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Sample records for hypogastric plexus block

  1. Ultrasound-Guided Superior Hypogastric Plexus Block: A Cadaveric Feasibility Study with Fluoroscopic Confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofeld, Michael; Lee, Chuan-Whei

    2017-02-01

    Plancarte first described a fluoroscopy-guided superior hypogastric plexus block to manage pelvic pain in 1990. Modifications have since been described using different imaging modalities. Ultrasound-guided approach has been described in a clinical outcome study. However, the accuracy of an ultrasound-guided method has never been validated by alternative imaging. We conducted an experiment aiming to develop ultrasound-guided superior hypogastric plexus block using human cadavers in the supine position. Final needle position and spread of a radiopaque contrast was verified by fluoroscopy, a standard imaging tool. The needle approach to the L5 vertebral body was performed in the short axis as has been recommended. Injection of radiopaque contrast revealed unilateral and cephalad spread to the L5/S1 disk. Additional transabdominal long-axis scanning of the lumbosacral segment was and the needle trajectory was modified to aim for the apex of the L5/S1 disk. Bilateral spread was achieved by strict midline placement of the needle tip and real-time observation of injection. The modified ultrasound-guided technique resulted in a similar spread of injectate as the traditional fluoroscopy-guided technique that in a clinical scenario would offer complete block of the superior hypogastric plexus. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  2. Superior hypogastric plexus combined with ganglion impar neurolytic blocks for pelvic and/or perineal cancer pain relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Doaa G; Mohamed, Mohamed F; Mohamed, Sahar Abd-Elbaky

    2015-01-01

    The superior hypogastric plexus (SHGP) carries afferents from the viscera of the lower abdomen and pelvis. Neurolytic block of this plexus is used for reducing pain resulting from malignancy in these organs. The ganglion impar (GI) innervats the perineum, distal rectum, anus, distal urethra, vulva, and distal third of the vagina. Different approaches to the ganglion impar neurolysis have been described in the literature. To assess the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of combining the block of the SHGP through the postero-median transdiscal approach with the GI block by the trans-sacro-coccygeal approach for relief of pelvic and/or perineal pain caused by pelvic and/or perineal malignancies or any cancer related causes. Fifteen patients who had cancer-related pelvic pain, perineal pain, or both received a combined SHGP neurolytic block through the postero-median transdiscal approach using a 20-gauge Chiba needle and injection of 10 mL of 10% phenol in saline plus a GI neurolytic block by the trans-sacro-coccygeal approach using a 22-gauge 5 cm needle and injection of 4 - 6 mL of 8% phenol in saline. Pain intensity (measured using a visual analogue scale) and oral morphine consumption pre- and post-procedure were measured. All patients presented with cancer-related pelvic, perineal, or pelviperineal pain. Pain scores were reduced from a mean (± SD) of 7.87 ± 1.19 pre-procedurally to 2.40 ± 2.10 one week post-procedurally (P pain in cancer patients presented with pelvic and/or perineal pain. Also, a combined SHGP block through a posteromedian transdiscal approach with a GI block through a trans-sacrococcygeal approach may be considered more effective and easier to perform than the recently invented bilateral inferior hypogastric plexus neurolysis through a transsacral approach.

  3. Comparative study between computed tomography guided superior hypogastric plexus block and the classic posterior approach: A prospective randomized study

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    Ayman A Ghoneim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The classic posterior approach to superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB is sometimes hindered by the iliac crest or a prominent transverse process of L5. The computed tomography (CT - guided anterior approach might overcome these difficulties. Aims: This prospective, comparative, randomized study was aimed to compare the CT guided anterior approach versus the classic posterior approach. Settings and Design: Controlled randomized study. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with chronic pelvic cancer pain were randomized into either classic or CT groups where classic posterior approach or CT guided anterior approach were done, respectively. Visual analog score, daily analgesic morphine consumed and patient satisfaction were assessed just before the procedure, then, after 24 h, 1 week and monthly for 2 months after the procedure. Duration of the procedure was also recorded. Adverse effects associated with the procedure were closely observed and recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: Student′s t-test was used for comparison between groups. Results: Visual analog scale and morphine consumption decreased significantly in both groups at the measured times after the block compared with the baseline in the same group with no significant difference between both groups. The procedure was carried out in significantly shorter duration in the CT group than that in the classic group. The mean patient satisfaction scale increased significantly in both groups at the measured times after the block compared with the baseline in the same group. The patients in the CT groups were significantly more satisfied than those in classic group from day one after the procedure until the end of the study. Conclusions: The CT guided approach for SHPB is easier, faster, safer and more effective, with less side-effects than the classic approach.

  4. Chemical Neurolysis of the Inferior Hypogastric Plexus for the Treatment of Cancer-Related Pelvic and Perineal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Abd-Elbaky Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various interventions, including the superior hypogastric plexus block and ganglion impar block, are commonly used for the treatment of pelvic or perineal pain caused by cancer. The inferior hypogastric plexus block (performed using a trans-sacral approach under fluoroscopy and using a local anesthetics/steroid combination for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain conditions involving the lower pelvic viscera was first described in 2007. Neurolysis of the inferior hypogastric plexus may be useful for the treatment of pelvic and perineal pain caused by cancer.

  5. O Bloqueio do plexo hipogástrico superior é eficaz no tratamento de dor pélvica crônica? ¿El bloqueo del plexo hipogástrico superior es eficaz en el tratamiento del dolor pélvico crónico? Is superior hypogastric plexus block effective for treatment of chronic pelvic pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André P Schmidt

    2005-12-01

    calidad de vida antes y después del procedimiento. El bloqueo del plexo hipogástrico superior debe ser recomendado como una alternativa y no como terapéutica principal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hypograstric plexus block has been considered a safe and effective alternative for treat patients with chronic pelvic pain. Published studies available at MedLine on the subject were included and evaluated in this review. CONTENTS: Some studies have documented superior hypogastric plexus block effectiveness in relieving pain and decreasing opioid consumption, mainly in cancer patients. However, studies had failures in method or design. CONCLUSIONS: New prospective and better-designed studies are still needed to confirm the effectiveness of hypogastric plexus block in relieving pelvic pain. These studies shall have stricter inclusion criteria, longer follow-up, and evaluation of other symptoms and quality of life before and after the procedure. Superior hypogastric plexus block should be recommended as alternative and not as primary therapy.

  6. SUPERFICIAL CERVICAL PLEXUS BLOCK

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    Komang Mega Puspadisari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superficial cervical plexus block is one of the regional anesthesia in  neck were limited to thesuperficial fascia. Anesthesia is used to relieve pain caused either during or after the surgery iscompleted. This technique can be done by landmark or with ultrasound guiding. The midpointof posterior border of the Sternocleidomastoid was identified and the prosedure done on thatplace or on the level of cartilage cricoid.

  7. Seizure complicating interscalene brachail plexus block | Idehen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of seizure occurring immediately after completion of interscalene brachial plexus block, using 20mls mixture of 10mls of 0.5% bupivacaine and 10mls of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline for post operative analgesia. Seizure occurred despite negative test aspiration and non response to the use of 0.5mls of ...

  8. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy | Kolawole | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Thyroidectomy is traditionally performed under general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. However, cervical plexus block has also been found useful for this operation in some parts of the world. This particular anaesthetic option has never been reported in our environment. The aims of this study were to ...

  9. Comparison of Two Techniques of Brachial Plexus Block for Upper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study compared trans-arterial approach and mid-humeral technique of axillary brachial plexus block in terms of the clinical benefit of each method; adequacy of block, onset of sensory and motor block, duration of block and complications. .In a prospective randomized study, axillary plexus block was carried out in 50 ...

  10. Sympathetic blocks for visceral cancer pain management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Klepstad, Pal; Kurita, Geana Paula

    2015-01-01

    The neurolytic blocks of sympathetic pathways, including celiac plexus block (CPB) and superior hypogastric plexus block (SHPB) , have been used for years. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence to support the performance of sympathetic blocks in cancer patients with abdominal visceral...

  11. hoarseness and Horner's after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to compressive effects on the axillary fascial sheath. However, further studies are required to prove this. Keywords: combined incidence, Horner's syndrome, recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy, supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Introduction. Supraclavicular block is performed at the level of divisions of the brachial plexus.

  12. Ganglion block. Celiac plexus neurolysis; Ganglienblockade. Neurolyse des Plexus coeliacus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, S.C.; Seifarth, H. [Klinikum Esslingen gGmbH, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Esslingen (Germany); Meier, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Klinik fuer diagnostische und interventionelle Radiologie, Ulm (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    Pain originating from the organs of the upper abdomen, especially in patients suffering from inoperable carcinoma of the pancreas or advanced inflammatory conditions, is difficult to treat in a significant number of patients. Computed tomography (CT) guided neurolysis is the most commonly used technique for neurolysis of the celiac plexus. Ethanol is used to destroy the nociceptive fibers passing through the plexus and provides an effective means of diminishing pain arising from the upper abdomen. Using either an anterior or posterior approach, a 22 G Chiba needle is advanced to the antecrural space and neurolysis is achieved by injecting a volume of 20-50 ml of ethanol together with a local anesthetic and contrast medium. In up to 80 % of patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen, CT-guided celiac plexus neurolysis diminishes pain or allows a reduction of analgesic medication; however, in some patients the effect may only be temporary necessitating a second intervention. In inflammatory conditions, celiac neurolysis is often less effective in reducing abdominal pain. The CT-guided procedure for neurolysis of the celiac plexus is safe and effective in diminishing pain especially in patients suffering from tumors of the upper abdomen. The procedure can be repeated if the effect is only temporary. (orig.) [German] Therapierefraktaere und schwere rezidivierende Schmerzen im Oberbauch stellen insbesondere beim nicht operablen Pankreaskarzinom, aber auch bei fortgeschrittenen entzuendlichen Erkrankungen eine Herausforderung dar. Die CT-gesteuerte Neurolyse/Blockade des Plexus coeliacus schaltet durch eine gezielte Zerstoerung der afferenten und efferenten Nervenfasern mit Alkohol die Schmerzweiterleitung aus. Mittels unterschiedlicher Zugaenge von ventral oder dorsal wird eine 22-G-Chiba-Nadel CT-durchleuchtungsgesteuert nach prae- und/oder paraaortal auf Hoehe des Truncus coeliacus vorgebracht. An der entsprechenden Lokalisation erfolgt die Injektion von 20

  13. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... regarding pain after 1 week. In conclusion, pancreatic hormone concentrations in response to standing are not useful for monitoring celiac plexus block, whereas heart rate, blood pressure and hepato-splanchnic blood flow may yield useful information. From such measurements it was concluded that permanent...

  14. [Bilateral brachial plexus block. Case report and systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia-Terrazas, Gabriel Enrique; Garduño-Juárez, María de Ángeles; Limón-Muñoz, Marisol; Torres-Maldonado, Areli Seir; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    The bilateral brachial plexus block is considered a contraindication, due to the possible development of complications, such as: toxicity from local anaesthetics or bilateral diaphragmatic paralysis. However, with the real time visualisation provided by the ultrasound scan, these complications have decreased and it is a safer procedure. Four cases are presented where the bilateral block was performed using guided ultrasound, as the patients were unable to receive general anaesthesia due to a history of adverse effects or the use of opioids in the post-operative or by the prediction of a difficult airway associated with obesity. A systematic review of the literature from January 1993 to June 2013, was also performed by using a search in the MEDLINE, EMBASE, ARTEMISA, LILACS, Google data bases, in Spanish and English language with the following words: bilateral brachial plexus block, bilateral interscalene block, bilateral infraclavicular block, bilateral supraclavicular block, bilateral lateral supraclavicular block, bilateral axillary block, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block. Based on the evidence found, ultrasound-guided bilateral brachial plexus block in selected patients and expert hands, is no longer a contraindication. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Monitoring of celiac plexus block in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myhre, John Gabriel; Hilsted, J; Tronier, B

    1989-01-01

    Pharmacological, percutaneous celiac plexus blockade is often inefficient in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Lack of efficiency could be due to incomplete denervation of the plexus; however, a method for measuring the completeness of celiac plexus blockade is not yet available. We...... have, therefore, monitored the physiological completeness of pharmacological percutaneous celiac blockade with 40 ml 25% ethanol by measuring the effect of posture on heart rate, blood pressure, hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance, and pancreatic hormone concentrations before and after celiac plexus...... block in 6 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Blood pressure decreased and heart rate increased after the block (P less than 0.025), whereas no significant change was found in hepato-splanchnic vascular resistance nor in the change of these parameters during transition from the supine to standing...

  16. CT-guided coeliac plexus block

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    Schild, H.; Guenther, R.; Hoffmann, J.; Goedecke, R.

    1983-08-01

    A modified procedure for infiltrating the coeliac plexus for the treatment of chronic pain syndromes is described. The injection of the analgesic is made through a fine needle introduced via a transabdominal approach under CT guidance. The advantages of this technique, compared with the dorsal approach, are a more accurate placement of the solution and the ability to carry out this procedure in very sick patients. No complications have been observed.

  17. [Effects of cervical plexus block on lung ventilation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wośko, Jarosław; Sawulski, Sławomir; Dabrowski, Wojciech; Nestorowicz, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Carotid endarterectomy is a preventative operation to reduce the incidence of embolic stroke. The prime concern during surgery is the protection of the brain during carotid artery cross-clamping. Since blood flow to the brain is provided via the non-affected carotid artery and collateral circulation, it is essential to maintain consciousness in the patient during surgery, in order to assess the effects of cross-clamping. Regional anaesthesia has therefore been regarded as the method of choice for this kind of surgery. Cervical plexus analgesia can be achieved at two levels: superficial--when skin branches of the plexus are blocked, and deep--when short and long nerves are blocked. Successful block of the cervical plexus depends of effective analgesia achieved at both levels. This can be achieved by a single injection as described by Winnie, or multiple injection at C2, C3 and C4 as described by Moore. Among possible complications, the most common is transient phrenic nerve block with diaphragm dysfunction. We have compared the effects of cervical plexus block performed according to Winnie (group W), or Moore (group M) on spirometry, arterial oxygen saturation and carbon dioxide tension, in seventy-five patients scheduled for endarterectomy. Group W consisted of 44 patients, and group M--of 31 patients. VC, FVC, FEV1 and PIF decreased in all patients. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups. Transient paralysis of the diaphragm, confirmed by chest x-ray, occurred in 8 (19.5%) patients of group W, and in 4 (14.3%) patients of group M. Gas exchange remained unchanged. We proved that cervical plexus block is associated with moderate depression of respiratory function without impairment of gas exchange. The block may be complicated by transient unilateral diaphragm paralysis.

  18. Superior Hypogastric Nerve Block to Reduce Pain After Uterine Artery Embolization: Advanced Technique and Comparison to Epidural Anesthesia

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    Binkert, Christoph A., E-mail: christoph.binkert@ksw.ch [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hirzel, Florian C. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland); Gutzeit, Andreas; Zollikofer, Christoph L. [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Institute of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine (Switzerland); Hess, Thomas [Kantonsspital Winterthur, Department of Gynecology (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate a modified superior hypogastric nerve block (SHNB) to reduce pain after uterine artery embolization (UAE) compared to epidural anesthesia.Materials and methodsIn this retrospective study, the amount of opiate drugs needed after UAE was compared between SHNB and epidural anesthesia. Eighty one consecutive women (mean age: 43.67 years) were in the SHNB group and 27 consecutive women (mean age: 43.48 years) treated earlier at the same institution in the epidural anesthesia group. UAE was performed from a unilateral femoral artery approach using a 4F catheter. 500–700 or 700–900 μm trisacryl gelatine microspheres were used as embolic agents. The SHNB was performed by advancing a 21G from the abdominal wall below the umbilicus to the anterior portion of the 5th vertebral body. For optimal guidance a cranio-caudal tilt of 5°–15° was used. On a lateral view the correct contrast distribution in front of the vertebral body is confirmed. Then 20 ml local anesthesia (ropivacain 0.75 %) is injected. In case of an asymmetric right–left distribution the needle was repositioned.ResultsAll SHNB were successful without severe complications. The mean time for the SHNB was 4 min 38 s (2 min 38 s–9 min 27 s). The needle was repositioned in average 0.87 times. The opiate dose for the SHNB group was 19.33 ± 22.17 mg which was significantly lower. The average time to receive an opiate drug after SHNB was 4 h 41 min.ConclusionThe SHNB is a safe and minimally time-consuming way to reduce pain after UAE especially within the first 4 h.

  19. Surgical anesthesia with a combination of T12 paravertebral block and lumbar plexus, sacral plexus block for hip replacement in ankylosing spondylitis: CARE-compliant 4 case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xijian; Li, Ji; Liu, Yong; Wu, Xi; Mei, Wei

    2017-06-26

    Anesthesia management for patients with severe ankylosing spondylitis scheduled for total hip arthroplasty is challenging due to a potential difficult airway and difficult neuraxial block. We report 4 cases with ankylosing spondylitis successfully managed with a combination of lumbar plexus, sacral plexus and T12 paravertebral block. Four patients were scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. All of them were diagnosed as severe ankylosing spondylitis with rigidity and immobilization of cervical and lumbar spine and hip joints. A combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block was successfully used for the surgery without any additional intravenous anesthetic or local anesthetics infiltration to the incision, and none of the patients complained of discomfort during the operations. The combination of T12 paravertebral block, lumbar plexus and sacral plexus block, which may block all nerves innervating the articular capsule, surrounding muscles and the skin involved in total hip arthroplasty, might be a promising alternative for total hip arthroplasty in ankylosing spondylitis.

  20. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate effects of neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) on stress and inflammation in rats with partial hepatectomy (PH). Methods: A model of PH rat was established, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP); corticosterone (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); noradrenaline (NA); adrenalin (AD); aspartate ...

  1. Brachial Plexus Blocks for Upper Extremity Surgeries in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Different techniques of brachial plexus blocks are in use to provide surgical anaesthesia from the shoulder to the fingertips. However, they are perceived as time-consuming and unreliable as the sole anaesthetic for surgical procedures. Until recently (July 2008), only general anaesthesia was employed in our ...

  2. Use Of Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Facilitates ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report the successful use of continuous axillary brachial plexus block in the assessment of muscle functions during tendon repair. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out at Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ile-Ife between November 2006 and December 2007. The study included ...

  3. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  4. Brachial plexus block in phantom limb pain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissler, Sandra; Dietrich, Caroline; Meissner, Winfried; Huonker, Ralph; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this case report is twofold: first, to present evidence of long-lasting relief in a patient suffering from phantom limb pain after pharmacologically blocking his plexus brachialis and, second, to replicate results from a previous study focusing on cortical reorganization and phantom limb pain. Before regional anesthesia, the patient suffered from a phantom hand that cramped and was immovable. We performed a diagnostic axillary blockade of the brachial plexus to differentiate peripheral from more central contributions to phantom limb pain. During blockade of the brachial plexus, the patient reported a reduction of phantom limb pain for the first time following years of suffering and a complete loss of cramping together with muscle relaxation of the phantom hand. Additionally, we found cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex (re-reorganization). Strikingly, the relaxed phantom limb together with the reduction of phantom limb pain remained preserved even 6 months after blockade of the brachial plexus. A single temporary blockade of the brachial plexus may relieve phantom limb pain and unpleasant phantom feelings (cramping) for an extended period. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Increasing the efficacy of a celiac plexus block in patients with severe pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical possibilities of placing a catheter near the celiac plexus for performance of a celiac plexus block, and to study the efficacy of repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks with alcohol in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer pain resistant

  6. Ipsilateral Brachial Plexus Block and Hemidiaphragmatic Paresis as Adverse Effect of a High Thoracic Paravertebral Block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renes, Steven H.; van Geffen, Geert J.; Snoeren, Miranda M.; Gielen, Matthieu J.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    Background: Thoracic paravertebral block is regularly used for unilateral chest and abdominal surgery and is associated with a low complication rate. Case Reports: We describe 2 patients with an ipsilateral brachial plexus block with Horner syndrome after a high continuous thoracic paravertebral

  7. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the...

  8. Quantification of the vasodilatory effect of axillary plexus block. A prospective controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Andrea; Rothenberger, Jens; Hakim-Meibodi, Lara-Elena; Notheisen, Thomas; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2017-05-15

    Axillary plexus block is a common method for regional anesthesia, especially in hand and wrist surgery. Local anesthetics (e.g., mepivacaine) are injected around the peripheral nerves in the axilla. A vasodilatory effect due to sympathicolysis has been described, but not quantified. In a prospective controlled study between October 2012 and July 2013, we analyzed 20 patients with saddle joint arthritis undergoing trapeziectomy under axillary plexus block. Patients received a mixture of mepivacaine 1% and ropivacaine 0.75% in a 3:1 ratio. The measurements were carried out on the plexus side and the contralateral hand, which acted as the control. Laser-Doppler spectrophotometry (oxygen to see [O2C] device) was used to measure various perfusion factors before and after the plexus block, after surgery and in 2-h intervals until 6 h postoperatively. Compared with the contralateral side, the plexus block produced an enhancement of tissue oxygen saturation of 117.35 ± 34.99% (cf. control SO2: 92.92 ± 22.30%, P plexus block produces an improvement of peripheral tissue oxygen saturation of the upper extremity over the first 4 h after the inception of anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ferrero-Manzanal

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus.

  10. Comparison of Outside Versus Inside Brachial Plexus Sheath Injection for Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Nerve Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maga, Joni; Missair, Andres; Visan, Alex; Kaplan, Lee; Gutierrez, Juan F; Jain, Annika R; Gebhard, Ralf E

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks are commonly used to provide anesthesia for the shoulder and proximal upper extremity. Some reviews identify a sheath that envelops the brachial plexus as a potential tissue plane target, and current editorials in the literature highlight the need to establish precise and reproducible injection targets under ultrasound guidance. We hypothesize that an injection of a local anesthetic inside the brachial plexus sheath during ultrasound-guided interscalene nerve blocks will result in enhanced procedure success and provide a consistent tissue plane target for this approach with a reproducible and characteristic local anesthetic spread pattern. Sixty patients scheduled for shoulder surgery with a preoperative interscalene block for postoperative pain management were enrolled in this prospective randomized observer-blinded study. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive a single-shot interscalene block either inside or outside the brachial plexus sheath. The rate of complete motor and sensory blocks of the axillary nerve territory 10 minutes after local anesthetic injection for the inside group was 70% versus 37% for the outside group (P complete sensory blockade. The incidence rates of transient paresthesia during needle passage were 6.7% for the outside group and 96.7% for the inside group (P randomized trial did not find any advantages to performing an interscalene block inside the brachial plexus sheath. There was a higher incidence of transient paresthesia when injections were performed inside compared to outside the sheath. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  11. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to brachial plexus block and its comparison with tramadol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Kelika

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Clonidine in a dose of 1.5 μg/kg body weight provided the fastest onset of sensory as well as motor block and the longest duration of postoperative analgesia and thus is a good additive to local anesthetic solutions for brachial plexus blocks.

  12. brachial plexus blocks for upper extremity surgeries in a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... and oxygen therapy. To localise the target nerve/ plexus, paraesthesia was elicited by mechanical stimulation before injecting the local anaesthetic solution in four out of ten patients in 2008. In 2009,. PNS technique was employed in 36 BPB with muscle twitch at 0.2-0.4mA as end-point, while the remaining.

  13. Hoarseness of voice after supraclavicular ultrasound-guided subclavian perivascular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block is ideal for surgical procedures at or distal to the elbow. Ultrasound (USG continues to grow in popularity as a method of nerve localization, and for the supraclavicular block, it has the advantage of allowing real-time visualization of the plexus, pleura, and vessels along with the needle and local anesthetic spread, but it may conversely create a false sense of security. The incidence of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN block occurring with supraclavicular approach is 1.3% of patients.[10] Incidence of RLN block with USG-guided supraclavicular block is not known. In this case report, we discuss a rare complication of RLN block which occurred while performing a supraclavicular perivascular block performed under USG guidance.

  14. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Ultrasound guidance is the safe and effective method for the supraclavicular brachial plexus block

  15. Does the Addition of Tramadol and Ketamine to Ropivacaine Prolong the Axillary Brachial Plexus Block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Can Senel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. A prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trial to assess the effect of tramadol and ketamine, 50 mg, added to ropivacaine in brachial plexus anesthesia. Methods. Thirty-six ASA physical statuses I and II patients, between 18 and 60 years of age, scheduled for forearm and hand surgery under axillary brachial plexus block, were allocated to 3 groups. Group R received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL, group RT received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg tramadol, and group RK received 0.375% ropivacaine in 40 mL with 50 mg ketamine for axillary brachial plexus block. The onset times and the duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, hemodynamic parameters, and adverse events (nausea, vomiting, and feeling uncomfortable were recorded. Results. The onset time of sensorial block was the fastest in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of sensorial and motor block was the shortest in the ropivacaine + tramadol group. Duration of analgesia was significantly longer in ropivacaine + tramadol group. Conclusion. We conclude that when added to brachial plexus analgesia at a dose of 50 mg, tramadol extends the onset and duration time of the block and improves the quality of postoperative analgesia without any side effects.

  16. Anatomic Basis for Brachial Plexus Block at the Costoclavicular Space: A Cadaver Anatomic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Reina, Miguel Angel; Pangthipampai, Pawinee; Karmakar, Manoj Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The costoclavicular space (CCS), which is located deep and posterior to the midpoint of the clavicle, may be a better site for infraclavicular brachial plexus block than the traditional lateral paracoracoid site. However, currently, there is paucity of data on the anatomy of the brachial plexus at the CCS. We undertook this cadaver anatomic study to define the anatomy of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS and thereby establish the anatomic basis for ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block at this proximal site. The anatomy and topography of the cords of the brachial plexus at the CCS was evaluated in 8 unembalmed (cryopreserved), thawed, fresh adult human cadavers using anatomic dissection, and transverse anatomic and histological sections, of the CCS. The cords of the brachial plexus were located lateral and parallel to the axillary artery at the CCS. The topography of the cords, relative to the axillary artery and to one another, in the transverse (axial) plane was also consistent at the CCS. The lateral cord was the most superficial of the 3 cords and it was always anterior to both the medial and posterior cords. The medial cord was directly posterior to the lateral cord but medial to the posterior cord. The posterior cord was the lateral most of the 3 cords at the CCS and it was immediately lateral to the medial cord but posterolateral to the lateral cord. The cords of the brachial plexus are clustered together lateral to the axillary artery, and share a consistent relation relative to one another and to the axillary artery, at the CCS.

  17. Celiac Plexus Block and Neurolysis in the Management of Chronic Upper Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornman-Homonoff, Joshua; Holzwanger, Daniel J; Lee, Kyungmouk S; Madoff, David C; Li, David

    2017-12-01

    Chronic upper abdominal pain occurs as a complication of various malignant and benign diseases including pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis, and when present may contribute to lower quality of life and higher mortality. Though various pain management strategies are available as part of a multimodal approach, they are often incompletely effective and accompanied by side effects. Pain originating in upper abdominal viscera is transmitted through the celiac plexus, which is an autonomic plexus located in the retroperitoneum at the root of the celiac trunk. Direct intervention at the level of the plexus, referred to as celiac plexus block or neurolysis depending on the injectate, is a minimally invasive therapeutic strategy which has been demonstrated to decrease pain, improve function, and reduce opiate dependence. Various percutaneous techniques have been reported, but, with appropriate preprocedural planning, use of image guidance (usually computed tomography), and postprocedural care, the frequency and severity of complications is low and the success rate high regardless of approach. The main benefit of the intervention may be in reduced opiate dependence and opiate-associated side effects, which in turn improves quality of life. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are safe and effective treatments for chronic upper abdominal pain and should be considered early in patients experiencing such symptoms.

  18. A comparison of the lateral and posterior approach for brachial plexus block.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, H.C.; Gielen, M.J.M.; Jack, N.T.; Boersma, E.; Klein, J.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus block by the posterior approach described by Pippa is not widely used in contrast to the lateral approach of Winnie. We compared the clinical efficacy of both approaches in a randomized prospective study. METHODS: Eighty patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists

  19. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, McB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  20. A clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sultan, S F

    2012-05-01

    Competency in anesthesia traditionally has been determined subjectively in practice. Optimal training in procedural skills requires valid and reliable forms of assessment. The objective was to examine a procedure-specific clinical assessment tool for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block for inter-rater reliability and construct validity in a clinical setting.

  1. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  2. Neurohistopathologic findings after a neurolytic celiac plexus block with alcohol in patients with pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W. A.; van Kemenade, F. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very poor prognosis resulting in the death of 98% of patients. Pain may be severe and difficult to treat. Management of pain includes chemotherapy, radiotherapy, pharmacologic treatment, and neurolytic celiac plexus block. Recent reviews of the efficacy of neurolytic celiac

  3. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cevdet Düger; Ahmet Cemil İsbir; İclal Özdemir Kol,; Kenan Kaygusuz; Sinan Gürsoy,; Caner Mimaroğlu

    2013-01-01

    Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular, central ...

  4. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  5. Convulsion due to levobupivacaine in axillary brachial plexus block: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Düger, Cevdet; İsbir, Ahmet Cemil; Özdemir Kol, İclal; Kaygusuz,Kenan; Gürsoy, Sinan; Mimaroğlu, Caner

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Axillary brachial plexus block is an effective method of anaesthesia for the surgeries performed on the hand, forearm and distal third of the arm. However it has the risk of serious complications such as cardiovascular and central nervous system toxicity. Levobupivacaine is a long acting amide local anaesthetic used for epidural, caudal, spinal, infiltration and peripheral nerve blocks. Levobupivacaine is the S (-) isomer of racemic bupivacaine and has a lower risk of cardiovascular,...

  6. An estimation of the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasound guidance facilitates precise needle and injectate placement, increasing axillary block success rates, reducing onset times, and permitting local anesthetic dose reduction. The minimum effective volume of local anesthetic in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is unknown. The authors performed a study to estimate the minimum effective anesthetic volume of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine (2% LidoEpi) in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  7. brachial plexus blocks for upper extremity surgeries in a nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-04

    Apr 4, 2011 ... PNS technique and 11 had PNS with ultrasound guidance. In patients who had BPB, a successful block was achieved when no supplementary local anaesthetic was administered intra-operatively nor conversion to a general anaesthetic. Sedation was administered before instituting blocks in children.

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus block and neurolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Ichiro; Wang, Hsiu-Po

    2017-05-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) is widely used for reducing pain originating from upper abdominal organs. It is mainly indicated to treat pancreatic cancer pain, but also to relieve pain as a result of chronic pancreatitis. Real-time guidance and color Doppler imaging by EUS made the procedure easier and safer, resulting in greater pain relief. Currently, two techniques are used for EUS-CPN. The classic approach, known as the central technique, involves injection of a neurolytic agent at the base of the celiac axis. In the bilateral technique, the neurolytic agent is injected on both sides of the celiac axis. In addition, EUS-guided direct celiac ganglia neurolysis (EUS-CGN) was introduced recently. Pain relief is achieved by EUS-CPN in 70-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer and in 50-60% of those with chronic pancreatitis. The bilateral technique may be more efficient than the central technique, although the central technique is easier and possibly safer. Moreover, EUS-CGN may provide greater pain relief than conventional EUS-CPN. Procedure-related complications include transient pain exacerbation, transient hypotension, transient diarrhea, and inebriation. Although most complications are not serious, major adverse events such as retroperitoneal bleeding, abscess, and ischemic complications occasionally occur. © 2017 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  9. [Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Yang, Debao; Xie, Hong; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US) guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB) through the success rate and the onset time. The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, Embase, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group) and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD) and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS)). Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p<0.00001). The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB through the success rate and the onset time. METHODS: The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. RESULTS: Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS. Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p < 0.00001. The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance.

