WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypogonadism androgen receptor

  1. Effects of testosterone replacement therapy on bone metabolism in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: focus on the role of androgen receptor CAG polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, G; delli Muti, N; Gioia, A; Biagioli, A; Lenzi, A; Balercia, G

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between androgen receptor (AR) CAG polymorphism and bone metabolism is highly controversial. We, therefore, aimed to evaluate the independent role of AR CAG repeat polymorphism on bone metabolism improvement induced by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in male post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition frequently associated with hypopituitarism and in which the effects of TRT have to be distinguished from those resulting from concomitant administration of pituitary function replacing hormones. 12 men affected by post-surgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism [mean duration of hypogonadism 8.3 ± 2.05 (SD) months] were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT (from 74 to 84 weeks after the beginning of therapy). The following measures were studied: parameters of bone metabolism [serum markers and bone mineral density (BMD)], pituitary dependent hormones and genetic analysis (AR CAG repeat number). Total testosterone, estradiol, free T4 (FT4) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) increased between the two phases, while follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) decreased. While serum markers did not vary significantly between the two phases, BMD improved slightly but significantly in all the studied sites. The number of CAG triplets correlated negatively and significantly with all the variations (Δ-) of BMDs. Conversely, Δ-testosterone correlated positively and significantly with all studied Δ-BMDs, while Δ-FSH, Δ-estradiol, Δ-FT4, and Δ-IGF-1 did not correlate significantly with any of the Δ-BMDs. Multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for Δ-testosterone, showed that CAG repeat length was negatively and significantly associated with ∆-BMD of all measured sites. Our data suggest that, in post-surgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, shorter AR CAG tract is independently associated with greater TRT-induced improvement of BMD.

  2. [Case of androgenic anabolic steroid abuse caused hypogonadotropic hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Akio; Kobayashi, Ko; Hashimoto, Kohei; Kato, Ryuichi; Masumori, Naoya; Itoh, Naoki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2008-11-01

    A 32-year-old man complained about a reduction of testicular volume and loss of libido. He had been abusing androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) for 7 years. Genital examination revealed that both testicular volumes were reduced to 13 ml. Endocrinological investigations showed luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and total testosterone (Total T) levels to be low. The level of free testosterone (Free T) was documented to be high. Later, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and calculated bioavailable testosterone (cBAT) levels were found to be low. Based on these features, we diagnosed his condition as hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism caused by AAS abuse. We first forbade him to use AAS, but the symptoms and endocrinological features were not improved. Then treatment with injections of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was started. About one month after treatment with hCG started, his symptoms and endocrinological features were not improved. It is well known that AAS abuse induces hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. It is also reported that normal hormonal function usually recovers after AAS are discontinued, but sometimes the condition is not reversible. In such cases, we should carefully observe the endocrinological features of the patient, and whether the early treatment with hCG injection leads to early recovery of testicular function. It was useful to examine cBAT in this case to understand his endocrinological condition. There are many severe side effects of abusing AAS and thus education about the severe side effects of AAS abuse is necessary.

  3. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  4. Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... function properly. Causes of primary hypogonadism include: Certain autoimmune disorders Genetic and developmental disorders Infection Liver and kidney disease Radiation Surgery Trauma The most common genetic disorders ...

  5. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon Jarløv; Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. METHODS: This st......AIMS: Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. METHODS...... training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. RESULTS: Former AAS abusers...

  6. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty

  7. [Osteoporosis fracture in a male patient secondary to hypogonadism due to androgen deprivation treatment for prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú Solans, J; Roig Grau, I; Almirall Banqué, C

    2014-01-01

    A 84 year-old patient, in therapy with androgen deprivation during the last 5 years due a prostate cancer, is presented with a osteoporotic fracture of the first lumbar vertebra. The pivotal role of the primary care physician, in the prevention of the osteoporosis secondary to the hypogonadism in these patients, is highlighted. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism Due to Loss of Function of the KiSS1-Derived Peptide Receptor GPR54

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolas de Roux; Emmanuelle Genin; Jean-Claude Carel; Fumihiko Matsuda; Jean-Louis Chaussain; Edwin Milgrom

    2003-01-01

    ...), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is referred to as isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). A limited number of IHH cases are due to loss-of-function mutations of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor...

  9. Treatment of Hypogonadism: Current and Future Therapies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthi Thirumalai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of hypogonadism in men is of great interest to both patients and providers. There are a number of testosterone formulations currently available and several additional formulations under development. In addition, there are some lesser-used alternative therapies for the management of male hypogonadism, which may have advantages for certain patient groups. The future of hypogonadism therapy may lie in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that allow the benefits of androgens whilst minimizing unwanted side effects.

  10. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Bailey

    Full Text Available Testosterone (T and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR, cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22. All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  11. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete’s urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as ‘T-equivalent’ concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact. PMID:26998755

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  13. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanism from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-31

    except that no salmon sperm DNA was used as blocking reagent. The immunoprecipitated DNA and un- enriched input DNA were treated with RNase A and purified...A, Wang Y, Suzuki K, Mirosevich J, et al. (2005) Foxa1 and Foxa2 interact with the androgen receptor to regulate prostate and epididymal genes

  14. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  15. Brain masculinization requires androgen receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Takashi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Kawano, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Yoshikatsu; Sekine, Keisuke; Fukuda, Toru; Aihara, Ken-ichi; Krust, Andrée; Yamada, Takashi; NAKAMICHI, YUKO; Yamamoto, Yoko; Nakamura, Takashi; Yoshimura, Kimihiro; Yoshizawa, Tatsuya

    2004-01-01

    Testicular testosterone produced during a critical perinatal period is thought to masculinize and defeminize the male brain from the inherent feminization program and induce male-typical behaviors in the adult. These actions of testosterone appear to be exerted not through its androgenic activity, but rather through its conversion by brain aromatase into estrogen, with the consequent activation of estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling. Thus, the role of androgen receptor (AR) in perinatal...

  16. Neonatal androgenization of hypogonadal (hpg male mice does not abolish estradiol-induced FSH production and spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Jeffrey B

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Testicular development is arrested in the hypogonadal (hpg mouse due to a congenital deficiency in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH synthesis. Chronic treatment of male hpg mice with estradiol induces FSH synthesis and secretion, and causes testicular maturation and qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. As estradiol negative feedback normally inhibits FSH production in the male, this study tested whether this paradoxical response to estradiol in the male hpg mouse might be due to inadequate masculinisation or incomplete defeminization in the neonatal period. Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of hpg mice with testosterone propionate in the immediate neonatal period is necessary to allow full reproductive behaviors to be expressed following suitable endocrine stimulation at adult ages. Methods Hpg mice were treated with 100 μg testosterone propionate or vehicle on postnatal day 2. At 35 days of age, subgroups of these mice were treated with silastic implants containing estradiol or cholesterol. Reproductive behavior was scored in tests with steroid-primed female mice, then testicular development was assessed histologically, and measures of pituitary FSH content made at 85 days of age. Results The neonatal testosterone propionate treatment successfully defeminized female litter mates, as revealed by impaired vaginal opening and deficiencies in lordosis behavior, and it allowed appropriate male reproductive behavior to be expressed in a proportion of the hpg males when tested at an adult age. However, neonatal androgen supplementation did not block or even reduce the subsequent actions of estradiol in increasing pituitary FSH content, nor did it affect the ability of estradiol to induce qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. Conclusion The ability of the hpg male to show a "female" neuroendocrine response to estradiol is not a result of inadequate androgenization during neonatal development, and

  17. Neonatal androgenization of hypogonadal (hpg) male mice does not abolish estradiol-induced FSH production and spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwagwu, Margaret O; Baines, Helen; Kerr, Jeffrey B; Ebling, Francis JP

    2005-01-01

    Background Testicular development is arrested in the hypogonadal (hpg) mouse due to a congenital deficiency in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) synthesis. Chronic treatment of male hpg mice with estradiol induces FSH synthesis and secretion, and causes testicular maturation and qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. As estradiol negative feedback normally inhibits FSH production in the male, this study tested whether this paradoxical response to estradiol in the male hpg mouse might be due to inadequate masculinisation or incomplete defeminization in the neonatal period. Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of hpg mice with testosterone propionate in the immediate neonatal period is necessary to allow full reproductive behaviors to be expressed following suitable endocrine stimulation at adult ages. Methods Hpg mice were treated with 100 μg testosterone propionate or vehicle on postnatal day 2. At 35 days of age, subgroups of these mice were treated with silastic implants containing estradiol or cholesterol. Reproductive behavior was scored in tests with steroid-primed female mice, then testicular development was assessed histologically, and measures of pituitary FSH content made at 85 days of age. Results The neonatal testosterone propionate treatment successfully defeminized female litter mates, as revealed by impaired vaginal opening and deficiencies in lordosis behavior, and it allowed appropriate male reproductive behavior to be expressed in a proportion of the hpg males when tested at an adult age. However, neonatal androgen supplementation did not block or even reduce the subsequent actions of estradiol in increasing pituitary FSH content, nor did it affect the ability of estradiol to induce qualitatively normal spermatogenesis. Conclusion The ability of the hpg male to show a "female" neuroendocrine response to estradiol is not a result of inadequate androgenization during neonatal development, and thus the actions of

  18. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    p. 132-138. 7. Han , G., et al., Mutation of the androgen receptor causes oncogenic transformation of the prostate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A, 2005. 102...the confor- (1997) 306-360. mational state of the AR may recruit specific TPR- [9] K. Richter, J. Buchner , Hsp90: chaperoning signal transduc-tion...Biol. 42 connection, Trends Biochem. Sci. 22 (1997) 87-92. (1992) 803-812.[19] 2) D.F. 812. S[34] U. Jakob, J. Buchner , Assisting spontaneity: the role

  19. The neural androgen receptor: a therapeutic target for myelin repair in chronic demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rashad; Ghoumari, Abdel M; Bielecki, Bartosz; Steibel, Jérôme; Boehm, Nelly; Liere, Philippe; Macklin, Wendy B; Kumar, Narender; Habert, René; Mhaouty-Kodja, Sakina; Tronche, François; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Schumacher, Michael; Ghandour, M Said

    2013-01-01

    testosterone analogue 7α-methyl-19-nortestosterone, which has been developed for long-term male contraception and androgen replacement therapy in hypogonadal males and does not stimulate prostate growth, also efficiently promoted myelin repair. These data establish the efficacy of androgens as remyelinating agents and qualify the brain androgen receptor as a promising drug target for remyelination therapy, thus providing the preclinical rationale for a novel therapeutic use of androgens in males with multiple sclerosis.

  20. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    BALACHANDRAN SARANYA

    Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. BALACHANDRAN SARANYA1, GUNASEKARAN BHAVANI1, BRINDHA ARUMUGAM1,. MEENA JAYASHANKAR2 and SATHIYAVEDU THYAGARAJAN SANTHIYA1∗.

  1. Structure and function of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A O; Klaasen, P; Kuiper, G G; van der Korput, J A; Bolt, J; de Boer, W; Smit, A; Faber, P W; van Rooij, H C; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1989-01-01

    The androgen receptor in several species (human, rat, calf) is a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 100-110 kDa. The steroid binding domain is confined to a region of 30 kDa, while the DNA-binding domain has the size of approx. 10 kDa. A 40 kDa fragment containing both the DNA and steroid binding domain displayed a higher DNA binding activity than did the intact 100 kDa molecule. cDNA encoding the major part of the human androgen receptor was isolated. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 2,277 bp but still lacks part of the 5'-coding sequence. Homology with the progesterone and glucocorticoid receptor was about 80% in the DNA binding domain and 50% in the steroid binding domain. The present data provide evidence that the androgen receptor belongs to the superfamily of ligand responsive transcriptional regulators and consists of three distinct domains each with a specialized function.

  2. Testosterone regulates keratin 33B expression in rat penis growth through androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan-Min; Wu, Kai-Jie; Dang, Qiang; Shi, Qi; Gao, Yang; Guo, Peng; Xu, Shan; Wang, Xin-Yang; He, Da-Lin; Gong, Yong-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Androgen therapy is the mainstay of treatment for the hypogonadotropic hypogonadal micropenis because it obviously enhances penis growth in prepubescent microphallic patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of androgen treatment leading to penis growth are still largely unknown. To clarify this well-known phenomenon, we successfully generated a castrated male Sprague Dawley rat model at puberty followed by testosterone administration. Interestingly, compared with the control group, testosterone treatment stimulated a dose-dependent increase of penis weight, length, and width in castrated rats accompanied with a dramatic recovery of the pathological changes of the penis. Mechanistically, testosterone administration substantially increased the expression of androgen receptor (AR) protein. Increased AR protein in the penis could subsequently initiate transcription of its target genes, including keratin 33B (Krt33b). Importantly, we demonstrated that KRT33B is generally expressed in the rat penis and that most KRT33B expression is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, AR could directly modulate its expression by binding to a putative androgen response element sequence of the Krt33b promoter. Overall, this study reveals a novel mechanism facilitating penis growth after testosterone treatment in precastrated prepubescent animals, in which androgen enhances the expression of AR protein as well as its target genes, such as Krt33b.

  3. Androgen replacement therapy contributes to improving lower urinary tract symptoms in patients with hypogonadism and benign prostate hypertrophy: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehara, Kazuyoshi; Sugimoto, Kazuhiro; Konaka, Hiroyuki; Iijima, Masashi; Fukushima, Masato; Maeda, Yuji; Mizokami, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Origasa, Hideki; Iwamoto, Teruaki; Namiki, Mikio

    2011-03-01

    We performed a randomised controlled study regarding the effects of androgen replacement therapy (ART) on lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in hypogonadal men with benign prostate hypertrophy (BPH). Fifty-two patients with hypogonadism and BPH were randomly assigned to receive testosterone (ART group) as 250 mg of testosterone enanthate every 4 weeks or to the untreated control group. We compared International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), uroflowmetry data, post-voiding residual volume (PVR) and systemic muscle volume at baseline and 12 months after treatment. Forty-six patients (ART group, n=23; control, n=23) were included in the analysis. At the 12-month visit, IPSS showed a significant decrease compared with baseline in the ART group (15.7 +/- 8.7 vs. 12.5 +/- 9.5; p<0.05). No significant changes were observed in the control group. The ART group also showed improvement in maximum flow rate and voided volume (p<0.05), whereas no significant improvements were observed in the controls. PVR showed no significant changes in either group. In addition, the ART group showed significant enhancement of mean muscle volume (p<0.05), whereas no significant changes were seen in the controls. ART improved LUTS in hypogonadal men with mild BPH.

  4. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  5. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). PMID:9399843

  6. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A Study of the androgen receptor gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    The aim of the work is to study the genotype of the androgen receptor gene. (StuI polymorphism) and its relationship to AGA in a case control study and to determine the level of androgen receptor expression (AR) in the balding scalp relative to the non-balding scalp area. Subjects and Methods: This study was conducted on ...

  8. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jon Jarløv; Selmer, Christian; Østergren, Peter Busch; Pedersen, Karen Boje; Schou, Morten; Gustafsson, Finn; Faber, Jens; Juul, Anders; Kistorp, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers. This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI) elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7) years) and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18-50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH)) were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction) were recorded systematically. Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th -75th percentiles) total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9-17.7) nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6-22.0) nmol/l) (P abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l) whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2%) (11.1; 42.2)), erectile dysfunction ((27.3%) (13.3; 45.6)) and decreased libido ((40.1%) (23.2; 57.0)) than the other two groups (trend analyses: P abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation. Current AAS abusers exhibited severely decreased AMH and inhibin B indicative of impaired spermatogenesis.

  9. The Response to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone and hCG in Men with Prior Chronic Androgen Steroid Abuse and Clinical Hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, J N; Lehtihet, M

    2015-08-01

    Androgens were initially developed to improve anabolism for therapeutic purposes. An observed side effect is a sustained inability to regain normal gonadal function after long-term use. This study was designed to evaluate the response to a standard GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) test (100 μg) followed by an hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin) test to evaluate the HPG (hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal) axis in a subgroup of men with former androgen use (FAU, n=13, mean age 38±8 years) with secondary hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and total serum testosterone levels below 10 nmol/l. For comparison, healthy men (n=8, mean age 41±5 years) and untreated men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH, n=5, mean age 26±8 years) were included. Five of 13 FAU males had an LH (luteinizing hormone) peak after GnRH over 9.6 U/l, the 5(th) percentile of normal reference controls. None of the 13 FAU males reached a testosterone response above 16.0 nmol/l after the 72-h hCG stimulation test, the lowest recorded value for healthy male controls. The IHH patients responded to GnRH with an LH peak after 45 min, while the FAU males and healthy controls had an LH peak after 30 min. After hCG stimulation, the IHH patients increased mean testosterone level to 16.8 nmol/l (median 15.0 nmol/l), significantly higher than the FAU males, pabuse, and may provide valuable information in clinical management of these men. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    male breast cancer (Wooster et al. 1992) and prostate cancer. (Tilley et al. 1996). The two most important androgens are testosterone and. 5α-dihydrotestosterone, whose actions are mediated by func- tional androgen receptor, which upon receipt of signal acti- vate transcription of specific genes in target tissues (Melo et al.

  11. Male Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male hypogonadism Overview Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body doesn't produce enough testosterone — the hormone that plays a key ... sperm or both. You may be born with male hypogonadism, or it can develop later in life, ...

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    .... Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods...

  13. Selective androgen receptor modulators in preclinical and clinical development

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Mohler, Michael L.; Bohl, Casey E.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the function of several organs including primary and accessory sexual organs, skeletal muscle, and bone, making it a desirable therapeutic target. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) bind to the AR and demonstrate osteo- and myo-anabolic activity; however, unlike testosterone and other anabolic steroids, these nonsteroidal agents produce less of a growth effect on prostate and other secondary sexual organs. SARMs provide therapeutic o...

  14. Androgen receptor characteristics in skin fibroblasts from hirsute women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eil, C; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L

    1985-01-01

    Hormonal measurements in some women with hirsutism often reveal little or no elevation in androgen levels to explain the disorder. Thus, it has been postulated that increased sensitivity of the hair follicle to androgen may contribute to the development of hirsutism in such patients. We, therefore, sought androgen receptor abnormalities in skin fibroblasts cultured from 10 hirsute women (ages 17-43) and normal or mildly elevated plasma testosterone levels (28-82 ng/dl). Androgen receptor content (Ro) and binding affinity (Kd) in cultured pubic skin fibroblasts were measured using a dispersed, whole cell assay. Ten such cell lines from these women were compared with 19 pubic skin cell lines from 9 normal volunteers (6 males and 3 females) and from 10 other subjects (males with gynecomastia or hypospadias). There was no statistically significant difference in the mean androgen receptor content (11,600 +/- 2700 (SE) sites/cell fibroblasts vs 7900 +/- 700 sites/cell or binding affinity (2.0 +/- 0.3 (SE) X 10(-9) M vs 1.5 +/- 0.2 X 10(-9) M, respectively) between the patients' fibroblasts and those of the controls. We conclude that hirsutism cannot be explained by abnormalities in fibroblast androgen receptor number or affinity. These observations do not exclude the possibility that other mechanisms might lead to increased peripheral androgen sensitivity in such patients.

  15. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  16. Genetics of Isolated Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism: Role of GnRH Receptor and Other Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karges Beate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH is a key player in normal puberty and sexual development and function. Genetic causes of isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH have been identified during the recent years affecting the synthesis, secretion, or action of GnRH. Developmental defects of GnRH neurons and the olfactory bulb are associated with hyposmia, rarely associated with the clinical phenotypes of synkinesia, cleft palate, ear anomalies, or choanal atresia, and may be due to mutations of KAL1, FGFR1/FGF8, PROKR2/PROK2, or CHD7. Impaired GnRH secretion in normosmic patients with IHH may be caused by deficient hypothalamic GPR54/KISS1, TACR3/TAC3, and leptinR/leptin signalling or mutations within the GNRH1 gene itself. Normosmic IHH is predominantly caused by inactivating mutations in the pituitary GnRH receptor inducing GnRH resistance, while mutations of the β-subunits of LH or FSH are very rare. Inheritance of GnRH deficiency may be oligogenic, explaining variable phenotypes. Future research should identify additional genes involved in the complex network of normal and disturbed puberty and reproduction.

  17. Former Abusers of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Exhibit Decreased Testosterone Levels and Hypogonadal Symptoms Years after Cessation: A Case-Control Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Jarløv Rasmussen

    Full Text Available Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS is highly prevalent among male recreational athletes. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of AAS abuse on reproductive hormone levels and symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism in current and former AAS abusers.This study had a cross-sectional case-control design and involved 37 current AAS abusers, 33 former AAS abusers (mean (95%CI elapsed duration since AAS cessation: 2.5 (1.7; 3.7 years and 30 healthy control participants. All participants were aged 18-50 years and were involved in recreational strength training. Reproductive hormones (FSH, LH, testosterone, inhibin B and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH were measured using morning blood samples. Symptoms of hypogonadism (depressive symptoms, fatigue, decreased libido and erectile dysfunction were recorded systematically.Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower median (25th -75th percentiles total and free testosterone levels than control participants (total testosterone: 14.4 (11.9-17.7 nmol/l vs. 18.8 (16.6-22.0 nmol/l (P < 0.01. Overall, 27.2% (13.3; 45.5 of former AAS abusers exhibited plasma total testosterone levels below the lower reference limit (12.1 nmol/l whereas no control participants exhibited testosterone below this limit (P < 0.01. Gonadotropins were significantly suppressed, and inhibin B and AMH were significantly decreased in current AAS abusers compared with former AAS abusers and control participants (P < 0.01. The group of former AAS abusers had higher proportions of participants with depressive symptoms ((24.2% (11.1; 42.2, erectile dysfunction ((27.3% (13.3; 45.6 and decreased libido ((40.1% (23.2; 57.0 than the other two groups (trend analyses: P < 0.05.Former AAS abusers exhibited significantly lower plasma testosterone levels and higher frequencies of symptoms suggestive of hypogonadism than healthy control participants years after AAS cessation. Current AAS abusers exhibited severely decreased AMH

  18. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  19. Targeting Androgen Receptor by Lysosomal Degradation in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    cellular proteins turn over by ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent mechanism, steroid hormone receptors including AR were recently shown to be substrates of...patients develop androgen- independent disease, which no longer responds to hormonal therapies. Importantly, even at this advanced stage of androgen...and Yuzuru Shiio*’t,:t: t Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute and *Department of Biochemistry , The University of Texas Health Science Center

  20. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    and ProduXion Manager® from Aries Systems Corporation 2 Bifunctional Ligand Control of Nuclear Receptors 1 Bifunctional Ligands Allow...androgen receptor. Genes Dev 21:2005-2017 23. Inohara N, Koseki T, Lin J, del Peso L, Lucas PC, Chen FF, Ogura Y, Núñez G 2000 An Induced Proximity

  1. Argirein alleviates stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism in rats via normalizing testis endothelin receptor A and connexin 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming; Hu, Chen; Khan, Hussein-hamed; Shi, Fang-hong; Cong, Xiao-dong; Li, Qing; Dai, Yin; Dai, De-zai

    2016-02-01

    Argirein (rhein-arginine) is a derivative of rhein isolated from Chinese rhubarb (Rheum Officinale Baill.) that exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In the present study we investigated the effects of argirein on stress-induced (hypergonadotrophic) and diabetic (hypogonadotrophic) hypogonadism in male rats. Stress-induced and diabetic hypogonadism was induced in male rats via injection of isoproterenol (ISO) or streptozotocin (STZ). ISO-injected rats were treated with argirein (30 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) or testosterone replacement (0.5 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), sc) for 5 days, and STZ-injected rats were treated with argirein (40-120 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) or aminoguanidine (100 mg·kg(-1)·d(-1), po) for 4 weeks. After the rats were euthanized, blood samples and testes were collected. Serum hormone levels were measured, and the expression of endothelin receptor A (ETA), connexin 43 (Cx43) and other proteins in testes was detected. For in vitro experiments, testis homogenate was prepared from normal male rats, and incubated with ISO (1 μmol/L) or high glucose (27 mmol/L). ISO injection induced hyper-gonadotrophic hypogonadism characterized by low testosterone and high FSH and LH levels in the serum, whereas STZ injection induced hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism as evidenced by low testosterone and low FSH and LH levels in the serum. In the testes of ISO- and STZ-injected rats, the expression of ETA, MMP-9, NADPH oxidase and pPKCε was significantly increased, and the expression of Cx43 was decreased. Administration of argirein attenuated both the abnormal serum hormone levels and the testis changes in ISO- and STZ-injected rats, and aminoguanidine produced similar actions in STZ-injected rats; testosterone replacement reversed the abnormal serum hormone levels, but did not affect the testis changes in ISO-injected rats. Argirein (0.3-3 μmol/L) exerted similar effects in testis homogenate incubated with ISO or high glucose in vitro. Two types of

  2. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, MH Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2–3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein. PMID:24909511

  3. Transfection of Sertoli cells with androgen receptor alters gene expression without androgen stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, D; Markmann, M; Lang, D; Konrad, L; Geyer, J; Kliesch, S; Chakraborty, T; Hossain, H; Bergmann, M

    2015-12-29

    Androgens play an important role for the development of male fertility and gained interest as growth and survival factors for certain types of cancer. Androgens act via the androgen receptor (AR/Ar), which is involved in various cell biological processes such as sex differentiation. To study the functional mechanisms of androgen action, cell culture systems and AR-transfected cell lines are needed. Transfection of AR into cell lines and subsequent gene expression analysis after androgen treatment is well established to investigate the molecular biology of target cells. However, it remains unclear how the transfection with AR itself can modulate the gene expression even without androgen stimulation. Therefore, we transfected Ar-deficient rat Sertoli cells 93RS2 by electroporation using a full length human AR. Transfection success was confirmed by Western Blotting, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. AR transfection-related gene expression alterations were detected with microarray-based genome-wide expression profiling of transfected and non-transfected 93RS2 cells without androgen stimulation. Microarray analysis revealed 672 differentially regulated genes with 200 up- and 472 down-regulated genes. These genes could be assigned to four major biological categories (development, hormone response, immune response and metabolism). Microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis for 22 candidate genes. We conclude from our data, that the transfection of Ar-deficient Sertoli cells with AR has a measurable effect on gene expression even without androgen stimulation and cause Sertoli cell damage. Studies using AR-transfected cells, subsequently stimulated, should consider alterations in AR-dependent gene expression as off-target effects of the AR transfection itself.

  4. Androgen Receptor in Laryngeal Carcinoma: Could There Be an Androgen-Refractory Tumor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulioumis, Anastasios K.; Varakis, John; Goumas, Panos; Papadaki, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Androgen receptors (ARs) which are implicated in the pathogenesis of several malignancies can also be a possible downstream effector in laryngeal cancer. In the present study, 97 invasive squamous laryngeal carcinomas were studied by immunohistochemistry for protein expression of AR. Androgen receptors were expressed in 52.6% of tumor specimens, suggesting their implication in the pathogenesis of this tumor. Our study's aim was to investigate the hypothetical scenario of an androgen refractory laryngeal carcinoma where androgen receptors can be activated by nodal molecules in the course of an Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenomenon. In line with this we correlated AR expression with the expression of ILK, p-Akt, E-cadherin, β-catenin in our sample as well as with tumor grade and TNM stage. A reverse correlation between nuclear AR and cytoplasmic ILK expression was evidenced, indicating an interaction of those molecules in laryngeal carcinoma. Finally in our material, in those carcinomas that were expressing ARs, stronger nuclear expression of the receptor was characterized by poorer cell differentiation and correlated with the acquisition of EMT features like E-cadherin loss and β-catenin translocation raising a question whether activated ARs can drive an EMT procedure. PMID:22191056

  5. Androgen receptor overexpression in prostate cancer in type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Zoltán Lutz

    2018-02-01

    Conclusions: We report elevated androgen receptor signaling and activity presumably due to altered insulin/IGF-1 receptors and decreased levels of protective estrogen receptor ligands in prostate cancer in men with diabetes. Our results reveal new insights why these patients have a worse prognosis. These findings provide the basis for future clinical trials to investigate treatment response in patients with prostate cancer and diabetes.

  6. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerpohl, Ole; Bens, Susanne; Appari, Mahesh; Werner, Ralf; Korn, Bernhard; Drop, Stenvert L S; Verheijen, Frans; van der Zwan, Yvonne; Bunch, Trevor; Hughes, Ieuan; Cools, Martine; Riepe, Felix G; Hiort, Olaf; Siebert, Reiner; Holterhus, Paul-Martin

    2013-01-01

    Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  7. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  8. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  9. ORIGINAL ARTICLE A Study of the androgen receptor gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) occurs in men and women. The nature of the genetic predisposition to androgenetic alopecia is still unresolved. The aim of the work is to study the genotype of the androgen receptor gene. (StuI polymorphism) and its relationship to AGA in a case control study and to determine the ...

  10. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    Nine structurally different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested for their ability to either agonize or antagonize the human androgen receptor (hAR) in a sensitive reporter gene assay based on CHO cells transiently cotransfected with a hAR vector and an MMTV-LUC vector. Benz...

  11. A Competitive Inhibitor That Reduces Recruitment of Androgen Receptor to Androgen-responsive Genes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Shapiro, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ∼160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer. PMID:22589544

  12. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  13. Synthetic anabolic agents: steroids and nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2010-01-01

    The central role of testosterone in the development of male characteristics, as well as its beneficial effects on physical performance and muscle growth, has led to the search for synthetic alternatives with improved pharmacological profiles. Hundreds of steroidal analogs have been prepared with a superior oral bioavailability, which should also possess reduced undesirable effects. However, only a few entered the pharmaceutical market due to severe toxicological incidences that were mainly attributed to the lack of tissue selectivity. Prominent representatives of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are for instance methyltestosterone, metandienone and stanozolol, which are discussed as model compounds with regard to general pharmacological aspects of synthetic AAS. Recently, nonsteroidal alternatives to AAS have been developed that selectively activate the androgen receptor in either muscle tissue or bones. These so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are currently undergoing late clinical trials (IIb) and will be prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency from January 2008. Their entirely synthetic structures are barely related to steroids, but particular functional groups allow for the tissue-selective activation or inhibition of androgen receptors and, thus, the stimulation of muscle growth without the risk of severe undesirable effects commonly observed in steroid replacement therapies. Hence, these compounds possess a high potential for misuse in sports and will be the subject of future doping control assays.

  14. Cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of F877L mutant androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel J.; Van Hook, Kathryn; King, Carly J.; Schwartzman, Jacob; Lisac, Robert; Urrutia, Joshua; Sehrawat, Archana; Woodward, Josha; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gulati, Roman; Thomas, George V.; Beer, Tomasz M.; Gleave, Martin; Korkola, James E.; Gao, Lina; Heiser, Laura M.; Alumkal, Joshi J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed and second-most lethal cancer among men in the United States. The vast majority of prostate cancer deaths are due to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) – the lethal form of the disease that has progressed despite therapies that interfere with activation of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. One emergent resistance mechanism to medical castration is synthesis of intratumoral androgens that activate the AR. This insight led to the development of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. However, resistance to enzalutamide invariably develops, and disease progression is nearly universal. One mechanism of resistance to enzalutamide is an F877L mutation in the AR ligand-binding domain that can convert enzalutamide to an agonist of AR activity. However, mechanisms that contribute to the agonist switch had not been fully clarified, and there were no therapies to block AR F877L. Using cell line models of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we determined that cellular androgen content influences enzalutamide agonism of mutant F877L AR. Further, enzalutamide treatment of AR F877L-expressing cell lines recapitulated the effects of androgen activation of F877L AR or wild-type AR. Because the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ-1 was previously shown to block androgen activation of wild-type AR, we tested JQ-1 in AR F877L-expressing CRPC models. We determined that JQ-1 suppressed androgen or enzalutamide activation of mutant F877L AR and suppressed growth of mutant F877L AR CRPC tumors in vivo, demonstrating a new strategy to treat tumors harboring this mutation. PMID:27276681

  15. Splice variants of androgen receptor and prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Caffo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the last ten years, two new-generation hormonal drugs and two chemotherapeutic agents have been approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. Unfortunately, some patients have primary resistance to them and the others eventually develop secondary resistance. It has recently been suggested that the presence of androgen receptor splice variants plays a leading role in the primary and secondary resistance to the new hormonal drugs, whereas their presence seem to have only a partial effect on the activity of the chemotherapeutic agents. The aim of this paper is to review the published data concerning the role of androgen receptor splice variants in prostate cancer biology, and their potential use as biomarkers when making therapeutic decisions.

  16. Identification and characterisation of an androgen receptor from zebrafish Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Andersen, Ole; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2007-01-01

    ) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Binding assays with zfAR demonstrated high affinity, saturable, single class binding site, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor. Saturation experiments along with subsequent Scatchard analysis determined that the Kd of the zfAR for 3H-testosterone was 2 n......Androgens play key roles in vertebrate sex differentiation, gonadal differentiation and sexual behaviour. The action of androgens is primarily mediated through androgen receptors (ARs). The present study describes the isolation, sequencing and initial characterisation of an androgen receptor from...

  17. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0480 TITLE: Androgen Receptor Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0480 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...During this reporting period, we have obtained approval for a no-cost extension of this award and change of research focus in the final year. This

  18. Androgen Receptor Mutations and Polymorphisms in African American Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koochekpour, Shahriar; Buckles, Erick; Shourideh, Mojgan; Hu, SiYi; Chandra, Dhyan; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Attwood, Kristopher

    2014-01-01

    The Androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the normal development of the prostate gland, in prostate carcinogenesis, and in the progression of prostate cancer (PCa) to advanced metastatic disease. African American (AA) men with PCa present with higher tumor volume, more advanced tumor stage, and higher Gleason score. This could be in part related to the AR expression or activity in the prostate tissue of AA men, or to unique mutations or polymorphisms of the AR. In Caucasian Americans...

  19. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos

    OpenAIRE

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pa...

  20. Preserving fertility in the hypogonadal patient: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjith Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of young and middle-aged men are seeking treatment for symptoms related to deficient levels of androgens (hypogonadism including depression, loss of libido, erectile dysfunction, and fatigue. The increase in prevalence of testosterone supplementation in general and anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism specifically among younger athletes is creating a population of young men who are uniquely impacted by the testicular end-organ negative consequences of exogenous steroid use. Exogenous testosterone therapy can alter the natural regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis leading to impaired spermatogenesis with azoospermia being a serious possible result, thus rendering the individual infertile. For men of reproductive age who suffer from hypogonadal symptoms, preservation of fertility is an important aspect of their treatment paradigm. Treatment with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG has shown the ability not only to reverse azoospermia brought on by testosterone supplementation therapy but also to help maintain elevated intratesticular testosterone levels. In addition, selective estrogen receptor modulators, often used with hCG have been shown both to elevate total testosterone levels and to maintain spermatogenesis in hypogonadal men.

  1. Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer: Potential Role of Androgen and ErbB Receptor Signal Transduction Crosstalk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soha Salama El Sheikh

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In prostate cancer (PC, increasing evidence suggests that androgen receptor (AR signalling is functional under conditions of maximal androgen blockade. PC cells survive and proliferate in the altered hormonal environment possibly by interactions between growth factor-activated pathways and AR signalling. The present review article summarizes the current evidence of this crosstalk and focuses on the interactions among the ErbB receptor network, its downstream pathways, the AR. The potential role of this crosstalk in the development of androgen independence and in relation to antiandrogen therapy is discussed. Such interactions provide insight into possible complementary or additional strategies in the management of PC.

  2. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  3. Discovery and biological characterization of a novel series of androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Wu, G; Feng, Y; Li, Q; Su, H; Mais, D E; Zhu, Y; Li, N; Deng, Y; Yang, D; Wang, M-W

    2008-05-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators are of great value in the treatment of prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary characterization of a new class of non-steroidal androgen receptor modulators discovered in a high-throughput screening campaign. Competitive receptor binding, luciferase-based reporter methods, cell proliferation and in vivo assays were employed to evaluate an initial set of compounds from chemistry efforts. Forty-nine analogues from the chemistry efforts showed high affinity binding to androgen receptors, agonist and/or antagonist activities in both CV-1 and MDA-MB-453 transfection assays. A proliferation assay in LNCaP cells also exhibited this profile. A representative of these non-steroidal compounds (compound 21) was devoid of activity at other nuclear receptors (oestrogen, progesterone, glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors) in the CV-1 co-transfection assay. At the same time, in an immature castrated rat model, it behaved as an androgen receptor antagonist against the growth of prostate, seminal vesicles and levator ani induced by exogenous androgen. Separation of compound 21 into its enantiomers showed that nearly all the androgen receptor modulating activity and binding resided in the dextrorotatory compound (23) while the laevorotatory isomer (22) possessed weak or little effect depending on the cell type studied. These non-steroidal compounds may represent a new class of androgen receptor modulators for the treatment of not only prostate cancer but other clinical conditions where androgens and androgen receptors are involved in the pathological processes.

  4. Androgen receptor as a mediator and biomarker of radioresistance in triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers, Corey; Zhao, Shuang G; Chandler, Ben; Liu, Meilan; Wilder-Romans, Kari; Olsen, Eric; Nyati, Shyam; Ritter, Cassandra; Alluri, Prasanna G; Kothari, Vishal; Hayes, Daniel F; Lawrence, Theodore S; Spratt, Daniel E; Wahl, Daniel R; Pierce, Lori J; Feng, Felix Y

    2017-01-01

    Increased rates of locoregional recurrence have been observed in triple-negative breast cancer despite chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Thus, approaches that combine therapies for radiosensitization in triple-negative breast cancer are critically needed. We characterized the radiation therapy response of 21 breast cancer cell lines and paired this radiation response data with high-throughput drug screen data to identify androgen receptor as a top target for radiosensitization. Our radiosensitizer screen nominated bicalutamide as the drug most effective in treating radiation therapy-resistant breast cancer cell lines. We subsequently evaluated the expression of androgen receptor in >2100 human breast tumor samples and 51 breast cancer cell lines and found significant heterogeneity in androgen receptor expression with enrichment at the protein and RNA level in triple-negative breast cancer. There was a strong correlation between androgen receptor RNA and protein expression across all breast cancer subtypes (R(2) = 0.72, p triple-negative breast cancer, expression of androgen receptor above the median was associated with increased risk of locoregional recurrence after radiation therapy (hazard ratio for locoregional recurrence 2.9-3.2)) in two independent data sets, but there was no difference in locoregional recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer patients not treated with radiation therapy when stratified by androgen receptor expression. In multivariable analysis, androgen receptor expression was most significantly associated with worse local recurrence-free survival after radiation therapy (hazard ratio of 3.58) suggesting that androgen receptor expression may be a biomarker of radiation response in triple-negative breast cancer. Inhibition of androgen receptor with MDV3100 (enzalutamide) induced radiation sensitivity (enhancement ratios of 1.22-1.60) in androgen receptor-positive triple-negative breast cancer lines, but did not affect androgen

  5. Androgen receptor expression is a biological marker for androgen sensitivity in high grade serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, Ahmed; Warburton, Katharine G; Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Freer, Rebecca M; Shaheen, Fadhel; Cross, Paul; Plummer, E Ruth; Robson, Craig N; Edmondson, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    In the present study we explore the effects of androgens and anti-androgens on primary cultures of EOC cells. We also investigate the effects of chemotherapy on AR expression. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) arises from ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE), which express the androgen receptor (AR). Androgen stimulation of OSE cells results in increased proliferation and protection from apoptosis. Nevertheless, in clinical trials anti-androgens have had a low objective response rate in relapsed ovarian cancer. 1. Androgen receptor (AR) expression and response to androgenic stimulation were correlated in primary ovarian cancer cells derived from ascitic fluid from patients with advanced ovarian cancer, 2. AR expression in primary epithelial ovarian cancer was investigated before and after chemotherapy using paired histological samples which had been incorporated into a tissue microarray. Eleven primary ovarian cancer cultures were established from ascitic fluid. There was wide variation of expression of androgen receptor mRNA between cultures. Cell division increased after dihydro-testosterone (DHT) stimulation in 6 out of 11 primary cultures. The fraction of cells in S-phase increased from 4.4% in cells grown in serum-free medium to 8.3% in cells stimulated with 100 nM of DHT (PIHC) decreased significantly after chemotherapy (Povarian cancer is more likely to be effective as these data suggest that androgen receptor expression decreases with exposure to chemotherapy and this may explain the low response rates seen in clinical trials of patients heavily pre-treated with multiple courses of chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy: are signs of hypogonadism always due to testicular failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapanou, Olga; Vlassopoulou, Barbara; Tzanela, Marinella; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Angelidakis, Panagiotis; Michelakakis, Helen; Ioannidis, George; Mihalatos, Markos; Kamakari, Smaragda; Tsagarakis, Stylianos

    2014-01-01

    We present the clinical and hormonal findings of a young male with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD), with special emphasis on the biochemical and clinical pattern of hypogonadism. A patient, with primary adrenal insufficiency since the age of 5 years, developed progressive neurological symptoms at the age of 29. Diagnosis of X-ALD was established by elevated serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) and genetic testing. His sexual body hair was sparse. Hormonal investigations revealed normal testosterone and inappropriately elevated LH levels. Androgen receptor gene analysis was negative for mutations or polymorphic variants associated with decreased receptor activity. Signs of hypogonadism in patients with confirmed X-ALD are not exclusively due to primary testicular failure. Tissue specific androgen resistance represents an alternative possibility. Since no loss-of-function mutations were detected in the androgen receptor, it is speculated that the patient's androgen resistance could be part of a functional defect mediated through VLCFA accumulation at the testosterone receptor and/or post-receptor levels.

  7. Reptides and Proteins Interacting with the Androgen Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van de Wijngaart (Dennis)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAndrogens are important sex steroid hormones. The androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are essential for normal male sexual differentiation and for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues, including the prostate. Androgens mediate their effects by

  8. Expression of androgen receptor splice variants in clinical breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Theresa E; Irvine, Connie M; Dvinge, Heidi; Tarulli, Gerard A; Hanson, Adrienne R; Ryan, Natalie K; Pickering, Marie A; Birrell, Stephen N; Hu, Dong Gui; Mackenzie, Peter I; Russell, Roslin; Caldas, Carlos; Raj, Ganesh V; Dehm, Scott M; Plymate, Stephen R; Bradley, Robert K; Tilley, Wayne D; Selth, Luke A

    2015-12-29

    The importance of androgen receptor (AR) signaling is increasingly being recognized in breast cancer, which has elicited clinical trials aimed at assessing the efficacy of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic disease. In prostate cancer, resistance to ADT is frequently associated with the emergence of androgen-independent splice variants of the AR (AR variants, AR-Vs) that lack the LBD and are constitutively active. Women with breast cancer may be prone to a similar phenomenon. Herein, we show that in addition to the prototypical transcript, the AR gene produces a diverse range of AR-V transcripts in primary breast tumors. The most frequently and highly expressed variant was AR-V7 (exons 1/2/3/CE3), which was detectable at the mRNA level in > 50% of all breast cancers and at the protein level in a subset of ERα-negative tumors. Functionally, AR-V7 is a constitutively active and ADT-resistant transcription factor that promotes growth and regulates a transcriptional program distinct from AR in ERα-negative breast cancer cells. Importantly, we provide ex vivo evidence that AR-V7 is upregulated by the AR antagonist enzalutamide in primary breast tumors. These findings have implications for treatment response in the ongoing clinical trials of ADT in breast cancer.

  9. Super-Penetrant Androgen Receptor: Overcoming Enzalutamide Sensitivity in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    AR, a versatile transcriptional co-activator, seems to adapt to androgen-deprived environment by distinct modifications. This proposal will use an...Chen Z, Sinha CK, Malik R, Shukla S, Kim J, Coppola D, Lawrence N and Mahajan NP. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Androgen Receptor by Histone H4 Tyr88...Prostate Cancer Research Symposium- Prostate Cancer Epigenetic Reprogramming of the Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer, May19

  10. Novel Uses for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Nandrolone and Oxandrolone in the Management of Male Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Christopher; Kovac, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    There has recently been renewed interest in novel clinical applications of the anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) testosterone and its synthetic derivatives, particularly given with the rising popularity of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) for the treatment of male hypogonadism. In this manuscript, we provide a brief review of the history of AAS and discuss clinical applications of two of the more well-known AAS: nandrolone and oxandrolone. Both agents exhibit favorable myotrophic/androgenic ratios and have been investigated for effectiveness in numerous disease states. We also provide a brief synopsis of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and postulate how these orally active, non-aromatizing, tissue-selective agents might be used in contemporary andrology. Currently, the applications of testosterone alternatives in hypogonadism are limited. However, it is tempting to speculate that these agents may one day become accepted as alternatives, or adjuncts, to the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a nuclear androgen receptor activated by 11-ketotestosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Johnny

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although 11-ketotestosterone is a potent androgen and induces male secondary sex characteristics in many teleosts, androgen receptors with high binding affinity for 11-ketotestosterone or preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone have not been identified. So, the mechanism by which 11-ketotestosterone exhibits such high potency remains unclear. Recently we cloned the cDNA of an 11-ketotestosterone regulated protein, spiggin, from three-spined stickleback renal tissue. As spiggin is the only identified gene product regulated by 11-ketotestosterone, the stickleback kidney is ideal for determination of the mechanism of 11-ketotestosterone gene regulation. A single androgen receptor gene with two splicing variants, belonging to the androgen receptor-β subfamily was cloned from stickleback kidney. A high affinity, saturable, single class of androgen specific binding sites, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor, was identified in renal cytosolic and nuclear fractions. Measurement of ligand binding moieties in the cytosolic and nuclear fractions as well as to the recombinant receptor revealed lower affinity for 11-ketotestosterone than for dihydrotestosterone. Treatment with different androgens did not up-regulate androgen receptor mRNA level or increase receptor abundance, suggesting that auto-regulation is not involved in differential ligand activation. However, comparison of the trans-activation potential of the stickleback androgen receptor with the human androgen receptor, in both human HepG2 cells and zebrafish ZFL cells, revealed preferential activation by 11-ketotestosterone of the stickleback receptor, but not of the human receptor. These findings demonstrate the presence of a receptor preferentially activated by 11-ketotestosterone in the three-spined stickleback, so far the only one known in any animal.

  12. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  13. Probing the functional link between androgen receptor coactivator and ligand-binding sites in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Gampe, Robert T; Hnat, Andrew T; Faggart, Jonathan L; Minges, John T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2006-03-10

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor required for male sex development and virilization and contributes to prostate cancer initiation and progression. High affinity androgen binding triggers conformational changes required for AR transactivation. Here we characterized naturally occurring AR gene mutations in the region of activation function 2 (AF2) that decrease or increase AR transcriptional activity by altering the region bounded by AF2 and the ligand binding pocket without affecting equilibrium androgen binding affinity. In the androgen insensitivity syndrome, germ line AR mutations increase the androgen dissociation rate and reduce AR FXXLF motif binding and the recruitment of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC)/p160 coactivator LXXLL motifs. In prostate cancer, somatic AR mutations in AF2 or near the bound ligand slow androgen dissociation and increase AR stabilization and coactivator recruitment. Crystal structures of the AR ligand binding domain bound to R1881 and FXXLF or LXXLL motif peptide indicate the mutations are proximal to the AF2 bound peptide, adjacent to the ligand pocket, or in a putative ligand gateway. The results suggest a bidirectional structural relay between bound ligand and coactivator that establishes AR functional potency in vivo.

  14. Adaptive Auto-Regulation of Androgen Receptor Provides a Paradigm Shifting Rationale for Bipolar Androgen Therapy (BAT) for Castrate Resistant Human Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, John T.; D’Antonio, Jason M; Chen, Shuangling; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan P.; Ndikuyeze, Georges H.; Luo, Jun; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture/xenograft and gene arrays of clinical material document that development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells involves acquisition of adaptive auto-regulation resulting in > 25 fold increase in Androgen Receptor (AR) protein expression in a low androgen environment. Such adaptive AR increase paradoxically is a liability in castrated hosts; however, when supraphysiologic androgen is acutely replaced. Cell synchronization/anti-androgen response document this is due ...

  15. Inhibition of the androgen receptor activity by Coprinus comatus substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Nesly; Wasser, Solomon P; Mahajna, Jamal

    2011-11-01

    Prostatic adenocarcinoma is the second leading cause of death from cancer in Western men. The common prostate cancer treatments are effective in the early stages; however, advanced prostate cancer is resilient to most of these treatments. Altered androgen receptor (AR) activity caused by point mutations or signaling mechanisms that regulate AR function has been proposed as a key mechanism in the transition to the androgen-independent stage. Our previous results demonstrated that hexane extract prepared from Coprinus comatus (C. comatus) strain 734 was able to interfere with AR activity. The current study was made to further evaluate the antiandrogenic activity of the C. comatus mushroom strain 734. Activity-guided chromatography was conducted and 2 active fractions, F-32-and F-33, were found to contain substances that were able to inhibit AR-mediated reporter activity and reduce the levels of AR and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) transcripts in LNCaP cells. Fraction F-32 also inhibited the proliferation and clonigenicity of LNCaP cells. Furthermore, F-32 was able to inhibit the binding of AR to the PSA enhancer region and to inhibit Akt-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser 213. This study illustrated the potential of substances from the C. comatus mushroom to serve as natural antiandrogenic modulators for the treatment of prostatic disorders.

  16. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  17. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Sensitization of androgen refractory prostate cancer cells to anti-androgens through re-expression of epigenetically repressed androgen receptor - Synergistic action of quercetin and curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas; Kumar, Lokesh; Mohanty, Sujit K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Gopal

    2016-08-15

    Epigenetic repression of Androgen Receptor (AR) gene by hypermethylation of its promoter causes resistance in prostate cancer (CaP) to androgen deprivation therapy with anti-androgens. Some dietary phytocompounds like quercetin (Q) and curcumin (C) with reported DNMT-inhibitory activity were tested for their ability to re-express the AR in AR-negative CaP cell lines PC3 and DU145. Combined treatment with Q+C was much more effective than either Q or C in inhibiting DNMT, causing global hypomethylation, restoring AR mRNA and protein levels and causing apoptosis via mitochondrial depolarization of PC3 and DU145. The functional AR protein expressed in Q+C treated cells sensitized them to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced proliferation, bicalutamide-induced apoptosis, bound to androgen response element to increase luciferase activity in gene reporter assay and was susceptible to downregulation by AR siRNA. Bisulfite sequencing revealed high methylation of AR promoter CpG sites in AR-negative DU145 and PC3 cell lines that was significantly demethylated by Q+C treatment, which restored AR expression. Notable synergistic effects of Q+C combination in re-sensitizing androgen refractory CaP cells to AR-mediated apoptosis, their known safety in clinical use, and epidemiological evidences relating their dietary consumption with lower cancer incidences indicate their potential for use in chemoprevention of androgen resistance in prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of novel genes that regulate androgen receptor signaling and growth of androgen-deprived prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Elina; Ji, Hao; Chen, Mengqiang; Baig, Mirza; Oliver, David; Ohouo, Patrice; Lim, Chang-uk; Schools, Garry; Carmack, Steven; Ding, Ye; Broude, Eugenia V; Roninson, Igor B; Buttyan, Ralph; Shtutman, Michael

    2015-05-30

    Prostate cancer progression to castration refractory disease is associated with anomalous transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) in an androgen-depleted milieu. To identify novel gene products whose downregulation transactivates AR in prostate cancer cells, we performed a screen of enzymatically-generated shRNA lenti-libraries selecting for transduced LNCaP cells with elevated expression of a fluorescent reporter gene under the control of an AR-responsive promoter. The shRNAs present in selected populations were analyzed using high-throughput sequencing to identify target genes. Highly enriched gene targets were then validated with siRNAs against selected genes, testing first for increased expression of luciferase from an AR-responsive promoter and then for altered expression of endogenous androgen-regulated genes in LNCaP cells. We identified 20 human genes whose silencing affected the expression of exogenous and endogenous androgen-responsive genes in prostate cancer cells grown in androgen-depleted medium. Knockdown of four of these genes upregulated the expression of endogenous AR targets and siRNAs targeting two of these genes (IGSF8 and RTN1) enabled androgen-independent proliferation of androgen-dependent cells. The effects of IGSF8 appear to be mediated through its interaction with a tetraspanin protein, CD9, previously implicated in prostate cancer progression. Remarkably, homozygous deletions of IGSF8 are found almost exclusively in prostate cancers but not in other cancer types. Our study shows that androgen independence can be achieved through the inhibition of specific genes and reveals a novel set of genes that regulate AR signaling in prostate cancers.

  20. Improved androgen specificity of AR-EcoScreen by CRISPR based glucocorticoid receptor knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Nick; Andringa, Dave; de Leeuw, Willem-Jan; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Iida, Mitsuru; Houtman, Corine J; de Boer, Jacob; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja H; Hamers, Timo

    2017-12-01

    The AR-EcoScreen is a widely used reporter assay for the detection of androgens and anti-androgens. Endogenous expression of glucocorticoid receptors and their affinity for the androgen responsive element that drives reporter expression, however, makes the reporter cells sensitive to interference by glucocorticoids and less specific for (anti-)androgens. To create a glucocorticoid insensitive derivative of the AR-EcoScreen, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing was used to develop glucocorticoid receptor knockout mutants by targeting various sites in the glucocorticoid gene. Two mutant cell lines were further characterized and validated against the unmodified AR-EcoScreen with a set of 19 environmentally relevant chemicals and a series of environmental passive sampler extracts with (anti-)androgenic activity. Sequencing of the targeted sites revealed premature stop codons following frame-shift mutations, leading to an absence of functional glucocorticoid receptor expression. The introduced mutations rendered cell lines insensitive to glucocorticoid activation and caused no significant difference in the responsiveness towards (anti-)androgens, compared to the unmodified AR-EcoScreen cells, allowing the selective, GR-independent, determination of (anti-)androgenicity in environmental passive sampler extracts. The increase in selectivity for (anti-)androgens improves reliability of the AR-EcoScreen and will provide higher accuracy in determining (anti-)androgenic potential when applied in toxicity screening and environmental monitoring of both single compounds and mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Finasteride treatment alters tissue specific androgen receptor expression in prostate tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, Tyler M; Sehgal, Priyanka D; Johnson, Karen A; Pier, Thomas; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Ricke, William A; Huang, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Normal and pathologic growth of the prostate is dependent on the synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) from testosterone by 5α-reductase. Finasteride is a selective inhibitor of 5α-reductase 2, one isozyme of 5α-reductase found in abundance in the human prostate. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of finasteride on androgen receptor expression and tissue morphology in human benign prostatic hyperplasia specimens. Patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate and either treated or not treated with finasteride between 2004 and 2010 at the University of Wisconsin-Hospital were retrospectively identified using an institutional database. Prostate specimens from each patient were triple-stained for androgen receptor, prostate-specific antigen, and basal marker cytokeratin 5. Morphometric analysis was performed using the multispectral imaging, and results were compared between groups of finasteride treated and non-treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor but not stromal androgen receptor expression was significantly lower in patients treated with finasteride than in non-treated patients. Androgen receptor-regulated prostate-specific antigen was not significantly decreased in finasteride-treated patients. Significant luminal epithelial atrophy and basal cell hyperplasia were prevalent in finasteride treated patients. Epithelial androgen receptor expression was highly correlated to the level of luminal epithelial atrophy. In this study, finasteride decreased the expression of epithelial androgen receptor in a tissue specific manner. The correlation between epithelial androgen receptor and the extent of luminal epithelial atrophy suggests that epithelial androgen receptor may be directly regulating the atrophic effects observed with finasteride treatment. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Calcium regulation of androgen receptor expression in the human prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen); J.E. Perry; J.K. Lindzey; D.J. Tindall; Y. Gong (Yuewen)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractElevation of intracellular calcium levels in the presence of normal androgen levels has been implicated in apoptotic prostate cell death. Since the androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in the regulation of growth and differentiation of the prostate, it was of

  3. Sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene is not a common determinant of male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macke, J.P.; Nathans, J.; King, V.L. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)); Hu, N.; Hu, S.; Hamer, D.; Bailey, M. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)); Brown, T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Hygiene and Public Health, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-10-01

    To test the hypothesis that DNA sequence variation in the androgen receptor gene plays a causal role in the development of male sexual orientation, the authors have (1) measured the degree of concordance of androgen receptor alleles in 36 pairs of homosexual brothers, (2) compared the lengths of polyglutamine and polyglycine tracts in the amino-terminal domain of the androgen receptor in a sample of 197 homosexual males and 213 unselected subjects, and (3) screened the entire androgen receptor coding region for sequence variation by PCR and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and/or single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis in 20 homosexual males with homosexual or bisexual brothers and one homosexual male with no homosexual brothers, and screened the amino-terminal domain of the receptor for sequence variation in an additional 44 homosexual males, 37 of whom had one or more first- or second-degree male relatives who were either homosexual or bisexual. These analyses show that (1) homosexual brothers are as likely to be discordant as concordant for androgen receptor alleles; (2) there are no large-scale differences between the distributions of polyglycine or polyglutamine tract lengths in the homosexual and control groups; and (3) coding region sequence variation is not commonly found within the androgen receptor gene of homosexual men. The DGGE screen identified two rare amino acid substitutions, ser[sup 205] -to-arg and glu[sup 793]-to-asp, the biological significance of which is unknown. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Differential androgen receptor signals in different cells explain why androgen-deprivation therapy of prostate cancer fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Y; Chang, T-M; Yeh, S; Ma, W-L; Wang, Y Z; Chang, C

    2010-06-24

    Prostate cancer is one of the major causes of cancer-related death in the western world. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) for the suppression of androgens binding to the androgen receptor (AR) has been the norm of prostate cancer treatment. Despite early success to suppress prostate tumor growth, ADT eventually fails leading to recurrent tumor growth in a hormone-refractory manner, even though AR remains to function in hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Interestingly, some prostate cancer survivors who received androgen replacement therapy had improved quality of life without adverse effect on their cancer progression. These contrasting clinical data suggest that differential androgen/AR signals in individual cells of prostate tumors can exist in the same or different patients, and may be used to explain why ADT of prostate cancer fails. Such a hypothesis is supported by the results obtained from transgenic mice with selective knockout of AR in prostatic stromal vs epithelial cells and orthotopic transplants of various human prostate cancer cell lines with AR over-expression or knockout. These studies concluded that AR functions as a stimulator for prostate cancer proliferation and metastasis in stromal cells, as a survival factor of prostatic cancer epithelial luminal cells, and as a suppressor for prostate cancer basal intermediate cell growth and metastasis. These dual yet opposite functions of the stromal and epithelial AR may challenge the current ADT to battle prostate cancer and should be taken into consideration when developing new AR-targeting therapies in selective prostate cancer cells.

  5. Expression of androgen receptor and prostate-specific antigen in male breast carcinoma

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kidwai, Noman; Gong, Yun; Sun, Xiaoping; Deshpande, Charuhas G; Yeldandi, Anjana V; Rao, M Sambasiva; Badve, Sunil

    .... In this study we analyzed the expression of PSA, PSAP and androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry in 26 cases of male breast carcinomas and correlated these with the expression of other prognostic markers...

