimation of public acceptance cost is the estimation problem of economic value of environmental property. In this report, contingent valuation method is discussed, which is one of the estimation methods of economic value. The recent research on residual radiation detection system is analyzed. (author). 7 refs., 10 tabs., 11 figs

  19. Implementation of the Rauch-Tung-Striebel Smoother for Sensor Compatibility Correction of a Fixed-Wing Unmanned Air Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Bin Hsiao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a complete procedure for sensor compatibility correction of a fixed-wing Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV. The sensors consist of a differential air pressure transducer for airspeed measurement, two airdata vanes installed on an airdata probe for angle of attack (AoA and angle of sideslip (AoS measurement, and an Attitude and Heading Reference System (AHRS that provides attitude angles, angular rates, and acceleration. The procedure is mainly based on a two pass algorithm called the Rauch-Tung-Striebel (RTS smoother, which consists of a forward pass Extended Kalman Filter (EKF and a backward recursion smoother. On top of that, this paper proposes the implementation of the Wiener Type Filter prior to the RTS in order to avoid the complicated process noise covariance matrix estimation. Furthermore, an easy to implement airdata measurement noise variance estimation method is introduced. The method estimates the airdata and subsequently the noise variances using the ground speed and ascent rate provided by the Global Positioning System (GPS. It incorporates the idea of data regionality by assuming that some sort of statistical relation exists between nearby data points. Root mean square deviation (RMSD is being employed to justify the sensor compatibility. The result shows that the presented procedure is easy to implement and it improves the UAV sensor data compatibility significantly.

  20. The Effect of Empathy Training Programs on Aggression and Compatibility Students of Elementary Schools in Yazd, Center of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Bi Halimeh Sohravardi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Empathy is believed to play an important role in fostering prosocial behavior and social competence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of empathy teaching on aggression and compatibility in female students of elementary sixth grade in yazd, center of Iran. Materials and Methods The samples were 62 girl students of grade 6 in elementary schools that were selected by available (targeted sampling among girl students of grade 6 on Yazd. They were put in two groups of control group and experiment group randomly and equally. Data were collected by using empathy questions of Isenberg, Febs, Oscolar, Carlo & Miller, Rater questionnaire about children behavioral disorder and Bus & Perry questionnaire and were analyzed with Mankoo & Ankova methods. Results The mean age of students was 13 ± 0.359 year-old. The Results showed that after controlling scores of pretests, there was a meaningful relationship between two groups in their empathy, social compatibility and aggression and its aspects (like physical aggression, verbal aggression, hostility and anger scores (P< 0.05. Conclusion The development of empathy with training programs, can have a positive effect on reduce of aggression and increasing of compatibility in students at elementary schools.

  1. Optimized Protocol for Protein Extraction from the Breast Tissue that is Compatible with Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Zakharchenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteomics is a highly informative approach to analyze cancer-associated transformation in tissues. The main challenge to use a tissue for proteomics studies is the small sample size and difficulties to extract and preserve proteins. The choice of a buffer compatible with proteomics applications is also a challenge. Here we describe a protocol optimized for the most efficient extraction of proteins from the human breast tissue in a buffer compatible with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE. This protocol is based on mechanically assisted disintegration of tissues directly in the 2D-GE buffer. Our method is simple, robust and easy to apply in clinical practice. We demonstrate high quality of separation of proteins prepared according to the reported here protocol.

  2. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusso Silmara

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Resting and sub-maximal exercise images (at 110 beats per minute were successfully obtained in 8 healthy adults. Conclusions The MRI-compatible cycle ergometer constructed by our research group enabled cardiac assessments at fixed heart rates, while continuously recording power output by directly measuring pedal force and crank rotation.

  3. Baja frecuencia de positividad serológica en pacientes con biopsias histológicamente compatibles con enfermedad celiaca en Perú Low serological positivy in patients with histology compatible with celiac disease in Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Arévalo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: estudiar la frecuencia de positividad de las pruebas serológicas en pacientes con biopsias compatible con enfermedad celiaca. Material y métodos: estudio transversal. Se incluyeron pacientes con biopsia duodenal histológicamente compatible con enfermedad celiaca y determinación de anticuerpos antigliadina, antiendomisio y antitransglutaminasa IgA. Definimos como caso de enfermedad celiaca a quienes tuvieran biopsia positiva y anticuerpos antiendomisio y/o antitransglutaminasa positivos. Resultados: 31 pacientes fueron incluidos de los cuales 6 fueron antiendomisio positivo, 5 fueron antitransglutaminasa positivo y antigliadina fue positivo en 14. Por lo tanto de 31 pacientes con cambios histológicos compatibles con enfermedad celiaca sólo 10 tuvieron serología diagnóstica. Sólo uno de los pacientes tuvo positividad tanto para antitransglutaminasa como para antiendomisio. Conclusiones: a encontramos que la mayoría de biopsias de duodeno con un cuadro histológico sugerente de enfermedad celiaca no se corresponden con serología diagnóstica de esta enfermedad; b encontramos baja coincidencia en la positividad serológica entre antiendomisio y antitransglutaminasa.Objective: to study the frequency of positive serology for celiac disease (CD in patients with duodenal biopsies suggestive of this disease. Material and methods: cross sectional study. We included patients with duodenal biopsies histologically compatible with CD and antigliadin, antiendomysial and IgA antitransglutaminase antibodies. We defined a "case" of CD if there was a positive biopsy and either antiendomisial or antitransglutaminase positive antibodies. Results: thirty one patients were included in our study. Six were antiendomysial positive and 5 antitransglutaminase positive while the antigliadin was positive in 14 cases. Therefore, out of 31 patients only 10 had a serology compatible with CD and only one had positive both antibodies, antiendomysial and

  4. Is compatible the idea of incommensurability with that of scientific progress? Some reasons in support of its compatibility [Spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Jaramillo Uribe

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of incommensurability and, particulary, the one of the scientific progress, is associated two names: Kuhn and Feyerabend, whose proposals caused than many put in doubt the apparent evidence of the call scientific progress, relativizing its validity to each school or paradigm. In this writing we will show that this type of epistemic relativism —just as convergentist theory of the truth— they lack of philosophical validity and historical and how the idea of scientific progress is compatible with the thesis of the incommensurability beyond the ontosemantics difficulties that it implies. This suppose to leave the the call statement view of the scientific theories and adopt a non-statement view where the intertheoretical relation of approach allows to subsink different non trivial incommensurability and to validate in them the notion oaf scientific progress.

  5. Compatible, energy conserving, bounds preserving remap of hydrodynamic fields for an extended ALE scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, D. E.; Morgan, N. R.; Charest, M. R. J.; Kenamond, M. A.; Fung, J.

    2018-02-01

    From the very origins of numerical hydrodynamics in the Lagrangian work of von Neumann and Richtmyer [83], the issue of total energy conservation as well as entropy production has been problematic. Because of well known problems with mesh deformation, Lagrangian schemes have evolved into Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methods [39] that combine the best properties of Lagrangian and Eulerian methods. Energy issues have persisted for this class of methods. We believe that fundamental issues of energy conservation and entropy production in ALE require further examination. The context of the paper is an ALE scheme that is extended in the sense that it permits cyclic or periodic remap of data between grids of the same or differing connectivity. The principal design goals for a remap method then consist of total energy conservation, bounded internal energy, and compatibility of kinetic energy and momentum. We also have secondary objectives of limiting velocity and stress in a non-directional manner, keeping primitive variables monotone, and providing a higher than second order reconstruction of remapped variables. In particular, the new contributions fall into three categories associated with: energy conservation and entropy production, reconstruction and bounds preservation of scalar and tensor fields, and conservative remap of nonlinear fields. The paper presents a derivation of the methods, details of implementation, and numerical results for a number of test problems. The methods requires volume integration of polynomial functions in polytopal cells with planar facets, and the requisite expressions are derived for arbitrary order.

  6. Quantitative, Simultaneous PET/MRI for Intratumoral Imaging with an MRI-Compatible PET Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Thomas S.C.; Bading, James R.; Park, Ryan; Sohi, Hargun; Procissi, Daniel; Colcher, David; Conti, Peter S.; Cherry, Simon R.; Raubitschek, Andrew A.; Jacobs, Russell E.

    2012-01-01

    Noninvasive methods are needed to explore the heterogeneous tumor microenvironment and its modulation by therapy. Hybrid PET/MRI systems are being developed for small-animal and clinical use. The advantage of these integrated systems depends on their ability to provide MR images that are spatially coincident with simultaneously acquired PET images, allowing combined functional MRI and PET studies of intratissue heterogeneity. Although much effort has been devoted to developing this new technology, the issue of quantitative and spatial fidelity of PET images from hybrid PET/MRI systems to the tissues imaged has received little attention. Here, we evaluated the ability of a first-generation, small-animal MRI-compatible PET scanner to accurately depict heterogeneous patterns of radiotracer uptake in tumors. Methods Quantitative imaging characteristics of the MRI-compatible PET (PET/MRI) scanner were evaluated with phantoms using calibration coefficients derived from a mouse-sized linearity phantom. PET performance was compared with a commercial small-animal PET system and autoradiography in tumor-bearing mice. Pixel and structure-based similarity metrics were used to evaluate image concordance among modalities. Feasibility of simultaneous PET/MRI functional imaging of tumors was explored by following 64Cu-labeled antibody uptake in relation to diffusion MRI using cooccurrence matrix analysis. Results The PET/MRI scanner showed stable and linear response. Activity concentration recovery values (measured and true activity concentration) calculated for 4-mm-diameter rods within linearity and uniform activity rod phantoms were near unity (0.97 ± 0.06 and 1.03 ± 0.03, respectively). Intratumoral uptake patterns for both 18F-FDG and a 64Cu-antibody acquired using the PET/MRI scanner and small-animal PET were highly correlated with autoradiography (r > 0.99) and with each other (r = 0.97 ± 0.01). On the basis of these data, we performed a preliminary study comparing

  7. Electromagnetic compatibility and safety design of a patient compliance-free, inductive implant charger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridis, Michael P; Mollov, Stefan V

    2014-10-01

    This article presents the design of a domestic, radiofrequency induction charger for implants toward compliance with the Federal Communications Commission safety and electromagnetic compatibility regulations. The suggested arrangement does not impose any patient compliance requirements other than the use of a designated bed for night sleep, and therefore can find a domestic use. The method can be applied to a number of applications; a rechargeable pacemaker is considered as a case study. The presented work has proven that it is possible to realize a fully compliant inductive charging system with minimal patient interaction, and has generated important information for consideration by the designers of inductive charging systems. Experimental results have verified the validity of the theoretical findings.

  8. CMOS-compatible catalytic growth of graphene on a silicon dioxide substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Min-Sung; Lim, Jae-Young; Jung, Su-Ho; Kang, Seog-Gyun; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Choi, Jae-Young; Hwang, Sung-Woo; Whang, Dongmok

    2016-08-01

    We report the direct growth of graphene on a dielectric SiO2 surface by utilizing complementary metal oxide semiconductor compatible germane as a gas-phase catalyst. Results of Raman spectroscopy and XPS confirmed that the synthesized graphene consist of a sp2 hybridized carbon network. We were able to fabricate graphene field effect transistors without the wet etching process, and the calculated mobility was ˜160 cm2/V.s at high carrier concentration (n = 3 × 1012 cm-2). Furthermore, the crystallinity and morphology of graphene is easily controlled from single-layer graphene to graphene nanowall structures by adjusting the reaction conditions. The results of this study verify the promising catalytic graphene growth method on a non-catalytic insulating surface without metal contaminations.

  9. Ge Microdisk with Lithographically-Tunable Strain using CMOS-Compatible Process

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhdeo, David S; Gupta, Shashank; Kim, Daeik; Woo, Sungdae; Kim, Youngmin; Vuckovic, Jelena; Saraswat, Krishna C; Nam, Donguk

    2015-01-01

    We present germanium microdisk optical resonators under a large biaxial tensile strain using a CMOS-compatible fabrication process. Biaxial tensile strain of ~0.7% is achieved by means of a stress concentration technique that allows the strain level to be customized by carefully selecting certain lithographic dimensions. The partial strain relaxation at the edges of a patterned germanium microdisk is compensated by depositing compressively stressed silicon nitride layer. Two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy measurements along with finite-element method simulations confirm a relatively homogeneous strain distribution within the final microdisk structure. Photoluminescence results show clear optical resonances due to whispering gallery modes which are in good agreement with finite-difference time-domain optical simulations. Our bandgap-customizable microdisks present a new route towards an efficient germanium light source for on-chip optical interconnects.

  10. Improved low-cost, MR-compatible olfactometer to deliver tobacco smoke odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowen, Steven B; Farmer, Stacey L; Lukas, Scott E

    2017-02-01

    We describe a low-cost, MRI-compatible olfactometer that delivers fresh cigarette smoke odor, a challenging odorant to present, as well as other odorants. This new olfactometer retains all of the advantages of an earlier design that was capable of only delivering volatile odors (Lowen & Lukas, Behavior Research Methods, 38, 307-313, 2006). The new system incorporates a novel switching mechanism that allows it to deliver fresh smoke generated from a burning cigarette during a stimulus presentation paradigm that might be employed in a cue-reactivity experiment. An evaluation study established that the olfactometer reliably delivered smoke to the participants and that tobacco smoke was discriminated from other odorants; there were no adverse reactions to the device.

  11. Study on the compatibility of unbleached and bleached bamboo-fiber with LLDPE matrix

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumar, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available of employing natural fibers is that these are biodegradable and renewable, and exhibit low cost, low density and high toughness. However, the low compatibility between fibers and polymer matrix generally leads to weak mechanical performances, limiting... of the compatibility of the fibers with the matrix. This study gives us the idea of using the bleached fiber for the preparation of the composites. Keywords LLDPE � Compatibility � Bamboo-fiber � Bleaching � Thermal characterization Introduction Polymer...

  12. Method for inducing hypothermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Lance B [Chicago, IL; Hoek, Terry Vanden [Chicago, IL; Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL

    2008-09-09

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  13. Method for inducing hypothermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Lance B.; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Kasza, Kenneth E.

    2005-11-08

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  14. Method for inducing hypothermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Lance B. (Chicago, IL); Hoek, Terry Vanden (Chicago, IL); Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL)

    2003-04-15

    Systems for phase-change particulate slurry cooling equipment and methods to induce hypothermia in a patient through internal and external cooling are provided. Subcutaneous, intravascular, intraperitoneal, gastrointestinal, and lung methods of cooling are carried out using saline ice slurries or other phase-change slurries compatible with human tissue. Perfluorocarbon slurries or other slurry types compatible with human tissue are used for pulmonary cooling. And traditional external cooling methods are improved by utilizing phase-change slurry materials in cooling caps and torso blankets.

  15. Taguchi approach for anti-heat stress prescription compatibility in mice spleen lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Yu; Cheng, Gui-Lin; Liu, Feng-Hua; Yu, Jin; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yu, Tong-Quan; Xu, Jian-Qin; Wang, Ming

    2011-07-01

    Heat stress (HS) may induce immunosuppression as well as inhibit the proliferation of lymphocytes. This study evaluated the effects on immune function of our prescription on splenic lymphocytes under HS as well as its compatibility. The effects of four herbal extracts from Agastache rugosa, Atractylodes lancea, Cortex Phellodendri, and Gypsum Fibrosum on heat treated splenic lymphocytes were investigated and the compatibility of the prescription was also explored by using the Taguchi method. This study revealed changes in proliferation by traditional Chinese medicines of splenic lymphocytes after HS. Proliferation in the HS group was significantly lower than the control group. Under HS, the effects of higher concentrations of Agastache rugosa (100 and 200 μg/mL), Atractylodes lancea (100 and 200 μg/mL), Cortex Phellodendri (50 and 100 μg/mL) and Gypsum Fibrosum (100 and 200 μg/mL) caused a significant increase on ConA/LPS-induced proliferation of lymphocytes than lower concentrations. We, therefore, conclude that the prescription of traditional Chinese medicines may recover splenic lymphocytes from the immunosuppression induced by HS. The Taguchi design, which allows rapid and high efficiency for the selection of the best conditions for our prescription on HS-treated splenic lymphocytes, demonstrated that Agastache rugosa (200 μg/mL), Atractylodes lancea (200 μg/mL), Cortex Phellodendri (100 μg/mL) and Gypsum Fibrosum (100 μg/mL) were the optimal conditions for the prescription. The validation experiment confirmed that our composition in optimum extraction conditions enhanced effects on ConA or LPS-stimulated lymphocytes under HS. The results showed that the Taguchi optimization approach is a suitable method for optimization of the composition of prescription.