  11. Ultrasound guidance improves the success rate of axillary plexus block: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Qin; Yang, Debao; Xie, Hong; Zhang, Liyuan; Wang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the value of real-time ultrasound (US) guidance for axillary brachial plexus block (AXB) through the success rate and the onset time. The meta-analysis was carried out in the Anesthesiology Department of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu Province, China. A literature search of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane database from the years 2004 to 2014 was performed. The literature searches were carried out using medical subject headings and free-text word: "axilla", "axillary", "brachial plexus", "ultrasonography", "ultrasound", "ultrasonics". Two different reviewers carried out the search and evaluated studies independently. Seven randomized controlled trials, one cohort study and three retrospective studies were included. A total of 2042 patients were identified. 1157 patients underwent AXB using US guidance (US group) and the controlled group included 885 patients (246 patients using traditional approach (TRAD) and 639 patients using nerve stimulation (NS)). Our analysis showed that the success rate was higher in the US group compared to the controlled group (90.64% vs. 82.21%, p<0.00001). The average time to perform the block and the onset of sensory time were shorter in the US group than the controlled group. The present study demonstrated that the real-time ultrasound guidance for axillary brachial plexus block improves the success rate and reduce the mean time to onset of anesthesia and the time of block performance. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a study on 30 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiri HR

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-GB X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Successful brachial plexus blocks rely on proper techniques of nerve localization, needle placement, and local anesthetic injection. Standard approaches used today (elicitation of paresthesia or nerve-stimulated muscle contraction, unfortunately, are all "blind" techniques resulting in procedure-related pain and complications. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus blocks can potentially improve success and complication rates. This study presents the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks for the first time in Iran in adults and pediatrics. "n"n Methods: In this study ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blocks in 30 patients (25 adults & 5 pediatrics scheduled for an elective upper extremity surgery, are introduced. Ultrasound imaging was used to identify the brachial plexus before the block, guide the block needle to reach target nerves, and visualize the pattern of local anesthetic spread. Needle position was further confirmed by nerve stimulation before injection. Besides basic variables, block approach, block time, postoperative analgesia duration (VAS<3 was considered as target pain control opioid consumption during surgery, patient satisfaction and block related complications were reported

  13. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat Pai, Rohini V; Hegde, Harihar V.; MCB, Santhosh; S Roopa; Shrinivas S Deshpande; P Raghavendra Rao

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypert...

  14. Comparison of two approaches of infraclavicular brachial plexus block for orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Trehan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus in infraclavicular region can be blocked by various approaches. Aim of this study was to compare two approaches (coracoid and clavicular regarding success rate, discomfort during performance of block, tourniquet tolerance and complications. The study was randomised, prospective and observer blinded. Sixty adult patients of both sexes of ASA status 1 and 2 requiring orthopaedic surgery below mid-humerus were randomly assigned to receive nerve stimulator guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block either by lateral coracoid approach (group L, n = 30 or medial clavicular approach (group M, n = 30 with 25-30 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine. Sensory block in the distribution of five main nerves distal to elbow, motor block (Grade 1-4, discomfort during performance of block and tourniquet pain were recorded by a blinded observer. Clinical success of block was defined as the block sufficient to perform the surgery without any supplementation. All the five nerves distal to elbow were blocked in 77 and 67% patients in groups L and M respectively. Successful block was observed in 87 and 73% patients in groups L and M, respectively (P > 0.05. More patients had moderate to severe discomfort during performance of block due to positioning of limb in group M (14 vs. 8 in groups M and L. Tourniquet was well tolerated in most patients with successful block in both groups. No serious complication was observed. Both the approaches were equivalent regarding success rate, tourniquet tolerance and safety. Coracoid approach seemed better as positioning of operative limb was less painful, coracoids process was easy to locate and the technique was easy to learn and master.

  15. Comparison of Combined (Deep and Superficial) and Intermediate Cervical Plexus Block by Use of Ultrasound Guidance for Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sait Kavaklı, Ali; Kavrut Öztürk, Nilgün; Umut Ayoğlu, Raif; Sağdıç, Kadir; Çakmak, Gül; İnanoğlu, Kerem; Emmiler, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    Carotid endarterectomy under regional anesthesia may be performed by using superficial, intermediate, deep or combined cervical plexus block. The authors compared the combined and intermediate cervical plexus block by use of ultrasound guidance in patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. A prospective, randomized, double-blinded trial. Education and research hospital. Adult patients undergoing carotid artery surgery. Forty-eight patients were randomized to receive either combined cervical plexus block (deep plus superficial) or intermediate cervical plexus block by use of ultrasound guidance for carotid endarterectomy. The primary outcome measure was the amount of supplemental 1% lidocaine used by the surgeon. Secondary outcome measures were the time for the first analgesic requirement after surgery, block-related complications, postoperative visual analog scale score, and patient and surgeon satisfaction. Intraoperative supplemental lidocaine requirements were 3.0±1.9 mL in the combined-block group and 7.8±3.8 mL in the intermediate block group. These differences were statistically significant. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in block-related complications and the time between the block completion and the first administration of the first dose of intravenous analgesic. In the combined-block group, maximum visual analog scale score was lower at 3 hours (2.2 [1-5] v 5.3 [3-8]), and patient satisfaction score was higher than the intermediate-block group (4.3 [3-5] v 3.1 [1-4]). One regional anesthesia procedure was converted to general anesthesia in the combined-block group. Ultrasound-guided combined cervical plexus block compared to intermediate cervical plexus block led to less additional analgesic use, lower visual analog scale score, and higher patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Pneumothorax post brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandim, Beatriz L S; Alves, Rodrigo R; Almeida, Rodrigo; Pontes, João Paulo J; Arantes, Lorena J; Morais, Fabíola P

    2012-01-01

    Brachial plexus block is used for upper limbs anesthesia. The use of ultrasound-guided (USG) technique for blockade has become popular in recent years, facilitating its execution by providing real-time images of the plexus and surrounding structures while minimizing complications. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of pneumothorax following ultrasound-guided interscalene block. Male patient, 49 years old, weight 62kg and height 1.72m, slender, smoker, asymptomatic, ASA II E. The patient underwent surgical repair of right ulna open fracture through USG-guided interscalene brachial plexus block with axillary supplementation. After sedation and antisepsis, the linear probe of the USG apparatus was placed perpendicular to the interscalene groove (12 Hz), and stimucath A50 introduced in plane. After visualization of nerve trunks, 20mL of ropivacaine 0.5% was administered with axillary block supplementation (same volume and concentration of anesthetic). At the end of surgery, the patient complained of respiratory-dependent chest pain associated with dyspnea and decreased pulse oximetry (91% in room air), but hemodynamic stable (BP=130/70 and HR=84 bpm). Although pulmonary auscultation was normal, chest X-ray showed the presence of right pneumothorax. Water seal chest drainage was performed, after which the patient reported improvement of symptoms and was discharged from hospital in good general condition after 8 days. Despite the dynamic visualization of cervical structures with USG, interscalene block may result in pneumothorax. An unusual higher pleural dome due to the hyperinflated lung (smoking) probably facilitated the accidental pleural puncture. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Takeda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90 of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. METHODS: Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous. The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability or the same concentration (0.9 probability. Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4 h after the blockade. RESULTS: MEC90 was 0.241% [R 2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4 h. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations.

  18. Sonographic Guidance for Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Blocks: Single vs. Double Injection Cluster Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung Ju; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Jung, Wol Seon; Chung, Seung Hyun; Lee, Mi Geum

    2017-09-01

    The cluster approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SC-BPB) can be easily performed but may result in asymmetric local anesthetic (LA) spread. The authors hypothesized that the use of a cluster approach in each of the 2 planes would achieve better 3-dimensional LA distribution than the traditional single cluster approach. The purpose of the present study was to compare a double injection (DI) in 2 planes (one injection in each plane) with the traditional single injection (SI) cluster approach for ultrasound-guided SC-BPB. A randomized, controlled trial. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center. In the SI group (n = 18), 30 mL of LA was injected into the main neural cluster after penetrating the brachial plexus sheath laterally. In the DI group (n = 18), the needle penetrated the sheath in a downward direction at the first skin puncture, and 15 mL of LA was injected, and at the second skin puncture (behind the initial puncture site), the needle penetrated the sheath in an upward direction, and 15 mL was again injected. Ultrasound-guided SC-BPB was evaluated from immediately after the block every 5 minutes to 30 minutes by sensory and motor testing. The main outcome variables were procedural time; onset time (time for complete sensory and motor block of the median, radial, ulnar, and musculocutaneous nerves); and rate of blockage of all 4 nerves. Procedure times (medians [interquartile range]) were similar in the DI and SI groups (5.5 [4.75 - 8] vs. 5 [4 - 7] minutes, respectively; P = 0.137). Block onset time in the DI group was not significantly different from that in the SI group (10 [5 - 17.5] vs. 20 [6.25 - 30] minutes, P = 0.142). However, the rate of blockage of all 4 nerves was significantly higher in the DI group (94% vs. 67%, P = 0.035). Although the results of this study indicate LA distribution in the DI group was more evenly spread within brachial plexus sheaths than in the SI group, this was not

  19. The urogenital-hypogastric sheath: an anatomical observation on the relationship between the inferomedial extension of renal fascia and the hypogastric nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Luo, G H; Ding, Z H; Li, G X; Chen, X W; Zhong, S Z

    2014-11-01

    The study aimed to perform an anatomical observation on the inferomedial extension of the renal fascia (RF) to the pelvis and explore its relationship with the hypogastric nerves (HGNs). Gross anatomy was performed on 12 formalin-fixed and 12 fresh cadavers. Sectional anatomy was performed on four formalin-fixed cadavers. Different from the traditional concept, both the anterior and posterior RF included the outer and inner layer with different inferomedial extensions. The multiple layers of RF extended downward to form a sandwich-like and compound fascia sheath with potential and expandable spaces which was named as "the urogenital-hypogastric sheath." Below the level of the origin of the inferior mesenteric artery, the bilateral urogenital-hypogastric sheath communicated with the counterpart in front of the great vessels in the midline and the superior hypogastric plexus ran into the urogenital-hypogastric sheath which carried the HGNs, ureters, and genital vessels downward to their terminations in the pelvis. In the retrorectal space, the urogenital-hypogastric sheath surrounded the fascia propria of the rectum posterolaterally as a layer of coat containing HGNs. The multiple layers of RF with different extensions are the anatomical basis of the formation of the urogenital-hypogastric sheath. As a special fascial structure in the retroperitoneal space and the pelvis, emphasis on its formation and morphology may be helpful for not only unifying the controversies about the relationship between the pelvic fascia and HGNs but also improving the intraoperative preservation of the HGNs by dissecting in the correct surgical plane.

  20. Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Image Fusion Guided Lumbosacral Plexus Block – A Clinical Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strid, JM; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial with crossover design. MR datasets will be acquired and uploaded in an advanced US system (Epiq7, Phillips, Amsterdam, Netherlands). All volunteers will receive SSPS blocks with lidocaine added gadolinium contrast guided by US/MR image fusion and by US one week......Background and aims Ultrasound (US) guided lumbosacral plexus block (Supra Sacral Parallel Shift [SSPS]) offers an alternative to general anaesthesia and perioperative analgesia for hip surgery.1 The complex anatomy of the lumbosacral region hampers the accuracy of the block, but it may be improved...... apart. The block of the L2-S1 nerves, the plasma lidocaine, and the anatomical distribution of lidocaine will be assessed with neurological mapping, pharmacokinetic assays, and MR visualisation and compared. We are awaiting the final ethical approval of the study. Results On going study. Conclusions...

  1. Analgesic efficacy of bilateral superficial and deep cervical plexus block in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yinglan; Zhang, Zhongjun; Zhang, Qiuli; Zhang, Yaoxian; Liu, Zhanli

    2015-12-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) develops in patients with chronic renal failure. This study aimed to compare analgesic efficacy in SHPT patients who undergo subtotal parathyroidectomy after superficial versus deep cervical plexus block. Sixty chronic renal failure patients with SPHT scheduled for subtotal parathyroidectomy were randomized to receive general anesthesia (group GA), general anesthesia plus bilateral superficial and deep cervical plexus block (group BD), or general anesthesia plus bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (group BS) (n = 20). Bilateral superficial cervical plexus block or combined superficial and deep cervical plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine was administered. Postoperative pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). VAS score at 1 hour, 4 hours, and 8 hours after operation was 3.71 ± 0.60, 2.72 ± 0.54, 2.17 ± 0.75 in BS group; 4.00 ± 0.28, 2.89 ± 0.21, and 2.46 ± 1.01 in BD group, significantly lower than in GA group (6.50 ± 0.50, 5.02 ± 0.54, and 4.86 ± 0.51, respectively). The dosage of tramadol was 109.0 ± 35.2 mg in BS group and 93.0 ± 24.52 mg in BD group, significantly lower than in GA group (300.0 ± 27.13 mg). The incidence of complications in GA group (90%) was significantly higher than in BS group (30%) and BD group (15%). Serum glucose and norepinephrine levels were significantly higher at 1 hour, 4 hours, and 8 hours after operation, but returned to baseline levels at 24 hours after operation. Superficial cervical plexus block or combined superficial and deep cervical plexus block effectively reduces postoperative pain, stress response, and complications in SHPT patients who undergo subtotal parathyroidectomy.

  2. [Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, Luiz Carlos Buarque de; Lima, Jacqueline Silva Brito; Ramalho, Jeane da Rosa Oiticica; Leite, Amanda Lira Dos Santos; Silva, Alberson Maylson Ramos da

    2015-01-01

    This study shows how occurs the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath through the axiliary infraclavicular space and hence prove the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, and 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gusmão, Luiz Carlos Buarque; Lima, Jacqueline Silva Brito; Ramalho, Jeane da Rosa Oiticica; Leite, Amanda Lira dos Santos; da Silva, Alberson Maylson Ramos

    2015-01-01

    This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of brachial plexus fascicles involvement on infraclavicular block: unfixed cadaver study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows how the diffusion of the anesthetic into the sheath occurs through the axillary infraclavicular space and hence proves the efficacy of the anesthetic block of the brachial plexus, and may thereby allow a consolidation of this pathway, with fewer complications, previously attached to the anesthesia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 33 armpits of adult cadavers were analyzed and unfixed. We injected a solution of neoprene with latex dye in the infraclavicular space, based on the technique advocated by Gusmão et al., and put the corpses in refrigerators for three weeks. Subsequently, the specimens were thawed and dissected, exposing the axillary sheath along its entire length. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Was demonstrated involvement of all fasciculus of the plexus in 51.46%. In partial involvement was 30.30%, 18.24% of cases the acrylic was located outside the auxiliary sheath involving no issue. CONCLUSIONS: The results allow us to establish the infraclavicular as an effective and easy way to access plexus brachial, because the solution involved the fascicles in 81.76% partially or totally, when it was injected inside the axillary sheath. We believe that only the use of this pathway access in practice it may demonstrate the efficiency.

  5. Effect of Verapamil as an Adjuvant to Levobupivacaine in Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routray, Sidharth Sraban; Mishra, Debasis; Routray, Daityari; Nanda, Kasturi

    2017-01-01

    Many adjuvants have been used with local anesthetics to reduce the time of onset and prolong the duration of analgesia in brachial plexus blocks. However, few studies are there using verapamil as an adjuvant with levobupivacaine. This study aims to study the effects of verapamil as adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular block for upper extremity surgery. In this double-blinded clinical trial, 60 American Society of Anesthesiologist Class I and II patients posted to undergo upper extremity surgery were divided into 2 different groups randomly. In Group A, the patients received 30 ml levobupivacaine 0.5% plus 2 ml normal saline and Group B patients received 30 ml levobupivacaine 0.5% plus 5 mg verapamil diluted to 2 ml normal saline for supraclavicular block. Time of request for rescue analgesia, onset and duration of sensory motor blocks and changes in hemodynamic parameters were studied and analyzed. P < 0.001 was considered statistically significant. Time for a request for rescue analgesia was 425.80 ± 90.46 min in Group B and 366.13 ± 70.42 min in Group A which was clinically significant. The mean of sensory and motor block onset time in Group B was less than in Group A, the difference between the two groups being statistically significant (P < 0.001). In Group A, mean duration of sensory block was 316.13 ± 91.08 min and in Group B was 375.83 ± 114.48 min, which was statistically significant (P < 0.001). The addition of verapamil as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in brachial plexus blockade delayed the requirement of rescue analgesia with decreased onset time and prolonged duration of sensory and motor block characteristics.

  6. [Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong Jin; Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-01-01

    A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5min for 60min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6±12.9min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2±13.9min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hong Jin; Hasan, Mohd Shahnaz; Chinna, Karuthan

    2016-01-01

    A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5min for 60min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6±12.9min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2±13.9min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Faster onset time of supraclavicular brachial plexus block using local anesthetic diluted with dextrose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Jin Lim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: A high sodium concentration is known to antagonize local anesthetics when infiltrated around neural tissue. Thus, we hypothesized that the onset time for sensory and motor blockade, in supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine diluted with dextrose would be shorter than with saline. Methods: Patients scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to receive ultrasound guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine. Evaluation of sensory and motor blockade was performed every 5 min for 60 min. Patients were followed-up on postoperative day 1, and between days 7 and 10 for the presence of any complications. Twenty-five patients in each group were analyzed. Results: Mean time for onset of analgesia for the dextrose group was 37.6 ± 12.9 min while the mean time for the saline group was 45.2 ± 13.9 min with a p-value of 0.05. The effect size was 0.567, which was moderate to large. No major complications were observed. Conclusion: We conclude that there was a decrease in onset time of analgesia when dextrose was used as a diluent instead of saline for ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

  9. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira dos, E-mail: pclopes@ulbra.br [Universidade Luterana do Brasil (Ulbra), Canoas, RS (Brazil); Pozzobon, Adriane [Centro Universitario Univates, Lajeado, RS (Brazil); Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Angela [Fundacao Serdil/Saint Pastous, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: to analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods: one hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results: aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion: considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. (author)

  11. Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block. Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5 mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block; a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4h after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R(2): 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20-0.34%]. No patient, with successful block, reported pain after 4h. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach. A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazin, Mojgan; Jensen, Kenneth; Hjort, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniq...

  13. Infraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of posterior cord stimulation with lateral or medial cord stimulation, a prospective double blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushyant Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus sheath provides anesthesia for surgery on the distal arm, elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand. It has been found that evoked distal motor response or radial nerve-type motor response has influenced the success rate of single-injection infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim: We conducted this study to compare the extent and effectiveness of infraclavicular brachial plexus block achieved by injecting a local anesthetic drug after finding specific muscle action due to neural stimulator guided posterior cord stimulation and lateral cord/medial cord stimulation. Methods: After ethical committee approval, patients were randomly assigned to one of the two study groups of 30 patients each. In group 1, posterior cord stimulation was used and in group 2 lateral/medial cord stimulation was used for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. The extent of motor block and effectiveness of sensory block were assessed. Results: All four motor nerves that were selected for the extent of block were blocked in 23 cases (76.7% in group 1 and in 15 cases (50.0% in group 2 (P:0.032. The two groups did not differ significantly in the number of cases in which 0, 1, 2, and 3 nerves were blocked (P>0.05. In group 1, significantly lesser number of patients had pain on surgical manipulation compared with patients of group 2 (P:0.037. Conclusion: Stimulating the posterior cord guided by a nerve stimulator before local anesthetic injection is associated with greater extent of block (in the number of motor nerves blocked and effectiveness of block (in reporting no pain during the surgery than stimulation of either the lateral or medial cord.

  14. Incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis after peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasound guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Sachin Ghodki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: We compared interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB using peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS and ultrasound (US techniques. The primary outcomes were the incidence of hemidiaphragmatic paresis (HDP and the duration of the block. Secondary outcomes were the block success rate, time to conduct the block, onset of sensory block, and dermatomal spread, postoperative pain by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS, duration of postoperative analgesia and incidence of complications. Material and Methods: We conducted a prospective, randomized, and observer-blinded study in 60 patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy under block plus general anesthesia. ISBPB was performed with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine using either PNS (Group PNS, n = 30 or US (Group US, n = 30. Hemidiaphragmatic function, the primary outcome, was assessed by ultrasonographic evaluation of diaphragmatic movement and pulmonary function tests using a bedside spirometer (forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and peak expiratory flow rate. General anesthesia was administered to all the patients for surgery. P < 0.05 test was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Twelve patients in Group PNS had HDP and none in Group US (P < 0.0001. PFTs were also significantly reduced in Group PNS (P < 0.0001. The time to conduct the block and sensory onset time both were less in Group US (P < 0.05. The groups did not differ in block success rate, duration of analgesia, and NRS. Other complications like incidence of Horner′s syndrome and vascular puncture were comparable in both the groups. Conclusions: PNS guided ISBPB with 10 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine is associated with a higher incidence of HDP as compared to US guided ISBPB. There is no significant difference in quality or duration of analgesia in the two groups.

  15. Brief reports: a clinical evaluation of block characteristics using one milliliter 2% lidocaine in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, Brian

    2010-09-01

    We report onset and duration of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block using 1 mL of 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine per nerve (total local anesthetic volume 4 mL). Block performance time, block onset time, duration of surgery, and block duration were measured. Seventeen consecutive patients were recruited. The mean (SD) block performance and onset times were 271 (67.9) seconds and 9.7 (3.7) minutes, respectively. Block duration was 160.8 (30.7) minutes. All operations were performed using regional anesthesia alone. The duration of anesthesia obtained is sufficient for most ambulatory hand surgery.

  16. [Pharmacokinetic and clinical effects of two bupivacaine concentrations on axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo H C; Takeda, Alexandre; Barreto, Cleber N; Faria, Bernadete; Assunção, Nilson A

    2017-10-16

    The risk of systemic bupivacaine toxicity is a persistent problem, which makes its pharmacokinetic study fundamental for regional anesthesia safety. There is little evidence of its influence on plasma peak at different concentrations. The present study compares two bupivacaine concentrations to establish how the concentration affects this drug plasma peak in axillary brachial plexus block. Postoperative latency and analgesia were also compared. 30 patients were randomized. In the 0.25% Group, 0.25% bupivacaine (10mL) was injected per nerve. In the 0.5% Group, 0.5% bupivacaine (5mL) was injected per nerve. Peripheral blood samples were collected during the first 2hours after the blockade. For sample analyses, high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used. Plasma peak occurred 45minutes after the blockade, with no difference between groups at the assessed time-points. Plasma peak was 933.97 ± 328.03 ng.mL-1 (mean ± SD) in 0.25% Group and 1022.79 ± 253.81 ng.mL-1 in 0.5% Group (p = 0.414). Latency was lower in 0.5% Group than in 0.25% Group (10.67 ± 3.71 × 17.33min ± 5.30, respectively, p = 0.004). No patient had pain within the first 4hours after the blockade. For axillary brachial plexus block, there was no difference in bupivacaine plasma peak despite the use of different concentrations with the same local anesthetic mass. The concentration inversely influenced latency. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  17. [Effects of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-Hui; Sun, Wei-Guo; Li, Yong-le; Chen, Xiang-Nan; Qi, Dong-Mei; Sun, Yi-Juan

    2017-06-20

    To observe the anesthetic effect and safety of different doses of dexmedetomidine combined with ropivacaine for brachial plexus nerve block in children undergoing polydactyly surgery. Eighty children undergoing polydactyly surgery were randomized into 4 groups to receive brachial plexus nerve block with dexmedetomidine at 0.25, 0.50 or 0.75 µg/kg combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) (D1, D2, and D3 groups, respectively) or with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) only (control group). The onset time, duration of brachial plexus nerve block, awakening time, success rate, and incidence of complications were compared among the groups. Results In D2 and D3 groups, the onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia lasted longer than those in the control group. The onset time and awakening time were shorter and anesthesia maintenance time was longer in D3 group than in D1 group. The success rates of brachial plexus nerve block were significantly higher in D1-3 groups than in the control group (Pblock occurred in 1 child and respiratory depression in another; 2 or 3 patients had Horner syndrome, and 1 patient in D3 group experienced an episode of lowered heart beat to below 70 min(-1). All the complications were managed properly and the patients all recovered uneventfully. Brachial plexus nerve block with 0.5 µg/kg dexmedetomidine combined with 0.25% ropivacaine (0.20 mL/kg) is safe for effective anesthesia in children undergoing surgery for polydactyly.

  18. Effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A prospective, randomised, double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant A Biradar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used to prolong brachial plexus block. We performed a prospective, randomised, double-blind study to evaluate the effect of dexamethasone added to lidocaine on the onset and duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus block as this is the most common type of brachial block performed in our institute. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologist′s physical status I and II patients undergoing elective hand, forearm and elbow surgery under brachial plexus block were randomly allocated to receive either 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of normal saline (group C, n=30 or 1.5% lidocaine (7 mg/kg with adrenaline (1:200,000 and 2 ml of dexamethasone (8 mg (group D, n=30. The block was performed using a nerve stimulator. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade were assessed. The sensory and motor blockade of radial, median, ulnar and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated and recorded at 5, 10, 20, 120 min, and at every 30 min thereafter. Results: Two patients were excluded from the study because of block failure. The onset of sensory and motor blockade (13.4±2.8 vs. 16.0±2.3 min and 16.0±2.7 vs. 18.7±2.8 min, respectively were significantly more rapid in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. The duration of sensory and motor blockade (326±58.6 vs. 159±20.1 and 290.6±52.7 vs. 135.5±20.3 min, respectively were significantly longer in the dexamethasone group than in the control group ( P=0.001. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to 1.5% lidocaine with adrenaline in supraclavicular brachial plexus block speeds the onset and prolongs the duration of sensory and motor blockade.

  19. Effect of Superficial Cervical Plexus Block on Baroreceptor Sensitivity in Patients Undergoing Carotid Endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Serdar; Celi de la Torre, Juan Antonio; Bruijnen, Hans; Martin, Eike; Popp, Erik; Böckler, Dittmar; Attigah, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Regional anesthesia for patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy is associated with improved intraoperative hemodynamic stability compared with general anesthesia. The authors hypothesized that the reported advantages might be related to attenuated ipsilateral baroreflex control of blood pressure, caused by chemical denervation of the carotid bulb baroreceptor nerve fibers. A prospective cohort study. Single-center university hospital. The study included 46 patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy using superficial cervical block. A noninvasive computational periprocedural measurement of baroreceptor sensitivity was performed in all patients. Two groups were formed, depending on the patients' subjective response to surgical stimulation regarding the necessity of additional intraoperative local anesthesia (LA) administration on the carotid bulb. Group A (block alone) included 23 patients who required no additional anesthesia, and group B (block + LA) consisted of 23 patients who required additional anesthesia. Baroreceptor sensitivity showed no significant change after application of the block in both groups (group A: median [IQR], 5.19 [3.07-8.54] v 4.96 [3.1-9.07]; p = 0.20) (group B: median [IQR], 4.47 [3.36-8.09] v 4.53 [3.29-8.01]; p = 0.55). There was a significant decrease in baroreceptor sensitivity in group B after intraoperative LA administration (median [IQR], 4.53 [3.29-8.01] v 3.31 [2.26-7.31]; p = 0.04). Standard superficial cervical plexus block did not impair local baroreceptor function, and, therefore, it was not related to improved cerebral perfusion in awake patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy. However, direct infiltration of the carotid bulb was associated with the expected attenuation of baroreflex sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Careful Dissection of the Distal Ureter Is Highly Important in Nerve-sparing Radical Pelvic Surgery: A 3D Reconstruction and Immunohistochemical Characterization of the Vesical Plexus.

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    Kraima, Anne C; Derks, Marloes; Smit, Noeska N; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Kenter, Gemma G; DeRuiter, Marco C

    2016-06-01

    Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy (RHL) is the preferred treatment for early-stage cervical cancer. Although oncological outcome is good with regard to recurrence and survival rates, it is well known that RHL might result in postoperative bladder impairments due to autonomic nerve disruption. The pelvic autonomic network has been extensively studied, but the anatomy of nerve fibers branching off the inferior hypogastric plexus to innervate the bladder is less known. Besides, the pathogenesis of bladder dysfunction after RHL is multifactorial but remains unclear. We studied the 3-dimensional anatomy and neuroanatomical composition of the vesical plexus and describe implications for RHL. Six female adult cadaveric pelvises were macroscopically dissected. Additionally, a series of 10 female fetal pelvises (embryonic age, 10-22 weeks) was studied. Paraffin-embedded blocks were transversely sliced in 8-μm sections. (Immuno) histological analysis was performed with hematoxylin and eosin, azan, and antibodies against S-100 (Schwann cells), tyrosine hydroxylase (postganglionic sympathetic fibers), and vasoactive intestinal peptide (postganglionic parasympathetic fibers). The results were 3-dimensionally visualized. The vesical plexus formed a group of nerve fibers branching off the ventral part of the inferior hypogastric plexus to innervate the bladder. In all adult and fetal specimens, the vesical plexus was closely related to the distal ureter and located in both the superficial and deep layers of the vesicouterine ligament. Efferent nerve fibers belonging to the vesical plexus predominantly expressed tyrosine hydroxylase and little vasoactive intestinal peptide. The vesical plexus is located in both layers of the vesicouterine ligament and has a very close relationship with the distal ureter. Complete mobilization of the ureter in RHL might cause bladder dysfunction due to sympathetic and parasympathetic denervation. Hence, the distal ureter should be

  1. [Minimum effective concentration of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block guided by ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Alexandre; Ferraro, Leonardo Henrique Cunha; Rezende, André Hosoi; Sadatsune, Eduardo Jun; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis; Tardelli, Maria Angela

    2015-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia allows reducing the dose of local anesthetic used for peripheral nerve block. The present study was performed to determine the minimum effective concentration (MEC90) of bupivacaine for axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB). Patients undergoing hand surgery were recruited. To estimate the MEC90, a sequential up-down biased coin method of allocation was used. The bupivacaine dose was 5mL for each nerve (radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous). The initial concentration was 0.35%. This concentration was changed by 0.05% depending on the previous block: a blockade failure resulted in increased concentration for the next patient; in case of success, the next patient could receive or reduction (0.1 probability) or the same concentration (0.9 probability). Surgical anesthesia was defined as driving force ≤ 2 according to the modified Bromage scale, lack of thermal sensitivity and response to pinprick. Postoperative analgesia was assessed in the recovery room with numeric pain scale and the amount of drugs used within 4hours after the blockade. MEC90 was 0.241% [R2: 0.978, confidence interval: 0.20%-0.34%]. No successful block patient reported pain after 4hours. This study demonstrated that ultrasound guided ABPB can be performed with the use of low concentration of local anesthetics, increasing the safety of the procedure. Further studies should be conducted to assess blockade duration at low concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Continuous lumbar plexus block for acute postoperative pain management after open reduction and internal fixation of acetabular fractures.

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    Chelly, Jacques E; Casati, Andrea; Al-Samsam, Tameem; Coupe, Kevin; Criswell, Allen; Tucker, Jeffery

    2003-05-01

    To assess the efficacy of postoperative continuous lumbar plexus blocks for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture. Twenty-six patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture. DESIGN/PERSPECTIVE: According to a case-control study design, patients were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (n = 13) received postoperatively a continuous lumbar plexus block with 0.2% ropivacaine (10 mL/hr for 48 hours), and group 2 (n = 13) received postoperatively patient-controlled analgesia with morphine (1 mg; lock-out time, 10 minutes; total 6 mg/hr). Postoperative morphine consumption, time to unassisted ambulation, and clinical and radiographic outcomes. No significant differences in demographics, surgical procedure, or duration of surgery were reported between the two groups. The lumbar plexus catheter group showed a lower requirement for morphine in the postanesthesia care unit (6 mg [0-14 mg]) and during the first 2 days (20 mg [6-55 mg] on day 1 and 29 mg [4-56 mg] on day 2) than the control group (51 mg [20-100 mg] on day 1 and 50 mg [10-93 mg] on day 2) (P = 0.001 and P = 0.021). Effective unassisted ambulation was recovered earlier in patients with the lumbar plexus catheter (3 days; range 2-4 days) than in the control group (4 days; range 3-7 days) (P = 0.015). Continuous lumbar plexus block represents an interesting alternative for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture.

  3. DOES THE ADDITION OF DEXAMETHASON TO LOCAL ANESTHETIC PROLONG THE ANALGESIA OF INTERSCALEN PLEXUS BRACHIALIS BLOCK IN PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER SURGERY?