  6. Androgen and Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baron, John

    1999-01-01

    This project will assess the association between the risk of breast cancer and polymorphisms of the androgen and vitamin D receptor among subjects in a recently- completed population-based case-control study in Sweden...

  7. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-01-01

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild-type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild-type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy. PMID:21386657

  8. Effect of nonpersistent pesticides on estrogen receptor, androgen receptor, and aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Zoechling, Alfred; Gerster, Petra; Ivanova, Margarita M; Teng, Yun; Klinge, Carolyn M; Schildberger, Barbara; Gartner, Michael; Jungbauer, Alois

    2014-10-01

    Nonpersistent pesticides are considered less harmful for the environment, but their impact as endocrine disruptors has not been fully explored. The pesticide Switch was applied to grape vines, and the maximum residue concentration of its active ingredients was quantified. The transactivation potential of the pesticides Acorit, Frupica, Steward, Reldan, Switch, Cantus, Teldor, and Scala and their active compounds (hexythiazox, mepanipyrim, indoxacarb, chlorpyrifos-methyl, cyprodinil, fludioxonil, boscalid, fenhexamid, and pyrimethanil) were tested on human estrogen receptor α (ERα), androgen receptor (AR) and arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in vitro. Relative binding affinities of the pure pesticide constituents for AR and their effect on human breast cancer and prostate cancer cell lines were evaluated. Residue concentrations of Switch's ingredients were below maximum residue limits. Fludioxonil and fenhexamid were ERα agonists (EC50 -values of 3.7 and 9.0 μM, respectively) and had time-dependent effects on endogenous ERα-target gene expression (cyclin D1, progesterone receptor, and nuclear respiratory factor 1) in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Fludioxonil, mepanipyrim, cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, and chlorpyrifos-methyl were AhR-agonists (EC50 s of 0.42, 0.77, 1.4, 4.6, and 5.1 μM, respectively). Weak AR binding was shown for chlorpyrifos-methyl, cyprodinil, fenhexamid, and fludioxonil. Assuming a total uptake which does not take metabolism and clearance rates into account, our in vitro evidence suggests that pesticides could activate pathways affecting hormonal balance, even within permitted limits, thus potentially acting as endocrine disruptors. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  9. Comparison of steroid receptors from the androgen responsive DDT1 cell line and the nonresponsive HVP cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J S; Kohler, P O

    1978-01-01

    Two hamster cell lines have been isolated from androgen target tissue. The DDT1 cells derived from ductus deferens tissue exhibit a growth response to androgens, while the HVP cells derived from ventral prostate are androgen unresponsive. Both cell lines contain androgen receptors, that are similar when compared by kinetic methods, sedimentation velocity, chromatographic procedures or nuclear translocation ability. The forms of the high salt extracted nuclear receptors are indistinguishable chromatographically. Therefore, we postulate that the lesion preventing androgen induced growth in the HVP cell line is subseqent to nuclear translocation of the steroid receptor complex.

  10. Male hypogonadism (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye.V. Luchytskyy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the review presents the current data on the prevalence of male hypogonadism, methods of diagnosing different forms of hypogonadism, describes the clinical manifestations of the most common forms of this disease.

  11. Cat eye syndrome with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masukawa, H; Ozaki, T; Nogimori, T

    1998-10-01

    A 17-year-old male diagnosed as having Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism showed short stature and no development of secondary sex characteristics. Exogeneous gonadotropin replacement therapy combining human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and human menopausal gonadotropin (hMG) was started. As a result, the short stature and androgen deficiency were relieved. The critical region of CES was tetrasomy of 22 pter-->q11. Abnormalities of other chromosomes which cause hypogonadotropic hypogonadism may exist, thus further investigation is needed.

  12. In Silico and In Vitro Investigation of the Piperine's Male Contraceptive Effect: Docking and Molecular Dynamics Simulation Studies in Androgen-Binding Protein and Androgen Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Gopichand; Ramya Chandar Charles, Mariasoosai; Klopčič, Ivana; Sollner Dolenc, Marija; Periyasamy, Latha; Selvaraj Coumar, Mohane

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanism of action of traditional medicines is an important step towards developing marketable drugs from them. Piperine, an active constituent present in the Piper species, is used extensively in Ayurvedic medicines (practiced on the Indian subcontinent). Among others, piperine is known to possess a male contraceptive effect; however, the molecular mechanism of action for this effect is not very clear. In this regard, detailed docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies of piperine with the androgen-binding protein and androgen receptors were carried out. Androgen receptors control male sexual behavior and fertility, while the androgen-binding protein binds testosterone and maintains its concentration at optimal levels to stimulate spermatogenesis in the testis. It was found that piperine docks to the androgen-binding protein, similar to dihydrotestosterone, and to androgen receptors, similar to cyproterone acetate (antagonist). Also, the piperine-androgen-binding protein and piperine-androgen receptors interactions were found to be stable throughout 30 ns of molecular dynamics simulation. Further, two independent simulations for 10 ns each also confirmed the stability of these interactions. Detailed analysis of the piperine-androgen-binding protein interactions shows that piperine interacts with Ser42 of the androgen-binding protein and could block the binding with its natural ligands dihydrotestosterone/testosterone. Moreover, piperine interacts with Thr577 of the androgen receptors in a manner similar to the antagonist cyproterone acetate. Based on the in silico results, piperine was tested in the MDA-kb2 cell line using the luciferase reporter gene assay and was found to antagonize the effect of dihydrotestosterone at nanomolar concentrations. Further detailed biochemical experiments could help to develop piperine as an effective male contraceptive agent in the future. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Androgen receptor and monoamine oxidase polymorphism in wild bonobos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garai, Cintia; Furuichi, Takeshi; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Ryu, Heungjin; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2014-12-01

    Androgen receptor gene (AR), monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA) and monoamine oxidase B gene (MAOB) have been found to have associations with behavioral traits, such as aggressiveness, and disorders in humans. However, the extent to which similar genetic effects might influence the behavior of wild apes is unclear. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ), AR glycine repeat (ARG), MAOA intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MAin2) and MAOB intron 2 dinucleotide repeat (MBin2) in 32 wild bonobos, Pan paniscus, and compared them with those of chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, and humans. We found that bonobos were polymorphic on the four loci examined. Both loci MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos showed a higher diversity than in chimpanzees. Because monoamine oxidase influences aggressiveness, the differences between the polymorphisms of MAin2 and MBin2 in bonobos and chimpanzees may be associated with the differences in aggression between the two species. In order to understand the evolution of these loci and AR, MAOA and MAOB in humans and non-human primates, it would be useful to conduct future studies focusing on the potential association between aggressiveness, and other personality traits, and polymorphisms documented in bonobos.

  14. Muscle Dysfunction in Androgen Deprivation: Role of Ryanodine Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    calcium leak and contractile dysfunction in chronic muscle fatigue , heart failure and muscular dystrophy (13-16). RyR1 is the skeletal muscle...controlled trial. Jama . Nov 13 2002;288(18):2282-2292. 8. Snyder PJ, Peachey H, Berlin JA, et al. Effects of testosterone replacement in hypogonadal men. J...385. 14. Allen DG, Lamb GD, Westerblad H. Skeletal muscle fatigue : cellular mechanisms. Physiol Rev. Jan 2008;88(1):287-332. 15. Bellinger AM, Reiken S

  15. Classification and virtual screening of androgen receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiazhong; Gramatica, Paola

    2010-05-24

    Computational tools, such as quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR), are highly useful as screening support for prioritization of substances of very high concern (SVHC). From the practical point of view, QSAR models should be effective to pick out more active rather than inactive compounds, expressed as sensitivity in classification works. This research investigates the classification of a big data set of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs)-androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, mainly aiming to improve the external sensitivity and to screen for potential AR binders. The kNN, lazy IB1, and ADTree methods and the consensus approach were used to build different models, which improve the sensitivity on external chemicals from 57.1% (literature) to 76.4%. Additionally, the models' predictive abilities were further validated on a blind collected data set (sensitivity: 85.7%). Then the proposed classifiers were used: (i) to distinguish a set of AR binders into antagonists and agonists; (ii) to screen a combined estrogen receptor binder database to find out possible chemicals that can bind to both AR and ER; and (iii) to virtually screen our in-house environmental chemical database. The in silico screening results suggest: (i) that some compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a complex mechanism binding both to ER and AR; (ii) new EDCs, which are nonER binders, but can in silico bind to AR, are recognized; and (iii) about 20% of compounds in a big data set of environmental chemicals are predicted as new AR antagonists. The priority should be given to them to experimentally test the binding activities with AR.

  16. Study clarifies associations between hypogonadism and health in aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, John K

    2012-11-01

    Tajar and colleagues present the associations between moderate and severe hypogonadism, symptoms of androgen deficiency and the prevelence of end-organ evidence of androgen deficency in 2966 older men in the European Male Aging Study. They find lower muscle mass, reduced bone mineral density, anemia, insulin resistence, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease, with greater risks of these signs of androgen deficiency at lower serum testosterone concentrations.

  17. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  18. Are the Aging Male's Symptoms (AMS) scale and the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire suitable for the screening of late-onset hypogonadism in aging Chinese men?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Liu, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Lin-Hui; Zeng, Qin-Song; Wang, Hui-Qing; Sun, Ying-hao

    2013-09-01

    The Aging Male's Symptoms (AMS) scale and the Androgen Deficiency in the Aging Male (ADAM) questionnaire have been widely used for screening men suspected of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). We evaluated the consistency of the two questionnaires with sex hormone levels. A total of 985 men completed the two questionnaires, as well as an analysis of the serum levels of total testosterone (TT), bioavailable testosterone (BT), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol (E2), prolactin (PRL) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). No correlation was observed between any hormone level and the psychological or somatic section of the AMS score, whereas the sexual section was correlated with the levels of FT, LH, FSH, SHBG and BT. Significant correlations were observed between the result of the two questionnaires and these hormone levels. When LOH was defined as TT specificity of the AMS scale were 54.0% and 41.2% compared with 78.7% and 14.8% for the ADAM questionnaire. Several sex hormone levels correlated with the two questionnaires, but neither of these questionnaires had sufficient sensitivity and specificity. It is necessary to provide a new questionnaire applicable to the Chinese population to screening LOH.

  19. Effect of oral isotretinoin treatment on skin androgen receptor levels in male acneic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, P; Soliman, H; Chivot, M; Villette, J M; Vexiau, P; Belanger, A; Fiet, J

    1995-04-01

    An oral daily dose (mean +/- SD, 0.75 +/- 0.05 mg/kg) of isotretinoin was administered for 3 months to six male patients with acne (scores of 4 and 5 according to Rosenfield). The therapy resulted in complete resolution of acne in four patients and improved acne significantly (score 1) in two patients. In accordance with recent findings, no change in serum testosterone and significant decreases in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol glucosiduronate, and androsterone glucosiduronate levels were observed after treatment. Androgen receptor status was investigated in back skin biopsies obtained in acne areas before and after 3 months of isotretinoin treatment. The treatment did not modify the binding affinity constant of skin androgen receptor (0.44 vs. 0.32 nmol/L), but it did induce a 2.6-fold decrease in its binding capacity constant (62 vs. 24 fmol/mg cytosolic protein), as assessed by Scatchard plot and confirmed immunologically by Western blot analysis. These data clearly showed that skin androgen receptor was sensitive to oral isotretinoin administration in acneic patients. The decrease in skin androgen receptor levels (this study) and the recently reported suppression of skin 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone production by isotretinoin treatment appeared consistent with the involvement of androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone in the pathogenesis of acne. Indeed, sebum production is under androgen control, and an abnormal response of the pilosebaceous unit to androgens appears to be implicated in the pathogenesis of acne. These observations were consistent with the absence of sebum in complete androgen-insensitive patients and normal sebum production in male pseudohermaphrodites.

  20. Androgen receptor is overexpressed in boys with severe hypospadias, and ZEB1 regulates androgen receptor expression in human foreskin cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Liang; Tasian, Gregory E.; Zhang, Haiyang; Cao, Mei; Ferretti, Max; Cunha, Gerald R.; Baskin, Laurence S.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION ZEB1 is overexpressed in patients with severe hypospadias. We examined the interaction between ZeB1 and the androgen receptor (AR) in vitro and the expression of AR in boys with hypospadias. RESULTS ZEB1 and AR colocalize to the nucleus. Estrogen upregulated ZEB1 and AR expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that ZEB1 binds to an E-box sequence in the AR gene promoter. AR expression is higher in subjects with severe hypospadias than those with mild hypospadias and control subjects (P hypospadias. Environmental estrogenic compounds may increase the risk of hypospadias by facilitating the interaction between ZEB1 and AR. METHODS Hs68 cells, a fibroblast cell line derived from neonatal human foreskin, were exposed to 0, 10, and 100 nmol/l of estrogen, after which the cellular localization of ZEB1 and AR was assessed using immunocytochemistry. To determine if ZEB1 interacted with the AR gene, ChIP was performed using ZEB1 antibody and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for AR. Second, AR expression was quantified using real-time PcR and western blot in normal subjects (n = 32), and subjects with mild (n = 16) and severe hypospadia (n = 16). PMID:22391641

  1. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine the ...... muscle size increased exponentially with decreasing androgen levels and was tripled at total testosterone levels...... the CAG-repeat number in relation to body fat mass and circulating androgens, and to identify the best hormonal marker of low muscle size amongst total testosterone, bioavailable testosterone, and dihydrotestosterone. Design, Setting, and Participants: Population-based study of 783 Danish men aged 20......, chronic disease, and age. The CAG-repeat number correlated positively with total body fat mass adjusted for weight, but not with the concentration of any of the circulating androgens. Total testosterone and dihydrotestosterone correlated positively with all outcomes of muscle size. The prevalence of low...

  2. Platelet-Synthesized Testosterone in Men with Prostate Cancer Induces Androgen Receptor Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander B. Zaslavsky

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelets have been long postulated to play a critical role in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, although relatively little is known regarding the precise mechanisms involved. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for prostate cancer eventually fails with relapse occurring in the form of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. CRPC tumors typically overexpress androgen receptor (AR, demonstrating continued dependence upon AR signaling. Platelets have been previously demonstrated to contain androgens, and we sought to explore the contribution of platelet-derived androgens in CRPC. In this study, we examined the role of platelet-derived androgens in vitro using platelets from men with CRPC, men with high-risk prostate cancer, and healthy male donors. A series of in vitro assays was performed to elucidate the impact of platelet-derived androgens on androgen-sensitive prostate tumor cells. By examining platelet-derived androgen effects on AR signaling in prostate tumor cells, we found that platelets, from men with CRPC and on ADT, strongly induce AR target genes and tumor cell proliferation. Moreover, we show a fully intact testosterone (T biosynthetic pathway within platelets from its precursor cholesterol and demonstrate that platelets of CRPC patients with ADT resistance are able to generate T. Overall, our findings reveal an unknown capacity of platelets to synthesize T at functionally relevant levels in patients with lethal prostate cancer. Importantly, it suggests a novel paracrine mechanism of T production that may act to sustain CRPC state and potentiate therapeutic resistance.

  3. Identification of an anabolic selective androgen receptor modulator that actively induces death of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Meissner, Robert S; Gentile, Michael A; Chisamore, Michael J; Opas, Evan E; Scafonas, Angela; Cusick, Tara E; Gambone, Carlo; Pennypacker, Brenda; Hodor, Paul; Perkins, James J; Bai, Chang; Ferraro, Damien; Bettoun, David J; Wilkinson, Hilary A; Alves, Stephen E; Flores, Osvaldo; Ray, William J

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) initially responds to inhibition of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, but inevitably progresses to hormone ablation-resistant disease. Much effort is focused on optimizing this androgen deprivation strategy by improving hormone depletion and AR antagonism. However we found that bicalutamide, a clinically used antiandrogen, actually resembles a selective AR modulator (SARM), as it partially regulates 24% of endogenously 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-responsive genes in AR(+) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. These data suggested that passive blocking of all AR functions is not required for PCa therapy. Hence, we adopted an active strategy that calls for the development of novel SARMs, which induce a unique gene expression profile that is intolerable to PCa cells. Therefore, we screened 3000 SARMs for the ability to arrest the androgen-independent growth of AR(+) 22Rv1 and LNCaP PCa cells but not AR(-) PC3 or DU145 cells. We identified only one such compound; the 4-aza-steroid, MK-4541, a potent and selective SARM. MK-4541 induces caspase-3 activity and cell death in both androgen-independent, AR(+) PCa cell lines but spares AR(-) cells or AR(+) non-PCa cells. This activity correlates with its promoter context- and cell-type dependent transcriptional effects. In rats, MK-4541 inhibits the trophic effects of DHT on the prostate, but not the levator ani muscle, and triggers an anabolic response in the periosteal compartment of bone. Therefore, MK-4541 has the potential to effectively manage prostatic hypertrophic diseases owing to its antitumor SARM-like mechanism, while simultaneously maintaining the anabolic benefits of natural androgens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CAMK2N1 inhibits prostate cancer progression through androgen receptor-dependent signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Guo, ShuiMing; Liu, Zhuo; Wu, Licheng; Li, Mingchao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Xiaming; Xu, Hua; Cai, Shaoxin; CHEN, Hui; LI, WEIYONG; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Liang; Hu, Zhiquan

    2014-01-01

    Castration resistance is a major obstacle to hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients. Although androgen independence of prostate cancer growth is a known contributing factor to endocrine resistance, the mechanism of androgen receptor deregulation in endocrine resistance is still poorly understood. Herein, the CAMK2N1 was shown to contribute to the human prostate cancer cell growth and survival through AR-dependent signaling. Reduced expression of CAMK2N1 was correlated to recurrence-fre...

  5. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  6. Controlling Androgen receptor nuclear localization by dendrimer conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haoyu

    Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists, such as bicalutamide and flutamide have been used widely in the treatment of prostate cancer. Although initial treatment is effective, prostate cancer cells often acquire antiandrogen resistance with prolonged treatment. AR over-expression and AR mutations contribute to the development of antiandrogen resistant cancer. Second generation antiandrogens such as enzalutamide are more effective and show reduced AR nuclear localization. In this study, derivatives of PAN52, a small molecule antiandrogen previously developed in our lab, were conjugated to the surface of generation 4 and generation 6 PAMAM dendrimers to obtain antiandrogen PAMAM dendrimer conjugates (APDC). APDCs readily enter cells and associate with AR in the cytoplasm. Due to their large size and positive charge, they can not enter the nucleus, thus retaining AR in the cytoplasm. In addition, APDCs are effective in decreasing AR mediated transcription and cell proliferation. APDC is the first AR antagonists that inhibit DHT-induced nuclear localization of AR. By inhibiting AR nuclear localization, APDC represents a new class of antiandrogens that offer an alternative approach to addressing antiandrogen-resistant prostate cancer. Lysine post-translational modification of AR Nuclear Localization Sequence (NLS) has great impact on AR cellular localization. It is of interest to understand which modifications modulate AR translocation into the nucleus. In this study, we prepared dendrimer-based acetyltransferase mimetic (DATM), DATM is able to catalytically acetylate AR in CWR22Rv1 cells, which will be a useful tool for studying AR modification effect on AR cellular localization. Derivatives of DATM, which transfer other chemical groups to AR, can be prepared similarly, and with more dendrimer based AR modification tools prepared in future, we will be able to understand and control AR cellular localization through AR modification.

  7. Bypass mechanisms of the androgen receptor pathway in therapy-resistant prostate cancer cell models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute B Marques

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is initially dependent on androgens for survival and growth, making hormonal therapy the cornerstone treatment for late-stage tumors. However, despite initial remission, the cancer will inevitably recur. The present study was designed to investigate how androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells eventually survive and resume growth under androgen-deprived and antiandrogen supplemented conditions. As model system, we used the androgen-responsive PC346C cell line and its therapy-resistant sublines: PC346DCC, PC346Flu1 and PC346Flu2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Microarray technology was used to analyze differences in gene expression between the androgen-responsive and therapy-resistant PC346 cell lines. Microarray analysis revealed 487 transcripts differentially-expressed between the androgen-responsive and the therapy-resistant cell lines. Most of these genes were common to all three therapy-resistant sublines and only a minority (∼5% was androgen-regulated. Pathway analysis revealed enrichment in functions involving cellular movement, cell growth and cell death, as well as association with cancer and reproductive system disease. PC346DCC expressed residual levels of androgen receptor (AR and showed significant down-regulation of androgen-regulated genes (p-value = 10(-7. Up-regulation of VAV3 and TWIST1 oncogenes and repression of the DKK3 tumor-suppressor was observed in PC346DCC, suggesting a potential AR bypass mechanism. Subsequent validation of these three genes in patient samples confirmed that expression was deregulated during prostate cancer progression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Therapy-resistant growth may result from adaptations in the AR pathway, but androgen-independence may also be achieved by alternative survival mechanisms. Here we identified TWIST1, VAV3 and DKK3 as potential players in the bypassing of the AR pathway, making them good candidates as biomarkers and novel therapeutical targets.

  8. Short poly-glutamine repeat in the androgen receptor in New World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Chihiro; Paukner, Annika; Kuroshima, Hika; Fujita, Kazuo; Suomi, Stephen J; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2017-12-01

    The androgen receptor mediates various physiological and developmental functions and is highly conserved in mammals. Although great intraspecific length polymorphisms in poly glutamine (poly-Q) and poly glycine (poly-G) regions of the androgen receptor in humans, apes and several Old World monkeys have been reported, little is known about the characteristics of these regions in New World monkeys. In this study, we surveyed 17 species of New World monkeys and found length polymorphisms in these regions in three species (common squirrel monkeys, tufted capuchin monkeys and owl monkeys). We found that the poly-Q region in New World monkeys is relatively shorter than that in catarrhines (humans, apes and Old World monkeys). In addition, we observed that codon usage for poly-G region in New World monkeys is unique among primates. These results suggest that the length of polymorphic regions in androgen receptor genes have evolved uniquely in New World monkeys.

  9. Androgen receptor regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene: altered expression in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, Lorella; Luciani, Paola; Nesi, Gabriella; Mannucci, Edoardo; Deledda, Cristiana; Dichiara, Francesca; Paglierani, Milena; Rosati, Fabiana; Masieri, Lorenzo; Serni, Sergio; Carini, Marco; Proietti-Pannunzi, Laura; Monti, Salvatore; Forti, Gianni; Danza, Giovanna; Serio, Mario; Peri, Alessandro

    2008-10-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) represents a major leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Elevated cholesterol levels, resulting from altered cholesterol metabolism, have been found in CaP cells. Seladin-1 (SELective Alzheimer Disease INdicator-1)/DHCR24 is a recently described gene involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrated the androgen regulation of seladin-1/DHCR24 expression, due to the presence of androgen responsive element sequences in its promoter region. In metastatic androgen receptor-negative CaP cells seladin-1/DHCR24 expression and cholesterol amount were reduced compared to androgen receptor-positive cells. In tumor samples from 61 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy the expression of seladin-1/DHCR24 was significantly higher with respect to normal tissues. In addition, in cancer tissues mRNA levels were positively related to T stage. In tumor specimens from 23 patients who received androgen ablation treatment for 3 months before surgery seladin-1/DHCR24 expression was significantly lower with respect to patients treated by surgery only. In conclusion, our study demonstrated for the first time the androgen regulation of the seladin-1/DHCR24 gene and the presence of a higher level of expression in CaP tissues, compared to the normal prostate. These findings, together with the results previously obtained in metastatic disease, suggest an involvement of this gene in CaP.

  10. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Kenta [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Cooperative Major in Advanced Health Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Hirata, Michiko [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Tominari, Tsukasa [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Institute of Global Innovation Research, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Matsumoto, Chiho [Department of Biotechnology and Life Science, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Endo, Yasuyuki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 4-4-1, Komatsushima, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 981-8558 (Japan); Murphy, Gillian [Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cancer Research UK, Cambridge Institute, Li Ka Shing Centre, Cambridge, CB2 0RE (United Kingdom); Nagase, Hideaki [Institute of Global Innovation Research, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16 Nakamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7FY (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-09

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. - Highlights: • A novel carborane compound BA321 binds to both AR and ERs, ERα and ERβ. • BA321 restores bone loss in orchidectomized mice without effects on sex organ. • BA321 acts as an estrogen agonist in bone and uterus in ovariectomized mice. • BA321 may be a new SARM to prevent the loss of musculoskeletal mass in elder men.

  11. Adaptive auto-regulation of androgen receptor provides a paradigm shifting rationale for bipolar androgen therapy (BAT) for castrate resistant human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, John T; D'Antonio, Jason M; Chen, Shuangling; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan P; Ndikuyeze, Georges H; Luo, Jun; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2012-10-01

    Cell culture/xenograft and gene arrays of clinical material document that development of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) cells involves acquisition of adaptive auto-regulation resulting in >25-fold increase in Androgen Receptor (AR) protein expression in a low androgen environment. Such adaptive AR increase paradoxically is a liability in castrated hosts, however, when supraphysiologic androgen is acutely replaced. Cell synchronization/anti-androgen response is due to AR binding to replication complexes (RC) at origin of replication sites (ORS) in early G1 associated with licensing/restricting DNA for single round of duplication during S-phase. When CRPC cells are acutely exposed to supraphysiologic androgen, adaptively increased nuclear AR is over-stabilized, preventing sufficient degradation in mitosis, inhibiting DNA re-licensing, and thus death in the subsequent cell cycle. These mechanistic results and the fact that AR/RC binding occurs in metastatic CRPCs directly from patients provides a paradigm shifting rationale for bipolar androgen therapy (BAT) in patient progressing on chronic androgen ablation. BAT involves giving sequential cycles alternating between periods of acute supraphysiologic androgen followed by acute ablation to take advantage of vulnerability produced by adaptive auto-regulation and binding of AR to RC in CRPC cells. BAT therapy is effective in xenografts and based upon positive results has entered clinical testing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Androgen receptor disorder in three brothers with bifid prepenile scrotum and hypospadias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bals-Pratsch, M; Schweikert, H U; Nieschlag, E

    1990-09-01

    Three brothers with congenital transposition of the penis, scrotal hypospadias, bifid scrotum, and bilateral undescended testes are described. Further signs of incomplete virilization, but no gynecomastia were seen. LH and FSH were elevated, whereas testosterone levels were reduced or in the normal range. Serum concentrations of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, androstenedione, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and estradiol measured in two affected brothers were in the normal range. Fibroblasts from scrotal skin biopsies performed in two patients showed normal 5 alpha-reductase activity (419 and 214 pmol.(mg protein)-1.h-1; normal greater than 1), whereas androgen receptors had reduced maximal binding capacity (Bmax 4 and 14 fmol.(mg protein)-1; normal greater than 18) and an increased equilibrium dissociation constant (0.7 and 1.26 nmol/l: normal 0.2 +/- 0.08) indicating a quantitative and qualitative androgen receptor defect. These patients represent a further variant of androgen insensitivity.

  13. Biochemical characterization of a membrane androgen receptor in the ovary of the atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Alyssa M; Thomas, Peter

    2004-07-01

    Membrane androgen receptors have been biochemically characterized in only a few vertebrate species to date. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to comprehensively investigate the binding characteristics of a putative membrane androgen receptor in the ovary of the teleost, Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus). Specific androgen binding to an ovarian plasma membrane fraction was demonstrated using a radioreceptor assay protocol consisting of a short-term incubation with [(3)H]testosterone (T) and subsequent filtration of bound steroid from free steroid. Saturation and Scatchard analyses of T binding to an ovarian plasma membrane fraction indicated the presence of a single, high-affinity (K(d) = 15.32 +/- 2.68 nM [mean +/- SEM]), low-capacity (B(max) = 2.81 +/- 0.31 pmol/mg protein), androgen-binding site. Specific androgen binding to the receptor was readily displaceable, and the association and dissociation kinetics were rapid (half-time = 3.7 +/- 1.7 and 4.7 +/- 0.2 min, respectively). Competitive binding assays showed that 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone, T, and 11-ketotestosterone had relative binding affinities (RBAs) of 193%, 100%, and 13%, respectively, whereas none of the C(18) or C(21) steroids tested bound with high affinity except for progesterone (RBA = 191%). This androgen-binding moiety with high affinity for progesterone is unlikely to mediate the physiological actions of progestins in croaker, because it has low binding affinity for fish progestin hormones. Androgen-binding sites were also detected in membrane fractions of the brain, liver, kidney, and drumming muscle, whereas little or no binding was detected in the trunk muscle, heart, gills, or intestine. Receptor levels increased 10-fold during ovarian recrudescence, reaching maximum levels in fully mature ovaries, which suggests a likely physiological role for this receptor during the reproductive cycle of female croaker. It is concluded that the androgen-binding moiety identified in

  14. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred to as...... pedigree segregating AIS, where the molecular analyses of the androgen receptor gene in the family provided evidences that a 25-bp deletion of the DNA-binding domain is causative of this equine syndrome....

  15. AOP description: Androgen receptor agonism leading to reproductive dysfunction (in fish)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This adverse outcome pathway details the linkage between binding and activation of androgen receptor as a nuclear transcription factor in females and the adverse effect of reduced cumulative fecundity in repeat-spawning fish species. Cumulative fecundity is the most apical endpoi...

  16. Genotype and phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome - impact of androgen receptor polymorphism and skewed X inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A; Hertz, J M; Gravholt, C H

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic variation of Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is wide and may by caused by various genetic and epigenetic effects. Skewed inactivation of the supra-numerical X chromosome and polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) have been suggested as plausible causes. We wanted to describe X...

  17. Androgen, estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in the human uterus during the menstrual cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, HJMM; Heineman, MJ; Theunissen, PHMH; de Jong, FH; Evers, JLH

    Cyclic changes in steroid receptor expression in endometrial cells are considered a reflection of its differential functions. Besides estrogen and progestogens, androgens have also been suggested to affect the biological function of the female reproductive tract. We investigated the distribution and

  18. A Study of the androgen receptor gene polymorphism and the level ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) occurs in men and women. The nature of the genetic predisposition to androgenetic alopecia is still unresolved. The aim of the work is to study the genotype of the androgen receptor gene (StuI polymorphism) and its relationship to AGA in a case control study and to determine the ...

  19. Stilbenes inhibit androgen receptor expression in 22Rv1 castrate-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays an important role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Importantly, AR continues to be expressed in advanced stages of castrate-resistant PCa (CRPC), where it can have ligand- independent activity. Identification of naturally occurring s...

  20. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  1. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    5α-reductase inhibitor; prostate cancer; chemoprevention; androgen receptor; FOXO1 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...influences comparative activity of selenium-enriched garlic and yeast in mammary cancer pre- vention. J Agric Food Chem 2000;48(6):2062–2070. 12. Medina D

  2. Targeting the androgen receptor in triple-negative breast cancer: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina A

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Alain Mina,1 Rachel Yoder,2 Priyanka Sharma1 1Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood, 2University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, KS, USA Abstract: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is an aggressive subtype associated with frequent recurrence and metastasis. Unlike hormone receptor-positive subtypes, treatment of TNBC is currently limited by the lack of clinically available targeted therapies. Androgen signaling is necessary for normal breast development, and its dysregulation has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. In recent years, gene expression studies have identified a subset of TNBC that is enriched for androgen receptor (AR signaling. Interference with androgen signaling in TNBC is promising, and AR-inhibiting drugs have shown antitumorigenic activity in preclinical and proof of concept clinical studies. Recent advances in our understanding of androgenic signaling in TNBC, along with the identification of interacting pathways, are allowing development of the next generation of clinical trials with AR inhibitors. As novel AR-targeting agents are developed and evaluated in clinical trials, it is equally important to establish a robust set of biomarkers for identification of TNBC tumors that are most likely to respond to AR inhibition. Keywords: triple-negative breast cancer, androgen signaling, targeted therapy, biomarkers, prognosis 

  3. Expression of androgen receptor and its association with estrogen receptor and androgen receptor downstream proteins in normal/benign breast luminal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Yarid, Nicole; McMahon, Loralee; Yang, Qi; Hicks, David G

    2014-08-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is strongly expressed in the majority of breast carcinomas, but its role in breast hormonal carcinogenesis is not clear. We believe a better knowledge of the biology of normal/benign breast tissue will be the key to understanding this process. Using standard immunohistochemical staining on consecutive sections and dual immunohistochemical labeling, we studied the expression pattern of AR and estrogen receptor (ER) in normal/benign breast luminal epithelial cells. We found that most of the AR-positive cells are also ER positive, about 10% of the cells are AR-positive only, whereas ER-positive only cells are uncommon, a distribution pattern of hormone receptor expression similar to what was revealed in invasive breast carcinomas. Whereas the expression of AR downstream proteins, such as prostate-specific antigen and gross cystic disease fluid protein, was either negative or unrelated to the AR status. We conclude that AR and ER expression status in invasive breast carcinomas reflects that of their progenitor cells in terminal duct lobular units. Our study did not reveal the expression of AR downstream proteins in normal/benign luminal epithelial cells at the regular immunohistochemistry level.

  4. Characterizing and Targeting Androgen Receptor Pathway-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    potential to treat castration- resistant prostate cancer. Cancer Res 72: abstr 3848. 41. Haag P, Bektic J, Bartsch G, Klocker H, Eder IE (2005) Androgen...AR gene amplification, and PTEN gene deletion. (A) Illustration of the 4-color FISH technique for the detection of rearrangements of TMPRSS2 and/or...shown below the corresponding illustration . (B) FISH probes used to detect AR gene amplification and PTEN gene deletion AR gene amplification was

  5. Calpain-Dependent Proteolysis of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses...Giovannucci, M.J. Stampfer, K. Krithivas, M. Brown, D. Dahl, A. Brufsky, J. Talcott , C.H. Hennekens, P.W. Kantoff, The CAG repeat within the androgen...Amorino, S.J. Parsons , Neuroendocrine cells in prostate cancer, Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression 14 (2004) 287–300. [43] J.C. Reubi, S

  6. The Biological and Clinical Significance of Androgen Receptor Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    specimen with similar cell composition and histology among control and experimental samples in an in vivo setting. The authentic response ofTSGs to ADT...mice retained the histology and biomarker expression of parent tumors, and whether androgen deprivation affected cell proliferation, AR-regulated...skin between the shoulder blades . Castration of mice Castration of mice was performed one month after subrenal implantation as previously described

  7. CLONING, EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists, including those recommended for use in the EPA's Tier 1 screening battery, typically use mammalian estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR) such as rat or human. Although we know that the amino acid s...

  8. Selectivity in progesterone and androgen receptor binding of progestagens used in oral contraceptives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloosterboer, H.J.; Vonk-Noordegraaf, C.A.; Turpijn, E.W.

    1988-09-01

    The relative binding affinities (RBAs) of four progestational compounds (norethisterone, levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene) for the human progesterone and androgen receptors were measured in MCF-7 cytosol and intact MCF-7 cells. For the binding to the progesterone receptor, both Org 2058 and Org 3236 (or 3-keto-desogestrel) were used as labelled ligands. The following ranking (low to high) for the RBA of the nuclear (intact cells) progesterone receptor irrespective of the ligand used is found: norethisterone much less than levonorgestrel less than 3-keto-destogestrel less than gestodene. The difference between the various progestagens is significant with the exception of that between 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene, when Org 2058 is used as ligand. For the cytosolic progesterone receptor, the same order is found with the exception that similar RBAs are found for gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel. The four progestagens clearly differ with respect to binding to the androgen receptor using dihydrotestosterone as labelled ligand in intact cells; the ranking (low to high) is: norethisterone less than 3 keto-desogestrel less than levonorgestrel and gestodene. The difference between 3-keto-desogestrel and levonorgestrel or gestodene is significant. The selectivity indices (ratio of the mean RBA for the progesterone receptor to that of androgen receptor) in intact cells are significantly higher for 3-keto-desogestrel and gestodene than for levonorgestrel and norethisterone. From these results we conclude that the introduction of the 18-methyl in norethisterone (levonorgestel) increases both the binding to the progesterone and androgen receptors.

  9. Non-Genomic Action of Androgens is Mediated by Rapid Phosphorylation and Regulation of Androgen Receptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Deng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Testosterone is critical for maintaining spermatogenesis and male fertility. The accomplishment of these processes requires the synergistic actions of the classical and non-classical signaling pathways of androgens. Methods: A murine testicular Sertoli cell line, TM4 cell was used to examine androgen actions in Sertoli cells. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence assay were employed to study the testosterone-induced Androgen receptor (AR translocation. Protein phosphorylation antibody array was applied to identify the phosphorylation sites under testosterone treatment, and these findings were verified by Western blot analysis. Results: We found that a physiological dose of testosterone induced fast membrane association of AR. By using a phosphorylation antibody array, several phosphorylation sites, such as MEK1/2 (Ser217/221, Akt (Ser473, and Erk1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204 were rapidly phosphorylated within 5 min of testosterone treatment. Inhibition of the MEK and Akt signaling pathways prevented AR trafficking. Blocking of AR by flutamide eliminated the stimulation effect of testosterone on kinase phosphorylation. Testosterone induced kinase Src phosphorylation, and inhibition of Src restricted AR translocation to the membrane and the nucleus. Conclusion: Findings suggested that the membrane association of AR was mediated by the MEK and Akt phosphorylation signaling pathways, which resulted in Src activation and was initiated by testosterone binding to the membrane-localized AR. This study provides new insights into the testosterone signaling pathway in Sertoli cells, which mediate spermatogenesis. In addition, the study can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of male infertility caused by disorders in spermatogenesis.

  10. Androgen receptors and experimental bone loss - an in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffens, Joao Paulo; Coimbra, Leila Santana; Rossa, Carlos; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Van Dyke, Thomas E; Spolidorio, Luis Carlos

    2015-12-01

    Testosterone is a sex hormone that exhibits many functions beyond reproduction; one such function is the regulation of bone metabolism. The role played by androgen receptors during testosterone-mediated biological processes associated with bone metabolism is largely unknown. This study aims to use a periodontal disease model in vivo in order to assess the involvement of androgen receptors on microbial-induced inflammation and alveolar bone resorption in experimental bone loss. The impact of hormone deprivation was tested through both orchiectomy and chemical blockage of androgen receptor using flutamide (FLU). Additionally, the direct effect of exogenous testosterone, and the role of the androgen receptor, on osteoclastogenesis were investigated. Thirty male adult rats (n=10/group) were subjected to: 1-orchiectomy (OCX); 2-OCX sham surgery; or 3-OCX sham surgery plus FLU, four weeks before the induction of experimental bone loss. Ten OCX sham-operated rats were not subjected to experimental bone loss and served as healthy controls. The rats were euthanized two weeks later, so as to assess bone resorption and the production of inflammatory cytokines in the gingival tissue and serum. In order to study the in vitro impact of testosterone, osteoclasts were differentiated from RAW264.7 cells and testosterone was added at increasing concentrations. Both OCX and FLU increased bone resorption, but OCX alone was observed to increase osteoclast count. IL-1β production was increased only in the gingival tissue of OCX animals, whereas FLU-treated animals presented a decreased expression of IL-6. Testosterone reduced the osteoclast formation in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly impacted the production of TNF-α; FLU partially reversed these actions. When taken together, our results indicate that testosterone modulates experimental bone loss, and that this action is mediated, at least in part, via the androgen receptor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  11. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. Appication of selective androgen receptor modulator to the therapy of sarcopenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Tanabe, Makito; Nomiyama, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    The research to develop a drug, so called selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) , which shows beneficial androgenic action on bone and muscle, but hardly possesses the stimulatory action on prostate has been making a progress. However, no drug is available in the market at present. Most of such drugs are developed, aiming at the application to age-related muscle reduction (sarcopenia) and osteoporosis. Recently, in a clinical trial of SARM (enbosarm) administration to healthy elderly men, a promising data showing the increase of lean body mass and physical function has been reported. Future clinical applications of SARMs are expected.

  12. Canine REIC/Dkk-3 interacts with SGTA and restores androgen receptor signalling in androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yuiko; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Kawakami, Shota; Nakao, Nobuhiro; Azakami, Daigo; Bonkobara, Makoto; Michishita, Masaki; Morimatsu, Masami; Watanabe, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2017-06-09

    The pathological condition of canine prostate cancer resembles that of human androgen-independent prostate cancer. Both canine and human androgen receptor (AR) signalling are inhibited by overexpression of the dimerized co-chaperone small glutamine-rich tetratricopeptide repeat-containing protein α (SGTA), which is considered to cause the development of androgen-independency. Reduced expression in immortalised cells (REIC/Dkk-3) interferes with SGTA dimerization and rescues AR signalling. This study aimed to assess the effects of REIC/Dkk-3 and SGTA interactions on AR signalling in the canine androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line CHP-1. Mammalian two-hybrid and Halo-tagged pull-down assays showed that canine REIC/Dkk-3 interacted with SGTA and interfered with SGTA dimerization. Additionally, reporter assays revealed that canine REIC/Dkk-3 restored AR signalling in both human and canine androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Therefore, we confirmed the interaction between canine SGTA and REIC/Dkk-3, as well as their role in AR signalling. Our results suggest that this interaction might contribute to the development of a novel strategy for androgen-independent prostate cancer treatment. Moreover, we established the canine androgen-independent prostate cancer model as a suitable animal model for the study of this type of treatment-refractory human cancer.

  13. Equol inhibits prostate cancer growth through degradation of androgen receptor by S-phase kinase-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsumi, Momoe; Shiota, Masaki; Takeuchi, Ario; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Kajioka, Shunichi; Uchiumi, Takeshi; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi; Yokomizo, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Chemopreventive and potential therapeutic effects of soy isoflavones have been shown to be effective in numerous preclinical studies as well as clinical studies in prostate cancer. Although the inhibition of androgen receptor signaling has been supposed as one mechanism underlying their effects, the precise mechanism of androgen receptor inhibition remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to clarify their mechanism. Among soy isoflavones, equol suppressed androgen receptor as well as prostate-specific antigen expression most potently in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells. However, the inhibitory effect on androgen receptor expression and activity was less prominent in castration-resistant CxR and 22Rv1 cells. Consistently, cell proliferation was suppressed and cellular apoptosis was induced by equol in LNCaP cells, but less so in CxR and 22Rv1 cells. We revealed that the proteasome pathway through S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) was responsible for androgen receptor suppression. Taken together, soy isoflavones, especially equol, appear to be promising as chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for prostate cancer based on the fact that equol augments Skp2-mediated androgen receptor degradation. Moreover, because Skp2 expression was indicated to be crucial for the effect of soy isoflavones, soy isoflavones may be applicable for precancerous and cancerous prostates. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  14. Mental rotation in intellectually gifted boys is affected by the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Lakatošová, Silvia; Kubranská, Aneta; Laznibatová, Jolana; Ficek, Andrej; Ostatníková, Daniela; Celec, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Testosterone was shown to organize brain and modulate cognitive functions. It is currently unknown whether mental rotation is also associated with prenatal testosterone exposure and testosterone-related genetic polymorphisms. The aim of our study was to analyze associations between mental rotation performance, the actual testosterone levels, the prenatal testosterone level (expressed as 2D:4D ratio) and the androgen receptor CAG repeat polymorphism in intellectually gifted boys. One hundred forty-seven boys aged 10-18 years with IQ>130 were enrolled. Saliva samples were collected and used for ELISA of actual levels of salivary testosterone. The 2D:4D finger length ratio as an indicator of prenatal testosterone was measured on both hands and averaged. Amthauer mental rotation test was used for the assessment of this spatial ability. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene was analyzed using PCR and capillary electrophoresis. Linear regression revealed that 2D:4D finger length ratio and the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene were associated with mental rotation. Actual levels of testosterone did not correlate significantly with mental rotation. Multivariate analysis of covariance revealed that after adjustment of age as a confounding variable, only the effect of the genetic polymorphism was significant. The results are in line with our previous genetic analysis of intellectually gifted boys showing the importance of CAG repeat polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene. Details of the interactions between androgen signaling, testosterone levels and its metabolism especially during the prenatal development of brain function remain to be elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cell Cycle Regulation of Estrogen and Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    hypersensitivity as- the transiently transfected MMTV promoter as shown say was performed as described previously [18]. In brief, cells were previously [3, 41...per 1 F 108 cells, in 10 mM his tris propane , pH 7, 10 mM MgC12, 1 mM DTT) significant increase of CAT activity was observed. Pre- and incubated for 15...within nucleosome B, which is remodeled and becomes hypersensitive to restriction enzyme (SstI) cleavage during androgen that at no time point during the

  16. Delayed puberty and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Differential diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoep, Marinus Cornelis

    1978-01-01

    This thesis describes a method enabling a prospecrive differential diagnosis to be made berween delayed puberty (DP) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The influence of androgen administration on the gonadal feedback sysrem of patients with delayed puberty was also studied. ... Zie: Summary

  17. Triallelic digenic mutation in the prokineticin 2 and GNRH receptor genes in two brothers with normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Juan Pablo; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Coronel, Agustín; Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin Antonio; Valencia-Villalvazo, Elith Yazmín; Soderlund, Daniela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón Mauricio; Canto, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/aim of the study: To date, different genes have been identified as responsible for the presence of normosmic congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nCHH). Herein, we report the molecular findings regarding the analysis of PROK2, in two brothers with nCHH. Two siblings with nCHH, in whom mutations in GNRHR, PROKR2 and FGFR1 had been investigated previously, as well as their family were studied. DNA was amplified by PCR and sequenced for the PROK2 gene. Controls were analyzed by restriction fragment-length polymorphism. The structure of PROK2 and its mutant protein were compared using a protein molecular model. Both affected siblings exhibited a heterozygous p.R117W mutation in PROK2, while their mother was a heterozygous carrier and their father, an unaffected brother and their sister were homozygous wild type. Besides, both patients presented a homozygous p.E90K mutation in GNRHR that had been previously reported. We found a novel mutation in PROK2 in two siblings in whom a mutation in the GNRHR gene had been previously reported.

  18. Localization of the androgen-synthesizing enzymes, androgen receptor, and sex steroids in the vagina: possible implications for the treatment of postmenopausal sexual dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Jonathan; Dury, Alain Y; Ouellet, Johanne; Pelletier, Georges; Labrie, Fernand

    2014-08-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of the intravaginal administration of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) observed in postmenopausal women on sexual dysfunction. To identify the distribution of the androgen-synthesizing enzymes as well as androgen receptor (AR) and measure steroid levels in the monkey vagina. The cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis), the closest model to the human, has been used to measure the expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes and androgen receptor by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (n=4), confirmed by immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence (n=3). DHEA and its androgenic metabolites were quantified by LC-MS/MS (n=4). The presence of SRD5A1, SRD5A2, HSD17B3, AR as well as nerve fibers (PGP 9.5) was investigated, and steroid levels were measured. AR is widely distributed within the vaginal epithelium and also in the lamina propria with a lower expression in the muscularis layer and blood vessel walls. Androgen-forming enzymes, on the other hand, are expressed in the vaginal stratified squamous epithelium at a relatively high level where they are uniformly distributed from the basal membrane up to the superficial keratinized cells. The enzymes are at a lower level in blood vessel walls and zona muscularis where nerve fibers are localized. DHEA and its androgen metabolites are present at biologically significant concentrations in the monkey vagina. The enzymes responsible for androgen formation as well as AR are at the highest level in the superficial layer of the stratified epithelium and muscularis layers of the vagina. These data provide a potential explanation for the described role of androgens in regulating vaginal lubrication, smooth muscle activity, blood flow, and the neuronal activity potentially involved in the correction of sexual dysfunction. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  19. Insulin Resistance and Hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Shermin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Backgound: The number of hypogonads is increasing day by day. It may be due to sedentary life style with increased obesity, increased tension or stressed lifestyle among all groups of populations. Visceral obesity is associated with insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus and also with hypogonadism.Objective: This study was carried out to determine the proportion of insulin resistance among male subjects with hypogonadism in different age groups along with status of erectile quality among diabetics and non diabetics.Materials and method: This cross sectional study among 161 adult male subjects aged ≥ 20 to ≤ 60 years were purposively selected from Bangladesh Institute of Research and Rehabilitation in Diabetes Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders (BIRDEM, Dhaka, Bangladesh between May 2009 to September 2010. Glycemic status and insulin resistance (by HOMA-R were done and relevant history were documented.Results: The highest proportion (38.9% of hypogonadism was in ≥ 50 years age group whereas highest proportion (39.6% of the eugonads was in the age group of 40 to 49 years. More than half of the hypogonad subjects had weak erectile quality (54.0% which were followed by absent erectile quality in 32.7% and 13.3% subjects had normal erectile quality. Among the eugonad subjects 41.7% had normal erectile quality, 41.6% subjects had weak erectile quality and 16.7% subjects had no erectile quality. More than ninety percent of the hypogonad subjects and about 60% of the eugonad subjects had insulin resistance. The average HOMA-R was more in the subjects with hypogonadism with diabetes which was highly significant (p-value < 0.001.Conclusion: Hypogonadism is associated with insulin resistance.

  20. SMILE upregulated by metformin inhibits the function of androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yon; Song, Chin-Hee; Xie, Yuan-Bin; Jung, Chaeyong; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Lee, Keesook

    2014-11-28

    Metformin, a diabetes drug, has been reported to inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effect and action mechanism of metformin on the function of androgen receptor (AR), a key molecule in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Metformin was found to reduce androgen-dependent cell growth and the expression of AR target genes by inhibiting AR function in prostate cancer cells such as LNCaP and C4-2 cells. Interestingly, metformin upregulated the protein level of small heterodimer partner-interacting leucine zipper (SMILE), a coregulator of nuclear receptors, and knockdown of SMILE expression with shRNA abolished the inhibitory effect of metformin on AR function. Further studies revealed that SMILE protein itself suppressed the transactivation of AR, and its ectopic expression resulted in the repressed expression of endogenous AR target genes, PSA and NKX3.1, in LNCaP cells. In addition, SMILE protein physically interacted with AR and competed with the AR coactivator SRC-1 to modulate AR transactivation. As expected, SMILE repressed androgen-dependent growth of LNCaP and C4-2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SMILE, which is induced by metformin, functions as a novel AR corepressor and may mediate the inhibitory effect of metformin on androgen-dependent growth of prostate cancer cells. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Sex differences in neuromuscular androgen receptor expression and sociosexual behavior in a sex changing fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Schuppe

    Full Text Available Androgen signaling, via receptor binding, is critical for regulating the physiological and morphological foundations of male-typical reproductive behavior in vertebrates. Muscles essential for male courtship behavior and copulation are highly sensitive to androgens. Differences in the distribution and density of the androgen receptor (AR are important for maintaining dimorphic musculature and thus may provide for anatomical identification of sexually selected traits. In Lythrypnus dalli, a bi-directional hermaphroditic teleost fish, both sexes produce agonistic approach displays, but reproductive behavior is sexually dimorphic. The male-specific courtship behavior is characterized by rapid jerky movements (involving dorsal fin erection towards a female or around their nest. Activation of the supracarinalis muscle is involved in dorsal fin contributions to both agonistic and sociosexual behavior in other fishes, suggesting that differences in goby sexual behavior may be reflected in sexual dimorphism in AR signaling in this muscle. We examined sex differences in the local distribution of AR in supracarinalis muscle and spinal cord. Our results demonstrate that males do express more AR in the supracarinalis muscle relative to females, but there was no sex difference in the number of spinal motoneurons expressing AR. Interestingly, AR expression in the supracarinalis muscle was also related to rates of sociosexual behavior in males, providing evidence that sexual selection may influence muscle androgenic sensitivity to enhance display vigor. Sex differences in the distribution and number of cells expressing AR in the supracarinalis muscle may underlie the expression of dimorphic behaviors in L. dalli.

  2. Sex differences in neuromuscular androgen receptor expression and sociosexual behavior in a sex changing fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuppe, Eric R; Pradhan, Devaleena S; Thonkulpitak, Kevin; Drilling, Cathleen; Black, Michael; Grober, Matthew S

    2017-01-01

    Androgen signaling, via receptor binding, is critical for regulating the physiological and morphological foundations of male-typical reproductive behavior in vertebrates. Muscles essential for male courtship behavior and copulation are highly sensitive to androgens. Differences in the distribution and density of the androgen receptor (AR) are important for maintaining dimorphic musculature and thus may provide for anatomical identification of sexually selected traits. In Lythrypnus dalli, a bi-directional hermaphroditic teleost fish, both sexes produce agonistic approach displays, but reproductive behavior is sexually dimorphic. The male-specific courtship behavior is characterized by rapid jerky movements (involving dorsal fin erection) towards a female or around their nest. Activation of the supracarinalis muscle is involved in dorsal fin contributions to both agonistic and sociosexual behavior in other fishes, suggesting that differences in goby sexual behavior may be reflected in sexual dimorphism in AR signaling in this muscle. We examined sex differences in the local distribution of AR in supracarinalis muscle and spinal cord. Our results demonstrate that males do express more AR in the supracarinalis muscle relative to females, but there was no sex difference in the number of spinal motoneurons expressing AR. Interestingly, AR expression in the supracarinalis muscle was also related to rates of sociosexual behavior in males, providing evidence that sexual selection may influence muscle androgenic sensitivity to enhance display vigor. Sex differences in the distribution and number of cells expressing AR in the supracarinalis muscle may underlie the expression of dimorphic behaviors in L. dalli.

  3. Androgen Receptor Localizes to Plasma Membrane by Binding to Caveolin-1 in Mouse Sertoli Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonclassical androgen signaling pathway translates signals into alterations in cellular function within minutes, and this action is proposed to be mediated by an androgen receptor (AR localized to the plasma membrane. This study was designed to determine the mechanism underlying the membrane association of androgen receptor in TM4 cells, a mouse Sertoli cell line. Western blot analysis indicated testosterone-induced AR translocation to the cell membrane. Data from coimmunoprecipitation indicated that AR is associated with caveolin-1, and testosterone enhanced this association. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by shRNA decreased the amount of AR localized to membrane fraction and prevented AR membrane trafficking after being exposed to testosterone at physiological concentration. The palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate decreased AR membrane localization in basal condition and completely blocked testosterone-induced AR translocation to membrane fraction. These data suggested that AR localized to membrane fraction by binding with caveolin-1 through palmitoylation of the cysteine residue. This study provided a new evidence for AR membrane localization and its application for clarifying the nonclassical signaling pathway of androgens.

  4. Minireview: Alternative activation pathways for the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Kristin R; Tindall, Donald J

    2011-06-01

    Advanced prostate tumors, which are androgen dependent, are often initially treated in the clinic with hormone ablation therapy, either through surgical castration or administration of small-molecule antiandrogens. Most tumors respond favorably to these treatments, exhibiting regression of the tumor, amelioration of symptoms, and a decrease of prostate-specific antigen in patient sera. However, with time, the majority of tumors recur in a more aggressive, castration-resistant (CR) phenotype. Currently, no effective treatment exists for this stage of the cancer, and patients ultimately succumb to metastatic disease. The androgen receptor (AR), which is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily of proteins, is the transcription factor that is responsible for mediating the effects of androgens upon target tissues, and it has been demonstrated to play a central role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Despite CR tumor cells being able to continue to grow after hormonal therapy in which testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are markedly reduced, they still require the expression and activity of the AR. The AR can become transactivated in this low-androgen environment through a number of different mechanisms, including amplification and mutation of the receptor, cross talk with other signaling pathways, and altered regulation by coregulatory proteins. This review will summarize the most current data regarding non-ligand-mediated activation of the AR in prostate cancer cells. Developing work in this field aims to more clearly elucidate the signals that drive AR activity independently of androgens in CR disease so that better therapeutic targets can be developed for patients with this stage of highly aggressive prostate carcinoma.

  5. Effect of small molecules modulating androgen receptor (SARMs in human prostate cancer models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Tesei

    Full Text Available The management of hormone-refractory prostate cancer represents a major challenge in the therapy of this tumor, and identification of novel androgen receptor antagonists is needed to render treatment more effective. We analyzed the activity of two novel androgen receptor antagonists, (S-11 and (R-9, in in vitro and in vivo experimental models of hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In vitro experiments were performed on LNCaP, LNCaP-AR, LNCaP-Rbic and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cytotoxic activity was assessed by SRB and BrdU uptake, AR transactivation by luciferase reporter assay and PSA levels by Real Time RT-PCR and ELISA assays. Cell cycle progression-related markers were evaluated by western blot. In vivo experiments were performed on SCID mice xenografted with cells with different sensitivity to hormonal treatment. In hormone-sensitive LNCaP and LNCaP-AR cells, the latter expressing high androgen receptor levels, (R-9 and (S-11 exhibited a higher cytotoxic effect compared to that of the reference compound ((R-bicalutamide, also in the presence of the synthetic androgen R1881. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect produced by (R-9 was higher than that of (S-11 in the two hormone-resistant LNCaP-AR and VCaP cells. A significant reduction in PSA levels was observed after exposure to both molecules. Moreover, (S-11 and (R-9 inhibited DNA synthesis by blocking the androgen-induced increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. In vivo studies on the toxicological profile of (R-9 did not reveal the presence of adverse events. Furthermore, (R-9 inhibited tumor growth in various in vivo models, especially LNCaP-Rbic xenografts, representative of recurrent disease. Our in vitro results highlight the antitumor activity of the two novel molecules (R-9 and (S-11, making them a potentially attractive option for the treatment of CRPC.