  16. Aqueous compatible boron nitride nanosheets for high-performance hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Liu, Jiahui; He, Qiuju; Meng, Yuan; Cao, Liu; Sun, Ya-Ping; Chen, Jijie; Lu, Fushen

    2016-02-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) possess ultimate thermal and chemical stabilities and mechanical strengths. However, the unmodified BNNSs are hydrophobic and insoluble in water, which hinders their use in many technological areas requiring aqueous compatibility. In this work, h-BN was treated with molten citric acid to produce aqueous dispersible boron nitride sheets (ca-BNNSs). The resultant ca-BNNSs were used to fabricate ca-BNNS/polyacrylamide (i.e., BNNS2.5/PAAm) nanocomposite hydrogels, targeting high water retentivity and flexibility. The BNNS2.5/PAAm hydrogel (initially swollen in water) largely remained swollen (water content ~94 wt%) even after one-year storage under ambient conditions. Importantly, the swollen BNNS2.5/PAAm hydrogel (water content ~95 wt%) was highly flexible. Its elongation and compressive strength exceeded 10 000% and 8 MPa at 97% strain, respectively. Moreover, the aforementioned hydrogel recovered upon the removal of compression force, without obvious damage. The substantially improved water retentivity and flexibility revealed that BNNSs can serve as a promising new platform in the development of high-performance hydrogels.Hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) possess ultimate thermal and chemical stabilities and mechanical strengths. However, the unmodified BNNSs are hydrophobic and insoluble in water, which hinders their use in many technological areas requiring aqueous compatibility. In this work, h-BN was treated with molten citric acid to produce aqueous dispersible boron nitride sheets (ca-BNNSs). The resultant ca-BNNSs were used to fabricate ca-BNNS/polyacrylamide (i.e., BNNS2.5/PAAm) nanocomposite hydrogels, targeting high water retentivity and flexibility. The BNNS2.5/PAAm hydrogel (initially swollen in water) largely remained swollen (water content ~94 wt%) even after one-year storage under ambient conditions. Importantly, the swollen BNNS2.5/PAAm hydrogel (water content ~95 wt%) was highly flexible. Its

  17. FPGA-based implementation for steganalysis: a JPEG-compatibility algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Fernandez, E.; Portela-García, M.; Lopez-Ongil, C.; Garcia-Valderas, M.

    2013-05-01

    Steganalysis is a process to detect hidden data in cover documents, like digital images, videos, audio files, etc. This is the inverse process of steganography, which is the used method to hide secret messages. The widely use of computers and network technologies make digital files very easy-to-use means for storing secret data or transmitting secret messages through the Internet. Depending on the cover medium used to embed the data, there are different steganalysis methods. In case of images, many of the steganalysis and steganographic methods are focused on JPEG image formats, since JPEG is one of the most common formats. One of the main important handicaps of steganalysis methods is the processing speed, since it is usually necessary to process huge amount of data or it can be necessary to process the on-going internet traffic in real-time. In this paper, a JPEG steganalysis system is implemented in an FPGA in order to speed-up the detection process with respect to software-based implementations and to increase the throughput. In particular, the implemented method is the JPEG-compatibility detection algorithm that is based on the fact that when a JPEG image is modified, the resulting image is incompatible with the JPEG compression process.

  18. Development of Design Standards and Guidelines for Electromagnetic Compatibility and Lightning Protection for Spacecraft Utilizing Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary design guidelines necessary to assure electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of spacecraft using composite materials, are presented. A database of electrical properties of composite materials which may have an effect on EMC is established. The guidelines concentrate on the composites that are conductive but may require enhancement to be adequate for EMC purposes. These composites are represented by graphite reinforced polymers. Methods for determining adequate conductivity levels for various EMC purposes are defined, along with the methods of design which increase conductivity of composite materials and joints to adequate levels.

  19. Solutions to helmet-mounted display visual correction compatibility issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Clarence E.; Kalich, Melvyn E.; van de Pol, Corina

    2002-08-01

    To meet the goal of 24-hour, all-weather operation, U.S. Army aviation uses a number of imaging sensor systems on its aircraft. Imagery provided by these systems is presented on helmet-mounted displays (HMDs). Fielded systems include the Integrated Helmet Display Sighting System (IHADSS) used on the AH-64 Apache. Proposed future HMD systems such as the Helmet Integrated Display Sighting System (HIDSS) and the Microvision, Inc., Aircrew Integrated Helmet System (AIHS) scanning laser system are possible choices for the Army's RAH-66 Comanche helicopter. Ever present in current and future HMD systems is the incompatibility problem between the design-limited physical eye relief of the HMD and the need to provide for the integration of laser and nuclear, biological and chemical (NBC) protection, as well as the need to address the changing optical and vision requirements of the aging aviator. This paper defines the compatibility issue, reviews past efforts to solve this problem (e.g., contact lenses, NBC masks, optical inserts, etc.), and identifies emerging techniques (e.g., refractive surgery, adaptive optics, etc.) that require investigation.

  20. Electro magnetic compatibility of rockets; Rocket ni okeru denji tekigosei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Y. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    Outlined herein is electro-magnetic compatibility (EMC), which is of crucial importance for rockets and satellites. It is concerned with interference between electronic devices, resulting from increased quantities of electromagnetic waves. This problem can be solved by keeping conducted emission (CE: emission of noise) or radiated emission (RE: radiated noise) of one component lower than conducted susceptibility (CS: resistance to noise) or radiated susceptibility (RS: ability of preventing malfunction by noise) of another component. The EMC-related standards have been established, base on the above concepts. They fall into two general categories; CISPR- and MIL-centered ones. MIL-STD-461 is one of the basic EMC standards for space craft. The aerospace industry should solve the various EMC-related problems specific to flying bodies, such as limited spaces for on-board devices, diversified types of components, common power sources, combinations of components supplied by different makers and ungrounded devices. The EMC testing unit installed can measure 20 Hz to 18 GHz of radiated noise and 20 Hz to 1 GHz of conducted noise, and works in an electrical field of up to 60 V/m at 14 KHz to 18 GHz. (NEDO)

  1. Electromagnetic compatibility of electronic implants--review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, W; Neubauer, G; Alesch, F; Schmid, G; Jahn, O

    2001-12-17

    The aim of the article was to provide an overview of published studies regarding the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of electronic implants. The available literature was sorted according to combinations of implant types and sources of interference. Several experiments concerning the susceptibility of pacemakers to mobile phones have been performed. The results of these experiments suggest measures that may be used to prevent the disturbance of pacemakers. For instance, instead of carrying the activated mobile phone in the breast pocket it is recommended that a distance of 30 cm be maintained between the pacemaker and the mobile phone, and that the mobile phone be used on the contralateral side of the pacemaker's location. Similar measures may be recommended for patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators when using mobile phones. Patients with electronic implants should walk rapidly through anti theft-devices because some of these devices are liable to disturb implants. Patients with cardiac pacemakers should not be subjected to magnetic resonance imaging as far as possible. For a variety of combinations of implants and interference sources, e.g. cardiac pacemakers and base station antennas, no studies were found in the literature. It is strongly recommended that trials be carried out to evaluate the potential risk for patients in these settings.

  2. Electromagnetic compatibility testing of implantable neurostimulators exposed to metal detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidman, Seth J; Kainz, Wolfgang; Casamento, Jon; Witters, Donald

    2010-03-09

    This paper presents results of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) testing of three implantable neurostimulators exposed to the magnetic fields emitted from several walk-through and hand-held metal detectors. The motivation behind this testing comes from numerous adverse event reports involving active implantable medical devices (AIMDs) and security systems that have been received by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). EMC testing was performed using three neurostimulators exposed to the emissions from 12 walk-through metal detectors (WTMDs) and 32 hand-held metal detectors (HHMDs). Emission measurements were performed on all HHMDs and WTMDs and summary data is presented. Results from the EMC testing indicate possible electromagnetic interference (EMI) between one of the neurostimulators and one WTMD and indicate that EMI between the three neurostimulators and HHMDs is unlikely. The results suggest that worst case situations for EMC testing are hard to predict and testing all major medical device modes and setting parameters are necessary to understand and characterize the EMC of AIMDs.

  3. Shuttle Communications and Tracking, Avionics, and Electromagnetic Compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSilva, K.; Hwu, Shian; Kindt, Kaylene; Kroll, Quin; Nuss, Ray; Romero, Denise; Schuler, Diana; Sham, Catherine; Scully, Robert

    2011-01-01

    By definition, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) is the capability of components, sub-systems, and systems, to operate in their intended electromagnetic environment, within an established margin of safety, and at design levels of performance. Practice of the discipline itself incorporates knowledge of various aspects of applied physics, materials science, and engineering across the board, and includes control and mitigation of undesirable electromagnetic interaction between intentional and unintentional emitters and receivers of radio frequency energy, both within and external to the vehicle; identification and control of the hazards of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation to personnel, ordnance, and fuels and propellants; and vehicle and system protection from the direct and indirect effects of lightning and various other forms of electrostatic discharge (ESD) threats, such as triboelectrification and plasma charging. EMC is extremely complex and far-reaching, affecting in some degree every aspect of the vehicle s design and operation. The most successful efforts incorporate EMC design features and techniques throughout design and fabrication of the vehicle s structure and components, as well as appropriate operational considerations with regard to electromagnetic threats in the operational environment, from the beginning of the design effort to the end of the life cycle of the manufactured product. This approach yields the highest design performance with the lowest cost and schedule impact.

  4. Electromagnetic Compatibility of Devices on Hybrid Electromagnetic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konesev, S. G.; Khazieva, R. T.; Kirillov, R. V.; Gainutdinov, I. Z.; Kondratyev, E. Y.

    2018-01-01

    There is a general tendency to reduce the weight and dimensions, the consumption of conductive and electrical insulating materials, increase the reliability and energy efficiency of electrical devices. In recent years, designers have been actively developing devices based on hybrid electromagnetic components (HEMC) such as inductive-capacitive converters (ICC), voltages pulse generators (VPG), secondary power supplies (SPS), capacitive storage devices (CSD), induction heating systems (IHS). Sources of power supplies of similar electrical devices contain, as a rule, links of increased frequency and function in key (pulse) modes, which leads to an increase in electromagnetic interference (EMI). Nonlinear and periodic (impulse) loads, non-sinusoidal (pulsation) of the electromotive force and nonlinearity of the internal parameters of the source and input circuits of consumers distort the shape of the input voltage lead to an increase in thermal losses from the higher harmonic currents, aging of the insulation, increase in the weight of the power supply filter units, resonance at higher harmonics. The most important task is to analyze the operation of electrotechnical devices based on HEMC from the point of view of creating EMIs and assessing their electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) with power supply systems (PSS). The article presents the results of research on the operation of an IHS, the operation principle of a secondary power supply source of which is based on the operation of a half-bridge autonomous inverter, the switching circuit of which is made in the form of a HEMC, called the «multifunctional integrated electromagnetic component»" (MIEC).

  5. Left-right compatibility in the processing of trading verbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Mario Vicario

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research investigating the nature of cognitive processes involved in the representation of economical outcomes is growing. Within this research, the mental accounting model proposes that individuals may well use cognitive operations to organize, evaluate, and keep track of their financial activities (Thaler, 1999. Here we wanted to test this hypothesis by asking to a group of participants to detect a syntax mistake of verbs indicating incoming and going out activities related to economical profit (trading verbs, swapping (swapping verbs and thinking (thinking verbs. We reported a left-right compatibility for trading verbs (i.e. participants were faster with their right hand while detecting verb referring to a monetary gain with respect to a monetary loss; and faster with their left hand while detecting a monetary loss with respect to a monetary gain. However, this pattern of result was not reported while detecting swapping verbs. Results are discussed taking into account the mental accounting theory as well as to the spatial mapping of valence hypothesis.

  6. PET Performance Evaluation of an MR-Compatible PET Insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yibao; Catana, Ciprian; Farrell, Richard; Dokhale, Purushottam A.; Shah, Kanai S.; Qi, Jinyi; Cherry, Simon R.

    2009-06-01

    A magnetic resonance (MR) compatible positron emission tomography (PET) insert has been developed in our laboratory for simultaneous small animal PET/MR imaging. This system is based on lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillator arrays with position-sensitive avalanche photodiode (PSAPD) photodetectors. The PET performance of this insert has been measured. The average reconstructed image spatial resolution was 1.51 mm. The sensitivity at the center of the field of view (CFOV) was 0.35%, which is comparable to the simulation predictions of 0.40%. The average photopeak energy resolution was 25%. The scatter fraction inside the MRI scanner with a line source was 12% (with a mouse-sized phantom and standard 35 mm Bruker 1 H RF coil), 7% (with RF coil only) and 5% (without phantom or RF coil) for an energy window of 350-650 keV. The front-end electronics had a dead time of 390 ns, and a trigger extension dead time of 7.32 mus that degraded counting rate performance for injected doses above 0.75 mCi (28 MBq). The peak noise-equivalent count rate (NECR) of 1.27 kcps was achieved at 290 muCi (10.7 MBq). The system showed good imaging performance inside a 7-T animal MRI system; however improvements in data acquisition electronics and reduction of the coincidence timing window are needed to realize improved NECR performance.

  7. Radiation-Tolerant, SpaceWire-Compatible Switching Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Current and future near-Earth and deep space exploration programs and space defense programs require the development of robust intra-spacecraft serial data transfer electronics that must be reconfigurable, fault-tolerant, and have the ability to operate effectively for long periods of time in harsh environmental conditions. Existing data transfer systems based on state-of-the-art serial data transfer protocols or passive backplanes are slow, power-hungry, and poorly reconfigurable. They provide limited expandability and poor tolerance to radiation effects and total ionizing dose (TID) in particular, which presents harmful threats to modern submicron electronics. This novel approach is based on a standard library of differential cells tolerant to TID, and patented, multi-level serial interface architecture that ensures the reliable operation of serial interconnects without application of a data-strobe or other encoding techniques. This proprietary, high-speed differential interface presents a lowpower solution fully compatible with the SpaceWire (SW) protocol. It replaces a dual data-strobe link with two identical independent data channels, thus improving the system s tolerance to harsh environments through additional double redundancy. Each channel incorporates an automatic line integrity control circuitry that delivers error signals in case of broken or shorted lines.

  8. Compatibility tests of steels in flowing liquid lead-bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, F.; Benamati, G. E-mail: benamati@brasimone.enea.it; Fazio, C.; Rusanov, A

    2001-06-01

    The behaviour of steels exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi was evaluated. The materials tested are the two austenitic steels AISI 316L and 1.4970, and the six martensitic steels Optifer IVc, T91, Batman 27, Batman 28, EP823 and EM10 which were exposed to flowing Pb-55Bi for 1000, 2000 and 3000 h and at two temperatures (573 and 743 K). The corrosion tests were conducted in the non-isothermal loop of IPPE-Obninsk under a controlled oxygen level (10{sup -6} wt%). The compatibility study showed that at a lower temperature, a very thin oxide layer (<1 {mu}m) was formed on the steels. At higher temperature, austenitic steels also exhibited a thin oxide layer sufficient to prevent their dissolution in the melt. A thicker oxide, which grew according to a parabolic law, was observed on the surface of the martensitic steels. The oxidation resistance behaviour of the martensitic steels was correlated with their alloying elements.

  9. Compatible bacterial mixture, tolerant to desiccation, improves maize plant growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Molina-Romero

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR increase plant growth and crop productivity. The inoculation of plants with a bacterial mixture (consortium apparently provides greater benefits to plant growth than inoculation with a single bacterial strain. In the present work, a bacterial consortium was formulated containing four compatible and desiccation-tolerant strains with potential as PGPR. The formulation had one moderately (Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and three highly desiccation-tolerant (Sphingomonas sp. OF178, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and Acinetobacter sp. EMM02 strains. The four bacterial strains were able to adhere to seeds and colonize the rhizosphere of plants when applied in both mono-inoculation and multi-inoculation treatments, showing that they can also coexist without antagonistic effects in association with plants. The effects of the bacterial consortium on the growth of blue maize were evaluated. Seeds inoculated with either individual bacterial strains or the bacterial consortium were subjected to two experimental conditions before sowing: normal hydration or desiccation. In general, inoculation with the bacterial consortium increased the shoot and root dry weight, plant height and plant diameter compared to the non-inoculated control or mono-inoculation treatments. The bacterial consortium formulated in this work had greater benefits for blue maize plants even when the inoculated seeds underwent desiccation stress before germination, making this formulation attractive for future field applications.

  10. Compatibility issues of cement with water reducing admixture in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.K. Shrivastava

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple brand of cement and water reducing admixtures are available in the market, even though these cements and admixture comply with the respective codal provisions there performance are not same in the concrete for each and every brand of cement and water reducing admixture, even if quality and source of other ingredients of concrete is kept same. This has created a lot of confusion among the user about what type/brand of admixture is used with what type/brand of cement and what should be optimum dose of admixture. Common problem associated with incompatibility issue is flash setting, delayed setting, rapid slump loss, improper strength gain and cracking, these not only effect the strength of the concrete but also the durability of the structure. Hence, in the present study different brand/type of cement and water reducing admixture available in the market is used to find study the compatibility issue and optimum dose of admixture. To achieve this marsh cone test has been performed. Test results indicate that the optimum dose of admixture vary from 0.9 to 1.1% of the weight of cement with different type/brand of cement and type/brand of admixture.

  11. Compatible bacterial mixture, tolerant to desiccation, improves maize plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Romero, Dalia; Baez, Antonino; Quintero-Hernández, Verónica; Castañeda-Lucio, Miguel; Fuentes-Ramírez, Luis Ernesto; Bustillos-Cristales, María Del Rocío; Rodríguez-Andrade, Osvaldo; Morales-García, Yolanda Elizabeth; Munive, Antonio; Muñoz-Rojas, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) increase plant growth and crop productivity. The inoculation of plants with a bacterial mixture (consortium) apparently provides greater benefits to plant growth than inoculation with a single bacterial strain. In the present work, a bacterial consortium was formulated containing four compatible and desiccation-tolerant strains with potential as PGPR. The formulation had one moderately (Pseudomonas putida KT2440) and three highly desiccation-tolerant (Sphingomonas sp. OF178, Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and Acinetobacter sp. EMM02) strains. The four bacterial strains were able to adhere to seeds and colonize the rhizosphere of plants when applied in both mono-inoculation and multi-inoculation treatments, showing that they can also coexist without antagonistic effects in association with plants. The effects of the bacterial consortium on the growth of blue maize were evaluated. Seeds inoculated with either individual bacterial strains or the bacterial consortium were subjected to two experimental conditions before sowing: normal hydration or desiccation. In general, inoculation with the bacterial consortium increased the shoot and root dry weight, plant height and plant diameter compared to the non-inoculated control or mono-inoculation treatments. The bacterial consortium formulated in this work had greater benefits for blue maize plants even when the inoculated seeds underwent desiccation stress before germination, making this formulation attractive for future field applications.