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    Nancheva Jasminka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Peripherial nerve blocks is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia especially for one-day case surgery. Interscalene approach of plexus brachialis block as much as supraclavicular and infraclavicular provide reliable, safe, effective, low cost and most complete anesthesia with satisfactory postoperative analgesia for upper limb surgery. Postoperative analgesia of plexus brachialis blocks can be prolonged by using different drugs as adjuvants with local anesthetics. Dexamethasone has been shown to prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia when given as an adjunct for peripheral nerve blocks. The investigation was randomized, prospective, double blinded and controlled study. Objective: The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block on the onset, duration and postoperative analgesia in patients under the shoulder surgery. Methods: A prospective, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for shoulder surgeries under the interscalene brachial plexus block. We enrolled 60 patients, ASA I-II both sexes, aged 19-65 years, weighing 54-89 kg, divided to two groups G1 and G2. The brachial plexus block was performed by interscalene approach and mixture of 2% lidocaine (12ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (22 ml either alone or combined with dexamethasone (4 mg. The block was performed by using double technique neurostimulator/ultrasound technique. Results: In our investigation we found a significant increase in onset and duration of motor and sensory block in Group G2 (with dexamethasone as compared to Group G1 patients (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic drugs in interscalene plexus brachialis block, significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and motor block in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. Moreover, it is a remarkably safe and costeffective method of providing

  4. Treatment of herpes zoster with ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyerim

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster most commonly occurs in elderly patients, and usually affects sensory neurons. Therefore, its characteristic symptoms are segmental pain, itching, and sensory changes in the affected areas. A 71-yr-old woman experienced painful herpetic rash on the right cervical 2–4 dermatomes for 16 days. Two days after the onset of the rash, she was diagnosed with herpes zoster, and prescribed 250 mg famciclovir three times a day for 7 days, pregabalin 150 mg twice a day, and tramadol 150 mg once a day for 14 days, by a dermatologist. Despite medication, her pain was rated at an intensity of 6/10 on the numeric rating scale. In addition, she complained of severe itching sensation on the affected dermatomes. Superficial cervical plexus block (SCPB) was performed at the right C4 level with 15 ml 0.5% lidocaine plus triamcinolone 30 mg. Five days after the procedure, pain and itching completely disappeared. SCPB may be an effective option for the treatment of acute pain and itching arising from herpes zoster, and for the prevention of postherpetic neuralgia. PMID:28879287

  5. Opioid withdrawal presenting only nausea during tapering of oxycodone after celiac plexus block: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Takayama, Hiroto; Mamiya, Keiko; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is an effective treatment for patients suffering pain. CPB may allow for a reduction in opioid dosage, and may alleviate some of the unwanted side effects of these drugs. However, there is a substantial risk of withdrawal symptoms after reduction of opioid dose. We describe a case of pancreatic cancer developing opioid withdrawal after CPB, who presented only nausea. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to severe pancreatic cancer pain. He was administered oxycodone (oxycontin®) at 240 mg per day, and presented nausea and anorexia as side effects. CPB was performed due to insufficient pain relief. His pain disappeared on the same day as treatment. Oxycodone was reduced to 160 mg/day, and further reduced two days later to 80 mg/day. However, he complained of more severe nausea and loss of appetite even after tapering of oxycodone. Physical examination, blood chemistry examination, and brain computed tomography (CT) showed no abnormalities. Administration of fast-release oxycodone (Oxinome®) at a dose of 10 mg immediately improved his nausea. There have been no previous reports of nausea as the sole symptom of opioid withdrawal. The present case indicates that unless opioid side effects improve after dosage reduction, the possibility that they may be withdrawal symptoms should also be considered.

  6. Continuous interscalene brachial plexus block versus parenteral analgesia for postoperative pain relief after major shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Hameed; Samad, Khalid; Khan, Fauzia A

    2014-02-04

    Postoperative pain may lead to adverse effects on the body, which might result in an increase in morbidity. Its management therefore poses a unique challenge for the clinician. Major shoulder surgery is associated with severe postoperative pain, and different modalities are available to manage such pain, including opioid and non-opioid analgesics, local anaesthetics infiltrated into and around the shoulder joint and regional anaesthesia. All of these techniques, alone or in combination, have been used to treat the postoperative pain of major shoulder surgery but with varying success. The objective of this review was to compare the analgesic efficacy of continuous interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) with parenteral opioid analgesia for pain relief after major shoulder surgery. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE (1950 to December 2012), EMBASE (1980 to December 2012), Web of Science (1954 to December 2012), CINAHL (1982 to December 2012) and bibliographies of published studies. We included randomized controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of continuous ISBPB compared with different forms of parenteral opioid analgesia in relieving pain in adult participants undergoing elective major shoulder surgery. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted outcome data. We included two randomized controlled trials (147 participants). A total of 17 participants were excluded from one trial because of complications related to continuous ISBPB (16) or parenteral opioid analgesia (one). Thus we have information on 130 participants (66 in the continuous ISBPB group and 64 in the parenteral opioid group). The studies were clinically heterogeneous. No meta-analysis was undertaken. However, results of the two included studies showed better pain relief with continuous ISBPB following major shoulder surgery and a lower incidence of complications when interscalene block is performed under

  7. Interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient shoulder arthroplasty: Postoperative analgesia, patient satisfaction and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Anand

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shoulder arthroplasty procedures are seldom performed on an ambulatory basis. Our objective was to examine postoperative analgesia, nausea and vomiting, patient satisfaction and complications of ambulatory shoulder arthroplasty performed using interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB. Materials and Methods: We prospectively examined 82 consecutive patients undergoing total and hemi-shoulder arthroplasty under ISB. Eighty-nine per cent (n=73 of patients received a continuous ISB; 11% (n=9 received a single-injection ISB. The blocks were performed using a nerve stimulator technique. Thirty to 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine was injected perineurally after appropriate muscle twitches were elicited at a current of less than 0.5% mA. Data were collected in the preoperative holding area, intraoperatively and postoperatively including the postanesthesia care unit (PACU, at 24h and at seven days. Results: Mean postoperative pain scores at rest were 0.8 ± 2.3 in PACU (with movement, 0.9 ± 2.5, 2.5 ± 3.1 at 24h and 2.8 ± 2.1 at seven days. Mean postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV scores were 0.2 ± 1.2 in the PACU and 0.4 ± 1.4 at 24h. Satisfaction scores were 4.8 ± 0.6 and 4.8 ± 0.7, respectively, at 24h and seven days. Minimal complications were noted postoperatively at 30 days. Conclusions: Regional anesthesia offers sufficient analgesia during the hospital stay for shoulder arthroplasty procedures while adhering to high patient comfort and satisfaction, with low complications.

  8. Is lumbosacral plexus block an effective and safe alternative as surgical anesthesia for total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    the interventions. Secondary endpoints will include change in systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation. CONCLUSIONS We expect that our findings will support the hypothesis of a reduced hemodynamic impact from lumbosacral plexus blockade...... will be monitored using calibrated pulse contour analyses of the femoral artery pressure. All patients will receive a lumbar spinal catheter as well as lumbosacral plexus blockade. Group 1: Ropivacaine for the plexus blockade and placebo for the spinal catheter. Group 2: Bupivacaine for the spinal catheter...

  9. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block: Comparison of varying doses of dexmedetomidine combined with levobupivacaine: A double-blind randomised trial

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    Srinivasa Rao Nallam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The ideal dose of dexmedetomidine for brachial plexus block is a matter of debate. This study was carried out to evaluate 50 μg or 100 μg of dexmedetomidine added to 0.5% levobupivacaine, with regard to the duration of analgesia. Our study also sought to assess the onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic effects, sedation and adverse effects. Methods: One hundred adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomly allocated into two groups. Group LD50 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 50 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Group LD100 received 29 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine plus 100 μg of dexmedetomidine diluted in 1 ml of normal saline. Duration of analgesia was the primary outcome. Onset and duration of sensorimotor blockade, haemodynamic variables, sedation score, and adverse effects were secondary outcomes. The data were analysed with Students' t-test and Chi-square test. Results: The onset of sensory block and motor block was 14.82 ± 3.8 min and 19.75 ± 6.3 min, respectively, in group LD50, while it was 11.15 ± 1.7 min and 14.3 ± 4.2 min, respectively, in group LD100. The duration of analgesia was significantly prolonged in group LD100 (1033.6 ± 141.6 vs. 776.4 ± 138.6 min; P = 0.001. The incidence of bradycardia and sedation was observed in significantly more patients in group LD100. Significantly fewer patients in group LD100 required rescue analgesia. Conclusion: The 100 μg dose of dexmedetomidine in brachial plexus block hastens the onset and prolongs the duration of sensorimotor blockade and analgesia, but with higher incidence of bradycardia and sedation.

  10. Role of ultrasound-guided continuous brachial plexus block in the management of neonatal ischemia in upper limb

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    Vrushali C Ponde

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal upper limb ischemia due to accidental arterial damage remains a major concern, which can lead to devastating complications if untreated. The primary objective of this case report is to emphasize the role of continuous infraclavicular brachial plexus block, the issues related with block performance in an ischemic hand, and the importance of ultrasound guidance in this particular case scenario. A 1.1 kg infant suffered from distal forearm ischemia due to accidental arterial damage, which was treated with brachial plexus block. An ultrasound-guided single shot block with 0.5 mL/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine was followed by ultrasound-guided catheter placement in the target area. A continuous infusion of 0.03% of bupivacaine at the rate of 0.5 mL/kg/hr (approx. 0.15 mg/kg/h of bupivacaine was administered for 36 h. This treatment resulted in reversal of ischemia. Permanent ischemic damage was eventually confined to the tips of 4 fingers. We conclude that ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block has a therapeutic role to play in the treatment of hand ischemia due to arterial damage and subsequent arterial spasm in neonates with added benefits.

  11. [Randomized prospective study of three different techniques for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Leonardo Henirque Cunha; Takeda, Alexandre; Sousa, Paulo César Castello Branco de; Mehlmann, Fernanda Moreira Gomes; Junior, Jorge Kiyoshi Mitsunaga; Falcão, Luiz Fernando Dos Reis

    2017-06-23

    Randomized prospective study comparing two perivascular techniques with the perineural technique for ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block (US-ABPB). The primary objective was to verify if these perivascular techniques are noninferior to the perineural technique. 240 patients were randomized to receive the techniques: below the artery (BA), around the artery (AA) or perineural (PN). The anesthetic volume used was 40mL of 0.375% bupivacaine. All patients received a musculocutaneous nerve blockade with 10mL. In BA technique, 30mL were injected below the axillary artery. In AA technique, 7.5mL were injected at 4 points around the artery. In PN technique, the median, ulnar, and radial nerves were anesthetized with 10mL per nerve. Confidence interval analysis showed that the perivascular techniques studied were not inferior to the perineural technique. The time to perform the blockade was shorter for the BA technique (300.4±78.4sec, 396.5±117.1sec, 487.6±172.6sec, respectively). The PN technique showed a lower latency time (PN - 655.3±348.9sec; BA -1044±389.5sec; AA-932.9±314.5sec), and less total time for the procedure (PN-1132±395.8sec; BA -1346.2±413.4sec; AA 1329.5±344.4sec). TA technique had a higher incidence of vascular puncture (BA - 22.5%; AA - 16.3%; PN - 5%). The perivascular techniques are viable alternatives to perineural technique for US-ABPB. There is a higher incidence of vascular puncture associated with the BA technique. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  12. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery: A Prospective, Randomized, Parallel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-10-01

    Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5-C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P blocks. However, SCBPB produces a better motor blockade and a lower incidence of Horner's syndrome than ISBPB.

  13. Dexamethasone as a ropivacaine adjuvant for ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block: A randomized, double-blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakae, Thiago Mamôru; Marchioro, Patricia; Schuelter-Trevisol, Fabiana; Trevisol, Daisson José

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intravenous or perineural dexamethasone added to ropivacaine on the duration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus blocks (BPB). Randomized clinical trial. Sixty ASA physical status I-II patients with elective shoulder arthroscopic surgeries under interscalene brachial plexus blocks were randomly allocated to receive 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline (C group, n=20), 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml (4mg) of perineural dexamethasone (Dpn group, n=20), or 20ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1ml of isotonic saline and intravenous 4mg dexamethasone (IV) (Div group, n=20). A nerve stimulation technique with ultrasound was used in all patients. The onset time and duration of sensory blocks were assessed. Secondary outcomes were pain scores (VAS) and postoperative vomiting and nausea (PONV). The duration of the motor and sensory block was extended in group Dpn compared with group Div and group C (Pdexamethasone was more effective than intravenous in extending the duration of ropivacaine in ultrasound-guided interscalene BPB. Moreover, Dpn has significant effects on onset time, PONV, and VAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lumbar plexus block for post-operative analgesia following hip surgery: A comparison of "3 in 1" and psoas compartment block

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    Uma Srivastava

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We used a single shot lumbar plexus block by posterior approach (Psoas compartment block- PCB or anterior approach (′3in1′ block for postoperative analgesia in the patients of hip fractures operated under spinal anaesthesia. The blocks were given at the end of operation with 0.25% of bupivacaine and pain was assessed using Verbal Rating scale at 1,6,12 and 24 hours postoperatively both during rest and physiotherapy. We also noted time for first analgesic, need of supplemental analgesics and quality of analgesia during 24 hours. The mean time for first demand of analgesia was 12.4 ±7.9 and 10.7±6.4 hrs in groups PCB and ′3 in 1′ respectively (p>0.05. Requirement of supplemental analgesics was considerably reduced and more than 80% patients in both groups needed only single injection of diclofenac in 24 hrs. It was concluded that both approaches of lumbar plexus block were effective in providing post operative analgesia after hip surgery.

  15. Ultrasound guidance for brachial plexus block decreases the incidence of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular punctures and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with peripheral nerve stimulator in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia-Min; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Fu, Shu-Kun; Yuan, Chao-Qun; Chen, Kai; Li, Jia-Yi; Li, Quan

    2012-05-01

    The use of traditional techniques (such as landmark techniques, paresthesia and peripheral nerve stimulator) for upper-limb anesthesia has often been restricted to the expert or enthusiast, which was blind. Recently, ultrasound (US) has been applied to differ blood vessel, pleura and nerve, thus may reduce the risk of complications while have a high rate of success. The aim of this study was to determine if the use of ultrasound guidance (vs. peripheral nerve stimulator, (PNS)) decreases risk of vascular puncture, risk of hemi-diaphragmatic paresis and risk of Horner syndrome and improves the success rate of nerve block. A search strategy was developed to identify randomized control trials (RCTs) reporting on complications of US and PNS guidance for upper-extremity peripheral nerve blocks (brachial plexus) in adults available through PubMed databases, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase databases, SinoMed databases and Wanfang data (date up to 2011-12-20). Two independent reviewers appraised eligible studies and extracted data. Risk ratios (OR) were calculated for each outcome and presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI) with the software of Review Manager 5.1.0 System (Cochrane Library). Sixteen trials involving 1321 adults met our criteria were included for analysis. Blocks performed using US guidance were more likely to be successful (risk ratio (RR) for block success 0.36, 95%CI 0.23 - 0.56, P block performance (RR 0.13, 95%CI 0.06 - 0.27, P complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis (RR 0.09, 95%CI 0.03 - 0.52, P = 0.0001). US decreases risks of complete hemi-diaphragmatic paresis or vascular puncture and improves success rate of brachial plexus nerve block compared with techniques that utilize PNS for nerve localization. Larger studies are needed to determine whether or not the use of US can decrease risk of neurologic complications.

  16. Low-Volume Brachial Plexus Block Providing Surgical Anesthesia for Distal Arm Surgery Comparing Supraclavicular, Infraclavicular, and Axillary Approach: A Randomized Observer Blind Trial

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    Mojgan Vazin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Distal arm surgery is widely performed under regional anesthesia with brachial plexus block. The preponderance of evidence for the efficacy relies upon injection of local anesthetic in excess of 30 mL. We aimed to compare three different ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block techniques restricting the total volume to 20 mL. Methods. 120 patients were prospectively randomized to ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block with 20 mL ropivacaine 0.75% at either the supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or axillary level. Multiinjection technique was performed with all three approaches. Primary outcome measure was performance time. Results. Performance time and procedural pain were similar between groups. Needle passes and injection numbers were significantly reduced in the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Nerve visibility was significantly reduced in the axillary group (P=0.01. Success-rate was significantly increased in the supraclavicular versus the axillary group (P<0.025. Total anesthesia-related time was significantly reduced in the supraclavicular compared to the infraclavicular group (P<0.01. Block duration was significantly increased in the infraclavicular group (P<0.05. No early adverse effects occurred. Conclusion. Supraclavicular and infraclavicular blocks exhibited favorable characteristics compared to the axillary block. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block with the multiinjection intracluster technique exhibited significantly reduced total anesthesia-related time and higher success rate without any early adverse events.

  17. Ultrasound evaluation of diaphragm function and its application in critical patients, mechanical ventilation and brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Quintana Gordon, F de B; Nacarino Alcorta, B; Fajardo Pérez, M

    2017-11-01

    Before diaphragm ultrasonography, assessment of diaphragm function was very difficult due to the complex nature of its exploration. The use of this new technique has shed light on diagnostic problems and treatment with an improvement in final outcomes for critically ill patients, in whom the incidence of diaphragm weakness or dysfunction has been underestimated. Better knowledge of diaphragm function enables us earlier diagnosis by quantification of diaphragm contractile activity or evaluation of functional status after delivery of plexus block anaesthesia, facilitating therapeutic decisions. It is also being used as a guide in the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation or as the safest approach for braquial plexus block. In this review we present how to perform a systematic exploration of diaphragm function and its clinical implications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Administered with or without Adrenaline for the Paravertebral Brachial Plexus Block in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquette, Amélie; Troncy, Eric; Guillot, Martin; Varin, France; Del Castillo, Jérôme R E

    2017-01-01

    Adrenaline is known to prolong the duration of local anesthesia but its effects on the pharmacokinetic processes of local anesthetic drugs are not fully understood. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model for quantification of adrenaline's impact on the pharmacokinetics of perineurally-injected lidocaine in the dog. Dogs were subjected to paravertebral brachial plexus block using lidocaine alone or adrenalinated lidocaine. Data was collected through a prospective, randomised, blinded crossover protocol performed over three periods. Blood samples were collected during 180 minutes following block execution. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed and their goodness-of-fit were compared. The lowering effects of adrenaline on the absorption of lidocaine were statistically determined with one-sided tests. A one-compartment disposition model with two successive zero-order absorption processes best fitted our experimental data. Adrenaline decreased the peak plasma lidocaine concentration by approximately 60% (P Adrenaline decreased the absorption rate of lidocaine and prolonged the duration of its absorption.

  19. Proactive error analysis of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block performance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Owen

    2012-07-13

    Detailed description of the tasks anesthetists undertake during the performance of a complex procedure, such as ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve blockade, allows elements that are vulnerable to human error to be identified. We have applied 3 task analysis tools to one such procedure, namely, ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blockade, with the intention that the results may form a basis to enhance training and performance of the procedure.

  20. Effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to local anesthetics for brachial plexus block: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Won Shin

    Full Text Available Tramadol, a 4-phenyl-piperidine analog of codeine, has a unique action in that it has a central opioidergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic analgesic, and peripheral local anesthetic (LA effect. Many studies have reported contradictory findings regarding the peripheral analgesic effect of tramadol as an adjuvant to LA in brachial plexus block (BPB. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the effects of tramadol as an adjunct to LA in BPB during shoulder or upper extremity surgery.We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, KoreaMed databases, and Google Scholar for eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared BPB with LA alone and BPB with LA and tramadol. Primary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia. Secondary outcomes were the effects of tramadol as an adjuvant on time to onset of sensory block and motor block and on adverse effects. We performed the meta-analysis using Review Manager 5.3 software.We identified 16 RCTs with 751 patients. BPB with tramadol prolonged the duration of sensory block (mean difference [MD], -61.5 min; 95% CI, -95.5 to -27.6; P = 0.0004, motor block (MD, -65.6 min; 95% CI, -101.5 to -29.7; P = 0.0003, and analgesia (MD, -125.5 min; 95% CI, -175.8 to -75.3; P < 0.0001 compared with BPB without tramadol. Tramadol also shortened the time to onset of sensory block (MD, 2.1 min; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1; P < 0.0001 and motor block (MD, 1.2 min; 95% CI, 0.2 to 2.1; P = 0.010. In subgroup analysis, the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia was prolonged for BPB with tramadol 100 mg (P < 0.05 but not for BPB with tramadol 50 mg. The quality of evidence was high for duration of analgesia according to the GRADE system. Adverse effects were comparable between the studies.In upper extremity surgery performed under BPB, use of tramadol 100 mg as an adjuvant to LA appears to prolong the duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia, and

  1. Posterior parasagittal in-plane ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block-a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beh, Zhi Yuen; Hasan, M Shahnaz; Lai, Hou Yee; Kassim, Normadiah M; Md Zin, Siti Rosmani; Chin, Kin Fah

    2015-07-21

    The brachial plexus at the infraclavicular level runs deeper compared to its course proximally, giving rise to impaired needle visualisation due to the steep angle of needle insertion with the current ultrasound-guided approach. A new posterior parasagittal in-plane ultrasound-guided infraclavicular approach was introduced to improve needle visibility. However no further follow up study was done. We performed a case series and a cadaveric dissection to assess its feasibility in a single centre, University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from November 2012 to October 2013. After obtaining approval from the Medical Ethics Committee, University Malaya Medical Centre, 18 patients undergoing upper limb surgery were prospectively recruited. A cadaveric dissection was also performed. The endpoints of this study were the success rate, performance time, total anaesthesia-related time, quality of anaesthesia and any incidence of complications. All patients had 100 % success rate. The imaging time, needling time and performance time were comparable with previously published study. There were no adverse events encountered in this study. The cadaveric dissection revealed a complete spread of methylene blue dye over the brachial plexus. This study demonstrated that the posterior parasagittal in-plane approach is a feasible and reliable technique with high success rate. Future studies shall compare this technique with the conventional lateral parasagittal in-plane approach. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02312453 . Registered on 8 December 2014.

  2. Axillary brachial plexus block duration with mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure. Case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, V; Nieuwveld, D; Herrera, A E; Mestres, G; López, A M; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Regional anaesthesia is commonly preferred for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. Previous studies suggest a shorter block duration in patients with chronic renal failure, maybe because of the changes in regional blood flow. The aim of our study was to evaluate the duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure scheduled for AVF compared with healthy controls. Patients scheduled for AVF creation for the first time (GIRC) were included. They were compared with patients without renal failure (GC), with similar anthropometric characteristics. Ultrasound-guided axillary blocks with 20mL of 1.5% mepivacaine were performed on all patients. We evaluated onset time, humeral artery diameter and blood flow before and after the block, as well as the block duration. Twenty-three patients (GIRC: 12 and GC: 11) were included. No differences between groups were observed in block duration (GIRC: 227±43min vs GC: 229±27min; P=.781), or in onset time (GIRC: 13±5min vs GC: 12.2±3min; P=.477). The humeral blood flow before and after block was significantly lower in the GIRC (pre-block: GIRC: 52±21ml/min GC: 100±62ml/min; P=.034 and p ost block: GIRC: 130±57ml/min and GC: 274±182ml/min; P=.010). There was no significant correlation between the duration of the block and the preblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.106; P=.657) or the postblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.267; P=.254). The duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure was similar to that of the control patients. The duration of axillary brachial plexus block seems not to be related to changes in regional blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective, randomized, double-blind comparison of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus blocks using 2 versus 4 injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imasogie, Ngozi; Ganapathy, Sugantha; Singh, Sudha; Armstrong, Kevin; Armstrong, Paidrig

    2010-04-01

    In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, we compared the effectiveness and time efficiency of perioperative axillary blocks performed via 2 different techniques, 1 involving 2 and the other 4 separate skin punctures. One hundred twenty patients undergoing upper limb surgery were randomized to receive either (1) an axillary brachial plexus block involving 2 injections, with 30 mL local anesthetic injected posterior to the axillary artery (with redirection, as needed, to achieve circumferential spread), plus 10 mL local anesthetic to the musculocutaneous nerve, guided by ultrasound (group 1, n = 56); or (2) 4 separate 10-mL injections to the median, ulnar, radial, and musculocutaneous nerves, using a combined ultrasound and neurostimulation technique (group 2, n = 58). All patients received 40 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine with 1:400,000 epinephrine. The primary outcome was the success rate of the block, defined as anesthesia adequate for surgery. Secondary outcomes were the time to administer the block, time to the onset of motor-sensory block, time to surgical readiness, and incidence of adverse events. The 2-injection technique was slightly faster to administer (8 vs 11 minutes, P = 0.003). The mean nerve block score was slightly higher for the 4-injection group at the 10-, 15-, 20-, and 30-minute time points, but the cumulative percentages of blocks having taken effect were not significantly different over these time points, at 0.0%, 5.4%, 12.5%, and 37.5% among those who had received a 2-injection block versus 6.9%, 10.4%, 19.0%, and 48.3%, respectively, with the 4-injection block (P = 0.20). There was no difference in the percentage of patients with complete block by 30 minutes (32.1% vs 37.5%, P = 0.55) or in final block success rates (89.3% vs 87.9%, P = 0.99). An ultrasound-guided 2-injection axillary block may be as effective as, and more time efficient than, a 4-injection technique.

  4. Buprenorphine for postoperative analgesia: Axillary brachial plexus block versus intramuscular administration in a placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepali Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Peripheral administration of opioids has been suggested for prolongation of regional analgesia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study was undertaken to compare the effect of regional (axillary brachial plexus block [ABPB] versus intramuscular (IM buprenorphine (2 μg/kg in adults. Material and Methods: Seventy-five adults undergoing upper limb surgery received ABPB with local anaesthetic (15 ml 0.5% bupivacaine, 15 ml 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:200,000, 9 ml normal saline [NS]. In addition, regional group RB (n = 25 received buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in ABPB and 1 ml NS IM. Systemic Group SB (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and buprenorphine 2 μg/kg IM. Group C (n = 25 received 1 ml NS in ABPB and IM. Onset, duration of sensory and motor block, hemodynamic parameters, sedation score, pain scores using visual analog scale, duration of postoperative analgesia, rescue analgesic (RA requirement, adverse events, and patient satisfaction were noted. Results: Demographics, onset and duration of sensory, motor block were similar. RB group had longest duration of analgesia (20.61 ± 1.33 h compared to SB (10.91 ± 0.90 h and control group (5.86 ± 0.57 h (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. RA requirement was highest in the control group and least in RB group (P = 0.000 RB vs. SB/C and SB vs. C. SB group had a maximum number of side effects (P = 0.041, SB vs. RB/C. Patient satisfaction was highest with group RB (P < 0.05 RB vs. SB/C, and P = 0.06 SB vs. C. Conclusion: Buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in axillary plexus block provides significantly prolonged analgesia with less RA requirement and greater patient satisfaction compared to IM administration. This is highly suggestive of action on peripheral opioid receptors.

  5. A wandering spleen presenting as a hypogastric mass: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the spleen. A 26-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and abdominal pain. Abdominal examination revealed a large ovoid hypogastric mass. A CT scan showed a wandering spleen in the hypogastric region. Exploratory laparotomy revealed an ischemic spleen. A total splenectomy was performed.

  6. Is there a dose response of dexamethasone as adjuvant for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block? A prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiabin; Richman, Kenneth A; Grodofsky, Samuel R; Bhatt, Siya; Huffman, George Russell; Kelly, John D; Glaser, David L; Elkassabany, Nabil

    2015-05-01

    The study objective is to examine the analgesic effect of 3 doses of dexamethasone in combination with low concentration local anesthetics to determine the lowest effective dose of dexamethasone for use as an adjuvant in supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. The design is a prospective randomized double-blinded clinical study. The setting is an academic medical center. The patients are 89 adult patients scheduled for shoulder arthroscopy. All patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 4 treatment groups: (i) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL; (ii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 1-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; (iii) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 2-mg preservative-free dexamethasone; and (iv) bupivacaine, 0.25% 30 mL with 4-mg preservative-free dexamethasone. All patients received ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve blocks and general anesthesia. The measurements are the duration of analgesia and motor block. The median analgesia duration of supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block with 0.25% bupivacaine was 12.1 hours; and 1-, 2-, or 4-mg dexamethasone significantly prolonged the analgesia duration to 22.3, 23.3, and 21.2 hours, respectively (P = .0105). Dexamethasone also significantly extended the duration of motor nerve block in a similar trend (P = .0247). Low-dose dexamethasone (1-2 mg) prolongs analgesia duration and motor blockade to the similar extent as 4-mg dexamethasone when added to 0.25% bupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pharmacokinetics of Lidocaine Hydrochloride Administered with or without Adrenaline for the Paravertebral Brachial Plexus Block in Dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Choquette

    Full Text Available Adrenaline is known to prolong the duration of local anesthesia but its effects on the pharmacokinetic processes of local anesthetic drugs are not fully understood. Our objective was to develop a compartmental model for quantification of adrenaline's impact on the pharmacokinetics of perineurally-injected lidocaine in the dog. Dogs were subjected to paravertebral brachial plexus block using lidocaine alone or adrenalinated lidocaine. Data was collected through a prospective, randomised, blinded crossover protocol performed over three periods. Blood samples were collected during 180 minutes following block execution. Compartmental pharmacokinetic models were developed and their goodness-of-fit were compared. The lowering effects of adrenaline on the absorption of lidocaine were statistically determined with one-sided tests. A one-compartment disposition model with two successive zero-order absorption processes best fitted our experimental data. Adrenaline decreased the peak plasma lidocaine concentration by approximately 60% (P < 0.001, decreased this local anesthetic's fast and slow zero-order absorption rates respectively by 50% and 90% (P = 0.046, and P < 0.001, which respective durations were prolonged by 90% and 1300% (P < 0.020 and P < 0.001. Lidocaine demonstrated a previously unreported atypical absorption profile following its paravertebral injection in dogs. Adrenaline decreased the absorption rate of lidocaine and prolonged the duration of its absorption.

  8. Low-dose ropivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block combined with general anesthesia for successful postoperative analgesia: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Iwata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ropivacaine, a long-acting local anesthetic agent, has been used for postoperative analgesia in brachial plexus block (BPB at high doses. However, use of lower doses would reduce the occurrence of adverse effects. Methods: We applied BPB with low-dose ropivacaine (10 mL of 0.375% ropivacaine after induction of general anesthesia for surgery of the upper extremities in 62 patients at our hospital. Ropivacaine was administered via a fluoroscopy-guided supraclavicular method. Analgesic effects during surgery, visual analog scale pain scores, skin sensation, muscle strength, and postoperative patient satisfaction indices were evaluated. Results: Fifty-six patients (90.3% did not require supplemental analgesics during surgery. The remaining six patients were administered fentanyl due to the insufficient analgesic effects of the nerve block. Some adverse effects, including numbness and delayed motor and sensory recovery of the upper extremities, were observed. The mean postoperative patient-evaluated visual satisfaction scale was 94.1. Conclusions: Our results suggest that low-dose ropivacaine is clinically acceptable for BPB under general anesthesia.

  9. Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block for Analgesia During Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty for Dialysis Access

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, Emiko, E-mail: chibaemi23@comet.ocn.ne.jp; Hamamoto, Kohei, E-mail: hkouhei917@gmail.com [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan); Nagashima, Michio, E-mail: nagamic00@gmail.com [Asahikawa Medical University, Department of Emergency Medicine (Japan); Matsuura, Katsuhiko, E-mail: kmatsur@gmail.com; Okochi, Tomohisa, E-mail: t-shachi@dj8.so-net.ne.jp; Tanno, Keisuke, E-mail: tankichi1974@gmail.com; Tanaka, Osamu, E-mail: otanaka@omiya.jichi.ac.jp [Jichi Medical University, Department of Radiology, Saitama Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    PurposeTo evaluate the efficacy and safety of ultrasound (US)-guided axillary brachial plexus block (ABPB) for analgesia during percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) for dialysis access.Subjects and MethodsTwenty-one patients who underwent PTA for stenotic dialysis access shunts and who had previous experience of PTA without sedation, analgesia, and anesthesia were included. The access type in all patients was native arteriovenous fistulae in the forearm. Two radiologists performed US-guided ABPB for the radial and musculocutaneous nerves before PTA. The patients’ pain scores were evaluated using a visual analog scale (VAS) after PTA, and these were compared with previous sessions without US-guided ABPB. The patient’s motor/sensory paralysis after PTA was also examined.ResultsThe mean time required to achieve US-guided ABPB was 8 min. The success rate of this procedure was 100 %, and there were no significant complications. All 21 patients reported lower VAS with US-guided ABPB as compared to without the block (p < 0.01). All patients expressed the desire for an ABPB for future PTA sessions, if required. Transient motor paralysis occurred in 8 patients, but resolved in all after 60 min.ConclusionUS-guided ABPB is feasible and effective for analgesia in patients undergoing PTA for stenotic dialysis access sites.Level of EvidenceLevel 4 (case series).