  6. Bone stroma-derived cells change coregulators recruitment to androgen receptor and decrease cell proliferation in androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villagran, Marcelo A.; Gutierrez-Castro, Francisco A.; Pantoja, Diego F.; Alarcon, Jose C.; Fariña, Macarena A.; Amigo, Romina F.; Muñoz-Godoy, Natalia A. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Pinilla, Mabel G. [Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Peña, Eduardo A.; Gonzalez-Chavarria, Ivan; Toledo, Jorge R.; Rivas, Coralia I.; Vera, Juan C. [Department of Physiopathology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); McNerney, Eileen M. [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Onate, Sergio A., E-mail: sergio.onate@udec.cl [Molecular Endocrinology and Oncology Laboratory, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Medical Specialties, School of Medicine, University of Concepcion, Concepcion (Chile); Department of Urology, State University of New York at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Prostate cancer (CaP) bone metastasis is an early event that remains inactive until later-stage progression. Reduced levels of circulating androgens, due to andropause or androgen deprivation therapies, alter androgen receptor (AR) coactivator expression. Coactivators shift the balance towards enhanced AR-mediated gene transcription that promotes progression to androgen-resistance. Disruptions in coregulators may represent a molecular switch that reactivates latent bone metastasis. Changes in AR-mediated transcription in androgen-sensitive LNCaP and androgen-resistant C4-2 cells were analyzed for AR coregulator recruitment in co-culture with Saos-2 and THP-1. The Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteosarcoma and THP-1 cell line representing human monocytes were used to display osteoblast and osteoclast activity. Increased AR activity in androgen-resistant C4-2 was due to increased AR expression and SRC1/TIF2 recruitment and decreased SMRT/NCoR expression. AR activity in both cell types was decreased over 90% when co-cultured with Saos-2 or THP-1 due to dissociation of AR from the SRC1/TIF2 and SMRT/NCoR coregulators complex, in a ligand-dependent and cell-type specific manner. In the absence of androgens, Saos-2 decreased while THP-1 increased proliferation of LNCaP cells. In contrast, both Saos-2 and THP-1 decreased proliferation of C4-2 in absence and presence of androgens. Global changes in gene expression from both CaP cell lines identified potential cell cycle and androgen regulated genes as mechanisms for changes in cell proliferation and AR-mediated transactivation in the context of bone marrow stroma cells. - Highlights: • Decreased corepressor expression change AR in androgen-resistance prostate cancer. • Bone stroma-derived cells change AR coregulator recruitment in prostate cancer. • Bone stroma cells change cell proliferation in androgen-resistant cancer cells. • Global gene expression in CaP cells is modified by bone stroma cells in co

  7. Up-Regulation of Hepatic Alpha-2-HS-Glycoprotein Transcription by Testosterone via Androgen Receptor Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG, a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. Methods: HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. Results: In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Conclusions: Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  8. Up-regulation of hepatic alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein transcription by testosterone via androgen receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkl, Jakob; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Lin, Yun; Viereck, Robert; Lebedeva, Aleksandra; Kukuk, Damaris; Pichler, Bernd J; Alesutan, Ioana; Lang, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Fetuin-A (alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, AHSG), a liver borne plasma protein, contributes to the prevention of soft tissue calcification, modulates inflammation, reduces insulin sensitivity and fosters weight gain following high fat diet or ageing. In polycystic ovary syndrome, fetuin-A levels correlate with free androgen levels, an observation pointing to androgen sensitivity of fetuin-A expression. The present study thus explored whether the expression of hepatic fetuin-A is modified by testosterone. HepG2 cells were treated with testosterone and androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, and were silenced with androgen receptor siRNA. To test the in vivo relevance, male mice were subjected to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for 7 weeks. AHSG mRNA levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and fetuin-A protein abundance by Western blotting. In HepG2 cells, AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance were both up-regulated following testosterone treatment. The human alpha- 2-HS-glycoprotein gene harbors putative androgen receptor response elements in the proximal 5 kb promoter sequence relative to TSS. The effect of testosterone on AHSG mRNA levels was abrogated by silencing of the androgen receptor in HepG2 cells. Moreover, treatment of HepG2 cells with the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide in presence of endogenous ligands in the medium significantly down-regulated AHSG mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein abundance. In addition, ADT of male mice was followed by a significant decrease of hepatic Ahsg mRNA expression and fetuin-A protein levels. Testosterone participates in the regulation of hepatic fetuin-A expression, an effect mediated, at least partially, by androgen receptor activation.

  9. Disruption of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor with Chromatin: A Novel Therapeutic Approach in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    level. KEYWORDS: Prostate cancer, Androgen Receptor, FOXA1, androgen receptor co- regulators , Protein-protein interactions, peptides...peptidomimetics ACCOMPLISHMENTS: What were the major goals of the project? Aim 1: Select and evaluate peptides/peptidomimetics in models of PCa. Based on...will be tested for its stability, pharmacologic properties, toxicity, efficacy in disrupting AR/FoxA1 PPI, and for activity on AR- driven gene

  10. Testosterone downregulates angiotensin II type-2 receptor via androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in rat aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jay S; Hankins, Gary D; Kumar, Sathish

    2016-10-01

    Blood pressure is lower in females than males. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor (AT2R) induces vasodilation. This study determined whether sex differences in vascular AT2R expression occur and if androgens exert control on AT2R expression in the vasculature. AT2Rs in the aorta of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were examined following alteration in androgen levels by gonadectomy or hormone supplementation. AT2R mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in the aortas of males than females. In males, testosterone withdrawal by castration significantly elevated AT2R mRNA and protein levels and testosterone replacement restored them. In females, increasing androgen levels decreased AT2R mRNA and protein expression and this was attenuated by androgen receptor blocker flutamide. Ex vivo, dihydrotestosterone downregulated AT2R in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded aorta. Dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation in isolated aorta was blocked by an androgen receptor antagonist. Furthermore, blockade of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase or TGFβ signaling with specific inhibitors abolished dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation. Androgens downregulate AT2R expression levels in aorta, in vivo and ex vivo. The androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase-signaling pathway may be a key mechanism by which testosterone downregulates AT2R expression, implicating androgens' contributing role to gender differences in vascular AT2R expression. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Minnelide Inhibits Androgen Dependent, Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth by Decreasing Expression of Androgen Receptor Full Length and Splice Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isharwal, Sumit; Modi, Shrey; Arora, Nivedita; Uhlrich, Charles; Giri, Bhuwan; Barlass, Usman; Soubra, Ayman; Chugh, Rohit; Dehm, Scott M; Dudeja, Vikas; Saluja, Ashok; Banerjee, Sulagna; Konety, Badrinath

    2017-05-01

    With almost 30,000 deaths per year, prostate cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Androgen Deprivation Therapy (ADT) has been the corner stone of prostate cancer treatment for decades. However, despite an initial response of prostate cancer to ADT, this eventually fails and the tumors recur, resulting in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC). Triptolide, a diterpene triepoxide, has been tested for its anti-tumor properties in a number of cancers for over a decade. Owing to its poor solubility in aqueous medium, its clinical application had been limited. To circumvent this problem, we have synthesized a water-soluble pro-drug of triptolide, Minnelide, that is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1 clinical trial against gastrointestinal tumors. In the current study, we assessed the therapeutic potential of Minnelide and its active compound triptolide against androgen dependent prostate cancer both in vitro as well as in vivo. Cell viability was measured by a MTT based assay after treating prostate cancer cells with multiple doses of triptolide. Apoptotic cell death was measured using a caspase 3/7 activity. Androgen Receptor (AR) promoter-binding activity was evaluated by using luciferase reporter assay. For evaluating the effect in vivo, 22Rv1 cells were implanted subcutaneously in animals, following which, treatment was started with 0.21 mg/kg Minnelide. Our study showed that treatment with triptolide induced apoptotic cell death in CRPC cells. Triptolide treatment inhibited AR transcriptional activity and decreased the expression of AR and its splice variants both at the mRNA and the protein level. Our studies show that triptolide inhibits nuclear translocation of Sp1, resulting in its decreased transcriptional activity leading to downregulation of AR and its splice variants in prostate cancer cells. In vivo, Minnelide (0.21 mg/kg) regressed subcutaneous tumors derived from CRPC 22RV1 at our study endpoint. Our animal

  12. Structural features discriminate androgen receptor N/C terminal and coactivator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-30

    Human androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity involves interdomain and coactivator interactions with the agonist-bound AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Structural determinants of the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction between the AR NH(2)-terminal FXXLF motif and activation function 2 (AF2) in the LBD were shown previously by crystallography. In this report, we provide evidence for a region in AR LBD helix 12 outside the AF2 binding cleft that facilitates interactions with the FXXLF and LXXLL motifs. Mutagenesis of glutamine 902 to alanine in AR LBD helix 12 (Q902A) disrupted AR FXXLF motif binding to AF2, but enhanced coactivator LXXLL motif binding. Functional compensation for defective FXXLF motif binding by AR-Q902A was suggested by the slower dissociation rate of bound androgen. Functional importance of glutamine 902 was indicated by the charged residue germline mutation Q902R that caused partial androgen insensitivity, and a similar somatic mutation Q902K reported in prostate cancer, both of which increased the androgen dissociation rate and decreased AR transcriptional activity. High affinity equilibrium androgen binding was retained by alanine substitution mutations at Tyr-739 in AR LBD helix 5 or Lys-905 in helix 12 structurally adjacent to AF2, whereas transcriptional activity decreased and the androgen dissociation increased. Deleterious effects of these loss of function mutations were rescued by the helix stabilizing AR prostate cancer somatic mutation H874Y. Sequence NH(2)-terminal to the AR FXXLF motif contributed to the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction based on greater AR-2-30 FXXLF motif peptide binding to the agonist-bound AR LBD than a shorter AR-20-30 FXXLF motif peptide. We conclude that helix 12 residues outside the AF2 binding cleft modulate AR transcriptional activity by providing flexibility to accommodate FXXLF or LXXLL motif binding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Strategies for Amplification of Trinucleotide Repeats: Optimization of Fragile X and Androgen Receptor PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp; Snyder; Sedra; Guida; Prior

    1996-06-01

    Background: Trinucleotide repeat regions are heritable unstable elements that change in copy number from generation to generation. Amplification of these triplet repeats is an important diagnostic tool for molecular medicine. However, these repeats are often difficult to amplify and may require the use of different cosolvents or amplification strategies. Methods and Results: We used the fragile X and androgen receptor triplet repeat regions to demonstrate a series of conditions that may be used to optimize the amplification of repeat sequences. Conclusions: For androgen receptor, we show that predigestion of the template DNA was sufficient to generate consistent amplification. In the case of fragile X we found that predigestion, when combined with use of betaine as a destabilizing additive, was superior to other methods and yielded consistent amplification of normal and premutation alleles in both isotopic and nonisotopic reactions.

  14. Human minimal androgen insensitivity with normal dihydrotestosterone-binding capacity in cultured genital skin fibroblasts: evidence for an androgen-selective qualitative abnormality of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsky, L; Kaufman, M; Killinger, D W; Burko, B; Shatz, D; Volpé, R

    1984-09-01

    We have studied a kindred in which two parts of siblings, maternal first cousins, have a form of "minimal" androgen insensitivity that permits morphogenesis of unambiguous male external genitalia, but interferes with normal virilization at puberty. All four had gynecomastia that required reductive surgery. Apart from this common phenotype, they varied considerably in the temporal and regional aspects of their subvirilization and appreciably in their androgenic responsiveness to pharmacological doses of testosterone. The cultured genital skin fibroblasts from one set of siblings have an androgen-receptor activity with the following properties: (1) a normal maximum-binding capacity (Bmax) with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or the synthetic androgen, methyltrienolone (MT; R1881) as ligand; (2) a higher than normal apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for DHT (0.77 nM) but not for MT; and (3) an elevated dissociation rate (k) of DHT-receptor (0.013 min-1, 37 degrees C), but not MT-receptor, complexes within intact cells. In addition, prolonged incubation with MT, but not DHT, augments the specific androgen-binding activity of the mutant cells as much as that of the controls. Normal cells yield lower values of apparent Kd for DHT (0.1-0.3 nM) after 2- than after 0.5-hr incubation (0.3-1.8 nM), and 1-hr values are intermediate. This occurs despite concurrent catabolic consumption of DHT from the medium and is considered to reflect transformation of initial, low-affinity DHT-receptor complexes to subsequent, higher-affinity states by a process that depends on time and initial ligand concentration. The mutant complexes described here can readily attain the highest state of affinity with MT, but have an impeded, variably expressed ability to do so with DHT. These findings suggest that a structural mutation at the X-linked locus that encodes the androgen-receptor protein is responsible for its androgen-selective dysfunction. Synthetic, nonhepatotoxic

  15. Activational action of testosterone on androgen receptors protects males preventing temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanton, L E; Macedo, C G; Torres-Chávez, K E; Fischer, L; Tambeli, C H

    2017-01-01

    Testosterone protects male rats from Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) pain. This study investigated whether this protective effect is mediated by an organizational action of testosterone during nervous system development, by central estrogen and androgen receptors and by the 5α-reduced metabolite of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone. A pharmacological approach was used to assess the ability of the androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182 780 and the 5-α reductase inhibitor dutasteride to block the protective effect of testosterone, evaluated through the behavioral response induced by a TMJ injection of 0.5% formalin. Flutamide and ICI 182 780 were injected into the medullary subarachnoid space, and dutasteride and testosterone were systemically administered. The TMJ injection of 0.5% formalin induced a significant nociceptive behavioral response in gonadectomized male and naïve female, but not in sham gonadectomized male rats, confirming that endogenous testosterone prevents TMJ nociception in males. Testosterone administration prevented formalin-induced TMJ nociception in males gonadectomized either in the neonatal (at the day of birth) or adult period and in naïve female rats, suggesting that the protective effect of testosterone on TMJ nociception does not depend on its organizational actions during critical periods of development. The administration of flutamide and dutasteride but not of ICI 182 780 blocked the protective effect of testosterone. We conclude that the protective effect of testosterone on TMJ nociception depends on activational actions of dihydrotestosterone on androgen receptors rather than on organizational androgenic actions during central nervous system development or estrogenic actions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Frozen sections were cut and analyzed for tumor by the Univ of CO Pathology Core and sent on dry ice to the laboratory of collaborator Dr. Chip...Cancer. Functional Development of the Mammary Gland Program Project Grant Retreat, February 2014, Aurora, CO. Targeting Androgen Receptor to Inhibit ER...D’Amato N, Richer JK. Endocrine therapy for triple negative breast cancer. Oral presentation at Pathology Grand Rounds, University of Colorado Anschutz

  17. Targeting androgen receptor/Src complex impairs the aggressive phenotype of human fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, Gabriella; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the conservation of this process across divergent cancer

  18. Androgen receptor signalling in Vascular Endothelial cells is dispensable for spermatogenesis and male fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Hara Laura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen signalling is essential both for male development and function of the male reproductive system in adulthood. Within the adult testis, Germ cells (GC do not express androgen receptor (AR suggesting androgen-mediated promotion of spermatogenesis must act via AR-expressing somatic cell-types. Several recent studies have exploited the Cre/lox system of conditional gene-targeting to ablate AR function from key somatic cell-types in order to establish the cell-specific role of AR in promotion of male fertility. In this study, we have used a similar approach to specifically ablate AR-signalling from Vascular Endothelial (VE cells, with a view to defining the significance of androgen signalling within this cell-type on spermatogenesis. Findings AR expression in VE cells of the testicular vasculature was confirmed using an antibody against AR. A Cre-inducible fluorescent reporter line was used to empirically establish the utility of a mouse line expressing Cre Recombinase driven by the Tie2-Promoter, for targeting VE cells. Immunofluorescent detection revealed expression of YFP (and therefore Cre Recombinase function limited to VE cells and an interstitial population of cells, believed to be macrophages, that did not express AR. Mating of Tie2-Cre males to females carrying a floxed AR gene produced Vascular Endothelial Androgen Receptor Knockout (VEARKO mice and littermate controls. Ablation of AR from all VE cells was confirmed; however, no significant differences in bodyweight or reproductive tissue weights could be detected in VEARKO animals and spermatogenesis and fertility was unaffected. Conclusions We demonstrate the successful generation and empirical validation of a cell-specific knockout of AR from VE cells, and conclude that AR expression in VE cells is not essential for spermatogenesis or male fertility.

  19. Gartanin, an isoprenylated xanthone from the mangosteen fruit (Garcinia mangostana), is an androgen receptor degradation enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gongbo; Petiwala, Sakina M; Yan, Miao; Won, Jong Hoon; Petukhov, Pavel A; Johnson, Jeremy J

    2016-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) has been a target of prostate cancer for nearly seven decades. In the last several years there has been an interest in identifying compounds that promote degradation of the androgen receptor. In the present study, gartanin, an isoprentylated xanthone in the mangosteen fruit, was evaluated for enhancing AR degradation, and inducing the unfolded protein response pathway. The interaction of gartanin with the ligand-binding domain was characterized using a fluorescence polarization cell-free assay and cell-based FRET assay. Western blot analysis identified modulation of ER stress markers (BiP, PERK, IRE1, and CHOP) along with androgen receptor degradation. A computation simulation was performed to identify possible orientations of gartanin with the ligand-binding domain. Utilizing a cell-free and cell-based FRET assays gartanin was found to interact with the ligand-binding domain through a solely antagonist interaction. Interestingly, inhibition of CHOP, a critical component of the ER stress pathway, was observed to stabilize AR. Gartanin is an isoprenylated xanthone that promotes AR degradation with evidence suggesting this process is critically regulated by the unfolded protein response pathway. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The impact of the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene on muscle and adipose tissues in 20-29-year-old Danish men: Odense Androgen Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Background: The number of CAG repeats (CAGn) within the CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene correlates inversely with the transactivation of the receptor. Objective: To examine the impact of CAGn on muscle, fat distribution, and circulating androgen levels. Design, settings...

  1. Androgen Receptor Tumor Suppressor Function Is Mediated by Recruitment of Retinoblastoma Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuai; Gao, Yanfei; He, Housheng Hansen; Han, Dong; Han, Wanting; Avery, Amy; Macoska, Jill A; Liu, Xiaming; Chen, Sen; Ma, Fen; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P; Cai, Changmeng

    2016-10-18

    Although well characterized as a transcriptional activator that drives prostate cancer (PCa) growth, androgen receptor (AR) can function as a transcriptional repressor, and high-level androgens can suppress PCa proliferation. The molecular basis for this repression activity remains to be determined. Genes required for DNA replication are highly enriched among androgen-repressed genes, and AR is recruited to the majority of these genes, where it rapidly represses their transcription. This activity is enhanced in PCa cells expressing high AR levels and is mediated by recruitment of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb). Significantly, AR also indirectly increases the expression of DNA replication genes through stimulatory effects on other metabolic genes with subsequent CDK activation and Rb hyperphosphorylation. In castration-resistant PCa cells, which are dependent on high-level AR expression, this anti-proliferative repression function might be exploited through treatment with androgen in combination with agents that suppress AR-driven metabolic functions or cell cycle progression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Androgen Receptor Tumor Suppressor Function Is Mediated by Recruitment of Retinoblastoma Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although well characterized as a transcriptional activator that drives prostate cancer (PCa growth, androgen receptor (AR can function as a transcriptional repressor, and high-level androgens can suppress PCa proliferation. The molecular basis for this repression activity remains to be determined. Genes required for DNA replication are highly enriched among androgen-repressed genes, and AR is recruited to the majority of these genes, where it rapidly represses their transcription. This activity is enhanced in PCa cells expressing high AR levels and is mediated by recruitment of hypophosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (Rb. Significantly, AR also indirectly increases the expression of DNA replication genes through stimulatory effects on other metabolic genes with subsequent CDK activation and Rb hyperphosphorylation. In castration-resistant PCa cells, which are dependent on high-level AR expression, this anti-proliferative repression function might be exploited through treatment with androgen in combination with agents that suppress AR-driven metabolic functions or cell cycle progression.

  3. The androgen receptor confers protection against diet-induced atherosclerosis, obesity, and dyslipidemia in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagman, Johan B; Wilhelmson, Anna S; Motta, Benedetta M; Pirazzi, Carlo; Alexanderson, Camilla; De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Holmäng, Agneta; Anesten, Fredrik; Jansson, John-Olov; Levin, Malin; Borén, Jan; Ohlsson, Claes; Krettek, Alexandra; Romeo, Stefano; Tivesten, Åsa

    2015-04-01

    Androgens have important cardiometabolic actions in males, but their metabolic role in females is unclear. To determine the physiologic androgen receptor (AR)-dependent actions of androgens on atherogenesis in female mice, we generated female AR-knockout (ARKO) mice on an atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficient background. After 8 weeks on a high-fat diet, but not on a normal chow diet, atherosclerosis in aorta was increased in ARKO females (+59% vs. control apoE-deficient mice with intact AR gene). They also displayed increased body weight (+18%), body fat percentage (+62%), and hepatic triglyceride levels, reduced insulin sensitivity, and a marked atherogenic dyslipidemia (serum cholesterol, +52%). Differences in atherosclerosis, body weight, and lipid levels between ARKO and control mice were abolished in mice that were ovariectomized before puberty, consistent with a protective action of ovarian androgens mediated via the AR. Furthermore, the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone reduced atherosclerosis (-41%; thoracic aorta), subcutaneous fat mass (-44%), and cholesterol levels (-35%) in ovariectomized mice, reduced hepatocyte lipid accumulation in hepatoma cells in vitro, and regulated mRNA expression of hepatic genes pivotal for lipid homeostasis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the AR protects against diet-induced atherosclerosis in female mice and propose that this is mediated by modulation of body composition and lipid metabolism. © FASEB.

  4. Differential effects of genistein on prostate cancer cells depend on mutational status of the androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer M Mahmoud

    Full Text Available Blocking the androgen receptor (AR activity is the main goal of therapies for advanced prostate cancer (PCa. However, relapse with a more aggressive, hormone refractory PCa arises, which harbors restored AR activity. One mechanism of such reactivation occurs through acquisition of AR mutations that enable its activation by various steroidal and non-steroidal structures. Thus, natural and chemical compounds that contribute to inappropriate (androgen-independent activation of the AR become an area of intensive research. Here, we demonstrate that genistein, a soy phytoestrogen binds to both the wild and the Thr877Ala (T877A mutant types of AR competitively with androgen, nevertheless, it exerts a pleiotropic effect on PCa cell proliferation and AR activity depending on the mutational status of the AR. Genistein inhibited, in a dose-dependent way, cell proliferation and AR nuclear localization and expression in LAPC-4 cells that have wild AR. However, in LNCaP cells that express the T877A mutant AR, genistein induced a biphasic effect where physiological doses (0.5-5 µmol/L stimulated cell growth and increased AR expression and transcriptional activity, and higher doses induced inhibitory effects. Similar biphasic results were achieved in PC-3 cells transfected with AR mutants; T877A, W741C and H874Y. These findings suggest that genistein, at physiological concentrations, potentially act as an agonist and activate the mutant AR that can be present in advanced PCa after androgen ablation therapy.

  5. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    'andropause' has been suggested. However, testosterone levels show no or only modest variation with age in men; with large prospective studies suggesting a maximal decline of total testosterone of 1.6% per year. Thus, in contrast to the sudden arrest of gonadal activity in females around menopause, men do...... with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...

  6. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadam, Mohamad; Khatami, Saied Reza; Galehdari, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR) encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN) in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015). The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234). Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity. PMID:26221130

  7. Association of androgen receptor GGN repeat length polymorphism and male infertility in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Moghadam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgens play critical role in secondary sexual and male gonads differentiations such as spermatogenesis, via androgen receptor. The human androgen receptor (AR encoding gene contains two regions with three nucleotide polymorphic repeats (CAG and GGN in the first exon. Unlike the CAG repeats, the GGN has been less studied because of technical difficulties, so the functional role of these polymorphic repeats is still unclear. Objective: The goal of this study was to investigate any relationship between GGN repeat length in the first exon of AR gene and idiopathic male infertility in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: This is the first study on GGN repeat of AR gene in infertile male in Khuzestan, Iran. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to categorize GGN repeat lengths in 72 infertile and 72 fertile men. Afterwards we sequenced the PCR products to determine the exact length of GGN repeat in each category. Our samples included 36 azoospermic and 36 oligozoospermic men as cases and 72 fertile men as control group. Results: We found that the numbers of repeats in the cases range from 18 to 25, while in the controls this range is from 20 to 28. The results showed a significant relation between the length of GGN repeat and fertility (p=0.015. The most frequent alleles were alleles with 24 and 25 repeats respectively in case and control groups. On the other hand no significant differences were found between Arab and non-Arab cases by considering GGN repeat lengths (p=0.234. Conclusion: Due to our results, there is a significant association between the presence of allele with 24 repeats and susceptibility to male infertility. Therefore this polymorphism should be considered in future studies to clarify etiology of disorders related to androgen receptor activity.

  8. Evolutionary history and functional characterization of androgen receptor genes in jawed vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yukiko; Katoh, Hironori; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Yamada, Gen

    2009-12-01

    Vertebrates show diverse sexual characters in sexually attractive and reproductive organs, which are regulated by steroid hormones, particularly androgens. However, the evolutionary history of androgen receptor (AR) gene remains largely unknown on the basis of phylogenic and functional analyses. To elucidate the evolutionary history and functional diversification of AR genes in vertebrates, we cloned the AR cDNAs from a shark, basal ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii), namely bichir and sturgeon (Acipenseriformes), and teleosts including a basal teleost, arowana (Osteoglossiformes). Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the gene duplication event that gave rise to two different teleost ARs (alpha and beta) likely occurred in the actinopterygian lineage leading to teleosts after the divergence of Acipenseriformes but before the split of Osteoglossiformes, which is compatible with the phylogenetic timing of teleost-specific genome duplication. Searching for AR genes in the medaka genome indicated that the teleost AR gene duplication has been associated with the duplication between chromosomes 10 and 14. Our functional analysis revealed that the shark AR activates the target gene via androgen response element by classical androgens. The teleost ARalpha showed the unique intracellular localization with a significantly higher transactivating capacity than that by teleost ARbeta. These findings indicate that the most ancient type of AR, as activated by the classical androgens as ligands, emerged before the Chondrichthyes-Osteichthyes split, and the AR gene was duplicated during the teleost-specific genome duplication event. We report here for the first time the accurate evolutionary history of AR gene and functional characterization of AR duplicates in teleost lineage.

  9. Salivary Duct Carcinoma: An Update on Morphologic Mimics and Diagnostic Use of Androgen Receptor Immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udager, Aaron M; Chiosea, Simion I

    2017-09-01

    More than 15 years ago, seminal studies by Dr. E. Leon Barnes and colleagues transformed our understanding of salivary duct carcinoma (SDC) and, in doing so, paved the way for contemporary diagnostic and therapeutic approaches to this aggressive salivary adenocarcinoma. In particular, attention to the apocrine phenotype of SDC and expression of androgen receptor (AR) by immunohistochemistry has improved the diagnostic accuracy and showed how SDC can be reliably distinguished from its morphologic mimics (i.e., other salivary gland carcinomas with high grade transformation, low grade cribriform cystadenocarcinoma, and squamous cell carcinomas involving parotid). Furthermore, the observation that SDC shares AR expression with prostate cancer and apocrine breast cancer foresaw the discovery of common molecular alterations between SDC and these tumor types and draw attention to androgen deprivation therapy for SDC patients.

  10. Resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs inhibit activation of both wild-type and T877A mutant androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Johan; Tringali, Corrado; Oskarsson, Agneta

    2017-11-01

    Prostate cancer growth and progression are mainly dependent on androgens and many current prostate cancer treatment options target the synthesis or function of androgens. We have previously reported that resveratrol and synthetic analogs of resveratrol with a higher bioavailability inhibit the synthesis of androgens in human adrenocortical H295R cells. Now we have studied the antiandrogenic properties of resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs in two different prostate cell lines; LNCaP and RWPE. LNCaP carry a T877A mutation in the androgen receptor while RWPE has a wild-type androgen receptor. We found that resveratrol, piceatannol and all studied analogs were able to inhibit a dihydrotestosterone-induced activation of the androgen receptor, showing that they act as antiandrogens. In LNCaP cells, all studied compounds were able to statistically significantly decrease the androgenic signaling in concentrations ≥1μM and the synthetic analogs trimethylresveratrol (RSVTM) and tetramethylpiceatannol (PICTM) were the most potent compounds. RWPE cells were not as responsive to the studied compounds as the LNCaP cells. A statistically significant decrease in the androgenic signaling was observed at concentrations ≤5μM for most compounds and RSVTM was found to be the most potent compound. Further, we studied the effects of resveratrol, piceatannol and analogs on the levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in LNCaP cells and found that all studied compounds decreased the level of PSA and that the synthetic analogs diacetylresveratrol (RSVDA), triacetylresveratrol (RSVTA) and RSVTM were the most potent compounds, decreasing the PSA level by approx. 50% at concentrations ≥10μM. In a cell-free receptor binding assay we were unable to show binding of resveratrol or analogs to the ligand binding domain of the androgen receptor, indicating that the observed effects are mediated via other mechanisms than direct ligand competition. We conclude that the resveratrol

  11. Chemical Composition and Labeling of Substances Marketed as Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators and Sold via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagoner, Ryan M; Eichner, Amy; Bhasin, Shalender; Deuster, Patricia A; Eichner, Daniel

    2017-11-28

    Recent reports have described the increasing use of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators, which have not been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), to enhance appearance and performance. The composition and purity of such products is not known. To determine the chemical identity and the amounts of ingredients in dietary supplements and products marketed and sold through the internet as selective androgen receptor modulators and compare the analyzed contents with product labels. Web-based searches were performed from February 18, 2016, to March 25, 2016, using the Google search engine on the Chrome and Internet Explorer web browsers to identify suppliers selling selective androgen receptor modulators. The products were purchased and the identities of the compounds and their amounts were determined from April to August 2016 using chain-of-custody and World Anti-Doping Association-approved analytical procedures. Analytical findings were compared against the label information. Products marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators. Chemical identities and the amount of ingredients in each product marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators. Among 44 products marketed and sold as selective androgen receptor modulators, only 23 (52%) contained 1 or more selective androgen receptor modulators (Ostarine, LGD-4033, or Andarine). An additional 17 products (39%) contained another unapproved drug, including the growth hormone secretagogue ibutamoren, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-δ agonist GW501516, and the Rev-ErbA agonist SR9009. Of the 44 tested products, no active compound was detected in 4 (9%) and substances not listed on the label were contained in 11 (25%). In only 18 of the 44 products (41%), the amount of active compound in the product matched that listed on the label. The amount of the compounds listed on the label differed substantially from that found by analysis in 26 of 44 products

  12. Metabolomics for informing adverse outcome pathways: Androgen receptor activation and the pharmaceutical spironolactone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J.M., E-mail: davis.john@epa.gov [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Ekman, D.R., E-mail: ekman.drew@epa.gov [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); Skelton, D.M. [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States); LaLone, C.A.; Ankley, G.T.; Cavallin, J.E.; Villeneuve, D.L. [U.S. EPA, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Collette, T.W. [U.S. EPA, National Exposure Research Laboratory, 960 College Station Rd., Athens, GA 30605 (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Metabolomics identified potential key events in an androgen receptor activation AOP. • Metabolomics indicate spironolactone may elicit effects via multiple nuclear receptors. • Spironolactone exposure may elicit interactive effects in multi-stressor environments. - Abstract: One objective in developing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) is to connect biological changes that are relevant to risk assessors (i.e., fecundity) to molecular and cellular-level alterations that might be detectable at earlier stages of a chemical exposure. Here, we examined biochemical responses of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) to inform an AOP relevant to spironolactone’s activation of the androgen receptor, as well as explore other biological impacts possibly unrelated to this receptor. Liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (LC–MS) was used to measure changes in endogenous polar metabolites in livers of male and female fish that were exposed to five water concentrations of spironolactone (0, 0.05, 0.5, 5, or 50 μg L{sup −1}) for 21 days. Metabolite profiles were affected at the two highest concentrations (5 and 50 μg L{sup −1}), but not in the lower-level exposures, which agreed with earlier reported results of reduced female fecundity and plasma vitellogenin (VTG) levels. We then applied partial least squares regression to assess whether metabolite alterations covaried with changes in fecundity, VTG gene expression and protein concentrations, and plasma 17β-estradiol and testosterone concentrations. Metabolite profiles significantly covaried with all measured endpoints in females, but only with plasma testosterone in males. Fecundity reductions occurred in parallel with changes in metabolites important in osmoregulation (e.g., betaine), membrane transport (e.g., L-carnitine), and biosynthesis of carnitine (e.g., methionine) and VTG (e.g., glutamate). Based on a network analysis program (i.e., mummichog), spironolactone also

  13. Kennedy's disease and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Report of 4 cases and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera Yepes, Rocío; Virgili Casas, Maria; Povedano Panades, Monica; Guerrero Gual, Mireia; Villabona Artero, Carles

    2015-05-01

    Kennedy's disease, also known as bulbospinal muscular atrophy, is a rare, X-linked recessive neurodegenerative disorder affecting adult males. It is caused by expansion of an unstable cytosine-adenine-guanine tandem-repeat in exon 1 of the androgen-receptor gene on chromosome Xq11-12, and is characterized by spinal motor neuron progressive degeneration. Endocrinologically, these patients often have the features of hypogonadism associated to the androgen insensitivity syndrome, particularly its partial forms. We report 4 cases with the typical neurological presentation, consisting of slowly progressing generalized muscle weakness with atrophy and bulbar muscle involvement; these patients also had several endocrine manifestations; the most common non-neurological manifestation was gynecomastia. In all cases reported, molecular analysis showed an abnormal cytosine-adenine-guanine triplet repeat expansion in the androgen receptor gene. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Megalin and androgen receptor gene expression in young and old human skeletal muscle before and after three sequential exercise bouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Chris N; Roberts, Michael D; Dalbo, Vincent J; Sunderland, Kyle L; Kerksick, Chad M

    2011-02-01

    Androgen signaling occurs primarily via the androgen receptor. Megalin, a low-density lipoprotein endocytic receptor located in various mammalian tissues, has been recently shown to facilitate sex hormone–binding globulin (SHBG) steroid complexes across cell membranes. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if the megalin gene is expressed in human skeletal muscle and if present to determine how megalin and androgen receptor mRNA expression change in response to sequential exercise bouts with respect to aging. Ten younger (age: 18-25 years) and 10 older (age: 60-75 years) men completed 3 workouts (M, W, F) each consisting of 9 sets of lower-body exercises with 10 repetitions per set at 80% 1 repetition maximum. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were extracted at baseline (T1), 48 hours after workout 1 (T2) and 2 (T3), and 24 hours after workout 3 (T4), and blood samples were collected before and 5 minutes after each workout. Muscle was analyzed for megalin and androgen receptor expression using gene-specific primers and SYBR green chemistry, and blood was analyzed for serum testosterone, SHBG, and the free androgen index. Megalin was expressed in both young and old subjects across all time points, although no between- or within-group mean differences were detected at any time point. Androgen receptor was expressed higher in young men at all time points compared to in old men (p workout 1. Based on our data, the gene coding for megalin is expressed inside skeletal muscle, but its role, if any, in steroid cellular transport cannot be determined. This finding could lay the groundwork for more mechanistic investigations to better delineate its functional role and its potential as a therapeutic adjunct for androgen-related disorders in healthy and aged populations.

  15. Androgen receptor levels during progression of prostate cancer in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisna Murti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To construct tissue microarrays (TMAs that consisted of prostate tumours from the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP mice and non-transgenic murine prostates and to assess androgen receptor (AR levels during progression of prostate cancer in TRAMP mice by immunohistochemistry.Methods Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E sections from the ventral and dorso-lateral prostate lobes of non-transgenic, intact TRAMP and castrated TRAMP were used to demarcate regions of interest for TMAs construction. The samples on TMAs were used to evaluate AR expression using video image analysis (VIA.Results AR was expressed during cancer progression, but AR levels were reduced or absent in late stage disease. Furthermore, when AR levels were compared in tumours from intact and castrate animals, a significant increase in AR levels was observed following androgen ablation.Conclusion Similar to clinical prostate cancer, in the TRAMP model, prostate tumours evolve mechanisms to maintain AR expression and AR responsive gene pathways following castration to facilitate continued tumour growth. (Med J Indones 2010; 19:5-13Keywords : androgen ablation therapy, tissue microarrays, haematoxylin and eosin, video image analysis

  16. Differential targeting of androgen and glucocorticoid receptors induces ER stress and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Pankaj; Yang, Ximing; Ugolkov, Andrey; Iwadate, Kenichi; Karseladze, Apollon; Budunova, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor signaling play opposing roles in prostate tumorigenesis: in prostate, AR acts as an oncogene, and GR is a tumor suppressor. Recently, we found that non-steroidal phyto-chemical compound A (CpdA) is AR/GR modulator acting as anti-inflammatory anti-androgen. CpdA inhibits AR and prevents GR transactivation while enhancing GR transrepression. GR and AR are controlled by proteasomal degradation. We found that prolonged exposure of LNCaP, LNCaP-GR, DU145 and PC3 prostate carcinoma (PCa) cells to proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (BZ) caused AR degradation and GR accumulation. BZ enhanced CpdA ability to inhibit AR and to augment GR transrepression. We also found that CpdA+BZ differentially regulated GR/AR to cooperatively suppress PCa cell growth and survival and to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). Importantly, CpdA+BZ differentially regulated GR-responsive genes. CpdA+BZ blocked activation of glucocorticoid-responsive pro-survival genes, including SGK1, but activated BZ-induced ERS-related genes BIP/HSPA5 and CHOP/GADD153. Using ChIP, we showed that SGK1, BIP/HSPA5 and CHOP regulation was due to effects of CpdA and CpdA+BZ on GR loading on their promoters. We also found that AR and GR are abundant in advanced PCa from patients treated by androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy: 56% of carcinomas from treated patients expressed both receptors, and the other 27% expressed either GR or AR. Overall, our data validate the concept of dual AR/GR targeting in prostate cancer (PC) and suggest that BZ combination with dual-target steroid receptor modulator CpdA has high potential for PC therapy. PMID:22223138

  17. Androgen receptors and serum testosterone levels identify different subsets of postmenopausal breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Secreto Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen receptors (AR are frequently expressed in breast cancers, but their implication in cancer growth is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the role of the androgen/AR pathway in breast cancer development. Methods AR expression was evaluated by immunochemistry in a cohort of 528 postmenopausal breast cancer patients previously examined for the association of serum testosterone levels with patient and tumor characteristics. AR expression was classified according to the percentage of stained cells: AR-absent (0% and AR-poorly (1%-30%, AR-moderately (>30%-60%, and AR-highly (>60% positive. Results Statistical analysis was performed in 451 patients who experienced natural menopause. AR-high expression was significantly related with low histologic grade and estrogen receptor (ER- and progesterone receptor (PR-positive status (P trendP=0.022, although a trend across the AR expression categories was not present. When women defined by ER status were analyzed separately, regression analysis in the ER-positive group showed a significant association of high testosterone levels with AR-highly-positive expression (OR 1.86; 95% CI, 1.10-3.16, but the association was essentially due to patients greater than or equal to 65 years (OR 2.42; 95% CI, 1.22-4.82. In ER-positive group, elevated testosterone levels appeared also associated with AR-absent expression, although the small number of patients in this category limited the appearance of significant effects (OR 1.92; 95% CI, 0.73–5.02: the association was present in both age groups ( Conclusions The findings in the present study confirm that testosterone levels are a marker of hormone-dependent breast cancer and suggest that the contemporary evaluation of ER status, AR expression, and circulating testosterone levels may identify different subsets of cancers whose growth may be influenced by androgens.

  18. Androgen Receptor Repeat Length Polymorphism Associated with Male-to-Female Transsexualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Lauren; Bernard, Pascal; Sánchez, Francisco J.; Baird, Paul N.; Vilain, Eric; Kennedy, Trudy; Harley, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is a likely genetic component to transsexualism, and genes involved in sex steroidogenesis are good candidates. We explored the specific hypothesis that male-to-female transsexualism is associated with gene variants responsible for undermasculinization and/or feminization. Specifically, we assessed the role of disease-associated repeat length polymorphisms in the androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor β (ERβ), and aromatase (CYP19) genes. Methods Subject-control analysis included 112 male-to-female transsexuals and 258 non-transsexual males. Associations and interactions were investigated between CAG repeat length in the AR gene, CA repeat length in the ERβ gene, and TTTA repeat length in the CYP19 gene and male-to-female transsexualism. Results A significant association was identified between transsexualism and the AR allele, with transsexuals having longer AR repeat lengths than non-transsexual male control subjects (p = .04). No associations for transsexualism were evident in repeat lengths for CYP19 or ERβ genes. Individuals were then classified as short or long for each gene polymorphism on the basis of control median polymorphism lengths in order to further elucidate possible combined effects. No interaction associations between the three genes and transsexualism were identified. Conclusions This study provides evidence that male gender identity might be partly mediated through the androgen receptor. PMID:18962445

  19. Structural basis for androgen receptor interdomain and coactivator interactions suggests a transition in nuclear receptor activation function dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Gampe, Robert T; Kole, Adam J; Hnat, Andrew T; Stanley, Thomas B; An, Gang; Stewart, Eugene L; Kalman, Rebecca I; Minges, John T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-11-05

    The androgen receptor (AR) is required for male sex development and contributes to prostate cancer cell survival. In contrast to other nuclear receptors that bind the LXXLL motifs of coactivators, the AR ligand binding domain is preferentially engaged in an interdomain interaction with the AR FXXLF motif. Reported here are crystal structures of the ligand-activated AR ligand binding domain with and without bound FXXLF and LXXLL peptides. Key residues that establish motif binding specificity are identified through comparative structure-function and mutagenesis studies. A mechanism in prostate cancer is suggested by a functional AR mutation at a specificity-determining residue that recovers coactivator LXXLL motif binding. An activation function transition hypothesis is proposed in which an evolutionary decline in LXXLL motif binding parallels expansion and functional dominance of the NH(2)-terminal transactivation domain in the steroid receptor subfamily.

  20. Novel Small Molecule Antagonists of the Interaction of the Androgen Receptor and Transcriptional Co-regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence Counter (Packard Instrument Company). All data were analyzed using GraphPad Prism 4.03 (GraphPad Software, San Diego, CA); IC50 values...DP: Single-step purification of full- length human androgen receptor. Nucl Recept Signal 2005;3:e001. 5. Matias PM, Donner P, Coelho R, Thomaz M...Feau4, R. Kiplin Guy4, Keith R. Yamamoto2, Byron Hann5, Marc I. Diamond1,2 1_Department of Neurology, UCSF, San Francisco, CA 2_Department of

  1. An influence of androgen receptor (AR gene СAG-polymorphism on spermatogenesis in infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Chernykh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the results of semen examination in 200 infertile men with various numbers of GAG-repeats in the exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR gene. The number of repeats ranged from 7 to 31, the average number of repeats was 22.2 ± 1.6, with the most common variant (13 % present 21 repeats. Our findings confirm that of AR gene СAG-polymorphism can an effect on sperm parameters and male fertility. The spermatogenesis can be impaired in infertile men with “short” CAG-repeats not less than with “long” CAG-repeats.

  2. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-09-28

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells.

  3. Targeting Androgen Receptor/Src Complex Impairs the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, Marzia; Hayashi, Ryo; Arra, Claudio; Appella, Ettore; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Migliaccio, Antimo

    2013-01-01

    Background Hormones and growth factors influence the proliferation and invasiveness of human mesenchymal tumors. The highly aggressive human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cell line harbors classical androgen receptor (AR) that responds to androgens triggering cell migration in the absence of significant mitogenesis. As occurs in many human cancer cells, HT1080 cells also express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Experimental Findings: We report that the pure anti-androgen Casodex inhibits the growth of HT1080 cell xenografts in immune-depressed mice, revealing a novel role of AR in fibrosarcoma progression. In HT1080 cultured cells EGF, but not androgens, robustly increases DNA synthesis. Casodex abolishes the EGF mitogenic effect, implying a crosstalk between EGFR and AR. The mechanism underlying this crosstalk has been analyzed using an AR-derived small peptide, S1, which prevents AR/Src tyrosine kinase association and androgen-dependent Src activation. Present findings show that in HT1080 cells EGF induces AR/Src Association, and the S1 peptide abolishes both the assembly of this complex and Src activation. The S1 peptide inhibits EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis, cell matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion and invasiveness of HT1080 cells. Both Casodex and S1 peptide also prevent DNA synthesis and migration triggered by EGF in various human cancer-derived cells (prostate, breast, colon and pancreas) that express AR. Conclusion This study shows that targeting the AR domain involved in AR/Src association impairs EGF signaling in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. The EGF-elicited processes inhibited by the peptide (DNA synthesis, MMP-9 secretion and invasiveness) cooperate in increasing the aggressive phenotype of HT1080 cells. Therefore, AR represents a new potential therapeutic target in human fibrosarcoma, as supported by Casodex inhibition of HT1080 cell xenografts. The extension of these findings in various human cancer-derived cell lines highlights the

  4. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  5. Targeting Androgen Receptor and JunD Interaction for Prevention of Prostate Cancer Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehraein-Ghomi, Farideh; Kegel, Stacy J.; Church, Dawn R.; Schmidt, Joseph S.; Reuter, Quentin R.; Saphner, Elizabeth L.; Basu, Hirak S.; Wilding, George

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple studies show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Previously, we reported an induction of Spermidine/Spermine N1-Acetyl Transferase (SSAT) by androgen-activated androgen receptor (AR)-JunD protein complex that leads to over-production of ROS in PCa cells. In our current research, we identify small molecules that specifically block AR-JunD in this ROS-generating metabolic pathway. METHODS A high throughput assay based on Gaussia Luciferase reconstitution was used to identify inhibitors of the AR-JunD interaction. Selected hits were further screened using a fluorescence polarization competitor assay to eliminate those that bind to the AR Ligand Binding Domain (LBD), in order to identify molecules that specifically target events downstream to androgen activation of AR. Eleven molecules were selected for studies on their efficacy against ROS generation and growth of cultured human PCa cells by DCFH dye-oxidation assay and DNA fluorescence assay, respectively. In situ Proximity Ligation Assay (PLA), SSAT promoter-luciferase reporter assay, and western blotting of apoptosis and cell cycle markers were used to study mechanism of action of the lead compound. RESULTS Selected lead compound GWARJD10 with EC50 10 μM against ROS production was shown to block AR-JunD interaction in situ as well as block androgen-induced SSAT gene expression at IC50 5 μM. This compound had no effect on apoptosis markers, but reduced cyclin D1 protein level. CONCLUSIONS Inhibitor of AR-JunD interaction, GWARJD10 shows promise for prevention of progression of PCa at an early stage of the disease by blocking growth and ROS production. PMID:24647988

  6. Androgen and Estrogen Receptors in Breast Cancer Coregulate Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases 2B15 and 2B17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Dong G; Selth, Luke A; Tarulli, Gerard A; Meech, Robyn; Wijayakumara, Dhilushi; Chanawong, Apichaya; Russell, Roslin; Caldas, Carlos; Robinson, Jessica L L; Carroll, Jason S; Tilley, Wayne D; Mackenzie, Peter I; Hickey, Theresa E

    2016-10-01

    Glucuronidation is an enzymatic process that terminally inactivates steroid hormones, including estrogens and androgens, thereby influencing carcinogenesis in hormone-dependent cancers. While estrogens drive breast carcinogenesis via the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), androgens play a critical role as prohormones for estrogen biosynthesis and ligands for the androgen receptor (AR). In this study, the expression and regulation of two androgen-inactivating enzymes, the UDP-glucuronosyltransferases UGT2B15 and UGT2B17, was assessed in breast cancer. In large clinical cohorts, high UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 levels positively influenced disease-specific survival in distinct molecular subgroups. Expression of these genes was highest in cases positive for ERα. In cell line models, ERα, AR, and the transcription factor FOXA1 cooperated to increase transcription via tandem binding events at their proximal promoters. ERα activity was dependent on FOXA1, facilitated by AR activation, and potently stimulated by estradiol as well as estrogenic metabolites of 5α-dihydrotestosterone. AR activity was mediated via binding to an estrogen receptor half-site 3' to the FOXA1 and ERα-binding sites. Although AR and FOXA1 bound the UGT promoters in AR-positive/ERα-negative breast cancer cell lines, androgen treatment did not influence basal transcription levels. Ex vivo culture of human breast tissue and ERα(+) tumors provided evidence for upregulation of UGT2B15 and UGT2B17 by estrogen or androgen treatment. ERα binding was evident at the promoters of these genes in a small cohort of primary tumors and distant metastases. Collectively, these data provide insight into sex steroid receptor-mediated regulation of androgen-inactivating enzymes in ERα(+) breast cancer, which may have subtype-specific consequences for disease progression and outcomes. Cancer Res; 76(19); 5881-93. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. CDNA CLONING OF FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN RECEPTORS FOR USE IN STEROID RECEPTOR EXTRAPOLATION STUDIES FOR ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    cDNA Cloning of Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) Estrogen and Androgen Receptors for Use in Steroid Receptor Extrapolation Studies for Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals. Wilson, V.S.1,, Korte, J.2, Hartig P. 1, Ankley, G.T.2, Gray, L.E., Jr 1, , and Welch, J.E.1. 1U.S...

  8. CLONING AND IN VITRO EXPRESSION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ANDROGEN RECEPTOR AND ISOLATION OF ESTROGEN RECEPTOR α FROM THE FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro screening assays designed to identify hormone mimics or antagonists typically use mammalian (rat, human) estrogen (ER) and androgen receptors (AR). Although we know that the amino acid sequences of steroid receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates are not identical to the ma...

  9. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation.

  10. Repression of androgen receptor transcription through the E2F1/DNMT1 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad David Valdez

    Full Text Available Although androgen receptor (AR function has been extensively studied, regulation of the AR gene itself has been much less characterized. In this study, we observed a dramatic reduction in the expression of androgen receptor mRNA and protein in hyperproliferative prostate epithelium of keratin 5 promoter driven E2F1 transgenic mice. To confirm an inhibitory function for E2F1 on AR transcription, we showed that E2F1 inhibited the transcription of endogenous AR mRNA, subsequent AR protein, and AR promoter activity in both human and mouse epithelial cells. E2F1 also inhibited androgen-stimulated activation of two AR target gene promoters. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of E2F-mediated inhibition of AR, we evaluated the effects of two functional E2F1 mutants on AR promoter activity and found that the transactivation domain appears to mediate E2F1 repression of the AR promoter. Because DNMT1 is a functional intermediate of E2F1 we examined DNMT1 function in AR repression. Repression of endogenous AR in normal human prostate epithelial cells was relieved by DNMT1 shRNA knock down. DNMT1 was shown to be physically associated within the AR minimal promoter located 22 bps from the transcription start site; however, methylation remained unchanged at the promoter regardless of DNMT1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that DNMT1 operates either as a functional intermediary or in cooperation with E2F1 inhibiting AR gene expression in a methylation independent manner.

  11. Registered report: androgen receptor splice variants determine taxane sensitivity in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochuan Shan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Determine Taxane Sensitivity in Prostate Cancer” by Thadani-Mulero and colleagues (2014 published in Cancer Research in 2014. The experiment that will be replicated is reported in Fig. 6A. Thadani-Mulero and colleagues generated xenografts from two prostate cancer cell lines; LuCaP 86.2, which expresses predominantly the ARv567 splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR, and LuCaP 23.1, which expresses the full length AR as well as the ARv7 variant. Treatment of the tumors with the taxane docetaxel showed that the drug inhibited tumor growth of the LuCaP 86.2 cells but not of the LuCaP 23.1 cells, indicating that expression of splice variants of the AR can affect sensitivity to docetaxel. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Foundation and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  12. A test of somatic mosaicism in the androgen receptor gene of Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, Melanie B; Bowman, Jeff; Wilson, Paul J

    2015-10-26

    The androgen receptor, an X-linked gene, has been widely studied in human populations because it contains highly polymorphic trinucleotide repeat motifs that have been associated with a number of adverse human health and behavioral effects. A previous study on the androgen receptor gene in carnivores reported somatic mosaicism in the tissues of a number of species including Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx). We investigated this claim in a closely related species, Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). The presence of somatic mosaicism in lynx tissues could have implications for the future study of exonic trinucleotide repeats in landscape genomic studies, in which the accurate reporting of genotypes would be highly problematic. To determine whether mosaicism occurs in Canada lynx, two lynx individuals were sampled for a variety of tissue types (lynx 1) and tissue locations (lynx 1 and 2), and 1,672 individuals of known sex were genotyped to further rule out mosaicism. We found no evidence of mosaicism in tissues from the two necropsied individuals, or any of our genotyped samples. Our results indicate that mosaicism does not manifest in Canada lynx. Therefore, the use of hide samples for further work involving trinucleotide repeat polymorphisms in Canada lynx is warranted.

  13. The androgen receptor and prostate cancer: a role for sexual selection and sexual conflict?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Kyle; Crespi, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    We propose and evaluate the hypothesis that the CAG repeat region of the androgen receptor represents a locus of antagonistic pleiotropy in the context of sexual selection and sexual conflict. Short repeats are associated with increased transactivation of the androgen receptor at the molecular level, and increased fertility at the phenotypic level. However, short repeats are also associated with increased risk of prostate cancer, and with more aggressive forms of the disease. The somatic evolution of cancer cell lineages also shows a repeated pattern of shortening of the CAG repeat in association with cancer progression, apparently as a result of positive selection among cell lineages. We further postulate that other genes associated with prostate cancer are likely to mediate antagonistic pleiotropy in the context of sexual selection and sexual conflict. A key prediction of this hypothesis is that the genes mediating antagonistic pleiotropy will show historical evidence of positive selection, particularly in the context of sexual conflict. Previous research on the molecular evolution of specific genes associated with prostate cancer supports this prediction, and we suggest further critical tests of the role for genomic conflicts and tradeoffs in the evolution of cancer risk.

  14. A Novel, Essential Control for Clonality Analysis with Human Androgen Receptor Gene Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Jeroen P.; Heuver, Leonie H.; van der Reijden, Bert A.; Raymakers, Reinier A.; de Witte, Theo; Jansen, Joop H.

    2002-01-01

    The most widely used technique for determining clonality based on X-chromosome inactivation is the human androgen receptor gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The reliability of this assay depends critically on the digestion of DNA before PCR with the methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme HpaII. We have developed a novel method for quantitatively monitoring the HpaII digestion in individual samples. Using real-time quantitative PCR we measured the efficiency of HpaII digestion by measuring the amplification of a gene that escapes X-chromosome inactivation (XE169) before and after digestion. This method was tested in blood samples from 30 individuals: 2 healthy donors and 28 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. We found a lack of XE169 DNA reduction after digestion in the granulocytes of two myelodysplastic syndrome patients leading to a false polyclonal X-chromosome inactivation pattern. In all other samples a significant reduction of XE169 DNA was observed after HpaII digestion. The median reduction was 220-fold, ranging from a 9.0-fold to a 57,000-fold reduction. Also paraffin-embedded malignant tissue was investigated from two samples of patients with mantle cell lymphoma and two samples of patients with colon carcinoma. In three of these cases inefficient HpaII digestion led to inaccurate X-chromosome inactivation pattern ratios. We conclude that monitoring the efficiency of the HpaII digestion in a human androgen receptor gene PCR setting is both necessary and feasible. PMID:12213708

  15. Registered report: androgen receptor splice variants determine taxane sensitivity in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Xiaochuan; Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Fung, Juan José; Kosaka, Alan H; Tan, Fraser; Perfito, Nicole; Lomax, Joelle; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Determine Taxane Sensitivity in Prostate Cancer" by Thadani-Mulero and colleagues (2014) published in Cancer Research in 2014. The experiment that will be replicated is reported in Fig. 6A. Thadani-Mulero and colleagues generated xenografts from two prostate cancer cell lines; LuCaP 86.2, which expresses predominantly the ARv567 splice variant of the androgen receptor (AR), and LuCaP 23.1, which expresses the full length AR as well as the ARv7 variant. Treatment of the tumors with the taxane docetaxel showed that the drug inhibited tumor growth of the LuCaP 86.2 cells but not of the LuCaP 23.1 cells, indicating that expression of splice variants of the AR can affect sensitivity to docetaxel. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Foundation and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  16. Effect of highly bioaccumulated polychlorinated biphenyl congeners on estrogen and androgen receptor activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld-Jørgensen, E.C.; Andersen, H. R.; Rasmussen, T.H.

    2001-01-01

    pleiotropic effects on the estrogen- and androgen-receptor. In MCF-7 cells a slightly increased cell proliferation was observed at low concentrations (1-10 nM) in cells co-treated with 0.01 nM 17 beta -Estradiol. whereas the compounds inhibited cell growth significantly at 1 and 10 muM. In reporter gene (ERE...... in transiently co-transfected Chinese Hamster Ovary cells with an IC50, of 6.2 muM. In summary, this study indicate that the di-ortho, multiple-chloro substituted biphenyls, PCB # 138, PCB # 153 and PCB # 180, can compete with the binding of the natural ligand to two nuclear receptors and thus possess...

  17. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  18. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Davies, John D; Bunch, Trevor I; Pasterski, Vickie; Mastroyannopoulou, Kiki; MacDougall, Jane

    2012-10-20

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome in its complete form is a disorder of hormone resistance characterised by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype and testes producing age-appropriate normal concentrations of androgens. Pathogenesis is the result of mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor gene, which encodes for the ligand-activated androgen receptor--a transcription factor and member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. This Seminar describes the clinical manifestations of androgen insensitivity syndrome from infancy to adulthood, reviews the mechanism of androgen action, and shows examples of how mutations of the androgen receptor gene cause the syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team and include gonadectomy to avoid gonad tumours in later life, appropriate sex-hormone replacement at puberty and beyond, and an emphasis on openness in disclosure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    with severe primary or secondary hypogonadism. Thus, androgen substitution therapy is warranted in men with true hypogonadism at all ages. Symptoms experienced by otherwise healthy ageing males are non-specific and vague, although some may be similar to symptoms of hypogonadism. Therefore, the term...... not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...... in some elderly males with low-normal testosterone levels. However, at this point in time, widespread use of testosterone in an elderly male population outside controlled clinical trials seems inappropriate....