  12. Design of a small animal MR compatible PET scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slates, R.; Cherry, S.; Boutefnouchet, A.; Shao, Y.; Dahlbom, M.; Farahani, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1999-06-01

    Using a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations and experimental measurements, the authors have designed a small animal MR compatible PET (McPET) scanner for simultaneous PET and MR imaging of mice and rats in vivo. The scanner consists of one ring of 480 LSO crystals arranged in 3 layers with 160 crystals per layer. The crystal dimensions are 2 x 3 x 7.5 mm{sup 3}. This was based on a target resolution of 2.5 mm and simulations showing that a depth of 7.5 mm avoided significant depth of interaction effects across the desired field of view. The system diameter of 11.2 cm is large enough to accommodate the animal positioned inside a stereotactic frame. Each crystal will be coupled through 2 mm diameter optical fibers to multi-channel PMT`s which reside outside the main magnetic field. Through 50 cm of optical fiber, a photopeak is clearly seen and the measured energy resolution is 25%. Prototype optical fiber connectors have been tested to increase the flexibility of the system and result in a light loss of only 6%. The proposed system will have adequate resolution and sensitivity for a number of applications in small animals and will be the first practical device for simultaneous in vivo imaging with PET and MR.

  13. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines had been traditionally used for peak load plants and remote locations as they offer advantage of low installation costs and quick start up time. Their use as a base load generator had not been feasible owing to their poor efficiency. However, with the advent of gas turbines based combined cycle plants (CCPs), continued advances in efficiency are being made. Coupled with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions, coal compatibility and higher unit output, gas turbines are now competing with conventional power plants for base load power generation. Currently, the turbines are designed with TIT of 2300{degrees}F and metal temperatures are maintained around 1700{degrees}F by using air cooling. New higher efficiency ATS turbines will have TIT as high as 2700{degrees}F. To withstand this high temperature improved materials, coatings, and advances in cooling system and design are warranted. Development of advanced materials with better capabilities specifically for land base applications are time consuming and may not be available by ATS time frame or may prove costly for the first generation ATS gas turbines. Therefore improvement in the cooling system of hot components, which can take place in a relatively shorter time frame, is important. One way to improve cooling efficiency is to use better cooling agent. Steam as an alternate cooling agent offers attractive advantages because of its higher specific heat (almost twice that of air) and lower viscosity.

  14. MRI-Compatible Pneumatic Robot for Transperineal Prostate Needle Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gregory S; Iordachita, Iulian; Csoma, Csaba; Tokuda, Junichi; Dimaio, Simon P; Tempany, Clare M; Hata, Nobuhiko; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2008-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide high-quality 3-D visualization of prostate and surrounding tissue, thus granting potential to be a superior medical imaging modality for guiding and monitoring prostatic interventions. However, the benefits cannot be readily harnessed for interventional procedures due to difficulties that surround the use of high-field (1.5T or greater) MRI. The inability to use conventional mechatronics and the confined physical space makes it extremely challenging to access the patient. We have designed a robotic assistant system that overcomes these difficulties and promises safe and reliable intraprostatic needle placement inside closed high-field MRI scanners. MRI compatibility of the robot has been evaluated under 3T MRI using standard prostate imaging sequences and average SNR loss is limited to 5%. Needle alignment accuracy of the robot under servo pneumatic control is better than 0.94 mm rms per axis. The complete system workflow has been evaluated in phantom studies with accurate visualization and targeting of five out of five 1 cm targets. The paper explains the robot mechanism and controller design, the system integration, and presents results of preliminary evaluation of the system.

  15. Word Meaning Frequencies Affect Negative Compatibility Effects In Masked Priming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Andreas; Koenig, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Negative compatibility effects (NCEs)—that is, slower responses to targets in related than unrelated prime-target pairs, have been observed in studies using stimulus-response (S-R) priming with stimuli like arrows and plus signs. Although there is no consensus on the underlying mechanism, explanations tend to locate NCEs within the motor-response system. A characteristic property of perceptuo-motor NCEs is a biphasic pattern of activation: A brief period in which very briefly presented (typically) masked primes facilitate processing of related targets is followed by a phase of target processing impairment. In this paper, we present data that suggest that NCEs are not restricted to S-R priming with low-level visual stimuli: The brief (50 ms), backward masked (250 ms) presentation of ambiguous words (bank) leads to slower responses than baseline to words related to the more frequent (rob) but not less frequent meaning (swim). Importantly, we found that slowed responses are preceded by a short phase of response facilitation, replicating the biphasic pattern reported for arrows and plus signs. The biphasic pattern of priming and the fact that the NCEs were found only for target words that are related to their prime word’s more frequent meaning has strong implications for any theory of NCEs that locate these effects exclusively within the motor-response system. PMID:27152129

  16. Left-right compatibility in the processing of trading verbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo M; Rumiati, Raffaella I

    2014-01-01

    The research investigating the nature of cognitive processes involved in the representation of economical outcomes is growing. Within this research, the mental accounting model proposes that individuals may well use cognitive operations to organize, evaluate, and keep track of their financial activities (Thaler, 1999). Here we wanted to test this hypothesis by asking to a group of participants to detect a syntax mistake of verbs indicating incoming and going out activities related to economical profit (trading verbs), swapping (swapping verbs) and thinking (thinking verbs). We reported a left-right compatibility for trading verbs (i.e., participants were faster with their right hand while detecting verb referring to a monetary gain with respect to a monetary loss; and faster with their left hand while detecting a monetary loss with respect to a monetary gain). However, this pattern of result was not reported while detecting swapping verbs. Results are discussed taking into account the mental accounting theory as well as to the spatial mapping of valence hypothesis.

  17. Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-07-02

    There are 177 waste storage tanks containing over 210,000 m{sup 3} (55 million gal) of mixed waste at the Hanford Site. The River Protection Project (RPP) has adopted the data quality objective (DQO) process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (EPA 1994a) and implemented by RPP internal procedure (Banning 1999a) to identify the information and data needed to address safety issues. This DQO document is based on several documents that provide the technical basis for inputs and decision/action levels used to develop the decision rules that evaluate the transfer of wastes. A number of these documents are presently in the process of being revised. This document will need to be revised if there are changes to the technical criteria in these supporting documents. This DQO process supports various documents, such as sampling and analysis plans and double-shell tank (DST) waste analysis plans. This document identifies the type, quality, and quantity of data needed to determine whether transfer of supernatant can be performed safely. The requirements in this document are designed to prevent the mixing of incompatible waste as defined in Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-040. Waste transfers which meet the requirements contained in this document and the Double-Shell Tank Waste Analysis Plan (Mulkey 1998) are considered to be compatible, and prevent the mixing of incompatible waste.

  18. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  19. Space hardware compatibility tests with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye, Delphine; Aguila, Alexandre; Debus, Andre; Remaury, Stephanie; Nabarra, Pascale; Darbord, Jacques C.; Soufflet, Caroline; Destrez, Philippe; Coll, Patrice; Coscia, David

    The exploration of the Solar System shall comply with planetary protection requirements handled presently by the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR). The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual contamination carried by return samples or by space systems. For project teams, avoiding the biological contamination of other Solar System bodies such as Mars imposes to perform unusual tasks at technical and operational constraints point of view. The main are the reduction of bioburden on space hardware, the sterile integration of landers, the control of the biological cleanliness and the limitation of crash probability. In order to reduce the bioburden on spacecraft, the use of qualified sterilization processes may be envisaged. Since 1992 now, with the Mars96 mission, one of the most often used is the Sterrad(R) process working with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma. In the view of future Mars exploration programs, after tests performed in the frame of previous missions, a new test campaign has been performed on thermal coatings and miscellaneous materials coming from an experiment in order to assess the compatibility of space hardware and material with this sterilization process.

  20. Compatibility and incompatibility in hyphal anastomosis of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candido Barreto de Novais

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, which live in symbiosis with 80 % of plants, are not able to grow when separated from their hosts. Spore germination is not host-regulated and germling growth is shortly arrested in the absence of host roots. Germling survival chances may be increased by hyphal fusions (anastomoses, which allow access to nutrients flowing in the extraradical mycelium (ERM. Perfect anastomoses, occurring with high frequency among germlings and the ERM of the same isolate, show protoplasm continuity and disappearance of hyphal walls. A low frequency of perfect fusions has been detected among co-specific genetically different isolates, although fungal nuclei have been consistently detected in all perfect fusions, suggesting active nuclear migration. When plants of different taxa establish symbioses with the same AMF species, anastomoses between ERM spreading from single root systems establish a common mycelium, which is an essential element to plant nutrition and communication. The interaction among mycelia produced by different isolates may also lead to pre-fusion incompatibility which hinders anastomosis formation, or to incompatibility after fusion, which separates the hyphal compartments. Results reported here, obtained by analyses of hyphal compatibility/incompatibility in AMF, suggest that anastomosis formation and establishment of protoplasm flow, fundamental to the maintenance of mycelial physiological and genetic continuity, may affect the fitness of these ecologically important biotrophic fungi.

  1. Compatible diagonal-norm staggered and upwind SBP operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Ken; O'Reilly, Ossian

    2018-01-01

    The main motivation with the present study is to achieve a provably stable high-order accurate finite difference discretisation of linear first-order hyperbolic problems on a staggered grid. The use of a staggered grid makes it non-trivial to discretise advective terms. To overcome this difficulty we discretise the advective terms using upwind Summation-By-Parts (SBP) operators, while the remaining terms are discretised using staggered SBP operators. The upwind and staggered SBP operators (for each order of accuracy) are compatible, here meaning that they are based on the same diagonal norms, allowing for energy estimates to be formulated. The boundary conditions are imposed using a penalty (SAT) technique, to guarantee linear stability. The resulting SBP-SAT approximations lead to fully explicit ODE systems. The accuracy and stability properties are demonstrated for linear hyperbolic problems in 1D, and for the 2D linearised Euler equations with constant background flow. The newly derived upwind and staggered SBP operators lead to significantly more accurate numerical approximations, compared with the exclusive usage of (previously derived) central-difference first derivative SBP operators.

  2. Flexible substrate compatible solution processed P-N heterojunction diodes with indium-gallium-zinc oxide and copper oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Ishan; Deepak, E-mail: saboo@iitk.ac.in

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Both n and p-type semiconductors are solution processed. • Temperature compatibility with flexible substrates such as polyimide. • Compatibility of p-type film (CuO) on n-type film (IZO). • Diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. • Construction of band alignment using XPS. - Abstract: Printed electronics on flexible substrates requires low temperature and solution processed active inks. With n-type indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) based electronics maturing for thin film transistor (TFT), we here demonstrate its heterojunction diode with p-copper oxide, prepared by sol-gel method and processed at temperatures compatible with polyimide substrates. The phase obtained for copper oxide is CuO. When coated on n-type oxide, it is prone to develop morphological features, which are minimized by annealing treatment. Diodes of p-CuO films with IGZO are of poor quality due to its high resistivity while, conducting indium-zinc oxide (IZO) films yielded good diode with rectification ratio of 10{sup 4} and operating voltage <1.5 V. A detailed measurement at the interface by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and optical absorption ascertained the band alignment to be of staggered type. Consistently, the current in the diode is established to be due to electrons tunnelling from n-IZO to p-CuO.

  3. Gateway-compatible transposon vector to genetically modify human embryonic kidney and adipose-derived stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Spyros; Raskó, Tamas; Mátés, Lajos; Ivics, Zoltan; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Kouzi-Koliakou, Kokkona; Koliakos, George

    2012-07-01

    The Gateway technology cloning system and transposon technology represent state-of-the-art laboratory techniques. Combination of these molecular tools allows rapid cloning of target genes into expression vectors. Here, we describe a novel Gateway technology-compatible transposon plasmid that combines the advantages of Gateway recombination cloning with the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated transgene integrations. In our system the transposition is catalyzed by the novel hyperactive SB100x transposase, and provides highly efficient and precise transgene integrations into the host genome. A Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid was generated in which the potential target gene can be fused with a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) tag at the N-terminal. The vector utilizes the CAGGS promoter to control fusion protein expression. The transposon expression vector encoding the YFP-interferon-β protein (IFNB1) fusion protein together with the hyperactive SB100x transposase was used to generate stable cell lines in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and rat adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC). ASCs and HEK293 cells stably expressed and secreted the human IFNB1 for up to 4 weeks after transfection. The generated Gateway-compatible transposon plasmid can be utilized for numerous experimental approaches, such as gene therapy or high-throughput screening methods in primary cells, representing a valuable molecular tool for laboratory applications. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Orthoretroviral-like prototype foamy virus gag-pol expression is compatible with viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reh Juliane

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foamy viruses (FVs unlike orthoretroviruses express Pol as a separate precursor protein and not as a Gag-Pol fusion protein. A unique packaging strategy, involving recognition of briding viral RNA by both Pol precursor and Gag as well as potential Gag-Pol protein interactions, ensures Pol particle encapsidation. Results Several Prototype FV (PFV Gag-Pol fusion protein constructs were generated to examine whether PFV replication is compatible with an orthoretroviral-like Pol expression. During their analysis, non-particle-associated secreted Pol precursor protein was discovered in extracellular wild type PFV particle preparations of different origin, copurifying in simple virion enrichment protocols. Different analysis methods suggest that extracellular wild type PFV particles contain predominantly mature p85PR-RT and p40IN Pol subunits. Characterization of various PFV Gag-Pol fusion constructs revealed that PFV Pol expression in an orthoretroviral manner is compatible with PFV replication as long as a proteolytic processing between Gag and Pol proteins is possible. PFV Gag-Pol translation by a HIV-1 like ribosomal frameshift signal resulted in production of replication-competent virions, although cell- and particle-associated Pol levels were reduced in comparison to wild type. In-frame fusion of PFV Gag and Pol ORFs led to increased cellular Pol levels, but particle incorporation was only marginally elevated. Unlike that reported for similar orthoretroviral constructs, a full-length in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion construct showed wildtype-like particle release and infectivity characteristics. In contrast, in-frame PFV Gag-Pol fusion with C-terminal Gag ORF truncations or non-removable Gag peptide addition to Pol displayed wildtype particle release, but reduced particle infectivity. PFV Gag-Pol precursor fusion proteins with inactivated protease were highly deficient in regular particle release, although coexpression of p71Gag

  5. LAND USE COMPATIBILITY ASSESSMENT USING A MDIFIED TOPSIS MODEL: A CASE STUDY OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abedini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Being one of the most controversial issues in urban planning, land use planning has always been in the focus of researches. Land use planning is a subdivision of urban planning which tends to arrange land uses in order to avoid conflicts among them. In order to achieve a transparent and effective urban planning, land uses should be located and allocated in an ideal situation so that avoid negative impacts from neighbouring parcels and land uses. Neighbouring land uses can produce externalities and negative impacts on other land uses because of inter-land use interaction. These externalities may be undesirable effects such as noise, air and visual pollution or may be caused by hazardous facilities. The main objective of this research is to propose a new multi-criteria evaluation model for land use compatibility assessment. Considering the fact that a considerable number of factors affect the compatibility degree of neighbouring land uses, a multi-criteria evaluation approach is employed to address the aforementioned problem. This research employs the integration of Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS and Ordered Weighted Averaging (OWA methods to facilitate land use compatibility evaluation with respect to optimism degree. The applicability of the proposed model is illustrated by the problem of land use compatibility assessment for elementary schools in Tehran. The results indicate that most of the current schools are situated in a location which is incompatible for the land use type of elementary school especially in the southern and central parts of the city.