  10. Ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml versus bupivacaine 5 mg/ml for interscalene brachial plexus block--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann-Kiefer, K; Herbrich, C; Seebauer, A; Schwender, D; Peter, K

    2002-06-01

    We investigated ropivacaine 75 mg/ml in comparison with bupivacaine 5 mg/ml in patients receiving interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) and general anaesthesia. In this randomized, double-blind, prospective clinical trial, each patient received an ISB block according to the technique originally described by Winnie and a catheter technique as per Meier. The rapidity of onset and the quality of sensory and motor block were determined. After general anaesthesia had been induced further parameters evaluated were consumption of local anaesthetic, opioid and neuromuscular blocking drug. After arrival in the recovery room, the patients were assessed for intensity of pain using a visual analog scale (VAS). One hundred and twenty patients were included in the study. The onset and development of sensory block was similar in both groups. Development and quality of motor block was also nearly identical for both local anaesthetics. Consumption of neuromuscular blocking drug and opioid did not differ between ropivacaine and bupivacaine. In the recovery room the mean pain score was less than 25 in both groups. There were no significant differences in terms of onset and quality of sensory or motor block during the intraoperative and early postoperative period. In addition we did not identify any side-effects related to the administration of the local anaesthetics. Ropivacaine 7.5 mg/ml and bupivacaine 5mg/ml proved to be nearly indistinguishable when administered for interscalene brachial plexus block.

  11. Ropivacaine 3.75 mg/ml, 5 mg/ml, or 7.5 mg/ml for cervical plexus block during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrain, Vincent J; van Gorp, Viola L; Schmedding, Eric; Debing, Erik E; von Kemp, Karl; van den Brande, Pierre M; Camu, Frédéric

    2004-01-01

    To examine the effect of 225 mg (7.5 mg/mL), 150 mg (5 mg/mL), and 112.5 mg (3.75 mg/mL) ropivacaine on quality of cervical plexus block during carotid endarterectomy. Patients (n = 93) scheduled for carotid endarterectomy were randomized to receive a cervical plexus block with deep infiltration of 10 mL and superficial infiltration of 20-mL volumes of ropivacaine 7.5, 5.0, or 3.75 mg/mL. Pain, coughing, hemodynamic consequences of the block, postoperative visual analog scores, and pain satisfaction index were recorded. If necessary, anesthesia supplements with aliquots of 3 mL lidocaine 1% were given during surgery. Incidences of coughing and hoarseness were similar in all groups. More local anesthetic infiltrations were required in the ropivacaine 3.75-mg/mL and 5-mg/mL groups. Postoperatively, no intragroup differences were observed. A trend toward better pain satisfaction was observed in the ropivacaine 7.5-mg/mL group. The best quality of cervical plexus block associated with the smallest incidence of pain for patients undergoing carotid endarterectomy was obtained with 30 mL of 225 mg and 150 mg of ropivacaine, respectively.

  12. Medial approach of ultrasound-guided costoclavicular plexus block and its effects on regional perfussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwveld, D; Mojica, V; Herrera, A E; Pomés, J; Prats, A; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasound-guided infraclavicular block in the costoclavicular space located between the clavicle and the first rib, reaches the secondary trunks when they are clustered together and lateral to the axillary artery. This block is most often performed through a lateral approach, the difficulty being finding the coracoid process an obstacle and guiding the needle towards the vessels and pleura. A medial approach, meaning from inside to outside, will avoid these structures. Traditionally the assessment of a successful block is through motor or sensitive responses but a sympathetic fibre block can also be evaluated measuring the changes in humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and/or perfusion index. To describe the medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block evaluating its development by motor and sensitive response and measurement of sympathetic changes. Description of the technique and administration of 20ml of contrast in a fresh cadaver model, evaluating the distribution with CT-scan and sagittal sections of the anatomic piece. Subsequently in a clinical phase, including 11 patients, we evaluated the establishment of motor, sensitive and sympathetic blocks. We evaluated the sympathetic changes reflected by humeral artery blood flow, skin temperature and distal perfusion index. In the anatomical model the block was conducted without difficulties, showing an adequate periclavicular distribution of the contrast in the CT-scan and in sagittal sections, reaching the interscalenic space as far as the secondary trunks. Successful blocks were observed in 91% of patients after 25minutes. All the parameters reflecting sympathetic block increased significantly. The humeral artery blood flow showed an increase from 108 ± 86 to 188±141ml/min (P=.05), skin temperature from 32.1±2 to 32.8±9°C (P=.03) and perfusion index from 4±3 to 9±5 (P=.003). The medial approach of the ultrasound-guided costoclavicular block is anatomically feasible, with high

  13. Distal infrared thermography and skin temperature after ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Bjerregaard, Lars S; Lundstrøm, Lars H

    2014-01-01

    -four blocks were successful and two were failures. Four thermographic patterns were observed after successful blocks: the increase in skin temperature was restricted to the thumb (n = 5); increase in skin temperature of the thumb and the second digit (n = 11); increase in skin temperature of the thumb......, the second and fifth digits (n = 4); and an increase in skin temperature in all parts of the hand (n = 24). All successful blocks demonstrated a significant (P thumb of 6.6°C (0.7 to 17.2) by 30 min, which was already significant (P ....0001) by 5 min. By contrast, skin temperature decreased significantly (P thumb within 30...

  14. Electrical nerve stimulation as an aid to the placement of a brachial plexus block : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Most local anaesthetic blocks are placed blindly, based on a sound knowledge of anatomy. Very often the relationship between the site of deposition of local anaesthetic and the nerve to be blocked is unknown. Large motor neurons may be stimulated with the aid of an electrical current. By observing for muscle twitches, through electrical stimulation of the nerve, a needle can be positioned extremely close to the nerve. The accuracy of local anaesthetic blocks can be improved by this technique. By using the lowest possible current a needle could be positioned within 2-5mm of a nerve. The correct duration of stimulation ensures that stimulation of sensory nerves does not occur. The use of electrical nerve stimulation in veterinary medicine is a novel technique that requires further evaluation.

  15. Effect of ketamine as an adjuvant in ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A double-blind randomized clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Lashgarinia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supraclavicular brachial plexus block is one of the most effective anesthetic procedures in operations for the upper extremity. Ketamine has been reported to enhance the analgesic effects of local anesthetics. We have conducted this study to assess whether coadministration of ketamine can prolong the local analgesic effect of lidocaine in the supraclavicular brachial plexus block for patients undergoing elective upper extremity surgery. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients undergoing elective surgery of the elbow, forearm, wrist or hand were randomly allocated in two groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 (ketamine group received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% plus 2 mg/kg ketamine, Group 2 (control group received 5 mg/kg lidocaine 1.5% and saline. The outcome measures included severity of pain by using visual analog scale (VAS, 0 = no pain 10 cm = the most severe pain, time of first request for analgesia, and total dose of postoperative opioid administration. The data was analyzed using the χ2 test, student′s t-test, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Multivariate analysis tests. Results: Patients in the control group had a higher VAS than patients who received ketamine, at all time points during the first 24 hours after surgery (all P < 0.05. The time of first request for analgesia in the ketamine group was significantly more than in the control group (8.93 ± 1.0 vs. 7.30 ± 1.9, respectively, P < 0.001. Conclusion: The addition of ketamine to lidocaine in the ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block could decrease the postoperative pain and need for analgesic. Therefore, it could be considered as an option in the brachial plexus block to enhance the analgesic action of lidocaine.

  16. [Effects of patient-controlled infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain and surgical efficacy in patients with terrible tyriad of the elbow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu-Zhen, Wang; Ge, Ye-Ying; Ye, Guang-Yao; Zhang, Jing-Wei; Ma, Wei-Hu

    2017-11-25

    To study the effects of ultrasound guided inter-scalene brachial plexus block and patient-controlled infraclavicular brachial plexus block for postoperative pain and surgical efficacy in patients with terrible tyriad of the elbow. From March 2015 to August 2016, 60 patients with terrible tyriad of the elbows were treated in Ningbo No.6 Hospital with ASA I to II internal fixation. There were 32 males and 28 females, ranging in age from 16 to 70 years old, with a mean age of (55.6±18.2) years old. All the patients were divided into two groups(30 cases in each group): controlled intermuscular groove brachial plexus block (group C), infraclavicular brachial plexus block(group I). All catheters were placed using ultra-sound visualization and injected 0.33% ropivacaine 30 ml preoperatively. After regaining consciousness, all patients connected the electronic pump. The solution contained 0.2% ropiva-caine and the pump was setup to deliver a 5 ml bolus dose, with a 15 min lock out interval and background infusion at 5 ml/h. Both analgesia lasted until 5 d after operation. The patients underwent rehabilitation exercise everyday for 5 consecutive days starting from 24 h after operation.VAS score was recorded at 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 4 d, 5 d after operation during rest and rehabilitation exercise time. The elbow articular range of motion and Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS) were recorded at 6 d after operation. Catheter-related adversereactions (such as oozing from the insertion site, obstruction, prolapse) were recorded. The success rate of blockade was 100% during insertion in both groups. Compared with group C, the VAS score at 3 d during rest time and 3, 4, 5 d after operation during rehabili-tation exercise were decreased(2.5±0.5 vs. 3.8±1.1, 3.0±0.4 vs. 5.0±0.9, 2.5±0.4 vs. 4.5±1.2, 2.1±0.3 vs. 4.1±1.0, P plexus block can be effectively used for postoperative pain after fixation for terrible tyriad of the elbows, and it can increase surgical outcome.

  17. Choroid Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ... of Tumors Astrocytoma Atypical Teratoid Rhaboid Tumor (ATRT) Chondrosarcoma Choroid Plexus Craniopharyngioma Cysts Ependymoma Germ Cell Tumor ...

  18. Combining interscalene brachial plexus block with intravenous-inhalation combined anesthesia for upper extremity fractures surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lan; Tang, Wei; Fu, Guo-qiang; Wang, Jian; Guo, Jun; Chen, Wen-ting

    2014-12-01

    A parallel-group randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted to evaluate the effect of combining the interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) with Intravenous-inhalation combined anesthesia to isolated Intravenous-inhalation anesthesia in the upper extremity fractures surgery of elderly patients. One hundred elderly patients who underwent upper extremity surgery were randomly assigned to received isolated Intravenous-inhalation combined anesthesia (group CI, n = 50) and IBPB associated with Intravenous-inhalation combined anesthesia (group NB, n = 50). Associated side effects, recovery time after operation, as well as the dose of intraoperative vasoactive agents and auxiliary drugs were noted. The two groups were not significantly different in gender (P = 0.539), ages (P = 0.683) and weight (P = 0.212). Five patients (10%) in the group NB and 17 patients (34%) in the group CI suffered from preoperative hypotension (P = 0.004). Besides, lower incidence of other adverse effects such as mental stress, incision pain and hypertension were also found in the group NB; however, the differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). The consumption of general anesthetics in the group NB was significantly less than that of the group CI (propofol, P = 0.004; lsoflurane, P < 0.001), and the recovery time of the group NB was significantly shorter than that of the group CI (P = 0.020). Combining IBPB with Intravenous-inhalation combined anesthesia in elderly patients hold a greater potential for upper extremity fractures surgery due to its improved clinical effectiveness and fewer side effects. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effects of arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block combined with ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Jun; Hwang, Jung-Taek; Kim, Do-Young; Lee, Sang-Soo; Hwang, Sung Mi; Lee, Na Rea; Kwak, Byung-Chan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pain relieving effect of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) combined with arthroscopy-guided suprascapular nerve block (SSNB) with that of ultrasound-guided ISB alone within the first 48 h after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Forty-eight patients with rotator cuff tears who had undergone arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled. The 24 patients in group 1 received ultrasound-guided ISB and arthroscopy-guided SSNB; the remaining 24 patients in group 2 underwent ultrasound-guided ISB alone. Visual analogue scale pain score and patient satisfaction score were checked at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively. Group 1 had a lower visual analogue scale pain score at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 48 h post-operatively (1.7  6.0, 6.2 > 4.3, 6.4 > 5.1, 6.9 > 5.9, 7.9 > 7.1). Six patients in group 1 developed rebound pain twice, and the others in group 1 developed it once. All of the patients in group 2 had one rebound phenomenon each (p = 0.010). The mean timing of rebound pain in group 1 was later than that in group 2 (15.5 > 9.3 h, p  4.0, p = 0.001). Arthroscopy-guided SSNB combined with ultrasound-guided ISB resulted in lower visual analogue scale pain scores at 3-24 and 48 h post-operatively, and higher patient satisfaction scores at 6-36 h post-operatively with the attenuated rebound pain compared to scores in patients who received ultrasound-guided ISB alone after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. The combined blocks may relieve post-operative pain more effectively than the single block within 48 h after arthroscopic cuff repair. Randomized controlled trial, Level I. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02424630.

  20. Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep Aksu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. METHODS: In the first group of patients 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB were applied, while 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. RESULTS: In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24 h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6 h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24 h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2 h and lower than the control group in the 4th and 6th hours (p < 0.05. In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2nd, 4th and 6th hours were lower than in the control group (p < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia.

  1. [Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Biçer, Cihangir; Ülgey, Ayşe; Bayram, Adnan; Güneş, Işın; Güney, Ahmet; Yıldırım, Mustafa Denizhan; Gökahmetoğlu, Günhan; Yıldız, Karamehmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. In the first group of patients 20mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB) were applied, while 20mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA) administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2h and lower than the control group in the 4(th) and 6(th) hours (p<0.05). In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2(nd), 4(th) and 6(th) hours were lower than in the control group (p<0.05). Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Comparison of interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular local anesthetic administration on postoperative pain management in arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksu, Recep; Biçer, Cihangir; Ülgey, Ayşe; Bayram, Adnan; Güneş, Işın; Güney, Ahmet; Yıldırım, Mustafa Denizhan; Gökahmetoğlu, Günhan; Yıldız, Karamehmet

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the aim was to compare postoperative analgesia effects of the administration of ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block and intra-articular bupivacaine carried out with bupivacaine. In the first group of patients 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine and ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (ISPB) were applied, while 20 mL 0.25% bupivacaine was given via intra-articular (IA) administration to the second group patients after surgery. Patients in the third group were considered the control group and no block was performed. Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with morphine was used in all three groups for postoperative analgesia. In the ISPB group, morphine consumption in the periods between 0-4, 6-12 and 12-24 postoperative hours and total consumption within 24h was lower than in the other two groups. Morphine consumption in the IA group was lower than in the control group in the period from 0 to 6h and the same was true for total morphine consumption in 24h. Postoperative VASr scores in the ISPB group were lower than both of the other groups in the first 2h and lower than the control group in the 4th and 6th hours (p<0.05). In the IA group, VASr and VASm scores in the 2nd, 4th and 6th hours were lower than in the control group (p<0.05). Interscalene brachial plexus block was found to be more effective than intra-articular local anesthetic injection for postoperative analgesia. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of brachial plexus block-driven vascular access planning on primary distal arteriovenous fistula recruitment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, Claude J; Leong, Chuo Ren; Bin, Hsien Wern; Wong, Julian Chi Leung

    2015-11-01

    Hemodialysis vascular accesses (VAs) are traditionally planned based on the nondominant upper extremity preoperative physical and sonographic vascular findings. Clinical guidelines advocate the use of the most suitably distended vein in the most distal location. Brachial plexus block (BPB), through its sympathectomy-like effect, promotes vasodilation and can thus further optimize vein recruitment and operative strategy. However, studies on its role in driving primary distal autogenous arteriovenous fistula (AVF) placement are limited. We therefore evaluated a traditional approach of clinic-based VA planning against an on-table sonography-guided strategy under BPB. This was a prospective observational study involving 110 consecutive end-stage renal disease multiethnic Asian patients referred for primary VA creation under BPB after preoperative venous mapping. Cases were grouped according to whether there was a preset operative plan for radial cephalic (RC) or brachial cephalic (BC) AVF creation based on artery and vein >2 mm and >2.5 mm size criteria respectively (group A) or vein size or length were suboptimal (2-2.5 mm and  .05). Satisfactory post-BPB forearm vasodilation resulted in 44% of 36 plans for BC being changed to RC AVFs. RC AVF 6-week hemodynamic maturation and 3-month functional maturation in group A vs B were 48% vs 60% and 69% vs 57%, respectively (P > .05). One-year primary and secondary patency rates were 57% vs 50% and 73% vs 87%, respectively (log rank >.05). Outcomes of RC AVFs in group B were not inferior to those of BC AVFs. On-table BPB-driven VA planning and plan modification strategy contribute to considerable AVF recruitment but do not lead to significantly better distal AVF prevalence or outcomes over the traditional approach. An adequately powered randomized controlled study is, however, warranted to better assess the long-term clinical and cost benefits of such a strategy. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by

  4. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block using ropivacaine alone or combined with dexmedetomidine for upper limb surgery: A prospective, randomized, double-blinded, comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B; Lakshmegowda, M; Sharma, M; Mitra, S; Chauhan, R

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a new α-2 receptor agonist with analgesic and sedative properties. We used dexmedetomidine along with ropivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Eighty ASA grade I-II patients, 18-60 years old, scheduled for elective upper limb orthopaedic surgery under supraclavicular brachial plexus block, were included in this prospective study. The patients were randomly assigned to group R (ropivacaine alone) and group RD (ropivacaine and dexmedetomidine) (40 patients in each group). Group R received ropivacaine 0.50% (30 cc)+placebo and group RD received ropivacaine 0.50% (30 cc)+dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg. Primary outcome measure was duration of analgesia. Secondary measures were onset and duration of sensory blockade, pain scores, onset and duration of motor blockade, and evidence of any adverse drug reactions. There was no significant difference hemodynamic parameter during intra-operative period. Group RD showed a statistically significant shorter time to onset of sensory blockade (10.75±2.71 vs. 16.75±2.96 min, P=.003), longer sensory block duration (379.40±55.09 vs. 211.60±47.88 min, P=.002), shorter onset time to motor blockade (14.35±2.58 vs. 20.25±4.13 min, P=.003), longer motor block duration (312.0±49.91 vs. 184.7±36.76 min, P=.002), longer duration of postoperative analgesia (413.73±89.92 vs. 197.35±28.67 min, P=.002). Three patients in the group RD developed somnolence. (P=.04). Dexmedetomidine along with ropivacaine decreases the onset of motor and sensory block and increases the duration of sensory and motor block in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound-guided training in the performance of brachial plexus block by the posterior approach: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Rettig, H.C.; Koornwinder, T.; Renes, S.; Gielen, M.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The application of ultrasonography in guiding and controlling the path of the stimulating needle to the brachial plexus via the posterior approach (Pippa technique) was studied. In 21 ASA physical status 1 and 2 patients, scheduled for surgery of the shoulder or upper arm, needle insertion was

  6. Brachial plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These nerves ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation ... associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may include: ...

  7. Comparison of dexamethasone and clonidine as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine with adrenaline in infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipal Mahendra Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The role of clonidine as an adjuvant to regional blocks to hasten the onset of the local anesthetics or prolong their duration of action is proven. The efficacy of dexamethasone compared to clonidine as an adjuvant is not known. We aimed to compare the efficacy of dexamethasone versus clonidine as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine with adrenaline in infraclavicular brachial plexus block for upper limb surgeries. Material and Methods: Fifty three American Society of Anaesthesiologists-I and II patients aged 18-60 years scheduled for upper limb surgery were randomized to three groups to receive 1.5% lignocaine with 1:200,000 adrenaline and the study drugs. Group S (n = 13 received normal saline, group D (n = 20 received dexamethasone and group C (n = 20 received clonidine. The time to onset and peak effect, duration of the block (sensory and motor and postoperative analgesia requirement were recorded. Chi-square and ANOVA test were used for categorical and continuous variables respectively and Bonferroni or post-hoc test for multiple comparisons. P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The three groups were comparable in terms of time to onset and peak action of motor and sensory block, postoperative analgesic requirements and pain scores. 90% of the blocks were successful in group C compared to only 60% in group D (P = 0.028. The duration of sensory and motor block in group S, D and C were 217.73 ± 61.41 min, 335.83 ± 97.18 min and 304.72 ± 139.79 min and 205.91 ± 70.1 min, 289.58 ± 78.37 min and 232.5 ± 74.2 min respectively. There was significant prolongation of sensory and motor block in group D as compared to group S (P < 0.5. Time to first analgesic requirement was significantly more in groups C and D as compared with group S (P < 0.5. Clinically significant complications were absent. Conclusions: We conclude that clonidine is more efficacious than dexamethasone as an adjuvant to 1.5% lignocaine in brachial

  8. A prospective, randomized and controlled study of interscalene brachial plexus block for arthroscopic shoulder surgery: A comparison of C5 and conventional approach, a CONSORT-compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun-Jung; Na, Hyo-Seok; Oh, Ah-Young; Hwang, Jung-Won; Kim, Byung-Gun; Park, Hee-Pyoung; Jeon, Young-Tae; Min, Seong-Won; Ryu, Jung-Hee

    2016-09-01

    The shoulder area is mainly innervated with the C5 and C6 nerve roots, and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is widely used for postoperative analgesia after shoulder surgery. However, it is associated with adverse effects, such as numbness and weakness in the blocked arm due to an unwanted block of the lower brachial plexus (C7-T1). We hypothesized that the C5 approach during ISB would provide postoperative analgesia while minimizing adverse events after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. A total of 92 patients scheduled for arthroscopic shoulder surgery were enrolled and randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 groups: The control (no ISB, n = 31), conventional ISB (ISB with the conventional approach, n = 31), or C5 ISB (ISB with the C5 approach, n = 30) group. ISB was performed before the induction of anesthesia, and a subacromial catheter was placed in all patients at the end of the surgery. Postoperative pain scores, numbness, and weakness were recorded at 2, 8, and 24 hours after surgery. Oxygen saturation and overall patient satisfaction scores were also assessed at 1 and 48 hour after surgery, respectively. The pain scores were lower in the conventional ISB group and the C5 ISB group than in the control group at postoperative 2 and 8 hours (P C5 ISB group than in the conventional ISB group (P C5 ISB group than in the control group (P = 0.01). Overall patient satisfaction scores were higher in the C5 ISB group than in the control or conventional ISB group (P C5 approach for ISB provides analgesia as effectively as the conventional approach following arthroscopic shoulder surgery, with the advantages of minimal numbness and weakness.

  9. High- versus low-stimulation current threshold for axillary plexus blocks: a prospective randomized triple-blinded noninferiority trial in 205 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, Timon; Müller, Hans-Helge; Ellert, Angela; Wallot, Pascal; Kwee, Kuo-Min; Beyerle, Michaela; Eberhart, Leopold; Wulf, Hinnerk; Steinfeldt, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    For nerve stimulator-guided regional anesthesia, one has to compromise between a presumed low success rate (using a high-current threshold) and a presumed increased risk of nerve damage (using a low-current threshold). We hypothesized that high-current thresholds in the range of 0.9 to 1.1 mA are not inferior with respect to the procedural and latency times compared with low threshold currents in the range of 0.3 to 0.5 mA for nerve stimulation in brachial plexus blocks. Two hundred five patients scheduled for elective surgery were randomized to a low (0.3-0.5 mA, n = 103) or a high (0.9-1.1 mA, n = 102) stimulation current threshold for the axillary plexus block with 40 mL local anesthetic mixture (20 mL, each of prilocaine 1% and ropivacaine 0.75%). The primary end point was the time to complete sensory block. The secondary outcome measures were the time to readiness for surgery (defined as the time from the start of block procedure to complete sensory block) and the block performance time. The noninferiority margin was set at 5 minutes and was evaluated using the two-sided 95% bootstrap-confidence intervals ([CIs] 100,000 replications) for differences in means. The mean times to complete sensory block revealed a significant decrease with the low-current group (17.9 ± 12.1 (mean ± SD) versus 22.8 ± 12.4 minutes; 95% CI, 1.1 to 8.6; p = 0.012). The time to readiness for surgery was 30.3 ± 13.8 minutes in the low-current group and 31.7 ± 12.9 minutes in the high-current group (95% CI, -2.7 to 5.5; p = 0.49). The performance time was significantly shorter in the high-current threshold group (9.5 ± 4.7 versus 11.9 ± 5.7 minutes; 95% CI, -4 to 1.1; p = 0.001). Noninferiority for the high-current threshold technique could neither be confirmed for the primary end point nor for secondary end points. However, we consider a difference in mean times of approximately 8.5 minutes to achieve readiness for surgery acceptable for clinical practice.

  10. Clonidine as an adjuvant in axillary brachial plexus block for below elbow orthopedic surgeries: A comparison between local and systemic administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshmaulik, Sumanta; Bisui, Bikash; Saha, Debasish; Swaika, Sarbari; Ghosh, Arun K

    2012-01-01

    Axillary brachial plexus block for below elbow orthopedic surgery provides a safe and low-cost technique with the advantage of prolonged postoperative analgesia. Clonidine, with selective partial agonist activity on α2 adrenergic receptors, has significantly demonstrated its role in this regard as an adjuvant to local anesthetics. The current study compares the locally administered clonidine with systemically administered control group in terms of onset and duration of sensory block, motor block, and analgesia; hemodynamic variability; sedation; and other side effect profile. Seventy patients (ASA I or II) scheduled for below elbow orthopedic surgeries were randomly allocated in equal numbers to receive either 30 ml of 0.5% plain bupivacaine with 150 μg (1 ml) of inj. clonidine locally in the axillary sheath and 1 ml of normal saline (NS) subcutaneously (Group L) or 30 ml of 0.5% plain bupivacaine with 1 ml of NS locally and 150 μg (1 ml) of inj. clonidine subcutaneously (Group S). Standard monitoring of vital parameters was done. Duration of sensory and motor block, analgesia, hemodynamic changes, and any adverse effects were observed and recorded for different duration up to 24 h. Duration of sensory block (625 ± 35 min), motor block (690 ± 38 min), and analgesia (930 ± 45 min) was significantly longer in Group L than in Group S [sensory block (480 ± 30 min), motor block (535 ± 25 min), and analgesia (720 ± 30 min)] (P < 0.05). Significant alteration of heart rate, systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure, and mean arterial pressure in Group S was observed compared to Group L (P < 0.05). Side effects like nausea and vomiting were comparable, but highly significant sedation score (χ(2) = 47.75 and 49.51 at 120 and 240 min, respectively; P < 0.01) was observed between the two groups. Compared to systemic administration, local clonidine as an adjuvant in axillary block resulted in significant prolongation of duration of sensory and motor

  11. Diaphragm function after interscalene brachial plexus block: a double-blind, randomized comparison of 0.25% and 0.125% bupivacaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Elizabeth M; Swenson, Jeffrey D; Gertsch, Matthew C; Phillips, Kathleen M; Steele, John W; Burks, Robert T; Tashjian, Robert Z; Greis, Patrick E

    2013-03-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) provides excellent analgesia after rotator cuff surgery but is associated with diaphragm dysfunction. In this study, ISBPB with 20 mL of 0.125% or 0.25% bupivacaine were compared to assess the effect on diaphragm function, oxygen saturation, pain control, opioid requirements, and patient satisfaction. In this prospective, randomized, double-blind study, 30 adults undergoing outpatient arthroscopic rotator cuff repair were enrolled to receive ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus catheter placement with 20 mL of 0.125% (n = 15) or 0.25% bupivacaine (n = 15). Diaphragm function and oxygen saturation were assessed before ISBPB placement and on discharge from the postanesthesia care unit. Postoperative pain scores, opioid requirements, and patient satisfaction were compared. Diaphragm function and oxygen saturation were superior in the low concentration group. Absent or paradoxic motion of the diaphragm was present in 78% of the 0.25% group compared with 21% of patients in the 0.125% group (P = .008). Oxygen saturation decreased 4.3% in the 0.25% group compared with a decrease of 2.6% in the 0.125% group (P = .04). Pain scores averaged 1 of 10 in the 0.25% group and 0 of 10 in the 0.125% group (P = .02). Opioid requirements and patient satisfaction were not different between the two groups. In this randomized, double-blind comparison of ISBPB performed with 20 mL of 0.125% or 0.25% bupivacaine, diaphragm function and oxygen saturation were superior in patients treated with more dilute bupivacaine. Furthermore, there were no clinically significant differences in pain scores, and no statistically significant differences in opioid requirements and patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Procedural pain of an ultrasound-guided brachial plexus block: a comparison of axillary and infraclavicular approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B S; Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Jacobsen, R B

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided infraclavicular (IC) and axillary (AX) blocks have similar effectiveness. Therefore, limiting procedural pain may help to choose a standard approach. The primary aims of this randomized study were to assess patient's pain during the block and to recognize its cause....

  13. Brachial Plexus Anatomy: Normal and Variant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Orebaugh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective brachial plexus blockade requires a thorough understanding of the anatomy of the plexus, as well as an appreciation of anatomic variations that may occur. This review summarizes relevant anatomy of the plexus, along with variations and anomalies that may affect nerve blocks conducted at these levels. The Medline, Cochrane Library, and PubMed electronic databases were searched in order to compile reports related to the anatomy of the brachial plexus using the following free terms: "brachial plexus", "median nerve", "ulnar nerve", "radial nerve", "axillary nerve", and "musculocutanous nerve". Each of these was then paired with the MESH terms "anatomy", "nerve block", "anomaly", "variation", and "ultrasound". Resulting articles were hand searched for additional relevant literature. A total of 68 searches were conducted, with a total of 377 possible articles for inclusion. Of these, 57 were found to provide substantive information for this review. The normal anatomy of the brachial plexus is briefly reviewed, with an emphasis on those features revealed by use of imaging technologies. Anomalies of the anatomy that might affect the conduct of the various brachial plexus blocks are noted. Brachial plexus blockade has been effectively utilized as a component of anesthesia for upper extremity surgery for a century. Over that period, our understanding of anatomy and its variations has improved significantly. The ability to explore anatomy at the bedside, with real-time ultrasonography, has improved our appreciation of brachial plexus anatomy as well.

  14. Effect of intravenous ondansetron on reducing the incidence of hypotension and bradycardia events during shoulder arthroscopy in sitting position under interscalene brachial plexus block: A prospective randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Nallam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Sudden, profound hypotension and bradycardia events (HBEs have been reported in more than 20% of patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy in the sitting position. The present study was designed to know whether intravenous (IV ondansetron (selective 5-hydroxy tryptamine 3-antagonist can help in reducing the HBEs associated with shoulder arthroscopy performed in sitting position under interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB. Methods: A total of 100 patients (age 20-50 years undergoing shoulder arthroscopy performed in the sitting position under ISBPB were assigned randomly to one of the two groups: Group C received 10 ml of normal saline and Group T received 4 mg of ondansetron diluted in 10 ml of normal saline` IV. All patients received ISBPB using levobupivacaine 0.5%. Assessment of motor and sensory blockade, pulse rate, systolic blood pressure, respiration, and side effects were noted every 5 min for first 30 min and every 10 min till the end of surgery. HBEs were recorded in both groups. Results: IV injection of ondansetron significantly reduces the incidence of HBEs from 11 (22.44% in Group C to 3 (6.1% in Group T. The duration of analgesia was significantly longer in Group C (8.1 ± 3.3 in comparison with Group T (6.3 ± 4.2 h. Conclusion: We conclude that 4 ml of IV ondansetron can significantly reduce the HBEs during shoulder arthroscopy done in the sitting position under ISBPB.