  20. Internalization of secreted antigen–targeted antibodies by the neonatal Fc receptor for precision imaging of the androgen receptor axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Watson, Philip A.; Lee, Sang-Gyu; Ku, Anson T.; Bournazos, Stylianos; Braun, Katharina; Kim, Kwanghee; Sjöström, Kjell; Doran, Michael G.; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Santos, Elmer; Veach, Darren; Turkekul, Mesruh; Casey, Emily; Lewis, Jason S.; Abou, Diane S.; van Voss, Marise R. H.; Scardino, Peter T.; Strand, Sven-Erik; Alpaugh, Mary L.; Scher, Howard I.; Lilja, Hans; Larson, Steven M.; Ulmert, David

    2017-01-01

    Targeting the androgen receptor (AR) pathway prolongs survival in patients with prostate cancer, but resistance rapidly develops. Understanding this resistance is confounded by a lack of noninvasive means to assess AR activity in vivo. We report intracellular accumulation of a secreted antigen-targeted antibody (SATA) that can be used to characterize disease, guide therapy, and monitor response. AR-regulated human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 (free hK2) is a prostate tissue-specific antigen produced in prostate cancer and androgen-stimulated breast cancer cells. Fluorescent and radio conjugates of 11B6, an antibody targeting free hK2, are internalized and noninvasively report AR pathway activity in metastatic and genetically engineered models of cancer development and treatment. Uptake is mediated by a mechanism involving the neonatal Fc receptor. Humanized 11B6, which has undergone toxicological tests in nonhuman primates, has the potential to improve patient management in these cancers. Furthermore, cell-specific SATA uptake may have a broader use for molecularly guided diagnosis and therapy in other cancers. PMID:27903863

  1. A novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 exerts anti-androgenic activity in the prostate cancer xenograft R-3327G and anabolic activity on skeletal muscle mass & function in castrated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisamore, Michael J; Gentile, Michael A; Dillon, Gregory Michael; Baran, Matthew; Gambone, Carlo; Riley, Sean; Schmidt, Azriel; Flores, Osvaldo; Wilkinson, Hilary; Alves, Stephen E

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor super family of transcription factors. Androgens play an essential role in the development, growth, and maintenance of male sex organs, as well as the musculoskeletal and central nervous systems. Yet with advancing age, androgens can drive the onset of prostate cancer, the second leading cause of cancer death in males within the United States. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) by pharmacologic and/or surgical castration induces apoptosis of prostate cells and subsequent shrinkage of the prostate and prostate tumors. However, ADT is associated with significant musculoskeletal and behavioral adverse effects. The unique pharmacological activity of selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) MK-4541 recently has been reported as an AR antagonist with 5α-reductase inhibitor function. The molecule inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in AR positive, androgen dependent prostate cancer cells. Importantly, MK-4541 inhibited androgen-dependent prostate growth in male rats yet maintained lean body mass and bone formation following ovariectomy in female rats. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of SARM MK-4541 in the androgen-dependent Dunning R3327-G prostate carcinoma xenograft mouse model as well as on skeletal muscle mass and function, and AR-regulated behavior in mice. MK-4541 significantly inhibited the growth of R3327-G prostate tumors, exhibited anti-androgen effects on the seminal vesicles, reduced plasma testosterone concentrations in intact males, and inhibited Ki67 expression. MK-4541 treated xenografts appeared similar to xenografts in castrated mice. Importantly, we demonstrate that MK-4541 exhibited anabolic activity in androgen deficient conditions, increasing lean body mass and muscle function in adult castrated mice. Moreover, MK-4541 treatment restored general activity levels in castrated mice. Thus, MK-4541 exhibits an optimum profile as an adjuvant therapy to ADT

  2. A Phase II Study Evaluating the Role of Androgen Receptors as Targets for Therapy of Pre-treated Post-menopausal Patients With ER/PgR-negative/AR-positive or ER and/or PgRpositive/ AR-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer (ARTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-28

    Metastatic Breastcancer; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Progesterone Receptor Negative Neoplasm; Androgen Receptor Gene Overexpression

  3. Testosterone downregulates angiotensin II type-2 receptor via androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase pathway in rat aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay S Mishra

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood pressure is lower in females than males. Angiotensin II type-2 receptor (AT2R induces vasodilation. This study determined whether sex differences in vascular AT2R expression occur and if androgens exert control on AT2R expression in the vasculature. Methods: AT2Rs in the aorta of male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were examined following alteration in androgen levels by gonadectomy or hormone supplementation. Results: AT2R mRNA and protein expression levels were lower in the aortas of males than females. In males, testosterone withdrawal by castration significantly elevated AT2R mRNA and protein levels and testosterone replacement restored them. In females, increasing androgen levels decreased AT2R mRNA and protein expression and this was attenuated by androgen receptor blocker flutamide. Ex vivo, dihydrotestosterone downregulated AT2R in endothelium-intact but not endothelium-denuded aorta. Dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation in isolated aorta was blocked by an androgen receptor antagonist. Furthermore, blockade of ERK1/2 but not p38 MAP kinase or TGFβ signaling with specific inhibitors abolished dihydrotestosterone-induced AT2R downregulation. Conclusion: Androgens downregulate AT2R expression levels in aorta, in vivo and ex vivo. The androgen receptor-mediated ERK1/2 MAP kinase-signaling pathway may be a key mechanism by which testosterone downregulates AT2R expression, implicating androgens’ contributing role to gender differences in vascular AT2R expression.

  4. Androgen receptor signaling pathways as a target for breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Elisabetta; Conteduca, Vincenza; Andreis, Daniele; Massa, Ilaria; Melegari, Elisabetta; Sarti, Samanta; Cecconetto, Lorenzo; Schirone, Alessio; Bravaccini, Sara; Serra, Patrizia; Fedeli, Anna; Maltoni, Roberta; Amadori, Dino; De Giorgi, Ugo; Rocca, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor, and its effects on breast range from physiological pubertal development and age-related modifications to cancer onset and proliferation. The prevalence of AR in early breast cancer is around 60%, and AR is more frequently expressed in ER-positive than in ER-negative tumors. We offer an overview of AR signaling pathways in different breast cancer subtypes, providing evidence that its oncogenic role is likely to be different in distinct biological and clinical scenarios. In particular, in ER-positive breast cancer, AR signaling often antagonizes the growth stimulatory effect of ER signaling; in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), AR seems to drive tumor progression (at least in luminal AR subtype of TNBC with a gene expression profile mimicking luminal subtypes despite being negative to ER and enriched in AR expression); in HER2-positive breast cancer, in the absence of ER expression, AR signaling has a proliferative role. These data represent the rationale for AR-targeting treatment as a potentially new target therapy in breast cancer subset using androgen agonists in some AR-positive/ER-positive tumors, AR antagonists in triple-negative/AR-positive tumors and in combination with anti-HER2 agents or with other signaling pathways inhibitors (including PI3K/MYC/ERK) in HER2-positive/AR-positive tumors. Only the ongoing and future prospective clinical trials will allow us to establish which agents are the best option in every specific condition, keeping in mind that there is evidence of opposite androgens and AR agonist/antagonist drug effects on cell proliferation particularly in AR-positive/ER-positive tumors. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Immunohistochemical localization of androgen receptor in rat caput epididymis during postnatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sema Timurkaan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the developmental pattern of androgen receptor (AR in caput epididymis.Materials and methods: In this study three randomly selected rats were sacrificed at ages 21, 56, 90 and 120 days old. All male rats were anesthetized with ethyl ether before killing. Then, the caput epididymides were removed and fixed in Bouin’s fixative at +4°C for 36 hour. Afterwards the tissue samples were embedded in paraffin for routine histological methods. Later the tissues were sectioned at 5μm and mounted on poly-L-lysin-coated slides. To solve the antigen masking problem, we performed microwave stimulated antigen retrieval technique before the immunohistochemical staining. Avidin-Biotin-Peroxidase Complex (ABC method was applied for immunohistochemical staining.Results: In all age groups of rats studied, positive immunohistochemical staining for the AR appeared in nuclei of epididymal cells. The staining intensity of AR positive cells did not change depending on age. In caput epididymis, immunostainable AR was found in tubular epithelial cells (principal cells, basal cells and apical cells and peritubular smooth muscle cells. The AR staining in the epithelial cells appeared to be stronger than in the peritubular smooth muscle cells. In the epithelial cells; staining intensity was stronger in principal cells than in basal cells and apical cells.Conclusion: Staining intensity of AR positive epididymal cells irrespective of age indicated the necessity of androgens for postnatal differentiation and maintaining the structure of the epididymis. Stronger staining intensity in principal cells suggested that principal cells are more sensitive to androgen stimulation. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 260-266.

  6. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetti, Elise; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone

  7. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    western blot analysis with antibodies specific to AR and histone H3 (chromatin fraction control). 10 Key...Prostate Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Paul Rennie, Vancouver Prostate Centre CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of British Columbia Vancouver...of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14- 1-0519 5c. PROGRAM

  8. Handedness and the X chromosome: the role of androgen receptor CAG-repeat length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arning, Larissa; Ocklenburg, Sebastian; Schulz, Stefanie; Ness, Vanessa; Gerding, Wanda M; Hengstler, Jan G; Falkenstein, Michael; Epplen, Jörg T; Güntürkün, Onur; Beste, Christian

    2015-02-09

    Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to be one of the factors influencing handedness, making the androgen receptor gene (AR) a likely candidate gene for individual differences in handedness. Here, we examined the relationship between the length of the CAG-repeat in AR and different handedness phenotypes in a sample of healthy adults of both sexes (n = 1057). Since AR is located on the X chromosome, statistical analyses in women heterozygous for CAG-repeat lengths are complicated by X chromosome inactivation. We thus analyzed a sample of women that were homozygous for the CAG-repeat length (n = 77). Mixed-handedness in men was significantly associated with longer CAG-repeat blocks and women homozygous for longer CAG-repeats showed a tendency for stronger left-handedness. These results suggest that handedness in both sexes is associated with the AR CAG-repeat length, with longer repeats being related to a higher incidence of non-right-handedness. Since longer CAG-repeat blocks have been linked to less efficient AR function, these results implicate that differences in AR signaling in the developing brain might be one of the factors that determine individual differences in brain lateralization.

  9. CAMK2N1 inhibits prostate cancer progression through androgen receptor-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Guo, Shuiming; Liu, Zhuo; Wu, Licheng; Li, Mingchao; Yang, Jun; Chen, Ruibao; Liu, Xiaming; Xu, Hua; Cai, Shaoxin; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong; Xu, Shaohua; Wang, Liang; Hu, Zhiquan; Zhuang, Qianyuan; Wang, Liping; Wu, Kongming; Liu, Jihong; Ye, Zhangqun; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Wang, Chenguang; Chen, Ke

    2014-11-15

    Castration resistance is a major obstacle to hormonal therapy for prostate cancer patients. Although androgen independence of prostate cancer growth is a known contributing factor to endocrine resistance, the mechanism of androgen receptor deregulation in endocrine resistance is still poorly understood. Herein, the CAMK2N1 was shown to contribute to the human prostate cancer cell growth and survival through AR-dependent signaling. Reduced expression of CAMK2N1 was correlated to recurrence-free survival of prostate cancer patients with high levels of AR expression in their tumor. CAMK2N1 and AR signaling form an auto-regulatory negative feedback loop: CAMK2N1 expression was down-regulated by AR activation; while CAMK2N1 inhibited AR expression and transactivation through CAMKII and AKT pathways. Knockdown of CAMK2N1 in prostate cancer cells alleviated Casodex inhibition of cell growth, while re-expression of CAMK2N1 in castration-resistant cells sensitized the cells to Casodex treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that CAMK2N1 plays a tumor suppressive role and serves as a crucial determinant of the resistance of prostate cancer to endocrine therapies.

  10. Androgen Receptor Expression in Primary Nonsquamous Cell Rare-Variant Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Rahimi MD, FRCPath

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective Androgen receptor (AR is a diagnostic immunohistochemical marker for salivary gland duct carcinoma (SDC, but other nonsquamous cell head and neck carcinomas (NSCCs may also express it. The aim of this preliminary study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of AR in rare head and neck NSCCs. Study Design Retrospective analysis of histologic records. Setting A large community hospital. Subjects and Methods Twenty-seven patients with NSCC were selected (21 men, 6 women; average age, 69 years. Exclusion criteria were histologically confirmed primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and thyroid carcinomas. AR immunohistochemistry was done on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. Results Variable AR expression was found in 5 of 27 (25% cases of NSCC. All 7 patients with SDC showed intense and extensive positive immunoreactivity. Of 27 NSCC tumors, 15 (56% had negative staining. Conclusion In the head and neck, expression of AR is not limited to SDCs; other NSCCs also express it. When surgery or radiotherapy is not appropriate for recurrent or metastatic head and neck NSCC, palliative chemotherapy offers poor results. Antiandrogen therapy is well tolerated and is much less toxic than chemotherapy. Since androgen deprivation therapy has been used against SDCs, this therapy may theoretically be used in a small subset of head and neck NSCCs.

  11. Racial Variations in Prostate Cancer Molecular Subtypes and Androgen Receptor Signaling Reflect Anatomic Tumor Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Farzana A; Sundi, Debasish; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Choeurng, Voleak; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Ross, Ashley E; Klein, Eric; Den, Robert; Dicker, Adam; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M

    2016-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) subtypes based on ETS gene expression have been described. Recent studies suggest there are racial differences in tumor location, with PCa located anteriorly more often among African-American (AA) compared to Caucasian-American (CA) men. In this retrospective analysis of a multi-institutional cohort treated by radical prostatectomy (179 CA, 121 AA), we evaluated associations among molecular subtype, race, anatomic tumor location, and androgen receptor (AR) signaling. Subtype (m-ERG(+), m-ETS(+), m-SPINK1(+), or triple-negative) was determined using distribution-based outlier analysis. AR signaling was investigated using gene expression profiling of canonical AR targets. m-ERG(+) was more common in CA than AA men (47% vs 22%, pRacial differences in molecular subtypes did not persist when tumors were analyzed by location, suggesting a biologically important relationship between tumor location and subtype. Accordingly, anterior tumor location was associated with higher Decipher scores and lower global AR signaling. This study demonstrates associations among patient race, prostate cancer molecular subtypes, and tumor location. Location-specific differences in androgen regulation may further underlie these relationships. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  13. Prenatal androgen receptor activation determines adult alcohol and water drinking in a sex-specific way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sabine E; Zoicas, Iulia; Reichel, Martin; Mühle, Christiane; Büttner, Christian; Ekici, Arif B; Eulenburg, Volker; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Müller, Christian P

    2017-08-04

    Alcohol use disorders are major psychiatric disorders. Correlational studies in humans suggested organizational hormonal effects during embryonic development as a risk factor for adult alcohol dependence. Permanent changes can be induced by the activity of sex hormones, like testosterone. Here, we demonstrate a relationship between prenatal androgen receptor (AR)-activation and adult alcohol as well as water drinking in mice in a sex-dependent fashion. Prenatal AR inhibition using the antagonist flutamide decreased adult male alcohol consumption. In contrast, prenatal AR activation by dihydrotestosterone (DHT) led to an increase in adult alcohol consumption in females. These effects were different in adult water drinking, flutamide increased water consumption in females and DHT increased water consumption in males. Prenatal flutamide reduced locomotion and anxiety in adult males but was ineffective in females. We found that prenatal AR activation controls adult levels of monoaminergic modulatory transmitters in the brain and blood hormone levels in a sex-specific way. RNA-Seq analysis confirmed a prenatal AR mediated control of adult expression of alcohol drinking-related genes like Bdnf and Per2. These findings demonstrate that prenatal androgen activity is a risk factor for the establishment of alcohol consumption in adults by its organizational effects. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Prostate Cancer Cells in Different Androgen Receptor Status Employ Different Leucine Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Hideo; Kimura, Toru; Yamaga, Takashi; Kosaka, Takeo; Suehiro, Jun-Ichi; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-01

    Leucine stimulates cancer cell proliferation through the mTOR pathway, therefore, inhibiting leucine transporters may be a novel therapeutic target for cancer. L-type amino acid transporter (LAT) 1, a Na(+) -independent amino acid transporter, is highly expressed in many tumor cells. However, leucine transporter(s) in different stages of prostate cancer, particularly in the stages of castration resistance with androgen receptor (AR) expression, is unclear. LNCaP and DU145 and PC-3 cell lines were used as a model of androgen dependent, and metastatic prostate cancer. A new "LN-cr" cell line was established after culturing LNCaP cells for 6 months under androgen-free conditions, which is considered a model of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with androgen AR expression. The expression of leucine transporters was investigated with quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. Uptake of (14) C Leucine was examined in the presence or absence of BCH (a pan-LAT inhibitor), JPH203 (an LAT1-specific inhibitor), or Na(+) . Cell growth was assessed with MTT assay. siRNA studies were performed to evaluate the indispensability of y(+) LAT2 on leucine uptake and cell viability in LN-cr. Cell viability showed a 90% decrease in the absence of leucine in all four cell lines. LNCaP cells principally expressed LAT3, and their leucine uptake was more than 90% Na(+) -independent. BCH, but not JPH203, inhibited leucine uptake, and cell proliferation (IC50BCH :15 mM). DU145 and PC-3 cells predominantly expressed LAT1. Leucine uptake and cell growth were suppressed by BCH or JPH203 in a dose-dependent manner (IC50BCH : ∼20 mM, IC50JPH203 : ∼5 µM). In LN-cr cells, Na(+) -dependent uptake of leucine was 3.8 pmol/mgprotein/min, while, Na(+) -independent uptake was only 0.52 (P < 0.05). Leucine uptake of LN-cr was largely (∼85%) Na(+) -dependent. y(+) LAT2 expression was confirmed in LN-cr. Knockdown of y(+) LAT2 lead to significant leucine uptake inhibition (40%) and

  15. A Recurrent Germline Mutation in the 5'UTR of the Androgen Receptor Causes Complete Androgen Insensitivity by Activating Aberrant uORF Translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine C Hornig

    Full Text Available A subset of patients with monogenic disorders lacks disease causing mutations in the protein coding region of the corresponding gene. Here we describe a recurrent germline mutation found in two unrelated patients with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS generating an upstream open reading frame (uORF in the 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR of the androgen receptor (AR gene. We show in patient derived primary genital skin fibroblasts as well as in cell-based reporter assays that this mutation severely impacts AR function by reducing AR protein levels without affecting AR mRNA levels. Importantly, the newly generated uORF translates into a polypeptide and the expression level of this polypeptide inversely correlates with protein translation from the primary ORF of the AR thereby providing a model for AR-5'UTR mediated translational repression. Our findings not only add a hitherto unrecognized genetic cause to complete androgen insensitivity but also underline the importance of 5'UTR mutations affecting uORFs for the pathogenesis of monogenic disorders in general.

  16. Androgen Signaling Disruption during Fetal and Postnatal Development Affects Androgen Receptor and Connexin 43 Expression and Distribution in Adult Boar Prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hejmej

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, limited knowledge exists regarding the role of the androgen signaling during specific periods of development in the regulation of androgen receptor (AR and connexin 43 (Cx43 in adult prostate. Therefore, in this study we examined mRNA and protein expression, and tissue distribution of AR and Cx43 in adult boar prostates following fetal (GD20, neonatal (PD2, and prepubertal (PD90 exposure to an antiandrogen flutamide (50 mg/kg bw. In GD20 and PD2 males we found the reduction of the luminal compartment, inflammatory changes, decreased AR and increased Cx43 expression, and altered localization of both proteins. Moreover, enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation were detected in the prostates of these animals. In PD90 males the alterations were less evident, except that Cx43 expression was markedly upregulated. The results presented herein indicate that in boar androgen action during early fetal and neonatal periods plays a key role in the maintenance of normal phenotype and functions of prostatic cells at adulthood. Furthermore, we demonstrated that modulation of Cx43 expression in the prostate could serve as a sensitive marker of hormonal disruption during different developmental stages.

  17. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  18. A combinatorial screen of the CLOUD uncovers a synergy targeting the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licciardello, Marco P; Ringler, Anna; Markt, Patrick; Klepsch, Freya; Lardeau, Charles-Hugues; Sdelci, Sara; Schirghuber, Erika; Müller, André C; Caldera, Michael; Wagner, Anja; Herzog, Rebecca; Penz, Thomas; Schuster, Michael; Boidol, Bernd; Dürnberger, Gerhard; Folkvaljon, Yasin; Stattin, Pär; Ivanov, Vladimir; Colinge, Jacques; Bock, Christoph; Kratochwill, Klaus; Menche, Jörg; Bennett, Keiryn L; Kubicek, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Approved drugs are invaluable tools to study biochemical pathways, and further characterization of these compounds may lead to repurposing of single drugs or combinations. Here we describe a collection of 308 small molecules representing the diversity of structures and molecular targets of all FDA-approved chemical entities. The CeMM Library of Unique Drugs (CLOUD) covers prodrugs and active forms at pharmacologically relevant concentrations and is ideally suited for combinatorial studies. We screened pairwise combinations of CLOUD drugs for impairment of cancer cell viability and discovered a synergistic interaction between flutamide and phenprocoumon (PPC). The combination of these drugs modulates the stability of the androgen receptor (AR) and resensitizes AR-mutant prostate cancer cells to flutamide. Mechanistically, we show that the AR is a substrate for γ-carboxylation, a post-translational modification inhibited by PPC. Collectively, our data suggest that PPC could be repurposed to tackle resistance to antiandrogens in prostate cancer patients.

  19. Valproic acid induces histologic changes and decreases androgen receptor levels of testis and epididymis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitthichai Iamsaard

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Valproic acid (VPA, an anti-epileptic drug, can cause male subfertility. However, the degree to which testicular and epididymal histopathologies and androgen receptor (AR expression are changed under VPA treatment has never been reported. Objective: To investigate the histopathological changes and AR protein levels of testis and epididymis in VPA-treated rats for every single day. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four adult male Wistar rats were divided into control and VPA-treated groups (n=8/ each. Treated rats were injected with 500 mg/ kgBW, intraperitoneally, VPA for 10 consecutive days. At the end of every experimental day, all reproductive parameters including histology by hematoxylin and eosin staining and protein expression of AR by Immuno-Western blot in testis and epididymis were examined. Results: VPA-treated rats showed dramatically changes in testicular and epididymal histopathologies compared to control group. The multinucleated giant cells and sloughing of germ cells were observed on day 6. The germ cell disintegration and increased intercellular spaces of seminiferous tubular epithelium appeared in days 7-10 of VPA treatment. Additionally, extensive multinucleated giant cells and complete exfoliation were clearly found from days 8-10. Such exfoliated germ cells were clearly seen in its epididymal lumen at day 10. The increasing rate of sperm concentration was approximately 32.31% of that in control group at day 10 (p=0.03. Moreover, the protein expressions of testicular and epididymal AR (% intensity/ 80 μg protein lysate was decreased in VPA-treated rats compared with control. Conclusion: VPA treatment induces histologic changes of germ cell epithelium in seminiferous tubules and decreases the expression of testicular and epididymal androgen receptors

  20. Sigma1 Targeting to Suppress Aberrant Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jeffrey D; Longen, Charles G; Oyer, Halley M; Chen, Nan; Maher, Christina M; Salvino, Joseph M; Kania, Blase; Anderson, Kelsey N; Ostrander, William F; Knudsen, Karen E; Kim, Felix J

    2017-05-01

    Suppression of androgen receptor (AR) activity in prostate cancer by androgen depletion or direct AR antagonist treatment, although initially effective, leads to incurable castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) via compensatory mechanisms including resurgence of AR and AR splice variant (ARV) signaling. Emerging evidence suggests that Sigma1 (also known as sigma-1 receptor) is a unique chaperone or scaffolding protein that contributes to cellular protein homeostasis. We reported previously that some Sigma1-selective small molecules can be used to pharmacologically modulate protein homeostasis pathways. We hypothesized that these Sigma1-mediated responses could be exploited to suppress AR protein levels and activity. Here we demonstrate that treatment with a small-molecule Sigma1 inhibitor prevented 5α- dihydrotestosterone-mediated nuclear translocation of AR and induced proteasomal degradation of AR and ARV, suppressing the transcriptional activity and protein levels of both full-length and splice-variant AR. Consistent with these data, RNAi knockdown of Sigma1 resulted in decreased AR levels and transcriptional activity. Furthermore, Sigma1 physically associated with ARV7 and ARv567es as well as full-length AR. Treatment of mice xenografted with ARV-driven CRPC tumors with a drug-like small-molecule Sigma1 inhibitor significantly inhibited tumor growth associated with elimination of AR and ARV7 in responsive tumors. Together, our data show that Sigma1 modulators can be used to suppress AR/ARV-driven prostate cancer cells via regulation of pharmacologically responsive Sigma1-AR/ARV interactions, both in vitro and in vivoCancer Res; 77(9); 2439-52. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Identification of a Novel Androgen Receptor Mutation in a Family With Multiple Components Compatible With the Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lottrup, Grete; Jørgensen, Anne; Nielsen, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Androgen signaling via the androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal testis development and male reproductive functions. We describe a rare family with 3 males affected by a mild disorder of sex determination compatible with testicular dysgenesis syndrome (TDS), including subfertility.......Participants: The proband, his first cousin, and a nephew underwent a detailed clinical investigation including genetic tests, whereas four female members of the family were tested for the specific AR mutation.Results: A novel AR mutation, c.2214T>G;p.Ile738Met, was identified in the affected family members. Functional...... showed features consistent with insufficient testis development and TDS.Conclusion: The presence of all hallmarks of TDS, including germ cell cancer, in a family with a novel AR mutation causing a partial decrease in AR function is in line with the concept that reduced androgen signaling may contribute...

  2. Selective androgen receptor modulator RAD140 is neuroprotective in cultured neurons and kainate-lesioned male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Anusha; Christensen, Amy; Moser, V Alexandra; Vest, Rebekah S; Miller, Chris P; Hattersley, Gary; Pike, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    The decline in testosterone levels in men during normal aging increases risks of dysfunction and disease in androgen-responsive tissues, including brain. The use of testosterone therapy has the potential to increase the risks for developing prostate cancer and or accelerating its progression. To overcome this limitation, novel compounds termed "selective androgen receptor modulators" (SARMs) have been developed that lack significant androgen action in prostate but exert agonist effects in select androgen-responsive tissues. The efficacy of SARMs in brain is largely unknown. In this study, we investigate the SARM RAD140 in cultured rat neurons and male rat brain for its ability to provide neuroprotection, an important neural action of endogenous androgens that is relevant to neural health and resilience to neurodegenerative diseases. In cultured hippocampal neurons, RAD140 was as effective as testosterone in reducing cell death induced by apoptotic insults. Mechanistically, RAD140 neuroprotection was dependent upon MAPK signaling, as evidenced by elevation of ERK phosphorylation and inhibition of protection by the MAPK kinase inhibitor U0126. Importantly, RAD140 was also neuroprotective in vivo using the rat kainate lesion model. In experiments with gonadectomized, adult male rats, RAD140 was shown to exhibit peripheral tissue-specific androgen action that largely spared prostate, neural efficacy as demonstrated by activation of androgenic gene regulation effects, and neuroprotection of hippocampal neurons against cell death caused by systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainate. These novel findings demonstrate initial preclinical efficacy of a SARM in neuroprotective actions relevant to Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Pituitary gonadotrophic hormone synthesis, secretion, subunit gene expression and cell structure in normal and follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout, follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout, luteinising hormone receptor knockout, hypogonadal and ovariectomised female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, M H; Widen, A; Wang, X; Huhtaniemi, I; Pakarinen, P; Kumar, T R; Christian, H C

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between gonadotroph function and ultrastructure, we have compared, in parallel in female mice, the effects of several different mutations that perturb the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Specifically, serum and pituitary gonadotrophin concentrations, gonadotrophin gene expression, gonadotroph structure and number were measured. Follicle-stimulating hormone β knockout (FSHβKO), follicle-stimulating hormone receptor knockout (FSHRKO), luteinising hormone receptor knockout (LuRKO), hypogonadal (hpg) and ovariectomised mice were compared with control wild-type or heterozygote female mice. Serum levels of LH were elevated in FSHβKO and FSHRKO compared to heterozygote females, reflecting the likely decreased oestrogen production in KO females, as demonstrated by the threadlike uteri and acyclicity. As expected, there was no detectable FSH in the serum or pituitary and an absence of expression of the FSHβ subunit gene in FSHβKO mice. However, there was a significant increase in expression of the FSHβ and LHβ subunit genes in FSHRKO female mice. The morphology of FSHβKO and FSHRKO gonadotrophs was not significantly different from the control, except that secretory granules in FSHRKO gonadotrophs were larger in diameter. In LuRKO and ovariectomised mice, stimulation of LHβ and FSHβ mRNA, as well as serum protein concentrations, were reflected in subcellular changes in gonadotroph morphology, including more dilated rough endoplasmic reticula and fewer, larger secretory granules. In the gonadotophin-releasing hormone deficient hpg mouse, gonadotrophin mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower than in control mice and gonadotrophs were correspondingly smaller with less abundant endoplasmic reticula and reduced numbers of secretory granules. In summary, major differences in pituitary content and serum concentrations of the gonadotrophins LH and FSH were found between control and mutant female mice. These changes were

  4. Deletion of the steroid-binding domain of the human androgen receptor gene in one family with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome: Evidence for further genetic heterogeneity in this syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.R.; Lubahn, D.B.; Wilson, E.M.; Joseph, D.R.; French, F.S.; Migeon, C.J. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1988-11-01

    The cloning of a cDNA for the human androgen receptor gene has resulted in the availability for cDNA probes that span various parts of the gene, including the entire steroid-binding domain and part of the DNA-binding domain, as well as part of the 5' region of the gene. The radiolabeled probes were used to screen for androgen receptor mutations on Southern blots prepared by restriction endonuclease digestion of genomic DNA from human subjects with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). In this investigation, the authors considered only patients presenting complete AIS and with the androgen receptor (-) form as the most probably subjects to show a gene deletion. One subject from each of six unrelated families with the receptor (-) form of complete AIS and 10 normal subjects were studied. In the 10 normal subjects and in 5 of the 6 patients, identical DNA restriction fragment patterns were observed with EcoRI and BamHI. Analysis of other members of this family confirmed the apparent gene deletion. The data provide direct proof that complete AIS in some families can result from a deletion of the androgen receptor structural gene. However, other families do not demonstrate such a deletion, suggesting that point mutations may also result in the receptor (-) form of complete AIS, adding further to the genetic heterogeneity of this syndrome.

  5. Dynamic Nucleosome-Depleted Regions at Androgen Receptor Enhancers in the Absence of Ligand in Prostate Cancer Cells ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Vieyra, Claudia; Lai, John; Berman, Benjamin P.; Frenkel, Baruch; Jia, Li; Jones, Peter A.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning at transcription start sites is known to regulate gene expression by altering DNA accessibility to transcription factors; however, its role at enhancers is poorly understood. We investigated nucleosome positioning at the androgen receptor (AR) enhancers of TMPRSS2, KLK2, and KLK3/PSA in prostate cancer cells. Surprisingly, a population of enhancer modules in androgen-deprived cultures showed nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs) in all three loci. Under androgen-deprived conditions, NDRs at the TMPRSS2 enhancer were maintained by the pioneer AR transcriptional collaborator GATA-2. Androgen treatment resulted in AR occupancy, an increased number of enhancer modules with NDRs without changes in footprint width, increased levels of histone H3 acetylation (AcH3), and dimethylation (H3K4me2) at nucleosomes flanking the NDRs. Our data suggest that, in the absence of ligand, AR enhancers exist in an equilibrium in which a percentage of modules are occupied by nucleosomes while others display NDRs. We propose that androgen treatment leads to the disruption of the equilibrium toward a nucleosome-depleted state, rather than to enhancer de novo “remodeling.” This allows the recruitment of histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers, and ultimately gene activation. The “receptive” state described here could help explain AR signaling activation under very low ligand concentrations. PMID:21969603

  6. Androgen receptor status predicts development of brain metastases in ovarian cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittica, Gloria; Senetta, Rebecca; Scotto, Giulia; Aglietta, Massimo; Maggiorotto, Furio; Ghisoni, Eleonora; Genta, Sofia; Boldorini, Renzo; Manini, Claudia; Morra, Isabella; Buosi, Roberta; Sapino, Anna; Cassoni, Paola; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2017-06-20

    Brain metastases are uncommon localizations in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), their reported incidence is increasing and no predictive biomarkers have been identified yet. Goals of this study were: i) to define a possible association between Estrogen Receptor (ER), Progesterone Receptor (PR), Androgen Receptor (AR),human EGF receptor 2 (HER2) and brain progression in EOC patients, and ii) to identify differences in ER, PR, AR and HER2 protein expression from primary EOC and its matched resected brain metastasis. A retrospective series of 11 EOC with matched brain metastasis surgically removed was collected. For comparison, a "Control dataset" of 22 patients, without evidence of brain involvement after an adequate follow up was matched. ER, PR, AR and HER2 status were analyzed by means of immunohistochemistry forCases (both primary and metastatic lesions) and Controls.Univariate analysis showed that AR status was significantly associated with brain localization, both considered as discrete variable (cut-off: 10%, p=0.013) and as continuous one (p=0.035). Multivariate analysis confirmed this trend (p=0.053). When considered as continuous variables, ER and AR showed greater expression in primary tumors in comparison with brain metastases (p=0.013 and p=0.032, respectively).In our series, AR predicts brain involvement, with a 9.5 times higher propensity for AR-negative EOC. Moreover, brain dissemination is probably the result of progressive dedifferentiation of primary tumor, shown by reduction of ER and AR expression in metastases. Further studies are required, in order to anticipate and improve multimodal treatment of brain metastases.

  7. Influence of Androgen Receptor in Vascular Cells on Reperfusion following Hindlimb Ischaemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxi Wu

    Full Text Available Studies in global androgen receptor knockout (G-ARKO and orchidectomised mice suggest that androgen accelerates reperfusion of the ischaemic hindlimb by stimulating angiogenesis. This investigation used novel, vascular cell-specific ARKO mice to address the hypothesis that the impaired hindlimb reperfusion in G-ARKO mice was due to loss of AR from cells in the vascular wall.Mice with selective deletion of AR (ARKO from vascular smooth muscle cells (SM-ARKO, endothelial cells (VE-ARKO, or both (SM/VE-ARKO were compared with wild type (WT controls. Hindlimb ischaemia was induced in these mice by ligation and removal of the femoral artery. Post-operative reperfusion was reduced in SM-ARKO and SM/VE-ARKO mice. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this was accompanied by a reduced density of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels but no change in the density of isolectin B4-positive vessels in the gastrocnemius muscle. Deletion of AR from the endothelium (VE-ARKO did not alter post-operative reperfusion or vessel density. In an ex vivo (aortic ring culture model of angiogenesis, AR was not detected in vascular outgrowths and angiogenesis was not altered by vascular ARKO or by exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT 10-10-10-7M; 6 days.These results suggest that loss of AR from vascular smooth muscle, but not from the endothelium, contributes to impaired reperfusion in the ischaemic hindlimb of G-ARKO. Impaired reperfusion was associated with reduced collateral formation rather than reduced angiogenesis.

  8. Testosterone suppresses oxidative stress via androgen receptor-independent pathway in murine cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Wu, Saizhu; Ruan, Yunjun; Hong, Lei; Xing, Xiaowen; Lai, Wenyan

    2011-01-01

    Evidence supports that oxidative stress exerts significant effects on the pathogenesis of heart dysfunction. On the other hand, the presence of specific androgen receptor (AR) in mammalian cardiomyocytes implies that androgen plays a physiological role in cardiac function, myocardial injury and the regulation of the redox state in the heart. This study used the testicular feminized (Tfm) and castrated male mice to investigate the effects of testosterone deficiency, physiological testosterone therapy and AR on oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Tfm mice have a non-functional AR and reduced circulating testosterone levels. Male littermates and Tfm mice were separated into 5 experimental groups: non-castrated littermate controls, castrated littermates, sham-operated Tfm, testosterone-treated castrated littermates and testosterone-treated sham-operated Tfm mice. Cardiomyocytes that were isolated from the left ventricle were used for determination of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH‑Px) enzyme activities, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Additionally, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations were detected by nested PCR. The SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities of cardiomyocytes were decreased, and the MDA levels and the proportion of mtDNA mutations were increased in castrated and sham-operated Tfm mice compared to control mice. However, an increase was observed in the activities of SOD and GSH-Px enzyme as well as a decrease in MDA levels and the proportion of mtDNA mutations in the mice that had received testosterone therapy. These changes were statistically similar in castrated and sham-operated Tfm mice after testosterone therapy. In conclusion, it is testosterone deficiency that induces oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes. Physiological testosterone therapy is able to suppress oxidative stress mediated via the AR-independent pathway.

  9. Pterostilbene-isothiocyanate conjugate suppresses growth of prostate cancer cells irrespective of androgen receptor status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Nikhil

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy and anti-hormonal therapies are the most common treatments for non-organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa. However, the effectiveness of these therapies is limited, thus necessitating the development of alternative approaches. The present study focused on analyzing the role of pterostilbene (PTER-isothiocyanate (ITC conjugate--a novel class of hybrid compound synthesized by appending an ITC moiety on PTER backbone--in regulating the functions of androgen receptor (AR, thereby causing apoptosis of PCa cells. The conjugate molecule caused 50% growth inhibition (IC50 at 40 ± 1.12 and 45 ± 1.50 μM in AR positive (LNCaP and negative (PC-3 cells, respectively. The reduced proliferation of PC-3 as well as LNCaP cells by conjugate correlated with accumulation of cells in G2/M phase and induction of caspase dependent apoptosis. Both PI3K/Akt and MAPK/ERK pathways played an important and differential role in conjugate-induced apoptosis of these PCa cells. While the inhibitor of Akt (A6730 or Akt-specific small interference RNA (siRNA greatly sensitized PC-3 cells to conjugate-induced apoptosis, on the contrary, apoptosis was accelerated by inhibition of ERK (by PD98059 or ERK siRNA in case of LNCaP cells, both ultimately culminating in the expression of cleaved caspase-3 protein. Moreover, anti-androgenic activity of the conjugate was mediated by decreased expression of AR and its co-activators (SRC-1, GRIP-1, thus interfering in their interactions with AR. All these data suggests that conjugate-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis are partly mediated by the down regulation of AR, Akt, and ERK signaling. These observations provide a rationale for devising novel therapeutic approaches for treating PCa by using conjugate alone or in combination with other therapeutics.

  10. Neural androgen receptors modulate gene expression and social recognition but not social investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of sex and androgen receptors (ARs for social preference and social memory is rather unknown. In this study of mice we compared males, females and males lacking ARs specifically in the nervous system, ARNesDel, with respect to social preference, assessed with the three-chambered apparatus test, and social recognition, assessed with the social discrimination procedure. In the social discrimination test we also evaluated the tentative importance of the sex of the stimulus animal. Novel object recognition and olfaction were investigated to complement the results from the social tests. Gene expression analysis was performed to reveal molecules involved in the effects of sex and androgens on social behaviors. All three test groups showed social preference in the three-chambered apparatus test. In both social tests an AR-independent sexual dimorphism was seen in the persistence of social investigation of female conspecifics, whereas the social interest towards male stimuli mice was similar in all groups. Male and female controls recognized conspecifics independent of their sex, whereas ARNesDel males recognized female but not male stimuli mice. Moreover, the non-social behaviors were not affected by AR deficiency. The gene expression analyses of hypothalamus and amygdala indicated that Oxtr, Cd38, Esr1, Cyp19a1, Ucn3, Crh and Gtf2i were differentially expressed between the three groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that ARs are required for recognition of male but not female conspecifics, while being dispensable for social investigation towards both sexes. In addition, the AR seems to regulate genes related to oxytocin, estrogen and William’s syndrome.

  11. Casein kinase 2 inhibition attenuates androgen receptor function and cell proliferation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kai; Youn, Hyewon; Gao, Xiaoyan; Huang, Bijun; Zhou, Fangjian; Li, Benyi; Han, Hui

    2012-09-15

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is constitutively active with dual specificity and exists as a hetero-tetrameric complex of α, α', and β subunits. Its aberrant expression and elevated activity have been linked to many human cancers, including prostate cancer. As an effort to develop new chemotherapy for prostate cancers, in this study, we tested the effects of tetra-bromo-cinnamic acid (TBCA), a newly synthetic CK2-selective CK2 inhibitor, on androgen receptor (AR) transactivation, cell proliferation, and viability in multiple prostate cancer cell lines. We utilized a comprehensive approach of a newly synthetic CK2-selective inhibitor TBCA, plus gene-specific siRNAs in multiple cell-based assays to further understand the role of CK2 in AR signaling. Alamar-blue-based cell growth assay, flow cytometry for cell cycle distribution, Luciferase report gene assay for AR transactivation, and immuno-fluorescent approach for AR nuclear localization as well as quantitative PCR assay for AR-mediated gene expression were utilized. The significance of the differences between treatment and control was analyzed using the SPSS software (SPSS, Chicago, IL). Our data revealed that TBCA reduced cell proliferation and caused G2/M cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Further analysis demonstrated that TBCA blocked AR nuclear translocation and gene expression. To confirm the target specificity, we used gene-specific siRNAs for both CK2α and CK2α' subunits, and the results suggested that both CK2 catalytic subunits are involved in androgen-stimulated AR nuclear translocation and AR-mediated gene expression in prostate cancer cells. CK2 subunits α and α' are likely involved in AR signaling, and TBCA might be useful in the management of prostate cancers as a chemo-preventive agent in the future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  13. Differential microRNA expression is associated with androgen receptor expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yaqin; Yang, Fang; Sun, Zijia; Zhang, Wenwen; Gu, Jun; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is frequently expressed in breast cancer; however, its prognostic value remains unclear. AR expression in breast cancer has been associated with improved outcomes in estrogen receptor (ER)‑positive breast cancer compared with ER‑negative disease. Eliminating AR function in breast cancer is critically important for breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism underlying AR regulation remains poorly understood. The study of microRNAs (miRNAs) has provided important insights into the pathogenesis of hormone‑dependent cancer. To determine whether miRNAs function in the AR regulation of breast cancer, the present study performed miRNA expression profiling in AR‑positive and ‑negative breast cancer cell lines. A total of 153 miRNAs were differentially expressed in AR‑positive compared with AR‑negative breast cancer cells; 52 were upregulated and 101 were downregulated. A number of these have been extensively associated with breast cancer cell functions, including proliferation, invasion and drug‑resistance. Furthermore, through pathway enrichment analysis, signaling pathways associated with the prediction targets of the miRNAs were characterized, including the vascular endothelial growth factor and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that the expression of miRNAs may be involved in the mechanism underlying AR regulation of breast cancer, and may improve understanding of the role of AR in breast cancer.

  14. Comparative study on transcriptional activity of 17 parabens mediated by estrogen receptor α and β and androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Uramaru, Naoto; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    The structure-activity relationships of parabens which are widely used as preservatives for transcriptional activities mediated by human estrogen receptor α (hERα), hERβ and androgen receptor (hAR) were investigated. Fourteen of 17 parabens exhibited hERα and/or hERβ agonistic activity at concentrations of ≤ 1 × 10(-5)M, whereas none of the 17 parabens showed AR agonistic or antagonistic activity. Among 12 parabens with linear alkyl chains ranging in length from C₁ to C₁₂, heptylparaben (C₇) and pentylparaben (C₅) showed the most potent ERα and ERβ agonistic activity in the order of 10(-7)M and 10(-8)M, respectively, and the activities decreased in a stepwise manner as the alkyl chain was shortened to C₁ or lengthened to C₁₂. Most parabens showing estrogenic activity exhibited ERβ-agonistic activity at lower concentrations than those inducing ERα-agonistic activity. The estrogenic activity of butylparaben was markedly decreased by incubation with rat liver microsomes, and the decrease of activity was blocked by a carboxylesterase inhibitor. These results indicate that parabens are selective agonists for ERβ over ERα; their interactions with ERα/β are dependent on the size and bulkiness of the alkyl groups; and they are metabolized by carboxylesterases, leading to attenuation of their estrogenic activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Karaca

    Full Text Available Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  16. Mutation of androgen receptor N-terminal phosphorylation site Tyr-267 leads to inhibition of nuclear translocation and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Mehmet; Liu, Yuanbo; Zhang, Zhentao; De Silva, Dinuka; Parker, Joel S; Earp, H Shelton; Whang, Young E

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of androgen receptor (AR) may drive recurrent prostate cancer in castrate patients. Ack1 tyrosine kinase is overexpressed in prostate cancer and promotes castrate resistant xenograft tumor growth and enhances androgen target gene expression and AR recruitment to enhancers. Ack1 phosphorylates AR at Tyr-267 and possibly Tyr-363, both in the N-terminal transactivation domain. In this study, the role of these phosphorylation sites was investigated by characterizing the phosphorylation site mutants in the context of full length and truncated AR lacking the ligand-binding domain. Y267F and Y363F mutants showed decreased transactivation of reporters. Expression of wild type full length and truncated AR in LNCaP cells increased cell proliferation in androgen-depleted conditions and increased colony formation. However, the Y267F mutant of full length and truncated AR was defective in stimulating cell proliferation. The Y363F mutant was less severely affected than the Y267F mutant. The full length AR Y267F mutant was defective in nuclear translocation induced by androgen or Ack1 kinase. The truncated AR was constitutively localized to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that it was recruited to the target enhancers without androgen. The truncated Y267F AR mutant did not exhibit constitutive nuclear localization and androgen enhancer binding activity. These results support the concept that phosphorylation of Tyr-267, and to a lesser extent Tyr-363, is required for AR nuclear translocation and recruitment and DNA binding and provide a rationale for development of novel approaches to inhibit AR activity.

  17. Androgen receptor mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome: a high content analysis approach leading to personalized medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is a rare disease associated with inactivating mutations of AR that disrupt male sexual differentiation, and cause a spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities having as a common denominator loss of reproductive viability. No established treatment exists for these conditions, however there are sporadic reports of patients (or recapitulated mutations in cell lines that respond to administration of supraphysiologic doses (or pulses of testosterone or synthetic ligands. Here, we utilize a novel high content analysis (HCA approach to study AR function at the single cell level in genital skin fibroblasts (GSF. We discuss in detail findings in GSF from three historical patients with AIS, which include identification of novel mechanisms of AR malfunction, and the potential ability to utilize HCA for personalized treatment of patients affected by this condition.

  18. PI3K-AKT-mTOR Pathway is Dominant over Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kaarbø

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgen receptor (AR and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K signaling are two of the most important pathways implicated in prostate cancer. Previous work has shown that there is crosstalk between these two pathways; however, there are conflicting findings and the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here we studied the AR–PI3K pathway crosstalk in prostate cancer cells in vitro as well as in vivo.

  19. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs negatively regulate triple-negative breast cancer growth and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Narayanan

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is the most highly expressed steroid receptor in breast cancer with 75-95% of estrogen receptor (ER-positive and 40-70% of ER-negative breast cancers expressing AR. Though historically breast cancers were treated with steroidal androgens, their use fell from favor because of their virilizing side effects and the emergence of tamoxifen. Nonsteroidal, tissue selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs may provide a novel targeted approach to exploit the therapeutic benefits of androgen therapy in breast cancer.Since MDA-MB-453 triple-negative breast cancer cells express mutated AR, PTEN, and p53, MDA-MB-231 triple-negative breast cancer cells stably expressing wildtype AR (MDA-MB-231-AR were used to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative effects of SARMs. Microarray analysis and epithelial:mesenchymal stem cell (MSC co-culture signaling studies were performed to understand the mechanisms of action.Dihydrotestosterone and SARMs, but not bicalutamide, inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231-AR. The SARMs reduced the MDA-MB-231-AR tumor growth and tumor weight by greater than 90%, compared to vehicle-treated tumors. SARM treatment inhibited the intratumoral expression of genes and pathways that promote breast cancer development through its actions on the AR. SARM treatment also inhibited the metastasis-promoting paracrine factors, IL6 and MMP13, and subsequent migration and invasion of epithelial:MSC co-cultures.1. AR stimulation inhibits paracrine factors that are important for MSC interactions and breast cancer invasion and metastasis. 2. SARMs may provide promise as novel targeted therapies to treat AR-positive triple-negative breast cancer.

  20. Development of a New Class of Drugs to Inhibit All Forms of Androgen Receptor in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    to AR and histone H3 (chromatin fraction control). 10 Key Outcomes for Hauptman Woodward Institute Site (Gewirth, PI) Key Outcome 1: We have...Prostate Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATORS: Dan Gewirth CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Hauptman-Woodward Institute Buffalo, NY 14203 REPORT DATE: October...of Androgen Receptor in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  1. Androgen receptor expression and its relationship with clinicopathological parameters in an Iranian population with invasive breast carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Fereshteh Mohammadizadeh; Sahar Sajadieh; Hamidreza Sajjadieh; Zahra Kasaei

    2014-01-01

    Background: Androgen receptor (AR) status and its association with prognosis in Iranian breast cancer population are uncertain. We examined AR expression and its relationship with clinicopathological parameters among Iranian patients with invasive breast carcinoma. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tissue specimens with a diagnosis of invasive breast carcinoma archived at two University Hospitals in Isfahan city, Iran. Antibodies were ...

  2. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Fujii

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+ breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer.Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK, and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2 on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms.Of 68 patients, 51 (75% had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96% had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells.CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their heterogeneity.

  3. Androgen receptor expression on circulating tumor cells in metastatic breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takeo; Reuben, James M.; Huo, Lei; Espinosa Fernandez, Jose Rodrigo; Gong, Yun; Krupa, Rachel; Suraneni, Mahipal V.; Graf, Ryon P.; Lee, Jerry; Greene, Stephanie; Rodriguez, Angel; Dugan, Lyndsey; Louw, Jessica; Lim, Bora; Barcenas, Carlos H.; Marx, Angela N.; Tripathy, Debu; Wang, Yipeng; Landers, Mark; Dittamore, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Androgen receptor (AR) is frequently detected in breast cancers, and AR-targeted therapies are showing activity in AR-positive (AR+) breast cancer. However, the role of AR in breast cancers is still not fully elucidated and the biology of AR in breast cancer remains incompletely understood. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can serve as prognostic and diagnostic tools, prompting us to measure AR protein expression and conduct genomic analyses on CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Methods Blood samples from patients with metastatic breast cancer were deposited on glass slides, subjected to nuclear staining with DAPI, and reacted with fluorescent-labeled antibodies to detect CD45, cytokeratin (CK), and biomarkers of interest (AR, estrogen receptor [ER], and HER2) on all nucleated cells. The stained slides were scanned and enumerated by non-enrichment-based non-biased approach independent of cell surface epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) using the Epic Sciences CTC platform. Data were analyzed using established digital pathology algorithms. Results Of 68 patients, 51 (75%) had at least 1 CTC, and 49 of these 51 (96%) had hormone-receptor-positive (HR+)/HER2-negative primary tumors. AR was expressed in CK+ CTCs in 10 patients. Of these 10 patients, 3 also had ER expression in CK+ CTCs. Single cell genomic analysis of 78 CTCs from 1 of these 3 patients identified three distinct copy number patterns. AR+ cells had a lower frequency of chromosomal changes than ER+ and HER2+ cells. Conclusions CTC enumeration and analysis using no enrichment or selection provides a non-biased approach to detect AR expression and chromosomal aberrations in CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The heterogeneity of intrapatient AR expression in CTCs leads to the new hypothesis that patients with AR+ CTCs have heterogeneous disease with multiple drivers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the clinical applicability of AR+ CTCs and their

  4. Neofunctionalization of Androgen Receptor by Gain-of-Function Mutations in Teleost Fish Lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Yukiko; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Sumiya, Eri; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Matsubara, Hajime; Yamada, Gen; Baker, Michael E; Iguchi, Taisen

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptor family provides an example of evolution of diverse transcription factors through whole-genome duplication (WGD). However, little is known about how their functions have been evolved after the duplication. Teleosts present a good model to investigate an accurate evolutionary history of protein function after WGD, because a teleost-specific WGD (TSGD) resulted in a variety of duplicated genes in modern fishes. This study focused on the evolution of androgen receptor (AR) gene, as two distinct paralogs, ARα and ARβ, have evolved in teleost lineage after TSGD. ARα showed a unique intracellular localization with a higher transactivation response than that of ARβ. Using site-directed mutagenesis and computational prediction of protein-ligand interactions, we identified two key substitutions generating a new functionality of euteleost ARα. The substitution in the hinge region contributes to the unique intracellular localization of ARα. The substitution on helices 10/11 in the ligand-binding domain possibly modulates hydrogen bonds that stabilize the receptor-ligand complex leading to the higher transactivation response of ARα. These substitutions were conserved in Acanthomorpha (spiny-rayed fish) ARαs, but not in an earlier branching lineage among teleosts, Japanese eel. Insertion of these substitutions into ARs from Japanese eel recapitulates the evolutionary novelty of euteleost ARα. These findings together indicate that the substitutions generating a new functionality of teleost ARα were fixed in teleost genome after the divergence of the Elopomorpha lineage. Our findings provide a molecular explanation for an adaptation process leading to generation of the hyperactive AR subtype after TSGD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. The fate of the duplicated androgen receptor in fishes: a late neofunctionalization event?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haendler Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the observation of an increased number of paralogous genes in teleost fishes compared with other vertebrates and on the conserved synteny between duplicated copies, it has been shown that a whole genome duplication (WGD occurred during the evolution of Actinopterygian fish. Comparative phylogenetic dating of this duplication event suggests that it occurred early on, specifically in teleosts. It has been proposed that this event might have facilitated the evolutionary radiation and the phenotypic diversification of the teleost fish, notably by allowing the sub- or neo-functionalization of many duplicated genes. Results In this paper, we studied in a wide range of Actinopterygians the duplication and fate of the androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4, a nuclear receptor known to play a key role in sex-determination in vertebrates. The pattern of AR gene duplication is consistent with an early WGD event: it has been duplicated into two genes AR-A and AR-B after the split of the Acipenseriformes from the lineage leading to teleost fish but before the divergence of Osteoglossiformes. Genomic and syntenic analyses in addition to lack of PCR amplification show that one of the duplicated copies, AR-B, was lost in several basal Clupeocephala such as Cypriniformes (including the model species zebrafish, Siluriformes, Characiformes and Salmoniformes. Interestingly, we also found that, in basal teleost fish (Osteoglossiformes and Anguilliformes, the two copies remain very similar, whereas, specifically in Percomorphs, one of the copies, AR-B, has accumulated substitutions in both the ligand binding domain (LBD and the DNA binding domain (DBD. Conclusion The comparison of the mutations present in these divergent AR-B with those known in human to be implicated in complete, partial or mild androgen insensitivity syndrome suggests that the existence of two distinct AR duplicates may be correlated to specific functional differences that may be

  6. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-06-05

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty. It is an X-linked recessive disorder resulting from mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. However, AR gene mutations are found in less than a third of PAIS cases. A 16-year-old boy was admitted with complaints of gynecomastia and sparse facial hair. Family history revealed male relatives from maternal side with similar clinical phenotype. His external genitalia were phenotypically male with pubic hair Tanner stage IV, penoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with bilateral atrophic testes. He had elevated gonadotropins with a normal testosterone level. Chromosome analysis revealed a 46,XY karyotype. Due to the family history suggesting a disorder of X-linked trait, PAIS was considered and molecular analysis of AR gene was performed. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel hemizygous mutation p.T576I (c.1727C>T) in the AR gene. The diagnosis of PAIS is based upon clinical phenotype and laboratory findings and can be confirmed by detection of a defect in the AR gene. An accurate approach including a detailed family history suggesting an X-linked trait is an important clue for a quick diagnosis.

  7. Inhibition of Androgen Receptor Nuclear Localization and Castration-Resistant Prostate Tumor Growth by Pyrroloimidazole-based Small Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Xu, Yadong; Dar, Javid A; Eisermann, Kurtis; Pascal, Laura E; Parrinello, Erica; Ai, Junkui; Johnston, Paul A; Nelson, Joel B; Wipf, Peter; Wang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that controls the expression of androgen-responsive genes. A key step in androgen action, which is amplified in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is AR nuclear translocation. Small molecules capable of inhibiting AR nuclear localization could be developed as novel therapeutics for CRPC. We developed a high-throughput screen and identified two structurally-related pyrroloimidazoles that could block AR nuclear localization in CRPC cells. We show that these two small molecules, 3-(4-ethoxyphenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (EPPI) and 3-(4-chlorophenyl)-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]imidazole (CPPI) can inhibit the nuclear localization and transcriptional activity of AR and reduce the proliferation of AR-positive but not AR-negative prostate cancer cell lines. EPPI and CPPI did not inhibit nuclear localization of the glucocorticoid receptor or the estrogen receptor, suggesting they selectively target AR. In LNCaP tumor xenografts, CPPI inhibited the proliferation of relapsed LNCaP tumors. These findings suggest that EPPI and CPPI could serve as lead structures for the development of therapeutic agents for CRPC. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(10); 2120-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Vitamin D3 and androgen receptors in testis and epididymal region of roosters (Gallus domesticus) as affected by epididymal lithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, André G; Dornas, Rubem A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Hess, Rex A; Mahecha, Germán A B; Oliveira, Cleida A

    2008-12-01

    Epididymal lithiasis is a dysfunction characterized by formation of calcium-rich stones in the epididymal region of roosters, associated with decreased serum testosterone and loss of fertility. The segment most affected by the lithiasis is the efferent ductules, which, in birds, are responsible for reabsorption of calcium and luminal fluid. Therefore, we postulated that epididymal lithiasis could result from local impairment of calcium or fluid homeostasis, culminating in initiation of stone formation. Transepithelial calcium transport depends on vitamin D3 and vitamin D3 receptor (VDR). Based on the fact that VDR are present in efferent ductules, possible changes in the pattern of VDR in roosters affected by the epididymal lithiasis was investigated, to start to gain an understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of calcium stones. To evaluate the potential impact of androgen reduction, changes in androgen receptor (AR) were also investigated. Both VDR and AR were increased in specific segments of the epididymal region, whereas no alterations were found in the testes of affected animals. The increase in VDR was most likely due to an increase in the number of VDR-positive mononuclear leukocyte infiltrates found in the connective tissue followed by an increase in epithelial receptors. The AR were increased, however, mainly in the epididymal duct epithelium. These results suggest that the vitamin D3 and androgen responsive system may be directly/indirectly involved in the development of the disease.

  9. Estrogen and androgen receptor activities of hydraulic fracturing chemicals and surface and ground water in a drilling-dense region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassotis, Christopher D.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Davis, J. Wade; Hormann, Anette M.; Nagel, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    The rapid rise in natural gas extraction using hydraulic fracturing increases the potential for contamination of surface and ground water from chemicals used throughout the process. Hundreds of products containing more than 750 chemicals and components are potentially used throughout the extraction process, including more than 100 known or suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals. We hypothesized thataselected subset of chemicalsusedin natural gas drilling operationsandalso surface and ground water samples collected in a drilling-dense region of Garfield County, Colorado, would exhibit estrogen and androgen receptor activities. Water samples were collected, solid-phase extracted, and measured for estrogen and androgen receptor activities using reporter gene assays in human cell lines. Of the 39 unique water samples, 89%, 41%, 12%, and 46% exhibited estrogenic, antiestrogenic, androgenic, and antiandrogenic activities, respectively. Testing of a subset of natural gas drilling chemicals revealed novel antiestrogenic, novel antiandrogenic, and limited estrogenic activities. The Colorado River, the drainage basin for this region, exhibited moderate levels of estrogenic, antiestrogenic, and antiandrogenic activities, suggesting that higher localized activity at sites with known natural gas–related spills surrounding the river might be contributing to the multiple receptor activities observed in this water source. The majority of water samples collected from sites in a drilling-dense region of Colorado exhibited more estrogenic, antiestrogenic, or antiandrogenic activities than reference sites with limited nearby drilling operations. Our data suggest that natural gas drilling operationsmayresult in elevated endocrine-disrupting chemical activity in surface and ground water.

  10. A Molecular Modeling Study of the Hydroxyflutamide Resistance Mechanism Induced by Androgen Receptor Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Li Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyflutamide (HF, an active metabolite of the first generation antiandrogen flutamide, was used in clinic to treat prostate cancer targeting androgen receptor (AR. However, a drug resistance problem appears after about one year’s treatment. AR T877A is the first mutation that was found to cause a resistance problem. Then W741C_T877A and F876L_T877A mutations were also reported to cause resistance to HF, while W741C and F876L single mutations cannot. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations combined with the molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method have been carried out to analyze the interaction mechanism between HF and wild-type (WT/mutant ARs. The obtained results indicate that AR helix 12 (H12 plays a pivotal role in the resistance of HF. It can affect the coactivator binding site at the activation function 2 domain (AF2, surrounded by H3, H4, and H12. When H12 closes to the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD like a lid, the coactivator binding site can be formed to promote transcription. However, once H12 is opened to expose LBD, the coactivator binding site will be distorted, leading to invalid transcription. Moreover, per-residue free energy decomposition analyses indicate that N705, T877, and M895 are vital residues in the agonist/antagonist mechanism of HF.