  6. Mixing compatibilities of Aspergillus and American cockroach allergens with other high-protease fungal and insect extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Thomas J; Hall, Dawn M; Duncan, Elizabeth A; Coyne, Terrance C

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that Alternaria and German cockroach allergens can be degraded by endogenous proteases from other insect and fungal extracts when combined for immunotherapy, but data supporting the compatibilities of other high-protease products in comparable mixtures have not been reported. To assess the stabilities and compatibilities of Aspergillus fumigatus and American cockroach allergens after mixing with protease-rich extracts from other insects or fungi at concentrations similar to those recommended for subcutaneous immunotherapy. Mixtures containing A fumigatus, American cockroach, and other fungal or insect extracts were evaluated by quantitative (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) and qualitative (immunoblotting) methods. Test mixtures and control samples at 10% to 50% glycerin concentrations were analyzed after storage for up to 12 months at 2°C to 8°C. Moderate to high recoveries of Aspergillus extract activities were retained in control samples and extract mixtures under all conditions examined. American cockroach extract controls were partly degraded at 10% to 25% glycerin, and cockroach allergen compatibilities were decreased significantly in mixtures with several fungal extracts at 25% glycerin. Mixing with other insects did not compromise the stability of American cockroach allergens at 25% to 50% glycerin. Aspergillus extracts exhibited favorable stabilities after mixing with other high-protease products. American cockroach extract potencies were unstable in less than 50% glycerin, even in the absence of other protease-containing allergens, and were destabilized in mixtures with several fungal extracts. Addition of fungal and insect extracts to separate treatment vials or preparation of fungal-insect mixtures at elevated glycerin concentrations might be necessary to produce compatible patient formulations for allergen immunotherapy injections. Copyright © 2015 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier

  7. Medical and Scientific Evaluations aboard the KC-135. Microgravity-Compatible Flow Cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Nelman-Gonzalez, Mayra; Sams, Clarence

    2005-01-01

    A spaceflight-compatible flow cytometer would be useful for the diagnosis of astronaut illness during long duration spaceflight and for conducting in-flight research to evaluate the effects of microgravity on human physiology. Until recently, the primary limitations preventing the development of a spaceflight compatible flow cytometer have been largely mechanical. Standard commercially available flow cytometers are large, complex instruments that use high-energy lasers and require significant training to operate. Standard flow cytometers function by suspending the particles to be analyzed inside a sheath fluid for analysis. This requires the presence of several liters of sheath fluid for operation, and generates a corresponding amount of liquid hazardous waste. The particles are then passed through a flow cell which uses the fluid mechanical property of hydrodynamic focusing to place the cells in single-file (laminar flow) as they pass through a laser beam for scanning and evaluation. Many spaceflight experiments have demonstrated that fluid physics is dramatically altered in microgravity (MSF [Manned Space Flight] Fluid Physics Data Sheet-August 1997) and previous studies have shown that sheath-fluid based hydrodynamic focusing may also be altered during microgravity (Crucian et al, 2000). For these reasons it is likely that any spaceflight compatible design for a flow cytometer would abandon the sheath fluid requirement. The elimination of sheath fluid would remove both the problems of weight associated with large volumes of liquids as well as the large volume of liquid waste generated. It would also create the need for a method to create laminar particle flow distinct from the standard sheath-fluid based method. The spaceflight prototype instrument is based on a recently developed commercial flow cytometer possessing a novel flow cell design that creates single-particle laser scanning and evaluation without the need for sheath-fluid based hydrodynamic focusing

  8. Compatibility studies of nevirapine in physical mixtures with excipients for oral HAART

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, G.G.G. de; Ferraz, H.G. [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Health, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo 05508-900 (Brazil); Severino, P. [Department of Biotechnological Processes, School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, Campinas 13083-970 (Brazil); Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Fernando Pessoa University, Porto 4200-150 (Portugal); Souto, E.B., E-mail: eliana@ufp.edu.pt [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Fernando Pessoa University, Porto 4200-150 (Portugal); Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Genomics and Biotechnology, University of Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro (IBB-CGB/UTAD), 5001-801 Vila Real (Portugal)

    2013-03-01

    Nevirapine is a hydrophobic non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, used in first line regimens of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The drug has more than one crystalline form, which may have implications for its behaviour during production and also for its in vivo performance. This study was aimed at exploring the suitability of thermoanalytical methods for the solid-state characterization of commercial crystalline forms of nevirapine. The drug powder was characterized by ultraviolet spectrophotometry, stereoscopy, scanning electron microscopy, wide-angle X-ray diffraction, measurements of density, flowability, solubility and intrinsic dissolution rate (IDR), differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and photostability measurements. The results showed that nevirapine has high stability and is not susceptible to degradation under light exposure. The drug showed compatibility with the excipients tested (lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, polyvinylpyrrolidone and polyvinyl acetate copolymer (PVP/PVA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC)). Nevirapine has low solubility, an acid medium being the most appropriate medium for assessing the release of the drug from dosage forms. However, the data obtained from IDR testing indicate that dissolution is the critical factor for the bioavailability of this drug. - Graphical abstract: Bulk nevirapine powder analysed by scanning electron microscopy and the drug solubility profile in various buffer solutions. The pH values of the media in which the tests were conducted are also presented. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nevirapine shows more than one crystalline form, that influence its in vivo and in vitro behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DSC and TGA were used for solid-state characterization of crystalline forms of nevirapine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nevirapine is compatible with lactose, microcrystalline cellulose, PVP/PVA copolymers and HPMC. Black

  9. The Compatibility of Diagnoses Presented in Morning Reports of Pediatrics Department and Educational Curriculum of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyghobad Ghadiri

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Morning report is an educational process in which participants try to solve a diagnostic problem by discussing the patients (1. In spite of this fact that morning report is one of the most practical, clinical, and educational methods in the world, there is no special paradigm for it (2. Thus, it is necessary to assess it for students’ educational planning. Because there was no reference about the compatibility between the diagnosis reported in morning reports and educational curriculum, all the recorded information about the patients in morning reports between 2006 and 2010 was selected as research population. All of the information was recorded in information sheets. Then, the compatibility between diagnosis presented in morning report and educational curriculum of pediatrics department was assessed. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 16 using chi-square, independent t-test and, analysis of variance (ANOVA. Findings showed that most of the cases were recorded in 2007 (29% of all cases. Fewest cases were recorded in 2008. 57.3% of all patients were male. 72.4% were compatible with educational curriculum and 27.6% were not included in educational curriculum. Most reported diseases were toxicity, seizures, fever seizures, and icterus, respectively. In this study, the compatibility of patients and educational curriculum (72.4 was compatible with the findings of the study conducted by Durning et al. (2003 in which they compared the content of morning reports with principles of standard guidelines and showed that they were in line with each other (3. Further, the findings of this study indicated that the compatibility of patients and educational curriculum has decreased during the recent years. Spickard et al. (2000 in a research titled “Outpatient Morning Report: A New Conference for Internal Medicine Residency Programs” showed that residents choose morning report topics in most cases (73% while just 20% of medical students share the

  10. Universal and culture-specific effects of display-control compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Robert W; Vu, Kim-Phuong L

    2010-01-01

    Research on compatibility of displays and controls has been a staple of basic and applied experimental psychology since the work by Paul Fitts and colleagues in the 1950s. Compatibility is often defined in terms of natural response tendencies, and many behavioral studies have been conducted examining various determinants of compatibility effects. Some compatibility phenomena are universal because of constant properties of the physical environments in which people live. Others, often called population stereotypes (Loveless, 1962), are specific to particular cultural groups due to experience with unique display-control relations. Determining which compatibility phenomena are universal and which are limited to certain populations is necessary for knowing how widely various compatibility principles can be expected to hold for performance. In this article we examine the universal and cultural aspects of display-control compatibility with an emphasis on implications for understanding human performance in general and for applying the knowledge to design of interfaces that will be maximally compatible with the characteristics of the intended users.

  11. Practical operating points of multi-resolution frame compatible (MFC) stereo coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Taoran; Ganapathy, Hariharan; Lakshminarayanan, Gopi; Chen, Tao; Yin, Peng; Brooks, David; Husak, Walt

    2013-09-01

    3D content is gaining popularity and the production and delivery of 3D video is now an active working item among video compression experts, content providers and the CE industry. Frame compatible stereo coding was initially adopted for the first generation of 3DTV broadcasting services for its compatibility with existing 2D decoders. However, the frame compatible solution sacrifices half of the original video resolution. In 2012, the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) issued the call for proposal (CfP) for solutions that improve the resolution of frame compatible stereo 3D video signal while maintaining the backward compatibility to legacy decoders. The standardization process of the multiresolution frame compatible (MFC) stereo coding was then started. In this paper, the solution - Orthogonal Muxing Frame Compatible Full Resolution (OM-FCFR) - as a response to the CfP is introduced. In addition, this paper provides some experimental results for broadcasters to guide them in selecting operating points for MFC. It is observed that for typical broadcast bitrates, more than 0.5dB PSNR improvement can be achieved by MFC over the frame compatible solution with only 15%~20% overhead.

  12. Generalized fixed point theorems for compatible mappings with some types in fuzzy metric spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yeol Je [Department of Mathematics Education and the RINS, College of Education, Gyeongsang National University, Chinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yjcho@gsnu.ac.kr; Sedghi, Shaban [Department of Mathematics, Islamic Azad University, Ghaemshahr Branch Ghaemshahr P.O. Box 163 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sedghi_gh@yahoo.com; Shobe, Nabi [Department of Mathematics, Islamic Azad University, Babol Branch (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: nabi_shobe@yahoo.com

    2009-03-15

    In this paper, we give some new definitions of compatible mappings of types (I) and (II) in fuzzy metric spaces and prove some common fixed point theorems for four mappings under the condition of compatible mappings of types (I) and (II) in complete fuzzy metric spaces. Our results extend, generalize and improve the corresponding results given by many authors.

  13. 76 FR 72025 - Noise Compatibility Program Notice for W.M. Kellogg Airport, Battle Creek, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ...-compatible uses and prevent the introduction of additional non-compatible uses. The City of Battle Creek...); Figure D15 (Southwest Flow INM Flight Tracks); Figure D16 (Northeast Flow INM Flight Tracks); Figure D17 (East/West Flow INM Flight Tracks); Figure D18 (Touch & Go INM Flight Tracks--Fixed Wing). Information...

  14. 77 FR 4616 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Kona International Airport at Keahole, Keahole, North...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-30

    ...; maintaining an established communication process between DOT-A, Hawaii County, and Hawaii State Land Use... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Kona International... Kona International Airport at Keahole noise compatibility program. All of the recommendations of the...

  15. A basis for understanding compatibility among wood production and other forest values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Haynes; Robert A. Monserud

    2002-01-01

    In the public debate over forest management, many issues are portrayed as tradeoffs between biophysical and socioeconomic components of ecosystems. This simplistic portrayal ignores potential opportunities for compatible changes in outputs (either goods or services) among alternative management strategies. In response, a research effort called the Wood Compatibility...

  16. 49 CFR 176.184 - Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L. 176.184 Section 176.184 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE... (explosive) Materials in Port § 176.184 Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L. Class 1...

  17. 47 CFR 68.110 - Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and terminal equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compatibility of the public switched telephone... Conditions on Use of Terminal Equipment § 68.110 Compatibility of the public switched telephone network and... maintain uninterrupted service. (c) Availability of inside wiring information. Any available technical...

  18. Design of a New MR Compatible Haptic Interface with Six Actuated Degrees of Freedom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergin, Mehmet Alper; Kühne, Markus; Thielscher, Axel

    2014-01-01

    . Existing MR-compatible haptic interfaces are restricted to maximum three actuated degrees of freedom. We propose an MR-compatible haptic interface with six actuated degrees of freedom to be able to study human brain mechanisms of natural pick-and-place movements including arm transport. In this work, we...

  19. 46 CFR 153.436 - Heat transfer fluids: compatibility with cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Heat transfer fluids: compatibility with cargo. 153.436... Equipment Cargo Temperature Control Systems § 153.436 Heat transfer fluids: compatibility with cargo. A heat transfer fluid separated from the cargo by only one wall (for example, the heat transfer fluid in a coil...

  20. TRoPICALS: A Computational Embodied Neuroscience Model of Compatibility Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiore, Daniele; Borghi, Anna M.; Parisi, Domenico; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2010-01-01

    Perceiving objects activates the representation of their affordances. For example, experiments on compatibility effects showed that categorizing objects by producing certain handgrips (power or precision) is faster if the requested responses are compatible with the affordance elicited by the size of objects (e.g., small or large). The article…

  1. Some Common Fixed Point Theorems for Weakly Compatible Mappings in Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed MA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish a common fixed point theorem for weakly compatible mappings generalizing a result of Khan and Kubiaczyk (1988. Also, an example is given to support our generalization. We also prove common fixed point theorems for weakly compatible mappings in metric and compact metric spaces.

  2. 76 FR 60961 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program; Kissimmee Gateway Airport, Kissimmee, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Approval of Noise Compatibility Program; Kissimmee Gateway Airport... Gateway Airport Noise Compatibility Program Update. Some of the recommendations of the Program were approved. DATES: Effective Date: The effective date of the FAA's approval of the Kissimmee Gateway Airport...

  3. GROUND WATER ISSUE: NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS COMPATIBILITY WITH MATERIALS USED IN WELL CONSTRUCTION, SAMPLING, AND REMEDIATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This issue paper provides a comprehensive literature review regarding the compatibility of NAPLs with a wide variety of materials used at hazardous waste sites. A condensed reference table of compatibility data for 207 chemicals and 28 commonly used well construction and sampling...

  4. Breeding graft-compatible Douglas-fir rootstocks (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.L. Copes

    1999-01-01

    A study encompassing 24 years was conducted to determine if a breeding program could produce highly graft-compatible rootstocks. Twenty-seven trees of apparent high graft compatibility were selected and crossed to produce 226 control-pollinated families. Seedlings were grown, field planted, and grafted with test scions. Graft unions from field tests were evaluated...

  5. The Compatibility of Computer-Mediated Communication Solutions with Beginning Level Foreign Language Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collentine, Joseph; Collentine, Karina

    1997-01-01

    Explores the compatibility of computer-mediated communication (CMC) with two basic objectives of modern foreign language curricula: development of functional and pragmatic abilities, and instructional materials informed by what is known about cognitive processes responsible for acquisition. It is suggested that CMC is particularly compatible with…

  6. Myrosinase Compatible Simultaneous Determination of Glucosinolates and Allyl Isothiocyanate by Capillary Electrophoresis Micellar Electrokinetic Chromatography (CE-MEKC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Sándor; Kiss-Szikszai, Attila; Szűcs, Zsolt; Nguyen, Nhat Minh; Vasas, Gábor

    2016-05-01

    The functional food Cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates which are decomposed by the myrosinase enzyme upon tissue damage. The isothiocyanates are the most frequent decomposition products. Because of their various bioactivities, these compounds and the myrosinase is of high interest to many scientific fields. Development of a capillary electrophoresis method capable of myrosinase-compatible, simultaneous quantification of glucosinolates and isothiocyanates. Capillary electrochromatography parameters were optimised, followed by optimisation of a myrosinase-compatible derivatisation procedure for isothiocyanates. Vegetable extracts (Brussels sprouts, horseradish, radish and watercress) were tested for myrosinase activity, glucosinolate content and isothiocyanate conversion rate. Allyl isothiocyanate was quantified in some food products. The method allows quantification of sinigrin, gluonasturtiin and allyl isothiocyanate after myrosinase compatible derivatisation in-vial by mercaptoacetic acid. The chromatograhpic separation takes 2.5 min (short-end injection) or 15 min (long-end injection). For the tested vegetables, measured myrosinase activity was between 0.960-27.694 and 0.461-26.322 µmol/min/mg protein, glucosinolate content was between 0-2291.8 and 0-248.5 µg/g fresh weight for sinigrin and gluconastrutiin, respectively. The possible specificity of plants to different glucosinolates was also shown. Allyl isothiocyanate release rate was different in different vegetables (73.13 - 102.13%). The method could also be used for quantification of allyl isothiocyanate from food products. The presented capillary electrophoresis method requires a minimal amount of sample and contains only a few sample preparation steps, and can be used in several applications (glucosinolate determination, myrosinase activity measurement, isothiocyanate release estimation). Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. SILICON COMPATIBLE ACOUSTIC WAVE RESONATORS: DESIGN, FABRICATION AND PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza Aini Md Ralib

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Continuous advancement in wireless technology and silicon microfabrication has fueled exciting growth in wireless products. The bulky size of discrete vibrating mechanical devices such as quartz crystals and surface acoustic wave resonators impedes the ultimate miniaturization of single-chip transceivers. Fabrication of acoustic wave resonators on silicon allows complete integration of a resonator with its accompanying circuitry.  Integration leads to enhanced performance, better functionality with reduced cost at large volume production. This paper compiles the state-of-the-art technology of silicon compatible acoustic resonators, which can be integrated with interface circuitry. Typical acoustic wave resonators are surface acoustic wave (SAW and bulk acoustic wave (BAW resonators.  Performance of the resonator is measured in terms of quality factor, resonance frequency and insertion loss. Selection of appropriate piezoelectric material is significant to ensure sufficient electromechanical coupling coefficient is produced to reduce the insertion loss. The insulating passive SiO2 layer acts as a low loss material and aims to increase the quality factor and temperature stability of the design. The integration technique also is influenced by the fabrication process and packaging.  Packageless structure using AlN as the additional isolation layer is proposed to protect the SAW device from the environment for high reliability. Advancement in miniaturization technology of silicon compatible acoustic wave resonators to realize a single chip transceiver system is still needed. ABSTRAK: Kemajuan yang berterusan dalam teknologi tanpa wayar dan silikon telah menguatkan pertumbuhan yang menarik dalam produk tanpa wayar. Saiz yang besar bagi peralatan mekanikal bergetar seperti kristal kuarza menghalang pengecilan untuk merealisasikan peranti cip. Silikon serasi  gelombang akustik resonator mempunyai potensi yang besar untuk menggantikan unsur

  8. Pentecostals and politics in Argentina: A question of compatibility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Geir Aasmundsen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Coincidiendo con el proceso de democratización en Argentina a principios de la década de los ochenta, el Pentecostalismo obtuvo un crecimiento sustancial. En un nuevo panorama religioso el movimiento pentecostal-evangélico comenzó a reclamar libertad e igualdad religiosas y se acercó a la esfera política por diversos medios. Sin embargo, cómo deberían acercarse a la política no ha sido evidente. Desde hace medio siglo, lo político había sido percibido como el ámbito de los problemas ‘terrenales’, de la corrupción y de los compromisos. Hasta ese momento, los pocos pentecostales habían optado por y/o sido relegados a la marginalización con respecto a una sociedad dominada religiosamente por la Iglesia Católica. Con la apertura de los nuevos espacios democráticos, un número de adeptos considerablemente mayor y la Iglesia Católica estando a la defensiva, los pentecostales hallaron tanto oportunidades como incentivos para introducirse en la vida política. En este artículo se propone ilustrar cómo los proyectos políticos pentecostales necesitan ser compatibles con el proyecto religioso. En este sentido, los pentecostales deben legitimar y autorizar lo político en lo religioso a fin de obtener apoyo y votos en la comunidad pentecostal. En la actualidad, muchos pentecostales encuentran su espacio dentro de la actividad política a través de un compromiso social basado en ciertos valores ‘interiores’ y ‘exteriores’. Los valores ‘interiores’ se refieren a su percepción de un 'habitus 'Pentecostal: honestidad, sinceridad y confianza. Los valores ‘exteriores’ están relacionados a su concepción del orden natural de Dios: pro-vida, anti-homosexualidad, pro-familia. English: Coinciding with the processes of democratization in Argentina from the early 1980s, Pentecostalism experienced a substantial growth. From a new religious landscape the Pentecostal-Evangelical movement started making claims for religious

  9. Nuclear fusion and renewable energy forms: Are they compatible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamacher, Thomas, E-mail: Thomas.hamacher@tum.de [Lehrstuhl für Energiewirtchaft und Anwendungstechnik der Technischen Universität München, Arcissstrasse 21, 80333 München (Germany); Huber, Matthias; Dorfner, Johannes; Schaber, Katrin [Lehrstuhl für Energiewirtchaft und Anwendungstechnik der Technischen Universität München, Arcissstrasse 21, 80333 München (Germany); Bradshaw, Alex M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Association IPP-Euratom, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85741 Garching (Germany); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► The integration of intermittent renewable power sources like wind and PV is in a powerful European power grid much simpler due to smoothing effects. ► The often quoted incompatibility between intermittent and base-load technologies is also much less pronounced in large scale power grids. ► Nuclear fusion in combination with renewable power sources could simplify to reach ambitious greenhouse gas reduction goals. -- Abstract: Nuclear fusion can be considered as a base-load power plant technology: High investment costs and limited operational flexibility require continuous operation. Wind and solar, on the other hand, as the putative main pillars of a future renewable energy system, are intermittent power sources. The resulting variations that occur on many different time scales require at first sight a rather flexible back-up system to balance this stochastic behavior. Fusion would appear not to be well suited for this task. The situation changes, however, if a large-scale renewable energy system is envisaged based on a transnational, or even transcontinental power grid. The present paper discusses a possible European power system in the year 2050 and beyond. A high percentage share of renewable energies and a strong power grid spanning the whole of Europe and involving neighboring countries, in particular those in North Africa, are assumed. The linear programming model URBS is used to describe the power system. The model optimizes the overall system costs and simulates power plant operation with an hourly resolution for one whole year. The geographical resolution is at least at the country level. The renewable technologies are modeled first on a more local level and then summed together at the country or regional level. The results indicate that the smoothing effects of the large-scale power grid transform the intermittent renewable supply, which is then more compatible with base-load power plants such as fusion reactors.