  15. Nova técnica de bloqueio do plexo braquial em cães New technique of brachial plexus block in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Futema

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo foi analisar a viabilidade e a eficácia de uma nova técnica para o bloqueio do plexo braquial em cães. Para tanto, foram utilizados 11 cães, machos e fêmeas, idade e peso variáveis e mestiços. Os animais foram pré-tratados com acepromazina e a indução da anestesia foi realizada com propofol. Posteriormente, os animais foram submetidos ao bloqueio do plexo braquial que constou da associação da técnica de múltiplas injeções com o emprego do estimulador de nervos e a técnica da palpação arterial como ponto de referência para a localização dos nervos. Utilizou-se como anestésico local, a bupivacaína com vasoconstritor administrado na dose total de 4mg/kg a 0,375% . O volume total foi dividido em 4 partes iguais, administradas na velocidade de 30 segundos cada, com o objetivo de se atingir a maior quantidade de nervos. O tempo necessário para realização da técnica foi de 11,30 ± 4,54 minutos; o período de latência para o bloqueio motor foi de 9,70 ± 5,52 minutos e para o bloqueio sensitivo foi de 26,20 ± 8,86 min. , sendo a duração da analgesia de 11:00 ± 0:45 horas. Em 90% dos animais, o bloqueio foi efetivo, constatado através da anestesia de todo membro torácico distal à articulação escápulo-umeral. A única complicação observada foi a hipotensão arterial desenvolvida em um animal. Mediante os resultados obtidos, pode-se pressupor que as cirurgias envolvendo o membro torácico distal à articulação escápulo-umeral poderão ser utilizadas com auxílio desta nova técnica do bloqueio do plexo braquial, bem como na analgesia pós-operatória de longa duração.The aim of this study was to evaluate the viability and efficacy of a new technique of brachial plexus block in dogs. Eleven mongrel dogs of different ages and weight, both male and female were used. Animals were pre-medicated with acepromazine and induction of anesthesia was performed with propofol. The brachial

  16. The effect of metrics-based feedback on acquisition of sonographic skills relevant to performance of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, O M A; Niessen, T; O'Donnell, B D; Gallagher, A G; Breslin, D S; DunnGalvin, A; Shorten, G D

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of metrics-based vs. non-metrics-based feedback on novices learning predefined competencies for acquisition and interpretation of sonographic images relevant to performance of ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block. Twelve anaesthetic trainees were randomly assigned to either metrics-based-feedback or non-metrics-based feedback groups. After a common learning phase, all participants attempted to perform a predefined task that involved scanning the left axilla of a single volunteer. Following completion of the task, all participants in each group received feedback from a different expert in regional blocks (consultant anaesthetist) and were allowed to practise the predefined task for up to 1 h. Those in the metrics-based feedback group received feedback based on previously validated metrics, and they practised each metric item until it was performed satisfactorily, as assessed by the supervising consultant. Subsequently, each participant attempted to perform ultrasonography of the left axilla on the same volunteer. Two trained consultant anaesthetists independently scored the video recording pre- and post-feedback scans using the validated metrics list. Both groups showed improvement from pre-feedback to post-feedback scores. Compared with participants in the non-metrics-based feedback group, those in the metrics-based feedback group completed more steps: median (IQR [range]) 18.8 (1.5 [17-20]) vs. 14.3 (4.5 [11-18.5]), p = 0.009, and made fewer errors 0.5 (1 [0-1.5]) vs. 1.5 (2 [1-6]), p = 0.041 postfeedback. In this study, novices' sonographic skills showed greater improvement when feedback was combined with validated metrics. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  17. The effect of low serum bicarbonate values on the onset of action of local anesthesia with vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block in patients with End-stage renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-mustafa Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical infraclavicular brachial plexus block is utilized in patients with chronic renal failure at the time of creation of an arterio-venous fistula (AVF. The aim of this study is to test the effect of impaired renal function, with the resulting deranged serum electrolytes and blood gases, on the success rate and the onset of action of the local anesthetics used. In this prospective clinical study, we investigated the effect of the serum levels of sodium, potassium, urea, crea-tinine, pH, and bicarbonate on the onset of action of a mixture of lidocaine and bupivacaine administered to create infraclavicular brachial plexus block. A total of 31 patients were studied. The success rate of the block was 93.5 % (29 patients. The mean onset time for impaired or re-duced sensation was found to be 8.9 ± 4.7 mins and for complete loss of sensation, was 21.2 ± 6.7 mins. There was no significant association with serum sodium, potassium, urea, creatinine or the blood pH level (P> 0.05. The bivariate correlation between serum bicarbonate level and the partial and complete sensory loss was -0.714 and -0.433 respectively, with significant correlation (P= 0.00, 0.019. Our study suggests that infraclavicular block in patients with chronic renal failure carries a high success rate; the onset of the block is delayed in patients with low serum bicarbonate levels.

  18. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Thyroidectomy is traditionally performed under general ana- esthesia with endotracheal intubation. This in most cases re- flects surgeon's and anaesthetist's preference, as local or re- gional anaesthetic option is rarely offered to patients. How- ever, neither general anaesthesia nor endotracheal intubation is an absolute ...

  19. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    preoperative psychotherapy, careful patient selection and ju- dicious use of sedative drugs in the perioperative period were relied upon to minimize anxiety in our patients. Apart from anxiolysis, the amnesia provided by midazolam was also de- sirable for these patients. The classical thyroidectomy position requires ...

  20. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can happen because of shoulder trauma, tumors, or ... the nerves stretch or tear. Some brachial plexus injuries may heal without treatment. Many children who are ...

  1. Brachial plexus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise to ... in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  2. Interscalene brachial plexus block for open-shoulder surgery: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial between single-shot anesthesia and patient-controlled catheter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Sascha; Stehle, Jens; Schwemmer, Ulrich; Reppenhagen, Stephan; Rath, Beatrice; Gohlke, Frank

    2010-04-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (ISB) is widely used as an adjuvant regional pain therapy in patients undergoing major shoulder surgery and has proved its effectiveness on postoperative pain reduction and opioid-sparing effect. This single-center, prospective, double-blind, randomized and placebo-controlled study was to compare the effectiveness of a single-shot and a patient-controlled catheter insertion ISB system after major open-shoulder surgeries. Seventy patients were entered to receive an ISB and a patient-controlled interscalene catheter. The catheter was inserted under ultrasound guidance. Patients were then assigned to receive one of two different postoperative infusions, either 0.2% ropivacaine (catheter group) or normal saline solution (single-shot group) via a disposable patient-controlled infusion pump. The study variables were amount of rescue medication, pain at rest and during physiotherapy, patient satisfaction and incidence of unwanted side effects. The ropivacaine group revealed significantly less consumption of rescue medication within the first 24 h after surgery. Incidence of side effects did not differ between the two groups. Based on our results, we recommend the use of interscalene plexus block in combination with a patient-controlled catheter system under ultrasound guidance only for the first 24 h after major open-shoulder surgery.

  3. Ultrasound-guided lateral infraclavicular block evaluated by infrared thermography and distal skin temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Semera; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Bjerregaard, Lars Stryhn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus blocks cause changes in hand and digit skin temperature. We investigated thermographic patterns after the lateral infraclavicular brachial plexus block. We hypothesised that a successful lateral infraclavicular block could be predicted by increased skin temperature of ...

  4. Effect of dexamethasone dose and route on the duration of interscalene brachial plexus block for outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Darren; Amadeo, Ryan J J; Wolfe, Scott; Girling, Linda; Funk, Faylene; Collister, Mark; Czaplinski, Emily; Ferguson, Celeste; Leiter, Jeff; Old, Jason; MacDonald, Peter; Dufault, Brenden; Mutter, Thomas C

    2018-01-01

    Dexamethasone prolongs the duration of interscalene block, but the benefits of higher doses and perineural vs intravenous administration remain unclear. This factorial design, double-blinded trial randomized 280 adult patients undergoing ambulatory arthroscopic shoulder surgery at a single centre in a 1:1:1:1 ratio. Patients received ultrasound-guided interscalene block with 30 mL 0.5% bupivacaine and 4 mg or 8 mg dexamethasone by either the perineural or intravenous route. The primary outcome (block duration measured as the time of first pain at the surgical site) and secondary outcomes (adverse effects, postoperative neurologic symptoms) were assessed by telephone. In this superiority trial, the predetermined minimum clinically important difference for comparisons between doses and routes was 3.0 hr. The perineural route significantly prolonged the mean block duration by 2.0 hr (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.4 to 3.5 hr; P = 0.01), but 8 mg of dexamethasone did not significantly prolong the mean block duration compared with 4 mg (1.3 hr; 95% CI, -0.3 to 2.9 hr, P = 0.10), and there was no significant statistical interaction (P = 0.51). The mean (95% CI) block durations, in hours, were 24.0 (22.9 to 25.1), 24.8 (23.2 to 26.3), 25.4 (23.8 to 27.0), and 27.2 (25.2 to 29.3) for intravenous doses of 4 and 8 mg and perineural doses of 4 and 8 mg, respectively. There were no marked differences in side effects between groups. At 14 postoperative days, 57 (20.4%) patients reported neurologic symptoms, including dyspnea and hoarseness. At six months postoperatively, only six (2.1%) patients had residual symptoms, with four (1.4%) patients' symptoms unlikely related to interscalene block. Compared with the intravenous route, perineural dexamethasone prolongs the mean interscalene block duration by a small amount that may or may not be clinically significant, regardless of dose. However, the difference in mean block durations between 8 mg and 4 mg of dexamethasone is

  5. 1.5 T augmented reality navigated interventional MRI: paravertebral sympathetic plexus injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, David R; U Thainual, Paweena; Ungi, Tamas; Flammang, Aaron J; Fichtinger, Gabor; Iordachita, Iulian I; Carrino, John A; Fritz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The high contrast resolution and absent ionizing radiation of interventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be advantageous for paravertebral sympathetic nerve plexus injections. We assessed the feasibility and technical performance of MRI-guided paravertebral sympathetic injections utilizing augmented reality navigation and 1.5 T MRI scanner. A total of 23 bilateral injections of the thoracic (8/23, 35%), lumbar (8/23, 35%), and hypogastric (7/23, 30%) paravertebral sympathetic plexus were prospectively planned in twelve human cadavers using a 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI scanner and augmented reality navigation system. MRI-conditional needles were used. Gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced saline was injected. Outcome variables included the number of control magnetic resonance images, target error of the needle tip, punctures of critical nontarget structures, distribution of the injected fluid, and procedure length. Augmented-reality navigated MRI guidance at 1.5 T provided detailed anatomical visualization for successful targeting of the paravertebral space, needle placement, and perineural paravertebral injections in 46 of 46 targets (100%). A mean of 2 images (range, 1-5 images) were required to control needle placement. Changes of the needle trajectory occurred in 9 of 46 targets (20%) and changes of needle advancement occurred in 6 of 46 targets (13%), which were statistically not related to spinal regions (P = 0.728 and P = 0.86, respectively) and cadaver sizes (P = 0.893 and P = 0.859, respectively). The mean error of the needle tip was 3.9±1.7 mm. There were no punctures of critical nontarget structures. The mean procedure length was 33±12 min. 1.5 T augmented reality-navigated interventional MRI can provide accurate imaging guidance for perineural injections of the thoracic, lumbar, and hypogastric sympathetic plexus.

  6. Enhanced visual acuity with echogenic needles in ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block: a randomized, comparative, observer-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbal, B; Choquet, O; Gourari, A; Bouic, N; Massone, A; Biboulet, P; Bringuier, S; Capdevila, X

    2015-04-01

    We prospectively evaluated the effect of insertion angle on the visibility of echogenic and nonechogenic needles in phantoms and in axillary nerve blocks in patients. Conventional and echogenic needles were studied in phantoms at insertion angles of 0-30°, 30-45°, and ≥ 45°. Operators rated comfort and image quality during the procedure and experts blinded to the needle groups randomly analyzed videos for tip and shaft visibility, surrounding tissue visibility, sharpness of the needle surface, and percentage of time with the needle completely visible. Patients scheduled for axillary nerve block were prospectively enrolled in the clinical study. Needle insertion angles were 0-30° for the median nerve approach, 30-45° for the radial nerve, and ≥ 45° for the musculocutaneous nerve. The same needle parameters were analyzed during the procedure and on videos. Physician comfort and image quality were significantly better for echogenic needles for phantoms and patients at 30-45° and ≥ 45° insertion angles. Needle tip and shaft visibility at 30-45° and ≥ 45° insertion angles in phantoms and for the musculocutaneous nerve in patients were significantly improved, as well as the percentage with complete needle visualization during the procedure. Tissue visibility and needle sharpness were significantly superior for conventional needles. There were no differences concerning block parameters and adverse events. Needles with enhanced echogenicity improved physician comfort, image quality, needle visibility, and visualization time of the needle during ultrasound-guided procedures in phantoms and axillary nerve blocks using insertion angles of 30-45° and ≥ 45°.

  7. Comparison of 3 intensities of stimulation threshold for brachial plexus blocks at the midhumeral level: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvillon, Philippe; Dion, Nicolas; Deleuze, Michel; Nouvellon, Emmanuel; Mahamat, Aba; L'hermite, Joel; Boisson, Christophe; Vialles, Nathalie; Ripart, Jacques; de La Coussaye, Jean Emmanuel

    2009-01-01

    We conducted this prospective randomized study to compare the success rate and the onset time between 3 intensities of stimulation threshold (Blocks were performed using conventional nerve stimulation technique. Needle advance began at 2 mA (1 Hz, 0.1 millisecond). When motor response (MR) occurred at less than 0.5 mA, needle position was fixed for "group 0.65 mA," the needle was withdrawn until MR occurred at greater than 0.65 mA and disappeared at less than 0.65 mA. For each group, patients received 8 mL of ropivacaine 7.5 mg/mL on the 4 nerves (radial, median, ulnar, and musculocutaneous). Primary end point was the number of failed radial nerve sensory blocks at 30 mins. The time to perform the block was not different between the 3 groups (17 mins [SD, 7 mins] vs 13 mins [SD, 8 mins] and 13 mins [SD, 4 mins], respectively). The time required to obtain a complete sensory block was shorter for the 4 nerves in group 0.65 mA. Patients in group complete sensory radial nerve compared with those of group 0.5-0.64 mA and group >0.65 mA at any interval times between 5 and 30 mins (P = 0.0001). Supplemental local anesthesia was provided for the 3 groups more frequently for the median nerve, with no difference between groups. Group >0.65 mA required 5 general anesthesias (20%) as compared with 1 (4%) in group <0.5 mA (P < 0.05). No adverse event (dysesthesia) occurred after 48 hrs and 45 days. We conclude that intensity of stimulation influenced onset time and success rate.

  8. Fluoroscopy-guided Neurolytic Splanchnic Nerve Block for Intractable Pain from Upper Abdominal Malignancies in Patients with Distorted Celiac Axis Anatomy: An Effective Alternative to Celiac Plexus Neurolysis - A Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Arora, Divesh

    2017-01-01

    The pain from upper gastrointestinal malignancy leads to considerable morbidity. The celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis are good therapeutic options. Although splanchnic nerve neurolysis less frequently performed, but it has an edge over celiac plexus as it can be performed in patients with altered celiac plexus anatomy by enlarged lymph nodes. The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis was done in about 21 patients with intractable upper abdominal pain with pain intensity of ≥7 in numerical rating scale (NRS) from upper gastrointestinal cancers with distorted celiac plexus anatomy from enlarged celiac lymph nodes as seen by computed tomography scan after positive diagnostic splanchnic nerve neurolysis. The demographic features, pain intensity, daily opioid dose, functional status and quality of life was measured at baseline and 1 week, 1 and 3 months after the procedure. There was a significant improvement in pain intensity, opioid requirement, functional status, and physical components quality of life after the neurolysis (P celiac lymph node anatomy not amenable to celiac plexus neurolysis.

  9. Obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI, also known as birth brachial plexus injury (BBPI, is unfortunately a rather common injury in newborn children. Incidence varies between 0.15 and 3 per 1000 live births in various series and countries. Although spontaneous recovery is known, there is a large subset which does not recover and needs primary or secondary surgical intervention. An extensive review of peer-reviewed publications has been done in this study, including clinical papers, review articles and systematic review of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Causes of OBPI, indications of primary nerve surgery and secondary reconstruction of shoulder, etc. are discussed in detail. Although all affected children do not require surgery in infancy, a substantial proportion of them, however, require it and are better off for it. Secondary surgery is needed for shoulder elbow and hand problems. Results of nerve surgery are very encouraging. Children with OBPI should be seen early by a hand surgeon dealing with brachial plexus injuries. Good results are possible with early and appropriate intervention even in severe cases.

  10. Comparação da anestesia geral e bloqueio do plexo cervical superficial em tireoidectomias parciais Comparison between general anesthesia and superficial cervical plexus block in partial thyroidectomies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Celso Martins Mamede

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Tireoidectomia sob efeito de bloqueio do plexo cervical superficial (BPCS tem sofrido resistência. OBJETIVO: Comparar variáveis cirúrgicas e anestésicas, custos do tratamento e grau de satisfação de pacientes submetidos à hemitireoidectomia sob efeito de anestesia geral e BPCS. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODOS: Foram 21 pacientes submetidos à anestesia geral (AG e outro tanto ao BPCS. Após sedação, no grupo com BPCS, usou-se marcaína com vasoconstritor, e quando necessário, lidocaína a 2% com vasoconstritor. Sedação intra-operatória com diazepam endovenoso e metoprolol para controle da PA e FC eram administradas quando necessário. Usou-se anestesia geral (AG segundo padronização do serviço. RESULTADOS: Foram significantes (pThyroidectomy under the effect of superficial cervical plexus block (SCPB has met resistance. AIM: to compare variables in patients submitted to hemithyroidectomy under the effect of general anesthesia (GA and SCPB. CASE REPORT AND METHODS: GA was used in 21 patients, and SCPB was used in another 21 patients. Following sedation, marcaine 0.5% with vasoconstrictor was used in the SCPB group. Intraoperative sedation with diazepam and metoprolol to control arterial pressure and cardiac frequency was given as needed. GA followed the standard method in the unit. RESULTS: We found significant results (p<0.05, Student’s t-test for surgery time (GA - 111.4 min; SCPB - 125.5 min, anesthesia time (GA - 154.1 min; SCPB - 488.6 min, time in the surgery room (GA - 15 min; SCPB - 1 min, treatment costs (GA - R$203.2; SCPB - R$87.4, presence of bradycardia (GA - 0; SCPB - 23.8% and laryngotracheal injury (GA - 51; SCPB - 0 %. We also found the following non-significant results: hospitalization time (GA - 17.3; SCPB - 15.1 hours; bleeding volume (GA - 41,9 g; SCPB - 47.6 g, size of the operative specimen (GA - 52.1 cm3; SCPB - 93.69 cm3 and patient satisfaction level (GA - 3.8; SCPB - 3.9. CONCLUSION: Although the incidence of

  11. Cervical plexus block for thyroidectomy | Kolawole | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia and Analgesia. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Sinitsin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of cardiotropic therapy in neonates with severe posthypoxic myocardial ischemia and to improve severity rating criteria that would allow a differentiated approach to therapy for this condition. Subjects and methods. The efficiency of cardiotropic therapy was evaluated in 53 newborn infants with posthypoxic myocardial ischemia. Thirty (56.6% neonates received phosphocreatinine in a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 3 days as cardiotropic support; 23 (43.4% babies had riboxine in a dose of 15—20 mg/kg. Results. The use of phosphocreatinine was found to be more effective than that of riboxine and to favor better blood biochemical composition parameters and lower ECG and intracardiac hemodynamic changes, which in turn reduced the time of mechanical ventilation from 11 to 8.25 days and that of administration of dopamine from 8 to 6 days, and its dose from 2 to 5 mg/kg/min. Conclusion. This investigation has led to the conclusion that there is a need for a comprehensive approach to diagnosing postischemic myocardial damages, including not only their clinical picture, but also a set of biochemical markers for ischemia and ECG and EchoCG changes on the 1st, 3rd, and then every 5—7 days and for the concomitant use of cardiotonic (dopamine and cardiotrophic (phosphocreatinine therapy; the administration of phosphocreatinine on intensive care unit admission (after prior hypoxia as early as possible improves neonatal heart performance values. There are positive changes in both ECG and EchoCG and biochemical parameters (LDH, ALT, AST, De Ritis ratio. Key words: posthypoxic myocar-dial ischemia, neonates, phosphocreatinine.

  13. The suprasacral parallel shift vs lumbar plexus blockade with ultrasound guidance in healthy volunteers - a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, T F; Pedersen, E M; Haroutounian, S

    2014-01-01

    Surgical anaesthesia with haemodynamic stability and opioid-free analgesia in fragile patients can theoretically be provided with lumbosacral plexus blockade. We compared a novel ultrasound-guided suprasacral technique for blockade of the lumbar plexus and the lumbosacral trunk with ultrasound......-guided blockade of the lumbar plexus. The objective was to investigate whether the suprasacral technique is equally effective for anaesthesia of the terminal lumbar plexus nerves compared with a lumbar plexus block, and more effective for anaesthesia of the lumbosacral trunk. Twenty volunteers were included...... in a randomised crossover trial comparing the new suprasacral with a lumbar plexus block. The primary outcome was sensory dermatome anaesthesia of L2-S1. Secondary outcomes were peri-neural analgesic spread estimated with magnetic resonance imaging, sensory blockade of dermatomes L2-S3, motor blockade, volunteer...

  14. Transarterial Brachial Plexus Anaesthesia for Upper Limb Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We present our experience with the transarterial brachial plexus anaesthesia as a technique of choice for upper limb procedure in developing countries where nerve stimulator may not be readily available. Methods: For all consenting patients, the axillary block was instituted using a 23G hypodermic needle and ...

  15. Comparison of Pelvic Plexus Blockade to other Conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the degree of pain, efficacy and safety of pelvic plexus block to other conventional techniques of analgesia in 12 core transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of prostate. Materials and Methods: The study included 160 consecutive cases of prostate biopsy, prospectively randomized into four groups of ...

  16. Management of Brachial Plexus Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The results of early neurosurgical treatment of 58 infants with various types of brachial plexus birth injury have been compared with non-surgical intervention in 91 patients followed by a multidisciplinary team at the Brachial Plexus Program, Miami Children’s Hospital, FL.

  17. MRI of the brachial plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Es, H.W. van [Dept. of Radiology, St. Antonius Ziekenhuis, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2001-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is the imaging method of first choice for evaluating the anatomy and pathology of the brachial plexus. This review discusses the used imaging techniques, the normal anatomy, and a variety of pathologies that can involve the brachial plexus. The pathology includes primary and secondary tumors (the most frequent secondary tumors being superior sulcus tumor and metastatic breast carcinoma), radiation plexopathy, trauma, thoracic outlet syndrome, neuralgic amyotrophy, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN). (orig.)

  18. Estudo comparativo entre ultrassom e neuroestimulação no bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via axilar Estudio comparativo entre ultrasonido y neuroestimulación en el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía axilar A comparative study between ultrasound and neurostimulation guided axillary brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Brüggemann da Conceição

    2009-10-01

    seleccionaron 40 pacientes para operaciones por elección en la mano, con bloqueo de plexo braquial vía axilar. Los pacientes se distribuyeron aleatoriamente y electrónicamente en dos grupos de 20 pacientes: Grupo Neuroestimulación (NE y Grupo Ultrasonido (US. Se compararon el tiempo de realización, la tasa de éxito y las complicaciones. RESULTADOS: Las tasas de bloqueo completo, falla parcial y falla total, no presentaron diferencias estadísticas significativa entre los grupos US y NE. El tiempo promedio para la realización del procedimiento en el grupo US (354 segundos no presentó diferencia estadística significativa cuando se le comparó al grupo NE (381 segundos. Los pacientes del grupo NE presentaron una tasa más elevada de punción vascular (40%, cuando se les comparó con el grupo US (10%, p Conceição DB, Helayel PE, Oliveira Filho GR - A Comparative Study between Ultrasound- and Neurostimulation-Guided Axillary Brachial Plexus Block. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of ultrasound in Regional Blocks is increasingly more frequent. However, very few studies comparing ultrasound and neurostimulation have been conducted. The objective of this study was to compare neurostimulation-guided axillary brachial plexus block with double injection and ultrasound-guided axillary plexus block for hand surgeries. The time to perform the technique, success rate, and complications were compared. METHODS: After approval by the Ethics on Research Committee of the Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, 40 patients scheduled for elective hand surgeries under axillary plexus block were selected. Patients were randomly divided into two groups with 20 patients each: Neurostimulation (NE and Ultrasound (US groups. The time to perform the technique, success rate, and complication rate were compared. RESULTS: Complete blockade, partial failure, and total failure rates did not show statistically significant differences between the US and NE groups. The mean time to perform the technique in

  19. Lumbosacral Plexus Injury and Brachial Plexus Injury Following Prolonged Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Lan Kao

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 36-year-old woman who developed right upper and lower limb paralysis with sensory deficit after sedative drug overdose with prolonged immobilization. Due to the initial motor and sensory deficit pattern, brachial plexus injury or C8/T1 radiculopathy was suspected. Subsequent nerve conduction study/electromyography proved the lesion level to be brachial plexus. Painful swelling of the right buttock was suggestive of gluteal compartment syndrome. Elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase and urinary occult blood indicated rhabdomyolysis. The patient received medical treatment and rehabilitation; 2 years after the injury, her right upper and lower limb function had recovered nearly completely. As it is easy to develop complications such as muscle atrophy and joint contracture during the paralytic period of brachial plexopathy and lumbosacral plexopathy, early intervention with rehabilitation is necessary to ensure that the future limb function of the patient can be recovered. Our patient had suspected gluteal compartment syndrome that developed after prolonged compression, with the complication of concomitant lumbosacral plexus injury and brachial plexus injury, which is rarely reported in the literature. A satisfactory outcome was achieved with nonsurgical management.

  20. Identification and management of the ilio-inguinal and ilio-hypogastric nerves in open inguinal hernia repair: benefits of self-gripping mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeds, S; Nienhuijs, S; Kullman, E; Sanders, D L; Lehnert, T; Ziprin, P; Gingell-Littlejohn, M; Miserez, M; Kingsnorth, A

    2016-02-01

    A large randomized, multicenter European study recently reported a reduction in early pain after open inguinal surgery when self-gripping mesh was used compared with sutured Lichtenstein repair. This secondary exploratory study is focused on the influence of nerve identification and handling on post-operative pain. Post-operative VAS pain data and Surgical Pain Scores (SPS) from 507 patients included in this study were analyzed according to whether inguinal nerves were preserved or resected during surgery to investigate whether identification and peri-operative nerve handling impact post-operative pain. Preservation of the ilio-hypogastric nerve during Lichtenstein mesh repair with suture fixation was associated with significantly more post-operative pain compared with resection at each follow-up (p ≤ 0.003). This difference was not significant with self-gripping mesh repair. The decrease from baseline in post-operative VAS and SPS scores were significantly greater after self-gripping mesh repair compared to Lichtenstein repair at 1 year, but only when the ilio-hypogastric nerve was preserved (VAS scores, p = 0.009; SPS scores, p = 0.015). No such difference was observed with the ilio-inguinal nerve. When self-gripping mesh was used, preservation of the ilio-hypogastric nerve was associated with significantly greater decreases in post-operative pain (change in VAS score from baseline) compared with Lichtenstein repair at each follow-up (p ≤ 0.018). The ilio-hypogastric nerve is in danger of being traumatized during Lichtenstein mesh repair with suture fixation. The use of self-gripping mesh was shown to reduce the level of post-operative pain when the ilio-hypogastric nerve was preserved. Resection of the ilio-hypogastric nerve during Lichtenstein repair eliminates this difference.

  1. Radial Nerve Injury after Brachial Nerve Block - Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi Janos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Adding epinephrine to local anesthetics is recommended to extend the duration of peripheral nerve blocks. We describe in this article two cases of radial nerve injury possible due to coadministration of epinephrine during brachial plexus block.

  2. Successful off-label use of the GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis to preserve gluteal perfusion during staged endovascular repair of bilateral isolated hypogastric aneurysms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W. Cornwall, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular repair of iliac artery aneurysms has emerged as an alternative to traditional open surgical repair. Although there is little consensus on indications to preserve hypogastric blood flow during aneurysm repair, it is well understood that complications from bilateral hypogastric occlusion may be significant. The GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis (W. L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz received United States Food and Drug Administration approval in March 2016 for treatment of common iliac artery and aortoiliac aneurysms. This case report discusses an off-label use of GORE EXCLUDER Iliac Branch Endoprosthesis to maintain pelvic perfusion during treatment of bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms without surrounding aortoiliac pathology.

  3. Bases anatômicas para o bloqueio anestésico do plexo braquial por via infraclavicular Bases anatómicas para el bloqueo anestésico del plexo braquial por vía infraclavicular Anatomical basis for infraclavicular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos Buarque de Gusmão

    2002-06-01

    bloqueo anestésico del plexo braquial por via infraclavicular. Con la idea de solucionar el punto donde los fascículos del plexo braquial pueden ser localizados en el interior de la fosa, propusimos medidas a partir de la face anterior de la clavícula y del ángulo formado por el encuentro del músculo deltóide con la clavícula (ángulo deltoclavicular. La primera medida permite localizar en profundidad el local donde pasa el plexo braquial. Ya la segunda, determina la proyección de los fascículos dentro de la fosa, lo que corresponde al punto de entrada de la aguja en la superficie cutánea. MÉTODO: Fueron efectuadas medidas entre la face anterior de la clavícula y los fascículos del plexo braquial, y del ángulo deltoclavicular hasta la proyección superficial de los fascículos. Con base en los encuentros anatómicos fue propuesta una técnica de abordaje del plexo braquial por via infraclavicular. RESULTADOS: Fueron analizadas 100 regiones infraclaviculares de cadáveres fijados. La fosa infraclavicular fue detectada en 96 casos. En ésas, los fascículos del plexo braquial se localizan totalmente o parcialmente en 97,9%. La medida comparada entre la face anterior de la clavícula y los fascículos del plexo, fue de 2,49 cm y del ángulo deltoclavicular hasta la proyección superficial de los fascículos estaba en 2,21 cm. CONCLUSIONES: Los datos obtenidos permiten la determinación exacta del punto de introducción de la aguja, la cual, dirigida perpendicular a la piel, alcanza el plexo braquial sin peligro de provocar pneumotórax o lesión vascular, posibilitando una mayor seguridad a los anestesiologistas, y permitiendo la vuelta de la práctica del bloqueo del plexo abajo de la clavícula.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study shows the constant infraclavicular fossa presence, aiming at using it as a pathway for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Determining the point where brachial plexus fascicles may be located within the fossa, the authors have

  4. Accumulation of pantothenic acid by the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices in vitro. [Rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, R.; Boose, B.

    1984-08-01

    In vitro, the transport of (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid into and from the isolated rabbit choroid plexus, an anatomical locus of the blood-CSF barrier, and brain slices was studied. The choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium against a concentration gradient, although at low concentrations (less than 1 microM) there was substantial intracellular phosphorylation and binding of the (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid. The saturable accumulation process in choroid plexus was inhibited by probenecid and caproic acid but not by nicotinic acid or by weak bases. The accumulation process was markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, poly-L-lysine (which blocks sodium transport), and low temperatures. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from choroid plexus by a temperature-dependent process. Brain slices also accumulated and, at low concentrations, phosphorylated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium by a temperature-, probenecid-, and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive saturable process. However, unlike choroid plexus, brain slices did not concentrate free pantothenic acid and (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid accumulation was not sensitive to poly-L-lysine. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from brain slices by a temperature-sensitive process. These results are consistent with the view that (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid enters the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices by active transport and facilitated diffusion, respectively.