  11. ERG Cooperates with Androgen Receptor in Regulating Trefoil Factor 3 in Prostate Cancer Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S. Rickman

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC, we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3 emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  12. Androgen receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with aggression in Japanese Akita Inu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Akitsugu; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2011-10-23

    We tested for an association between variable number of tandem repeats in the canine androgen receptor (AR) gene and personality differences in Japanese Akita Inu dogs. The polymorphic trinucleotide (CAG) repeat region coding for glutamine in exon 1 of the AR gene was genotyped using genomic DNA obtained from 171 dogs. Three alleles (23, 24 and 26 repeats) were detected, and the allele frequency differed with the coat colour. We assessed the personality profiles of 100 fawn-coloured dogs (54 males and 46 females) based on a questionnaire answered by each dog's owner. The questionnaire consisted of five sub-scales (sociability, playfulness, neuroticism, aggressiveness, distractibility), and the psychometric properties were acceptable based upon internal consistency of the subscales. We found that male dogs with a short allele conferring increased AR function had higher aggressiveness scores than male dogs with longer alleles. By contrast, no evidence was found for a relationship between AR gene variants and personality in females. To our knowledge, our findings provide the first evidence of polymorphism in the AR gene being associated with canine aggression.

  13. Androgen receptor expression in the human vagina under different physiological and treatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassarre, M; Perrone, A M; Giannone, F A; Armillotta, F; Battaglia, C; Costantino, A; Venturoli, S; Meriggiola, M C

    2013-01-01

    Recent data report an important role of testosterone (T) in modulating female sexual responses, but little is known about the expression and distribution of androgen receptor (AR) in the human vagina. Therefore, the aims of our study were to evaluate the expression of AR in the human vagina in premenopausal (PrM) and menopausal (M) women and in T-treated women. Vaginal biopsies were obtained from PrM and postmenopausal women and from women with gender identity disorder (female to male (FtM)) receiving exogenous T. AR gene and protein expression levels in vaginal tissues were determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, whereas the localization of AR in vaginal mucosa and stroma was performed by immunohistochemistry. ARs were detected by immunostaining both in the mucosa and stroma. In vaginal mucosa, AR density score decreases with age but does not change with T administration. In stromal tissue, AR density score does not change with age but significantly increases with T administration (Pvagina in all groups of women. A negative correlation exists between age and AR expression in the vaginal mucosa. T administration increases AR expression in both the mucosa and stroma.

  14. Androgen Receptors Expression in Pituitary of Male Viscacha in relation to Growth and Reproductive Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Palmira Filippa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the androgen receptors (AR expression in pituitary pars distalis (PD of male viscachas in relation to growth and reproductive cycle. AR were detected by immunocytochemistry and quantified by image analysis. Pituitary glands from fetus, immature, prepubertal, and adult viscachas during their reproductive cycle were used. In the fetal PD, the immunoreactivity (ir was mainly cytoplasmic. In immature and prepubertal animals, AR-ir was cytoplasmic (ARc-ir and nuclear (ARn-ir in medial region. In adult animals, ARn-ir cells were numerous at caudal end. AR regionalization varied between the PD zones in relation to growth. In immature animals, the ARn-ir increased whereas the cytoplasmic expression decreased in relation to the fetal glands. The percentage of ARc-ir cells increased in prepubertal animals whereas the nuclear AR expression was predominant in adult viscachas. The AR expression changed in adults, showing minimum percentage in the gonadal regression period. The variation of nuclear AR expression was directly related with testosterone concentration. These results demonstrated variations in the immunostaining pattern, regionalization, and number of AR-ir cells throughout development, growth, and reproductive cycle, suggesting the involvement of AR in the regulation of the pituitary activity of male viscacha.

  15. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  16. Decision trees versus support vector machine for classification of androgen receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaye, A; Doucet, J P; Devillers, J; Marchand-Geneste, N; Porcher, J M

    2008-01-01

    With the current concern of limiting experimental assays, increased interest now focuses on in silico models able to predict toxicity of chemicals. Endocrine disruptors cover a large number of environmental and industrial chemicals which may affect the functions of natural hormones in humans and wildlife. Structure-activity models are now increasingly used for predicting the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. In this study, a large set of about 200 chemicals covering a broad range of structural classes was considered in order to categorize their relative binding affinity (RBA) to the androgen receptor. Classification of chemicals into four activity groups, with respect to their log RBA value, was carried out in a cascade of recursive partitioning trees, with descriptors calculated from CODESSA software and encoding topological, geometrical and quantum chemical properties. The hydrophobicity parameter (log P), Balaban index, and descriptors relying on charge distribution (maximum partial charge, nucleophilic index on oxygen atoms, charged surface area, etc.) appear to play a major role in the chemical partitioning. Separation of strongly active compounds was rather straightforward. Similarly, about 90% of the inactive compounds were identified. More intricate was the separation of active compounds into subsets of moderate and weak binders, the task requiring a more complex tree. A comparison was made with support vector machine yielding similar results.

  17. The CAG repeat within the androgen receptor gene and its relationship to cryptorchidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Silva-Ramos

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We examined the significance of the CAG repeat polymorphism in the pathogenesis of cryptorchidism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was extracted from blood samples from 42 cryptorchid boys and from 31 non-cryptorchid control subjects. In the cryptorchid group, 7 had bilateral cryptorchidism and 6 had patent processus vaginalis in the contralateral side. To determine the number of CAG repeats, the DNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and sequenced. RESULTS: The mean CAG repeat length in the AR gene was 22.5 (range 16 to 28 in patients and 21.5 (range 17 to 26 in controls (non-significant. Patients with bilateral cryptorchidism had a mean length of 24.3 (range 21 to 26 and patients with unilateral cryptorchidism and patent processus vaginalis in the contra lateral side had a mean of 25.2 (range 21 to 28, which was statistically different from controls (p = 0.015 and p = 0.005 respectively. CONCLUSION: CAG repeat length of the AR gene does not seem to play a major role in patients with unilateral cryptorchidism. However, in patients with bilateral undescended testis, a less functional androgen receptor through a longer polyglutamine chain may have a role in its pathogenesis. In the same way, patients with unilateral cryptorchidism a contralateral patent processus vaginalis have longer CAG repeats that might be responsible for a slower testicular descent and incomplete closure of the processus vaginalis.

  18. Novel Androgen Receptor Coregulator GRHL2 Exerts Both Oncogenic and Antimetastatic Functions in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltoglou, Steve; Das, Rajdeep; Townley, Scott L; Hickey, Theresa E; Tarulli, Gerard A; Coutinho, Isabel; Fernandes, Rayzel; Hanson, Adrienne R; Denis, Iza; Carroll, Jason S; Dehm, Scott M; Raj, Ganesh V; Plymate, Stephen R; Tilley, Wayne D; Selth, Luke A

    2017-07-01

    Alteration to the expression and activity of androgen receptor (AR) coregulators in prostate cancer is an important mechanism driving disease progression and therapy resistance. Using a novel proteomic technique, we identified a new AR coregulator, the transcription factor Grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2), and demonstrated its essential role in the oncogenic AR signaling axis. GRHL2 colocalized with AR in prostate tumors and was frequently amplified and upregulated in prostate cancer. Importantly, GRHL2 maintained AR expression in multiple prostate cancer model systems, was required for cell proliferation, enhanced AR's transcriptional activity, and colocated with AR at specific sites on chromatin to regulate genes relevant to disease progression. GRHL2 is itself an AR-regulated gene, creating a positive feedback loop between the two factors. The link between GRHL2 and AR also applied to constitutively active truncated AR variants (ARV), as GRHL2 interacted with and regulated ARVs and vice versa. These oncogenic functions of GRHL2 were counterbalanced by its ability to suppress epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell invasion. Mechanistic evidence suggested that AR assisted GRHL2 in maintaining the epithelial phenotype. In summary, this study has identified a new AR coregulator with a multifaceted role in prostate cancer, functioning as an enhancer of the oncogenic AR signaling pathway but also as a suppressor of metastasis-related phenotypes. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3417-30. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. An Amyloidogenic Sequence at the N-Terminus of the Androgen Receptor Impacts Polyglutamine Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Emmanuel; Stier, Gunter; Gaal, Miriam; Seeger, Rebecca; Stoeck, Melanie; Delsuc, Marc-André; Cato, Andrew C. B.; Kieffer, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand inducible transcription factor that harbors an amino terminal domain (AR-NTD) with a ligand-independent activation function. AR-NTD is intrinsically disordered and displays aggregation properties conferred by the presence of a poly-glutamine (polyQ) sequence. The length of the polyQ sequence as well as its adjacent sequence motifs modulate this aggregation property. AR-NTD also contains a conserved KELCKAVSVSM sequence motif that displays an intrinsic property to form amyloid fibrils under mild oxidative conditions. As peptide sequences with intrinsic oligomerization properties are reported to have an impact on the aggregation of polyQ tracts, we determined the effect of the KELCKAVSVSM on the polyQ stretch in the context of the AR-NTD using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Here, we present evidence for a crosstalk between the amyloidogenic properties of the KELCKAVSVSM motif and the polyQ stretch at the AR-NTD. PMID:28629183

  20. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR, are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa. But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  1. A Combined Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Research of Quinolinone Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Bai, Fang; Cao, Hong; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Antiandrogens bicalutamide, flutamide and enzalutamide etc. have been used in clinical trials to treat prostate cancer by binding to and antagonizing androgen receptor (AR). Although initially effective, the drug resistance problem will emerge eventually, which results in a high medical need for novel AR antagonist exploitation. Here in this work, to facilitate the rational design of novel AR antagonists, we studied the structure-activity relationships of a series of 2-quinolinone derivatives and investigated the structural requirements for their antiandrogenic activities. Different modeling methods, including 2D MLR, 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA, were implemented to evolve QSAR models. All these models, thoroughly validated, demonstrated satisfactory results especially for the good predictive abilities. The contour maps from 3D CoMFA and CoMSIA models provide visualized explanation of key structural characteristics relevant to the antiandrogenic activities, which is summarized to a position-specific conclusion at the end. The obtained results from this research are practically useful for rational design and screening of promising chemicals with high antiandrogenic activities.

  2. Combined Ligand/Structure-Based Virtual Screening and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Steroidal Androgen Receptor Antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuwei; Han, Rui; Zhang, Huimin; Liu, Hongli; Li, Jiazhong; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2017-01-01

    The antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), are the main endocrine therapies for prostate cancer (PCa). But as drug resistance to antiandrogens emerges in advanced PCa, there presents a high medical need for exploitation of novel AR antagonists. In this work, the relationships between the molecular structures and antiandrogenic activities of a series of 7α-substituted dihydrotestosterone derivatives were investigated. The proposed MLR model obtained high predictive ability. The thoroughly validated QSAR model was used to virtually screen new dihydrotestosterones derivatives taken from PubChem, resulting in the finding of novel compounds CID_70128824, CID_70127147, and CID_70126881, whose in silico bioactivities are much higher than the published best one, even higher than bicalutamide. In addition, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and MM/GBSA have been employed to analyze and compare the binding modes between the novel compounds and AR. Through the analysis of the binding free energy and residue energy decomposition, we concluded that the newly discovered chemicals can in silico bind to AR with similar position and mechanism to the reported active compound and the van der Waals interaction is the main driving force during the binding process.

  3. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  4. Physiological testosterone retards cardiomyocyte aging in Tfm mice via androgen receptor-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Lei, Da; Zhu, Gui-Ping; Hong, Lei; Wu, Sai-Zhu

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether testosterone modulates markers of cardiomyocytes aging via its classic androgen receptor (AR)-dependent pathway or conversion to estradiol. Male littermates and testicular feminized (Tfm) mice were randomly separated into 4 experimental groups littermate controls (n=8), Tfm mice (n=7), testosterone-treated Tfm mice (n=8), and Tfm mice treated with testosterone in combination with the aromatase inhibitor anastrazole (n=7). Cardiomyocytes were isolated from mouse left ventricles, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured using colorimetry method, and expression of p16(INK4α) and retinoblastoma (Rb) proteins were detected by Western blotting. The SOD and GSH-Px enzyme activities of cardiomyocytes were decreased, and the MDA levels and the expression of p16(INK4α) and Rb proteins were increased in Tfm mice compared with control mice. An increase was observed in the activities of SOD and GSH-Px enzyme as well as a decrease in MDA levels and the expression of p16(INK4α) and Rb proteins in the testosterone-treated Tfm mice. After co-treatment with anastrazole in Tfm mice, these improvement were partly inhibited. Physiological testosterone replacement can delay cardiomyocyte aging in Tfm mice, an effect that is independent of the AR pathway and in part conversion to estradiol.

  5. Testosterone therapy delays cardiomyocyte aging via an androgen receptor-independent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, S Z; Ruan, Y J; Hong, L; Xing, X W; Lai, W Y

    2011-11-01

    The testicular feminized (Tfm) mouse carries a nonfunctional androgen receptor (AR) and reduced circulating testosterone levels. We used Tfm and castrated mice to determine whether testosterone modulates markers of aging in cardiomyocytes via its classic AR-dependent pathway or conversion to estradiol. Male littermates and Tfm mice were divided into 6 experimental groups. Castrated littermates (group 1) and sham-operated Tfm mice (group 2, N = 8 each) received testosterone. Sham-operated Tfm mice received testosterone in combination with the aromatase inhibitor anastrazole (group 3, N = 7). Castrated littermates (group 4) and sham-operated untreated Tfm mice (group 5) were used as controls (N = 8 and 7, respectively). An additional control group (group 6) consisted of age-matched non-castrated littermates (N = 8). Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricle, telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR and expression of p16INK4α, retinoblastoma (Rb) and p53 proteins was detected by Western blot 3 months after treatment. Compared with group 6, telomere length was short (P testosterone deficiency contributes to cardiomyocyte aging. Physiological testosterone can delay cardiomyocyte aging via an AR-independent pathway and in part by conversion to estradiol.

  6. The fungus Cunninghamella elegans can produce human and equine metabolites of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydevik, Axel; Thevis, Mario; Krug, Oliver; Bondesson, Ulf; Hedeland, Mikael

    2013-05-01

    1. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a group of substances that have potential to be used as doping agents in sports. Being a relatively new group not available on the open market means that no reference materials are commercially available for the main metabolites. In the presented study, the in vitro metabolism of SARMs by the fungus Cunninghamella elegans has been investigated with the purpose of finding out if it can produce relevant human and equine metabolites. 2. Three different SARMs, S1, S4 and S24, were incubated for 5 days with C. elegans. The samples were analysed both with and without sample pretreatment using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. 3. All the important phase I and some phase II metabolites from human and horse were formed by the fungus. They were formed through reactions such as hydroxylation, deacetylation, O-dephenylation, nitro-reduction, acetylation and sulfonation. 4. The study showed that the fungus produced relevant metabolites of the SARMs and thus can be used to mimic mammalian metabolism. Furthermore, it has the potential to be used for future production of reference material.

  7. Association of androgen receptor gene CAG and GGN repeat polymorphism with cryptorchidism: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Ge, Xing; Wang, Heng-Xue; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Ding, Zhen; Xu, Li-Chun

    2017-10-18

    Researches on association between variations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene repeat polymorphisms and cryptorchidism (CO) had conflicting results. The aim of this meta-analysis was to analyse the potential effects of AR CAG and/or GGN repeat polymorphism on CO. Studies were independently appraised by two investigators on PubMed, Web of Science, EBSCO databases and Foreign Medical Retrieval System. Case-control studies with measurement of CAG and/or GGN repeat length were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the CAG or GGN repeat polymorphism and CO were calculated. Five reports were included in this analysis. Overall, no difference was identified between patients and fertile men in CAG repeat length. However, when the CO was divided into unilateral and bilateral, longer CAG repeat region was significantly associated with CO in bilateral group (WMD = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.01-1.47; p < .05). In addition, GGN lengths were significantly higher in patients compared with those in controls (WMD = 1.17; 95% CI, 0.28-2.06; p < .05). No obvious effect was found in the GGN length when compared unilateral or bilateral group with control respectively. The results in this meta-analysis indicated that AR CAG and GGN repeat polymorphisms may be an important pathogenesis of CO. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Involvement of androgen receptor in sex determination in an amphibian species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Fujii

    Full Text Available In mice and humans, the androgen receptor (AR gene, located on the X chromosome, is not known to be involved in sex determination. In the Japanese frog Rana rugosa the AR is located on the sex chromosomes (X, Y, Z and W. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AR on the X chromosome (X-AR of the Korean R. rugosa is basal and segregates into two clusters: one containing W-AR of Japanese R. rugosa, the other containing Y-AR. AR expression is twice as high in ZZ (male compared to ZW (female embryos in which the W-AR is barely expressed. Higher AR-expression may be associated with male sex determination in this species. To examine whether the Z-AR is involved in sex determination in R. rugosa, we produced transgenic (Tg frogs carrying an exogenous Z-AR. Analysis of ZW Tg frogs revealed development of masculinized gonads or 'ovotestes'. Expression of CYP17 and Dmrt1, genes known to be activated during normal male gonadal development, were up-regulated in the ZW ovotestis. Testosterone, supplied to the rearing water, completed the female-to-male sex-reversal in the AR-Tg ZW frogs. Here we report that Z-AR is involved in male sex-determination in an amphibian species.

  9. An Amyloidogenic Sequence at the N-Terminus of the Androgen Receptor Impacts Polyglutamine Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Oppong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The human androgen receptor (AR is a ligand inducible transcription factor that harbors an amino terminal domain (AR-NTD with a ligand-independent activation function. AR-NTD is intrinsically disordered and displays aggregation properties conferred by the presence of a poly-glutamine (polyQ sequence. The length of the polyQ sequence as well as its adjacent sequence motifs modulate this aggregation property. AR-NTD also contains a conserved KELCKAVSVSM sequence motif that displays an intrinsic property to form amyloid fibrils under mild oxidative conditions. As peptide sequences with intrinsic oligomerization properties are reported to have an impact on the aggregation of polyQ tracts, we determined the effect of the KELCKAVSVSM on the polyQ stretch in the context of the AR-NTD using atomic force microscopy (AFM. Here, we present evidence for a crosstalk between the amyloidogenic properties of the KELCKAVSVSM motif and the polyQ stretch at the AR-NTD.

  10. Immunoexpression of androgen receptors and aromatase in testes of patient with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Fracki

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY is the most common chromosome aneuploidy in men and is usually characterized by underdeveloped testes and sterility. The aim of the present study was to detect cellular distribution of androgen receptors (AR and aromatase in testes of patient with KS. The tissue sections were processed for morphological and immunohistochemical staining. Additionally, levels of FSH, LH, PRL, estradiol, and testosterone were measured in the plasma. Morphological analysis revealed a complete absence of spermatogenesis. No germ cells were present in seminiferous tubules. In some tubules, nests of apparently degenerating Sertoli cells were found. In the interstitium, Leydig cell hyperplasia was observed. Using immunohistochemistry, nuclear AR staining was detected in Sertoli cells and peritubular cells, whereas in Leydig cells the staining was exclusively cytoplasmic. The immunostaining of aromatase was detected in the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells and Leydig cells. Increased levels of gonadotropins and decreased level of testosterone concomitantly with the cytoplasmic localization of AR in Leydig cells might contribute to the impaired testicular function in patient with KS.

  11. Clinical Relevance of Androgen Receptor Splice Variants in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, Benjamin L; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2015-12-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) currently benefits from a wealth of treatment options, yet still remains lethal in the vast majority of patients. It is becoming increasingly understood that this disease entity continues to evolve over time, acquiring additional and diverse resistance mechanisms with each subsequent therapy used. This dynamic relationship between treatment pressure and disease resistance can be challenging for the managing clinician. The recent discovery of alternate splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR) is one potential mechanism of escape in mCRPC, and recognizing this resistance mechanism might be important for optimal treatment selection for our patients. AR-V7 appears to be the most relevant AR splice variant, and early clinical data suggest that it is a negative prognostic marker in mCRPC. Emerging evidence also suggests that detection of AR-V7 may be associated with resistance to novel hormonal therapy (abiraterone and enzalutamide) but may be compatible with sensitivity to taxane chemotherapy (docetaxel and cabazitaxel). Adding to this complexity is the observation that AR-V7 is a dynamic marker whose status may change across time and depending on selective pressures induced by different therapies. Finally, it is possible that AR-V7 may represent a therapeutic target in mCRPC if drugs can be designed that degrade or inhibit AR splice variants or block their transcriptional activity. Several such agents (including galeterone, EPI-506, and bromodomain/BET inhibitors) are now in clinical development.

  12. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistelli, Mirco, E-mail: mirco.pistelli@alice.it; Caramanti, Miriam [Clinica di Oncologia Medica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy); Biscotti, Tommasina; Santinelli, Alfredo [Anatomia Patologica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy); Pagliacci, Alessandra; De Lisa, Mariagrazia; Ballatore, Zelmira; Ridolfi, Francesca; Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Berardi, Rossana; Battelli, Nicola; Cascinu, Stefano [Clinica di Oncologia Medica, AO Ospedali Riuniti-Ancona, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona 60020 (Italy)

    2014-06-27

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target.

  13. Role of androgen and estrogen receptors for the action of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engdahl, Cecilia; Lagerquist, Marie K; Stubelius, Alexandra; Andersson, Annica; Studer, Erik; Ohlsson, Claes; Westberg, Lars; Carlsten, Hans; Forsblad-d'Elia, Helena

    2014-03-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is an abundant steroid hormone, and its mechanism of action is yet to be determined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the importance of androgen receptors (ARs) and estrogen receptors (ERs) for DHEA function. Orchidectomized C57BL/6 mice were treated with DHEA, DHT, 17β-estradiol-3-benzoate (E2), or vehicle. Orchidectomized AR-deficient (ARKO) mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were treated with DHEA or vehicle for 2.5 weeks. At termination, bone mineral density (BMD) was evaluated, thymus and seminal vesicles were weighted, and submandibular glands (SMGs) were histologically examined. To evaluate the in vivo ER activation of the classical estrogen signaling pathway, estrogen response element reporter mice were treated with DHEA, DHT, E2, or vehicle, and a reporter gene was investigated in different sex steroid-sensitive organs after 24 hours. DHEA treatment increased trabecular BMD and thymic atrophy in both WT and ARKO mice. In WT mice, DHEA induced enlargement of glands in the SMGs, whereas this effect was absent in ARKO mice. Furthermore, DHEA was able to induce activation of classical estrogen signaling in bone, thymus, and seminal vesicles but not in the SMGs. In summary, the DHEA effects on trabecular BMD and thymus do not require signaling via AR and DHEA can activate the classical estrogen signaling in these organs. In contrast, DHEA induction of gland size in the SMGs is dependent on AR and does not involve classical estrogen signaling. Thus, both ERs and ARs are involved in mediating the effects of DHEA in an organ-dependent manner.

  14. Abnormal Mitochondrial Function and Impaired Granulosa Cell Differentiation in Androgen Receptor Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Sheng Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the ovary, the paracrine interactions between the oocyte and surrounded granulosa cells are critical for optimal oocyte quality and embryonic development. Mice lacking the androgen receptor (AR−/− were noted to have reduced fertility with abnormal ovarian function that might involve the promotion of preantral follicle growth and prevention of follicular atresia. However, the detailed mechanism of how AR in granulosa cells exerts its effects on oocyte quality is poorly understood. Comparing in vitro maturation rate of oocytes, we found oocytes collected from AR−/− mice have a significantly poor maturating rate with 60% reached metaphase II and 30% remained in germinal vesicle breakdown stage, whereas 95% of wild-type AR (AR+/+ oocytes had reached metaphase II. Interestingly, we found these AR−/− female mice also had an increased frequency of morphological alterations in the mitochondria of granulosa cells with reduced ATP generation (0.18 ± 0.02 vs. 0.29 ± 0.02 µM/mg protein; p < 0.05 and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis. Mechanism dissection found loss of AR led to a significant decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ co-activator 1-β (PGC1-β and its sequential downstream genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM, in controlling mitochondrial biogenesis. These results indicate that AR may contribute to maintain oocyte quality and fertility via controlling the signals of PGC1-β-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis in granulosa cells.

  15. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirco Pistelli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001 and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01, but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72 or overall survival (p = 0.93. Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target.

  16. Influence of Androgen Receptor Expression on the Survival Outcomes in Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoonseok; Jae, Eunae; Yoon, Myunghee

    2015-06-01

    Despite the fact that the androgen receptor (AR) is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer, its prognostic effect remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, we explored AR expression and its impact on survival outcomes in breast cancer. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, and Ovid databases and references of articles to identify studies reporting data until December 2013. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by extracting the number of patients with recurrence and survival according to AR expression. There were 16 articles that met the criteria for inclusion in our meta-analysis. DFS and OS were significantly longer in patients with AR expression compared with patients without AR expression (odds ratio [OR], 0.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.90; OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.38-0.73, respectively). In addition, hormone receptor (HR) positive patients had a longer DFS when AR was also expressed (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.41-0.98). For patients with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), AR expression was also associated with longer DFS and OS (OR, 0.44, 95% CI, 0.26-0.75; OR, 0.26, 95% CI, 0.12-0.55, respectively). Furthermore, AR expression was associated with a longer DFS and OS in women (OR, 0.42, 95% CI, 0.27-0.64; OR, 0.47, 95% CI, 0.38-0.59, respectively). However, in men, AR expression was associated with a worse DFS (OR, 6.00; 95% CI, 1.46-24.73). Expression of AR in breast cancer might be associated with better survival outcomes, especially in patients with HR-positive tumors and TNBC, and women. Based on this meta-analysis, we propose that AR expression might be related to prognostic features and contribute to clinical outcomes.

  17. Registered report: the androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Chronscinski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative (PCFMFRI seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from “The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man” by Sharma and colleagues (2013, published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR, the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently downregulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  18. Coprinus comatus and Ganoderma lucidum interfere with androgen receptor function in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidman, Ben-Zion; Wasser, Solomon P; Nevo, Eviatar; Mahajna, Jamal

    2008-06-01

    In this study, we screened a total of 201 diethyl ether, ethanol, and ethyl acetate fungal Basidiomycetes extracts for anti-androgenic activity. Based on our screened results in combination with the selective inhibition of prostate cancer LNCaP cells, we selected Coprinus comatus and Ganoderma lucidum for further evaluation. We demonstrated that ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts from C. comatus and G. lucidum, respectively, selectively inhibit dihydrotestosterone-induced LNCaP cell viability, suppress levels of secreted prostate-specific antigen in a dose-dependent manner, and cause a G1 phase arrest in LNCaP, but not in DU 145 and PC-3 cells. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we demonstrated that C. comatus and G. lucidum decreased androgen and glucocorticoide receptors transcriptional activity in breast cancer MDA-kb2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, and suppressed androgen receptor (AR) protein level in LNCaP and MDA-kb2 cells. Our findings suggest that AR and non-AR mediated mechanisms underlie the effects of C. comatus and G. lucidum.

  19. Testosterone enhances cardiomyogenesis in stem cells and recruits the androgen receptor to the MEF2C and HCN4 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Madhoun, Ashraf Said; Voronova, Anastassia; Ryan, Tammy; Zakariyah, Abeer; McIntire, Christian; Gibson, Laura; Shelton, Michael; Ruel, Marc; Skerjanc, Ilona S

    2013-07-01

    Since a previous study (Goldman-Johnson et al., 2008 [4]) has shown that androgens can stimulate increased differentiation of mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells into cardiomyocytes using a genomic pathway, the aim of our study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms regulating testosterone-enhanced cardiomyogenesis. Testosterone upregulated cardiomyogenic transcription factors, including GATA4, MEF2C, and Nkx2.5, muscle structural proteins, and the pacemaker ion channel HCN4 in a dose-dependent manner, in mES cells and P19 embryonal carcinoma cells. Knock-down of the androgen receptor (AR) or treatment with anti-androgenic compounds inhibited cardiomyogenesis, supporting the requirement of the genomic pathway. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies showed that testosterone enhanced recruitment of AR to the regulatory regions of MEF2C and HCN4 genes, which was associated with increased histone acetylation. In summary, testosterone upregulated cardiomyogenic transcription factor and HCN4 expression in stem cells. Further, testosterone induced cardiomyogenesis, at least in part, by recruiting the AR receptor to the regulatory regions of the MEF2C and HCN4 genes. These results provide a detailed molecular analysis of the function of testosterone in stem cells and may offer molecular insight into the role of steroids in the heart. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Registered report: the androgen receptor induces a distinct transcriptional program in castration-resistant prostate cancer in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronscinski, Denise; Cherukeri, Srujana; Tan, Fraser; Perfito, Nicole; Lomax, Joelle; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative (PCFMFRI) seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replications of recent papers in the field of prostate cancer. This Registered Report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from "The Androgen Receptor Induces a Distinct Transcriptional Program in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer in Man" by Sharma and colleagues (2013), published in Cancer Cell in 2013. Of thousands of targets for the androgen receptor (AR), the authors elucidated a subset of 16 core genes that were consistently downregulated with castration and re-emerged with castration resistance. These 16 AR binding sites were distinct from those observed in cells in culture. The authors suggested that cellular context can have dramatic effects on downstream transcriptional regulation of AR binding sites. The present study will attempt to replicate Fig. 7C by comparing gene expression of the 16 core genes identified by Sharma and colleagues in xenograft tumor tissue compared to androgen treated LNCaP cells in vitro. The Prostate Cancer Foundation-Movember Foundation Reproducibility Initiative is a collaboration between the Prostate Cancer Foundation, the Movember Initiative, and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published by PeerJ.

  1. p68/DdX5 supports β-catenin & RNAP II during androgen receptor mediated transcription in prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma L Clark

    Full Text Available The DEAD box RNA helicase p68 (Ddx5 is an important androgen receptor (AR transcriptional co-activator in prostate cancer (PCa and is over-expressed in late stage disease. β-Catenin is a multifunctional protein with important structural and signalling functions which is up-regulated in PCa and similar to p68, interacts with the AR to co-activate expression of AR target genes. Importantly, p68 forms complexes with nuclear β-Catenin and promotes gene transcription in colon cancer indicating a functional interplay between these two proteins in cancer progression. In this study, we explore the relationship of p68 and β-Catenin in PCa to assess their potential co-operation in AR-dependent gene expression, which may be of importance in the development of castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPCa. We use immunoprecipitation to demonstrate a novel interaction between p68 and β-Catenin in the nucleus of PCa cells, which is androgen dependent in LNCaP cells but androgen independent in a hormone refractory derivative of the same cell line (representative of the CRPCa disease type. Enhanced AR activity is seen in androgen-dependent luciferase reporter assays upon transient co-transfection of p68 and β-Catenin as an additive effect, and p68-depleted Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation (ChIP showed a decrease in the recruitment of the AR and β-Catenin to androgen responsive promoter regions. In addition, we found p68 immunoprecipitated with the processive and non-processive form of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II and show p68 recruited to elongating regions of the AR mediated PSA gene, suggesting a role for p68 in facilitating RNAP II transcription of AR mediated genes. These results suggest p68 is important in facilitating β-Catenin and AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells.

  2. [Auto- and xenotransplantation of testicular organ culture to castrated rats and rats with experimental hypogonadism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potikha, O P; Chelnakova, I S; Turchin, I S

    1993-01-01

    The organ culture from the testes of newborn pigs able to produce the basic androgens such as testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, androstenedione and androstenediol has been obtained. CdCl2 administration to the rats in a dose of 0.055 mg/100 g of body weight and gonadectomy resulted in the development of two experimental models of hypogonadism. Autotransplantation of organ culture from the rat testes and xenotransplantation of the testes from newborn pigs to the rats with experimental hypogonadism provoked an increase in blood plasma testosterone for 1.5 and 3 months, respectively. Organ cultures from the testes of newborn pigs can be recommended for clinical purposes.

  3. Seasonal changes of androgen receptor, estrogen receptors and aromatase expression in the medial preoptic area of the wild male ground squirrels (Citellus dauricus Brandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The wild ground squirrel is a typical seasonal breeder. In this study, using RT-PCR, western blot and immunohistochemistry, we investigated the mRNA and protein expressions of androgen receptor (AR, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom in the medial preoptic area (MPOA of hypothalamus of the wild male ground squirrel during the breeding season (April, the non-breeding season (June and pre-hibernation (September. AR, ERα, ERβ and P450arom protein/mRNA were present in the MPOA of all seasons detected. The immunostaining of AR and ERα showed no significant changes in different periods, whereas ERβ and P450arom had higher immunoreactivities during the breeding season and pre-hibernation when compared to those of the non-breeding season. Consistently, both the protein and mRNA levels of P450arom and ERβ were higher in the MPOA of pre-hibernation and the breeding season than in the non-breeding season, whereas no significant difference amongst the three periods was observed for AR and ERα levels. These findings suggested that the MPOA of hypothalamus may be a direct target of androgen and estrogen. Androgen may play important regulatory roles through its receptor and/or the aromatized estrogen in the MPOA of hypothalamus of the wild male ground squirrels.

  4. Androgen Receptor Exon 1 Mutation Causes Androgen Insensitivity by Creating Phosphorylation Site and Inhibiting Melanoma Antigen-A11 Activation of NH2- and Carboxyl-terminal Interaction-dependent Transactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H.; Blackwelder, Amanda J.; Minges, John T.; Hnat, Andrew T.; French, Frank S.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH2- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH2-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif 433WHTLF437 required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero. PMID:22334658

  5. Androgen receptor exon 1 mutation causes androgen insensitivity by creating phosphorylation site and inhibiting melanoma antigen-A11 activation of NH2- and carboxyl-terminal interaction-dependent transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagarde, William H; Blackwelder, Amanda J; Minges, John T; Hnat, Andrew T; French, Frank S; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2012-03-30

    Naturally occurring germ line mutations in the X-linked human androgen receptor (AR) gene cause incomplete masculinization of the external genitalia by disrupting AR function in males with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Almost all AR missense mutations that cause androgen insensitivity syndrome are located in the highly structured DNA and ligand binding domains. In this report we investigate the functional defect associated with an AR exon 1 missense mutation, R405S, that caused partial androgen insensitivity. The 46,XX heterozygous maternal carrier had a wild-type Arg-405 CGC allele but transmitted an AGC mutant allele coding for Ser-405. At birth, the 46,XY proband had a bifid scrotum, hypospadias, and micropenis consistent with clinical stage 3 partial androgen insensitivity. Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity of AR-R405S expressed in CV1 cells was less than wild-type AR and refractory in androgen-dependent AR NH(2)- and carboxyl interaction transcription assays that depend on the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11. This mutation created a Ser-405 phosphorylation site evident by the gel migration of an AR-R405S NH(2)-terminal fragment as a double band that converted to the wild-type single band after treatment with λ-phosphatase. Detrimental effects of the R405S mutation were related to the proximity of the AR WXXLF motif (433)WHTLF(437) required for melanoma antigen-A11 and p300 to stimulate transcriptional activity associated with the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction. We conclude that the coregulator effects of melanoma antigen-A11 on the AR NH(2)- and carboxyl-terminal interaction amplify the androgen-dependent transcriptional response to p300 required for normal human male sex development in utero.

  6. Phase I trial of the androgen receptor modulator CR1447 in breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zweifel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available CR1447 (4-hydroxytestosterone, 4-OHT binds to the androgen receptor and has antiproliferative activity in both ER-positive and ER-negative/AR-positive breast cancer cells in preclinical studies. The objective of this first-in man trial was to evaluate the safety and to determine the dose of CR1447, administered as an ointment, for Phase II. Escalating doses (100, 200, 400 mg of CR1447 were administered topically on a daily basis to patients with ER-positive/AR-positive/HER2-negative advanced breast cancer pretreated with several lines of therapy. 14 patients have been treated for a total of 42 cycles. Two patients, one at dose level 100 mg and one at dose level 200 mg, showed early tumour progression and were replaced. Related adverse events were all ≤ grade 2 and included fatigue, bone and joint pain, stiffness, dry skin and mouth, nausea, sweating, urinary tract infection, rash, headache and distress. No drug-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs were seen. Two patients (17% achieved stable disease at 3 months. Pharmacokinetic analysis confirmed dose-dependent transdermal uptake of CR1447. 4-OH-androstenedione (4-OHA, a key metabolite of 4-OHT, was undetectable in most of the plasma samples. Urine metabolites of 4-OHT and 4-OHA indicate high exposure of 4-OHT after topical administration. Oestradiol serum concentrations did not increase, confirming preclinical data that CR1447 is not converted to estrogens in vivo. In conclusion, CR1447 administered transdermally as an ointment is well tolerated and appears to have single-agent activity in heavily pretreated ER-positive/HER2-negative breast cancer patients. The recommended phase II dose is 400 mg/day.

  7. The CAG repeat polymorphism in the Androgen receptor gene modifies the risk for hypospadias in Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypospadias is a birth defect of the urethra in males, and a milder form of 46,XY disorder of sexual development (DSD). The disease is characterized by a ventrally placed urinary opening due to a premature fetal arrest of the urethra development. Moreover, the Androgen receptor (AR) gene has an essential role in the hormone-dependent stage of sexual development. In addition, longer AR polyglutamine repeat lengths encoded by CAG repeats are associated with lower transcriptional activity in vitro. In the present study, we aimed at investigating the role of the CAG repeat length in the AR gene in hypospadias cases as compared to the controls. Our study included 211 hypospadias and 208 controls of Caucasian origin. Methods We amplified the CAG repeat region with PCR, and calculated the difference in the mean CAG repeat length between the hypospadias and control group using the T-test for independent groups. Results We detected a significant increase of the CAG repeat length in the hypospadias cases when compared to the controls (contrast estimate: 2.29, 95% Confidence Interval (1.73-2.84); p-value: 0.001). In addition, the odds ratios between the hypospadias and controls revealed that the hypospadias cases are two to 3 times as likely to have longer CAG repeats than a shorter length for each repeat length investigated. Conclusions We have investigated the largest number of hypospadias cases with regards to the CAG repeat length, and we provide evidence that a higher number of the CAG repeat sequence in the AR gene have a clear effect on the risk of hypospadias in Caucasians. PMID:23167717

  8. The direct inhibitory effect of dutasteride or finasteride on androgen receptor activity is cell line specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Halim, Danny; Cheng, Jinrong; Zhang, Huan Yi; Mohler, James L; Ip, Clement; Wu, Yue

    2013-10-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride were developed originally as 5α-reductase inhibitors to block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). These drugs may possess off-target effects on the androgen receptor (AR) due to their structural similarity to DHT. A total of four human prostate cancer cell models were examined: LNCaP (T877A mutant AR), 22Rv1 (H874Y mutant AR), LAPC4 (wild-type AR), and VCaP (wild-type AR). Cells were cultured in 10% charcoal-stripped fetal bovine serum, either with or without DHT added to the medium. AR activity was evaluated using the ARE-luciferase assay or the expression of AR regulated genes. Dutasteride was more potent than finasteride in interfering with DHT-stimulated AR signaling. Disruption of AR function was accompanied by decreased cell growth. Cells that rely on DHT for protection against death were particularly vulnerable to dutasteride. Different prostate cancer cell models exhibited different sensitivities to dutasteride and finasteride. LNCaP was most sensitive, LAPC4 and VCaP were intermediate, while 22Rv1 was least sensitive. Regardless of the AR genotype, if AR was transfected into drug-sensitive cells, AR was inhibited by drug treatment; and if AR was transfected into drug-resistant cells, AR was not inhibited. The direct inhibitory effect of dutasteride or finasteride on AR signaling is cell line specific. Mutations in the ligand binding domain of AR do not appear to play a significant role in influencing the AR antagonistic effect of these drugs. Subcellular constituent is an important factor in determining the drug effect on AR function. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Positive Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Metabolic Syndrome in a Korean Male Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Wook Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In epidemiological studies, there are various associations of androgen receptor (AR CAG with several diseases or phenotypes. However, the relationship between CAG repeat length and metabolic syndrome (MS remains unclear, especially in Asian populations. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population. Materials and Methods: We explored the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population (n=337 from 2013 to 2014. AR CAG repeat were determined by microsatellite fragment sizing. Components of MS and laboratory data (lipid profile, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c] were analyzed with AR CAG repeat length. Results: The mean AR CAG repeat length was 22.3±4.7. Sixty-nine men (20.5% were diagnosed with MS. Men with MS showed significantly longer AR CAG repeat lengths compared with men without MS (26.2 vs. 21.4, p<0.001. With increasing CAG repeat, the number of components meeting the NCEP criteria increased significantly. AR CAG repeat length was associated significantly with high density lipoprotein (HDL, triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. In the multivariate analysis, CAG repeat length, waist circumference, and levels of HDL were independently associated with MS. (odds ratio (OR=1.37, 1.19 and 0.90, p <0.001, 0.045, and 0.001, respectively. Conclusions: AR CAG repeat length was associated with MS and laboratory test results, such as those for HDL, triglycerides, and HbA1c, in Korean males. Longer CAG repeat length was identified as a risk factor for MS in Korean males.

  10. Bone mass and the CAG and GGN androgen receptor polymorphisms in young men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Guadalupe-Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine whether androgen receptor (AR CAG (polyglutamine and GGN (polyglycine polymorphisms influence bone mineral density (BMD, osteocalcin and free serum testosterone concentration in young men. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Whole body, lumbar spine and femoral bone mineral content (BMC and BMD, Dual X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA, AR repeat polymorphisms (PCR, osteocalcin and free testosterone (ELISA were determined in 282 healthy men (28.6+/-7.6 years. Individuals were grouped as CAG short (CAG(S if harboring repeat lengths of 21, and GGN was considered short (GGN(S or long (GGN(L if GGN 23. There was an inverse association between logarithm of CAG and GGN length and Ward's Triangle BMC (r = -0.15 and -0.15, P<0.05, age and height adjusted. No associations between CAG or GGN repeat length and regional BMC or BMD were observed after adjusting for age. Whole body and regional BMC and BMD values were similar in men harboring CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S or GGN(L AR repeat polymorphisms. Men harboring the combination CAG(L+GGN(L had 6.3 and 4.4% higher lumbar spine BMC and BMD than men with the haplotype CAG(S+GGN(S (both P<0.05. Femoral neck BMD was 4.8% higher in the CAG(S+GGN(S compared with the CAG(L+GGN(S men (P<0.05. CAG(S, CAG(L, GGN(S, GGN(L men had similar osteocalcin concentration as well as the four CAG-GGN haplotypes studied. CONCLUSION: AR polymorphisms have an influence on BMC and BMD in healthy adult humans, which cannot be explained through effects in osteoblastic activity.

  11. Positive Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Metabolic Syndrome in a Korean Male Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Wook; Bae, Young Dae; Ahn, Sun Tae; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Je Jong; Moon, Du Geon

    2018-01-01

    In epidemiological studies, there are various associations of androgen receptor (AR) CAG with several diseases or phenotypes. However, the relationship between CAG repeat length and metabolic syndrome (MS) remains unclear, especially in Asian populations. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population. We explored the relationship between AR CAG repeat length polymorphism and MS in a Korean male population (n=337) from 2013 to 2014. AR CAG repeat were determined by microsatellite fragment sizing. Components of MS and laboratory data (lipid profile, fasting glucose, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)) were analyzed with AR CAG repeat length. The mean AR CAG repeat length was 22.3±4.7. Sixty-nine men (20.5%) were diagnosed with MS. Men with MS showed significantly longer AR CAG repeat lengths compared with men without MS (26.2 vs. 21.4, p<0.001). With increasing CAG repeat, the number of components meeting the NCEP criteria increased significantly. AR CAG repeat length was associated significantly with high density lipoprotein (HDL), triglyceride, and HbA1c levels. In the multivariate analysis, CAG repeat length, waist circumference, and levels of HDL were independently associated with MS. (odds ratio (OR)=1.37, 1.19 and 0.90, p<0.001, 0.045, and 0.001, respectively). AR CAG repeat length was associated with MS and laboratory test results, such as those for HDL, triglycerides, and HbA1c, in Korean males. Longer CAG repeat length was identified as a risk factor for MS in Korean males.

  12. Androgen receptor splice variants circumvent AR blockade by microtubule-targeting agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanyi; Liu, Xichun; Li, Jianzhuo; Ledet, Elisa; Alvarez, Xavier; Qi, Yanfeng; Fu, Xueqi; Sartor, Oliver; Dong, Yan; Zhang, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Docetaxel-based chemotherapy is established as a first-line treatment and standard of care for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. However, half of the patients do not respond to treatment and those do respond eventually become refractory. A better understanding of the resistance mechanisms to taxane chemotherapy is both urgent and clinical significant, as taxanes (docetaxel and cabazitaxel) are being used in various clinical settings. Sustained signaling through the androgen receptor (AR) has been established as a hallmark of CRPC. Recently, splicing variants of AR (AR-Vs) that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD) have been identified. These variants are constitutively active and drive prostate cancer growth in a castration-resistant manner. In taxane-resistant cell lines, we found the expression of a major variant, AR-V7, was upregulated. Furthermore, ectopic expression of two clinically relevant AR-Vs (AR-V7 and ARV567es), but not the full-length AR (AR-FL), reduced the sensitivities to taxanes in LNCaP cells. Treatment with taxanes inhibited the transcriptional activity of AR-FL, but not those of AR-Vs. This could be explained, at least in part, due to the inability of taxanes to block the nuclear translocation of AR-Vs. Through a series of deletion constructs, the microtubule-binding activity was mapped to the LBD of AR. Finally, taxane-induced cytoplasm sequestration of AR-FL was alleviated when AR-Vs were present. These findings provide evidence that constitutively active AR-Vs maintain the AR signaling axis by evading the inhibitory effects of microtubule-targeting agents, suggesting that these AR-Vs play a role in resistance to taxane chemotherapy. PMID:26160840

  13. Probing Androgen Receptor Signaling in Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    enabled the protection of time for research and mentored training of the PI to continue his development towards a productive independent career in...this Physician Research Training Award enables the PI to have protected time for research and mentored training towards his development into an...following AR modulation in prostate cancer cells: PSA (androgen driven) and PSMA (androgen suppressed). Since the publication of our initial

  14. An androgen receptor NH2-terminal conserved motif interacts with the COOH terminus of the Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Bai, Suxia; Hnat, Andrew T; Kalman, Rebecca I; Minges, John T; Patterson, Cam; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2004-07-16

    The NH2-terminal sequence of steroid receptors is highly variable between different receptors and in the same receptor from different species. In this study, a primary sequence homology comparison identified a 14-amino acid NH2-terminal motif of the human androgen receptor (AR) that is common to AR from all species reported, including the lower vertebrates. The evolutionarily conserved motif is unique to AR, with the exception of a partial sequence in the glucocorticoid receptor of higher species. The presence of the conserved motif in AR and the glucocorticoid receptor and its absence in other steroid receptors suggests convergent evolution. The function of the AR NH2-terminal conserved motif was suggested from a yeast two-hybrid screen that identified the COOH terminus of the Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) as a binding partner. We found that CHIP functions as a negative regulator of AR transcriptional activity by promoting AR degradation. In support of this, two mutations in the AR NH2-terminal conserved motif previously identified in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate model reduced the interaction between CHIP and AR. Our results suggest that the AR NH2-terminal domain contains an evolutionarily conserved motif that functions to limit AR transcriptional activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the combination of comparative sequence alignment and yeast two-hybrid screening using short conserved peptides as bait provides an effective strategy to probe the structure-function relationships of steroid receptor NH2-terminal domains and other intrinsically unstructured transcriptional regulatory proteins.

  15. Male hypogonadism: Symptoms and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the testosterone hormone; the hormone that plays a key role in masculine growth and development during puberty. There is a clear need to increase the awareness of hypogonadism throughout the medical profession, especially in primary care physicians who are usually the first port of call for the patient. Hypogonadism can significantly reduce the quality of life and has resulted in the loss of livelihood and separation of couples, leading to divorce. It is also important for doctors to recognize that testosterone is not just a sex hormone. There is an important research being published to demonstrate that testosterone may have key actions on metabolism, on the vasculature, and on brain function, in addition to its well-known effects on bone and body composition. This article has been used as an introduction for the need to develop sensitive and reliable assays for sex hormones and for symptoms and treatment of hypogonadism.

  16. Male hypogonadism: Symptoms and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Peeyush; Kumar, Nitish; Thakur, Devendra Singh; Patidar, Ajay

    2010-07-01

    Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body does not produce enough of the testosterone hormone; the hormone that plays a key role in masculine growth and development during puberty. There is a clear need to increase the awareness of hypogonadism throughout the medical profession, especially in primary care physicians who are usually the first port of call for the patient. Hypogonadism can significantly reduce the quality of life and has resulted in the loss of livelihood and separation of couples, leading to divorce. It is also important for doctors to recognize that testosterone is not just a sex hormone. There is an important research being published to demonstrate that testosterone may have key actions on metabolism, on the vasculature, and on brain function, in addition to its well-known effects on bone and body composition. This article has been used as an introduction for the need to develop sensitive and reliable assays for sex hormones and for symptoms and treatment of hypogonadism.

  17. Integrated expression profiling and ChIP-seq analyses of the growth inhibition response program of the androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biaoyang Lin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR plays important roles in the development of male phenotype and in different human diseases including prostate cancers. The AR can act either as a promoter or a tumor suppressor depending on cell types. The AR proliferative response program has been well studied, but its prohibitive response program has not yet been thoroughly studied.Previous studies found that PC3 cells expressing the wild-type AR inhibit growth and suppress invasion. We applied expression profiling to identify the response program of PC3 cells expressing the AR (PC3-AR under different growth conditions (i.e. with or without androgens and at different concentration of androgens and then applied the newly developed ChIP-seq technology to identify the AR binding regions in the PC3 cancer genome. A surprising finding was that the comparison of MOCK-transfected PC3 cells with AR-transfected cells identified 3,452 differentially expressed genes (two fold cutoff even without the addition of androgens (i.e. in ethanol control, suggesting that a ligand independent activation or extremely low-level androgen activation of the AR. ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 6,629 AR binding regions in the cancer genome of PC3 cells with an FDR (false discovery rate cut off of 0.05. About 22.4% (638 of 2,849 can be mapped to within 2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS. Three novel AR binding motifs were identified in the AR binding regions of PC3-AR cells, and two of them share a core consensus sequence CGAGCTCTTC, which together mapped to 27.3% of AR binding regions (1,808/6,629. In contrast, only about 2.9% (190/6,629 of AR binding sites contains the canonical AR matrix M00481, M00447 and M00962 (from the Transfac database, which is derived mostly from AR proliferative responsive genes in androgen dependent cells. In addition, we identified four top ranking co-occupancy transcription factors in the AR binding regions, which include TEF1 (Transcriptional enhancer factor

  18. Crosstalk of the Androgen Receptor with Transcriptional Collaborators: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Obinata

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among males in Western countries. It is also the most commonly diagnosed male cancer in Japan. The progression of prostate cancer is mainly influenced by androgens and the androgen receptor (AR. Androgen deprivation therapy is an established therapy for advanced prostate cancer; however, prostate cancers frequently develop resistance to low testosterone levels and progress to the fatal stage called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. Surprisingly, AR and the AR signaling pathway are still activated in most CRPC cases. To overcome this problem, abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide were introduced for the treatment of CRPC. Despite the impact of these drugs on prolonged survival, CRPC acquires further resistance to keep the AR pathway activated. Functional molecular studies have shown that some of the AR collaborative transcription factors (TFs, including octamer transcription factor (OCT1, GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2 and forkhead box A1 (FOXA1, still stimulate AR activity in the castration-resistant state. Therefore, elucidating the crosstalk between the AR and collaborative TFs on the AR pathway is critical for developing new strategies for the treatment of CRPC. Recently, many compounds targeting this pathway have been developed for treating CRPC. In this review, we summarize the AR signaling pathway in terms of AR collaborators and focus on pyrrole-imidazole (PI polyamide as a candidate compound for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  19. Sequential Androgen Receptor Pathway Inhibitor in Prostate Cancer: Piling-Up The Benefits or a Case for Cross-Resistance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Tombal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years, there has been accumulating evidence that, even in a low serum testosterone environment, the androgen receptor (AR remains the main driver of prostate cancer progression. This has led to the discovery and clinical development of new anti-androgens and androgen biosynthesis inhibitors. Enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate are the lead compounds of this new generation of agents, but multiple other agents are on their way. Because they both target the ligand-dependent regulation of AR activity, it is plausible that cross-resistance may exist when both drugs are used sequentially, and that the benefit of these agents may fade away when sequencing them. As the exact mechanisms for cross- resistance between AR-targeted agents remain unclear at this point, additional clinical studies are crucial to define the exact combination or sequencing order that could yield highest clinical benefits. Moreover, new molecular targets are needed in order to address these resistances, as well as establishing biomarkers to improve patient selection that could most benefit from AR-targeted therapies, but also help develop novel agents to improve and optimise the management of castration-resistant prostate cancer and metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  20. Ligand Activation of the Androgen Receptor Downregulates E-Cadherin-Mediated Cell Adhesion and Promotes Apoptosis of Prostatic Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Nightingale

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen independence is the major cause of endocrine therapy failure in advanced prostate cancer (PC. To examine the effects of human androgen receptor (AR expression on growth of human PC cells, transfection of full-length AR cDNA in an androgen-insensitive human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line (DU145 was performed. Transcriptional activity of AR was confirmed by the MMTV luciferase assay and AR expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and immunocytochemistry. Two stable transfectant cell lines expressing functional AR were established and passaged over 60 times. Under standard culture conditions, AR expression in transfected cells was predominantly cytoplasmic. Exposure to dihydrotestosterone (DHT; 60 pM-10 nM resulted in a rapid (maximal at 30 minutes translocation of AR to the nucleus. Treatment with DHT (5 nM caused a significant reduction in cell-cell adhesion and aggregation accompanied by a decrease in E-cadherin expression. This was associated with up to 40% inhibition of proliferation and approximately two-fold increase in apoptosis. These results suggest that gene transfer-mediated AR expression in DU145 cells confers sensitivity to DHT, modulates cell-cell adhesion through E-cadherin, and suppresses cell growth by inhibiting proliferation and promoting apoptosis. This provides a model for studies of AR-regulated cell signalling and identification of novel androgenregulated genes in PC.

  1. [Optimization of modern conservative therapy of micropenis in hypogonadal men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, R Iu; Sokoll'shchik, M M; Tiuzikov, I A; Konstantinova, I V; Astakhova, M A

    2014-01-01

    The study was aimed to the optimization of conservative therapy of micropenis in hypogonadal men using combination of traction therapy and androgen replacment therapy (ART) with injections of prolonged testosterone undecanoate (Nebido) and to evaluatiom of the safety of ART in terms of the risk of prostate cancer against the background of combined treatment of micropenis by both methods within 12 months. The study included 16 men aged 22-62 years with micropenis and hypogonadism. 10 men were diagnosed with primary hypogonadism, 6 men were diagnosed with secondary hypogonadism without reserve gonadal function; therefore, all 16 patients were treated with testosterone undecanoate 1000 mg intramuscularly according to the scheme: the second injection 6 weeks after the first injection, then each injection once a 12 weeks, the course of 12 months. During the first 3 months of ART, hypogonadism in all men was eliminated, but only at 6 month of ART, the length of the penis in the flaccid state at maximum extension increased from 5.8±1.2 to 8.3±1.2 cm (ppenis - from 6.8±1.1 to 11.8±0.9 (ppenis in the flaccid state at maximum extension increased by 58% of the original length, and in a state of erection - by 114% (p<0.05). During the 12 months of treatment, prostate volume in all men increased from 3.4±1.2 to 16.3±1.2 (p<0.05), which corresponds to the size of the prostate in healthy men. Total blood PSA level increased from 0.72±0.03 to 1.4±0.05 ng/ml (p<0.05), but it was in the acceptable range of reference values for healthy men during whole period of ART in all patients. Start therapy with prolonged testosterone undecanoate for 6 months significantly increases the efficiency of traction therapy in men with hypogonadism and micropenis, but for maintenance of the effect, ART should be continued during all period of treatment.

  2. The co-regulators SRC-1 and SMRT are involved in interleukin-6-induced androgen receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Hui; Ju, Qiang; Ding, Zhen; Ge, Xing; Shi, Qiao-Mei; Zhou, Ji-Long; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Zhang, Mei-Rong; Yu, Hong-Min; Xu, Li-Chun

    2016-11-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) can be stimulated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the absence of androgens to induce prostate cancer progression. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the co-activator steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1) and co-repressor silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptors (SMRT) are involved in IL-6-induced AR activation. The effects of IL-6 on LNCaP cell proliferation were monitored using real-time cell analysis (RTCA) iCELLigence system. The impacts of IL-6 on the association of the AR with SRC-1 and SMRT were investigated using the mammalian two-hybrid assay. IL-6 increased the proliferation of LNCaP cells with maximal induction at 50 ng/mL. The AR-SRC-1interaction was enhanced by IL-6, with maximal induction at the concentration of 50 ng/mL (P<0.05). IL-6 decreased the AR-SMRT interaction and a marked reduction was detected at 50 ng/mL (P<0.05). IL-6 enhances LNCaP cells proliferation, which suggests that IL-6 might cause AR-positive prostate cancer growth through activation of the AR. The mechanism of IL-6-induced AR activation is mediated through enhancing AR-SRC-1 interaction and inhibiting AR-SMRT interaction. We have shown a significant role for SRC-1 and SMRT in modulating IL-6-induced AR transactivation.

  3. Partial Androgen Deficiency, Depression, and Testosterone Supplementation in Aging Men

    OpenAIRE

    Mario Amore; Marco Innamorati; Sara Costi; Leo Sher; Paolo Girardi; Maurizio Pompili

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize current knowledge on the correlation between depressive symptoms with a syndrome called partial androgen deficiency of the aging male (PADAM) and on the potential benefits of testosterone (T) treatment on mood. Despite, the causative nature of the relationship between low T levels and depression is uncertain, many hypogonadal men suffer from depression and vice versa several depressed patients are affected by hypogonadism. Supplementation with testoster...

  4. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koçyiğit, Cemil; Sarıtaş, Serdar; Çatlı, Gönül; Onay, Hüseyin; Dündar, Bumin Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty...

  5. A Novel Mutation in Human Androgen Receptor Gene Causing Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Patient Presenting with Gynecomastia at Puberty

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cemil Koçyigit; Serdar Saritas; Gönül Çatli; Hüseyin Onay; Bumin Nuri Dündar

    2016-01-01

      Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) typically presents with micropenis, perineoscrotal hypospadias, and a bifid scrotum with descending or undescending testes and gynecomastia at puberty...