  10. Compatibility of spectacles with their prescriptions in central Anatolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Nilufer; Dogan, Hakki; Ilhan, Ozgur; Coskun, Mesut; Bulut, Betul Tasar; Ersekerci, Tulay Karacan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate compatibility of spectacles with their prescriptions. This study was conducted prospectively between October 2007 and March 2009. A total of 1002 spectacles of 1002 individuals were included in the study. First right and then left lenses of the spectacles were measured with a Topcon CL-200 digital lensmeter. Interpupillary distance (PD) of the subjects was measured. Spherical, cylindrical, and axial differences between the prescription and the spectacles were separately calculated for the left and right lenses. Prismatic effect (PE) of the lenses, with decentralized focus according to the pupil, its base direction, and amount of decentralization, were measured. A total of 505 (50.4%) of the subjects were female and 497 (49.6%) were male. The mean age was 37.0 (range 3-81). The mean PD of the subjects was 59.9 ± 4.09 mm, and mean optical center distance (OCD) of the lenses was 65.6 ± 4.07 mm. The difference between PD and OCD was significant (p spectacles were not significant, the left axial difference was statistically significant (p spectacles was quite low. However, there may be a small amount of axis deviation at the time of mounting the lens to the frame. We conclude that asthenopic complaints due to PE caused by the decentralization of the optic center of the lenses are quite important. Examination of the spectacles after they are prepared can be deemed as a solution to reduce asthenopic complaints due to improper spectacles.

  11. Unconscious Presentation of Object Affordances Evokes a Negative Compatibility Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Makris

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available According to Gibson's (1979 theory of “affordances”, the environment is constantly bombarding the viewer with a multitude of possible actions. More recently, it has been suggested that the simple viewing of an object can automatically elicit motor plans for actions towards this object. Research has attributed this phenomenon to the existence of two different neural pathways for processing visual information from objects and implied a distinction between conscious visual perception (meditated by the ventral stream and unconscious visuomotor control (sub-served by the dorsal stream. This has proved compelling to many researchers, who have further tried to dissociate conscious visual perception from visually guided performance. In the present study, participants formed precision and power grips in response to a central colour stimulus, in order to determine whether these actions could be modulated by the prior subliminal presentation of pinch/grasp affording prime objects. All prime objects were briefly presented for 20 ms, thus making it impossible for participants to consciously identify these. A mask followed the prime's initial onset, after which the target was presented. The time between the onset of the prime and the appearance of the target was, also, varied in order to assess the time course of any priming effects obtained. The results suggest that affordances for relevant actions can also be extracted from objects whose physical properties are far from obvious, and appear inaccessible to consciousness. Furthermore, we provide evidence of a negative compatibility effect under experimental circumstances that have not been described in the literature before, and which rule out many kinds of interaction at a perceptual level.

  12. Flow and regulatory compatibility: an experimental approach to the flow model of intrinsic motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Johannes; Bless, Herbert

    2008-02-01

    The authors propose that the experience of flow (Csikszentmihalyi, 2000) as reflected in the deep involvement in an activity perceived as intrinsically rewarding represents a regulatory compatibility experience. The research addresses the notion that the compatibility of critical person (e.g., skills) and environmental factors (e.g., demands) involved in a given activity elicits subjective experiences that render the respective activity rewarding. Two studies are reported that investigate the consequences of compatibility of skills and task demands during task engagement. Departing from correlational research, the present studies employ a newly developed experimental paradigm to document the causal impact of such a skills/demands compatibility on the emergence of flow. Experiment 2 revealed that individuals characterized by a strong habitual action-orientation were most sensitive to the manipulation of the skills-demands compatibility.

  13. Isothermal Microcalorimetric Evaluation of Compatibility of Proposed Injector Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide in concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. All surfaces wetted by HTP must be evaluated for compatibility with the fluid. In the case of tanks, lines and valves compatibility is required to preserve the HTP oxygen and energy content and to avoid overpressurization due to decomposition. With injectors and regenerative cooling passages shorter exposure time reduces these concerns. However, phase changes from fluid to gas impact heat transfer and become the dominant compatibility concern. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) provides a convenient and reproducible means to observe the decomposition of HTP when exposed to structural materials and therefore the compatibility of those materials'. The instrument provides heat flow values in terms of watts that may be converted to a reaction rate given the heat of reaction for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. These values are then converted to percent active oxygen loss per week (%AOL/wk) to preserve an earlier convention for quantifying HTP compatibility. Additionally, qualitative designations of compatibility have been assigned to these values. This scheme consists of four classes with Class 1 being the most compatible. While historical compatibility data is available its current applicability is in question due to subtle changes in the compositions of both HTP and structural materials. Trace levels of molecules can have significant influence on compatibility. Therefore representative samples of materials must be evaluated with current HTP formulations. In this work seven materials were selected for their strength characteristics at high temperature as expected in a HTP injector. The materials were then evaluated by IMC for HTP compatibility.

  14. Compatibility of pedigree-based and marker-based relationship matrices for single-step genetic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2012-01-01

    Single-step methods for genomic prediction have recently become popular because they are conceptually simple and in practice such a method can completely replace a pedigree-based method for routine genetic evaluation. An issue with single-step methods is compatibility between the marker...... that it may be important that a single-step method is based on a model conditional on the observed markers. When data are from routine evaluation systems, selection affects the allele frequencies, and therefore both observed markers and observed phenotypes contain information about allele frequencies...... the marker-based relationship matrix is constructed assuming all allele frequencies equal to 0.5 and the pedigree-based relationship matrix is constructed using the unusual assumption that animals in the base population are related and inbreed with relationship coefficient alpha and inbreeding coefficient...

  15. Analysis of Maternal–Offspring HLA Compatibility, Parent-of-Origin Effects, and Noninherited Maternal Antigen Effects for HLA–DRB1 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Paola G.; Komorowski, Leanne K.; Ramsay, Patricia P.; May, Suzanne L.; Noble, Janelle; Lane, Julie A.; Thomson, Glenys; Claas, Frans H.; Seldin, Michael F.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Harley, John B.; Moser, Kathy L.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Behrens, Timothy; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Barcellos, Lisa F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Genetic susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is well established, with the HLA class II DRB1 and DQB1 loci demonstrating the strongest association. However, HLA may also influence SLE through novel biologic mechanisms in addition to genetic transmission of risk alleles. Evidence for increased maternal–offspring HLA class II compatibility in SLE and differences in maternal versus paternal transmission rates (parent-of-origin effects) and nontransmission rates (noninherited maternal antigen [NIMA] effects) in other autoimmune diseases have been reported. Thus, we investigated maternal–offspring HLA compatibility, parent-of-origin effects, and NIMA effects at DRB1 in SLE. Methods The cohort comprised 707 SLE families and 188 independent healthy maternal–offspring pairs (total of 2,497 individuals). Family-based association tests were conducted to compare transmitted versus nontransmitted alleles (transmission disequilibrium test) and both maternally versus paternally transmitted (parent-of-origin) and nontransmitted alleles (using the chi-square test of heterogeneity). Analyses were stratified according to the sex of the offspring. Maternally affected offspring DRB1 compatibility in SLE families was compared with paternally affected offspring compatibility and with independent control maternal–offspring pairs (using Fisher’s test) and was restricted to male and nulligravid female offspring with SLE. Results As expected, DRB1 was associated with SLE (P < 1 × 10−4). However, mothers of children with SLE had similar transmission and nontransmission frequencies for DRB1 alleles when compared with fathers, including those for the known SLE risk alleles HLA–DRB1*0301, *1501, and *0801. No association between maternal–offspring compatibility and SLE was observed. Conclusion Maternal–offspring HLA compatibility, parent-of-origin effects, and NIMA effects at DRB1 are unlikely to play a role in SLE. PMID:20191587

  16. SU-F-J-172: Hybrid MR/CT Compatible Phantom for MR-Only Based Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M; Lee, S; Song, K; Park, S; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Development of hybrid MR/CT compatible phantom was introduced to fully establish MR image only radiation treatment and this suggested technique using in-house developed hybrid MR/CT compatible phantom image would utilize to generate radiation treatment planning and perform dose calculation without multi-modal registration process or generation of pseudo CT. Methods: Fundamental characteristics for “hybrid MR/CT compatible phantom” was established: Relaxation times equivalent to human tissue, dielectric properties, homogeneous relaxation times, sufficient strength to fabricate a torso, ease of handling, a wide variety of density material for calibration, chemical and physical stability over an extended time. For this requirements, chemical component in each tested plug which would be tissue equivalent to human tissue on MR and CT image and production of phantom body and plug was performed. Chemical component has described below: Agaros, GdCl{sub 3}, NaN{sub 3}, NaCl, K{sub 2}Co{sub 3}, deionized-distilled water. Various mixture of chemical component to simulate human tissue on both MR and CT image was tested by measuring T1, T2 relaxation time and signal intensity (SI) on MR image and Hounsfield unit (HU) on CT and each value was compared. The hybrid MR/CT compatible phantom with 14 plugs was designed and has made. Total height and external diameter was decided by internal size of 32 channel MR head-coil. Results: Tissue-equivalent chemical component materials and hybrid MR/CT compatible phantom was developed. The range of T1, T2 relaxation time and SI on MR image, HU on CT was acquired and could be adjusted to correspond to simulated human tissue. Conclusion: Current result shows its possibility for MR-only based radiotherapy and the best mixing rate of chemical component for tissue-equivalent image on MR and CT was founded. However, additional technical issues remain to be overcome. Conversion of SI on MR image into HU and dose calculation based on

  17. Effects of Preparation Methods of Organoclays with Polyvinyl Alcohol in their Compatibility with HDPE. Thermal Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Carrera, María Celeste; Erdmann, Eleonora; Destefanis, Hugo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of polyvinyl alcohol addition on organoclay obtained by in situ polymerization and subsequent alcoholysis of polyvinyl acetate is studied. The incorporation of the monomer is carried out following two procedures. The first is the incorporation of the monomer by direct contact between the monomer and the organoclay. The second procedure involves a first step of impregnating the organoclay with propyl alcohol and the subsequent incorporation of the monomer. Both proced...

  18. Streaming video-based 3D reconstruction method compatible with existing monoscopic and stereoscopic endoscopy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouma, H.; Mark, W. van der; Eendebak, P.T.; Landsmeer, S.; Eekeren, A.W.M. van der; Haar, F.B. ter; Wieringa, F.P.; Basten, J.P. van

    2012-01-01

    Compared to open surgery, minimal invasive surgery offers reduced trauma and faster recovery. However, lack of direct view limits space perception. Stereo-endoscopy improves depth perception, but is still restricted to the direct endoscopic field-of-view. We describe a novel technology that

  19. Compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel (Part I) - Validation of nuclear design method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Roh, Gyu Hong; Park, Dong Whan; Choi, Hang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    For the DUPIC fuel physics analysis, the WIIMS-AECL, SHETAN and RFSP are being used for the lattice parameter generation, incremental cross-section generation and core simulation, respectively. The reactor physics codes used for DUPIC fuel analysis have been assessed using a Monte Carlo code MCNP, Phase-B measurement test of Wolsong nuclear power plant 2, and the CANDU core design and analysis codes (POWDERPUFS-V, MULTICELL and RFSP). The lattice calculations have shown that the eigenvalues are predicted within 0.73% {delta}k and the error of the coolant void reactivity is less than 5%. The fuel temperature coefficient has a relatively large error of {approx}80%; however, the fuel temperature coefficient predicted by WIMS-AECL is within 2STDs of MCNP results. The simulation of Wolsong nuclear power plant 2 has shown an excellent prediction of criticality by WIMS/RFSP. The reactivity device worth and flux distribution are also predicted with a reasonable accuracy generally acceptable core the CANDU core design and analysis. The MCNP simulation of a simplified CANDU core has also shown that the eigenvalue and power distribution are consistent with those calculated by WIMS/RFSP codes for the DUPIC fuel. In conclusion, the validation effort has shown that the WIMS/RFSP code system is good enough to be used for the feasibility and sensitivity analysis of the DUPIC fuel. 36 refs., 36 figs., 39 tabs. (Author)

  20. Investigation of flushing and clean-out methods for refrigeration equipment to ensure system compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, J.J.; Shows, M.; Abel, M.W. [Integral Sciences Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-04-24

    SECTION 608 of the Clean Air Act Amendments has altered much of the refrigeration service contracting industry. MCLR Project Number 660-52502 was established to examine two areas where the Amendments are influencing contractors to determine if more cost-effective service procedures might be developed. One area where existing service procedures are being revisited involves the removal of contaminants from a refrigeration system after a motor burnout. At one time, a Class 1 substance such as CFC-11 or CFC-113 was used as a flushing agent for cleaning a system after a burnout. On large systems, the compressor was disassembled, and the parts were cleaned using 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) or a TCA-containing mixture. Such alternatives are seldom possible today, as the manufacture of Class 1 substances was banned on January 1, 1996. This report describes processes for mineral oil removal, process alternatives for servicing burnouts, solvents, and laboratory retrofit tests.