  5. Bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via posterior com uso de neuroestimulador e ropivacaína a 0,5% Bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso de neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% Posterior brachial plexus block with nerve stimulator and 0.5% ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Beato

    2005-08-01

    ícula y húmero proximal. El objetivo de este estudio fue mostrar los resultados observados en pacientes sometidos a bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5%. MÉTODO: Veintidós pacientes con edad entre 17 y 76 años, estado físico ASA I y II, sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas envolviendo el hombro, clavícula y húmero proximal fueron anestesiados con bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior utilizando neuroestimulador desde 1 mA. Lograda la contracción deseada, la corriente fue disminuida para 0,5 MA y, permaneciendo la respuesta contráctil, fueron inyectados 40 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Fueron evaluados los siguientes parámetros: latencia, analgesia, duración de la cirugía, duración de la analgesia y del bloqueo motor, complicaciones y efectos colaterales. RESULTADOS: El bloqueo fue efectivo en 20 de los 22 pacientes; la latencia media fue de 15,52 min; la duración media de la cirugía fue de 1,61 hora. La media de duración de la analgesia fue de 15,85 horas y del bloqueo motor 11,16 horas. No fueron observados señales y síntomas clínicos de toxicidad del anestésico local y ningún paciente presentó efectos adversos del bloqueo. CONCLUSIONES: En las condiciones de este estudio el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior con el uso del neuroestimulador y ropivacaína a 0,5% demostró que es una técnica efectiva, confortable para el paciente y de fácil realización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There are several approaches to the brachial plexus depending on the experience of the anesthesiologist and the site of the surgery. Posterior brachial plexus block may be an alternative for shoulder, clavicle and proximal humerus surgery. This study aims at presenting the results of patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine and the aid of nerve stimulator. METHODS: Participated in this study 22 patients aged 17 to 76 years, physical status ASA I and II

  6. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Technical note: the humeral canal approach to the brachial plexus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Frizelle, H P

    2012-02-03

    Many variations to the axillary approach to the brachial plexus have been described. However, the success rate varies depending on the approach used and on the definition of success. Recent work describes a new approach to regional anaesthesia of the upper limb at the humeral\\/brachial canal using selective stimulation of the major nerves. This report outlines initial experience with this block, describing the technique and results in 50 patients undergoing hand and forearm surgery. All patients were assessed for completeness of motor and sensory block. The overall success rate was 90 percent. Motor block was present in 80 percent of patients. Completion of the block was necessary in 5 patients. Two patients required general anaesthesia. The preponderance of ulnar deficiencies agrees with previously published data on this technique. No complications were described. Initial experience confirms the high success rate described using the Dupre technique. This technically straightforward approach with minimal complications can be recommended for regional anaesthesia of the upper limb.

  8. Evidence of peripheral nerve blocks for cancer-related pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Kurita, G P; Mercadante, S

    2015-01-01

    retrieved was 155. No controlled studies were identified. Sixteen papers presented a total of 79 cases. The blocks applied were paravertebral blocks (10 cases), blocks in the head region (2 cases), plexus blocks (13 cases), intercostal blocks (43 cases) and others (11 cases). In general, most cases reported...

  9. Bloqueio do plexo braquial por via supraclavicular: estudo clínico comparativo entre bupivacaína e levobupivacaína Bloqueo del plexo braquial por vía supraclavicular: estudio clínico comparativo entre bupivacaína y levobupivacaína Supraclavicular brachial plexus block: a comparative clinical study between bupivacaine and levobupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ricardo Pinotti Pedro

    2009-12-01

    braquial es el territorio potencial para la absorción de anestésicos locales. Estudios de los estereoisómeros de la bupivacaína han venido demostrando un menor potencial de toxicidad de la fracción levógira (levobupivacaína, sobre el sistema cardiovascular. Sin embargo, se discute la eficacia anestésica (bloqueo sensitivo y motor, de la levobupivacaína en anestesia del neuro eje. Este estudio pretende demostrar la eficacia anestésica de la levobupivacaína, comparándola con la bupivacaína racémica en bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía perivascular subclavia. MÉTODO: Cincuenta pacientes adultos de ambos sexos, ASA I y II, fueron sometidos a la anestesia de plexo braquial vía perivascular subclavia para procedimientos ortopédicos de miembros superiores con la ayuda de un neuroestimulador. Se dividieron de modo aleatorio, en dos grupos: G BUPI - bupivacaína racémica, G LEVO - levobupivacaína, en un volumen de 30 mL a 0,5%. El bloqueo sensitivo fue evaluado por el método de "picada de aguja" en los metámeros de C5 a C8; y el bloqueo motor, en los intervalos en minutos: 1, 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, o hasta la instalación del bloqueo en los movimientos de los dedos, la mano el antebrazo y el brazo. RESULTADOS: No hubo ninguna diferencia estadística entre los dos grupos en cuanto a la latencia, incidencia de fallas, grado del bloqueo motor e incidencia de fallas y grado del bloqueo motor e incidencia de fallas del bloqueo sensitivo, pero sí que se verificó la diferencia estadística de la latencia del bloqueo sensitivo en todos los metámeros analizados. No hubo efectos adversos inherentes a la aplicación del anestésico local. CONCLUSIONES: La levobupivacaína demostró una eficacia anestésica en el bloqueo de plexo braquial, igualable a la solución racémica usualmente utilizada.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Brachial plexus block is used in surgical procedures of the upper limbs. The brachial plexus is a potential territory for absorption of local

  10. Effect of Local Anesthetic Concentration (0.2% vs 0.1% Ropivacaine) on Pulmonary Function, and Analgesia After Ultrasound-Guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew K; Keeney, Lauren Georgiades; Chen, Liting; Williams, Rebekah; Liu, Jiabin; Elkassabany, Nabil M

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to assess diaphragmatic excursion and measure pulmonary functions as measures of the degree to which the phrenic nerve is blocked after ISB with two different concentrations of ropivacaine: 0.2% and 0.1%. Randomized, double-blinded study. Ambulatory surgical facility. Fifty patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy for rotator cuff repair. Patients were randomized to receive ultrasound-guided ISB with 20 mL of either 0.2% or 0.1% ropivacaine. Diaphragmatic excursion was measured using M-mode ultrasound. Pulmonary functions were assessed by portable spirometer. Additional outcome data included oxygen saturation in post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), pain scores, quality of recovery scores (QOR), and opioid consumption over 72 hour period after surgery. Forced vital capacity (FVC) was significantly reduced 30 minutes after block placement and in PACU in the 0.2% group when compared with the 0.1% group (P = 0.04, P = 0.03, respectively). Forced expiratory volume (FEV1) was also significantly decreased in the 0.2% group in PACU when compared with the 0.1% group (P = 0.04). There were no significant differences in pain scores, length of stay, and total opioid consumption in PACU. Patients who received 0.2% ropivacaine had a longer block duration (18 vs 11.9 hours, P = 0.04) and used less opioid in the 72 hours after surgery (55 mg vs 102 mg codeine equivalents, P = 0.02), when they were compared to their counterparts who received 0.1% for their block. 0.1% ropivacaine may impair pulmonary function less than 0.2% ropivacaine. The clinical significance of these differences needs to be further studied. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Estudo radiológico da dispersão de diferentes volumes de anestésico local no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio radiológico de la dispersión de diferentes volúmenes de anestésico local en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por vía posterior Radiological evaluation of the spread of different local anesthetic volumes during posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2005-10-01

    aleatoriamente en tres grupos de cinco: Grupo 1: volumen de 20 mL; Grupo 2: volumen de 30 mL; Grupo 3: volumen de 40 mL. En un paciente, sometido al bloqueo continuado del plexo braquial por la vía posterior, la administración de un volumen de 10 mL fue estudiada. En todos, el anestésico usado fue la ropivacaína a 0,375% asociada a solución radiopaca. Fueron hechas radiografías de la región cervical inmediatamente después el bloqueo que fue evaluado a través de la pesquisa de la sensibilidad térmica utilizándose algodón embebido en alcohol, treinta minutos después de su realización y en la sala de recuperación anestésica. RESULTADOS: El comportamiento radiológico y clínico del bloqueo de plexo braquial por vía posterior es muy semejante de aquél descrito con la técnica de Winnie (interescalénico. Invariablemente hay envolvimiento del plexo cervical y de las raíces más altas (C5-C7 del plexo braquial. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio muestra que la dispersión del anestésico local en el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior se da primariamente en las raíces responsables por la inervación del hombroBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Local anesthetic spread during interscalenic block has been thoroughly studied, however there are few studies on posterior block. This study aimed at evaluating the spread of different local anesthetic volumes during posterior brachial plexus block using contrasted X-rays. METHODS: Participated in this study 16 patients submitted to posterior brachial plexus block, 15 of whom were randomly divided in three groups of five patients: Group 1: 20 mL; Group 2: 30 mL.; Group 3 40 mL. The volume of 10 mL was studied in one patient submitted to continuous posterior brachial plexus block. All patients received 0.375% ropivacaine associated to radio-opaque solution. X-rays of the cervical region were obtained immediately after blockade that were evaluated by thermal sensitivity using cotton soaked in alcohol 30 minutes after being

  12. Transport across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe; Damkier, Helle Hasager

    2017-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium is a secretory epithelium par excellence. However, this is perhaps not the most prominent reason for the massive interest in this modest-sized tissue residing inside the brain ventricles. Most likely, the dominant reason for extensive studies of the choroid plexus is the identification of this epithelium as the source of the majority of intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid. This finding has direct relevance for studies of diseases and conditions with deranged central fluid volume or ionic balance. While the concept is supported by the vast majority of the literature, the implication of the choroid plexus in secretion of the cerebrospinal fluid was recently challenged once again. Three newer and promising areas of current choroid plexus-related investigations are as follows: 1) the choroid plexus epithelium as the source of mediators necessary for central nervous system development, 2) the choroid plexus as a route for microorganisms and immune cells into the central nervous system, and 3) the choroid plexus as a potential route for drug delivery into the central nervous system, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Thus, the purpose of this review is to highlight current active areas of research in the choroid plexus physiology and a few matters of continuous controversy. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Raquianestesia total após bloqueio do plexo lombar por via posterior: relato de caso Raquianestesia total después del bloqueo del plexo lumbar por vía posterior: relato de caso Total spinal block after posterior lumbar plexus blockade: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Teixeira Domingues Duarte

    2006-10-01

    que continua hasta los espacios peridural y subaracnoideo, para donde la solución anestésica puede se dispersar. A pesar de ofrecer un extenso margen de seguridad, el bloqueo del plexo lumbar demanda del anestesiólogo un conocimiento minucioso de la anatomía, una capacitación en la técnica y una vigilancia constante.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lumbar plexus blockade can be very useful in surgical procedures of the hip, thigh, and knee, but it should be performed by an experienced anesthesiologist due to potential complications. The current report presents a case of total spinal block after posterior lumbar plexus blockade and discusses the possible pathophysiological mechanisms. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 34 years old, 97 kg, physical status ASA I, scheduled for total hip arthroplasty. After general anesthesia, a right posterior lumbar plexus blockade was performed with the adjunct of a peripheral nerve stimulator. The needle was introduced to a depth of 8 cm, perpendicular to the skin, 4 cm from the mid line, on a line perpendicular to the spinal process of L4. After identification of a motor response from the quadriceps, the intensity of the current was reduced to 0.35 mA and 0.5% ropivacaine (39 mL was administered. During the injection, there were intermittent contractions of the quadriceps. After the block, the patient presented apnea, hypotension, and both pupils were dilated. At the end of the surgery, the patient presented motor block of the lower extremities, which reversed only nine hours after the block. In the postoperative period, the patient complained of severe pain; he was discharged 12 days after the surgery without motor or sensitive deficits. CONCLUSIONS: To identify the psoas compartment, where the lumbar plexus blockade is located, the intensity of the current must be between 0.5 and 1 mA. Motor response with low current indicates that the needle may be inside the sheath that surrounds the nervous root and extends to the epidural and

  14. Bloqueio do nervo frênico após realização de bloqueio do plexo braquial pela via interescalênica: relato de caso A bloqueo del nervio frénico después de la realización de bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica: relato de caso Phrenic nerve block after interscalene brachial plexus block: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Henrique Cangiani

    2008-04-01

    embargo, en su mayoría, sin repercusiones clínicas importantes. El objetivo de este relato fue presentar un caso en que ocurrió bloqueo del nervio frénico, con comprometimiento ventilatorio en paciente con insuficiencia renal crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa, bajo bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía perivascular interescalénica. RELATO DEL CASO: Paciente del sexo masculino, 50 años, tabaquista, portador de insuficiencia renal crónica en régimen de hemodiálisis, hipertensión arterial, hepatitis C, diabetes melito, enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica, sometido a la instalación de fístula arterio-venosa extensa en el miembro superior derecho bajo bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía interescalénica. El plexo braquial fue localizado con la utilización del estimulador de nervio periférico. Se inyectaron 35 mL de una solución de anestésico local constituida de una mezcla de lidocaína a 2% con epinefrina a 1:200.000 y ropivacaína a 0,75% en partes iguales. Al final de la inyección el paciente estaba lúcido, pero sin embargo con disnea y predominio de incursión respiratoria intercostal ipsilateral al bloqueo. No había murmullo vesicular en la base del hemitórax derecho. La SpO2 se mantuvo en un 95%, con catéter nasal de oxígeno. No fue necesaria la instalación de métodos de auxilio ventilatorio invasivo. La radiografía del tórax reveló que el hemidiafragma derecho ocupaba el 5° espacio intercostal. El cuadro clínico se revirtió en tres horas. CONCLUSIONES: El caso mostró que hubo parálisis total del nervio frénico con síntomas respiratorios. A pesar de no haber sido necesaria la terapéutica invasiva para el tratamiento, queda el aviso aquí para la restricción de la indicación de la técnica en esos casos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Phrenic nerve block is a common adverse event of brachial plexus block. However, in most cases it does not have any important clinical repercussion. The objective

  15. Palpation- and ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Anderson F; Strain, George M; Rademacher, Nathalie; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Tully, Thomas N

    2013-01-01

    To compare palpation-guided with ultrasound-guided brachial plexus blockade in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. Prospective randomized experimental trial. Eighteen adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) weighing 252-295 g. After induction of anesthesia with isoflurane, parrots received an injection of lidocaine (2 mg kg(-1)) in a total volume of 0.3 mL at the axillary region. The birds were randomly assigned to equal groups using either palpation or ultrasound as a guide for the brachial plexus block. Nerve evoked muscle potentials (NEMP) were used to monitor effectiveness of brachial plexus block. The palpation-guided group received the local anesthetic at the space between the pectoral muscle, triceps, and supracoracoideus aticimus muscle, at the insertion of the tendons of the caudal coracobrachial muscle, and the caudal scapulohumeral muscle. For the ultrasound-guided group, the brachial plexus and the adjacent vessels were located with B-mode ultrasonography using a 7-15 MHz linear probe. After location, an 8-5 MHz convex transducer was used to guide injections. General anesthesia was discontinued 20 minutes after lidocaine injection and the birds recovered in a padded cage. Both techniques decreased the amplitude of NEMP. Statistically significant differences in NEMP amplitudes, were observed within the ultrasound-guided group at 5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection and within the palpation-guided group at 10, 15, and 20 minutes after injection. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. No effect on motor function, muscle relaxation or wing droop was observed after brachial plexus block. The onset of the brachial plexus block tended to be faster when ultrasonography was used. Brachial plexus injection can be performed in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots and nerve evoked muscle potentials were useful to monitor the effects on nerve conduction in this avian species. Neither technique produced an effective block at the

  16. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Bupivacaine 0,25% versus ropivacaine 0,25% in brachial plexus block in dogs of beagle breedBupivacaína 0,25% versus ropivacaína 0,25% no bloqueio do plexo braquial em cães da raça beagle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ignácio Wakoff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus block (BPB is a regional anesthesia technique which enables the attainment of surgical procedures distal scapulohumeral articulation. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of ropivacaine and bupivacaine 0.25% without vasoconstrictor in BPB guided by electrical stimulation in dogs. Thirteen male and female beagle dogs underwent a BPB using bupivacaine and ropivacaine 0.25% (4mg/kg, both alone and in different times. The anesthesic block was performed in the right forelimb and as control group the block proceeded in the left forelimb using a solution of sodium chloride 0.9% in volume corresponding to the drug in the contralateral limb. The block was performed after the localization of the radial nerve with the aid of eletrical stimulation, which was infiltrated half the volume of anesthetic calculated and subsequently the remaining solution was administered on the median nerve. We evaluated sensitive and motor latencies and sensitive and motor block total time by clamping technique. In the present study, a technique for electrical stimulation was effective in 100% of animals. Bupivacaine had lower motor latency period, however, the sensitive latency between the two groups showed no statistically significant differences. In the block total time, bupivacaine obtained time significantly higher. Clinical signs characteristic of Horner’s syndrome were present in 15% of animals treated with bupivacaine. Furthermore, two animals presented signs of cardiotoxicity in bupivacaine group. The use of bupivacaine (4mg/kg without vasoconstrictor in dogs brachial plexus block provided longer analgesia and motor blockade, however, ropivacaine at the same dose and concentration was found to be free of deleterious effects associated of cardiovascular instability, hemodynamic and respiratory. O bloqueio do plexo braquial (BPB é uma técnica de anestesia regional que possibilita a realização de procedimentos cirúrgicos distais a articula

  18. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy: a permanent challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Otto Heise

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP has an incidence of 1.5 cases per 1000 live births and it has not declined despite recent advances in obstetrics. Most patients will recover spontaneously, but some will remain severely handicapped. Rehabilitation is important in most cases and brachial plexus surgery can improve the functional outcome of selected patients. This review highlights the current management of infants with NBPP, including conservative and operative approaches.

  19. Neurovascular plexus theory for "escape pain phenomenon" in lower third molar surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gururaj Arakeri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pain during extraction of impacted mandibular third molars which can occur despite adequate local anesthesia is termed as "escape pain phenomenon". Recently, it was described during elevation of a mesioangular impacted mandibular third molar and also while curetting an extracted third molar socket. This phenomenon has been overlooked, as it was previously considered secondary to pressure effect on the inferior alveolar neurovascular bundle (IANB. However, it is unlikely that the pain impulses originate from direct pressure on the IANB, as the nerve is blocked more proximally at its entry into the mandible. The authors speculated that the occasional presence of a neurovascular plexus (NVP independent of the IANB causes the escape of a pain impulse upon stimulation by root pressure or instrumentation. To validate the presence of such a plexus, a meticulous literature search and review were performed. The search revealed evidence of the occasional presence of a NVP consisting of auriculotemporal and/or retromolar neural filaments. The plexus may be present around the inferior alveolar artery or embedded within the IANB, and does not innervate the tooth. This plexus likely propagates pain impulses only upon stimulation by compression or instrumentation in the apical area of the tooth socket. This theory explains the absence of pain during tooth sectioning and bone guttering in the presence of a complete inferior alveolar nerve block.

  20. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Etiological risk factors for brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudić, Igor; Fatusić, Zlatan; Sinanović, Osman; Skokić, Fahrija

    2006-10-01

    To investigate risk factors for brachial plexus palsy in newborns. We analyzed 45 544 live-born children, born over a nine-year period from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2004. The analysis was retrospective and based on the medical documentation of the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Clinic for Neurology, and Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of the University Clinical Center Tuzla. We compared study and control groups of newborns. Rates among groups were compared using Chi-square, with significance at p labor pattern itself, it was found that the highest factors of risk for brachial plexus injury were birth weight of over 4000 g, a precipitous second stage of labor (labor. Brachial plexus palsy was more frequent when the mothers were overweight, with a body mass index >or=29 kg/m2. None of the parturient women, whose newborns were diagnosed with brachial plexus palsy, had external conjugate diameter <18 cm. Newborns delivered vaginally were not diagnosed with a higher frequency of brachial plexus palsy when compared to newborns who were delivered by cesarean section, but newborns who were vaginal breech-delivered were diagnosed to have a higher incidence of brachial plexus palsy. Newborns whose mothers were older than 35 years were diagnosed to have brachial plexus palsy more frequently, but a statistically significant difference between primiparas and multiparas was not found. A total of 39 newborns (45.2%) were diagnosed with a fracture of the clavicle, which was the most frequently combined damage with brachial plexus injury. Forty-two newborns (48.8%) had an Apgar score of plexus damage was 3858.1+/-587.7 g, which for an average gestational age of 38.8+/-1.8 weeks, corresponds to eutrophic newborns. Both male and female newborns were

  2. AJU 3098.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mn

    Fibers from the celiac plexus and the first 4 lumbar splanchnic nerves form the superior hypogastric plexus, which is divided into two hypogastric nerves. The parasympathetic fibers in the nervi erigentes and hypogastric nerves join the fibers from the sacral sympathetic ganglia and form the pelvic (inferior hypogastric).

  3. Deoxycytidine transport and metabolism in choroid plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spector, R.; Huntoon, S.

    1983-05-01

    In vitro, the transport into and release of (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine from the isolated choroid plexus, the anatomical locus of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, were studied separately. By use of the ability of nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) to inhibit deoxycytidine efflux from choroid plexus, the transport of 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine into choroid plexus at 37 degrees C was measured. Deoxycytidine was transported into choroid plexus against a concentration gradient by a saturable process that depended on intracellular energy production, but not intracellular binding or metabolism. The Michaelis-Menten constant (KT) for the active transport of deoxycytidine into choroid plexus was 15 microM. The active transport system for deoxycytidine was inhibited by naturally occurring nucleosides and deoxynucleosides, but not by 1 mM probenecid and 2-deoxyribose or 100 microM cytosine and cytosine arabinoside. With less than 1 microM (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine in the medium, the choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine against a concentration gradient. However, approximately 50% of the (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine was phosphorylated to (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine nucleotides at a low extracellular (/sup 3/H)deoxycytidine concentration (6 nM) in 15-min incubations. This accumulation process depended, in part, on saturable intracellular phosphorylation. These studies provide further evidence that the choroid plexus contains an active nucleoside transport system of low specificity for deoxynucleosides and ribonucleosides, and a separate, saturable efflux system for deoxynucleosides which is very sensitive to inhibition by NBTI.

  4. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) outcome with conservative management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eng, GD; Binder, H; Getson, P; ODonnell, R

    Resurgence of neurosurgical intervention oi obstetrical brachial plexus palsy prompted our review of 186 patients evaluated between 1981 and 1993, correlating clinical examination, electrodiagnosis, and functional outcome with conservative management. Eighty-eight percent had upper brachial plexus

  5. Ameliorative Effects of Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block on Stress and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ); corticosterone. (GC); adrenocorticotropin (ACTH); ... liver cancer surgery in order to suppress or control the levels of stress and inflammatory reaction. ..... The protein expression level of GR in the NCPB group was obviously higher than that of ...

  6. Use of a hypogastric flap and split-thickness skin grafting for a degloving injury of the penis and scrotum: A different approach

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    Selvan S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile and scrotal skin avulsions are not common events and are caused usually by accidents with industrial machines or agricultural machines. We report a case of a 27-year-old newly married thin-built patient with avulsion and traumatic degloving of the penile and scrotal skin, with exposure of the corpora cavernosa and copus spongiosum of penis and testes as his loose clothes got entangled in a paddy harvesting machine accidently. Reconstruction was performed using a hypogastric flap and split skin graft, achieving a satisfactory aesthetic result and sexual functions.

  7. Progressive arm weakness and tonic hand spasm from multifocal motor neuropathy in the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltkamp, R; Krause, M; Schranz, C; Meinck, H-M

    2003-08-01

    A 50-year-old waitress presented with a 10-year history of progressive weakness in her right arm without atrophy and with tonic hand spasms suggesting a central motor disorder. Electromyography, however, disclosed chronic neurogenic changes including fasciculations and atypical cramps. Isolated motor conduction block in the right brachial plexus suggested a variant of multifocal motor neuropathy. Strength recovered and cramps disappeared after intravenous immunoglobulins. Motor neuropathies may thus manifest with features of central motor disorders.

  8. Lumbar plexus and psoas major muscle: not always as expected

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirchmair, Lukas; Lirk, Philipp; Colvin, Joshua; Mitterschiffthaler, Gottfried; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Conflicting definitions concerning the exact location of the lumbar plexus have been proposed. The present study was carried out to detect anatomical variants regarding the topographical relation between the lumbar plexus and the psoas major muscle as well as lumbar plexus anatomy at the L4-L5

  9. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  10. Choroid plexus carcinoma in adults: an extremely rare case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Choroid plexus tumors are rare intraventricular papillary neoplasms derived from choroid plexus epithelium, which account for approximately 2% to 4% of intracranial tumors in children and 0.5% in adults. Almost all choroid plexus carcinomas are seen in children and are extremely rare in adults. Headache, diplopia, and ...

  11. Morphological structure and variations of lumbar plexus in human fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Soner; Kaya, Serdar; Temiz, Cağlar; Tehli, Ozkan; Kural, Cahit; Izci, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to study the anatomy of lumbar plexus on human fetuses and to establish its morphometric characteristics and differences compared with adults. Twenty lumbar plexus of 10 human fetal cadavers in different gestational ages and genders were dissected. Lumbar spinal nerves, ganglions, and peripheral nerves were exposed. Normal anatomical structure and variations of lumbar plexus were investigated and morphometric analyses were performed. The diameters of lumbar spinal nerves increased from L1 to L4. The thickest nerve forming the plexus was femoral nerve, the thinnest was ilioinguinal nerve, the longest nerve through posterior abdominal wall was iliohypogastric nerve, and the shortest nerve was femoral nerve. Each plexus had a single furcal nerve and this arose from L4 nerve in all fetuses. No prefix or postfix plexus variation was observed. In two plexuses, L1 nerve was in the form of a single branch. Also, in two plexuses, genitofemoral nerve arose only from L2 nerve. Accessory obturator nerve was observed in four plexuses. According to these findings, the morphological pattern of the lumbar plexus in the fetus was found to be very similar to the lumbar plexus in adults. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Bloqueio do plexo braquial por via interescalênica: efeitos sobre a função pulmonar Bloqueo del plexo braquial por vía interescalénica: efectos sobre la función pulmonar Interscalene brachial plexus block: effects on pulmonary function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Hortense

    2010-04-01

    demostrado una asociación de esa técnica con el bloqueo del nervio frénico ipsilateral. La disfunción diafragmática de resultas de esa asociación, provoca alteraciones en la mecánica pulmonar, potencialmente perjudiciales en pacientes con una limitación de la reserva ventilatoria. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar la repercusión del bloqueo interescalénico sobre la función pulmonar por medio de la medida de la capacidad vital forzada (CVF. MÉTODO: Estudio doble ciego, con 30 pacientes, estado físico I o II (ASA, distribuidos aleatoriamente en dos grupos de 15. Se administró solución a 0,5% de ropivacaína (Grupo Ropi o bupivacaína a 0,5% con epinefrina (Grupo Bupi. El bloqueo fue realizado utilizando estimulador de nervio periférico e inyectando 30 mL de anestésico local. Cuatro espirometrías se hicieron en cada paciente: antes del bloqueo, 30 minutos, 4 y 6 horas después. Los pacientes no recibieron sedación. RESULTADOS: Un paciente del Grupo Ropi y tres pacientes del Grupo Bupi, quedaron excluidos del estudio por fallos de bloqueo. La reducción de la CVF en el Grupo Ropi se hizo máxima a los 30 minutos (25,1% y a partir de entonces, hubo una tendencia progresiva a la recuperación. Ya con la bupivacaína, la reducción de la CVF pareció ser menos acentuada en los diversos momentos estudiados; se observó una reducción adicional entre 30 minutos (15,8% y 4 horas (17,3%, siendo esa sin diferencia estadística. A partir de 4 horas, se notó una tendencia a la recuperación. En los dos grupos, después de 6 horas de bloqueo, la CVF todavía estaba por debajo de los valores previos. CONCLUSIONES: El bloqueo interescalénico reduce la CVF en la mayoría de los casos; las alteraciones fueron más acentuadas en el Grupo Ropivacaína.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The interscalene is one of the most common approaches used in brachial plexus block. However, the association of this approach with the ipsilateral blockade of the phrenic nerve has been

  13. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus anaesthesia improves arteriovenous fistula flow characteristics in end-stage renal disease patients. ... In all patients, a radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula was created by an experienced surgeon using a standard surgical technique. In both groups 20 ml of 0.375% ...

  14. MR evaluation of brachial plexus injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.K.; Jain, R.K. (Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, New Delhi (India). NMR Research Center); Mehta, V.S.; Banerji, A.K. (All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    Ten cases of brachial plexus injury were subjected to magnetic resonance (MR) to demonstrate the roots, trunks, divisions or cord abnormalities. Both normal and abnormal brachial plexuses were imaged in sagittal, axial, coronal and axial oblique planes. Myelography, using water soluble contrast agents, was performed in seven cases. MR demonstrated one traumatic meningocele, one extradural cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection, trunk and/or root neuromas in four, focal root fibrosis in two and diffuse fibrosis in the remaining two cases. Results of MR were confirmed at surgery in four cases with neuromas, while myelography was normal in two and was not carried out in the remaining two. In two cases, where MR demonstrated diffuse fibrosis of the brachial plexus, myelography showed C7 and T1 traumatic meningocele in one and was normal in the other. Both these patients showed excellent clinical and electrophysiological correlation with MR findings and in one of them surgical confirmation was also obtained. In the other two cases with focal nerve root fibrosis, myelography was normal in one and showed a traumatic meningocele in another. Operative findings in these cases confirmed focal root fibrosis but no root avulsion was observed although seen on one myelogram. Focal fibrosis, however, was noted at operation in more roots than was observed with MR. Initial experience suggests that MR may be the diagnostic procedure of choice for complete evaluation of brachial plexus injuries. (orig.).

  15. Choroid plexus tumors in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Hideki; Dipatri, Arthur J; Alden, Tord D; Bowman, Robin M; Tomita, Tadanori

    2012-02-01

    Choroid plexus tumors are rare intraventricular tumors, accounting for less than 1% of all intracranial tumors and 2-4% of brain tumors in children. The authors present their experience in the management of these lesions, and a review of the literature is performed. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of pediatric patients with choroid plexus tumors treated with surgical resection. The patients' charts were reviewed for demographic data, clinical presentation, surgical therapy and follow-up. This study involves 18 consecutive choroid plexus tumors: 14 papillomas, 2 atypical papillomas and 2 carcinomas. The tumor was located in the lateral ventricles (12), the fourth ventricle (4) and the third ventricle (2). The mean age at presentation was 4.6 years. Surgical resection was performed in all cases and no patients died perioperatively. Survival rate of papilloma patients was 100% without evidence of recurrent disease (mean follow-up for 73 months). Survival rate of carcinoma patients was 50% (mean follow-up for 23.5 months). One carcinoma patient died of disseminated disease 13 months after surgery. The functional outcome in long-term survivors after papilloma surgery was excellent. Postoperative extraventricular drainage (EVD) was performed in 12 patients. Five patients (27.8%) had persistent hydrocephalus after tumor resection and required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Choroid plexus papilloma is a surgically curable disease. Postoperative EVD was considered effective in lowering the rate of shunt requirement through releasing the blood-tinged CSF and small particles of tumor residue.

  16. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) and Choroid Plexus Cauterization (CPC) have been recommended as reliable surgical options in developing countries for childhood hydrocephalus owing to reported shunt failures in shunt dependency. Objective: To evaluate outcomes of the ETV and ETV-CPC ...

  17. Obstetric brachial plexus lesions: CT myelography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, S.C.A.; Pondaag, W.; Malessy, M.J.; Verbist, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the value of computed tomographic (CT) myelography in the detection of root damage and differentiation of root avulsions from neurotmesis in a large cohort of patients with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Institutional review board approval was

  18. MR imaging of the brachial plexus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, Hendrik Wouter van

    1997-01-01

    In this retrospective study we describe the MR imaging findings in 230 consecutive patients with suspected pathology in or near the brachial plexus. These patients were studied from 1991 through to 1996. Chapter 2 describes the anatomy and the MR imaging techniques. As the anatomy of the brachial

  19. PLEXUS--The Expert System for Referral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A.; Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Presents a description of PLEXUS, an expert system on gardening designed as a referral tool for public libraries by the University of London. Highlights include determining user characteristics, developing the problem statement, the use of semantic categories, and search strategies that modify the original problem statement using Boolean…

  20. Ultrasound guided distal peripheral nerve block of the upper limb: A technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Sehmbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity surgery is commonly performed under regional anesthesia. The advent of ultrasonography has made performing upper extremity nerve blocks relatively easy with a high degree of reliability. The proximal approaches to brachial plexus block such as supraclavicular plexus block, infraclavicular plexus block, or the axillary block are favored for the most surgical procedures of distal upper extremity. Ultrasound guidance has however made distal nerve blocks of the upper limb a technically feasible, safe and efficacious option. In recent years, there has thus been a resurgence of distal peripheral nerve blocks to facilitate hand and wrist surgery. In this article, we review the technical aspects of performing the distal blocks of the upper extremity and highlight some of the clinical aspects of their usage.