  6. Structural changes and immunohistochemical localisation of epidermal growth factor receptor in the true vocal fold of female albino rats administered anabolic, androgenic steroids, and effects of anti-androgen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, H E; Asker, S A; Mazroa, S A

    2011-08-01

    Anabolic steroid abuse by women is associated with a number of adverse effects, including laryngeal changes. The epidermal growth factor receptor is related to regulation of the cell life cycle. This study aimed to investigate the structural changes and immunohistochemical localisation of epidermal growth factor receptor in rat vocal folds following anabolic steroid administration, and also to assess the effect of anti-androgens. Thirty-two adult female albino rats were divided into: group I (controls), group II (receiving anabolic steroids for two months) or group III (receiving anabolic steroids plus anti-androgen for two months). Group II rat true vocal folds showed thicker epithelial layers with many mitotic figures, thicker lamina propria and thicker muscle fibres; epithelial cells were also immunohistochemically positive for epidermal growth factor receptor. Group III rats showed similar changes, but thin muscle fibres and extravasated red blood cells within the lamina propria. Anabolic steroids caused structural and immunohistochemical changes within the female rat true vocal fold. Co-administration of anti-androgens did not prevent these changes, suggesting that anti-androgens have a limited role in the management of such changes in humans.

  7. Reversibility of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in a patient with the juvenile form of hemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelopoulos, Nicholas G; Goula, Anastasia; Dimitriou, Evagelos; Tolis, George

    2005-12-01

    To report a case of complete reversibility of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with intensive venesection treatment in juvenile hemochromatosis. Case report. Endocrine department of Hippocrateion Hospital of Athens. A 25-year-old man who presented with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and severe iron overload due to juvenile hemochromatosis and who was initially treated with phlebotomies and androgen substitution. Intensification of chelation therapy. Clinical evaluation, serum ferritin concentration, and biochemical assessment of pituitary function were performed periodically. One year after normalization of serum ferritin levels and transferrin saturation was achieved, he became eugonadal. We believe that hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in juvenile hemochromatosis may be reversible by a consequent venesection therapy probably because treatment was intensive and promptly introduced at a young age.

  8. Prolonged androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of estrogen receptors in the brain and pelvic floor muscles of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Erik; Calich, Hannah J; Currie, R William; Wassersug, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Androgen deprivation in males has detrimental effects on various tissues and bodily functions, some of which can be restored by estradiol (E2) administration. We investigated how the duration of androgen deprivation affects the autoregulation of estrogen receptors (ERs) levels in core brain areas associated with sexual behavior and cognition, as well as in pelvic floor muscles (PFM). We also measured c-Fos levels in brain areas associated with sexual behavior shortly after the rats mated. Prolonged castration increases ERα levels in the preoptic area (POA) and E2 treatment reverses these effects. In the POA, c-Fos levels after mating are not affected by the duration of androgen deprivation and/or E2 treatment. ERβ levels in the POA as well as c-Fos levels in the POA and the core area of nucleus accumbens correlate with the mounting frequency for E2-treated Short-Term castrates. Additionally, ERβ levels in the medial amygdala are positively correlated with the mounting frequency of Long-Term castrates that received E2 treatment. In the hippocampus, ERs are downregulated only when E2 is administered early after castration, whereas downregulation of ERα in the prefrontal cortex only occurs with delayed E2 treatment. Early, but not delayed, E2 treatment after castration increases ERβ levels in the bulbocavernosus and ERα levels in the levator ani of male rats. Our data suggest that the duration of androgen deprivation may influence the autoregulation of ERs by E2 treatment in select brain areas and pelvic floor muscles of male rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Saw Palmetto induces growth arrest and apoptosis of androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells via inactivation of STAT 3 and androgen receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ikezoe, Takayuki; Zheng, Zhixing; Taguchi, Hirokuni; Koeffler, H Phillip; Zhu, Wei-Guo

    2007-09-01

    PC-SPES is an eight-herb mixture that has an activity against prostate cancer. Recently, we purified Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) from PC-SPES and found that Saw Palmetto induced growth arrest of prostate cancer LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cells with ED50s of approximately 2.0, 2.6, and 3.3 microl/ml, respectively, as measured by mitochondrial-dependent conversion of the the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Saw Palmetto induced apoptosis of LNCaP cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner as measured by TUNEL assays. Also, Saw Palmetto increased the expression of p21waf1 and p53 protein in LNCaP cells. In addition, we found that Saw Palmetto down-regulated DHT- or IL-6-induced expression of prostate specific antigen in conjunction with down-regulation of the level of androgen receptor in the nucleus as measured by Western blot analysis. Moreover, Saw Palmetto down-regulated the IL-6-induced level of the phosphorylated form of STAT 3 in LNCaP cells. Furthermore, Saw Palmetto inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells present as tumor xenografts in BALB/c nude mice without adverse effect. These results indicate that Saw Palmetto might be useful for the treatment of individuals with prostate cancer.

  10. Testosterone therapy delays cardiomyocyte aging via an androgen receptor-independent pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The testicular feminized (Tfm mouse carries a nonfunctional androgen receptor (AR and reduced circulating testosterone levels. We used Tfm and castrated mice to determine whether testosterone modulates markers of aging in cardiomyocytes via its classic AR-dependent pathway or conversion to estradiol. Male littermates and Tfm mice were divided into 6 experimental groups. Castrated littermates (group 1 and sham-operated Tfm mice (group 2, N = 8 each received testosterone. Sham-operated Tfm mice received testosterone in combination with the aromatase inhibitor anastrazole (group 3, N = 7. Castrated littermates (group 4 and sham-operated untreated Tfm mice (group 5 were used as controls (N = 8 and 7, respectively. An additional control group (group 6 consisted of age-matched non-castrated littermates (N = 8. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricle, telomere length was measured by quantitative PCR and expression of p16INK4α, retinoblastoma (Rb and p53 proteins was detected by Western blot 3 months after treatment. Compared with group 6, telomere length was short (P < 0.01 and expression of p16INK4α, Rb and p53 proteins was significantly (P < 0.05 up-regulated in groups 4 and 5. These changes were improved to nearly normal levels in groups 1 and 2 (telomere length = 0.78 ± 0.05 and 0.80 ± 0.08; p16INK4α = 0.13 ± 0.03 and 0.15 ± 0.04; Rb = 0.45 ± 0.05 and 0.39 ± 0.06; p53 = 0.16 ± 0.04 and 0.13 ± 0.03, but did not differ between these two groups. These improvements were partly inhibited in group 3 compared with group 2 (telomere length = 0.65 ± 0.08 vs 0.80 ± 0.08, P = 0.021; p16INK4α = 0.28 ± 0.05 vs 0.15 ± 0.04, P = 0.047; Rb = 0.60 ± 0.06 vs 0.39 ± 0.06, P < 0.01; p53 = 0.34 ± 0.06 vs 0.13 ± 0.03, P = 0.004. In conclusion, testosterone deficiency contributes to cardiomyocyte aging. Physiological testosterone can delay cardiomyocyte aging via an AR-independent pathway and in part by conversion to estradiol.

  11. Mass spectrometric characterization of the selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) YK-11 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Piper, Thomas; Dib, Josef; Lagojda, Andreas; Kühne, Dirk; Packschies, Lars; Geyer, Hans; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2017-07-30

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent an emerging class of therapeutics targeting inter alia conditions referred to as cachexia and sarcopenia. Due to their anabolic properties, the use of SARMs is prohibited in sports as regulated by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), and doping control laboratories test for these anabolic agents in blood and urine. In order to accomplish and maintain comprehensive test methods, the characterization of new drug candidates is critical for efficient sports drug testing. Hence, in the present study the mass spectrometric properties of the SARM YK-11 were investigated. YK-11 was synthesized according to literature data and three different stable-isotope-labeled analogs were prepared to support the mass spectrometric studies. Using high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry following electrospray ionization as well as electron ionization, the dissociation pathways of YK-11 were investigated, and characteristic features of its (product ion) mass spectra were elucidated. These studies were flanked by density functional theory (DFT) computation providing information on proton affinities of selected functional groups of the analyte. The steroidal SARM YK-11 was found to readily protonate under ESI conditions followed by substantial in-source dissociation processes eliminating methanol, acetic acid methyl ester, and/or ketene. DFT computation yielded energetically favored structures of the protonated species resulting from the aforementioned elimination processes particularly following protonation of the steroidal D-ring substituent. Underlying dissociation pathways were suggested, supported by stable-isotope labeling of the analyte, and diagnostic product ions for the steroidal nucleus and the D-ring substituent were identified. Further, trimethylsilylated YK-11 and its deuterated analogs were subjected to electron ionization high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry, complementing the dataset characterizing

  12. Cabazitaxel Remains Active in Patients Progressing After Docetaxel Followed by Novel Androgen Receptor Pathway Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Nakouzi, Nader; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Albigès, Laurence; Wang, Chris; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Gross-Goupil, Marine; de La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Guillot, Aline; Gajda, Dorota; Massard, Christophe; Gleave, Martin; Fizazi, Karim; Loriot, Yohann

    2015-08-01

    Cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate (AA), and enzalutamide have been approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) following docetaxel chemotherapy. Whether taxanes and next-generation androgen receptor (AR) axis inhibitors are cross-resistant or not is a subject of debate. To evaluate the antitumour activity of cabazitaxel in mCRPC pretreated with abiraterone or enzalutamide. The antitumour activity of cabazitaxel was assessed in patients with mCRPC and progressive disease after treatment with docetaxel and AA. In parallel, cabazitaxel antitumour activity was studied in enzalutamide-resistant models. Changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and progression-free survival were used to determine the activity of cabazitaxel treatment. Cell proliferation, immunofluorescence, and AR transactivation assay were used in enzalutamide-resistant models. A total of 79 patients who had progressive mCRPC after docetaxel (median: 8 cycles; range: 4-12 mo), and AA (median: 4.8 mo; range:1-55 mo) received cabazitaxel 25mg/m(2) every 3 weeks (median: 6 cycles; range:1-15 cycles). A PSA decline ≥30% was achieved in 48 patients (62%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51-73), and a decline ≥50% was achieved in 28 patients (35%; 95% CI, 25-47). The median progression-free survival and overall survival were 4.4 and 10.9 mo, respectively. In vitro, cabazitaxel decreased cell viability in both enzalutamide-sensitive and enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cells within the same range of concentrations. PC3, an AR-negative cell line, exhibited similar sensitivity to cabazitaxel. Cabazitaxel and AR-pathway inhibitors are not cross-resistant. Preclinical data suggest that cabazitaxel activity does not act mainly through AR axis inhibition. The antitumour activity of cabazitaxel, a chemotherapy agent, was studied in prostate cancer resistant to conventional hormonal therapy and to more recent endocrine therapies (abiraterone or

  13. Androgen receptor signalling in peritubular myoid cells is essential for normal differentiation and function of adult Leydig cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welsh, M.; Moffat, L.; Belling, Kirstine Christensen

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone synthesis depends on normal Leydig cell (LC) development, but the mechanisms controlling this development remain unclear. We recently demonstrated that androgen receptor (AR) ablation from a proportion of testicular peritubular myoid cells (PTM-ARKO) did not affect LC number, but res......Testosterone synthesis depends on normal Leydig cell (LC) development, but the mechanisms controlling this development remain unclear. We recently demonstrated that androgen receptor (AR) ablation from a proportion of testicular peritubular myoid cells (PTM-ARKO) did not affect LC number......, but resulted in compensated LC failure. The current study extends these investigations, demonstrating that PTM AR signalling is important for normal development, ultrastructure and function of adult LCs. Notably, mRNAs for LC markers [e.g. steroidogenic factor 1 (Nr5a1), insulin-like growth factor (Igf-1......) and insulin-like factor 3 (Insl3)] were significantly reduced in adult PTM-ARKOs, but not all LCs were similarly affected. Two LC sub-populations were identified, one apparently ‘normal’ sub-population that expressed adult LC markers and steroidogenic enzymes as in controls, and another ‘abnormal...

  14. Prostaglandin treatment is associated with a withdrawal of progesterone and androgen at the receptor level in the uterine cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladic-Stjernholm, Ylva; Vladic, Tomislav; Blesson, Chellakkan S; Ekman-Ordeberg, Gunvor; Sahlin, Lena

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with prostaglandin(PG)-E2 is clinically efficient for cervical priming. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of PG-E2 on the expression of the progesterone (PR), androgen (AR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptors in human uterine cervix in prolonged pregnancy. The study groups were postterm nulliparous women with unripe cervices undergoing cervical priming with PG-E2 before labor induction. Responders (n = 12) who delivered vaginally were compared with non-responders (n = 10), who underwent cesarean section due to failure to progress to the active phase of labor. Controls (n = 18) with vaginal partus at a normal gestational age served as a reference group. Cervical levels of PR-A and PR- B isoforms, AR and GR, serum levels of their ligands and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were quantified. The responder group displayed lower total PR-AB and AR protein levels as compared to non-responders, and lower PR-B and AR protein levels as compared to controls. In addition, the PR mRNA level was lower in responders as compared to non-responders. The GR protein level did not differ between the groups. We conclude that successful PG-E2 priming was followed by a progesterone and androgen withdrawal at the receptor level in the uterine cervix. PMID:19852793

  15. Prostaglandin treatment is associated with a withdrawal of progesterone and androgen at the receptor level in the uterine cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekman-Ordeberg Gunvor

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment with prostaglandin(PG-E2 is clinically efficient for cervical priming. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of PG-E2 on the expression of the progesterone (PR, androgen (AR and glucocorticoid (GR receptors in human uterine cervix in prolonged pregnancy. The study groups were postterm nulliparous women with unripe cervices undergoing cervical priming with PG-E2 before labor induction. Responders (n = 12 who delivered vaginally were compared with non-responders (n = 10, who underwent cesarean section due to failure to progress to the active phase of labor. Controls (n = 18 with vaginal partus at a normal gestational age served as a reference group. Cervical levels of PR-A and PR- B isoforms, AR and GR, serum levels of their ligands and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG were quantified. The responder group displayed lower total PR-AB and AR protein levels as compared to non-responders, and lower PR-B and AR protein levels as compared to controls. In addition, the PR mRNA level was lower in responders as compared to non-responders. The GR protein level did not differ between the groups. We conclude that successful PG-E2 priming was followed by a progesterone and androgen withdrawal at the receptor level in the uterine cervix.

  16. Imposex development in Nucella lapillus--evidence for the involvement of retinoid X receptor and androgen signalling pathways in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Daniela; Sieratowicz, Agnes; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2012-01-15

    Imposex in female gastropods is a widely documented masculinisation phenomenon in response to tributyltin (TBT) exposure. Although it is generally accepted that imposex is a case of endocrine disruption the underlying mechanisms are controversially discussed with aromatase inhibition and retinoid X receptor (RXR) signalling pathways as two conflicting hypotheses. Hence, we performed injection experiments with the marine dogwhelk Nucella lapillus. As expected TBT induced imposex in all test specimens while the natural RXR ligand 9 cis-retinoic acid did not cause significant effects. Additionally, TBT effects were suppressed if the organotin compound was simultaneously injected with an androgen receptor inhibitor (cyproterone acetate) but not if co-administered with the synthetic RXR antagonist HX531. In contrast, the injection of the RXR agonist HX630 resulted in imposex development in nearly 100% females. Therefore, the results provide evidence for the involvement of the RXR and the androgen signalling pathway. Further investigations are necessary to resolve the biochemical mechanism of imposex development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Free Testosterone With Hypogonadal Symptoms in Men With Near-normal Total Testosterone Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Golan, Ron; Wilken, Nathan; Scovell, Jason M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the association between hypogonadal symptoms and free testosterone (FT) levels in men with near-normal total testosterone (T) levels (250-350 ng/dL) and to determine whether a discriminatory threshold for FT exists below which hypogonadal symptoms become more prevalent. We reviewed the charts of 3167 men who presented to an outpatient men's health clinic. Two hundred thirty-one men had symptoms of "low testosterone" and serum testosterone levels between 250 and 350 ng/dL. We evaluated hypogonadal symptoms using the Androgen Deficiency in the Adult Male (ADAM) and quantitative ADAM (qADAM) questionnaires. Serum levels of T and sex hormone-binding globulin were collected on the same day that men completed their questionnaires. We used linear regression to determine whether a threshold of FT exists for hypogonadal symptoms. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses to evaluate factors that predicted a low FT level. The median age was 43.5 years, and the median testosterone and FT levels were 303 ng/dL and 6.3 ng/dL, respectively. Prevalence and severity of hypogonadal symptoms (ADAM and qADAM) were similar between men with low (testosterone levels. Symptom-specific FT thresholds could not be defined, as age remains an important confounder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of ART-27, a Novel Androgen Receptor Coactivator, in Normal Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    07$15.00/0 Printed m U 8 .A. Molecular Endocrino logy 21 (12):2864- 2876 Copyright C’l 2007 by The Endocrine Society d ol: 10.121G/ me.2007-0094...mutations identified in prostate cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome display aberrant ART -27 coacti- vator function. Mol Endocrino l 19

  19. Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length Is Associated With Body Fat and Serum SHBG in Boys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Annette; Hagen, Casper P; Sørensen, Kaspar

    2013-01-01

    was to evaluate associations between the AR (CAG)n polymorphism and development of pubic hair, levels of androgens, and body fat content in healthy boys. Methods: A longitudinal study of 78 healthy boys (age 6.2-12.4 years at inclusion) from the COPENHAGEN Puberty Study was conducted with clinical examinations...

  20. Hypogonadism and renal failure: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumavalavan, Nannan; Wilken, Nathan A; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of both hypogonadism and renal failure is increasing. Hypogonadism in men with renal failure carries with it significant morbidity, including anemia and premature cardiovascular disease. It remains unclear whether testosterone therapy can affect the morbidity and mortality associated with renal failure. As such, in this review, we sought to evaluate the current literature addressing hypogonadism and testosterone replacement, specifically in men with renal failure. The articles chosen for this review were selected by performing a broad search using Pubmed, Embase and Scopus including the terms hypogonadism and renal failure from 1990 to the present. This review is based on both primary sources as well as review articles. Hypogonadism in renal failure has a multifactorial etiology, including co-morbid conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, old age and obesity. Renal failure can lead to decreased luteinizing hormone production and decreased prolactin clearance that could impair testosterone production. Given the increasing prevalence of hypogonadism and the potential morbidity associated with hypogonadism in men with renal failure, careful evaluation of serum testosterone would be valuable. Testosterone replacement therapy should be considered in men with symptomatic hypogonadism and renal failure, and may ameliorate some of the morbidity associated with renal failure. Patients with all stages of renal disease are at an increased risk of hypogonadism that could be associated with significant morbidity. Testosterone replacement therapy may reduce some of the morbidity of renal failure, although it carries risk.

  1. Hedgehog/Gli supports androgen signaling in androgen deprived and androgen independent prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shtutman Michael

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC develops as a consequence of hormone therapies used to deplete androgens in advanced prostate cancer patients. CRPC cells are able to grow in a low androgen environment and this is associated with anomalous activity of their endogenous androgen receptor (AR despite the low systemic androgen levels in the patients. Therefore, the reactivated tumor cell androgen signaling pathway is thought to provide a target for control of CRPC. Previously, we reported that Hedgehog (Hh signaling was conditionally activated by androgen deprivation in androgen sensitive prostate cancer cells and here we studied the potential for cross-talk between Hh and androgen signaling activities in androgen deprived and androgen independent (AI prostate cancer cells. Results Treatment of a variety of androgen-deprived or AI prostate cancer cells with the Hh inhibitor, cyclopamine, resulted in dose-dependent modulation of the expression of genes that are regulated by androgen. The effect of cyclopamine on endogenous androgen-regulated gene expression in androgen deprived and AI prostate cancer cells was consistent with the suppressive effects of cyclopamine on the expression of a reporter gene (luciferase from two different androgen-dependent promoters. Similarly, reduction of smoothened (Smo expression with siRNA co-suppressed expression of androgen-inducible KLK2 and KLK3 in androgen deprived cells without affecting the expression of androgen receptor (AR mRNA or protein. Cyclopamine also prevented the outgrowth of AI cells from androgen growth-dependent parental LNCaP cells and suppressed the growth of an overt AI-LNCaP variant whereas supplemental androgen (R1881 restored growth to the AI cells in the presence of cyclopamine. Conversely, overexpression of Gli1 or Gli2 in LNCaP cells enhanced AR-specific gene expression in the absence of androgen. Overexpressed Gli1/Gli2 also enabled parental LNCaP cells to

  2. Molecular chaperones enhance the degradation of expanded polyglutamine repeat androgen receptor in a cellular model of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailey, CK; Andriola, IFM; Kampinga, HH; Merry, DE

    2002-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is one of a growing number of neurodegenerative diseases caused by a polyglutamine-encoding CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion, and is caused by an expansion within exon 1 of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The family of polyglutamine diseases is

  3. Sex differences in androgen receptors of the human mamillary bodies are related to endocrine status rather than to sexual orientation or transsexuality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijver, F. P.; Fernández-Guasti, A.; Fodor, M.; Kraan, E. M.; Swaab, D. F.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous study we found androgen receptor (AR) sex differences in several regions throughout the human hypothalamus. Generally, men had stronger nuclear AR immunoreactivity (AR-ir) than women. The strongest nuclear labeling was found in the caudal hypothalamus in the mamillary body complex

  4. EPI-001 is a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma modulator with inhibitory effects on androgen receptor expression and activity in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Lucas J.; Olson, Margaret E.; Ravindranathan, Preethi; Guo, Hong; Kempema, Aaron M.; Andrews, Timothy E.; Chen, Xiaoli; Raj, Ganesh V.; Harki, Daniel A.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a driver of prostate cancer (PCa) cell growth and disease progression. Therapies for advanced PCa exploit AR dependence by blocking the production or action of androgens, but these interventions inevitably fail via multiple mechanisms including mutation or deletion of the AR ligand binding domain (LBD). Thus, the development of new inhibitors which act through non-LBD interfaces is an unmet clinical need. EPI-001 is a bisphenol A-derived compound shown to bind covalently and inhibit the AR NH2-terminal domain (NTD). Here, we demonstrate that EPI-001 has general thiol alkylating activity, resulting in multilevel inhibitory effects on AR in PCa cell lines and tissues. At least one secondary mechanism of action associated with AR inhibition was found to be selective modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ). These multi-level effects of EPI-001 resulted in inhibition of transcriptional activation units (TAUs) 1 and 5 of the AR NTD, and reduced AR expression. EPI-001 inhibited growth of AR-positive and AR-negative PCa cell lines, with the highest sensitivity observed in LNCaP cells. Overall, this study provides new mechanistic insights to the chemical biology of EPI-001, and raises key issues regarding the use of covalent inhibitors of the intrinsically unstructured AR NTD. PMID:25669987

  5. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    2957-64. 27. Rieck GC, and Fiander AN. Human papillomavirus , cervical carcinogenesis and chemoprevention with Indole derivates - a review of...PSA-Luc, 4X-ARE-LUC) or BC (TOP- FLASH) and stimulated with androgen or Wnt respectively. Data is standardized to vector only control and expressed...For Task 1, I had to develop the pBi-Tet vectors to be used in this assay. Cloning, mutating, and especially sequencing of vectors containing AR

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  7. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  8. ROR-γ drives androgen receptor expression and represents a therapeutic target in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjian; Zou, June X; Xue, Xiaoqian; Cai, Demin; Zhang, Yan; Duan, Zhijian; Xiang, Qiuping; Yang, Joy C; Louie, Maggie C; Borowsky, Alexander D; Gao, Allen C; Evans, Christopher P; Lam, Kit S; Xu, Jianzhen; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Evans, Ronald M; Xu, Yong; Chen, Hong-Wu

    2016-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is overexpressed and hyperactivated in human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the determinants of AR overexpression in CRPC are poorly defined. Here we show that retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γ (ROR-γ) is overexpressed and amplified in metastatic CRPC tumors, and that ROR-γ drives AR expression in the tumors. ROR-γ recruits nuclear receptor coactivator 1 and 3 (NCOA1 and NCOA3, also known as SRC-1 and SRC-3) to an AR-ROR response element (RORE) to stimulate AR gene transcription. ROR-γ antagonists suppress the expression of both AR and its variant AR-V7 in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and tumors. ROR-γ antagonists also markedly diminish genome-wide AR binding, H3K27ac abundance and expression of the AR target gene network. Finally, ROR-γ antagonists suppressed tumor growth in multiple AR-expressing, but not AR-negative, xenograft PCa models, and they effectively sensitized CRPC tumors to enzalutamide, without overt toxicity, in mice. Taken together, these results establish ROR-γ as a key player in CRPC by acting upstream of AR and as a potential therapeutic target for advanced PCa.

  9. Transcriptional role of androgen receptor in the expression of long non-coding RNA Sox2OT in neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Tosetti

    Full Text Available The complex architecture of adult brain derives from tightly regulated migration and differentiation of precursor cells generated during embryonic neurogenesis. Changes at transcriptional level of genes that regulate migration and differentiation may lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. Androgen receptor (AR is a transcription factor that is already expressed during early embryonic days. However, AR role in the regulation of gene expression at early embryonic stage is yet to be determinate. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA Sox2 overlapping transcript (Sox2OT plays a crucial role in gene expression control during development but its transcriptional regulation is still to be clearly defined. Here, using Bicalutamide in order to pharmacologically inactivated AR, we investigated whether AR participates in the regulation of the transcription of the lncRNASox2OTat early embryonic stage. We identified a new DNA binding region upstream of Sox2 locus containing three androgen response elements (ARE, and found that AR binds such a sequence in embryonic neural stem cells and in mouse embryonic brain. Our data suggest that through this binding, AR can promote the RNA polymerase II dependent transcription of Sox2OT. Our findings also suggest that AR participates in embryonic neurogenesis through transcriptional control of the long non-coding RNA Sox2OT.

  10. [Effect of androgen receptor on IgG expression, proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu-Lin; Guo, Kai; Zeng, Ying-Ke; Wu, Kai-Hui; Tang, Chen; Zheng, Shao-Bo

    2017-03-20

    To investigate the effect of androgen receptor (AR) on IgG protein expression and the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of AR protein and IgG in androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCap cells and castration-resistant prostate cancer PC-3 cells. In AR-overexpressing cells (PC-3-AR cells) established by transfecting PC-3 with AR gene (pCDNA3.1) and LNCap cells with small interfering RNA-mediated AR silencing (LNCap-siAR cells) were analyzed for expressions of AR protein and IgG with Western blotting; the expression of IgG mRNA was detected by Q-PCR, and the cell proliferation and migration were assessed with MTT assay and wound healing assay, respectively. Compared with PC-3 cells, LNCap cells expressed a higher level of AR protein and a lower level of IgG (PIgG (PIgG (PIgG and is associated with the proliferation and migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro.

  11. Transcriptional role of androgen receptor in the expression of long non-coding RNA Sox2OT in neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosetti, Valentina; Sassone, Jenny; Ferri, Anna L M; Taiana, Michela; Bedini, Gloria; Nava, Sara; Brenna, Greta; Di Resta, Chiara; Pareyson, Davide; Di Giulio, Anna Maria; Carelli, Stephana; Parati, Eugenio A; Gorio, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    The complex architecture of adult brain derives from tightly regulated migration and differentiation of precursor cells generated during embryonic neurogenesis. Changes at transcriptional level of genes that regulate migration and differentiation may lead to neurodevelopmental disorders. Androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor that is already expressed during early embryonic days. However, AR role in the regulation of gene expression at early embryonic stage is yet to be determinate. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) Sox2 overlapping transcript (Sox2OT) plays a crucial role in gene expression control during development but its transcriptional regulation is still to be clearly defined. Here, using Bicalutamide in order to pharmacologically inactivated AR, we investigated whether AR participates in the regulation of the transcription of the lncRNASox2OTat early embryonic stage. We identified a new DNA binding region upstream of Sox2 locus containing three androgen response elements (ARE), and found that AR binds such a sequence in embryonic neural stem cells and in mouse embryonic brain. Our data suggest that through this binding, AR can promote the RNA polymerase II dependent transcription of Sox2OT. Our findings also suggest that AR participates in embryonic neurogenesis through transcriptional control of the long non-coding RNA Sox2OT.

  12. Targeting a Single Alternative Polyadenylation Site Coordinately Blocks Expression of Androgen Receptor mRNA Splice Variants in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Jamie L; Nyquist, Michael; Li, Yingming; Yang, Rendong; Ho, Yeung; Johnson, Rachel; Ondigi, Olivia; Voytas, Daniel F; Henzler, Christine; Dehm, Scott M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of male cancer deaths due to disease progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Androgen receptor (AR) splice variants including AR-V7 function as constitutively active transcription factors in CRPC cells, thereby promoting resistance to AR-targeted therapies. To date, there are no AR variant-specific treatments for CRPC. Here we report that the splicing of AR variants AR-V7 as well as AR-V1 and AR-V9 is regulated coordinately by a single polyadenylation signal in AR intron 3. Blocking this signal with morpholino technology or silencing of the polyadenylation factor CPSF1 caused a splice switch that inhibited expression of AR variants and blocked androgen-independent growth of CRPC cells. Our findings support the development of new therapies targeting the polyadenylation signal in AR intron 3 as a strategy to prevent expression of a broad array of AR variants in CRPC. Cancer Res; 77(19); 5228-35. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Characterization of aromatase expression in the adult male and female mouse brain. I. Coexistence with oestrogen receptors α and β, and androgen receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor Stanić

    Full Text Available Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR, although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα-, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females.

  14. Characterization of aromatase expression in the adult male and female mouse brain. I. Coexistence with oestrogen receptors α and β, and androgen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanić, Davor; Dubois, Sydney; Chua, Hui Kheng; Tonge, Bruce; Rinehart, Nicole; Horne, Malcolm K; Boon, Wah Chin

    2014-01-01

    Aromatase catalyses the last step of oestrogen synthesis. There is growing evidence that local oestrogens influence many brain regions to modulate brain development and behaviour. We examined, by immunohistochemistry, the expression of aromatase in the adult male and female mouse brain, using mice in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) is transcribed following the physiological activation of the Cyp19A1 gene. EGFP-immunoreactive processes were distributed in many brain regions, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, olfactory tubercle, medial amygdaloid nucleus and medial preoptic area, with the densest distributions of EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. Differences between male and female mice were apparent, with the density of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres being lower in some brain regions of female mice, including the bed nucleus and medial amygdala. EGFP-positive cell bodies in the bed nucleus, lateral septum, medial amygdala and hypothalamus co-expressed oestrogen receptor (ER) α and β, or the androgen receptor (AR), although single-labelled EGFP-positive cells were also identified. Additionally, single-labelled ERα-, ERβ- or AR-positive cell bodies often appeared to be surrounded by EGFP-immunoreactive nerve fibres/terminals. The widespread distribution of EGFP-positive cell bodies and fibres suggests that aromatase signalling is common in the mouse brain, and that locally synthesised brain oestrogens could mediate biological effects by activating pre- and post-synaptic oestrogen α and β receptors, and androgen receptors. The higher number of EGFP-positive cells in male mice may indicate that the autocrine and paracrine effects of oestrogens are more prominent in males than females.

  15. A novel androgen signalling pathway uses dihydrotestosterone, but not testosterone, to activate the EGF receptor signalling cascade in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, V L; Poulios, K; Ventura, S; Haynes, J M

    2013-10-01

    Human prostate growth and function are tightly controlled by androgens that are generally thought to exert their effects by regulating gene transcription. However, a rapid, non-genomic steroid action, often involving an elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+) ]i ), has also been described in a number of cell types. In this study we investigate whether androgens acutely regulate [Ca(2+) ]i in stromal cells derived from the human prostate. Human-cultured prostatic stromal cells (HCPSCs) were loaded with the calcium-sensitive fluorophore, fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester (FURA-2AM) (10 μM). Changes in [Ca(2+) ]i in response to the androgens, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone, as well as EGF were measured by fluorescence microscopy. DHT, but not testosterone (0.03-300 nM), elicited concentration-dependent elevations of [Ca(2+) ]i within 1 min of addition. These responses were blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide (10 μM); the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase pump inhibitor, thapsigargin (1 μM); the inositol trisphosphate receptor inhibitor, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (50 μM) and the PLC inhibitor, U-73122 (1 μM). Responses were also blocked by the L-type calcium channel blocker, nifedipine (1 μM), and by removal of extracellular calcium. A similar transient elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i was elicited by EGF (100 ng·mL(-1) ). The EGF receptor inhibitor, AG 1478 (30 nM), and the MMP inhibitor, marimastat (100 nM), blocked the DHT-induced elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i . These studies show that DHT elicits an androgen receptor-dependent acute elevation of [Ca(2+) ]i in HCPSC, most likely by activating EGF receptor signalling. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  16. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat length as modifier of the association between Persistent Organohalogen Pollutant exposure markers and semen characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, Aleksander; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Exposure to persistent organohalogen pollutants was suggested to impair male reproductive function. A gene-environment interaction has been proposed. No genes modifying the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutants on reproductive organs have yet been identified. We aimed...... to investigate whether the CAG and GGN polymorphisms in the androgen receptor gene modify the effect of persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure on human sperm characteristics. METHODS: Semen and blood from 680 men [mean (SD) age 34 (10) years] from Greenland, Sweden, Warsaw (Poland) and Kharkiv (Ukraine......) were collected. Persistent organohalogen pollutant exposure was assessed by measuring serum levels of 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethene (p,p'-DDE). Semen characteristics (volume, sperm concentration, total count, proportion of progressively motile...

  17. Androgen receptor and nutrient signaling pathways coordinate the demand for increased amino acid transport during prostate cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Bailey, Charles G; Ng, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    L-Type amino acid transporters such as LAT1 and LAT3 mediate the uptake of essential amino acids. Here, we report that prostate cancer cells coordinate the expression of LAT1 and LAT3 to maintain sufficient levels of leucine needed for mTORC1 signaling and cell growth. Inhibiting LAT function...... was sufficient to decrease cell growth and mTORC1 signaling in prostate cancer cells. These cells maintained levels of amino acid influx through androgen receptor-mediated regulation of LAT3 expression and ATF4 regulation of LAT1 expression after amino acid deprivation. These responses remained intact in primary...... prostate cancer, as indicated by high levels of LAT3 in primary disease, and by increased levels of LAT1 after hormone ablation and in metastatic lesions. Taken together, our results show how prostate cancer cells respond to demands for increased essential amino acids by coordinately activating amino acid...

  18. Overexpression of Endothelial Cell-Specific Molecule 1 Correlates with Gleason Score and Expression of Androgen Receptor in Prostate Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Yu; Chen, Chien-Min; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien; Liu, Chung-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Endothelial cell-specific molecule 1 (ESM1) is a major prognostic marker of several tumor types, but its value as a marker for prostate cancer is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to measure the relationship of ESM1 expression with androgen receptor (AR) expression and with Gleason score in human prostate carcinoma tissue. Expression of ESM1 and AR were determined by immunohistochemical staining of prostate tissues from healthy individuals and patients with prostate cancer. The results showed that ESM1 expression was significantly higher in prostate tumor tissues than in normal prostate tissues (p Gleason score (p Gleason grade (p Gleason score and Gleason grade (p < 0.001 for both comparisons), and also correlated with AR expression (R = 0.727, p < 0.001). In conclusion, our results demonstrated that ESM1 should be considered as a marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

  19. c-MYC-Induced Sebaceous Gland Differentiation Is Controlled by an Androgen Receptor/p53 Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denny L. Cottle

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the sebaceous gland (SG plays an important role in skin function, the mechanisms regulating SG differentiation and carcinoma formation are poorly understood. We previously reported that c-MYC overexpression stimulates SG differentiation. We now demonstrate roles for the androgen receptor (AR and p53. MYC-induced SG differentiation was reduced in mice lacking a functional AR. High levels of MYC triggered a p53-dependent DNA damage response, leading to accumulation of proliferative SG progenitors and inhibition of AR signaling. Conversely, testosterone treatment or p53 deletion activated AR signaling and restored MYC-induced differentiation. Poorly differentiated human sebaceous carcinomas exhibited high p53 and low AR expression. Thus, the consequences of overactivating MYC in the SG depend on whether AR or p53 is activated, as they form a regulatory axis controlling proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  1. CAG repeat polymorphisms in the androgen receptor and breast cancer risk in women: a meta-analysis of 17 studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Q

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Qixing Mao,1–3,* Mantang Qiu,1–3,* Gaochao Dong,3 Wenjie Xia,1–3 Shuai Zhang,1,3 Youtao Xu,1,3 Jie Wang,3 Yin Rong,1,3 Lin Xu,1,3 Feng Jiang1,3 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, Nanjing Medical University Affiliated Cancer Institute of Jiangsu Province, 2Fourth Clinical College of Nanjing Medical University, 3Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Translational Cancer Research, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The association between polymorphic CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene in women and breast cancer susceptibility has been studied extensively. However, the conclusions regarding this relationship remain conflicting. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify whether androgen receptor CAG repeat lengths were related to breast cancer susceptibility. The MEDLINE, PubMed, and EMBASE databases were searched through to December 2014 to identify eligible studies. Data and study quality were rigorously assessed by two investigators according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. The publication bias was assessed by the Begg’s test. Seventeen eligible studies were included in this meta-analysis. The overall analysis suggested no association between CAG polymorphisms and breast cancer risk (odds ratio [OR] 1.031, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.855–1.245. However, in the subgroup analysis, we observed that long CAG repeats significantly increased the risk of breast cancer in the Caucasian population (OR 1.447, 95% CI 1.089–1.992. Additionally, the risk was significantly increased in Caucasian women carrying two alleles with CAG repeats ≥22 units compared with those with two shorter alleles (OR 1.315, 95% CI 1.014–1.707. These findings suggest that long CAG repeats increase the risk of breast cancer in Caucasian women. However, larger scale case-control studies are needed to validate our results. Keywords: androgen, CAG repeat polymorphism, women

  2. Conazole fungicides inhibit Leydig cell testosterone secretion and androgen receptor activation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarke J.E. Roelofs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conazole fungicides are widely used in agriculture despite their suspected endocrine disrupting properties. In this study, the potential (anti-androgenic effects of ten conazoles were assessed and mutually compared with existing data. Effects of cyproconazole (CYPRO, fluconazole (FLUC, flusilazole (FLUS, hexaconazole (HEXA, myconazole (MYC, penconazole (PEN, prochloraz (PRO, tebuconazole (TEBU, triadimefon (TRIA, and triticonazole (TRIT were examined using murine Leydig (MA-10 cells and human T47D-ARE cells stably transfected with an androgen responsive element and a firefly luciferase reporter gene. Six conazoles caused a decrease in basal testosterone (T secretion by MA-10 cells varying from 61% up to 12% compared to vehicle-treated control. T secretion was concentration-dependently inhibited after exposure of MA-10 cells to several concentrations of FLUS (IC50 = 12.4 μM or TEBU (IC50 = 2.4 μM in combination with LH. The expression of steroidogenic and cholesterol biosynthesis genes was not changed by conazole exposure. Also, there were no changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS formation that could explain the altered T secretion after exposure to conazoles. Nine conazoles decreased T-induced AR activation (IC50s ranging from 10.7 to 71.5 μM and effect potencies (REPs were calculated relative to the known AR antagonist flutamide (FLUT. FLUC had no effect on AR activation by T. FLUS was the most potent (REP = 3.61 and MYC the least potent (REP = 0.03 AR antagonist. All other conazoles had a comparable REP from 0.12 to 0.38. Our results show distinct in vitro anti-androgenic effects of several conazole fungicides arising from two mechanisms: inhibition of T secretion and AR antagonism, suggesting potential testicular toxic effects. These effects warrant further mechanistic investigation and clearly show the need for accurate exposure data in order to perform proper (human risk assessment of this class of compounds.

  3. Survival Signaling in Prostate Cancer: Role of Androgen Receptor and Integrins in Regulating Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    content/full/123/2/266/DC1 References Alarid, E. T., Rubin, J. S., Young, P., Chedid, M., Ron , D., Aaronson, S. A. and Cunha, G. R. (1994). Keratinocyte...W. K., Hsieh , J.-T., Tu, S.-M. and Campbell, M. L. (1992). Expression of the protooncogene bcl-2 in the prostate and its association with emergence... Hsieh JT, Gleave ME, Brown NM, Pathak S, Chung LW. Derivation of androgen- independent human LNCaP prostatic cancer cell sublines: role of bone

  4. Targeting Ligand Dependent and Ligand Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Muller-Brand J, Forrer F. Targeted radio - therapy with radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am 2011;40:187–204. 55...carcinogenesis1. Androgen deprivation therapy is the mainstay in treatment of advanced PCa (PCa); however, after an initial response, the disease...R1 O NO2 O R2 Scheme 1 Syntheses of bis-benzamide libraries. Reagents and conditions: (a) (COCl)2, cat . DMF, CH2Cl2, reflux, 1 h; (b) DIEA, CH2Cl2

  5. Identifying Androgen Receptor-Independent Mechanisms of Prostate Cancer Resistance to Second-Generation Antiandrogen Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    cancers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Glucocorticoid Receptor, Serum and glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1, SGK1, epithelial- mesenchymal transition, EMT 16...receptor transcription factor, glucocorticoid receptor (GR), can activate an overlapping set of AR target genes and can mediate resistance to enzalutamide... glucocorticoid -regulated kinase 1 (SGK1), a target gene of the GR transcriptional program, might be more suitable for targeted inhibition. GR and

  6. Examining a pathway for hormone mediated maternal effects--yolk testosterone affects androgen receptor expression and endogenous testosterone production in young chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfannkuche, K A; Gahr, M; Weites, I M; Riedstra, B; Wolf, C; Groothuis, T G G

    2011-07-01

    In vertebrates maternal androgens can substantially influence developing offspring, inducing both short and long term changes in physiology and behavior, including androgen sensitive traits. However, how the effects of maternal hormones are mediated remains unknown. Two possible pathways are that maternal androgens affect parts of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG axis) or the sensitivity to androgens by affecting androgen receptor (AR) densities within the brain. To investigate both pathways, testosterone within the physiological range or vehicle only was injected into the egg yolk of unincubated chicken eggs and AR mRNA expression in different brain nuclei as well as plasma testosterone levels were measured in two week old male and female chicks that had hatched from these eggs. Our results showed a significant sex difference in plasma testosterone levels with males showing higher levels than females. Furthermore, AR mRNA expression as well as plasma testosterone levels were significantly lower in chicks hatched from testosterone treated eggs. These results suggest a compensatory mechanism for avoiding potential detrimental effects of high testosterone levels. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome in a Family of Warmblood Horses Caused by a 25-bp Deletion of the DNA-Binding Domain of the Androgen Receptor Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eastman Welsford, G.; Munk, Rikke; Villagómez, Daniel A.F.

    2017-01-01

    Testicular feminization, an earlier term coined for describing a syndrome resulting from failure of masculinization of target organs by androgen secretions during embryo development, has been well documented not only in humans but also in the domestic horse. The pathology, actually referred...

  8. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Willems

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  9. Androgen receptor functional analyses by high throughput imaging: determination of ligand, cell cycle, and mutation-specific effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam T Szafran

    Full Text Available Understanding how androgen receptor (AR function is modulated by exposure to steroids, growth factors or small molecules can have important mechanistic implications for AR-related disease therapies (e.g., prostate cancer, androgen insensitivity syndrome, AIS, and in the analysis of environmental endocrine disruptors.We report the development of a high throughput (HT image-based assay that quantifies AR subcellular and subnuclear distribution, and transcriptional reporter gene activity on a cell-by-cell basis. Furthermore, simultaneous analysis of DNA content allowed determination of cell cycle position and permitted the analysis of cell cycle dependent changes in AR function in unsynchronized cell populations. Assay quality for EC50 coefficients of variation were 5-24%, with Z' values reaching 0.91. This was achieved by the selective analysis of cells expressing physiological levels of AR, important because minor over-expression resulted in elevated nuclear speckling and decreased transcriptional reporter gene activity. A small screen of AR-binding ligands, including known agonists, antagonists, and endocrine disruptors, demonstrated that nuclear translocation and nuclear "speckling" were linked with transcriptional output, and specific ligands were noted to differentially affect measurements for wild type versus mutant AR, suggesting differing mechanisms of action. HT imaging of patient-derived AIS mutations demonstrated a proof-of-principle personalized medicine approach to rapidly identify ligands capable of restoring multiple AR functions.HT imaging-based multiplex screening will provide a rapid, systems-level analysis of compounds/RNAi that may differentially affect wild type AR or clinically relevant AR mutations.

  10. Seasonal expression of androgen receptor, aromatase, and estrogen receptor alpha and beta in the testis of the wild ground squirrel (Citellus dauricus Brandt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the seasonal expression of androgen receptor (AR, estrogen receptors α and β (ERα and ERβ and aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom mRNA and protein by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry in the wild ground squirrel (WGS testes. Histologically, all types of spermatogenic cells including mature spermatozoa were identified in the breeding season (April, while spermatogonia and primary spermatocytes were observed in the nonbreeding season (June, and spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes and secondary spermatocytes were found in pre-hibernation (September. AR was present in Leydig cells, peritubular myoid cells and Sertoli cells in the breeding season and pre-hibernation with more intense staining in the breeding season, whereas AR was only found in Leydig cells in the nonbreeding season; P450arom was expressed in Leydig cells, Sertoli cells and germ cells during the breeding season, whereas P450arom was found in Leydig cells and Sertoli cells during pre-hibernation, but P450arom was not present in the nonbreeding season; stronger immunohistochemical signal for ERα was present in Sertoli cells and Leydig cells during the breeding season; ERβ was only expressed in Leydig cells of the breeding season. Consistent with the immunohistochemical results, the mean mRNA level of AR, P450arom, ERα and ERβ were higher in the testes of the breeding season when compared to pre-hibernation and the nonbreeding season. These results suggested that the seasonal changes in spermatogenesis and testicular recrudescence and regression process in WGSs might be correlated with expression levels of AR, P450arom and ERs, and that estrogen and androgen may play an important autocrine/paracrine role to regulate seasonal testicular function.

  11. Increased Intimal Hyperplasia After Vascular Injury in Male Androgen Receptor-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmson, Anna S; Fagman, Johan B; Johansson, Inger

    2016-01-01

    replacement to castrated male mice increased p27 mRNA in an AR-dependent manner. In conclusion, AR deficiency in male mice increases intimal hyperplasia in response to vascular injury, potentially related to the effects of androgens/AR to inhibit proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells....... evaluated formation of intimal hyperplasia in male AR knockout (ARKO) mice using a vascular injury model. Two weeks after ligation of the carotid artery, male ARKO mice showed increased intimal area and intimal thickness compared with controls. After endothelial denudation by an in vivo scraping injury......, there was no difference in the reendothelialization in ARKO compared with control mice. Ex vivo, we observed increased outgrowth of vascular smooth muscle cells from ARKO compared with control aortic tissue explants; the number of outgrown cells was almost doubled in ARKO. In vitro, stimulation of human aortic vascular...

  12. Competitive androgen receptor antagonism as a factor determining the predictability of cumulative antiandrogenic effects of widely used pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Frances; Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Many pesticides in current use have recently been revealed as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their combined effects is lacking. We investigated the combined effects and the competitive AR antagonism of pesticide mixtures. We used the MDA-kb2 assay to test a combination of eight AR antagonists that did not also possess AR agonist properties ("pure" antagonists; 8 mix: fludioxonil, fenhexamid, ortho-phenylphenol, imazalil, tebuconazole, dimethomorph, methiocarb, pirimiphos-methyl), a combination of five AR antagonists that also showed agonist activity (5 mix: cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, vinclozolin, chlorpropham, linuron), and all pesticides combined (13 mix). We used concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) to formulate additivity expectations, and Schild plot analyses to investigate competitive AR antagonism. A good agreement between the effects of the mixture of eight "pure" AR antagonists and the responses predicted by CA was observed. Schild plot analysis revealed that the 8 mix acted by competitive AR antagonism. However, the observed responses of the 5 mix and the 13 mix fell within the "prediction window" boundaries defined by the predicted regression curves of CA and IA. Schild plot analysis with these mixtures yielded anomalous responses incompatible with competitive receptor antagonism. A mixture of widely used pesticides can, in a predictable manner, produce combined AR antagonist effects that exceed the responses elicited by the most potent component alone. Inasmuch as large populations are regularly exposed to mixtures of antiandrogenic pesticides, our results underline the need for considering combination effects for these substances in regulatory practice.

  13. Effect of long-term treatment with steroid hormones or tamoxifen on the progesterone receptor and androgen receptor in the endometrium of ovariectomized cynomolgus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline J Mark

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The progesterone receptor (PR and androgen receptor (AR belong to the nuclear receptor superfamily. Two isoforms of PR (A and B have been identified with different functions. The expression of AR, each isoform of PR and their involvement in long-term effects on the endometrium after hormonal replacement therapy (HRT or tamoxifen (TAM treatment is not known. The aims of this study were to determine PR(A+B, PRB and AR distribution by immunohistochemistry in the macaque (Macaca fascicularis endometrium. Ovariectomized (OVX animals were orally treated continuously for 35 months with either conjugated equine estrogens (CEE; medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA; the combination of CEE/MPA; or TAM. Treatment with CEE/MPA tended to down-regulate PR in the superficial glands, but increased it in the stroma. TAM treatment increased both the PR and PRB levels in the stroma. Overall, less than 20% of the cells were positive for the PRB isoform and less variation was observed after steroid treatment. AR was found in the stroma, mainly distributed in the basal layer of the endometrium in the OVX and steroid treated groups, but was absent in the TAM treated group. No AR was found in the glandular epithelium. The present data show that long-term hormone treatment affects the PR level, and also the ratio between PRA and PRB in the endometrium.

  14. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β counteracts ligand-independent activity of the androgen receptor in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie V Schütz

    Full Text Available In order to generate genomic signals, the androgen receptor (AR has to be transported into the nucleus upon androgenic stimuli. However, there is evidence from in vitro experiments that in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC cells the AR is able to translocate into the nucleus in a ligand-independent manner. The recent finding that inhibition of the glycogen-synthase-kinase 3β (GSK-3β induces a rapid nuclear export of the AR in androgen-stimulated prostate cancer cells prompted us to analyze the effects of a GSK-3β inhibition in the castration-resistant LNCaP sublines C4-2 and LNCaP-SSR. Both cell lines exhibit high levels of nuclear AR in the absence of androgenic stimuli. Exposure of these cells to the maleimide SB216763, a potent GSK-3β inhibitor, resulted in a rapid nuclear export of the AR even under androgen-deprived conditions. Moreover, the ability of C4-2 and LNCaP-SSR cells to grow in the absence of androgens was diminished after pharmacological inhibition of GSK-3β in vitro. The ability of SB216763 to modulate AR signalling and function in CRPC in vivo was additionally demonstrated in a modified chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay after systemic delivery of SB216763. Our data suggest that inhibition of GSK-3β helps target the AR for export from the nucleus thereby diminishing the effects of mislocated AR in CRPC cells. Therefore, inhibition of GSK-3β could be an interesting new strategy for the treatment of CRPC.

  15. Androgen Receptor Antagonists and Anti-Prostate Cancer Activities of Some Newly Synthesized Substituted Fused Pyrazolo-, Triazolo- and Thiazolo-Pyrimidine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh A. Bahashwan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted pyrazole, triazole and thiazole derivatives (2–13 were synthesized from 1-(naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylhydrazine as starting material and evaluated as androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer agents. The newly synthesized compounds showed potent androgen receptor antagonists and anti-prostate cancer activities with low toxicity (lethal dose 50 (LD50 comparable to Bicalutamide as reference drug. The structures of newly synthesized compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and MS spectral data and elemental analysis. The detailed synthesis, spectroscopic data, LD50 values and pharmacological activities of the synthesized compounds are reported.

  16. Fractionated Ocimum gratissimum leaf extract inhibit prostate cancer (PC3·AR) cells growth by reducing androgen receptor and survivin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekunwe, Stephen I; Hall, Sakeli M; Luo, Xuan; Wang, Hengshan; Begonia, Gregorio B

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the antiproliferative activity of the organic solvent-soluble and aqueous extracts of Ocimum gratissimum leaf against the prostate cancer cells PC3·AR were evaluated by their inhibitory effects on the Androgen Receptor (AR) and Survivin protein. Two organic solvent-soluble extracts P2 and P3-2, and a water- soluble extract, PS/PT1, were found to reduce AR and Survivin levels in a time-dependent manner. In addition, extract PS/PT1, also exhibited the inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent manner. This is the first time that the inhibitory eff ects of O. gratissimum extracts have been evaluated on the Androgen Receptor (AR) and Survivin protein. The results encouraged the further studies of O. gratissimum as a potential treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR)?IL12A Signal Enhances Efficacy of Sorafenib Plus NK Cells-Immunotherapy to Better Suppress HCC Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Liang; LIN, HUI; Li, Gonghui; Jin, Ren-An; Xu, Junjie; Sun, Yin; Ma, Wen-Lung; Yeh, Shuyuan; Cai, Xiujun; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    Gender disparity has long been considered as a key to fully understand hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. At the same time, immunotherapy related to interleukin-12 still need more investigation before being applied in clinical settings. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of androgen receptor (AR) on natural killer (NK) cells related innate immune surveillance in liver cancer, and provide a novel therapeutic approach to suppress HCC via altering IL-12A. By using in ...

  18. GTG mutation in the start codon of the androgen receptor gene in a family of horses with 64,XY disorder of sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révay, T; Villagómez, D A F; Brewer, D; Chenier, T; King, W A

    2012-01-01

    Genetic sex in mammals is determined by the sex chromosomal composition of the zygote. The X and Y chromosomes are responsible for numerous factors that must work in close concert for the proper development of a healthy sexual phenotype. The role of androgens in case of XY chromosomal constitution is crucial for normal male sex differentiation. The intracellular androgenic action is mediated by the androgen receptor (AR), and its impaired function leads to a myriad of syndromes with severe clinical consequences, most notably androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer. In this paper, we investigated the possibility that an alteration of the equine AR gene explains a recently described familial XY, SRY + disorder of sex development. We uncovered a transition in the first nucleotide of the AR start codon (c.1A>G). To our knowledge, this represents the first causative AR mutation described in domestic animals. It is also a rarely observed mutation in eukaryotes and is unique among the >750 entries of the human androgen receptor mutation database. In addition, we found another quiet missense mutation in exon 1 (c.322C>T). Transcription of AR was confirmed by RT-PCR amplification of several exons. Translation of the full-length AR protein from the initiating GTG start codon was confirmed by Western blot using N- and C-terminal-specific antibodies. Two smaller peptides (25 and 14 amino acids long) were identified from the middle of exon 1 and across exons 5 and 6 by mass spectrometry. Based upon our experimental data and the supporting literature, it appears that the AR is expressed as a full-length protein and in a functional form, and the observed phenotype is the result of reduced AR protein expression levels. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A Naturally-Derived Small Molecule Disrupts Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Karishma S.; Jagadeesh, Shankar; Baishya, Gakul; Rao, Paruchuri G.; Barua, Nabin C.; Bhattacharya, Samir; Banerjee, Partha P.

    2014-01-01

    Continued reliance on androgen receptor (AR) signaling is a hallmark of prostate cancer, including the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), making it an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer treatment. Mahanine is a novel carbazole alkaloid derived from the leaves of Murraya koenigii, commonly known as the curry leaf plant, which grows widely across East Asia. We show here that mahanine possesses the ability to inhibit ligand-dependent and ligand-independent AR transactivation, leading to a prominent decline in AR target gene expression. Mahanine treatment causes a time- and dose- dependent decline in AR protein levels, including truncated AR splice variants, in a panel of androgen-responsive and androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. The decrease in AR levels induced by mahanine occurs post-translationally by proteasomal degradation, without any change in AR gene expression. Mahanine treatment induces an outward movement of the AR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, leading to an initial rise in cytoplasmic AR levels, followed by a gradual decline in the AR levels in both cellular compartments. Ligand-induced AR phosphorylation at Ser-81, a phospho-site associated with prostate cancer cell growth and AR transactivity, is greatly diminished in the presence of mahanine. The decline in AR phosphorylation at Ser-81 by mahanine occurs via the inactivation of mitotic kinase, CDK1. Collectively, our data demonstrate that mahanine strongly disrupts androgen receptor signaling and inhibits the growth of androgen-dependent and –independent prostate cancer cells, thereby implicating a therapeutic role for mahanine in prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24258347

  20. Stilbene induced inhibition of androgen receptor dimerization: implications for AR and ARΔLBD-signalling in human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Streicher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is often characterized by an increase of C-terminally truncated, constitutively active androgen receptor (AR variants. Due to the absence of a ligand binding domain located in the AR-C-terminus, these receptor variants (also termed ARΔLBD are unable to respond to all classical forms of endocrine treatments like surgical/chemical castration and/or application of anti-androgens. METHODOLOGY: In this study we tested the effects of the naturally occurring stilbene resveratrol (RSV and (E-4-(2, 6-Difluorostyryl-N, N-dimethylaniline, a fluorinated dialkylaminostilbene (FIDAS on AR- and ARΔLBD in prostate cancer cells. The ability of the compounds to modulate transcriptional activity of AR and the ARΔLBD-variant Q640X was shown by reporter gene assays. Expression of endogenous AR and ARΔLBD mRNA and protein levels were determined by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Nuclear translocation of AR-molecules was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. AR and ARΔLBD/Q640X homo-/heterodimer formation was assessed by mammalian two hybrid assays. Biological activity of both compounds in vivo was demonstrated using a chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay. RESULTS: The stilbenes RSV and FIDAS were able to significantly diminish AR and Q640X-signalling. Successful inhibition of the Q640X suggests that RSV and FIDAS are not interfering with the AR-ligand binding domain like all currently available anti-hormonal drugs. Repression of AR and Q640X-signalling by RSV and FIDAS in prostate cancer cells was caused by an inhibition of the AR and/or Q640X-dimerization. Although systemic bioavailability of both stilbenes is very low, both compounds were also able to downregulate tumor growth and AR-signalling in vivo. CONCLUSION: RSV and FIDAS are able to inhibit the dimerization of AR and ARΔLBD molecules suggesting that stilbenes might serve as lead compounds for a novel generation of AR-inhibitors.

  1. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men...... 'andropause' has been suggested. However, testosterone levels show no or only modest variation with age in men; with large prospective studies suggesting a maximal decline of total testosterone of 1.6% per year. Thus, in contrast to the sudden arrest of gonadal activity in females around menopause, men do...... not have an andropause. As large placebo-controlled studies of androgen treatment in elderly males are lacking, proper risk assessment of adverse effects such as prostate cancer following testosterone treatment in elderly males is completely lacking. In the future, testosterone therapy may prove beneficial...