  1. A Method to Determine an Organization’s Compatibility with Hybrid Workspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    were selected from proven Likert scale survey questions regarding organizational culture (Campion, Medsker & Higgs , 1993; Morgeson, Medsker, Campion...suggest the Air Force should further explore the feasibility of using hybrid workspaces to not only improve space utilization, but as a mechanism to...content/uploads/2013/06/360Magazine-Issue66.pdf Bandura, A., & Jourden, F. J. (1991). Self-regulatory mechanisms governing the impact of social

  2. Semantic Web Compatible Names and Descriptions for Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Wilson, N.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Modern scientific names are critical for understanding the biological literature and provide a valuable way to understand evolutionary relationships. To validly publish a name, a description is required to separate the described group of organisms from those described by other names at the same level of the taxonomic hierarchy. The frequent revision of descriptions due to new evolutionary evidence has lead to situations where a single given scientific name may over time have multiple descriptions associated with it and a given published description may apply to multiple scientific names. Because of these many-to-many relationships between scientific names and descriptions, the usage of scientific names as a proxy for descriptions is inevitably ambiguous. Another issue lies in the fact that the precise application of scientific names often requires careful microscopic work, or increasingly, genetic sequencing, as scientific names are focused on the evolutionary relatedness between and within named groups such as species, genera, families, etc. This is problematic to many audiences, especially field biologists, who often do not have access to the instruments and tools required to make identifications on a microscopic or genetic basis. To better connect scientific names to descriptions and find a more convenient way to support computer assisted identification, we proposed the Semantic Vernacular System, a novel naming system that creates named, machine-interpretable descriptions for groups of organisms, and is compatible with the Semantic Web. Unlike the evolutionary relationship based scientific naming system, it emphasizes the observable features of organisms. By independently naming the descriptions composed of sets of observational features, as well as maintaining connections to scientific names, it preserves the observational data used to identify organisms. The system is designed to support a peer-review mechanism for creating new names, and uses a controlled

  3. Use of a structural alphabet to find compatible folds for amino acid sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Swapnil; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Sanejouand, Yves-Henri; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Offmann, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The structural annotation of proteins with no detectable homologs of known 3D structure identified using sequence-search methods is a major challenge today. We propose an original method that computes the conditional probabilities for the amino-acid sequence of a protein to fit to known protein 3D structures using a structural alphabet, known as "Protein Blocks" (PBs). PBs constitute a library of 16 local structural prototypes that approximate every part of protein backbone structures. It is used to encode 3D protein structures into 1D PB sequences and to capture sequence to structure relationships. Our method relies on amino acid occurrence matrices, one for each PB, to score global and local threading of query amino acid sequences to protein folds encoded into PB sequences. It does not use any information from residue contacts or sequence-search methods or explicit incorporation of hydrophobic effect. The performance of the method was assessed with independent test datasets derived from SCOP 1.75A. With a Z-score cutoff that achieved 95% specificity (i.e., less than 5% false positives), global and local threading showed sensitivity of 64.1% and 34.2%, respectively. We further tested its performance on 57 difficult CASP10 targets that had no known homologs in PDB: 38 compatible templates were identified by our approach and 66% of these hits yielded correctly predicted structures. This method scales-up well and offers promising perspectives for structural annotations at genomic level. It has been implemented in the form of a web-server that is freely available at http://www.bo-protscience.fr/forsa. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  4. Implantable cardiac pacemaker electromagnetic compatibility testing in a novel security system simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Wolfgang; Casamento, Jon P; Ruggera, Paul S; Chan, Dulciana D; Witters, Donald M

    2005-03-01

    This paper describes a novel simulator to perform electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests for active implantable medical devices (AIMDs) with electromagnetic fields emitted by security systems. The security system simulator was developed in response to over 100 incident reports over 17 years related to the interference of AIMD's with security systems and the lack of a standardized test method. The simulator was evaluated regarding field homogeneity, signal distortion, and maximum magnetic field strength levels. Small three-axis probes and a three-axis scanning system were designed to determine the spatial and temporal characteristics of the fields emitted by 12 different types of walk through metal detectors (WTMDs). Tests were performed on four implanted pacemakers with a saline phantom and correlated to a newly developed test method performed "in air" (without the phantom). Comparison of the simulator thresholds with tests performed in real WTMDs showed that the simulator is able to mimic the pacemaker interference. The interference thresholds found in the simulator indicate that pulsed magnetic fields are more likely to cause interference in pacemakers than sinusoidal fields. The security system simulator will help biomedical engineers, manufacturers of medical devices, and manufacturers of security systems to identify incompatible combinations of WTMDs and AIMDs early in the development stage.

  5. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing for Conducted Susceptibility Along Interconnecting Signal Lines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, P. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wood, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shourbaji, A. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, T. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beets, B. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-31

    This document presents recommendations and the associated technical basis for addressing the effects of conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) along interconnecting signal lines in safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in assisting the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in developing the technical basis for regulatory guidance on EMIIRFI immunity and power surge withstand capability (SWC). Previous research efforts have provided recommendations on (1) electromagnetic compatibility design and installation practices, (2) the endorsement of EMI/RFI and SWC test criteria and test methods, (3) the determination of ambient electromagnetic conditions at nuclear power plants, and (4) the development of recommended electromagnetic operating envelopes applicable to locations where safety-related I&C systems will be installed. The current research focuses on the susceptibility of l&C systems to conducted EMIIRFI along interconnecting signal lines. Coverage of signal line susceptibility was identified as an open issue in previous research on establishing the technical basis for EMIIRFI and SWC in safety-related I&C systems. Research results provided in this report will be used to establish the technical basis for endorsing U.S. Department of Defense and European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization test criteria and test methods that address signal-line susceptibility. In addition, recommendations on operating envelopes are presented based on available technical information.

  6. Comparison of US. Military and International Electromagnetic Compatibility Guidance. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, P. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wood, R. T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Antonescu, C. E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Washington, DC (United States)

    2003-08-31

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been engaged by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to assist in developing the technical basis for regulatory guidance on electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) immunity and power surge withstand capability (SWC). Previous research has provided recommendations on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) design and installation practices, endorsement of EMII/RFI immunity and SWC test criteria and test methods, and determination of ambient electromagnetic conditions at nuclear power plants. These recommendations have been incorporated into the technical basis for guidance in addressing EMI/RFI and power surges in safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems in nuclear power plants. The recommendations by the ORNL staff on test criteria, test methods, and operating envelopes were significantly influenced by the military standards issued by the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD). That is the case because until recently there were no comprehensive commercial standards that covered EMI/RFI immunity. The present research involves reviewing and assessing the commercial standards issued by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and endorsed by the European Union in the last few years. This document reports the results of a study performed by the ORNL staff comparing Regulatory Guide 1.180, the U.S. military standards, and international EMC guidance.

  7. Compatibility studies of acyclovir and lactose in physical mixtures and commercial tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz; Hassanzadeh, Davoud; Valizadeh, Hadi; Siahi-Shadbad, Mohammad R; Mojarrad, Javid Shahbazi; Robertson, Thomas A; Roberts, Michael S

    2009-11-01

    This study documents drug-excipient incompatibility studies of acyclovir in physical mixtures with lactose and in different tablet brands. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was initially used to assess compatibility of mixtures. The Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum was also compared with the spectra of pure drug and excipient. Although DSC results indicated incompatibility with lactose, FTIR spectra were mostly unmodified due to overlapping peaks. Samples of isothermally stressed physical mixture were stored at 95 degrees C for 24 h. The residual drug was monitored using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay and data fitting to solid-state kinetic models was performed. The drug loss kinetics followed a diffusion model. The aqueous mixture of drug and excipient was heated in order to prepare an adduct mixture. HPLC analysis revealed one extra peak that was fractionated and subsequently injected into the liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system. The MRM (Multiple Reaction Monitoring) chromatograms characterized the peak with molecular mass corresponding to an acyclovir-lactose Maillard reaction product. The presence of lactose in commercial tablets was checked using a new TLC method. Overall, the incompatibility of acyclovir with lactose was successfully evaluated using a combination of thermal methods and LC-MS/MS.

  8. Curcuma mangga-Mediated Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Characterization, Stability, Cytotoxicity, and Blood Compatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiing Yee Foo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of toxic chemicals as reducing and stabilizing agents in the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs has increased in vivo toxicity and thus limited its application in clinical settings. Herein, we propose an alternative method of preparing highly stable AuNPs, where non-toxic Curcuma mangga (CM extract was used as a single reducing and stabilizing agent to overcome the aforementioned constraints. The morphological images enunciated that the homogeneously dispersed AuNPs exhibited spherical morphology with an average particle diameter of 15.6 nm. Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR and cyclic voltammetry analysis demonstrated that carbonyl groups of terpenoids in CM extract played an important role in the formation and stabilization of AuNPs. Green-synthesized AuNPs were found to have good stability in physiological media after 24 h of dispersion. The AuNPs were also cytocompatible with human colon fibroblast cell (CCD-18Co and human lung fibroblast cell (MRC-5. Hemocompatibility tests revealed that the AuNPs were blood-compatible, with less than 10% of hemolysis without any aggregation of erythrocytes. The current study suggests potential in employing a CM-extract-based method in the preparation of AuNPs for anticancer diagnosis and therapy.

  9. Curcuma mangga-Mediated Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles: Characterization, Stability, Cytotoxicity, and Blood Compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Yiing Yee; Periasamy, Vengadesh; Kiew, Lik Voon; Kumar, G Gnana; Malek, Sri Nurestri Abd

    2017-05-27

    The utilization of toxic chemicals as reducing and stabilizing agents in the preparation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has increased in vivo toxicity and thus limited its application in clinical settings. Herein, we propose an alternative method of preparing highly stable AuNPs, where non-toxic Curcuma mangga (CM) extract was used as a single reducing and stabilizing agent to overcome the aforementioned constraints. The morphological images enunciated that the homogeneously dispersed AuNPs exhibited spherical morphology with an average particle diameter of 15.6 nm. Fourier Transform infrared (FTIR) and cyclic voltammetry analysis demonstrated that carbonyl groups of terpenoids in CM extract played an important role in the formation and stabilization of AuNPs. Green-synthesized AuNPs were found to have good stability in physiological media after 24 h of dispersion. The AuNPs were also cytocompatible with human colon fibroblast cell (CCD-18Co) and human lung fibroblast cell (MRC-5). Hemocompatibility tests revealed that the AuNPs were blood-compatible, with less than 10% of hemolysis without any aggregation of erythrocytes. The current study suggests potential in employing a CM-extract-based method in the preparation of AuNPs for anticancer diagnosis and therapy.

  10. Synergy, compatibility, and innovation: merging Lewis acids with stereoselective enamine catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, Andrea; Mengozzi, Luca; Wilson, Claire M; Cozzi, Pier Giorgio

    2014-04-01

    In recent years there has been an accelerated rate of development in the field of organocatalysis, with asymmetric organocatalysis now reaching full maturity. The invention of new organocatalytic reactions and the exploration of new concepts now appear in tandem with the application of organocatalytic techniques in the synthesis of natural products and active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). After a "golden rush" in organocatalysis, researchers are now starting to combine different methods, thereby taking advantage of the significant benefits of synergy. Metals are used in combination with organocatalytic processes, thus reaching complexity that is found in nature, where enzymes take advantage of the presence of certain metals to increase the arsenal of organic transformations available. In this Focus review, we illustrate the possibility of a "happy marriage" between Lewis acids and organocatalytic stereoselective processes. Questions have been raised about the combination of Lewis acids and organocatalysis owing to the presence of water and/or strong bases in these processes. Some Lewis acids have been shown to be compatible with organocatalysis and concepts relating to their use will be illustrated herein. To summarize the fruitful use of Lewis acids in stereoselective organocatalytic processes, we will draw attention to the advantages and selectivity achieved using this method.

  11. A recombinant fusion protein-based, fluorescent protease assay for high throughput-compatible substrate screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozóki, Beáta; Gazda, Lívia; Tóth, Ferenc; Miczi, Márió; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2018-01-01

    In connection with the intensive investigation of proteases, several methods have been developed for analysis of the substrate specificity. Due to the great number of proteases and the expected target molecules to be analyzed, time- and cost-efficient high-throughput screening (HTS) methods are preferred. Here we describe the development and application of a separation-based HTS-compatible fluorescent protease assay, which is based on the use of recombinant fusion proteins as substrates of proteases. The protein substrates used in this assay consists of N-terminal (hexahistidine and maltose binding protein) fusion tags, cleavage sequences of the tobacco etch virus (TEV) and HIV-1 proteases, and a C-terminal fluorescent protein (mApple or mTurquoise2). The assay is based on the fluorimetric detection of the fluorescent proteins, which are released from the magnetic bead-attached substrates by the proteolytic cleavage. The protease assay has been applied for activity measurements of TEV and HIV-1 proteases to test the suitability of the system for enzyme kinetic measurements, inhibition studies, and determination of pH optimum. We also found that denatured fluorescent proteins can be renatured after SDS-PAGE of denaturing conditions, but showed differences in their renaturation abilities. After in-gel renaturation both substrates and cleavage products can be identified by in-gel UV detection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. 60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-05

    Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.

  13. 60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuzum, J.L.

    1997-01-31

    Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.

  14. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment MECA Abrasion Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J.; Meloy, T. P.; Cobbly, T.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs'hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated: note that

  15. The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) Abrasion Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. R.; Anderson, M. S.; Hinde, B. D.; Hecht, M. H.; Pike, W. T.; Marshall, J. R.; Meloy, T. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment, an instrument suite to be flown on Mars Surveyor 2001, will include a tool for doing simple mineralogical scratch and streak tests on particles from the Martian regolith. The Abrasion Tool will be applied to particles that adhere themselves to highly polished substrates of various hardnesses. Granular soil components will be subjected to a compressive force of about 3 N using a leaf spring. The spring will be applied with a paraffin actuator capable of a 0.76 mm throw to achieve a maximum displacement of about 7.5 mm at the tip of the tool. The pressure per grain will be dependent on the grain size, the number of grains that adhere to the substrate and the number of grains in compression. The pressure per particle is expected to be on the order of 100 MPa - 1 GPa. The MECA sample wheel containing the substrates will be rotated after the particles are placed in compression to produce scratches or pits. A primary goal of the Abrasion Tool is to identify quartz (Mohs' hardness = 7) using substrates of varying hardnesses. Quartz is considered hazardous to future human explorers of Mars because it can cause silicosis of the lungs if it is of respirable size. It is also hazardous to machinery, structures, and space suits because of its ability to abrade and scratch surfaces. Since large quantities of minerals harder than quartz are not expected, any scratches produced on polished quartz substrates might be reasonably attributed to quartz particles, although there may be minerals such as impact metamorphic diamond in the soils. Careful calibration of the tool will be necessary to ensure that grains are not overloaded; for example, a steel ball pressed into glass will produce a Hertzian fracture, even though it is softer than glass. Other minerals, such as magnetite (Mohs' hardness = 6.5) have been shown to scratch glass ceramics such as Zerodur (Mohs' hardness = 6.5). Thus, minerals can be differentiated

  16. Application of nuclear and physico-chemical analysis methods in the study of an after-implanting bioactive glass deposition on a titanium alloy, in view of optimizing the long-term bio-compatibility and operability; Application de methodes nucleaires et physico-chimiques d`analyse a l`etude, apres implantation, d`un depot de bioverre sur un alliage de titane, en vue d`une optimisation de la biocompatibilite et de la fonctionnalite a long terme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brun, Vanessa [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Clermont-Ferrand-2 Univ., 63 - Aubiere (France)

    1999-01-27

    To improve the anchorage of orthopedic prosthesis into surrounding bone, osteo-conductive biomaterials are usually used as coatings. Among usual coatings, we find bioactive glasses. The bioactive glass A9 is analyzed before and after implantation. It is plasma sprayed onto titanium alloy cylinders (Ti-6Al-4V). Neutron Activation Analysis and Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry allow us to get the precise composition of A9 before implantation, and to observe a volatilization of some A9 oxides during plasma spraying. Scanning Electron Microscopy shows a coating constituted by pores and by A9 particles of different sizes, into a non compact and non homogeneous form of variable thickness. Wavelength Dispersive Spectroscopy is applied to the analysis of A9 major element composition, in surface and thickness: the composition of the coating is homogeneous in volume. Ti alloy cylinders coated with A9 are implanted in ovine femur epiphysis. At different times after implantation they are extracted to be analyzed. The formation of an in vivo gel in contact with the coated implant and neo-formed bone was found. Time variations in the concentration of the bioactive glass constituents were observed in the gel. Titanium is detected within gel and neo-formed bone, in a higher quantity than within an old bone. P.I.X.E. method enables us to get elemental mapping of several interesting areas and to trace elements (zinc, strontium) in the neo-formed bone. The percentages of bone surface in contact and of bone volume are calculated and the results show that at 12 months, the bone surface in contact is equivalent for coated and uncoated cylinders. However, the bone volume is higher for coated cylinders. This last point clearly stresses the interest of A9 bioactive glass shows its osteo-conductivity 63 refs., 74 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Quantitative proteomics and transcriptomics of potato in response to Phytophthora infestans in compatible and incompatible interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali, Ashfaq; Alexandersson, Erik; Sandin, Marianne; Resjö, Svante; Lenman, Marit; Hedley, Pete; Levander, Fredrik; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    In order to get global molecular understanding of one of the most important crop diseases worldwide, we investigated compatible and incompatible interactions between Phytophthora infestans and potato (Solanum tuberosum...

  18. Electromagnetic Compatibility between Marine Automatic Identification and Public Correspondence Systems in the Maritime Mobile VHF Band.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The Coast Guard funded the National Telecommunications and Information Administration : (NTIA) to perform electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests between an ITU-R M. 825-3 : (Characteristics Of a Transponder System Using Digital Selective Calling T...

  19. 76 FR 66666 - Basic Service Tier Encryption Compatibility Between Cable Systems and Consumer Electronics Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... Electronics Equipment AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: In this... consumer electronics equipment for most subscribers. At the same time, however, we recognize that some... Act), Congress recognized that compatibility problems between cable service and consumer electronics...

  20. [Compatible biomass estimation models of natural forests in Changbai Mountains based on forest inventory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan-Qiu; Wang, Li-Hai

    2007-01-01

    Forest biomass estimation is the groundwork of analyzing carbon cycle and its dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems, but the current estimation models had the problem of un-compatibility between total forest biomass and its components. Taking the Wangqing natural forest area in Jilin Province as a case, the compatible concept of building forest biomass models based on forest invent' tory was brought forward. A series of compatible biomass estimation models, taking stem volume as one of the independent variables, were established by using simultaneous equations. The accuracy of the models in estimating the biomass of coniferous forest, broad-leaved forest, and mixed forest was all higher than 95% , suggesting that these models basically solved the problem of un-compatibility between total forest biomass and its components.

  1. Compatibility of entomopathogenic nematodes (Nematoda: Rhabditida with insecticides used in the tomato crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Henrique de Siqueira Sabino

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs are agents that can be used for the biological control of pests associated with insecticides in a tank mix. Compatibility studies need to be conducted to analyze which products are compatible with nematodes. The aim of this work was to evaluate the compatibility between EPNs and the insecticides that are most used on the tomato crop, and to correlate the toxicological classification of the chemical products with two species of EPNs that have the potential to control tomato leaf miner, Tuta absoluta. Among the products tested, Certero (triflumuron, Decis (deltamethrin, Previcur (dimethylamino-propyl, Ampligo (lambdacyhalothrin + chlorantranilprole, Premio (clorantranilprole, Engeo Pleno (thiamethoxam + lambda-cyhalothrin were compatible (IOBC class 1 with both nematode species.