  1. Pulsed radiofrequency of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance for refractory stump pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng B

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bixin Zheng, Li Song, Hui Liu Department of Pain Management, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Abstract: The post-amputation (pain syndrome, including stump pain, phantom limb sensation, and phantom limb pain is common but difficult to treat. Refractory stump pain in the syndrome is an extremely challenging and troublesome clinical condition. Patients respond poorly to drugs, nerve blocks, and other effective treatments like spinal cord stimulation and surgery. Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF technique has been shown to be effective in reducing neuropathic pain. This report describes a patient with persistent and refractory upper limb stump pain being successfully relieved with PRF of brachial plexus under ultrasound guidance after a 6-month follow-up period, suggesting that PRF may be considered as an alternative treatment for refractory stump-neuroma pain. Keywords: ultrasound guidance, pulsed radiofrequency, brachial plexus, refractory stump pain 

  2. The role of dexamethasone in peripheral and neuraxial nerve blocks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    axillary, lumbar plexus, femoral, 3 in 1, sciatic, popliteal, ankle block, caudal, epidural or nerve block. The 'and' function was used to combine these terms with dexamethasone, corticosteroid, or steroid with the definition exploded. The initial search terms with the keywords with the definition exploded were utilised. We.

  3. Direct electrical injury to brachial plexus

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    Maksud Mubarak Devale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical current can cause neurological damage directly or by conversion to thermal energy. However, electrical injury causing isolated brachial plexus injury without cutaneous burns is extremely rare. We present a case of a 17-year-old boy who sustained accidental electrical injury to left upper extremity with no associated entry or exit wounds. Complete motor and sensory loss in upper limb were noted immediately after injury. Subsequently, the patient showed partial recovery in muscles around the shoulder and in ulnar nerve distribution at 6 months. However, there was no improvement in muscles supplied by musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves. On exploration at 6 months after trauma, injury to the infraclavicular plexus was identified. Reconstruction of musculocutaneous, median and radial nerves by means of sural nerve cable grafts was performed. The patient has shown excellent recovery in musculocutaneous nerve function with acceptable recovery of radial nerve function at 1-year post-injury.

  4. Symptomatic bilateral xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Tural Emon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomas (XGRs of the choroid plexus are rare, asymptomatic, and benign lesions usually found incidentally. Here, we present a case of a 47-year-old male with bilateral XGR of the choroid plexus with periventricular edema and discuss our case in relation to a review of existing literature pertaining to the radiology of XGRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral trigonal XGR causing brain edema without ventricular dilatation. Despite the fact that they can cause hydrocephalus, XGRs are silent and benign lesions. Although the etiopathology of XGRs remains poorly understood, enhanced imaging analyses may provide additional information regarding edema and focal white matter signal changes.

  5. Axillary brachial plexus blockade in moyamoya disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saban Yalcin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Moyamoya disease is characterized by steno-occlusive changes of the intracranial internal carotid arteries. Cerebral blood flow and metabolism are strictly impaired. The goal in perioperative anaesthetic management is to preserve the stability between oxygen supply and demand in the brain. Peripheral nerve blockade allows excellent neurological status monitoring and maintains haemodynamic stability which is very important in this patient group. Herein, we present an axillary brachial plexus blockade in a moyamoya patient operated for radius fracture.

  6. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Kelle

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000: 247-250

  7. Brachial Plexus Neuropraxia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bayram Kelle; Filiz Koc

    2012-01-01

    Neuropraxia develops as a result of localized nerve compression. The anatomical structure of the nerve is protected. Motor loss and paresthesias may occur, pain sensation is rarely affected. The distal portion of the extremities are affected more often. Clinical symptoms respond well to treatments. In this case was presented brachial plexus neuropraxia which is a very rare situation und the literature was reviewed. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(4.000): 247-250

  8. Lumbosacral plexus in Brazilian Common Opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senos, R; Ribeiro, M S; Benedicto, H G; Kfoury Júnior, J R

    2016-01-01

    The opossum has been suggested as an animal model for biomedical studies due to its adaptability to captivity and number of births per year. Despite many studies on morphology and experimental neurology using this opossum model, the literature does not offer details of the nerves of the lumbosacral plexus in this species. Ten lumbosacral plexus were dissected to describe the peripheral innervations of the Brazilian Common Opossum (Didelphis aurita) and compare the results with Eutheria clade species. The tensor fasciae latae muscle was absent and there was only one sartorius muscle for each limb. The distribution of the nerves were similar to other mammals, except for the caudal gluteal nerve, sartorius muscle innervations and the position of the pudendal nerve which arose from the major ischiatic foramen together with the ischiatic nerve, the cranial gluteal nerve and the caudal gluteal nerve. No anatomical variation was found. The special position of the pudendal nerve suggested that the Brazilian Common Opossum is a better model than rats or rabbits in surgical procedures with that specific nerve. In addition, the study revealed that the pelvic limb nerves are not an invariable structure of reference for muscle homology and homonym as reported previously. New investigation using other species of opossums are necessary to best comprehend the lumbosacral plexus distribution in the Methatheria clade and to confirm that other opossum species is eligible as a good model for pudendal nerve studies.

  9. Use of aortic extension cuffs for preserving hypogastric blood flow in endovascular aneurysm repair with aneurysmal involvement of common iliac arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Marcos, Francisco; Garcia de la Torre, Aurelio; Alonso Perez, Manuel; Llaneza Coto, Jose-Manuel; Camblor Santervas, Lino-Antonio; Zanabili Al Sibbai, Ahmad-Amer; Garcia-Cosio Mir, Jose-Manuel; Vega Garcia, Florentino; Rodriguez Menendez, Jose-Eduardo

    2013-02-01

    Intentional hypogastric artery covering during endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysms (EVAR) can carry a non-negligible rate of complications; to preserve pelvic blood flow, several approaches are in use, such as sandwich techniques, branched iliac devices, or the use of aortic extender cuffs in a bell-bottom configuration. We assess the performance of the latter for treatment of common iliac artery aneurysms during EVAR. Prospective gathering of data in 21 dilated common iliac arteries (18-25 mm) with coexisting abdominal aorta aneurysm, which were treated from 2005 to 2010 and received a GORE(®) Excluder endograft and one (n = 14) or several aortic extenders in a bell-bottom configuration. Control group consisted of 136 EVARs performed with the same device in the same time frame. Median follow-up was of 47 months, with contrast-enhanced computed tomography assessment 1 month after the procedure and yearly thereafter. Age and comorbidities were homogeneously distributed among groups, although the aortic aneurysm diameter was lower in the bell-bottom group (50 mm vs. 58.2 mm, P aneurysmal disease. No significant differences were found in reintervention (15.8% vs. 14.7%, P = 0.707) or endoleak rates (36.8% vs. 38.9%, Fisher P = 1). There were no type I and four type II endoleaks, two of which precised treatment for sac growth. Endoleak-free survival (P = 0.994) and reintervention-free survival (P = 0.563) did not show differences either. Bell-bottom technique is a feasible and safe alternative for preserving hypogastric blood flow, and does not imply a higher risk of reintervention or endoleak at 3-year follow-up. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Variations of the origin of collateral branches emerging from the posterior aspect of the brachial plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramirez Luis

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of variation found in the arrangement and distribution of the branches in the brachial plexus, make this anatomical region extremely complicated. The medical concerns involved with these variations include anesthetic blocks, surgical approaches, interpreting tumor or traumatic nervous compressions having unexplained clinical symptoms (sensory loss, pain, wakefulness and paresis, and the possibility of these structures becoming compromised. The clinical importance of these variations is discussed in the light of their differential origins. Methods The anatomy of brachial plexus structures from 46 male and 11 female cadaverous specimens were studied. The 40–80 year-old specimens were obtained from the Universidad Industrial de Santander's Medical Faculty's Anatomy Department (dissection laboratory. Parametric measures were used for calculating results. Results Almost half (47.1% of the evaluated plexuses had collateral variations. Subscapular nerves were the most varied structure, including the presence of a novel accessory nerve. Long thoracic nerve variations were present, as were the absence of C5 or C7 involvement, and late C7 union with C5–C6. Conclusion Further studies are needed to confirm the existence of these variations in a larger sample of cadaver specimens.

  11. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus for the early rehabilitation of children with posttraumatic elbow contractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Zabolotsky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Improvement of surgical treatment outcomes in children with post-traumatic elbow contractures. Materials and methods. The study is based on the diagnostic findings of 48 children with post-traumatic elbow contractures who were treated at the Turner Scientific and Research Institute for Children’s Orthopedics. All children underwent complex rehabilitation after reconstructive intra-articular surgery to work out passive motions in the elbow using ARTROMOT-E2 device. The patients of the study group started rehabilitation in the first days after reconstructive intra-articular surgery in the background of prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus. In the control group, the rehabilitation was carried out traditionally on the 6th day after surgery without regional anesthesia. The patients of the study group were supplied with Contiplex SU perinural catheters for prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus using ultrasound (Edge SonoSite and neurostimulation (Stimuplex® HNS12 before surgery. For perioperative blockade of the brachial plexus we used intermittent injection of 0.5% ropivacaine (2 mg / kg. The severity of pain at the stages of rehabilitation was assessed using 10-point grading scale (FPS-R. The range of active and passive motions in the joints was evaluated by measuring the range of motions with a fleximeter. Results. Intermittent injection of ropivacaine before rehabilitation allowed to correct post-traumatic elbow contractures in children in the first days after surgery associated with the minimum subjective pain level and stable hemodynamic parameteres, accompanied with a significant increase of the elbow motion range in comparison with the group of the patients who were not performed regional anesthesia . Conclusion. Prolonged blockade of the brachial plexus in rehabilitation treatment of children with post-traumatic contractures provides appropriate analgesic and myoneural block components from the 1st day after intra

  12. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy : impact throughout the lifespan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holst, van der M.

    2017-01-01

    Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is a nerve injury to the brachial plexus which controls arm-movements. This thesis describes the impact of this injury on the lives of patients in terms of quality of life, participation, healthcare use and treatment outcomes. Findings in this thesis

  13. Axillary plexus blockade in microvascular surgery, a steal phenomenon?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F.A. van der Werff (John); G. Medici; S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); A. Kusuma (Ari)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractA case report is presented of an axillary plexus blockade following a second toe-to-hand transfer. After completion of the microvascular anastomoses and restoration of blood flow to the transplanted toe, the axillary plexus blockade was started. Together with the vasodilation of the hand

  14. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe the pattern and prevalence of variations that occur in the supraclavicular part of the brachial plexus in a. Kenyan population. Study design: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Materials and methods: Ninety-four brachial plexuses from forty-seven formalin fixed cadavers were displayed by gross

  15. Ultrasonography for neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob Rahul; DiPietro, Michael A; Somashekar, Deepak; Parmar, Hemant A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasonography has previously been reported for use in the evaluation of compressive or traumatic peripheral nerve pathology and for its utility in preoperative mapping. However, these studies were not performed in infants, and they were not focused on the brachial plexus. The authors report a case in which ultrasonography was used to improve operative management of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP). An infant boy was born at term, complicated by right-sided shoulder dystocia. Initial clinical evaluation revealed proximal arm weakness consistent with an upper trunk injury. Unlike MRI or CT myelography that focus on proximal nerve roots, ultrasonography of the brachial plexus in the supraclavicular fossa was able to demonstrate a small neuroma involving the upper trunk (C-5 and C-6) and no asymmetry in movement of the diaphragm or in the appearance of the rhomboid muscle when compared with the unaffected side. However, the supra- and infraspinatus muscles were significantly asymmetrical and atrophied on the affected side. Importantly, ultrasound examination of the shoulder revealed posterior glenohumeral laxity. Instead of pursuing the primary nerve reconstruction first, timely treatment of the shoulder subluxation prevented formation of joint dysplasia and formation of a false glenoid, which is a common sequela of this condition. Because the muscles innervated by proximal branches of the cervical nerve roots/trunks were radiographically normal, subsequent nerve transfers were performed and good functional results were achieved. The authors believe this to be the first report describing the utility of ultrasonography in the surgical treatment planning in a case of NBPP. Noninvasive imaging, in addition to thorough history and physical examination, reduces the intraoperative time required to determine the extent and severity of nerve injury by allowing improved preoperative planning of the surgical strategy. Inclusion of ultrasonography as a preoperative

  16. Is lumbosacral plexus blockade effective and safe for surgical anesthesia in total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Niels Dalsgaard; Larsen, Jens Rolighed; Børglum, Jens

    vascular resistance, and arterial and central venous pressures. (table 1) No patients in group 1 achieved complete surgical anesthesia due to lack of anesthesia of the cranial part of the surgical incision. Conclusions Neither lumbosacral plexus block nor continuous spinal anesthesia affected any...... a 1-hour follow-up. Results All patients were ASA II and between 56-81 years of age. Two patients dropped out due to failure to insert a spinal catheter. We found no significant change in any hemodynamic parameters in group 1 and 2. The patient in group 3 showed significant decrease in systemic...

  17. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP.

  18. Motor cortex neuroplasticity following brachial plexus transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan eDimou

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27 year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralised to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced phantom limb pain.

  19. Fibrosis of the Choroid Plexus Filtration Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parratt, John D. E.; Kirwan, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a previously undescribed inflammatory lesion consisting of deposition of activated complement (C3d and C9neo) in association with major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC2)-positive activated microglia in choroid plexus villi exhibiting classical fibrous thickening of the pericapillary filtration membrane. The proportion of villi affected ranged from 5% to 90% in 56 adult subjects with diseases of the CNS and 11 subjects with no preexisting disease of the CNS. In 3 of the 4 children studied, 2% or less of examined villi showed stromal thickening, complement deposition, and the presence of MHC2-positive microglia; in adults, the proportion of villi affected increased with age. Other features of the lesion included loss of capillaries and failure by macrophages to clear extracellular particulate electron-dense material by clathrin-mediated phagocytosis. This choroid plexus lesion may relate pathogenetically to age-related macular degeneration and to Alzheimer disease, 2 other conditions with no known risk factors other than increasing age. All 3 conditions are characterized by the presence of damaged capillaries, inflammatory extracellular aggregates of mixed molecular composition and defective clearance of the deposits by macrophages. PMID:27444353

  20. Estudo comparativo entre clonidina associada à bupivacaína e bupivacaína isolada em bloqueio de plexo cervical para endarterectomia de carótida Estudio comparativo entre la clonidina asociada a la bupivacaína y la bupivacaína aislada en bloqueo de plexo cervical para endarterectomía de carótida A comparative study between bupivacaine and clonidine associated with bupivacaine in cervical plexus block for carotid endarterectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Pinto Neto

    2009-08-01

    este estudio fue comparar el efecto analgésico de la clonidina con la bupivacaína con relación a la bupivacaína aislada en bloqueo de plexo cervical. MÉTODO: Se evaluaron 30 pacientes, de forma aleatoria y en doble ciego, divididos en dos grupos: G1 recibió 1,5 mg.kg-1 de bupivacaína a 0,375% asociados a 150 ¼g de clonidina (2 mL y G2, 1,5 mg.kg-1 de bupivacaína a 0,375% asociados a la solución fisiológica (2 mL. Se evaluaron la frecuencia cardiaca y la presión arterial en los momentos 0 (bloqueo, 30, 60, 90 y 120 minutos; la necesidad de complementación anestésica; el momento para la primera complementación analgésica; la cantidad de analgésico usado y la intensidad del dolor en el momento 0 (término de la operación, 30, 60, 120, 240 y 360 minutos. RESULTADOS: La complementación anestésica con lidocaína fue de 3,8 mL en el G1 y 3,6 mL en el G2 sin diferencias estadísticas significativas. El momento para la primera complementación fue de 302,6 ± 152,6 minutos en el G1, y de 236,6 ± 132,9 minutos en el G2, sin diferencia significativa. No hubo diferencia en la dosis de dipirona y tramadol usada. No hubo diferencia en la intensidad del dolor entre los grupos. CONCLUSIÓN: La asociación de 150 ¼g de clonidina a bupivacaína en el bloqueo de plexo cervical para la endarterectomía de carótida, no generó ninguna mejoría significativa del efecto analgésico evaluado por la intensidad del dolor, en la primera complementación analgésica y en la cantidad de analgésico complementario.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Neurological evaluation can be done during cervical plexus block for endarterectomy, which also maintains postoperative analgesia. The objective of this study was to compare the analgesic effects of clonidine associated with bupivacaine to those of bupivacaine in cervical plexus block. METHODS: A randomized double-blind study was undertaken with 30 patients divided in two groups: G1 received 1.5 mg.kg-1 of 0.375% bupivacaine associated

  1. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus anaesthesia: differences in success between patients of normal and excessive weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, U; Papenfuss, T; Greim, C; Brederlau, J; Roewer, N

    2006-06-01

    Interscalene plexus blocks are an important part of the peri-operative treatment in shoulder surgery. The nerve stimulation technique uses external landmarks for the definition of the injection site. Patient obesity is, therefore, one causative factor for a reduced success rate of the blockade. This study investigated whether there are differences in visibility of the target nerves and in the success rate of the block between patients of normal weight (nw) and obese patients (ow), when portable sonography is used for guidance of the interscalene nerve blockade (ISB). We investigated 70 patients routinely scheduled for shoulder surgery (ASA status I-III). The patients were allocated to group nw (body mass index BMI 25). The interscalene part of the brachial plexus was examined using high-frequency portable ultrasound. The blockade was performed under continuous sonographic monitoring. The quality of the ISB was tested post-operatively, and the time required for the procedure was documented. Identification of nerve structures in the obese patients did require slightly more time than in patients of normal weight, statistically (ow: 5 +/- 1 min versus nw: 4 +/- 2 min, p = 0.02). While in 33 patients (94 %) of group nw the plexus blockade was complete, in group ow 27 (77 %) of the blocks were sufficient. The difference in success, however, was not significant (p = 0.08). Visualisation of nerves was difficult in 3 patients in ow-group. Portable ultrasound provides efficient depiction of the interscalene plexus structures in obese patients and, when used for guidance of regional blockade, renders similar results as in patients of normal weight.

  2. Variations in branching of the posterior cord of brachial plexus in a Kenyan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matakwa Ludia C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the branching of posterior cord are important during surgical approaches to the axilla and upper arm, administration of anesthetic blocks, interpreting effects of nervous compressions and in repair of plexus injuries. The patterns of branching show population differences. Data from the African population is scarce. Objective To describe the branching pattern of the posterior cord in a Kenyan population. Materials and methods Seventy-five brachial plexuses from 68 formalin fixed cadavers were explored by gross dissection. Origin and order of branching of the posterior cord was recorded. Representative photographs were then taken using a digital camera (Sony Cybershot R, W200, 7.2 Megapixels. Results Only 8 out of 75 (10.7% posterior cords showed the classical branching pattern. Forty three (57.3% lower subscapular, 8(10.3% thoracodorsal and 8(10.3% upper subscapular nerves came from the axillary nerve instead of directly from posterior cord. A new finding was that in 4(5.3% and in 3(4% the medial cutaneous nerves of the arm and forearm respectively originated from the posterior cord in contrast to their usual origin from the medial cord. Conclusions Majority of posterior cords in studied population display a wide range of variations. Anesthesiologists administering local anesthetic blocks, clinicians interpreting effects of nerve injuries of the upper limb and surgeons operating in the axilla should be aware of these patterns to avoid inadvertent injury. A wider study of the branching pattern of infraclavicular brachial plexus is recommended.

  3. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  4. Choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christian; Mergl, June; Gehring, Erica; Paulus, Werner; Martineau, Daniel; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We report herein a choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). This case was positive for choroid plexus tumor marker Kir7.1 on immunohistochemistry. These results and the high conservation of Kir7.1 across species at the amino acid sequence level strongly suggest that antibodies directed against Kir7.1 not only can be employed for the diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors in cetaceans, but are also likely to be diagnostically useful in other animal species. © 2016 The Author(s).

  5. Skin temperature after interscalene brachial plexus blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanns, Henning; Braun, Sebastian; Werdehausen, Robert; Werner, Andreas; Lipfert, Peter; Stevens, Markus F.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Objectives: In neuraxial anesthesia, increase of skin temperature is an early sign of successful block. Yet, during peripheral nerve block of the lower extremity, increase in skin temperature is a highly sensitive, but late sign of a successful block. We hypothesized that after

  6. Regional infraclavicular blocks via the coracoid approach for below ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This randomised, observer-blinded study compared brachial plexus infraclavicular block under ultrasound guidance with, or without, nerve stimulation, for patients undergoing below-elbow surgery. Sixty-six patients, aged 18-70 years, with American Society Anesthesiologists' status I, II or III, were randomised into two ...

  7. Usefulness of peripheral nerve block as an aneasthetic technique in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Regional anaesthesia in children is a growing field of interest in current anaesthesia practice. We report a case of brachial plexus block for a child with severe forearm necrotizing fasciitis and septicaemia. The need to avoid the multiple shortcomings of general anaesthesia in a critically ill child prompted the use of regional ...

  8. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teo Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD.

  9. Gelsolin Restores Aβ-Induced Alterations in Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Teo; Antequera, Desiree; Ugalde, Cristina; Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Histologically, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by senile plaques and cerebrovascular amyloid deposits. In previous studies we demonstrated that in AD patients, amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide also accumulates in choroid plexus, and that this process is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and epithelial cell death. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Aβ accumulation at the choroid plexus epithelium remain unclear. Aβ clearance, from the brain to the blood, involves Aβ carrier proteins that bind to megalin, including gelsolin, a protein produced specifically by the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In this study, we show that treatment with gelsolin reduces Aβ-induced cytoskeletal disruption of blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier at the choroid plexus. Additionally, our results demonstrate that gelsolin plays an important role in decreasing Aβ-induced cytotoxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide production and apoptotic mitochondrial changes. Taken together, these findings make gelsolin an appealing tool for the prophylactic treatment of AD. PMID:20369065

  10. The effects of morphine on the accumulation of homovanillic and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acids in the choroid plexus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J T; Wajda, I J

    1977-01-01

    1 Choroid plexus obtained from the lateral ventricles of the rat actively accumulated homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA). 2 Morphine 5 X 10(-6) M to 5 X 10(-4)M potentiated 5-HIAA accumulation but did not affect HVA accumulation. Levorphanol and dextorphan had little effect. 3 Naloxone at high concentrations inhibited both HVA and 5-HIAA accumulation. 4 Glutamic acid, glycine, and arginine also decreased 5-HIAA accumulation, but lysine, tryptophan, and aspartic acid had no effect. 5 Probenecid, naloxone, arginine, glycine, and tryptophan blocked the increase of 5-HIAA accumulation induced by morphine. 6 Acute or chronic morphine treatment did not increase the accumulation of 5-HIAA. 7 These results suggest that the increase of 5-HIAA or HVA in brain by morphine is not due to the inhibition of the elimination of these metabolites from the choroid plexus. PMID:890207

  11. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats’ upper limbs was significantly at...

  12. Development of the choroid plexus and blood-CSF barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddelow, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    Well-known as one of the main sources of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexuses have been, and still remain, a relatively understudied tissue in neuroscience. The choroid plexus and CSF (along with the blood-brain barrier proper) are recognized to provide a robust protective effort for the brain: a physical barrier to impede entrance of toxic metabolites to the brain; a “biochemical” barrier that facilitates removal of moieties that circumvent this physical barrier; and buoyant physical protection by CSF itself. In addition, the choroid plexus-CSF system has been shown to be integral for normal brain development, central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, and repair after disease and trauma. It has been suggested to provide a stem-cell like repository for neuronal and astrocyte glial cell progenitors. By far, the most widely recognized choroid plexus role is as the site of the blood-CSF barrier, controller of the internal CNS microenvironment. Mechanisms involved combine structural diffusion restraint from tight junctions between plexus epithelial cells (physical barrier) and specific exchange mechanisms across the interface (enzymatic barrier). The current hypothesis states that early in development this interface is functional and more specific than in the adult, with differences historically termed as “immaturity” actually correctly reflecting developmental specialization. The advanced knowledge of the choroid plexus-CSF system proves itself imperative to understand a range of neurological diseases, from those caused by plexus or CSF drainage dysfunction (e.g., hydrocephalus) to more complicated late-stage diseases (e.g., Alzheimer's) and failure of CNS regeneration. This review will focus on choroid plexus development, outlining how early specializations may be exploited clinically. PMID:25784848

  13. [Abdominal aortal plexus in fur animals (order Carnivora)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvedov, S I

    2004-01-01

    Abdominal aortal plexus was studied in foxes, polar foxes, sables and minks using macro-microscopic method of V.P. Vorobjov. Nerve ganglia of the abdominal aortal plexus in all examined fur animals are located at the roots of the largest arterial vessels originating from abdominal aorta and they are represented by paired abdominal, unpaired cranial mesenterial (excluding minks), inconstant visceral and aorto-renal, plural intermesenterial, single or plural caudal mesenterial nerve ganglia.

  14. Peripheral Nerve Block as a Supplement to Light or Deep General Anesthesia in Elderly Patients Receiving Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Bin; Zha, Hanning; Lu, Xiaolong; Cheng, Xinqi; Chen, Shishou; Liu, Xuesheng; Li, Yuanhai; Gu, Erwei

    2017-12-01

    Peripheral nerve block combined with general anesthesia is a preferable anesthesia method for elderly patients receiving hip arthroplasty. The depth of sedation may influence patient recovery. Therefore, we investigated the influence of peripheral nerve blockade and different intraoperative sedation levels on the short-term recovery of elderly patients receiving total hip arthroplasty. Patients aged 65 years and older undergoing total hip arthroplasty were randomized into 3 groups: a general anesthesia without lumbosacral plexus block group, and 2 general anesthesia plus lumbosacral plexus block groups, each with a different level of sedation (light or deep). The extubation time and intraoperative consumption of propofol, sufentanil, and vasoactive agent were recorded. Postoperative delirium and early postoperative cognitive dysfunction were assessed using the Confusion Assessment Method and Mini-Mental State Examination, respectively. Postoperative analgesia was assessed by the consumption of patient-controlled analgesics and visual analog scale scores. Discharge time and complications over a 30-day period were also recorded. Lumbosacral plexus block reduced opioid intake. With lumbosacral plexus block, intraoperative deep sedation was associated with greater intake of propofol and vasoactive agent. In contrast, patients with lumbosacral plexus block and intraoperative light sedation had lower incidences of postoperative delirium and postoperative cognitive decline, and earlier discharge readiness times. The 3 groups showed no difference in complications within 30 days of surgery. Lumbosacral plexus block reduced the need for opioids and offered satisfactory postoperative analgesia. It led to better postoperative outcomes in combination with intraoperative light sedation (high bispectral index).

  15. Ultrasound-guided block of the axillary nerve: a volunteer study of a new method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Asghar, S; Andersen, H L

    2011-01-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) is the gold standard for perioperative pain management in shoulder surgery. However, a more distal technique would be desirable to avoid the side effects and potential serious complications of IBPB. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop a...... and describe a new method to perform an ultrasound-guided specific axillary nerve block....

  16. Intermediate Type of Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2016-12-01

    Data of 829 infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were reviewed to identify any cases that could not be fitted into the any of the well-known types of palsy. These unusual cases were studied in detail with regard to clinical presentation and electrophysiological findings as well as management and spontaneous motor recovery. Erb's, extended Erb's, and total palsies were seen in 42.8%, 28.8%, and 28.0% of cases, respectively. Three cases (0.4%) did not fit into any of the classic types. One case had bilateral palsy, and the remaining 2 cases had unilateral palsy. All affected limbs presented with "abducted arms," "flexed forearms," and electrophysiological evidence of denervation of shoulder adductors and triceps. All cases had excellent spontaneous recovery within 6-12 months. It was concluded that these cases represent mild "intermediate" types of palsy in which the C7 root was the predominant site of injury. Good spontaneous recovery is expected. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Estudo comparativo da eficácia analgésica pós-operatória de 20 mL de ropivacaína a 0,5, 0,75 ou 1% no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio comparativo de la eficacia analgésica postoperatoria de 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,5, 0,75 ó 1% en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior Comparative study for the postoperative analgesic efficacy of 20 mL at 0.5, 0.75, and 1% ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2008-10-01

    ía posterior se dividieron aleatoriamente en tres grupos de 30. Grupo 1: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,5%; Grupo 2: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 0,75%; Grupo 3: 20 mL de ropivacaina a 1%. El bloqueo se evaluó a través de la investigación de sensibilidad térmica utilizando algodón con alcohol y el dolor postoperatorio se evaluó según una escala numérico verbal (ENV en las primeras 48 horas. RESULTADOS: En los tres grupos la analgesia postoperatoria fue similar según los parámetros evaluados; ENV de dolor medio, tiempo hasta el primer quejido de dolor y consumo de opioides en el postoperatorio. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio mostró que el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior es una técnica que promueve una analgesia eficaz para intervenciones quirúrgicas en el hombro. Utilizando 20 mL de ropivacaina, las tres diferentes concentraciones estudiadas promueven analgesia similar.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Arthroscopic shoulder surgeries are associated with severe postoperative pain. Among the analgesic techniques available, brachial plexus block has the best results. The objective of this study was to determine which concentration of local analgesic used in the posterior brachial plexus block provides longer postoperative analgesia. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing posterior brachial plexus block were randomly divided into three groups of 30 patients each. Group I: 20 mL of 0.5% ropivacaine; Group 2: 20 mL of 0.75% ropivacaine; and Group 3: 20 mL of 1% ropivacaine. The blockade was evaluated by assessing the thermal sensitivity using a cotton pad with alcohol and postoperative pain was evaluated according to a Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS in the first 48 hours. RESULTS: Postoperative analgesia was similar in all three groups according to the parameters evaluated: mean VNS, time until the first complaint of pain, and postoperative opioid consumption. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that posterior brachial plexus block provides effective analgesia for shoulder surgeries

  18. Identification of a novel mechanism of blood-brain communication during peripheral inflammation via choroid plexus-derived extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balusu, Sriram; Van Wonterghem, Elien; De Rycke, Riet; Raemdonck, Koen; Stremersch, Stephan; Gevaert, Kris; Brkic, Marjana; Demeestere, Delphine; Vanhooren, Valerie; Hendrix, An; Libert, Claude; Vandenbroucke, Roosmarijn E

    2016-10-01

    Here, we identified release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) by the choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) as a new mechanism of blood-brain communication. Systemic inflammation induced an increase in EVs and associated pro-inflammatory miRNAs, including miR-146a and miR-155, in the CSF Interestingly, this was associated with an increase in amount of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and exosomes per MVB in the CPE cells. Additionally, we could mimic this using LPS-stimulated primary CPE cells and choroid plexus explants. These choroid plexus-derived EVs can enter the brain parenchyma and are taken up by astrocytes and microglia, inducing miRNA target repression and inflammatory gene up-regulation. Interestingly, this could be blocked in vivo by intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of an inhibitor of exosome production. Our data show that CPE cells sense and transmit information about the peripheral inflammatory status to the central nervous system (CNS) via the release of EVs into the CSF, which transfer this pro-inflammatory message to recipient brain cells. Additionally, we revealed that blockage of EV secretion decreases brain inflammation, which opens up new avenues to treat systemic inflammatory diseases such as sepsis. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Plexus muscularis profundus and associated interstitial cells. I. Light microscopical studies of mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Thuneberg, L

    1982-01-01

    interstitial cells (ICC-II) in the subserous layer. (2) Auerbach's plexus with an associated extensive plexus of interstitial cells (ICC-I) in close contact with tertiary fasciculi. (3) Nerve fasciculi of the outer division of the circular muscle layer. These formed a nerve plexus in a well-defined plane...... in the outermost cell layers (plexus muscularis superficialis), with few fasciculi located internal to this plexus. A few bipolar interstitial cells (ICC-IV) were associated with nerve fasciculi of this region. (4) A nerve plexus located in the region between the two subdivisions of the circular muscle, plexus...... muscularis profundus (PMP). PMP was revealed throughout the small intestine as a continuous network of elongated, circularly oriented meshes. The pattern of connections between PMP and the other enteric plexuses was studied stereoscopically. Ganglion cells intrinsic to PMP occurred widely scattered...