  2. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Jakobsen, Marianne Antonius; Brusgaard, Klaus; Tan, Qihua; Gaster, Michael

    2014-09-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls. Glucose transport in myotubes was comparable in patients with PCOS vs. controls and was unchanged by testosterone treatment (p=0.21 PCOS vs. controls). These results suggest that testosterone treatment of myotubes increases the aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression without affecting insulin sensitivity and if testosterone is implicated in muscular insulin resistance in PCOS, this is by and indirect mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. INFERTILITY IN MEN WITH PRIMARY HYPOGONADOTROPIC HYPOGONADISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Zhukov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an analysis data on the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of male sterility with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Examination of the patients requires attention of urologist, andrologist, endocrinologist, neurosurgeon, medical geneticist. Clinical case, described by us, shows the necessity of development of a unified algorithm for working with these patients and search for effective and safe treatment of patients with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism

  4. A Network Investigation on Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH is a rare condition in which puberty does not take place naturally. We aimed to develop and follow an internet-based cohort and to improve our understanding of the disease. We established an internet-based questionnaire survey. A total of 74 male IHH patients were recruited from the Chinese largest IHH network social group. The clinical symptoms before treatment mainly included small testis, underdeveloped secondary sexual characteristics, and sexual dysfunction. After treatment, the penis length, testicular volume, external genital organ development, pubic hair, beard, laryngeal prominence, erection, and spermatorrhea were improved significantly (P<0.001. 18.9% of the patients completed fertility; however, more than half of the patients still complained of poor happiness and low physical strength. In addition, improvements in penis and pubic hair development, testosterone normalization and the physical strength in IHH patients who received gonadotropin and androgen replacement therapy were better than in those who received single gonadotropin therapy (P<0.05 for all. In conclusion, disease-specific network investigation can be used as an alternative method of medical research for rare diseases. The results of our cross-sectional study showed the effectiveness of hormone replacement therapy for IHH and implied that gonadotropin and androgen replacement therapy may be superior to gonadotropin treatment alone.

  5. Testosterone treatment of hypogonadal men participating in competitive sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooren, L J; Behre, H M

    2008-06-01

    Testosterone has a steeply dose-dependent effect on muscle mass and strength irrespective of gonadal status. So, for reasons of fairness, people who engage in competitive sports should not administer exogenous testosterone raising their blood testosterone levels beyond the range of normal. There is a ban on exogenous androgens for men and women in sports, but an exception has been made for men with androgen deficiency due to pituitary or testicular disease. Men who receive testosterone administration for the indication hypogonadism have an interest in the use of testosterone preparations generating blood testosterone levels within the normal range of healthy, eugonadal men. On the grounds of a positive correlation between blood testosterone concentrations muscle and volume/strength, they are best served with a parenteral testosterone preparation, rather than transdermal testosterone, but they should not run the risk of being excluded from competition because of supraphysiological testosterone levels. The latter is a realistic risk with the traditional parenteral testosterone esters. The new parenteral testosterone undecanoate preparation offers much better perspectives. Its pharmacokinetics have been investigated in detail and there is a fair degree of predictability of resulting blood testosterone levels with use of this preparation.

  6. Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops on androgen receptors of lacrimal gland cells of castrated rats with dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Quan-Long; Tan, Han-Yu; Zhang, Jing-Rong

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops in basic tears secretory volume, tear film stability, expression of androgen receptors (AR) in castrated rats with dry eye, and to investigate the therapeutic effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis on dry eye caused by gonadal hormones level imbalance. Forty-five Wistar masculinity rats were divided at random into nine groups, including normal groups (A1, A2 and A3); model groups (B1, B2 and B3); therapy groups with extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops (C1, C2 and C3). The "1" stood for being fed for 1 month, and "2" for 2 months, and "3" for 3 months. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy on groups B and C. Group C was treated with Buddleja officinalis extract eye drops for one month. All rats were checked with Schirmer I test (SIT) and tear film break-up time (BUT). Expression of AR was analyzed by flow cytometer (FCM). The SIT value of group C was significantly higher than that of group B (PBuddleja officinalis is the flavonoids that can significantly inhibit happening of dry eye of rat after androgen level lowered. Its mechanism is like androgen's and it can display androgen-like activity to keep basic tears secretory volume and tear film stability.

  7. Negative association between androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism and polycystic ovary syndrome? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Xiong, Ting; Wang, Di; Azziz, Ricardo; Zhang, Hanwang

    2012-01-01

    A number of studies focusing on the association between the exon 1 CAG repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor (AR) gene and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have revealed conflicting results. The current systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the strength of the association and to explore potential sources of heterogeneity that may have influenced the results. Studies matched to search terms from PubMed, EMBASE and HuGE Navigator published through to 31 January 2012 were retrieved. Data extraction from the included studies was carried out by two authors independently. Weighted mean differences (WMDs) of biallelic mean and odds ratios (ORs) of alleles and genotypes were pooled for meta-analysis. Sixteen articles reporting on 17 studies were included. In continuous data analysis, the summary WMD was −0.06 (95% confidence interval −0.29 to 0.16). In dichotomous data analysis, we divided the alleles into short and long alleles and calculated the summary ORs. No statistically significant results were identified by different comparison models or different cut-off point definitions. No publication bias was observed in continuous and dichotomous data analysis. In summary, the current systematic review and meta-analysis found that the AR CAG microsatellite repeat polymorphism is unlikely to be a major determining factor in the development of PCOS. PMID:22695532

  8. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Saeid Reza; Galehdari, Hamid; Rasekh, Abdorrahman; Mombeini, Hayat; Konar, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Background The androgen receptor (AR) gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (N- TAD). We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12) of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdele- tions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12) patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26) and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25) in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%), while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%). Conclusion Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. PMID:26246877

  9. Baldness and the androgen receptor: the AR polyglycine repeat polymorphism does not confer susceptibility to androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Cobb, Joanna E; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Duncan, Anna E; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complex condition with a strong heritable component. In 2001, we published the first significant evidence of a genetic association between baldness and a synonymous coding SNP (rs6152) in the androgen receptor gene, AR. Recently, this finding was replicated in three independent studies, confirming an important role for AR in the baldness phenotype. In one such replication study, it was claimed that the causative variant underlying the association was likely to be the polyglycine (GGN) repeat polymorphism, one of two apparently functional triplet repeat polymorphisms located in the exon 1 transactivating domain of the gene. Here, we extend our original association finding and present comprehensive evidence from approximately 1,200 fathers and sons drawn from 703 families of the Victorian Family Heart Study, a general population Caucasian cohort, that neither exon 1 triplet repeat polymorphism is causative in this condition. Seventy-eight percent of fathers (531/683) and 30% of sons (157/520) were affected to some degree with AGA. We utilised statistical methods appropriate for the categorical nature of the phenotype and familial structure of the cohort, and determined that whilst SNP rs6152 was strongly associated with baldness (P baldness, but also for the many other complex conditions that have thus far been linked to AR.

  10. Androgen Receptor Phosphorylation at Serine 308 and Serine 791 Predicts Enhanced Survival in Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Underwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that AR phosphorylation at serine 213 was associated with poor outcome and may contribute to prostate cancer development and progression. This study investigates if specific AR phosphorylation sites have differing roles in the progression of hormone naïve prostate cancer (HNPC to castrate resistant disease (CRPC. A panel of phosphospecific antibodies were employed to study AR phosphorylation in 84 matched HNPC and CRPC tumours. Immunohistochemistry measured Androgen receptor expression phosphorylated at serine residues 94 (pAR94, 308 (pAR308, 650(pAR650 and 791 (pAR791. No correlations with clinical parameters were observed for pAR94 or pAR650 in HNPC or CRPC tumours. In contrast to our previous observation with serine 213, high pAR308 is significantly associated with a longer time to disease specific death (p = 0.011 and high pAR791 expression significantly associated with a longer time to disease recurrence (p = 0.018 in HNPC tumours and longer time to death from disease recurrence (p = 0.040 in CRPC tumours. This observation in CRPC tumours was attenuated in high apoptotic tumours (p = 0.022 and low proliferating tumours (p = 0.004. These results demonstrate that understanding the differing roles of AR phosphorylation is necessary before this can be exploited as a target for castrate resistant prostate cancer.

  11. Inability of NCoR/SMRT to repress androgen receptor transcriptional activity in prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laschak, Martin; Bechtel, Marina; Spindler, Klaus-Dieter; Hessenauer, Andrea

    2011-10-01

    The molecular mechanisms leading to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are poorly understood. Among several mechanisms leading to CRPC growth a dysregulation of androgen receptor (AR) co-regulators (i.e. up-regulation of co-activators or down-regulation of co-repressors) is discussed. There are numerous reports demonstrating an increased expression of co-activators during prostate cancer progression. On the contrary, the impact of co-repressors on tumor growth and development is less clear. In this study we compared the effects of two known co-repressors, NCoR and SMRT, on AR transcriptional activity in prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines and compared them to that in COS-1 cells. Interestingly, we found that NCoR/SMRT overexpression did not repress AR-dependent gene expression in the PCa cell lines, but rather activated it. This finding is probably due to an impaired AR-co-repressor interaction in the prostate cancer cell lines. In conclusion, we provide evidence that up-regulation of NCoR or SMRT may increase transcriptional activity of the AR in a cell type-specific context.

  12. Assessment of Correlation between Androgen Receptor CAG Repeat Length and Infertility in Infertile Men Living in Khuzestan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Reza Khatami

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The androgen receptor (AR gene contains a polymorphic trinucleotide repeat that encodes a polyglutamine tract in its N-terminal transactivation domain (NTAD. We aimed to find a correlation between the length of this polymorphic tract and azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study during two years till 2010, we searched for microdeletions in the Y chromosome in 84 infertile male patients with normal karyotype who lived in Khuzestan Province, Southwest of Iran. All cases (n=12 of azoospermia or oligozoospermia resulting from Y chromosome microdeletions were excluded from our study. The number of CAG repeats in exon 1 of the AR gene was determined in 72 patients with azoospermia or oligozoospermia and in 72 fertile controls, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results: Microdeletions were detected in 14.3% (n=12 patients suffering severe oligozoospermia. The mean CAG repeat length was 18.99 ± 0.35 (range, 11-26 and 19.96 ± 0.54 (range, 12-25 in infertile males and controls, respectively. Also in the infertile group, the most common allele was 19 (26.38%, while in controls, it was 25 (22.22%. Conclusion: Y chromosome microdeletions could be one of the main reasons of male infertility living in Khuzestan Province, while there was no correlation between CAG length in AR gene with azoospermia or oligozoospermia in infertile men living in Khuzestan, Iran.

  13. [Effect of epidermal growth factor and testosterone on androgen receptor activation in urethral plate fibroblasts in hypospadias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Junshan; Xie, Cheng; Chen, Ruiqing; Li, Dumiao

    2016-05-01

    To investigate androgen receptor (AR) expression and the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and testosterone on AR expression level.
 EGF or different concentrations of testosterone were incubated with the primary urethral plate fibroblasts from patients with hypospadias. The levels of AR expression in the fibroblasts were detected by immunocytochemical assays and graphical analysis.
 There was no significant difference in AR activation under physiological concentrations (3×10(-8) mol/L) of testosterone between the control and the distal hypospadias group (P>0.05). However, there was a significant decrease in AR activation in the proximal hypospadias group compared to that in the control group (Pdistal hypospadias group>proximal hypospadias group, Phypospadias was improved most obviously when EGF and physiological concentration of testosterone were employed in the urethral plate fibroblasts from hypospadias patients (Phypospadias group than that in the control group (P=0.02).
 AR expression and activation in the urethral plate fibroblasts from hypospadias patients are abnormal. EGF can be used to improve AR activation in fibroblasts from different types of hypospadias, especially in the proximal type.

  14. Strategies for Imaging Androgen Receptor Signaling Pathway in Prostate Cancer: Implications for Hormonal Manipulation and Radiation Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravina Giovanni Luca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (Pca is a heterogeneous disease; its etiology appears to be related to genetic and epigenetic factors. Radiotherapy and hormone manipulation are effective treatments, but many tumors will progress despite these treatments. Molecular imaging provides novel opportunities for image-guided optimization and management of these treatment modalities. Here we reviewed the advances in targeted imaging of key biomarkers of androgen receptor signaling pathways. A computerized search was performed to identify all relevant studies in Medline up to 2013. There are well-known limitations and inaccuracies of current imaging approaches for monitoring biological changes governing tumor progression. The close integration of molecular biology and clinical imaging could ease the development of new molecular imaging agents providing novel tools to monitor a number of biological events that, until a few years ago, were studied by conventional molecular assays. Advances in translational research may represent the next step in improving the oncological outcome of men with Pca who remain at high risk for systemic failure. This aim may be obtained by combining the anatomical properties of conventional imaging modalities with biological information to better predict tumor response to conventional treatments.

  15. Receptors for Insulin-Like Growth Factor-2 and Androgens as Therapeutic Targets in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalo Hamilton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC occurs in 10–15% of all breast cancer patients, yet it accounts for about half of all breast cancer deaths. There is an urgent need to identify new antitumor targets to provide additional treatment options for patients afflicted with this aggressive disease. Preclinical evidence suggests a critical role for insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF2 and androgen receptor (AR in regulating TNBC progression. To advance this work, a panel of TNBC cell lines was investigated with all cell lines showing significant expression of IGF2. Treatment with IGF2 stimulated cell proliferation in vitro (p < 0.05. Importantly, combination treatments with IGF1R inhibitors BMS-754807 and NVP-AEW541 elicited significant inhibition of TNBC cell proliferation (p < 0.001. Based on Annexin-V binding assays, BMS-754807, NVP-AEW541 and enzalutamide induced TNBC cell death (p < 0.005. Additionally, combination of enzalutamide with BMS-754807 or NVP-AEW541 exerted significant reductions in TNBC proliferation even in cells with low AR expression (p < 0.001. Notably, NVP-AEW541 and BMS-754807 reduced AR levels in BT549 TNBC cells. These results provide evidence that IGF2 promotes TNBC cell viability and proliferation, while inhibition of IGF1R/IR and AR pathways contribute to blockade of TNBC proliferation and promotion of apoptosis in vitro.

  16. Heterogeneity of triple-negative breast cancer: mammographic, US, and MR imaging features according to androgen receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Min Sun; Song, Sung Eun; Kim, Won Hwa; Lee, Su Hyun; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Yeon; Park, In-Ae [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Wonshik; Noh, Dong-Young [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-16

    Our aim was to determine whether triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) with and without androgen receptor (AR) expression have distinguishing imaging features on mammography, breast ultrasound (US), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. AR expression was assessed immunohistochemically in 125 patients with TNBC from a consecutive series of 1,086 operable invasive breast cancers. Two experienced radiologists blinded to clinicopathological findings reviewed all imaging studies in consensus using the BI-RADS lexicon. The imaging and pathological features of 33 AR-positive TNBCs were compared with those of 92 AR-negative TNBCs. The presence of mammographic calcifications with or without a mass (p < 0.001), non-mass enhancement on MR imaging (p < 0.001), and masses with irregular shape or spiculated margins on US (p < 0.001 and p = 0.002) and MR imaging (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001) were significantly associated with AR-positive TNBC. Compared with AR-negative TNBC, AR-positive TNBC was more likely to have a ductal carcinoma in situ component (59.8 % vs. 90.9 %, p = 0.001) and low Ki-67 expression (30.4 % vs. 51.5 %, p = 0.030). AR-positive and AR-negative TNBCs have different imaging features, and certain imaging findings can be useful to predict AR status in TNBC. (orig.)

  17. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of the selective androgen receptor modulator GTx-024(Enobosarm) with itraconazole, rifampin, probenecid, celecoxib and rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2016-08-01

    GTx-024 (also known as enobosarm) is a first in class selective androgen receptor modulator being developed for diverse indications in oncology. Preclinical studies of GTx-024 supported the evaluation of several potential drug-drug interactions in a clinical setting. A series of open-label Phase I GTx-024 drug-drug interaction studies were designed to interrogate potential interactions with CYP3A4 inhibitor (itraconazole), a CYP3A4 inducer (rifampin), a pan-UGT inhibitor (probenecid), a CYP2C9 substrate (celecoxib) and a BCRP substrate (rosuvastatin). The plasma pharmacokinetics of GTx-024, its major metabolite (GTx-024 glucuronide), and each substrate were characterized in detail. Itraconazole administration had no effect on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics. Likewise, GTx-024 administration did not significantly change the pharmacokinetics of celecoxib or rosuvastatin. Rifampin administration had the largest impact on GTx-024 pharmacokinetics of any co-administered agent and reduced the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) by 23 % and the area under the curve (AUC∞) by 43 %. Probenecid had a complex interaction with GTx-024 whereby both GTx-024 plasma levels and GTx-024 glucuronide plasma levels (AUC∞) were increased by co-administration of the UGT inhibitor (50 and 112 %, respectively). Overall, GTx-024 was well tolerated and poses very little risk of generating clinically relevant drug-drug interactions.

  18. Durable Expression of Minicircle DNA-Liposome-Delivered Androgen Receptor cDNA in Mice with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-You Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The most common gene-based cancer therapies involve the suppression of oncogenic molecules and enhancement of the expression of tumor-suppressor genes. Studies in noncancer disease animal models have shown that minicircle (MC DNA vectors are easy to deliver and that the proteins from said MC-carrying DNA vectors are expressed over a long period of time. However, delivery of therapeutic genes via a liposome-mediated, MC DNA complex has never been tested in vascular-rich hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Liposome-mediated DNA delivery exhibits high in vivo transfection efficiency and minimal systemic immune response, thereby allowing for repetitive interventions. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of delivering an MC-liposome vector containing a 3.2 kb androgen receptor (AR; HCC metastasis suppressor cDNA into Hepatitis B Virus- (HBV- induced HCC mouse livers. Results. Protein expression and promoter luciferase assays revealed that liposome-encapsulated MC-AR resulted in abundant functional expression of AR protein (100 kD for up to two weeks. The AR cDNA was also successfully delivered into normal livers and diseased livers, where it was persistently expressed. In both normal livers and livers with tumors, the expression of AR was detectable for up to 60 days. Conclusion. Our results show that an MC/liposome delivery system might improve the efficacy of gene therapy in patients with HCC.

  19. Curcumin promotes the apoptosis of human endometrial carcinoma cells by downregulating the expression of androgen receptor through Wnt signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, W; Yang, C X; Zhang, L; Fang, Y; Yan, M

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to explore the effect ofcurcumin on androgen receptor (AR) expression in endometrial carcinoma cells, as well as the underlying mechanisms. Endometrial carcinoma cells were treated with curcumin (10, 50, and 100 micromol/l) for 12, 24, and 48 hours. Their growth curves were drawn using MTT assays and their apoptotic rates were determined using flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression of AR was detected using PCR and that of the Wnt signal related nucleopro- tein beta-cantenin was observed using western blot analysis. The influence of beta-cantenin on the action of curcumin was observed. Curcumin downregulated the proliferation and apoptosis of human endometrial carcinoma cells in concentration and time-dependent manners. It downregulated the expression of AR and beta-cantenin in the cells. rWnt3a partially cancelled the effects of curcumin on the proliferation and apoptosis of human endometrial carcinoma cells as well as the AR expression-downregulating effect of curcumin. Curcumin inhibits the proliferation and apoptosis of human endometrial carcinoma cells by downregulating their AR expression through the Wnt signal pathway.

  20. Androgen receptor gene (CAG)n repeat analysis in the differential diagnosis between Kennedy disease and other motoneuron disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferlini, A.; Patrosso, M.C.; Repetto, M. [Instituto di Tecnologie Biomediche Avanzate CNR, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    An increase in the number of (CAG)n repeats in the first coding exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been strongly associated with Kennedy disease (KD) (spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy). This is an X-linked hereditary disorder characterized by motoneuron degeneration occurring in adults together with gnecomastia and hyperestrogenemia. We have performed AR gene molecular analysis in several members of a large family with KD as well as in 26 sporadic patients suffering from heterogeneous motoneuron disease (MND). An increase in the length of the (CAG)n repeats was detected, as expected, in all the affected males and in obligatory carrier females, some of which had minor signs of lower motoneuron involvement. There was only one possible exception, one young male with initial signs of the disease, who had an apparent normal length allele. An increased pathological allele was also found in 3 patients with MND. This indicates that the analysis of (CAG)n repeats of the AR gene plays a role in the differential diagnosis of this heterogeneous group of neurological diseases. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Musculoskeletal and prostate effects of combined testosterone and finasteride administration in older hypogonadal men: a randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Stephen E; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Nseyo, Unyime; Meuleman, John R; Lipinska, Judyta A; Braith, Randy W; Beck, Darren T; Martin, Jeffrey S; Morrow, Matthew; Roessner, Shirley; Beggs, Luke A; McCoy, Sean C; Cannady, Darryl F; Shuster, Jonathan J

    2014-02-15

    Testosterone acts directly at androgen receptors and also exerts potent actions following 5α-reduction to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Finasteride (type II 5α-reductase inhibitor) lowers DHT and is used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, it is unknown whether elevated DHT mediates either beneficial musculoskeletal effects or prostate enlargement resulting from higher-than-replacement doses of testosterone. Our purpose was to determine whether administration of testosterone plus finasteride to older hypogonadal men could produce musculoskeletal benefits without prostate enlargement. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with a serum testosterone concentration of ≤300 ng/dl or bioavailable testosterone ≤70 ng/dl received 52 wk of treatment with testosterone enanthate (TE; 125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle, paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased upper and lower body muscle strength by 8-14% (P = 0.015 to finasteride did not alter any of these effects. Over 12 mo, testosterone also increased prostate volume 11.4 cm(3) (P = 0.0051), an effect that was completely prevented by finasteride (P = 0.0027). We conclude that a higher-than-replacement TE combined with finasteride significantly increases muscle strength and BMD and reduces body fat without causing prostate enlargement. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT mediates testosterone-induced prostate enlargement but is not required for benefits in musculoskeletal or adipose tissue.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord ameliorate testicular dysfunction in a male rat hypogonadism model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Yuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deficiency is a physical disorder that not only affects adults but can also jeopardize children′s health. Because there are many disadvantages to using traditional androgen replacement therapy, we have herein attempted to explore the use of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of androgen deficiency. We transplanted CM-Dil-labeled human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells into the testes of an ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS-induced male rat hypogonadism model. Twenty-one days after transplantation, we found that blood testosterone levels in the therapy group were higher than that of the control group (P = 0.037, and using immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry, we observed that some of the CM-Dil-labeled cells expressed Leydig cell markers for cytochrome P450, family 11, subfamily A, polypeptide 1, and 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. We then recovered these cells and observed that they were still able to proliferate in vitro. The present study shows that mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord may constitute a promising therapeutic modality for the treatment of male hypogonadism patients.

  3. Treadmill Slope Modulates Inflammation, Fiber Type Composition, Androgen, and Glucocorticoid Receptors in the Skeletal Muscle of Overtrained Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson L. da Rocha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Overtraining (OT may be defined as an imbalance between excessive training and adequate recovery period. Recently, a downhill running-based overtraining (OTR/down protocol induced the nonfunctional overreaching state, which is defined as a performance decrement that may be associated with psychological and hormonal disruptions and promoted intramuscular and systemic inflammation. To discriminate the eccentric contraction effects on interleukin 1beta (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-15, and SOCS-3, we compared the release of these cytokines in OTR/down with other two OT protocols with the same external load (i.e., the product between training intensity and volume, but performed in uphill (OTR/up and without inclination (OTR. Also, we evaluated the effects of these OT models on the muscle morphology and fiber type composition, serum levels of fatigue markers and corticosterone, as well as androgen receptor (AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressions. For extensor digitorum longus (EDL, OTR/down and OTR groups increased the cytokines and exhibited micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. While OTR/down group increased the cytokines in soleus muscle, OTR/up group only increased IL-6. All OT groups presented micro-injuries with polymorphonuclear infiltration. In serum, while OTR/down and OTR/up protocols increased IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, OTR group increased IL-1β, IL-6, IL-15, and corticosterone. The type II fibers in EDL and soleus, total and phosphorylated AR levels in soleus, and total GR levels in EDL and soleus were differentially modulated by the OT protocols. In summary, the proinflammatory cytokines were more sensitive for OTR/down than for OTR/up and OTR. Also, the specific treadmill inclination of each OT model influenced most of the other evaluated parameters.

  4. Competitive Androgen Receptor Antagonism as a Factor Determining the Predictability of Cumulative Antiandrogenic Effects of Widely Used Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosivatz, Erika; Scholze, Martin; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many pesticides in current use have recently been revealed as in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, but information about their combined effects is lacking. Objective: We investigated the combined effects and the competitive AR antagonism of pesticide mixtures. Methods: We used the MDA-kb2 assay to test a combination of eight AR antagonists that did not also possess AR agonist properties (“pure” antagonists; 8 mix: fludioxonil, fenhexamid, ortho-phenylphenol, imazalil, tebuconazole, dimethomorph, methiocarb, pirimiphos-methyl), a combination of five AR antagonists that also showed agonist activity (5 mix: cyprodinil, pyrimethanil, vinclozolin, chlorpropham, linuron), and all pesticides combined (13 mix). We used concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) to formulate additivity expectations, and Schild plot analyses to investigate competitive AR antagonism. Results: A good agreement between the effects of the mixture of eight “pure” AR antagonists and the responses predicted by CA was observed. Schild plot analysis revealed that the 8 mix acted by competitive AR antagonism. However, the observed responses of the 5 mix and the 13 mix fell within the “prediction window” boundaries defined by the predicted regression curves of CA and IA. Schild plot analysis with these mixtures yielded anomalous responses incompatible with competitive receptor antagonism. Conclusions: A mixture of widely used pesticides can, in a predictable manner, produce combined AR antagonist effects that exceed the responses elicited by the most potent component alone. Inasmuch as large populations are regularly exposed to mixtures of antiandrogenic pesticides, our results underline the need for considering combination effects for these substances in regulatory practice. PMID:23008280

  5. Dihydrotestostenone increase the gene expression of androgen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The actions of androgens are mediated through an androgen receptor (AR), and AR activity is modulated by coregulators. The aim of this study was to assess the action of androgens in the expression of AR and the coregulators FHL-2 and SHP-1 in human non-transformed epithelial prostatic cells (HNTEP) treated with ...

  6. Micro-RNA-204 Participates in TMPRSS2/ERG Regulation and Androgen Receptor Reprogramming in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorova, Krassimira; Metodiev, Metodi V; Metodieva, Gergana; Mincheff, Milcho; Fernández, Nelson; Hayrabedyan, Soren

    2017-02-01

    Cancer progression is driven by genome instability incurred rearrangements such as transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2)/v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene (ERG) that could possibly turn some of the tumor suppressor micro-RNAs into pro-oncogenic ones. Previously, we found dualistic miR-204 effects, acting either as a tumor suppressor or as an oncomiR in ERG fusion-dependent manner. Here, we provided further evidence for an important role of miR-204 for TMPRSS2/ERG and androgen receptor (AR) signaling modulation and fine tuning that prevents TMPRSS2/ERG overexpression in prostate cancer. Based on proximity-based ligation assay, we designed a novel method for detection of TMPRSS2/ERG protein products. We found that miR-204 is TMPRSS2/ERG oncofusion negative regulator, and this was mediated by DNA methylation of TMPRSS2 promoter. Transcriptional factors runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and ETS proto-oncogene 1 (ETS1) were positive regulators of TMPRSS2/ERG expression and promoter hypo-methylation. Clustering of patients' sera for fusion protein, transcript expression, and wild-type ERG transcript isoforms, demonstrated not all patients harboring fusion transcripts had fusion protein products, and only few fusion positive ones exhibited increased wild-type ERG transcripts. miR-204 upregulated AR through direct promoter hypo-methylation, potentiated by the presence of ERG fusion and RUNX2 and ETS1. Proteomics studies provided evidence that miR-204 has dualistic role in AR cancer-related reprogramming, promoting prostate cancer-related androgen-responsive genes and AR target genes, as well as AR co-regulatory molecules. miR-204 methylation regulation was supported by changes in molecules responsible for chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and its regulation. In summary, miR-204 is a mild regulator of the AR function during the phase of preserved AR sensitivity as the latter one is required for ERG-fusion translocation.

  7. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity is conse......Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity...... is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved...... in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls...

  8. Selective Androgen Receptor Down-Regulators (SARDs): A New Prostate Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    dominant-negative techniques ICI, as an already approved drug, can be rapidly moved to clinical trials in PCa patients. A therapy that down-regulates...Mancini, M. G., Dutertre, M., Smith, C. L., O’Malley, B. W., and Mancini, M. A. FRAP reveals that mobility of oestrogen receptor-alpha is ligand- and...ribozyme, antisense, small interfering RNA, or dominant-negative techniques, ICI, as an already approved drug, can be rapidly moved to clinical trials in

  9. Inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase, receptor binding, and nuclear uptake of androgens in the prostate by a 4-methyl-4-aza-steroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Heiss, C E

    1981-08-10

    17 beta-N,N-Diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one (DMAA) is a potent reversible inhibitor of 5 alpha-reductase. The inhibition by DMAA of the conversion of testosterone to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone by rat prostate 5 alpha-reductase is competitive with testosterone, the apparent Ki being 5 nM, and uncompetitive with NADPH, DMAA inhibited both membrane-bound and solubilized 5 alpha-reductase. DMAA has moderate affinity for the prostate cytosol androgen receptor: 3 X 10(-6) M gives 50% inhibition of the binding of 10(-9) M 5 alpha-[3H]dihydrotestosterone to this receptor. This affinity to the androgen receptor is 1,000-, 500-, 120-, and 40-fold lower than that of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, testosterone, spironolactone, and cyproterone acetate, respectively, and 7-fold higher than that of cimetidine. After incubation of [3H]testosterone with minced prostate, more than 90% of the radioactivity extracted from the nuclei co-chromatographed with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone and the rest with testosterone. DMAA at low concentrations decreased the ratio of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone to testosterone in the nuclei without significantly reducing the total uptake. DMAA at high concentrations also reduced the total radioactivity in the nuclei. This differential effect may reflect a higher affinity of DMAA for 5 alpha-reductase than for the androgen receptor. When 5 alpha-[3H]dihydrotestosterone was used in the tissue incubations, all radioactivity extracted from nuclei co-chromatographed with 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, regardless of whether or not DMAA was present. This nuclear uptake of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone is inhibited only by high concentrations of DMAA. In a cell-free system, the nuclear uptake of 5 alpha-[3H]dihydrotestosterone prebound to the cytosol receptor was not inhibited by DMAA. These results suggest that DMAA may inhibit nuclear uptake of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone by inhibiting the receptor binding. Sucrose gradient centrifugation of

  10. Recovery of spermatogenesis following testosterone replacement therapy or anabolic-androgenic steroid use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Abram McBride

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT for hypogonadism continues to rise, particularly in younger men who may wish to remain fertile. Concurrently, awareness of a more pervasive use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS within the general population has been appreciated. Both TRT and AAS can suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis resulting in diminution of spermatogenesis. Therefore, it is important that clinicians recognize previous TRT or AAS use in patients presenting for infertility treatment. Cessation of TRT or AAS use may result in spontaneous recovery of normal spermatogenesis in a reasonable number of patients if allowed sufficient time for recovery. However, some patients may not recover normal spermatogenesis or tolerate waiting for spontaneous recovery. In such cases, clinicians must be aware of the pathophysiologic derangements of the HPG axis related to TRT or AAS use and the pharmacologic agents available to reverse them. The available agents include injectable gonadotropins, selective estrogen receptor modulators, and aromatase inhibitors, but their off-label use is poorly described in the literature, potentially creating a knowledge gap for the clinician. Reviewing their use clinically for the treatment of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and other HPG axis abnormalities can familiarize the clinician with the manner in which they can be used to recover spermatogenesis after TRT or AAS use.

  11. Higher sexual interest with androgen receptor inhibitor monotherapy than with castration plus an androgen receptor inhibitor in prostate cancer patients treated with curative radiotherapy, but otherwise small health-related quality of life differences: A randomised prospective 18-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Khairul; Nilsson, Sten; Johansson, Hemming; Ullén, Anders; Lennernäs, Bo; Bergenmar, Mia; Brandberg, Yvonne

    2016-09-01

    To prospectively study differences in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with localised/locally advanced prostate cancer (PC) treated with curative intended radiation therapy and randomised to androgen receptor inhibitor monotherapy treatment versus castration plus an androgen receptor inhibitor used continuously. Time to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) relapse, time to symptomatic metastasis and overall survival (OS) were also described for the two groups. From 2005 to 2011, a total of 110 patients were randomised at a ratio of 1:1. HRQoL was assessed at six time points: before randomisation, before radiotherapy (RT) start and 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after randomisation, using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC QLQ-PR25. At the 3-month follow-up, statistically significant differences between the two groups were found for overall quality of life (p = 0.006), fatigue (p = 0.023), sexual interest (p quality of life, role functioning, fatigue, pain, sleeping problems and urinary problems. At that assessment point, clinical differences between the groups were substantial regarding sexual interest and moderate regarding sexual functioning (the latter indicated only by patients reporting having sexual interest at baseline). All statistical and clinical differences favoured the androgen receptor inhibitor monotherapy arm. At 18 months after randomisation, statistically significant differences were found for cognitive functioning (p = 0.040) and sexual interest (p = 0.011), both favouring the androgen receptor inhibitor monotherapy arm. The results suggest that neo-adjuvant androgen receptor inhibitor monotherapy might be preferred compared to castration plus an androgen receptor inhibitor before curative intended RT in men with localised/locally advanced PC, with higher levels of HRQoL, especially concerning sexual interest. HRQoL differences over time

  12. Characterizing Breast Cancer in a Population with Increased Prevalence of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Androgen Receptor and ALDH1 Expression in Ghanaian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Erica; Kidwell, Kelley M; Jiagge, Evelyn; Bensenhaver, Jessica; Awuah, Baffour; Gyan, Kofi; Toy, Kathy; Oppong, Joseph Kwaku; Kyei, Ishmael; Aitpillah, Francis; Osei-Bonsu, Ernest; Adjei, Ernest; Ohene-Yeboah, Michael; Brewer, Robert Newman; Fondjo, Linda Ahenkorah; Owusu-Afriyie, Osei; Wicha, Max; Merajver, Sofia; Kleer, Celina; Newman, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a commonly-expressed hormone receptor in breast cancer and may be a marker of response to targeted anti-androgen therapy, a particularly attractive option for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Gene expression studies suggest that ARs may distinguish a luminal/AR TNBC subtype from stem cell-like subtypes. TNBC frequency is two to three times higher in African American and African breast cancers compared with White American and European breast cancers, yet little is known regarding TNBC subtypes in high-frequency African-ancestry populations. We evaluated ARs and the mammary stem cell marker aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) among breast cancers from Ghana, Africa. Overall, 147 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded invasive breast cancers from the Komfo Anoyke Teaching Hospital in Ghana were studied at the University of Michigan, and analyzed immunohistochemically for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), HER2/neu, ALDH1, and AR expression. The median age of patients was 45 years. Only 31 cases (21 %) were ER-positive, and 14 (10 %) were HER2-positive; 89 (61 %) were TNBCs. For the entire group, 44 % were AR-positive and 45 % were ALDH1-positive. ER/PR-positive tumors were more likely to be AR-positive compared with ER/PR-negative tumors (87 vs. 26 %; p Africa. Surprisingly, ALDH1 was found to correlate with AR expression among TNBC, suggesting that novel TNBC subtypes may exist among populations with African ancestry.

  13. Dehydroepiandrosterone-induces miR-21 transcription in HepG2 cells through estrogen receptor β and androgen receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yun; Litchfield, Lacey M.; Ivanova, Margarita M.; Prough, Russell A.; Clark, Barbara J.; Klinge, Carolyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Although oncomiR miR-21 is highly expressed in liver and overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), its regulation is uncharacterized. We examined the effect of physiologically relevant nanomolar concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulfate (DHEA-S) on miR-21 expression in HepG2 human hepatoma cells. 10 nM DHEA and DHEA-S increase pri-miR-21 transcription in HepG2 cells. Dietary DHEA increased miR-21 in vivo in mouse liver. siRNA and inhibitor studies suggest that DHEA-S requires desulfation for activity and that DHEA-induced pri-miR-21 transcription involves metabolism to androgen and estrogen receptor (AR and ER) ligands. Activation of ERβ and AR by DHEA metabolites androst-5-ene-3,17-dione (ADIONE), androst-5-ene-3β,17β-diol (ADIOL), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and 5α-androstane-3β,17β-diol (3β-Adiol) increased miR-21 transcription. DHEA-induced miR-21 increased cell proliferation and decreased Pdcd4 protein, a bona fide miR-21. Estradiol (E2) inhibited miR-21 expression via ERα. DHEA increased ERβ and AR recruitment to the miR-21 promoter within the VMP1/TMEM49 gene, with possible significance in hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:24845419

  14. CCAR1 promotes chromatin loading of androgen receptor (AR) transcription complex by stabilizing the association between AR and GATA2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seo, Woo-Young; Jeong, Byong Chang; Yu, Eun Ji; Kim, Hwa Jin; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Lim, Joung Eun; Kwon, Ghee Young; Lee, Hyun Moo; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2013-01-01

    .... We further showed that CCAR1 is required for recruitment of AR, MED1 and RNA polymerase II to the enhancers of AR target genes and for androgen-induced long-range prostate specific antigen enhancer-promoter interaction...

  15. The 11S Proteasomal Activator REGγ Impacts Polyglutamine-Expanded Androgen Receptor Aggregation and Motor Neuron Viability through Distinct Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M. Yersak

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by expression of a polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded androgen receptor (AR. The inefficient nuclear proteasomal degradation of the mutant AR results in the formation of nuclear inclusions containing amino-terminal fragments of the mutant AR. PA28γ (also referred to as REGγ is a nuclear 11S-proteasomal activator with limited proteasome activation capabilities compared to its cytoplasmic 11S (PA28α, PA28β counterparts. To clarify the role of REGγ in polyQ-expanded AR metabolism, we carried out genetic and biochemical studies in cell models of SBMA. Overexpression of REGγ in a PC12 cell model of SBMA increased polyQ-expanded AR aggregation and contributed to polyQ-expanded AR toxicity in the presence of dihydrotestosterone (DHT. These effects of REGγ were independent of its association with the proteasome and may be due, in part, to the decreased binding of polyQ-expanded AR by the E3 ubiquitin-ligase MDM2. Unlike its effects in PC12 cells, REGγ overexpression rescued transgenic SBMA motor neurons from DHT-induced toxicity in a proteasome binding-dependent manner, suggesting that the degradation of a specific 11S proteasome substrate or substrates promotes motor neuron viability. One potential substrate that we found to play a role in mutant AR toxicity is the splicing factor SC35. These studies reveal that, depending on the cellular context, two biological roles for REGγ impact cell viability in the face of polyQ-expanded AR; a proteasome binding-independent mechanism directly promotes mutant AR aggregation while a proteasome binding-dependent mechanism promotes cell viability. The balance between these functions likely determines REGγ effects on polyQ-expanded AR-expressing cells.

  16. Genomic androgen receptor-occupied regions with different functions, defined by histone acetylation, coregulators and transcriptional capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR is a steroid-activated transcription factor that binds at specific DNA locations and plays a key role in the etiology of prostate cancer. While numerous studies have identified a clear connection between AR binding and expression of target genes for a limited number of loci, high-throughput elucidation of these sites allows for a deeper understanding of the complexities of this process.We have mapped 189 AR occupied regions (ARORs and 1,388 histone H3 acetylation (AcH3 loci to a 3% continuous stretch of human genomic DNA using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP microarray analysis. Of 62 highly reproducible ARORs, 32 (52% were also marked by AcH3. While the number of ARORs detected in prostate cancer cells exceeded the number of nearby DHT-responsive genes, the AcH3 mark defined a subclass of ARORs much more highly associated with such genes -- 12% of the genes flanking AcH3+ARORs were DHT-responsive, compared to only 1% of genes flanking AcH3-ARORs. Most ARORs contained enhancer activities as detected in luciferase reporter assays. Analysis of the AROR sequences, followed by site-directed ChIP, identified binding sites for AR transcriptional coregulators FoxA1, CEBPbeta, NFI and GATA2, which had diverse effects on endogenous AR target gene expression levels in siRNA knockout experiments.We suggest that only some ARORs function under the given physiological conditions, utilizing diverse mechanisms. This diversity points to differential regulation of gene expression by the same transcription factor related to the chromatin structure.

  17. A feed-forward regulatory loop between androgen receptor and PlncRNA-1 promotes prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ziyu; Xu, Chen; Li, Yaoming; Cai, Xiaobing; Ren, Shancheng; Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue; Wang, Fubo; Chen, Rui; Qu, Min; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Yasheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Xiaolei; Yao, Jingjing; Gao, Xu; Hou, Jianguo; Xu, Chuanliang; Sun, Yinghao

    2016-04-28

    We previously reported that PlncRNA-1, a long non-coding RNA that is up-regulated in prostate cancer (PCa), affects the proliferation and apoptosis of PCa cells. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that long non-coding RNA PlncRNA-1, whose expression is promoted by Androgen Receptor (AR), protects AR from microRNA-mediated suppression in PCa cells. PlncRNA-1 knockdown resulted in the up-regulation of a series of AR-targeting microRNAs, among which miR-34c and miR-297 were found to regulate both AR and PlncRNA-1 expression at the post-transcriptional level. Functional analysis revealed that miR-34c and miR-297 overexpression down-regulated AR expression and inhibited the expression of downstream AR targets and that PlncRNA-1 overexpression rescued these effects. The association of PlncRNA-1 with tumor progression was also evaluated in mouse xenograft models, PCa tissues (16 paired samples), and blood samples (35 biopsy-negative and 37 biopsy-positive). Together, the data generated in this study indicate that PlncRNA-1 sponges AR-targeting microRNAs to protect AR from microRNA-mediated down-regulation and that these events form a regulatory feed-forward loop in the development of PCa. These findings suggest that PlncRNA-1 might potentially serve as a novel biomarker in PCa and that PlncRNA-1 might warrant further investigation to determine its potential role as a promising therapeutic target in PCa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. miR-1207-3p regulates the androgen receptor in prostate cancer via FNDC1/fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Dibash K. [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The Graduate Center Departments of Biology and Biochemistry, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Naidoo, Michelle; Ilboudo, Adeodat [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Park, Jong Y. [Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Ali, Thahmina [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Krampis, Konstantinos [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute for Computational Biomedicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Robinson, Brian D. [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Osborne, Joseph R. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Ogunwobi, Olorunseun O., E-mail: ogunwobi@genectr.hunter.cuny.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, Hunter College of The City University of New York, New York, NY 10065 (United States); The Graduate Center Departments of Biology and Biochemistry, The City University of New York, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, Cornell University, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is frequently diagnosed in men, and dysregulation of microRNAs is characteristic of many cancers. MicroRNA-1207-3p is encoded at the non-protein coding gene locus PVT1 on the 8q24 human chromosomal region, an established PCa susceptibility locus. However, the role of microRNA-1207-3p in PCa is unclear. We discovered that microRNA-1207-3p is significantly underexpressed in PCa cell lines in comparison to normal prostate epithelial cells. Increased expression of microRNA-1207-3p in PCa cells significantly inhibits proliferation, migration, and induces apoptosis via direct molecular targeting of FNDC1, a protein which contains a conserved protein domain of fibronectin (FN1). FNDC1, FN1, and the androgen receptor (AR) are significantly overexpressed in PCa cell lines and human PCa, and positively correlate with aggressive PCa. Prostate tumor FN1 expression in patients that experienced PCa-specific death is significantly higher than in patients that remained alive. Furthermore, FNDC1, FN1 and AR are concomitantly overexpressed in metastatic PCa. Consequently, these studies have revealed a novel microRNA-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR regulatory pathway in PCa. - Graphical abstract: miR-1207-3p/FNDC1/FN1/AR is a novel regulatory pathway in prostate cancer. - Highlights: • Expression of microRNA-1207-3p is significantly lost in prostate cancer (PCa) cells. • MicroRNA-1207-3p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration via direct molecular targeting of the 3′UTR of FNDC1. • MicroRNA-1207-3p regulates proliferation, apoptosis, and migration via direct molecular targeting of the 3′UTR of FNDC1. • FNDC1, FN1, and AR are concurrently overexpressed in metastatic PCa.

  19. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  20. Effects of resveratrol and other wine polyphenols on the proliferation, apoptosis and androgen receptor expression in LNCaP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruelo, A; Romero, I; Cabrera, P M; Arance, I; Andrés, G; Angulo, J C

    2014-01-01

    To address the effect of resveratrol and other red wine polyphenols on cell proliferation, apoptosis and androgen receptor (AR) expression in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells (5 × 102) were cultured in microtiter plate modules and treated with gallic acid, tannic acid and quercetin (1, 5 and 10 μM), rutin and morin (25, 50 and 75 μM) and resveratrol (5, 10 and 25 μM). To address the extent of proliferation at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours, a colorimetric immunoassay method was used. An activity caspase 3/7 detection assay was used to disclose apoptosis at 24, 48 and 72 hours. AR mARN levels were determined by real time RT-PCR. All polyphenols studied significantly inhibited (P<.05) cell proliferation compared to control. However, there were moderate differences between them. Resveratrol was the strongest inhibitor at different times and doses. Also, caspase-3 and caspase-7 activity was significantly higher (P<.05) than control in the presence of all the compounds, but the earlier response was achieved by resveratrol. Resveratrol, quercetin and morin were the only nutrients that significantly inhibited AR mRNA expression. Again resveratrol produced the highest inhibition (90-250 times less than control), followed by morin (67-100 times) and quercetin (55-91 times). All polyphenols studied showed important antiproliferative effects and induced apoptosis when added to LNCaP cells culture. We confirm that resveratrol, morin and quercetin may achieve such effect through reduced expression of AR. The synergistic effects of these compounds and their potential to prevent progression of hormone-dependent prostate cancer merit further study. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Correlation of androgen receptor and SRD5A2 gene mutations with pediatric hypospadias in 46, XY DSD children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X H; Zhang, W Q; Qu, X S

    2016-03-31

    We performed an exploratory study by analyzing the correlation of 46, XY disorders of sex development (46, XY DSD) with androgen receptor (AR) and steroid 5α-reductase-2 (SRD5A2) gene mutations and a safety analysis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) gel treatment for pediatric micropenis. We collected samples from 76 pediatric patients with 46, XY DSD and 50 healthy adult men with normal fertility as the control group. The pediatric patients were treated with DHT gel (0.1-0.3 mg/kg/day) for three to six months. The extended penis length, testicular volume, and multiple blood parameters were collected before treatment and one, three, and six months after treatment. Of the 76 cases with 46, XY DSD, 31.58% had hypospadias with micropenis and 6.58% had male pseudohermaphroditism. Through AR gene screening, it was found that 14 patients had AR point mutations and 22 patients had SRD5A2 mutations. After treatment with DHT, the penis length of the patients significantly improved after one, three, and six months of treatment, with longer treatment times resulting in greater improvement. Before treatment with DHT, the average serum DHT value of patients with 46, XY DSD was 24.29 pg/mL. After one, three, and six months of treatment, this value increased to 430.71, 328.9, and 323.6 pg/mL, respectively. We conclude that for pediatric patients who have male hermaphroditism or hypospadias with micropenis, AR and SRD5A2 gene mutation detection should be performed. Local application of DHT gel can promote penis growth effectively without systemic adverse reactions.

  2. Association between G1733A (rs6152) polymorphism in androgen receptor gene and recurrent spontaneous abortions in Mexican population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porras-Dorantes, Ángela; Brambila-Tapia, Aniel Jessica Leticia; Lazcano-Castellanos, Alma Benita; Da Silva-José, Thiago Donizete; Juárez-Osuna, Jesús Alejandro; García-Ortiz, José Elías

    2017-10-01

    Recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA) is a multifactorial condition that occurs with a frequency of 0.2-5% in women of reproductive age. Among genetic factors, the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) G1733A in the androgen receptor (AR) gene has been associated with its presence in Greek and Iranian populations. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine its possible association with RSA in this population. A total of 156 Mexican RSA (with at least 2 consecutive abortions) unrelated patients and 152 unrelated healthy women were included, the presence of karyotype anomalies in the parents as well as uterine anomalies as well as antiphospholipid antibodies was excluded in patients; while all the controls presented at least two healthy pregnancies and no abortion. In all the included women, the presence of the SNP G1733A was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique. No significant differences were observed in age between groups. The genotype GG, GA, and AA had a frequency of 0.70, 0.27, and 0.03 in controls and of 0.89, 0.10, and 0.01 in patients (p < 0.001); while the A allele frequency was of 0.06 and 0.16 in controls and patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The difference in allele frequency increased 10-15% when patients with primary RSA (with no live births) and with at least three abortions were included. The SNP G1733A of the AR gene is significantly associated with RSA in Mexican patients. These results coincide with previous reports in other populations.

  3. The role of hypogonadism in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Christian; Skakkebæk, Anne; Groth, Kristian A

    2014-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47, XXY) is the most abundant sex-chromosome disorder, and is a common cause of infertility and hypogonadism in men. Most men with KS go through life without knowing the diagnosis, as only 25% are diagnosed and only a few of these before puberty. Apart from hypogonadism......, with more fat and less muscle mass and diminished bone mineral mass, as well as increased risk of metabolic consequences, such as type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome are all common in KS. These findings should be a concern as they are not simply laboratory findings; epidemiological studies in KS...... been published. Here, we will review the current knowledge of hypogonadism in KS and the rationale for testosterone treatment and try to give our best recommendations for surveillance of this rather common, but often ignored, syndrome....

  4. Estrogen-Induced Developmental Disorders of the Rat Penis Involve Both Estrogen Receptor (ESR)- and Androgen Receptor (AR)-Mediated Pathways1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, H.O.; Braden, T.D.; Williams, C.S.; Williams, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the estrogen receptor (ESR) pathway, androgen receptor (AR) pathway, or both mediate estrogen-induced developmental penile disorders. Rat pups received diethylstilbestrol (DES), with or without the ESR antagonist ICI 182,780 (ICI) or the AR agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or testosterone (T), from Postnatal Days 1 to 6. Testicular T concentration, penile morphology and morphometry, and/or fertility was determined at age 7, 28, or 150 days. DES treatment alone caused 90% reduction in the neonatal intratesticular T surge; this reduction was prevented by ICI coadministration, but not by DHT or T coadministration. Unlike the T surge, coadministration of ICI and coadministration of DHT or T mitigated penile deformities and loss of fertility. Generally, ICI, DHT, or T treatment alone did not alter penile morphology; however, fertility was 20% that of controls in ICI-treated rats vs. 70%–90% in DHT- or T-treated rats. The lower fertility in the rats treated with ICI alone could be due to altered sexual behavior, as these males did not deposit vaginal plugs. In conclusion, observations that both an ESR antagonist and AR agonists prevent penile deformities and infertility suggest that both pathways are involved in estrogen-induced penile disorders. Observations that coadministration of ICI, but not DHT or T, prevents the DES-induced reduction in the neonatal T surge suggest that, although ICI exerts its mitigating effect both at the level of Leydig cells and penile stromal cells, DHT and T do so only at the level of stromal cells. PMID:19420389

  5. Testosterone Reduces Knee Passive Range of Motion and Expression of Relaxin Receptor Isoforms via 5α-Dihydrotestosterone and Androgen Receptor Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouzeh Dehghan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian steroids such as estrogen and progesterone have been reported to influence knee laxity. The effect of testosterone, however, remains unknown. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on the knee range of motion (ROM and the molecular mechanisms that might involve changes in the expression of relaxin receptor isoforms, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 in the patella tendon and lateral collateral ligament of the female rat knee. Ovariectomized adult female Wistar rats received three days treatment with peanut oil (control, testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg and testosterone (125 and 250 μg/kg plus flutamide, an androgen receptor blocker or finasteride, a 5α-reductase inhibitor. Duplicate groups received similar treatment however in the presence of relaxin (25 ng/kg. A day after the last drug injection, knee passive ROM was measured by using a digital miniature goniometer. Both tendon and ligament were harvested and then analysed for protein and mRNA expression for Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 respectively. Knee passive ROM, Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression were significantly reduced following treatment with testosterone. Flutamide or finasteride administration antagonized the testosterone effect. Concomitant administration of testosterone and relaxin did not result in a significant change in knee ROM as compared to testosterone only treatment; however this was significantly increased following flutamide or finasteride addition. Testosterone effect on knee passive ROM is likely mediated via dihydro-testosterone (DHT, and involves downregulation of Rxfp1 and Rxfp2 expression, which may provide the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced decrease in female knee laxity.

  6. Expression of sarcosine metabolism-related proteins in estrogen receptor negative breast cancer according to the androgen receptor and HER-2 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ju; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the expression of sarcosine metabolism related proteins according to androgen receptor (AR) and HER-2 status in estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancer and to analyze its clinical implications. Tissue microarray was constructed for a total of 334 cases of ER negative breast cancer. Immunohistochemical stain was conducted for sarcosine metabolism related proteins such as glycine N-methyltransferase (GNMT), sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH), and l-pipecolic acid oxidase (PIPOX). There were 131 AR positive, 205 AR negative cases and 143 HER-2 positive, 193 HER-2 negative cases. When subdividing into four groups according to AR and HER-2 status, there were 55 AR(+)/HER-2(-) cases, 76 AR(+)/HER-2(+) cases, 67 AR(-)/HER-2(+) cases and 138 AR(-)/HER-2(-) cases. GNMT and PIPOX expression was highest in the AR(+)/HER-2(-) group while expressed lowest in the AR(-)/HER-2(-) group (PHER-2(+) group and lowest in the AR(-)/HER-2(-) group (P=0.010). GNMT and PIPOX expression was higher in the AR positive group compared with those of AR negative group (P=0.001, and PHER-2 positivity (P=0.006, and P=0.005, respectively). AR positive group had the highest ratio of low sarcosine type while the AR negative group had the highest ratio of null type (PHER-2 status. GNMT and PIPOX expression was high in the AR positive group while tumoral and stromal PIPOX expression was high in the HER-2 positive group.

  7. Male pubertal development and the role of androgen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Erick J; Rogol, Alan D

    2007-04-01

    In boys, the hormonal changes that accompany normal puberty are well defined, as are the physical signs of pubertal development and the kinetics of the growth spurt. Most androgens are derived from the testes, although adrenal androgens may also contribute; testosterone can also be aromatized to estrogen to exert important effects during puberty. Androgens, but especially their conversion to estrogens by aromatase, have a major role in the dramatic changes in linear growth, secondary sexual characteristics, and changes to bone, muscle and fat distribution that occur during puberty. Androgen therapy for delayed puberty should permit full normal pubertal development and thereby also address some of the associated psychosocial problems. Adolescent boys with conditions of permanent hypogonadism (hypogonadotropic or hypergonadotropic) or transient hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (constitutional delay of growth and puberty) can benefit from testosterone therapy. Long-term testosterone therapy should be given for hypothalamic or pituitary gonadotropin deficiency, or for primary hypogonadism such as for adolescents with Klinefelter syndrome, if endogenous testosterone levels drop or levels of luteinizing hormone rise. Intramuscular administration every few weeks is effective, but newer cutaneous forms, for example, gels or patches, also show promise in permitting adolescent males to reach adult body composition.

  8. Sex differences in androgen receptors of the human mamillary bodies are related to endocrine status rather than to sexual orientation or transsexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijver, F P; Fernández-Guasti, A; Fodor, M; Kraan, E M; Swaab, D F

    2001-02-01

    In a previous study we found androgen receptor (AR) sex differences in several regions throughout the human hypothalamus. Generally, men had stronger nuclear AR immunoreactivity (AR-ir) than women. The strongest nuclear labeling was found in the caudal hypothalamus in the mamillary body complex (MBC), which is known to be involved in aspects of cognition and sexual behavior. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the sex difference in AR-ir of the MBC is related to sexual orientation or gender identity (i.e. the feeling of being male or female) or to circulating levels of androgens, as nuclear AR-ir is known to be up-regulated by androgens. Therefore, we studied the MBC in postmortem brain material from the following groups: young heterosexual men, young homosexual men, aged heterosexual castrated and noncastrated men, castrated and noncastrated transsexuals, young heterosexual women, and a young virilized woman. Nuclear AR-ir did not differ significantly between heterosexual and homosexual men, but was significantly stronger than that in women. A female-like pattern of AR-ir (i.e. no to weak nuclear staining) was observed in 26- to 53-yr-old castrated male-to-female transsexuals and in old castrated and noncastrated men, 67--87 yr of age. In analogy with animal studies showing strong activational effects of androgens on nuclear AR-ir, the present data suggest that nuclear AR-ir in the human MBC is dependent on the presence or absence of circulating levels of androgen. The group data were, moreover, supported by the fact that a male-like AR-ir (i.e. intense nuclear AR-ir) was found in a 36-yr-old bisexual noncastrated male-to-female transsexual and in a heterosexual virilized woman, 46 yr of age, with high levels of circulating testosterone. In conclusion, the sexually dimorphic AR-ir in the MBC seemed to be clearly related to circulating levels of androgens and not to sexual orientation or gender identity. The functional implications of these

  9. Differential regulation of metabolic pathways by androgen receptor (AR) and its constitutively active splice variant, AR-V7, in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Ayesha A; Putluri, Vasanta; Arnold, James M; Tsouko, Efrosini; Maity, Suman; Roberts, Justin M; Coarfa, Cristian; Frigo, Daniel E; Putluri, Nagireddy; Sreekumar, Arun; Weigel, Nancy L

    2015-10-13

    Metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) is primarily an androgen-dependent disease, which is treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Tumors usually develop resistance (castration-resistant PCa [CRPC]), but remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Numerous mechanisms for AR-dependent resistance have been identified including expression of constitutively active AR splice variants lacking the hormone-binding domain. Recent clinical studies show that expression of the best-characterized AR variant, AR-V7, correlates with resistance to ADT and poor outcome. Whether AR-V7 is simply a constitutively active substitute for AR or has novel gene targets that cause unique downstream changes is unresolved. Several studies have shown that AR activation alters cell metabolism. Using LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7 as a model system, we found that AR-V7 stimulated growth, migration, and glycolysis measured by ECAR (extracellular acidification rate) similar to AR. However, further analyses using metabolomics and metabolic flux assays revealed several differences. Whereas AR increased citrate levels, AR-V7 reduced citrate mirroring metabolic shifts observed in CRPC patients. Flux analyses indicate that the low citrate is a result of enhanced utilization rather than a failure to synthesize citrate. Moreover, flux assays suggested that compared to AR, AR-V7 exhibits increased dependence on glutaminolysis and reductive carboxylation to produce some of the TCA (tricarboxylic acid cycle) metabolites. These findings suggest that these unique actions represent potential therapeutic targets.

  10. Testosterone-receptor positive hepatocellular carcinoma in a 29-year old bodybuilder with a history of anabolic androgenic steroid abuse: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbach, Philipp; Potthoff, Andrej; Raatschen, Hans-Jürgen; Soudah, Bisharah; Lehmann, Ulrich; Schneider, Andrea; Gebel, Michael J; Manns, Michael P; Vogel, Arndt

    2015-05-20

    Continuous use of anabolic androgenic steroid in high-doses is associated with substantial health risks, including hepatocellular adenoma. Malignant transformation from hepatocellular adenoma to hepatocellular carcinoma after anabolic androgenic steroid abuse has been rarely reported. The morphological distinction of adenoma from well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma is challenging and requires elaborated imaging techniques and histology. We report about a 29-year old male professional bodybuilder who presented with mid-epigastric pain at the emergency unit. Ultrasound showed a severe hepatomegaly with multiple lesions. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound revealed a heterogeneous pattern with signs of hepatocellular carcinoma. CT scan of the abdomen confirmed multiple hypervascular lesions and central areas of necrosis without contrast enhancement. Subsequent diagnostics included fine needle aspiration (FNA) of suspicious lesions and mini-laparoscopy to establish the diagnosis of a β-catenin and testosterone-receptor positive hepatocellular carcinoma embedded in multiple adenomas. The patient was subsequently treated by liver transplantation and remains tumor-free 27 month after surgery. Hepatocellular carcinoma occurring in association with anabolic androgenic steroid abuse should sensitize physicians and especially professional bodybuilders for the harmful use of high doses of steroids.