  2. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  3. A BioBrick compatible strategy for genetic modification of plants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyle, Patrick M; Burrill, Devin R; Inniss, Mara C; Agapakis, Christina M; Deardon, Aaron; Dewerd, Jonathan G; Gedeon, Michael A; Quinn, Jacqueline Y; Paull, Morgan L; Raman, Anugraha M; Theilmann, Mark R; Wang, Lu; Winn, Julia C; Medvedik, Oliver; Schellenberg, Kurt; Haynes, Karmella A; Viel, Alain; Brenner, Tamara J; Church, George M; Shah, Jagesh V; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-01-01

    .... Described here is a framework for engineering the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with standardized, BioBrick compatible vectors and parts available through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://www.partsregistry.org...

  4. Condoms and condiments: compatibility and safety of personal lubricants and their use in Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Geibel, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on the use of personal lubricants for sexual intercourse is limited and has primarily focused on condom compatibility and breakage, with only recent limited assessment of lubricant...

  5. Plug-and-Play Compatibility for CubeSat Attitude Determination and Control Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of Plug-and-play Compatibility for CubeSat Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADACS) is proposed. Existing Maryland Aerospace (MAI) ADACS...

  6. Complexity and Approximation for Scheduling Problem for Coupled-Tasks in Presence of Compatibility Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Simonin, Gilles; Giroudeau, Rodolphe; König, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we study a scheduling problem with compled-tasks in presence of incompatible constraint. We give complexity results and a polynomial-time approximation for a specific problem when the compatibility graph has different topologies.

  7. Compatibility Determination [Monitoring and Collection of Black Flies and Other Insects Attracted to Carbon Dioxide

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document provides the compatibility determination for research by the International Crane Foundation to deploy carbon dioxide traps to monitor insect...

  8. 76 FR 46798 - Compatibility of Underground Storage Tank Systems With Biofuel Blends; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Compatibility of Underground Storage Tank Systems With Biofuel Blends; Correction AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: This document contains a...

  9. [Study on interface compatibility and fracture resistance of polyglycidyl methacrylate pre-impregnated quartz fiber reinforced polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-ming; Yan, Xu; Deng, Xu-ling

    2015-02-18

    To explore the reinforcement of polyglycidyl methacrylate (PGMA) pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh in denture base materials by investigation of interface compatibility and fracture resistance. 1-layer, 2-layer, 3-layer PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber meshes, electrolyzed cobalt-chromium alloy mesh and cobalt-chromium alloy mesh conditioned by metal primer were integrated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin by sandwich embedding method. Block samples of 5 groups were prepared (40 mm×15 mm×2 mm). Fracture resistance was determined in a 3-point bending test at 2 mm/min. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), micrographs were taken from the fractured surfaces to analyze the bonding interface compatibility. The group of 3-layer PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh presented the highest elastic modulus of 6 406 MPa and flexural strength of 227 MPa among the five groups, while the 1-layer and 2-layer expressed the similar elastic modulus and flexural strength to the pure PMMA group. The metal groups demonstrated better mechanical properties, while the metal surface conditioner played much better. The metal surface conditioner pre-impregnated cobalt-chromium alloy and PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh showed compatible interface with PMMA. The mechanical properties were improved by the increasing of the fiber by adding the more meshed. Although the benign interface did help the compatibility, the quantity of the fibers played an important role in the strength.

  10. Microstructure, corrosion properties and bio-compatibility of calcium zinc phosphate coating on pure iron for biomedical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Zhang, Erlin; Yang, Ke

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the biocompatibility and the corrosion resistance in the initial stage of implantation, a phosphate (CaZn2(PO4)2·2H2O) coating was obtained on the surface of pure iron by a chemical reaction method. The anti-corrosion property, the blood compatibility and the cell toxicity of the coated pure iron specimens were investigated. The coating was composed of some fine phosphate crystals and the surface of coating was flat and dense enough. The electrochemical data indicated that the corrosion resistance of the coated pure iron was improved with the increase of phosphating time. When the specimen was phosphated for 30min, the corrosion resistance (Rp) increased to 8006 Ω. Compared with that of the naked pure iron, the anti-hemolysis property and cell compatibility of the coated specimen was improved significantly, while the anti-coagulant property became slightly worse due to the existence of element calcium. It was thought that phosphating treatment might be an effective method to improve the biocompatibility of pure iron for biomedical application. © 2013.

  11. [Discussion on the electromagnetic compatibility testing and evaluation of radio frequency ablation catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuji; Yang, Jiangang

    2014-11-01

    With the enforcement of YY 0505-2012, the testing items and evaluation points of radio frequency ablation catheter in electromagnetic compatibility field should be studied and discussed. Based on the requirements of relevant standards, this paper discusses on the testing items that should be applied and the evaluation points that should be focused on by analyzing the intended use and the structure of radio frequency ablation catheter, when it intends to apply registration individually with the basic knowledge of electromagnetic compatibility field.

  12. Power-related compatibility and maximum electrical power output of a thermogenerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, W. [Institute of Physics, University Halle-Wittenberg, 06099 Halle (Germany); Zabrocki, K.; Mueller, E. [Institute of Materials Research, German Aerospace Center (DLR), 51170 Koeln (Germany); Snyder, G.J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The compatibility approach enables the description of thermoelectric effects in terms of intensive state variables. Within the framework of a new optimization strategy based on self-compatible thermoelectric elements,the consequences for the maximum electrical power output from a graded thermoelectric generator with fixed length are discussed. Unlike efficiency and coefficient of performance, no strict local criterion exists for maximum power. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Affordances of distractors and compatibility effects: a study with the computational model TRoPICALS

    OpenAIRE

    Caligiore, Daniele; Anna M Borghi; Parisi, Domenico; Ellis, Rob; Cangelosi, Angelo; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Seeing an object activates in the brain both visual and action codes. Crucial evidence supporting this view is offered by compatibility effect experiments (Ellis et al. (2007). J Exp Psychol: Hum Percept Perform): perception of an object can facilitate or interfere with the execution of an action (e.g. grasping) even when the viewer has no intention of interacting with the object. TRoPICALS (Caligiore et al. (2010). Psychol Rev) is a computational model developed to study compatibility effect...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging compatibility test of a cranial prosthesis with titanium screws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, R.; Benavides, A.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S. S.; Solis, S. E.; Uribe, E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    The follow-up of patients with skull prosthesis is necessary to provide adequate medical care. Skull prostheses for cranioplasty have been developed at the Faculty of Odontology of Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. We built a skull prosthesis phantom and tested for compatibility with standard magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Results showed full compatibility but susceptibility artefacts occurred due to titanium used to fix the prosthesis to the skull.

  15. Condoms and condiments: compatibility and safety of personal lubricants and their use in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Scott Geibel

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on the use of personal lubricants for sexual intercourse is limited and has primarily focused on condom compatibility and breakage, with only recent limited assessment of lubricant safety and possible epidemiologic implications. This article discusses the global evidence of lubricant compatibility with latex condoms and biological safety of lubricants, as well as documentation of lubricant use and current guidelines for HIV prevention programming in Africa. Data on lubricant...

  16. A scenario-based verification technique to assess the compatibility of collaborative business processes.

    OpenAIRE

    De Backer, Manu; Snoeck, Monique; Monsieur, Geert; Lemahieu, Wilfried; Dedene, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Successful E-Business is based on seamless collaborative business processes. Each partner in the collaboration specifies its own rules and interaction preconditions. The verification of the compatibility of collaborative business processes, based on local and global views, is a complex task, which is critical for the success of the cooperation. The verification of process compatibility should be a key element in the design of new business alliances, which makes this verification essential in ...

  17. Chemical compatibility of tank wastes in 241-C-106, 241-AY-101, and 241-AY-102

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sederburg, J.P.

    1994-08-03

    This report documents the chemical compatibility of waste types within tanks 241-C-106, 241-AY-101, and 241-AY-102. This information was compiled to facilitate the transfer of tank C-106 waste to tank AY-102 utilizing supernatant from AY-101 as the sluicing medium. This document justifies that no chemical compatibility safety issues currently understood, or theorized from thermodynamic modeling, will result from the intended sluice transfer operation.

  18. Competing Compatibility Standards and Network Externalities in the PC Software Market.

    OpenAIRE

    Gandal, Neil

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an empirical study of the value of four file compatibility standards for transferring data in the personal computer software market. The results are that only the LOTUS file compatibility standard is significant in explaining price variations and it is significant in both the spreadsheet and database management system markets. This supports the hypothesis that the personal computer software market exhibits complementary network externalities. Copyright 1995 by MIT Press.

  19. Elements of a compatible optimization theory for coupled systems; Elements d'une theorie de l'optimisation compatible de systemes couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnemay, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1969-07-01

    The first theory deals with the compatible optimization in coupled systems. A game theory for two players and with a non-zero sum is first developed. The conclusions are then extended to the case of a game with any finite number of players. After this essentially static study, the dynamic aspect of the problem is applied to the case of games which evolve. By applying PONTRYAGIN maximum principle it is possible to derive a compatible optimisation theorem which constitutes a necessary condition. (author) [French] La premiere these traite de l'optimalisation compatible des systemes couples. Une theorie du jeu a deux joueurs et a somme non nulle est d'abord developpee. Ses conclusions sont etendues ensuite au jeu a un nombre fini quelconque de joueurs. Apres cette etude essentiellement statique, l'aspect dynamique du probleme est introduit dans les jeux evolutifs. L'application du principe du maximum de PONTRYAGIN permet d'enoncer un theoreme d'optimalite compatible qui constitue une condition necessaire. (auteur)

  20. Bumper and grille airbags concept for enhanced vehicle compatibility in side impact: phase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbat, Saeed; Li, Xiaowei; Prasad, Priya

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental physics and numerous field studies have shown a higher injury and fatality risk for occupants in smaller and lighter vehicles when struck by heavier, taller and higher vehicles. The consensus is that the significant parameters influencing compatibility in front-to-side crashes are geometric interaction, vehicle stiffness, and vehicle mass. The objective of this research is to develop a concept of deployable bumper and grille airbags for improved vehicle compatibility in side impact. The external airbags, deployed upon signals from sensors, may help mitigate the effect of weight, geometry and stiffness differences and reduce side intrusions. However, a highly reliable pre-crash sensing system is required to enable the reliable deployment, which is currently not technologically feasible. Analytical and numerical methods and hardware testing were used to help develop the deployable external airbags concept. Various Finite Element (FE) models at different stages were developed and an extensive number of iterations were conducted to help optimize airbag and inflator parameters to achieve desired targets. The concept development was executed and validated in two phases. This paper covers Phase II ONLY, which includes: (1) Re-design of the airbag geometry, pressure, and deployment strategies; (2) Further validation using a Via sled test of a 48 kph perpendicular side impact of an SUV-type impactor against a stationary car with US-SID-H3 crash dummy in the struck side; (3) Design of the reaction surface necessary for the bumper airbag functionality. The concept was demonstrated through live deployment of external airbags with a reaction surface in a full-scale perpendicular side impact of an SUV against a stationary passenger car at 48 kph. This research investigated only the concept of the inflatable devices since pre-crash sensing development was beyond the scope of this research. The concept design parameters of the bumper and grille airbags are presented in

  1. Enhanced compatibility of chemically modified titanium surface with periodontal ligament cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kado, T.; Hidaka, T. [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Ishikari-Tobetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan); Aita, H. [Division of Occlusion and Removable Prosthodontics, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Ishikari-Tobetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan); Endo, K. [Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Ishikari-Tobetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan); Furuichi, Y., E-mail: furuichi@hoku-iryo-u.ac.jp [Division of Periodontology and Endodontology, Department of Oral Rehabilitation, School of Dentistry, Health Sciences University of Hokkaido, 1757 Kanazawa, Ishikari-Tobetsu, Hokkaido 061-0293 (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell-adhesive molecules were covalently immobilized on a Ti surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized cell-adhesive molecules maintained native function on the Ti surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Immobilized collagen enhanced adhesion of periodontal ligament cells to the Ti. - Abstract: A simple chemical modification method was developed to immobilize cell-adhesive molecules on a titanium surface to improve its compatibility with human periodontal ligament cells (HPDLCs).The polished titanium disk was immersed in 1% (v/v) p-vinylbenzoic acid solution for 2 h to introduce carboxyl groups onto the surface. After rinsing with distilled deionized water, the titanium disk was dipped into 1.47% 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide solution containing 0.1 mg/ml Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS), human plasma fibronectin (pFN), or type I collagen from calf skin (Col) to covalently immobilize the cell-adhesive molecules on the titanium surface via formation of peptide bonds. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses revealed that cell-adhesive molecules were successfully immobilized on the titanium surfaces. The Col-immobilized titanium surface revealed higher values regarding nano rough characteristics than the as-polished titanium surface under scanning probe microscopy. The number of HPDLCs attached to both the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces was twice that attached to the as-polished titanium surfaces. The cells were larger with the cellular processes that stretched to a greater extent on the pFN- and Col-immobilized titanium surfaces than on the as-polished titanium surface (p < 0.05). HPDLCs on the Col-immobilized titanium surfaces showed more extensive expression of vinculin at the tips of cell projections and more contiguously along the cell outline than on the as-polished, GRGDS-immobilized and pFN-immobilized titanium surfaces. It was concluded that cell-adhesive molecules successfully

  2. The use of the bicycle compatibility index in identifying gaps and deficiencies in bicycle networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, A.; Oprea, C.; Costescu, D.; Roşca, E.; Dinu, O.; Ghionea, F.

    2016-11-01

    Currently, no methodology is widely accepted by engineers, planners, or bicycle coordinators that allow them to determine how compatible a roadway is in providing efficient operation of both bicycles and motor vehicles. Previous studies reported a number of approaches to obtain an appropriate level of service; some authors developed the bicycle level of service (BLOS) and other authors developed the bicycle compatibility indexes (BCI). The level of service (BLOS) for a bicycle route represents an evaluation of safety and commodity perceived by a bicyclist reported to the motorized traffic, while running on the road surface. The bicycle compatibility index (BCI) is used by bicycle coordinators, transportation planners, traffic engineers to evaluate the capability of specific roadways to accommodate both motorists and bicyclists and to plan for and design roadways that are bicycle compatible. After applying BCI and BLOS models for the designed bicycle infrastructure network in the city of Dej, one can see that only few streets are Moderately Low compatible compared to the others with a high degree of compatibility that recommends to include them in the bicycle infrastructure network.

  3. Transcriptome changes between compatible and incompatible graft combination of Litchi chinensis by digital gene expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Jietang; Hu, Fuchu; Qin, Yonghua; Wang, Xianghe; Hu, Guibing

    2017-06-21

    Plant grafting has been practiced widely in horticulture and proved as a useful tool in science. However, the mechanisms of graft healing or graft incompatibility remain poorly understood. In this study, Litchi chinensis cv. 'Jingganghongnuo' homograft ('J/J') and 'Jingganghongnuo'/'zhuangyuanhong' heterograft ('J/Z') as compatible and incompatible combination, respectively, was used to study transcriptional changes between incompatible and compatible graft during graft union formation. Anatomical observation indicated that three stages (2 h, 14 d and 21 d after grafting) were critical for graft union formation and selected for high-throughput sequencing. Results indicated 6060 DEGs were differentially expressed in the compatible combination and 5267 DEGs exhibiting in the incompatible one. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis revealed that DEGs were involved in metabolism, wound response, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and plant hormone signal transduction. The expression of 9 DEGs annotated in auxin pathway was up-regulated in compatible combination than that in incompatible combination. The IAA concentration confirmed that the IAA might promote the graft compatibility. In addition, 13 DEGs related to lignin biosynthesis were differentially expressed during graft healing process. Overall, our results provide abundant sequence resources for studying mechanisms underlying graft compatibility and establish a platform for further studies of litchi and other evergreen fruit trees.

  4. Software development for the evaluation of the ergonomic compatibility on the selection of advanced manufacturing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Macías, A; Reyes, R; Guillen, L; García, J

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Manufacturing Technology (AMT) is one of the most relevant resources that companies have to achieve competitiveness and best performance. The selection of AMT is a complex problem which involves significant amount of information and uncertainty when multiple aspects must be taken into consideration. Actual models for the selection of AMT are found scarce of the Human Factors and Ergonomics perspective which can lead to a more complete and reliable decision. This paper presents the development of software that enhances the application of an Ergonomic Compatibility Evaluation Model that supports decision making processes taking into consideration ergonomic attributes of designs. Ergonomic Compatibility is a construct used in this model and it is mainly based in the concept of human-artifact compatibility on human compatible systems. Also, an Axiomatic Design approach by the use of the Information Axiom was evolved under a fuzzy environment to obtain the Ergonomic Incompatibility Content. The extension of this axiom for the evaluation of ergonomic compatibility requirements was the theoretical framework of this research. An incremental methodology of four stages was used to design and develop the software that enables to compare AMT alternatives by the evaluation of Ergonomic Compatibility Attributes.