  11. Androgen receptor regulated microRNA miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression by targeting the ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jingjing [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chen [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Department of Orthopedics, Changzheng Hospital Affiliated to Second Military Medical University, 415th Feng Yang Road, Shanghai, 200003 (China); Fang, Ziyu; Li, Yaoming [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Liu, Houqi; Wang, Yue [Research Center of Developmental Biology, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Translational Medicine Center, Second Military Medical University, 800th Xiangyin Road, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Xu, Chuanliang [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China); Sun, Yinghao, E-mail: sunyh@medmail.com.cn [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 200433 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Abstracts: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important endogenous gene regulators that play key roles in prostate cancer development and metastasis. However, specific miRNA expression patterns in prostate cancer tissues from Chinese patients remain largely unknown. In this study, we compared miRNA expression patterns in 65 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues by RNA sequencing and found that miR-182-5p was the most up-regulated miRNA in prostate cancer tissues. The result was validated using realtime PCR in 18 pairs of prostate cancer and para-cancer tissues. In in vitro analysis, it was confirmed that miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation, invasion and migration and inhibit apoptosis. In addition, the androgen receptor directly regulated the transcription of miR-182-5p, which could target to the 3′UTR of ARRDC3 mRNA and affect the expression of ARRDC3 and its downstream gene ITGB4. For the in vivo experiment, miR-182-5p overexpression also promoted the growth and progression of prostate cancer tumors. In this regard, we suggest that miR-182-5p may be a key androgen receptor-regulated factor that contributes to the development and metastasis of Chinese prostate cancers and may be a potential target for the early diagnosis and therapeutic studies of prostate cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-182-5p is the mostly up-regulated miRNA in Chinese prostate cancer. •miR-182-5p is regulated by androgen receptor. •miR-182-5p promotes prostate cancer progression. •miR-182-5p regulates ARRDC3/ITGB4 pathway.

  12. Tissue selectivity and potential clinical applications of trenbolone (17beta-hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one): A potent anabolic steroid with reduced androgenic and estrogenic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrow, Joshua F; McCoy, Sean C; Borst, Stephen E

    2010-06-01

    Recently, the development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) has been suggested as a means of combating the deleterious catabolic effects of hypogonadism, especially in skeletal muscle and bone, without inducing the undesirable androgenic effects (e.g., prostate enlargement and polycythemia) associated with testosterone administration. 17beta-Hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (trenbolone; 17beta-TBOH), a synthetic analog of testosterone, may be capable of inducing SARM-like effects as it binds to androgen receptors (ARs) with approximately three times the affinity of testosterone and has been shown to augment skeletal muscle mass and bone growth and reduce adiposity in a variety of mammalian species. In addition to its direct actions through ARs, 17beta-TBOH may also exert anabolic effects by altering the action of endogenous growth factors or inhibiting the action of glucocorticoids. Compared to testosterone, 17beta-TBOH appears to induce less growth in androgen-sensitive organs which highly express the 5alpha reductase enzyme (e.g., prostate tissue and accessory sex organs). The reduced androgenic effects result from the fact that 17beta-TBOH is metabolized to less potent androgens in vivo; while testosterone undergoes tissue-specific biotransformation to more potent steroids, dihydrotestosterone and 17beta-estradiol, via the 5alpha-reductase and aromatase enzymes, respectively. Thus the metabolism of 17beta-TBOH provides a basis for future research evaluating its safety and efficacy as a means of combating muscle and bone wasting conditions, obesity, and/or androgen insensitivity syndromes in humans, similar to that of other SARMs which are currently in development. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Androgen and oestrogen receptors as potential prognostic markers for patients with ductal carcinoma in situ treated with surgery and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaioli, Sara; Tumedei, Maria Maddalena; Foca, Flavia; Maltoni, Roberta; Rocca, Andrea; Massa, Ilaria; Pietri, Elisabetta; Bravaccini, Sara

    2017-11-28

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a heterogeneous disease that has been investigated less extensively than invasive breast cancer. Women with DCIS are mainly treated with conservative surgery almost exclusively followed by radiotherapy. However, as radiation treatment is not always effective, the search for biomarkers capable of identifying DCIS lesions that could progress to invasive cancer is ongoing. Although conventional biomarkers have been thoroughly studied in invasive tumours, little is known about the role played by androgen receptor (AR), widely expressed in DCIS. A series of 42 DCIS patients treated with quadrantectomy and radiotherapy were followed for a period of up to 95 months. Of these, 11 had recurrent DCIS or progressed to invasive cancer. All tumours were analysed for clinical pathological features. Conventional biomarkers and androgen receptor expression were determined by immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that AR was higher in tumours of relapsed patients than non-relapsed patients (P value: 0.0005). Conversely, oestrogen receptor (ER) was higher, albeit not significantly, in non-relapsed patients than in relapsed patients. AR/ER ratio was considerably different in the two subgroups (P value: 0.0033). Area under the curve (AUC) values were 0.85 for AR and 0.80 for the AR/ER ratio. These preliminary results highlight the potentially important role of both AR and the AR/ER ratio as prognostic markers in DCIS. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2017 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  14. Evaluation of OASIS QSAR Models Using ToxCast™ in Vitro Estrogen and Androgen Receptor Binding Data and Application in an Integrated Endocrine Screening Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Wilson, Daniel M; Price, Paul S; Marty, Sue; Parks, Amanda K; Carney, Edward

    2016-09-01

    Integrative testing strategies (ITSs) for potential endocrine activity can use tiered in silico and in vitro models. Each component of an ITS should be thoroughly assessed. We used the data from three in vitro ToxCast™ binding assays to assess OASIS, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) platform covering both estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) binding. For stronger binders (described here as AC50 75%) and specificity (> 86%) for ER as well as both high sensitivity (92-100%) and specificity (70-81%) for AR. For compounds within the domains of the ER and AR QSAR models that bound with AC50 approach wherein a) QSAR is used to identify compounds in-domain of the ER or AR binding models and predicted to bind; b) those compounds are screened in vitro to assess binding potency; and c) the stronger binders (AC50 vitro, that require metabolism to manifest activity, or for which in vivo AR testing is in order, need to be assessed differently. Bhhatarai B, Wilson DM, Price PS, Marty S, Parks AK, Carney E. 2016. Evaluation of OASIS QSAR models using ToxCast™ in vitro estrogen and androgen receptor binding data and application in an integrated endocrine screening approach. Environ Health Perspect 124:1453-1461; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP184.

  15. Comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) model using a large diverse set of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals for binding to the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, H; Fang, H; Xie, Q; Perkins, R; Sheehan, D M; Tong, W

    2003-01-01

    A large number of natural, synthetic and environmental chemicals are capable of disrupting the endocrine systems of experimental animals, wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), some mimic the functions of the endogenous androgens, have become a concern to the public health. Androgens play an important role in many physiological processes, including the development and maintenance of male sexual characteristics. A common mechanism for androgen to produce both normal and adverse effects is binding to the androgen receptor (AR). In this study, we used Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA), a three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) technique, to examine AR-ligand binding affinities. A CoMFA model with r2 = 0.902 and q2 = 0.571 was developed using a large training data set containing 146 structurally diverse natural, synthetic, and environmental chemicals with a 10(6)-fold range of relative binding affinity (RBA). By comparing the binding characteristics derived from the CoMFA contour map with these observed in a human AR crystal structure, we found that the steric and electrostatic properties encoded in this training data set are necessary and sufficient to describe the RBA of AR ligands. Finally, the CoMFA model was challenged with an external test data set; the predicted results were close to the actual values with average difference of 0.637 logRBA. This study demonstrates the utility of this CoMFA model for real-world use in predicting the AR binding affinities of structurally diverse chemicals over a wide RBA range.

  16. Avolition in a patient with hypogonadism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.M.A. Verhoeven (Wim); S. Tuinier (Siegfried); J.I.M. Egger (Jos); F. van Erp (Femke); J. Tuerlings (Joep)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and Objectives: Testosterone deficiency has been implicated in the etiology of depression although there is an ongoing debate on the nature of this association. There is a paucity of data about the psychological impact of hypogonadism in genetic disorders associated with

  17. Avolition in a patient with hypogonadism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Tuinier, S.; Egger, J.I.M.; Erp, C.A. van; Tuerlings, J.H.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Testosterone deficiency has been implicated in the etiology of depression although there is an ongoing debate on the nature of this association. There is a paucity of data about the psychological impact of hypogonadism in genetic disorders associated with testosterone

  18. Anosmia Predicts Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism in CHARGE Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Bocca, Gianni; Hoefsloot, Lies H.; Meiners, Linda C.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.

    Objective To test the hypothesis that a smell test could predict the occurrence of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) in patients with CHARGE syndrome, which is a variable combination of ocular coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, retardation of growth/development, genital hypoplasia, and ear

  19. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of hypogonadism in male patients with Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), and to study its impact on skeletal muscle dysfunction and assess the effect of systemic markers of inflammation on testosterone level and muscle function. The study included 50 stable male ...

  20. Genetics of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommiska, Johanna; Känsäkoski, Johanna; Christiansen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) is a rare disorder characterized by incomplete/absent puberty caused by deficiency or defective action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The phenotypic features of patients with CHH vary from genital hypoplasia and absent puberty to reversal...

  1. A Functionally Significant Cross-talk between Androgen Receptor and ErbB2 Pathways in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naderi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have identified novel subgroups in ER-negative breast cancer based on the expression pattern of androgen receptor (AR. One subtype (molecular apocrine has an over-expression of steroid-response genes and ErbB2. Using breast cancer cell lines with molecular apocrine features, we demonstrate a functional cross-talk between AR and ErbB2 pathways. We show that stimulation of AR and ErbB2 pathways leads to the cross-regulation of gene expression for AR, ErbB2, FOXA1, XBP1, TFF3, and KLK3. As opposed to the physiologic transient phosphorylation of extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK1/2 observed with the testosterone treatment, we demonstrate that the addition of ErbB2 inhibition leads to a persistent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which negatively regulates the downstream signaling and cell growth. This suggests a mechanism for the cross-talk involving the ERK pathway. Moreover, testosterone stimulates the proliferation of molecular apocrine breast cell lines, and this effect can be reversed using antiandrogen flutamide and anti-ErbB2 AG825. Conversely, the growth stimulatory effect of heregulin can also be inhibited with flutamide, suggesting a cross-talk between the AR and ErbB2 pathways affecting cell proliferation. Importantly, there is a synergy with the combined use of flutamide and AG825 on cell proliferation and apoptosis, which indicates a therapeutic advantage in the combined blockage of AR and ErbB2 pathways.

  2. Screening for hypogonadism in diabetes 2008/9: results from the Cheshire Primary Care cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Simon George; Heald, Adrian; Younger, Novie; Bujawansa, Sumudu; Narayanan, Ram Prakash; McCulloch, Alan; Jones, Hugh

    2012-07-01

    There is increasing awareness of hypogonadism in men with type 2 diabetes but limited data from Primary Care. The anonymised records of 6457 male patients aged 18-80 years with diabetes were accessed. Within the last 2 years 391 men (6.0% of total) underwent measurement of serum testosterone. Data search was performed through the centralised data facility afforded by EMIS®, the majority GP systems provider in Cheshire. 4.4% of type 2 diabetes men screened were frankly hypogonadal with a serum total testosterone of less than 8.0 nmol/l. For borderline hypogonadism (serum total testosterone 8-11.99 nmol/l) the proportion of type 2 diabetes men rose to 32.1%. Age adjusted mean (geometric) testosterone was lower in men with type 2 diabetes (13.6 nmol/l 95%CI: 13.1-14.2) vs type 1 diabetes (17.9 nmol/l; 95%CI 15.2-21.0), F=10.3; p=0.0014. For those screened age adjusted body mass index (BMI) was greater in type 2 diabetes at 30.7 (30.1-31.3) vs 28.4 (26.1-30.6)kg/m(2) in type 1 diabetes (F=4.3; p=0.04). Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that there was a statistically significant interaction (P=0.014) between BMI and diabetes type in their relation with log testosterone. For persons with type 1 DM and type 2 DM, testosterone can be expected to decrease by 6% (P=0.002) and by 1% (P=0.002) respectively, for every one unit increment in BMI. There is manifestly a subset of men with diabetes and androgen deficiency who could benefit from testosterone replacement. BMI has an independent influence on androgen status. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Detection of the arylpropionamide-derived selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) S-4 (Andarine) in a black-market product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevis, Mario; Geyer, Hans; Kamber, Matthias; Schänzer, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Non-steroidal and tissue-selective anabolic agents such as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) represent a promising class of therapeutics for the treatment of various diseases such as sarcopenia or cancer cachexia. Advanced compounds of SARMs are based on an arylpropionamide-derived structure and leading drug candidates have successfully completed phase-II-clinical trials. Although none of these therapeutics have been approved, their performance-enhancing qualities and the black-market availability of these products makes them a viable target for misuse in the athletic community. In 2008, SARMs were added to the Prohibited List established by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). That SARMs are the subject of misuse even without clinical approval was proved for the first time by the detection of the drug candidate Andarine (also referred to as S-4, S-3-(4-acetylamino-phenoxy)-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-propionamide), advertised, sold and supplied via the Internet. The oily liquids, declared as green tea extracts and face moisturizer, were assayed using state-of-the-art analytical procedures and S-4 was found at concentrations of approximately 150 mg/mL. The authenticity of the product was demonstrated in comparison to reference material by liquid chromatography, high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry using positive and negative electrospray ionization, and comparison to reference material. Moreover, an impurity resulting from poor product purification was detected, accounting for approximately 10% of S-4. This consisted of 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-N-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-3-(4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-phenylamino)-propionamide. The ease of purchasing non-approved drug candidates that could potentially increase athletic performance demonstrates the need to operate proactively in the continued fight against doping. The early inclusion of emerging drugs into routine sports drug testing procedures is a key

  4. Screening for estrogen and androgen receptor activities in 200 pesticides by in vitro reporter gene assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Katsura, Eiji; Takeuchi, Shinji; Niiyama, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Kunihiko

    2004-01-01

    We tested 200 pesticides, including some of their isomers and metabolites, for agonism and antagonism to two human estrogen receptor (hER) subtypes, hERalpha and hERbeta, and a human androgen receptor (hAR) by highly sensitive transactivation assays using Chinese hamster ovary cells. The test compounds were classified into nine groups: organochlorines, diphenyl ethers, organophosphorus pesticides, pyrethroids, carbamates, acid amides, triazines, ureas, and others. These pesticides were tested at concentrations methiocarb were predominantly hERbeta rather than hERalpha agonistic. Weak antagonistic effects toward hERalpha and hERbeta were shown in five and two pesticides, respectively. On the other hand, none of tested pesticides showed hAR-mediated androgenic activity, but 66 of 200 pesticides exhibited inhibitory activity against the transcriptional activity induced by 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. In particular, the antiandrogenic activities of two diphenyl ether herbicides, chlornitrofen and chlomethoxyfen, were higher than those of vinclozolin and p,p -dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene, known AR antagonists. The results of our ER and AR assays show that 34 pesticides possessed both estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, indicating pleiotropic effects on hER and hAR. We also discussed chemical structures related to these activities. Taken together, our findings suggest that a variety of pesticides have estrogenic and/or antiandrogenic potential via ER and/or AR, and that numerous other manmade chemicals may also possess such estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities. PMID:15064155

  5. The Three Dimensional Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (3D-QSAR and Docking Studies of Curcumin Derivatives as Androgen Receptor Antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Yang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor antagonists have been proved to be effective anti-prostate cancer agents. 3D-QSAR and Molecular docking methods were performed on curcumin derivatives as androgen receptor antagonists. The bioactive conformation was explored by docking the potent compound 29 into the binding site of AR. The constructed Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA and Comparative Similarity Indices Analysis (CoMSIA models produced statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficients q2 of 0.658 and 0.567, non-cross-validated correlation coefficients r2 of 0.988 and 0.978, and predicted correction coefficients r2pred of 0.715 and 0.793, respectively. These results ensure the CoMFA and CoMSIA models as a tool to guide the design of novel potent AR antagonists. A set of 30 new analogs were proposed by utilizing the results revealed in the present study, and were predicted with potential activities in the developed models.

  6. Non-linear association between androgen receptor CAG and GGN repeat lengths and reproductive parameters in fertile European and Inuit men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brokken, L J S; Rylander, L; Jönsson, B A

    2013-01-01

    Recently the dogma that there is an inverse linear association between androgen receptor (AR) CAG and GGN polymorphisms and receptor activity has been challenged. We analysed the pattern of association between 21 male reproductive phenotypes and AR CAG/GGN repeat lengths in 557 proven-fertile men......-positive germ cells. Subjects with either short or long CAG had increased seminal levels of prostate-specific antigen and neutral α-glucosidase activity. Compared to men with the median GGN length of 23, those with shorter GGN repeats had higher levels of inhibin B, higher proportions of normal and progressive...... sperm, and a higher fraction of Fas-positive sperm, while men with longer GGN had higher oestradiol levels. These data indicate that at least for some markers of male reproductive function the association with CAG or GGN repeat length is curvilinear....

  7. Progesterone, estrogen, and androgen receptors in the corpus luteum of the domestic cat, Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) and Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amelkina, Olga; Zschockelt, Lina; Painer, Johanna; Serra, Rodrigo; Villaespesa, Francisco; Krause, Eberhard; Jewgenow, Katarina; Braun, Beate C

    2016-12-01

    In contrast to the species studied, the corpus luteum (CL) of Iberian and Eurasian lynx physiologically persists in the ovary for more than 2 years and continues to secrete progesterone. Such persistent CL (perCL) transition into the next cycle and are present in the ovary together with the freshly formed CL (frCL) of a new ovulation. To date, the mechanisms supporting such CL persistence are not known. We analyzed the potential receptivity of feline CL to sex steroids through mRNA measurements of progesterone receptor (PGR), progesterone receptor membrane components (PGRMC) 1 and 2, estrogen receptor (ESR) 1 and ESR2, G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), and androgen receptor (AR). All receptors were present in domestic cat CL during pregnancy and the nonpregnant luteal phase, in frCL and perCL of post-mating Iberian lynx and in perCL of pre-mating Eurasian lynx. Mass spectrometry detected the presence of PGRMC1 protein in frCL and perCL of the Iberian lynx. In both domestic cat and lynx CL, PGR, PGRMC1, and ESR1 proteins were localized in luteal cells by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA levels of PGR, PGRMC1, PGRMC2, ESR1, and AR changed significantly throughout the domestic cat luteal phase. This may indicate involvement of these receptors in the processes of formation, maintenance, and regression of feline CL. In Iberian lynx, expression of PGRMC1, PGRCM2, ESR1, GPER1, and AR was significantly higher in perCL compared with frCL, whereas ESR2 was reversed. High mRNA amounts of these receptors in perCL suggest that physiological persistence of lynx CL may be partly regulated by actions of sex steroids through their nuclear and/or membrane receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Widely used pharmaceuticals present in the environment revealed as in vitro antagonists for human estrogen and androgen receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Janochová, Jana; Filipová, Alena; Křesinová, Zdena; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 152, JUNE (2016), s. 284-291 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020218; GA ČR GA13-28283S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Endocrine disruptor * Anti-estrogenic * Anti-androgenic Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.208, year: 2016

  9. Amino acid containing thapsigargin analogues deplete androgen receptor protein via synthesis inhibition and induce the death of prostate cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griend, Donald J Vander; Antony, Lizamma; Dalrymple, Susan L

    2009-01-01

    -penetrant sequiterpene-lactone that once inside cells inhibits (IC(50), approximately 10 nmol/L) critically important housekeeping SERCA 2b calcium pumps in the endoplasmic reticulum. Using a series of five genetically diverse androgen ablation refractory human prostate cancer lines (LNCaP, LAPC-4, VCaP, MDA-PCa-2b...

  10. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Asencio-Hernández

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA, a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER, estrogen-related receptor (ERR and androgen receptor (AR. BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD, which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules.

  11. Screening for mutations in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and androgen receptor in women presenting with partially virilised 46,XY disorders of sex development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Niamh; Williams, Emma L; Cardamone, Stefanie; Lee, Marilyn; Creighton, Sarah M; Rumsby, Gill; Conway, Gerard S

    2015-06-01

    The precise diagnosis of partially virilised women with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSD) is often obscure. In practice, this group often comes under the poorly defined, clinically based label of partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS). In a previous study, we found that 5α-reductase 2 (SRD5A2) mutations occurred in 43% of women in this subgroup. We expand this work to include biochemical and genetic screening for 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3) and androgen receptor (AR) mutations. Analysis of serum androgens (androstenedione and testosterone) and genetic analyses for HSD17B3 and AR were performed in 42 women from 36 pedigrees with partially virilised 46,XY DSD in whom SRD5A2 deficiency had been excluded by urine steroid profiling. Out of 36 unrelated women, 14 (38%) were found to have HSD17B3 mutations and one (2.7%) to have an AR defect. Six novel pathogenic HSD17B3 mutations were identified: three splice site mutations and three missense changes. Seven patients with HSD17B3 deficiency tested before gonadectomy had basal testosterone/androstenedione (T/A) ratio XY female DSD population and is often associated with lesser degrees of virilisation compared with those with 5α-reductase deficiency. This diagnosis should be considered for individuals labelled as PAIS, particularly, but not exclusively, those who present with virilisation at puberty or primary amenorrhoea. Before gondadectomy, T/A ratio is useful to aid diagnosis, but after gonadectomy sequencing of HSD17B3 must be performed to confirm the diagnosis. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  12. A Survey of the Relationship between Serum Testosterone Level and Expressions of Androgen, Progesterone and Estrogen Receptors and HER2 in Iranian Women with Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Vojdani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer in women. This tumor is hormone dependent tumor and oncologists use estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and HER2 for treatment of this malignancy. Androgens like testosterone and their receptors (AR have a role in the pathophysiology of breast cancer but their clinical values are not clear. Method: AR expression was evaluated in 49 patients with breast cancers using immunohistochemistry. Testosterone was evaluated with ELISA. The relation of clinical characteristics and biomarkers with AR and testosterone were analyzed. According to the percentage of stained cells AR categorized to: AR-absent (0%, AR-poorly (1%-10%, AR-moderately (>10%-50%, and AR-highly (>50% positive. Results: Among 49 patients with breast cancer, 34% were AR-positive and 44% of ERpositive and 22% of ER negative patients were AR-positive. There was no significant association between mean of testosterone and AR, ER, PR and HER2. AR was positive more frequently but not significantly statistically in older patients and patients less than 45 years of age. Testosterone level was higher in ER positive patients than ER negative and lower in AR positive patients than AR negative patients, but these findings were not statistically significant. ten persent of breast cancers were triple negative and AR was negative in all of them. Conclusion: Androgens and AR have role in pathophysiology of breast cancer and in the future one can use the potency of this pathway for the treatment of breast cancer.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Membrane Androgen Receptors in the ZIP9 Zinc Transporter Subfamily: II. Role of Human ZIP9 in Testosterone-Induced Prostate and Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing; Berg, A. Håkan

    2014-01-01

    ...) encoding a protein with characteristics of a membrane androgen receptor (mAR). Here, we demonstrate that human ZIP9 expressed in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells and stably overexpressed in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (PC-3-ZIP9...

  14. Androgen Receptor Splice Variant 7 and Efficacy of Taxane Chemotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.; Lu, Changxue; Luber, Brandon; Wang, Hao; Chen, Yan; Nakazawa, Mary; Nadal, Rosa; Paller, Channing J.; Denmeade, Samuel R.; Carducci, Michael A.; Eisenberger, Mario A.; Luo, Jun

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE We previously showed that detection of androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) was associated with primary resistance to enzalutamide and abiraterone therapy, but the relevance of AR-V7 status in the context of chemotherapy is unknown. OBJECTIVE To investigate whether AR-V7–positive patients would retain sensitivity to taxane chemotherapy and whether AR-V7 status would have a differential impact on taxane-treated men compared with enzalutamide- or abiraterone-treated men. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We examined CTCs for AR-V7 mRNA using a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. From January 2013 to July 2014, we prospectively enrolled patients with metastatic CRPC initiating taxane chemotherapy (docetaxel or cabazitaxel) at a single academic institution (Johns Hopkins). Our prespecified statistical plan required a sample size of 36 taxane-treated men. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We evaluated associations between AR-V7 status and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response rates. PSA progression-free survival (PSA PFS), and clinical and/or radiographic progression-free survival (PFS). After incorporating updated data from our prior study of 62 patients treated with enzalutamide or abiraterone, we also investigated the interaction between AR-V7 status (positive or negative) and treatment type (taxane vs enzalutamide or abiraterone). RESULTS Of 37 taxane-treated patients enrolled. 17 (46%) had detectable AR-V7 in CTCs. Prostate-specific antigen responses were achieved in both AR-V7–positive and AR-V7–negative men (41% vs 65%; P = .19) Similarly, PSA PFS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.7, 95% CI, 0.6-5.0; P = .32) and PFS (HR, 2.7, 95% CI, 0.8-8.8; P = .11) were comparable in AR-V7–positive and AR-V7–negative patients. A significant interaction was observed between AR-V7 status and treatment type (P < .001). Clinical outcomes were superior with

  15. Co regulation of srGAP1 by Wnt and androgen receptor signaling: a new target for treatment of CRPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetics conference hosted by the Center for Epigenetics and Metabolism at UCI in January of 2015 and February 2016. - I have attended seminar and...native molecular mechanisms [6, 10]. When prostate cancer cells have been adapted to the low androgen environment , β-catenin has been shown to act...Res 2008; 68: 4709-18. [92] Zong Y, Huang J, Sankarasharma D, Morikawa T, Fukayama M, Epstein JI, Chada KK, Witte ON. Stromal epigenetic

  16. Raloxifene, an oestrogen-receptor-beta-targeted therapy, inhibits androgen-independent prostate cancer growth: results from preclinical studies and a pilot phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazer, Ronald L; Jain, Anjali; Galkin, Anna V; Cinman, Nadya; Nguyen, Koo N; Natale, Ronald B; Gross, Mitchell; Green, Leland; Bender, Leon I; Holden, Stuart; Kaplan, Leslie; Agus, David B

    2006-04-01

    To determine, in preclinical in vivo animal and in clinical studies, whether raloxifene (a selective oestrogen-receptor (ER) modulator that targets ER-beta and induces apoptosis in vitro in androgen-independent prostate cancer, AIPC cells) affects prostate cell differentiation, proliferation and carcinogenesis, and in the pilot phase II clinical trial, the response rate and duration of patients with AIPC treated with a daily oral dose of raloxifene. Tumour proliferation rate in response to raloxifene treatment, and molecular markers of cell cycle and apoptosis, were evaluated in established ER-beta-positive androgen-dependent (AD) CWR22 and AI CWRSA9 human xenograft prostate cancer models. Twenty-one patients with AIPC and evidence of disease progression were enrolled into the clinical trial and given daily oral raloxifene. There was significant growth inhibition by raloxifene in the ADPC and AIPC xenograft models (CWR22 68%, P < 0.010; CWRSA9 64%, P < 0.001), with no tumour regression. There was evidence of G1 arrest by increased p27kip1 expression in the raloxifene-treated group. Eighteen patients comprised the efficacy analysis, as three withdrew before the first evaluation. At the first evaluation, five men had stable disease and continued on the study for a median of five cycles. The longest response was 17 cycles. Drug related toxicity was minimal. Raloxifene has activity in xenograft models, slowing disease progression. This translated to possible disease stabilization in patients with AIPC. Further studies are warranted.

  17. Melanoma antigen gene protein-A11 (MAGE-11) F-box links the androgen receptor NH2-terminal transactivation domain to p160 coactivators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B; Bai, Suxia; Hnat, Andrew T; Minges, John T; Wilson, Elizabeth M

    2009-12-11

    Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity by the androgen receptor (AR) and its coregulators is required for male reproductive development and function. In humans and other primates, melanoma antigen gene protein-A11 (MAGE-11) is an AR selective coregulator that increases AR transcriptional activity. Here we show that the interaction between AR and MAGE-11 is mediated by AR NH(2)-terminal FXXLF motif binding to a highly conserved MAGE-11 F-box in the MAGE homology domain, and is modulated by serum stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of MAGE-11 Ser-174. The MAGE-11-dependent increase in AR transcriptional activity is mediated by a direct interaction between MAGE-11 and transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2) through the NH(2)-terminal region of TIF2, and by a MAGE-11 FXXIF motif interaction with an F-box-like region in activation domain 1 of TIF2. The results suggest that MAGE-11 functions as a bridging factor to recruit AR coactivators through a novel FXX(L/I)F motif-F-box interaction paradigm.

  18. Melanoma Antigen Gene Protein-A11 (MAGE-11) F-box Links the Androgen Receptor NH2-terminal Transactivation Domain to p160 Coactivators*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askew, Emily B.; Bai, Suxia; Hnat, Andrew T.; Minges, John T.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Androgen-dependent transcriptional activity by the androgen receptor (AR) and its coregulators is required for male reproductive development and function. In humans and other primates, melanoma antigen gene protein-A11 (MAGE-11) is an AR selective coregulator that increases AR transcriptional activity. Here we show that the interaction between AR and MAGE-11 is mediated by AR NH2-terminal FXXLF motif binding to a highly conserved MAGE-11 F-box in the MAGE homology domain, and is modulated by serum stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of MAGE-11 Ser-174. The MAGE-11-dependent increase in AR transcriptional activity is mediated by a direct interaction between MAGE-11 and transcriptional intermediary factor 2 (TIF2) through the NH2-terminal region of TIF2, and by a MAGE-11 FXXIF motif interaction with an F-box-like region in activation domain 1 of TIF2. The results suggest that MAGE-11 functions as a bridging factor to recruit AR coactivators through a novel FXX(L/I)F motif-F-box interaction paradigm. PMID:19828458

  19. Deletion of the Androgen Receptor in Adipose Tissue in Male Mice Elevates Retinol Binding Protein 4 and Reveals Independent Effects on Visceral Fat Mass and on Glucose Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Kerry J.; Smith, Lee B.; Hunger, Nicole I.; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is epidemic in obese ageing males with type 2 diabetes, but the direction of causality remains unclear. Testosterone-deficient males and global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice are insulin resistant with increased fat, but it is unclear whether AR signaling in adipose tissue mediates body fat redistribution and alters glucose homoeostasis. To investigate this, mice with selective knockdown of AR in adipocytes (fARKO) were generated. Male fARKO mice on normal diet had reduced perigonadal fat but were hyperinsulinemic and by age 12 months, were insulin deficient in the absence of obesity. On high-fat diet, fARKO mice had impaired compensatory insulin secretion and hyperglycemia, with increased susceptibility to visceral obesity. Adipokine screening in fARKO mice revealed a selective increase in plasma and intra-adipose retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) that preceded obesity. AR activation in murine 3T3 adipocytes downregulated RBP4 mRNA. We conclude that AR signaling in adipocytes not only protects against high-fat diet–induced visceral obesity but also regulates insulin action and glucose homeostasis, independently of adiposity. Androgen deficiency in adipocytes in mice resembles human type 2 diabetes, with early insulin resistance and evolving insulin deficiency. PMID:22415878

  20. [Effects of extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops on androgen receptors of lacrimal gland cells of castrated rats with dry eye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Qing-Hua; Yao, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Quan-Long

    2012-01-01

    To observe the effects of the extract of Buddleja officinalis eye drops (EBOED) on basic tears secretory volume, tear film stability, and expressions of androgen receptors (AR) in castrated rats with dry eye, and to investigate the mechanism of EBOED on dry eye caused by decreased anti-androgen levels. Forty-five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the blank group, the model group, and the treatment group (treated by EBOED), respectively. Rats in each group were further divided into three sub-groups (fed for one month, two months, and three months, respectively). There were totally nine groups, with five in each. The dry eye model was established with orchiectomy of rats in the model group and the treatment group. EBOED was given to rats in the treatment group for one successive month. Schirmer I test (SIT) and breakup time of tear film (BUT) were determined in all experimental rats. Expressions of AR was analyzed by flow cytometer. Ths SIT value, BUT, and AR positive rate in the model group at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd month were lower than those in the blank group of the same time points (P < 0.01). There was statistical difference in SIT value, BUT, and AR positive rate between the model group and the treatment group at the three time points (P < 0.01). Take the three-month subgroup as an example, the SIT value in the treatment group was (12.667 +/- 5.221) mm, obviously higher than that in the model group (2.676 +/- 1.987) mm. The BUT in the treatment group was (11.758 +/- 4.415) s, obviously longer than that of the model group (4.667 +/- 2.108) s. The AR positive rate in the treatment group was 49.33% +/- 3.44%, obviously higher than that of the model group (33.32% +/- 7.12%, all P < 0.01). The main components of EBOED was the flavonoids which could significantly inhibit the occurrence of dry eye in rats with decreased androgen levels. Its mechanism might possibly be similar to androgen.

  1. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T; Livermore, Karen E; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I; Robson, Craig N; Leung, Hing Y; Harries, Lorna W; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G; Elliott, David J

    2015-10-27

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, beingsignificantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression.

  2. The androgen receptor controls expression of the cancer-associated sTn antigen and cell adhesion through induction of ST6GalNAc1 in prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkley, Jennifer; Oltean, Sebastian; Vodák, Daniel; Wilson, Brian T.; Livermore, Karen E.; Zhou, Yan; Star, Eleanor; Floros, Vasileios I.; Johannessen, Bjarne; Knight, Bridget; McCullagh, Paul; McGrath, John; Crundwell, Malcolm; Skotheim, Rolf I.; Robson, Craig N.; Leung, Hing Y.; Harries, Lorna W.; Rajan, Prabhakar; Mills, Ian G.; Elliott, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of glycosylation are important in cancer, but the molecular mechanisms that drive changes are often poorly understood. The androgen receptor drives prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression to lethal metastatic castration-resistant disease. Here we used RNA-Seq coupled with bioinformatic analyses of androgen-receptor (AR) binding sites and clinical PCa expression array data to identify ST6GalNAc1 as a direct and rapidly activated target gene of the AR in PCa cells. ST6GalNAc1 encodes a sialytransferase that catalyses formation of the cancer-associated sialyl-Tn antigen (sTn), which we find is also induced by androgen exposure. Androgens induce expression of a novel splice variant of the ST6GalNAc1 protein in PCa cells. This splice variant encodes a shorter protein isoform that is still fully functional as a sialyltransferase and able to induce expression of the sTn-antigen. Surprisingly, given its high expression in tumours, stable expression of ST6GalNAc1 in PCa cells reduced formation of stable tumours in mice, reduced cell adhesion and induced a switch towards a more mesenchymal-like cell phenotype in vitro. ST6GalNAc1 has a dynamic expression pattern in clinical datasets, being significantly up-regulated in primary prostate carcinoma but relatively down-regulated in established metastatic tissue. ST6GalNAc1 is frequently upregulated concurrently with another important glycosylation enzyme GCNT1 previously associated with prostate cancer progression and implicated in Sialyl Lewis X antigen synthesis. Together our data establishes an androgen-dependent mechanism for sTn antigen expression in PCa, and are consistent with a general role for the androgen receptor in driving important coordinate changes to the glycoproteome during PCa progression. PMID:26452038

  3. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L

    2007-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and variable phenotype of patients with Klinefelter syndrome, there is a need for a robust and rapid screening method allowing early diagnosis. Here, we report on the development and detailed clinical validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based method...... of the copy number assessment of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located to Xq11.2-q12. We analysed samples from 50 individuals, including a healthy male and female controls and patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY; 48,XXXY) (n = 28), mosaicisms (46,XX/47,XXY/48XXYY; 45,X/46,XY) (n = 3), other sex......-gene expression. The XIST-expression based assay was correct in only 29/36 samples (81%). Our findings demonstrated that the AR-qPCR technique is a simple and reliable screening method for diagnosis of patients with Klinefelter syndrome or other chromosomal disorders involving an aberrant number of X-chromosomes....

  4. C-terminally truncated constitutively active androgen receptor variants and their biologic and clinical significance in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoitei, Anca; Merseburger, Axel S; Godau, Beate; Hoda, M Raschid; Schmid, Evi; Cronauer, Marcus V

    2017-02-01

    A mechanism allowing castration resistant prostate cancer cells to escape the effects of conventional anti-hormonal treatments is the synthesis of constitutively active, C-terminally truncated androgen receptor (AR)-variants. Lacking the entire or vast parts of the ligand binding domain, the intended target of traditional endocrine therapies, these AR-variants (termed ARΔLBD) are insensitive to all traditional treatments including second generation compounds like abiraterone, enzalutamide or ARN-509. Although ARΔLBD are predominantly products of alternative splicing, they can also be products of nonsense mutations or proteolytic cleavage. In this review, we will discuss the etiology and function of c-terminally truncated AR-variants and their clinical significance as markers/targets for the treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Examining a pathway for hormone mediated maternal effects - Yolk testosterone affects androgen receptor expression and endogenous testosterone production in young chicks (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfannkuche, K. A.; Gahr, M.; Weites, I. M.; Riedstra, B.; Wolf, C.; Groothuis, T. G. G.

    2011-01-01

    In vertebrates maternal androgens can substantially influence developing offspring, inducing both short and long term changes in physiology and behavior, including androgen sensitive traits. However, how the effects of maternal hormones are mediated remains unknown. Two possible pathways are that

  6. The Prognostic Role of Androgen Receptor in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Clinical and Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, Ivana; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Brohée, Sylvain; Ameye, Lieveke; Fumagalli, Debora; Ades, Felipe; de Azambuja, Evandro; Bareche, Yacine; Piccart, Martine; Paesmans, Marianne; Sotiriou, Christos

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in about 70% of patients with breast cancer, but its prognostic role remains uncertain.Experimental Design: To assess the prognostic role of AR expression in early-stage breast cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of studies that evaluated the impact of AR at the protein and gene expression level on disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). Eligible studies were identified by systematic review of electronic databases using the MeSH-terms "breast neoplasm" and "androgen receptor" and were selected after a qualitative assessment based on the REMARK criteria. A pooled gene expression analysis of 35 publicly available microarray data sets was also performed from patients with early-stage breast cancer with available gene expression and clinical outcome data.Results: Twenty-two of 33 eligible studies for the clinical meta-analysis, including 10,004 patients, were considered as evaluable for the current study after the qualitative assessment. AR positivity defined by IHC was associated with improved DFS in all patients with breast cancer [multivariate (M) analysis, HR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.58, P analysis. High AR mRNA levels were found to confer positive prognosis overall in terms of DFS (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.72-0.92;P = 0.0007) and OS (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75-0.94; P = 0.02) only in univariate analysis.Conclusions: Our analysis, conducted among more than 17,000 women with early-stage breast cancer included in clinical and gene expression analysis, demonstrates that AR positivity is associated with favorable clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); 2702-12. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. The value of integrating pre-clinical data to predict nausea and vomiting risk in humans as illustrated by AZD3514, a novel androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Claire; Ewart, Lorna; Muthas, Daniel; Deavall, Damian; Smith, Simon A; Clack, Glen; Newham, Pete

    2016-04-01

    Nausea and vomiting are components of a complex mechanism that signals food avoidance and protection of the body against the absorption of ingested toxins. This response can also be triggered by pharmaceuticals. Predicting clinical nausea and vomiting liability for pharmaceutical agents based on pre-clinical data can be problematic as no single animal model is a universal predictor. Moreover, efforts to improve models are hampered by the lack of translational animal and human data in the public domain. AZD3514 is a novel, orally-administered compound that inhibits androgen receptor signaling and down-regulates androgen receptor expression. Here we have explored the utility of integrating data from several pre-clinical models to predict nausea and vomiting in the clinic. Single and repeat doses of AZD3514 resulted in emesis, salivation and gastrointestinal disturbances in the dog, and inhibited gastric emptying in rats after a single dose. AZD3514, at clinically relevant exposures, induced dose-responsive "pica" behaviour in rats after single and multiple daily doses, and induced retching and vomiting behaviour in ferrets after a single dose. We compare these data with the clinical manifestation of nausea and vomiting encountered in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer receiving AZD3514. Our data reveal a striking relationship between the pre-clinical observations described and the experience of nausea and vomiting in the clinic. In conclusion, the emetic nature of AZD3514 was predicted across a range of pre-clinical models, and the approach presented provides a valuable framework for predicition of clinical nausea and vomiting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of androgen receptor and GATA binding protein 3 as immunohistochemical markers in the diagnosis of metastatic breast carcinoma to the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yukinori; Yoshida, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masayuki; Takahashi, Masahide; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma in the lungs from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas is important for determining prognosis and treatment. We evaluated novel breast specific markers, androgen receptor (AR) and GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) immunohistostaining, for this differential, and compare to other traditional markers. The specimens comprised 33 metastatic breast carcinomas to the lung, 566 primary lung tumors (170 adenocarcinomas, 157 squamous cell carcinomas, 31 pleomorphic carcinomas, 115 large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, 43 small cell carcinomas, and 49 typical carcinoids) and 42 malignant mesotheliomas. They were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to AR, GATA3, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), mammaglobin, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 (GCDFP-15). Of the metastatic breast carcinomas, immunohistostaining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 27 cases (81.8%), 24 cases (72.7%), 26 cases (78.8%), 13 cases (39.4%), 12 cases (36.4%), 9 cases (27.3%), respectively. Of primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas, staining of AR, GATA3, ER, PgR, mammaglobin, GCDFP-15 were positive in 18 cases (3%), 3 cases (0.5%), 4 cases (0.7%), 2 cases (0.3%), 0 case (0%), 2 cases (0.3%), respectively. Immunohistochemistry of AR and GATA3 are reliable for differentiating metastatic breast carcinoma from primary lung tumors and mesotheliomas. © 2015 Japanese Society of Pathology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Molecular basis of androgen insensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, A O

    2001-06-20

    Androgens are important steroid hormones for expression of the male phenotype. They have characteristic roles during male sexual differentiation, during development and maintenance of secondary male characteristics, and during the initiation and maintenance of spermatogenesis. The two most important androgens in this respect are testosterone and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Each androgen has its own specific role during male sexual differentiation, testosterone is involved in the development and differentiation of Wolffian duct derived structures, whereas 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, a metabolite of testosterone, is the active ligand in the urogenital sinus and tubercle and their derived structures. The actions of androgens are mediated by the androgen receptor. This ligand dependent transcription factor belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptors, including those for the other steroid hormones. The androgen receptor gene is located on the X-chromosome at Xq11--12 and codes for a protein with a molecular mass of approximately 110 kDa. Only one androgen receptor cDNA has been identified sofar, despite two different ligands. It is generally accepted that defects in the androgen receptor gene prevent the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46, XY individuals. The end-organ resistance to androgens has been designated as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and is distinct from other forms of male pseudohermaphroditism like 17 beta-hydroxy-steroid dehydrogenase type 3 deficiency, leydig cell hypoplasia due to inactivating LH receptor mutations or 5 alpha-reductase type 2 deficiency. Furthermore, two additional pathological situations are associated with abnormal androgen receptor structure and function -- spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, or Kennedy's disease) and prostate cancer. In the AR gene, four different types of mutations have been detected in DNA from individuals with AIS -- (i) single point mutations resulting in

  10. Hypogonadism in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rasha Galal Daabis

    2015-02-24

    Feb 24, 2015 ... Hypogonadism;. Quadriceps muscle weakness;. Systemic inflammation;. Airflow obstruction;. Exercise capacity. Abstract Objectives: To determine the ... lated with the quadriceps strength and exercise capacity, while IL-6 was inversely correlated to ..... Hypogonadism in elderly men–what to do until the.

  11. A Rare Presentation of Transfusional Hemochromatosis: Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifki Ucler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemochromatosis is a disease caused by extraordinary iron deposition in parenchymal cells leading to cellular damage and organ dysfunction. β-thalassemia major is one of the causes of secondary hemochromatosis due to regular transfusional treatment for maintaining adequate levels of hemoglobin. Hypogonadism is one of the potential complications of hemochromatosis, usually seen in patients with a severe iron overload, and it shows an association with diabetes and cirrhosis in adult patients. We describe a patient with mild transfusional hemochromatosis due to β-thalassemia major, presenting with central hypogonadism in the absence of cirrhosis or diabetes. Our case showed an atypical presentation with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism without severe hyperferritinemia, cirrhosis, or diabetes. With this case, we aim to raise awareness of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism in patients with intensive transfused thalassemia major even if not severe hemochromatosis so that hypogonadism related complications, such as osteoporosis, anergia, weakness, sexual dysfunction, and infertility, could be more effectively managed in these patients.

  12. New insights into androgen treatment of erectile dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Gooren

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Erectile response in mammals is centrally and peripherally regulated by androgens. Severe hypogonadism in men usually results in loss of libido and potency which can be restored by androgen administration. The original insights into the mechanisms of action of androgens on sexual function indicated that androgens particularly exert effects on libido and that sleep-related erections were androgen-sensitive but erections in response to erotic stimuli were relatively androgen-independent. There are a number of recent developments which shed new light on testosterone treatment of erectile dysfunction in aging men. There is growing insight that testosterone has profound effects on tissues of the penis involved in the mechanism of erection and that testosterone deficiency impairs the anatomical and physiological/biochemical substrate of erectile capacity, reversible upon androgen treatment. Several studies have indicated that the administration of PDE-5-inhibitors is not always sufficient to restore erectile potency in men and that administration of testosterone improves the therapeutical response to PDE-5-inhibitors considerably. There is increasing insight not to view erectile dysfunction (ED as a single entity but as part of the aging process. Circulating levels of testosterone are closely related to manifestations of other etiological factors in ED, such as atherosclerotic disease and diabetes mellitus. The latter are correlated with lower-than-normal testosterone levels.

  13. Downregulation of androgen receptors by NaAsO2via inhibition of AKT-NF-κB and HSP90 in castration resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunlim; Park, Sang Eun; Moon, Jeong-Weon; Kim, Bong-Min; Kim, Ha-Gyeong; Jeong, In Gab; Yoo, Sangjun; Ahn, Jae Beom; You, Dalsan; Pak, Jhang Ho; Kim, Sujong; Hwang, Jung Jin; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-07-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) play essential roles in the development and maintenance of prostate cancer. The recently identified AR splice variants (AR-Vs) have been considered as a plausible mechanism for the primary resistance against androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Sodium meta-arsenite (NaAsO 2 ; KML001; Kominox), a trivalent arsenical, is an orally bioavailable and water soluble, which is currently in phase I/II clinical trials for the treatment of prostate cancer. It has a potent anti-cancer effect on prostate cancer cells and xenografts. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of NaAsO 2 on AR signaling in LNCaP and 22Rv1 CRPC cells. We used hormone-sensitive LNCaP cells, hormone-insensitive 22Rv1 cells, and CRPC patient-derived primary cells. We analyzed anti-cancer effect of NaAsO 2 using real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blotting, immunofluorescence staining and CellTiter Glo® luminescent assay. Statistical evaluation of the results was performed by one-way ANOVA. NaAsO 2 significantly reduced the translocation of AR and AR-Vs to the nucleus as well as their level in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells. Besides, the level of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA), downstream target gene of AR, was also decreased. This compound was also an effective modulator of AKT-dependent NF-κB activation which regulates AR. NaAsO 2 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT and expression and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. We then investigated the effect of NaAsO 2 on AR stabilization. NaAsO 2 promoted HSP90 acetylation by down-regulating HDAC6, which reduces the stability of AR in prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that NaAsO 2 disrupts AR signaling at multiple levels by affecting AR expression, stability, and degradation in primary tumor cell cultures from prostate cancer patients as well as CRPC cell lines. These results suggest that NaAsO 2 could be a novel therapeutics for prostate

  14. Interaction of the androgen receptor, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in mouse prostate varies with pathological stage and predicts cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Jake; Brogley, Michele; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Mehra, Rohit; Ittmann, Michael M.; Li, Jun Z.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Robins, Diane M.

    2015-01-01

    To examine the impact of common somatic mutations in prostate cancer (PCa) on androgen receptor (AR) signaling, mouse models were designed to perturb sequentially the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways. Mice with "humanized" AR (hAR) alleles that modified AR transcriptional strength by varying polyglutamine tract (Q-tract) length were crossed with mice expressing a prostate-specific, AR-responsive ETV1 transgene (ETV1Tg). While hAR allele did not grossly affect ETV1-induced neoplasia, ETV1 strongly antagonized global AR regulation and repressed critical androgen-induced differentiation and tumor suppressor genes, such as Nkx3-1 and Hoxb13. When Pten was varied to determine its impact on disease progression, mice lacking one Pten allele (Pten+/−) developed more frequent prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN). Yet only those with the ETV1 transgene progressed to invasive adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, progression was more frequent with the short Q-tract (stronger) AR, suggesting that the AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways cooperate in aggressive disease. On the Pten+/− background, ETV1 had markedly less effect on AR target genes. However, a strong inflammatory gene expression signature, notably upregulation of Cxcl16, was induced by ETV1. Comparison of mouse and human patient data stratified by presence of ETS fusion genes highlighted additional factors, some not previously associated with prostate cancer but for which targeted therapies are in development for other diseases. In sum, concerted use of these mouse models illuminates the complex interplay of AR, ETV1 and PTEN pathways in pre-cancerous neoplasia and early tumorigenesis, disease stages difficult to analyze in man. PMID:25631336

  15. Proteome-wide muscle protein fractional synthesis rates predict muscle mass gain in response to a selective androgen receptor modulator in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankaran, Mahalakshmi; Shearer, Todd W; Stimpson, Stephen A; Turner, Scott M; King, Chelsea; Wong, Po-Yin Anne; Shen, Ying; Turnbull, Philip S; Kramer, Fritz; Clifton, Lisa; Russell, Alan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Evans, William J

    2016-03-15

    Biomarkers of muscle protein synthesis rate could provide early data demonstrating anabolic efficacy for treating muscle-wasting conditions. Androgenic therapies have been shown to increase muscle mass primarily by increasing the rate of muscle protein synthesis. We hypothesized that the synthesis rate of large numbers of individual muscle proteins could serve as early response biomarkers and potentially treatment-specific signaling for predicting the effect of anabolic treatments on muscle mass. Utilizing selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) treatment in the ovariectomized (OVX) rat, we applied an unbiased, dynamic proteomics approach to measure the fractional synthesis rates (FSR) of 167-201 individual skeletal muscle proteins in triceps, EDL, and soleus. OVX rats treated with a SARM molecule (GSK212A at 0.1, 0.3, or 1 mg/kg) for 10 or 28 days showed significant, dose-related increases in body weight, lean body mass, and individual triceps but not EDL or soleus weights. Thirty-four out of the 94 proteins measured from the triceps of all rats exhibited a significant, dose-related increase in FSR after 10 days of SARM treatment. For several cytoplasmic proteins, including carbonic anhydrase 3, creatine kinase M-type (CK-M), pyruvate kinase, and aldolase-A, a change in 10-day FSR was strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.90-0.99) to the 28-day change in lean body mass and triceps weight gains, suggesting a noninvasive measurement of SARM effects. In summary, FSR of multiple muscle proteins measured by dynamics of moderate- to high-abundance proteins provides early biomarkers of the anabolic response of skeletal muscle to SARM. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome and alternative antiandrogen therapy associated with the W741C mutant androgen receptor in a novel prostate cancer xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Naoki; Shimizu, Yosuke; Yoshida, Toru; Maeno, Atsushi; Kamba, Tomomi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nakamura, Eijiro; Kamoto, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Osamu

    2010-02-15

    The mechanisms underlying antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome (AWS) and alternative antiandrogen therapy (AAT) effectiveness were assumed to be mutations in the androgen receptor (AR), which resulted in an altered response to antiandrogens. The aim of the present study was to test this assumption using the novel prostate cancer xenograft model KUCaP-1 harboring the W741C mutant AR (Yoshida et al., Cancer Res 2005; 65(21): 9611-9616). Mice bearing xenograft tumors were castrated, and the long-term sequential changes in tumor volume were observed. To determine whether AWS was observed in this model, bicalutamide (BCL) was orally administered to the castrated mice and then withdrawn. The effect of flutamide (FLT) on the W741C mutant AR was examined with transactivation assays in vitro and with the oral administration of FLT to non-castrated mice harboring KUCaP-1 in vivo. The AAT efficacy against KUCaP-1 was evaluated by changing BCL with FLT. KUCaP-1 regressed significantly after castration and did not re-grow. KUCaP-1 treated with BCL continued to grow even after castration and started regressing 2 months after BCL withdrawal, replicating clinically recognized AWS. The antagonistic effect of FLT against the W741C mutant AR was revealed in vitro and in vivo. AAT with FLT suppressed tumor growth after BCL withdrawal. KUCaP-1 was an entirely androgen-dependent xenograft and mimicked the clinical phenomena of AWS and AAT caused by the agonistic and antagonistic activity of BCL and FLT, respectively. KUCaP-1 could be an in vivo model for screening novel antiandrogens for the treatment of BCL resistant prostate cancer harboring the W741C mutation in the AR. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Androgens and androgen receptors in prostatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.G.J.M. van Aubel (Olav)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractOur understanding of the testicular control of growth and functioning of the accessory sex glands began with an observation in the 18th century of John Hunter (1), who discovered in animals the endocrine dependency of the prostate. He demonstrated that castration in experimental

  18. Binding of bisphenol A, bisphenol AF, and bisphenol S on the androgen receptor: Coregulator recruitment and stimulation of potential interaction sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Lalith; Li, Yin; Coons, Laurel A; Houtman, Rene; van Beuningen, Rinie; Goodwin, Bonnie; Auerbach, Scott S; Teng, Christina T

    2017-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol AF (BPAF), and bisphenol S (BPS) are well known endocrine disruptors. Previous in vitro studies showed that these compounds antagonize androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional activity; however, the mechanisms of action are unclear. In the present study, we investigated interactions of coregulator peptides with BPA, BPAF, or BPS at the AR complexes using Micro Array for Real-time Coregulator Nuclear Receptor Interaction (MARCoNI) assays and assessed the binding of these compounds on AR by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The set of coregulator peptides that are recruited by BPA-bound AR, either positively/or negatively, are different from those recruited by the agonist R1881-bound AR. Therefore, the data indicates that BPA shows no similarities to R1881 and suggests that it may recruit other coregulators to the AR complex. BPAF-bound AR recruits about 70-80% of the same coregulator peptides as BPA-bound AR. Meanwhile, BPS-bound AR interacts with only few peptides compared to BPA or BPAF-bound AR. MD results show that multiple binding sites with varying binding affinities are available on AR for BPA, BPAF, and BPS, indicating the availability of modified binding surfaces on AR for coregulator interactions. These findings help explain some of the distinct AR-related toxicities observed with bisphenol chemicals and raise concern for the use of substitutes for BPA in commercial products. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Comparison of the Pharmacological Effects of a Novel Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, the 5α-Reductase Inhibitor Finasteride, and the Antiandrogen Hydroxyflutamide in Intact Rats: New Approach for Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Nair, Vipin A.; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A. F.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5α-reductase (Ki, >20 µM) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5α-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH. PMID:15308613

  20. Ameliorating effects of green tea extract on cadmium induced reproductive injury in male Wistar rats with respect to androgen receptors and caspase- 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrazek, Heba M A; Helmy, Seham A; Elsayed, Doaa H; Ebaid, Hala M; Mohamed, Racha M

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium is one of the potent environmental endocrine disruptors that has adverse effects on male fertility. This study was conducted to investigate the protective role of green tea extract (GTE) on cadmium chloride (CdCl2) induced reproductive toxicities in male Wistar rats. Thirty-six male Wistar rats were divided to 4 groups, each one contained 9 rats. Control group, they were gavaged distilled water, meanwhile the treated groups gavaged CdCl2 (3mg/kg), GTE (70mg/kg) and CdCl2+GTE (3mg/kg and 70mg/kg) for 63days. In GTE+ CdCl2 treated rats, the final body weight, relative testicular weight, epididymal weight, seminal and prostate glands weights were significantly (P<0.05) increased compared to CdCl2 intoxicated rats. Sperm cell concentration was significantly (P<0.05) increased in CdCl2+GTE group, while sperm morphological abnormalities were significantly (P<0.05) decreased than CdCl2 group. The levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were elevated significantly (P<0.05) in CdCl2+GTE group, meanwhile catalase activity was significantly (P<0.05) declined than CdCl2 group. Hypercholesterolemia was observed in CdCl2 group than control one while GTE+CdCl2 group revealed significant (P<0.05) reduction in cholesterol level than CdCl2 treated group. Testicular androgen receptors and caspase-3 protein expression showed marked reduction and increase (P<0.05) in CdCl2 group than control, respectively. Treatment with GTE with CdCl2 significantly (P<0.05) increased androgen receptors, while decreased caspase-3 protein than CdCl2 group. In conclusion, GTE exhibited protective effect on testes by inhibiting CdCl2 induced oxidative damage and cellular apoptosis. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  1. Androgen Restored Contraception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmerman, X.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Combined oral contraceptives (COCs) reduce androgen levels, especially testosterone (T), by inhibiting ovarian and adrenal androgen synthesis and by increasing levels of sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG). Possible consequences of this androgen loss are diminished sexual function and mood

  2. PTTG1, A novel androgen responsive gene is required for androgen-induced prostate cancer cell growth and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zheng [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Bo [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034 (China); Jin, Yaqiong [Biobank for Clinical Data and Samples in Pediatric, Beijing Pediatric Research Institute, Beijing Children' s Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100045 (China); Huang, Shengquan; Niu, Xiaohua [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China); Mao, Zebin [The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Health Science Center, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Beijing 100191 (China); Xin, Dianqi, E-mail: xin-dianqi@163.com [Department of Urology, First Hospital, Peking University & Institute of Urology, Peking University, Beijing 100034 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Androgens (AR) play an important role in initiation and progression of prostate cancer. It has been shown that AR exert their effects mainly through the androgen-activated AR which binds to androgen response elements (AREs) in the regulatory regions of target genes to regulate the transcription of androgen-responsive genes, thus, identification of AR downstream target gene is critical to understand androgen function in prostate cancer. In this study, our results showed that androgen treatment of LNCaP cells induced PTTG1 expression, which was blocked by the androgen receptor antagonist, Casodex. Bioinformatics analysis and experiments using PTTG1 promoter deletion mutants showed that the PTTG1 promoter contains a putative androgen response element (ARE), which localizes in the −851 to −836 region of the pro