  5. A Wolbachia-Sensitive Communication between Male and Female Pupae Controls Gamete Compatibility in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Stéphanie M; Schweisguth, François

    2015-09-21

    Gamete compatibility is fundamental to sexual reproduction. Wolbachia are maternally inherited endosymbiotic bacteria that manipulate gamete compatibility in many arthropod species. In Drosophila, the fertilization of uninfected eggs by sperm from Wolbachia-infected males often results in early developmental arrest. This gamete incompatibility is called cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). CI is highest in young males, suggesting that Wolbachia affect sperm properties during male development. Here, we show that Wolbachia modulate testis development. Unexpectedly, this effect was associated with Wolbachia infection in females, not males. This raised the possibility that females influenced testis development by communicating with males prior to adulthood. Using a combinatorial rearing protocol, we provide evidence for such a female-to-male communication during metamorphosis. This communication involves the perception of female pheromones by male olfactory receptors. We found that this communication determines the compatibility range of sperm. Wolbachia interfere with this female-to-male communication through changes in female pheromone production. Strikingly, restoring this communication partially suppressed CI in Wolbachia-infected males. We further identified a reciprocal male-to-female communication at metamorphosis that restricts the compatibility range of female gametes. Wolbachia also perturb this communication by feminizing male pheromone production. Thus, Wolbachia broaden the compatibility range of eggs, promoting thereby the reproductive success of Wolbachia-infected females. We conclude that pheromone communication between pupae regulates gamete compatibility and is sensitive to Wolbachia in Drosophila. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computed tomography (CT)-compatible remote center of motion needle steering robot: Fusing CT images and electromagnetic sensor data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Navid; Heerink, Wout; van Katwijk, Tim; Hekman, Edsko; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Misra, Sarthak

    2017-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death, and early detection can reduce the mortality rate. Patients with lung nodules greater than 10 mm usually undergo a computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy. However, aligning the needle with the target is difficult and the needle tends to deflect from a straight path. In this work, we present a CT-compatible robotic system, which can both position the needle at the puncture point and also insert and rotate the needle. The robot has a remote-center-of-motion arm which is achieved through a parallel mechanism. A new needle steering scheme is also developed where CT images are fused with electromagnetic (EM) sensor data using an unscented Kalman filter. The data fusion allows us to steer the needle using the real-time EM tracker data. The robot design and the steering scheme are validated using three experimental cases. Experimental Case I and II evaluate the accuracy and CT-compatibility of the robot arm, respectively. In experimental Case III, the needle is steered towards 5 real targets embedded in an anthropomorphic gelatin phantom of the thorax. The mean targeting error for the 5 experiments is 1.78 ± 0.70 mm. The proposed robotic system is shown to be CT-compatible with low targeting error. Small nodule size and large needle diameter are two risk factors that can lead to complications in lung biopsy. Our results suggest that nodules larger than 5 mm in diameter can be targeted using our method which may result in lower complication rate. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of hydrophilicity on the compatibility between a dual-curing resin cement and one-bottle simplified adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Suh, Byoung In

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of the hydrophilicity of adhesives on the compatibility between one-bottle simplified adhesives and a dual-curing resin cement. Three experimental and two commercial adhesives (All-Bond Universal, OptiBond Allin- One) with the same or similar pH and various degrees of hydrophilicity were tested in this study. Extracted human dentin was treated with each adhesive and bonded with a dual-curing resin cement (Duolink), which was either light cured or chemically (self) cured (n = 10). Shear bond strength was tested using the Ultradent jig method, and failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope. Water contact angle (as a measure of hydrophilicity/-phobicity) was measured on a fully cured adhesive (n = 10). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test. The quantitative relationship between the hydrophilicity and bond strength differences was analyzed (confidence level 95%). Among the experimental adhesives, differences in bond strengths between light-curing and self-curing modes were larger for the more hydrophilic adhesives. For the commercial adhesives, Optibond All-in-One had a lower contact angle than All-bond Universal (p Universal were 29.6 and 31.5, respectively (light cured), and 1.9 and 30.0, respectively (self-cured). Adhesive failure was a predominant mode for all adhesives except for All-Bond Universal. Regression analysis indicated a linear correlation between adhesives' hydrophilicity and bond strength differences (p adhesives were less compatible (larger bond strength differences between different curing modes) with this dual-curing resin cement. All-bond Universal is more hydrophobic than Optibond All-in-One and it is compatible with this self-/dual-curing resin cement.

  8. Physical Compatibility of Magnesium Sulfate and Sodium Bicarbonate in a Pharmacy-compounded Bicarbonate-buffered Hemofiltration Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Brad; Henning, Stacey A.; Jin, Haksong; Kolf, Mike; Rehak, Nadja N.; Danner, Robert L.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Grimes, George J.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the physical compatibility of magnesium sulfate and sodium bicarbonate in a pharmacy-compounded bicarbonate-buffered hemofiltration solution used at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center (http://www.cc.nih.gov). METHODS Two hemofiltration fluid formulations with a bicarbonate of 50 mEq/L and a magnesium of 1.5 mEq/L or 15 mEq/L were prepared in triplicate with an automated compounding device. The hemofiltration solution with a bicarbonate of 50 mEq/L and a magnesium of 1.5 mEq/L contains the maximum concentration of additives that we use in clinical practice. The hemofiltration solution of 15 mEq/L of magnesium and 50 mEq/L of bicarbonate was used to study the physicochemical properties of this interaction. The solutions were stored without light protection at 22 to 25 °C for 48 hours. Physical compatibility was assessed by visual inspection and microscopy. The pH of the solutions was assayed at 3 to 4 hours and 52 to 53 hours after compounding. In addition, electrolyte and glucose concentrations in the solutions were assayed at two time points after preparation: 3 to 4 hours and 50 to 51 hours. RESULTS No particulate matter was observed by visual and microscopic inspection in the compounded hemofiltration solutions at 48 hours. Electrolyte and glucose concentrations and pH were similar at both time points after solution preparation. CONCLUSION Magnesium sulfate (1.5 mEq/L) and sodium bicarbonate (50 mEq/L) were physically compatible in a pharmacy-compounded bicarbonate-buffered hemofiltration solution at room temperature without light protection at 48 hours. PMID:20237384

  9. The MSP 2001 Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, M. H.; Meloy, T. P.; Anderson, M. S.; Buehler, M. G.; Frant, M. A.; Grannan, S. M.; Fuerstenau, D.; Keller, H. U.; Markiewicz, W. J.; Marshall, J.

    1999-09-01

    The Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) will evaluate the Martian environment for soil and dust-related hazards to human exploration as part of the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. Sponsored by the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, MECA's goal is to evaluate potential geochemical and environmental hazards that may confront future Martian explorers, and to guide HEDS scientists in the development of high fidelity Mars soil simulants. The integrated MECA payload contains a wet-chemistry laboratory, a microscopy station, an electrometer to characterize the electrostatics of the soil and its environment, and arrays of material patches to study the abrasive and adhesive properties of soil grains. The instrument will acquire soil samples with a robotic arm equipped with a camera. MECA will examine surface and subsurface soil and dust in order to characterize particle size, shape, hardness, and also physical characteristics that may provide clues to mineralogy. MECA will characterize soil/water mixtures with respect to pH, redox potential, total dissolved ions, and trace toxins. MECA will determine the nature of electrostatic charging associated with excavation of soil, and the influence of ionizing radiation on material properties. It will also observe natural dust accumulation on engineering materials. To accomplish these objectives, MECA is allocated a mass of 10 kg within an enclosure of 35 x 25 x 15 cm. The Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) consists of four identical cells that will accept samples from surface and subsurface regions accessible to the Lander's robotic arm, mix them with water, and perform extensive analysis of the solution. Ion-selective electrodes and related sensors will evaluate total dissolved solids, redox potential, pH, and the concentration of many soluble ions and gases in wet Martian soil. These electrodes can detect potentially dangerous heavy-metal ions, emitted pathogenic gases, and the soil

  10. Converting HAZUS capacity curves to seismic hazard-compatible building fragility functions: effect of hysteretic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyeuk; Luco, Nicolas; Baker, Jack W.; Karaca, Erdem

    2008-01-01

    A methodology was recently proposed for the development of hazard-compatible building fragility models using parameters of capacity curves and damage state thresholds from HAZUS (Karaca and Luco, 2008). In the methodology, HAZUS curvilinear capacity curves were used to define nonlinear dynamic SDOF models that were subjected to the nonlinear time history analysis instead of the capacity spectrum method. In this study, we construct a multilinear capacity curve with negative stiffness after an ultimate (capping) point for the nonlinear time history analysis, as an alternative to the curvilinear model provided in HAZUS. As an illustration, here we propose parameter values of the multilinear capacity curve for a moderate-code low-rise steel moment resisting frame building (labeled S1L in HAZUS). To determine the final parameter values, we perform nonlinear time history analyses of SDOF systems with various parameter values and investigate their effects on resulting fragility functions through sensitivity analysis. The findings improve capacity curves and thereby fragility and/or vulnerability models for generic types of structures.

  11. Evaluation of Directions for Use Compatibility Between Different Brands Strips Urine Reagent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme de Oliveira Cezar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Through the urine test we can measure kidney function and identify pathologies of the urinary tract. The urine test strips are a fast, easy and increasingly used method of analysis. It is extremely important to check compatibility between the different brands assuring a better understanding of the diagnosis. We compared the package inserts of eight different brands of urine test strips and the reagents used in the urinary determination, besides information concerning the detection of limit ranges, reading intervals and possible interferences. A comparison of the leaflets showed differences among them. Concerning the reagents used, in general, all brands use similar ones but in different quantities. The patient information leaflets have several interferences, but it was observed that some brands do not mention the interferences that are mentioned in other brands. As for the legends of semiquantitative measurements, most brands do not include this information on the product leaflet. Among the brands that could be analyzed with this parameter was observed that the analytes glucose, bilirubin, ketones and blood did not have the same correlation between concentration and label brands. We stress the importance of ensuring a greater standardization of the information contained in the leaflets of the reagent strips.

  12. Matrix compatible solid phase microextraction coating, a greener approach to sample preparation in vegetable matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarato, Attilio; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This work proposes the novel PDMS/DVB/PDMS fiber as a greener strategy for analysis by direct immersion solid phase microextraction (SPME) in vegetables. SPME is an established sample preparation approach that has not yet been adequately explored for food analysis in direct immersion mode due to the limitations of the available commercial coatings. The robustness and endurance of this new coating were investigated by direct immersion extractions in raw blended vegetables without any further sample preparation steps. The PDMS/DVB/PDMS coating exhibited superior features related to the capability of the external PDMS layer to protect the commercial coating, and showed improvements in terms of extraction capability and in the cleanability of the coating surface. In addition to having contributed to the recognition of the superior features of this new fiber concept before commercialization, the outcomes of this work serve to confirm advancements in the matrix compatibility of the PDMS-modified fiber, and open new prospects for the development of greener high-throughput analytical methods in food analysis using solid phase microextraction in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteomic Profiling of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris Leaves during Rhizomania Compatible Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, severely impacts sugar beet (Beta vulgaris production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most production regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with BNYVV, but as resistance breaking strains become more prevalent, effective disease control strategies will require the application of novel methods based on better understanding of disease susceptibility and symptom development. Herein, proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet, infected with two strains of BNYVV, to clarify the types of proteins prevalent during compatible virus-host plant interactions. Total protein was extracted from sugar beet leaf tissue infected with BNYVV, quantified, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 203 proteins were confidently identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and response to stimulus. Many proteins identified in this study are typically associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses. These results expand on relatively limited proteomic data available for sugar beet and provide the ground work for additional studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugar beet.

  14. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M.; Balcom, B. J.

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid.

  15. Fabrication of CMOS-compatible nanopillars for smart bio-mimetic CMOS image sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Saffih, Faycal

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, nanopillars with heights of 1μm to 5μm and widths of 250nm to 500nm have been fabricated with a near room temperature etching process. The nanopillars were achieved with a continuous deep reactive ion etching technique and utilizing PMMA (polymethylmethacrylate) and Chromium as masking layers. As opposed to the conventional Bosch process, the usage of the unswitched deep reactive ion etching technique resulted in nanopillars with smooth sidewalls with a measured surface roughness of less than 40nm. Moreover, undercut was nonexistent in the nanopillars. The proposed fabrication method achieves etch rates four times faster when compared to the state-of-the-art, leading to higher throughput and more vertical side walls. The fabrication of the nanopillars was carried out keeping the CMOS process in mind to ultimately obtain a CMOS-compatible process. This work serves as an initial step in the ultimate objective of integrating photo-sensors based on these nanopillars seamlessly along with the controlling transistors to build a complete bio-inspired smart CMOS image sensor on the same wafer. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. Sterilization Performance and Material Compatibility of Sterilizer for Dental Instruments using RF Oxygen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Liu, Zhen; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    The sterilization performance and material compatibility of low-pressure RF plasma sterilization method for dental instruments were investigated. RF electrode used in this experiment has been optimized for sterilization of dental instruments. The vial-type biological indicator (BI) simulating tiny space of dental instrument was used for evaluation of the sterilization performance. The pressure in the stainless chamber was fixed at 60 Pa. Sterilization of BI was achieved in shortest time 40 min at 80 W, and the sterilization effect was confirmed using three BIs. Light emission spectra of oxygen plasma indicated that production of atomic oxygen and excited oxygen molecule are maximum at pressure of 20 Pa and 200 Pa, respectively. Sterilization results of BIs indicated that successful rate increases with the oxygen pressure towards 200 Pa. Therefore, the excited oxygen molecule is deduced to be a major factor of the sterilization of BI. Surface morphology of dental instruments such as diamond bar was evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The deterioration of fine crystals of diamond bar has not observed after the plasma irradiation for 120 min with RF input power was 60W and pressure was 200 Pa.

  17. An MR/MRI compatible core holder with the RF probe immersed in the confining fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakerian, M; Balcom, B J

    2018-01-01

    An open frame RF probe for high pressure and high temperature MR/MRI measurements was designed, fabricated, and tested. The open frame RF probe was installed inside an MR/MRI compatible metallic core holder, withstanding a maximum pressure and temperature of 5000 psi and 80 °C. The open frame RF probe was tunable for both 1H and 19F resonance frequencies with a 0.2 T static magnetic field. The open frame structure was based on simple pillars of PEEK polymer upon which the RF probe was wound. The RF probe was immersed in the high pressure confining fluid during operation. The open frame structure simplified fabrication of the RF probe and significantly reduced the amount of polymeric materials in the core holder. This minimized the MR background signal detected. Phase encoding MRI methods were employed to map the spin density of a sulfur hexafluoride gas saturating a Berea core plug in the core holder. The SF6 was imaged as a high pressure gas and as a supercritical fluid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicity of spiromesifen and natural acaricides to Tetranychus urticae koch and compatibility with Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vargas de Oliveira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae, is one important pest of cotton crop due to reductions in cotton yield and fiber quality. Thus, this work evaluated the toxicity of the synthetic acaricide spiromesifen and natural products on T. urticae and the compatibility with the predatory mite Phytoseiulus macropilis (Banks (Acari: Phytoseiidae. Spiromesifen and the natural products Azadirachtin A/B, Azadirachtin 1%, Jatropha curcas L. and Ricinus communis L. oils were used at different concentrations; the leaf dipping method was employed. The mortality of T. urticae females and eggs was evaluated 48 and 96 h after treatment to calculate the lethal concentrations. The effect on P. macropilis was studied using the LC50s obtained to T. urticae. All acaricides tested were effective in controlling females and eggs of T. urticae. However, according to the LC50s and LC90s calculated, spiromesifen was the most toxic acaricide to females and J. curcas oil presented the higher toxicity to eggs. Spiromesifen, J. curcas oil and Azadiractina 1% caused side effects on P. macropilis. However, only espiromesifeno was classified as harmful to the predator, whereas Azadirachtin A/B and R. communis oil were slightly harmful. R. communis and Azadirachtin A/B were effective in controlling the two-spotted spider mite and promising for the management of this pest in cotton considering their low toxicity to the predator.

  19. A BioBrick compatible strategy for genetic modification of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick M; Burrill, Devin R; Inniss, Mara C; Agapakis, Christina M; Deardon, Aaron; DeWerd, Jonathan G; Gedeon, Michael A; Quinn, Jacqueline Y; Paull, Morgan L; Raman, Anugraha M; Theilmann, Mark R; Wang, Lu; Winn, Julia C; Medvedik, Oliver; Schellenberg, Kurt; Haynes, Karmella A; Viel, Alain; Brenner, Tamara J; Church, George M; Shah, Jagesh V; Silver, Pamela A

    2012-06-20

    Plant biotechnology can be leveraged to produce food, fuel, medicine, and materials. Standardized methods advocated by the synthetic biology community can accelerate the plant design cycle, ultimately making plant engineering more widely accessible to bioengineers who can contribute diverse creative input to the design process. This paper presents work done largely by undergraduate students participating in the 2010 International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition. Described here is a framework for engineering the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with standardized, BioBrick compatible vectors and parts available through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://www.partsregistry.org). This system was used to engineer a proof-of-concept plant that exogenously expresses the taste-inverting protein miraculin. Our work is intended to encourage future iGEM teams and other synthetic biologists to use plants as a genetic chassis. Our workflow simplifies the use of standardized parts in plant systems, allowing the construction and expression of heterologous genes in plants within the timeframe allotted for typical iGEM projects.

  20. A BioBrick compatible strategy for genetic modification of plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Patrick M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant biotechnology can be leveraged to produce food, fuel, medicine, and materials. Standardized methods advocated by the synthetic biology community can accelerate the plant design cycle, ultimately making plant engineering more widely accessible to bioengineers who can contribute diverse creative input to the design process. Results This paper presents work done largely by undergraduate students participating in the 2010 International Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM competition. Described here is a framework for engineering the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana with standardized, BioBrick compatible vectors and parts available through the Registry of Standard Biological Parts (http://www.partsregistry.org. This system was used to engineer a proof-of-concept plant that exogenously expresses the taste-inverting protein miraculin. Conclusions Our work is intended to encourage future iGEM teams and other synthetic biologists to use plants as a genetic chassis. Our workflow simplifies the use of standardized parts in plant systems, allowing the construction and expression of heterologous genes in plants within the timeframe allotted for typical iGEM projects.