  20. The Choroid Plexus in Healthy and Diseased Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Charanjit; Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Ling, Eng-Ang

    2016-03-01

    The choroid plexus is composed of epithelial cells resting on a basal lamina. These cells produce the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which has many functions including rendering mechanical support, providing a route for some nutrients, removing by-products of metabolism and synaptic activity, and playing a role in hormonal signaling. The choroid plexus synthesizes many growth factors, including insulin-like, fibroblast, and platelet-derived growth factors. The tight junctions located between the apical parts of the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB), which is crucial for the homeostatic regulation of the brain microenvironment along with the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Morphological changes such as atrophy of the epithelial cells and thickening of the basement membrane suggest altered CSF production occurs in aging and in Alzheimer disease. In brain injuries and infections, leukocytes accumulate in the CSF by passing through the choroid plexus. In inflammatory CNS diseases (eg, multiple sclerosis), pathogenic autoreactive T lymphocytes may migrate through the BBB and BCSFB into the CNS. The development of therapeutic strategies to mitigate disruption of the BCSFB may be helpful to curtail the entry of inflammatory cells into the CSF and hence reduce inflammation, thereby overcoming choroid plexus dysfunction in senescence and in various diseases of the CNS. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Outcome following nonoperative treatment of brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTaranto, Patricia; Campagna, Liliana; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, John A I

    2004-02-01

    Ninety-one infants who sustained a brachial plexus birth injury were treated with only physical and occupational therapy. The children were evaluated at 3-month intervals and followed for a minimum of 2 years. Sixty-three children with an upper or upper-middle plexus injury recovered good to excellent shoulder and hand function. In all of these children, critical marker muscles recovered M4 by 6 months of age. Twelve infants sustained a global palsy, with critical marker muscles remaining at M0-M1 at 6 months, resulting in a useless extremity. Sixteen infants with upper and upper-middle plexus injuries failed to recover greater than M1-M2 deltoid and biceps by 6 months, resulting in a very poor final outcome. These data provide useful guidelines for selection of infants for surgical reconstruction to improve ultimate outcome.

  2. Delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy by newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Balić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus injuries represent a low percentage of delivery complications. Most newborns fully recover from the injury, very few retain a permanent neurological deficit whereas some remain unnoticed. An objective of this study was to establish delivery factors for brachial plexus palsy at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics and relation between the deficits with length of delivery, the length of delivery periods, induction of delivery and surgical interventions at delivery. The analysed group involved 90 newborn babies with an injury of brachial plexus made at the delivery in the period between 01.01.1996 and 31.12.2005. The controlled group included 90 newborns randomly selected. The comparison was made using an χ2 test. The incidence of injuries of plexus brachialis was 1.72 per 1,000 newborns. Analysing the length of delivery there was no difference found between the analysed and controlled group (p > 0.05. In the group of newborns with the injury of brachial plexus it was found that the second delivery period was significantly shorter (p < 0.01. In the analysed group 89 (98.8% newborn babies were delivered vaginally and one (1.2% was delivered by the cesarean section. 13 newborns (14.4% from the analysed group were delivered with application of vacuum extractor and in the controlled group it was the case with one (1.2% newborn baby (p < 0.01. The delivery of 98.8% newborns from the analysed group started spontaneously and two deliveries (1.2% were induced. Risk factors for injuries of plexus brachialis in newborns at the Clinic for Gynaecology and Obstetrics of the University Clinical Centre Tuzla include shortened second delivery period and completion of deliveries applying the vacuum extractor.

  3. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Which is your choice for prolonging the analgesic duration of single-shot interscalene brachial blocks for arthroscopic shoulder surgery? intravenous dexamethasone 5 mg vs. perineural dexamethasone 5 mg randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chun, Eun Hee; Kim, Youn Jin; Woo, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intravenous (I.V.) dexamethasone with that of perineural dexamethasone on the prolongation of analgesic duration of single-shot interscalene brachial plexus blocks (SISB...

  6. Brachial plexus 3D reconstruction from MRI with dissection validation: a baseline study for clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Joris; Bogaert, Stephanie; Vandemaele, Pieter; Huysse, Wouter; Achten, Eric; Leijnse, Joris; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2016-03-01

    The present study aimed to establish a baseline for detailed 3D brachial plexus reconstruction from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Concretely, the goal was to determine the individual brachial plexus anatomy with maximum detail and accuracy achievable, as yet irrespective of whether the methods used could be economically and practically applied in the clinical setting. Six embalmed cadavers were randomly taken for MRI imaging of the brachial plexus. Detailed two-dimensional (2D) segmentation for all brachial plexus parts was done. The 2D brachial plexus segmentations were 3D reconstructed using Mimics(®) software. Then, these 3D reconstructions were anatomically validated by dissection of the cadavers. After finalising the cadaver experiments, brachial plexus MRIs were obtained in three healthy male volunteers and the same reconstruction procedure as in vitro was followed. A procedure was developed for brachial plexus 3D reconstruction based on MRI without the use of any contrast agent. Anatomical validation of six cadaver brachial plexus reconstructions showed high correspondence with the dissected brachial plexuses. Anatomical variations of the main branches were equally present in the 3D reconstructions generated. However, there were also some differences that related to the difference between the surface anatomy of the nerve and the internal nerve structure. In vivo, it was possible to reconstruct the complete brachial plexus in such a manner that normal-appearing BPs were derived in a reproducible way. This study showed that the described procedure results in accurate and reproducible brachial plexus 3D reconstructions.

  7. Practice guidelines for endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wyse, Jonathan M; Battat, Robert; Sun, Siyu

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of guideline was to provide clear and relevant consensus statements to form a practical guideline for clinicians on the indications, optimal technique, safety and efficacy of endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN). METHODS: Six important clinical...... of inoperable disease. Techniques may still vary based on operator experience. Serious complications exist, but are rare....

  8. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  9. Coeliac Plexus Neurolysis for Upper Abdominal Malignancies Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The use of various imaging modalities in an anterior approach has improved the technical accuracy in reaching the coeliac plexus, thereby avoiding the needle piercing crucial structures and avoiding deposition of drug in the retrocrural space, thereby reducing the risk of neurological complications. Coeliac ...

  10. Occult radiological effects of lipomatosis of the lumbosacral plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, Mark A. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Howe, B.M.; Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurosurgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedics, Rochester, MN (United States); Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Lipomatosis of nerve (LN) is a condition of massive peripheral nerve enlargement frequently associated with hypertrophy within the distribution of the nerve, and most commonly affecting the distal limbs. We sought to understand if LN of the lumbosacral plexus would be associated with the trophic effects of LN on surrounding tissue within the pelvis, which may be clinically occult, but present on MRI. Fifty-one cases of LN, confirmed by pathology or pathognomonic appearance on MRI, were reviewed. Patients with LN of the sciatic nerve were investigated for radiological signs suggestive of overgrowth. Five patients had involvement of the sciatic nerve, 4 of whom had MR imaging of the pelvis. Three patients had LN involving the lumbosacral plexus, and one patient had isolated involvement of the sciatic nerve. All patients with involvement of the lumbosacral plexus demonstrated previously unrecognized evidence of nerve territory overgrowth in the pelvis, including: LN, profound adipose proliferation, muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration, and bone hypertrophy and ankylosis. The patient with LN involving the intrapelvic sciatic nerve, but not the lumbosacral plexus did not demonstrate any radiological evidence of pelvic overgrowth. LN is broader in anatomical reach than previously understood. Proximal plexal innervation may be involved, with a consequent effect on axial skeleton and intrapelvic structures. (orig.)

  11. Shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in obstetrical brachial plexus injuries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Dijkstra, Piet; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Beelen, Anita; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2003-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of and the association between shoulder contracture and osseous deformity in a cohort of children with an obstetrical brachial plexus injury and to identify the risk factors for these complications. In a retrospective cohort study, all

  12. Obstetrical brachial plexus injuries: incidence, natural course and shoulder contracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, A. F.; Wolf, H.; Oei, S. L.

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) was investigated and the natural course of this disorder and the frequency of shoulder contracture described. Between 1988 and 1997 13,366 children with a gestational age of 30 weeks or more, were born at the Academic Medical Center,

  13. Choroid Plexus A-V Malformation Presenting with IVH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A term infant presenting on the second day with apnea and decerebrate posturing had an intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH, the result of an arteriovenous malformation of the choroid plexus demonstrated angiographically on the 3rd day and reported from Johns Hopkins Hospital.

  14. Ultrasound of the cervical roots and brachial plexus in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pillen, S.; Semmekrot, B.; Meulstee, J.; Verrips, A.; Alfen, N. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In this exploratory study we investigated whether ultrasound can visualize the neonatal cervical roots and brachial plexus. METHODS: In 12 healthy neonates <2 days old, the neck region was studied unilaterally with ultrasound using a small-footprint 15-7-MHz transducer. RESULTS: The

  15. Crohn's disease: ultrastructure of interstitial cells in colonic myenteric plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, Jüri Johs.; Vanderwinden, Jean-Marie; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The role of the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in chronic inflammatory bowel disease, i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), remains unclear. Ultrastructural alterations in ICC in the colonic myenteric plexus (ICC-MP) have been reported previously in UC, but descriptions of ICC...

  16. A novel technique for teaching the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefroy, Henrietta; Burdon-Bailey, Victoria; Bhangu, Aneel; Abrahams, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The brachial plexus has posed problems for both students and teachers throughout generations of medical education. The anatomy is intricate, and traditional pictorial representations can be difficult to understand and learn. Few innovative teaching methods have been reported. The basic anatomy of the brachial plexus is core knowledge required by medical students to aid clinical examination and diagnosis. A more detailed understanding is necessary for a variety of specialists, including surgeons, anaesthetists and radiologists. Here, we present a novel, cheap and interactive method of teaching the brachial plexus. Using coloured pipe cleaners, teachers and students can construct three-dimensional models using different colours to denote the origin and outflow of each nerve. The three-dimensional nature of the model also allows for a better understanding of certain intricacies of the plexus. Students may use these models as adjuncts for self study, didactic lectures and tutorials. Compared with traditional textbooks and whiteboards, the pipe-cleaner model was preferred by medical students, and provided a higher level of student satisfaction. This was demonstrated and analysed using student feedback forms. Our model could be incorporated into current curricula to provide an effective and enjoyable way of rapidly teaching a difficult concept. Other such novel methods for teaching complex anatomical principles should be encouraged and explored. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2011.

  17. General intravenous anesthesia for brachial plexus surgery in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, P; Rutowski, R; Kielbowicz, Z; Kuryszko, J; Kielbowicz, M

    2013-01-01

    The rabbit is a good experimental model for brachial plexus surgery. The risks of death during anesthesia were significantly greater in rabbits than cats or dogs. This article presents the protocol of injectable anesthesia for a short surgical procedure, safe for the rabbit patient and convenient for the surgeon.

  18. Anatomical variations of the brachial plexus terminal branches in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anatomical variations are clinically significant, but many are inadequately described or quantified. Variations in anatomy of the brachial plexus are important to surgeons and anesthesiologists performing surgical procedures in the neck, axilla and upper limb regions. It is also important for radiologists who interpret plain and ...

  19. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    schwannomas ofthe vagus and phrenic nervcs appeafing as medi— astinal masses”. Bmchial plexus schwannomatas have been reported to mani— fest as causing nerve compression symptoms8 which our patient cxperienced or an abnormal mediastinal shadow on plain chest— xray due to intrathoracïc extension'.

  20. Estudo comparativo da eficácia analgésica pós-operatória de 20, 30 ou 40 mL de ropivacaína no bloqueio de plexo braquial pela via posterior Estudio comparativo de la eficacia analgésica postoperatoria de 20, 30 o 40 mL de ropivacaína en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior A comparative study on the postoperative analgesic efficacy of 20, 30, or 40 mL of ropivacaine in posterior brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Guilherme Cunha Cruvinel

    2007-10-01

    fue determinar cuál volumen de anestésico local en el bloqueo de plexo braquial por la vía posterior propicia analgesia postoperatoria para esas operaciones de manera más eficiente. MÉTODO: Noventa pacientes sometidos al bloqueo del plexo braquial por vía posterior fueron divididos aleatoriamente en tres grupos de 30. Grupo 1 - volumen de 20 mL; Grupo 2 - volumen de 30 mL; Grupo 3 - volumen de 40 mL. En todos los grupos, el anestésico usado fue la ropivacaína a 0,375%. El bloqueo se evaluó a través de la investigación de sensibilidad térmica utilizando algodón con alcohol y el dolor postoperatorio se evaluó secundando una escala numérica verbal (ENV en las primeras 24 horas. RESULTADOS: En los tres grupos la analgesia postoperatoria fue similar según los parámetros evaluados; ENV de dolor promedio,tiempo hasta el primer quejido de dolor y consumo de opioides en el postoperatorio. En el grupo de 20 mL hubo un mayor consumo de analgésicos no opioides después de la 12ª hora de postoperatorio. En los grupos de 30 y 40 mL la extensión del bloqueo fue significativamente mayor. CONCLUSIONES: Este estudio mostró que el bloqueo del plexo braquial por la vía posterior es una técnica que promueve analgesia eficaz para intervenciones quirúrgicas en el hombro. Los tres diferentes volúmenes estudiados promovieron analgesia similar. La mayor extensión del bloqueo con volúmenes mayores no se tradujo en una mejor analgesia.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Arthroscopic surgeries of the shoulder are accompanied by severe postoperative pain. Among the analgesic techniques, brachial plexus block offers the best results. The objective of this study was to determine which volume of local anesthetic in the posterior brachial plexus block offers more adequate analgesia for those procedures. METHODS: Ninety patients undergoing posterior brachial plexus block were randomly divided in three groups of 30 patients: Group 1 – volume of 20 mL; Groups 2 – volume of 30 m

  1. Lycopene mitigates β-amyloid induced inflammatory response and inhibits NF-κB signaling at the choroid plexus in early stages of Alzheimer's disease rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong-Bin; Wang, Rui; Yi, Yan-Feng; Gao, Zhen; Chen, Yi-Zhu

    2017-11-28

    The choroid plexus is able to modulate the cognitive function, through changes in the neuroinflammatory response and in brain immune surveillance. However, whether lycopene is involved in inflammatory responses at the choroid plexus in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, and its molecular underpinnings are elusive. In this rat study, lycopene was used to investigate its protective effects on inflammation caused by β-amyloid. We characterized the learning and memory abilities, cytokine profiles of circulating TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β in the serum and the expressions of Toll like receptor 4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus. The results showed that functional deficits of learning and memory in lycopene treatment groups were significantly improved compared to the control group without lycopene treatment in water maze test. The levels of serum TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6β were significantly increased, and the expressions of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein at the choroid plexus were up-regulated, indicating inflammation response was initiated following administration of Aβ1-42. After intragastric pretreatment with lycopene, inflammatory cytokines were significantly reduced and lycopene also reversed the Aβ1-42 induced up-regulation of TLR4 and NF-κB p65 mRNA and protein expressions at the choroid plexus. These results provided a novel evidence that lycopene significantly improved cognitive deficits and were accompanied by the attenuation of inflammatory injury via blocking the activation of NF-κB p65 and TLR4 expressions and production of cytokines, thereby endorsing its usefulness for diminishing β-amyloid deposition in the hippocampus tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intracranial Connections of the Vertebral Venous Plexus: Anatomical Study with Application to Neurosurgical and Endovascular Procedures at the Craniocervical Junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Demerdash, Amin; Loukas, Marios; Curé, Joel; Oskouian, Rod J; Ansari, Shaheryar; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2018-01-01

    Descriptions of intracranial extensions of vertebral venous plexuses are lacking. To identify vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction in cadavers and describe them. The authors dissected 15 ink-injected, formalin-fixed, adult cadaveric heads and measured cranial extensions of the spinal venous plexuses. All specimens had vertebral venous plexuses at the craniocervical junction composed of multiple interwoven vessels concentrated anteriorly (anterior vertebral plexuses), posteriorly (posterior vertebral venous plexuses), and laterally (lateral vertebral venous plexuses). Veins making up the plexus tended to be largest for the anterior internal vertebral venous plexus. On 33%, a previously unnamed lateral internal vertebral venous plexus was identified that connected to the lateral marginal sinus. The anterior external vertebral venous plexus connected to the basilar venous plexus via transclival emissary veins in 13%; remaining veins connected either intracranially via small perforating branches through the anterior atlanto-occipital membrane (33%) or had no direct gross connections inside the cranium (53%). The anterior internal vertebral plexus, which traveled between layers of the posterior longitudinal ligament, connected to the anterior half of the marginal sinus in 33% and anterolateral parts of the marginal sinus in 20%. The posterior internal venous plexus connected to the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus on 80% and into the occipital sinus in 13.3%. The posterior external venous plexus connected to veins of the hypoglossal canal in 20% and into the posterior aspect of the marginal sinus in 13.3%. Knowledge of these connections is useful to neurosurgeons and interventional radiologists.

  3. Influence of Herpes Simplex Virus Latency-Associated Transcript (LAT) on the Distribution of Latently Infected Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-20

    consideration of alternative neuronal pathways by which the virus may spread. Hypogastric Nerve Sympathetic Chain Uterus Vagina Sacral Plexus ...could be potentially beneficial if the virus could be “ locked ” in a latent state, preventing reactivation into an actively replicating virus capable of...potentially inhibit recurrences by sterically blocking the binding of neuronal factors required for reactivation. Alternatively, peptide “ locks ” could be

  4. Posterior subscapular dissection: An improved approach to the brachial plexus for human anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Shaun; Backus, Timothy Charles; Futterman, Bennett; Solounias, Nikos; Mihlbachler, Matthew C

    2014-05-01

    Students of human anatomy are required to understand the brachial plexus, from the proximal roots extending from spinal nerves C5 through T1, to the distal-most branches that innervate the shoulder and upper limb. However, in human cadaver dissection labs, students are often instructed to dissect the brachial plexus using an antero-axillary approach that incompletely exposes the brachial plexus. This approach readily exposes the distal segments of the brachial plexus but exposure of proximal and posterior segments require extensive dissection of neck and shoulder structures. Therefore, the proximal and posterior segments of the brachial plexus, including the roots, trunks, divisions, posterior cord and proximally branching peripheral nerves often remain unobserved during study of the cadaveric shoulder and brachial plexus. Here we introduce a subscapular approach that exposes the entire brachial plexus, with minimal amount of dissection or destruction of surrounding structures. Lateral retraction of the scapula reveals the entire length of the brachial plexus in the subscapular space, exposing the brachial plexus roots and other proximal segments. Combining the subscapular approach with the traditional antero-axillary approach allows students to observe the cadaveric brachial plexus in its entirety. Exposure of the brachial dissection in the subscapular space requires little time and is easily incorporated into a preexisting anatomy lab curriculum without scheduling additional time for dissection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. An anatomical study of the parasacral block using magnetic resonance imaging of healthy volunteers.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Maeve

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: The parasacral approach to sciatic blockade is reported to be easy to learn and perform, with a high success rate and few complications. METHODS: Using magnetic resonance imaging, we evaluated the accuracy of a simulated needle (perpendicular to skin) in contacting the sacral plexus with this approach in 10 volunteers. Intrapelvic structures encountered during the simulated parasacral blocks were also recorded. RESULTS: The sacral plexus was contacted by the simulated needle in 4 of the 10 volunteers, and the sciatic nerve itself in one volunteer. The plexus was accurately located adjacent to a variety of visceral structures, including small bowel, blood vessels, and ovary. In the remaining five volunteers (in whom the plexus was not contacted on first needle pass), small bowel, rectum, blood vessels, seminal vesicles, and bony structures were encountered. Historically, when plexus is not encountered, readjustment of the needle insertion point more caudally has been recommended. We found that such an adjustment resulted in simulated perforation of intrapelvic organs or the perianal fossa. CONCLUSIONS: These findings question the reliability of the anatomical landmarks of the parasacral block and raise the possibility of frequent visceral puncture using this technique.

  6. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  7. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saunders, Norman R; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    and adult with additional data obtained at intermediate ages from microarray analysis. The largest represented functional group in the embryo was amino acid transporters (twelve) with expression levels 2-98 times greater than in the adult. In contrast, in the adult only six amino acid transporters were up...... in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain......The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15...

  8. A Review of Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy: Injury and Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raducha, Jeremy E; Cohen, Brian; Blood, Travis; Katarincic, Julia

    2017-11-01

    Brachial plexus injuries during the birthing process can leave infants with upper extremity deficits corresponding to the location of the lesion within the complex plexus anatomy. Manifestations can range from mild injuries with complete resolution to severe and permanent disability. Overall, patients have a high rate of spontaneous recovery (66-92%).1,2 Initially, all lesions are managed with passive range motion and observation. Prevention and/or correction of contractures with occupational therapy and serial splinting/casting along with encouraging normal development are the main goals of non-operative treatment. Surgical intervention may be war- ranted, depending on functional recovery. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-11.asp].

  9. Upper Trunk Brachial Plexus Palsy Following Chiropractic Manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cunningham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Upper trunk brachial plexus palsy can result from high energy trauma and has never been reported following spinal manipulation.Background:The case is presented of a patient who developed an acute brachial plexus upper trunk palsy following spinal manipulative therapy. Discussion:Discussion is made on the incidence of complications following manipulation and recommendations to prospectively capture all serious complications.Concluding Remarks:Risks exist with spinal manipulative therapy. Neurological injury can occur. Risk assessment and re-examination should occur at every visit. Large rigorous prospective studies are required to identify the true incidence of serious complications resulting from manipulative therapy and the benefit:risk ratio.

  10. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  11. A choroid plexus cyst in the fourth ventricle of a Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsuko; Nakamura, Kenji; Takimoto, Norifumi; Namiki, Kengo; Hibi, Daisuke; Yanagizawa, Yukihiro; Shimouchi, Koji

    2017-07-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are rare lesions in the brain and are reported in humans and dogs. Herein, we report a choroid plexus cyst found in a 10-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rat. Histologically, a cyst measuring approximately 600 μm in diameter was found in the fourth ventricle of the brain. The cyst was lined with a single layer of flattened cells and was present in the connective tissue of the choroid plexus. Next to the cyst, a dilated tube was found with a similar morphology to the epithelium of the choroid plexus. Immunohistochemistry revealed that flattened cells lining the cyst were positive for cytokeratin and vimentin, and negative for GFAP and S-100, which is the same as in the normal choroid plexus, excluding vimentin. We diagnosed the present cyst as a spontaneously occurring choroid plexus cyst that was considered to be undergoing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  12. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Coroneos, Christopher J.; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R.; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and childr...

  13. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allen M., E-mail: achen5@kumc.edu; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A.; Mikaeilian, Argin G.; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). Results: The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus–related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). Conclusion: The development of brachial plexus–related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications.

  14. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kohyama, Sho; Hara, Yuki; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Hara, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tanefumi; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2011-01-01

    Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enla...

  15. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    OpenAIRE

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasin...

  16. Intrapartum risk factors for permanent brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Sarah H; Stallings, Shawn P; Ghidini, Alessandro; Spong, Catherine Y; Deering, Shad H; Allen, Robert H

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare maternal, neonatal, and second stage of labor characteristics in shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in permanent brachial plexus injury with shoulder dystocia deliveries that result in no injury. Our cases were culled from a database of deliveries that resulted in permanent brachial plexus injuries and matched to control cases that were taken from a database of consecutive shoulder dystocia deliveries from one hospital. Deliveries that resulted in injury were excluded from the control cases; those cases with no recorded shoulder dystocia were excluded from the cases. Matching was for birth weight (+/-250 g), parity, and diabetic status. Rates of precipitous and prolonged second stage, operative delivery, neonatal depression, and average number of shoulder dystocia maneuvers used were compared between the two groups with chi(2) test, Fisher exact test, and the Student t test; a probability value of precipitous second stage rate, and sex were not significant between groups. The rates of precipitous second stage for both groups (28.0% injured and 35.0% uninjured) were more than triple the rates of prolonged second stage (9.5% injured and 11.3% uninjured). No characteristic of second-stage of labor predicts permanent brachial plexus injury. Precipitous second stage is the most prevalent labor abnormality that is associated with shoulder dystocia.

  17. Novel Axillary Approach for Brachial Plexus in Robotic Surgery: A Cadaveric Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihangir Tetik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus surgery using the da Vinci surgical robot is a new procedure. Although the supraclavicular approach is a well known described and used procedure for robotic surgery, axillary approach was unknown for brachial plexus surgery. A cadaveric study was planned to evaluate the robotic axillary approach for brachial plexus surgery. Our results showed that robotic surgery is a very useful method and should be used routinely for brachial plexus surgery and particularly for thoracic outlet syndrome. However, we emphasize that new instruments should be designed and further studies are needed to evaluate in vivo results.

  18. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  19. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  20. Axillary Block as the Sole Anesthetic for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement in an Infant with Goldenhar Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Carmen Bernardo-Ocampo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of peripheral nerve block as the sole anesthetic in infants is not very common. Studies have demonstrated that ultrasound guided (USG peripheral nerve block is associated with higher overall success rate when compared with nerve stimulation (Rubin et al., 2009, and Gelfand et al., 2011. Described below is a medically complex infant who had an USG axillary brachial plexus block for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC placement.

  1. Interstitial cells of Cajal and Auerbach's plexus. A scanning electron microscopical study of guinea-pig small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Harry; Thuneberg, Lars

    1991-01-01

    Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy......Anatomy, interstitial cells of Cajal, myenteric plexus, small intestine, guinea-pig, scanning electron microscopy...

  2. Clearance of amyloid-β peptide across the choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvira-Botero, Ximena; Carro, Eva M

    2010-12-01

    Aging and several neurodegenerative diseases bring about changes in the anatomy and physiology of the choroid plexus. The identification of specific membrane receptors that bind and internalize extracellular ligands has revolutionized the traditional roles of this tissue. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ), the major constituent of the amyloid core of senile plaques in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is known to contribute to disease neuropathology and progression. Recent emphasis on comorbidity of AD and a deficient clearance of Aβ across the blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier have highlighted the importance of brain Aβ clearance in AD. The megalin receptor has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. Faulty Aβ clearance from the brain across the choroid plexus epithelium by megalin appears to mediate focal Aβ accumulation in AD. Patients with AD have reduced levels of megalin at the choroid plexus, which in turn seem to increase brain levels of Aβ through a decreased efflux of brain Aβ. Therapies that increase megalin expression at the choroid plexus could potentially control accumulation of brain Aβ. This review covers in depth the anatomy and function of the choroid plexus, focusing on the brain barrier at the choroid plexus, as it actively participates in Aβ clearance. In addition, we describe the role of the choroid plexus in brain functions, aging and AD, as well as the role of megalin in the process of Aβ clearance. Finally, we present current data on the use of choroid plexus cells to repair the damaged brain.

  3. Neurogenic effects of β-amyloid in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolos, Marta; Spuch, Carlos; Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Wandosell, Francisco; Ferrer, Isidro; Carro, Eva

    2013-08-01

    β-amyloid (Aβ) can promote neurogenesis, both in vitro and in vivo, by inducing neural progenitor cells to differentiate into neurons. The choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is burdened with amyloid deposits and hosts neuronal progenitor cells. However, neurogenesis in this brain tissue is not firmly established. To investigate this issue further, we examined the effect of Aβ on the neuronal differentiation of choroid plexus epithelial cells in several experimental models of AD. Here we show that Aβ regulates neurogenesis in vitro in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells as well as in vivo in the choroid plexus of APP/Ps1 mice. Treatment with oligomeric Aβ increased proliferation and differentiation of neuronal progenitor cells in cultured choroid plexus epithelial cells, but decreased survival of newly born neurons. These Aβ-induced neurogenic effects were also observed in choroid plexus of APP/PS1 mice, and detected also in autopsy tissue from AD patients. Analysis of signaling pathways revealed that pre-treating the choroid plexus epithelial cells with specific inhibitors of TyrK or MAPK diminished Aβ-induced neuronal proliferation. Taken together, our results support a role of Aβ in proliferation and differentiation in the choroid plexus epithelial cells in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, G.J. van; Moayeri, N.; Bruhn, J.; Scheffer, G.J.; Chan, V.W.; Groen, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  5. Correlation between ultrasound imaging, cross-sectional anatomy, and histology of the brachial plexus: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Geert J; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Jörgen; Scheffer, Gert J; Chan, Vincent W; Groen, Gerbrand J

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound sonoanatomy is provided.

  6. Correlation Between Ultrasound Imaging, Cross-Sectional Anatomy, and Histology of the Brachial Plexus A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Geert J.; Moayeri, Nizar; Bruhn, Joergen; Scheffer, Gert J.; Chan, Vincent W.; Groen, Gerbrand J.

    2009-01-01

    The anatomy of the brachial plexus is complex. To facilitate the understanding of the ultrasound appearance of the brachial plexus, we present a review of important anatomic considerations. A detailed correlation of reconstructed, cross-sectional gross anatomy and histology with ultrasound

  7. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  8. 3 T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: Structural and microstructural evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouhi, Ammar, E-mail: Ammar.Mallouhi@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Marik, Wolfgang, E-mail: Wolfgang.Marik@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Prayer, Daniela, E-mail: Daniela.Prayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kainberger, Franz, E-mail: Franz.Kainberger@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bodner, Gerd, E-mail: Gerd.Bodner@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kasprian, Gregor, E-mail: Gregor.Kasprian@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Radiology, Division of Neuroradiology and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-09-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus.

  9. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, J.A.; Beckerman, H.; de Groot, V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Method: Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the

  10. Brachial plexus variations in its formation and main branches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Paula Sassoli Fazan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The brachial plexus has a complex anatomical structure since its origin in the neck throughout its course in the axillary region. It also has close relationship to important anatomic structures what makes it an easy target of a sort of variations and provides its clinical and surgical importance. The aims of the present study were to describe the brachial plexus anatomical variations in origin and respective branches, and to correlate these variations with sex, color of the subjects and side of the body. METHODS: Twenty-seven adult cadavers separated into sex and color had their brachial plexuses evaluated on the right and left sides. RESULTS: Our results are extensive and describe a large number of variations, including some that have not been reported in the literature. Our results showed that the phrenic nerve had a complete origin from the plexus in 20% of the cases. In this way, a lesion of the brachial plexus roots could result in diaphragm palsy. It is not usual that the long thoracic nerve pierces the scalenus medius muscle but it occurred in 63% of our cases. Another observation was that the posterior cord was formed by the posterior divisions of the superior and middle trunks in 9%. In these cases, the axillary and the radial nerves may not receive fibers from C7 and C8, as usually described. CONCLUSION: Finally, the plexuses studied did not show that sex, color or side of the body had much if any influence upon the presence of variations.OBJETIVOS: O plexo braquial apresenta uma estrutura anatômica complexa, desde sua origem, no pescoço, até sua ramificação terminal, na região axilar. Ele também apresenta relações importantes com outras estruturas anatômicas locais, o que o torna vulnerável ao aparecimento de uma série de variações anatômicas, marcando sua importância clínica e cirúrgica. Os objetivos desse estudo foram de descrever as variações anatômicas do plexo braquial, desde sua origem até seus

  11. 76 FR 59767 - Plexus Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-27

    ... ADMINISTRATION Plexus Fund II, L.P.; Notice Seeking Exemption Under Section 312 of the Small Business Investment Act, Conflicts of Interest Notice is hereby given that Plexus Fund II, L.P., 200 Providence Road... Business Administration (``SBA'') Rules and Regulations (13 CFR 107.730). Plexus II, L.P., proposes to...

  12. Trapezius transfer to treat flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz Humberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After severe brachial palsy involving the shoulder, many different muscle transfers have been advocated to restore movement and stability of the shoulder. Paralysis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles can be treated by transfer of the trapezius. Methods We treated 10 patients, 8 males and 2 females, by transfer of the trapezius to the proximal humerus. In 6 patients the C5 and C6 roots had been injuried; in one C5, C6 and C7 roots; and 3 there were complete brachial plexus injuries. Eight of the 10 had had neurosurgical repairs before muscle transfer. Their average age was 28.3 years (range 17 to 41, the mean delay between injury and transfer was 3.1 years (range 14 months to 6.3 years and the average follow-up was 17.5 months (range 6 to 52, reporting the clinical and radiological results. Evaluation included physical and radiographic examinations. A modification of Mayer's transfer of the trapezius muscle was performed. The principal goal of this work was to evaluate the results of the trapezius transfer for flail shoulder after brachial plexus injury. Results All 10 patients had improved function with a decrease in instability of the shoulder. The average gain in shoulder abduction was 46.2°; the gain in shoulder flexion average 37.4°. All patients had stable shoulder (no subluxation of the humeral head on radiographs. Conclusion Trapezius transfer for a flail shoulder after brachial plexus palsy can provide satisfactory function and stability.

  13. Spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S H; Lee, J S; Kim, Y H; Kim, T W; Kwon, K M

    2017-06-27

    We investigated the spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). A total of 25 cases of non-operated traumatic BPI were analysed by retrospective review of medical records; in all cases, consecutive electrodiagnostic studies (ES) were conducted from 1 to 4 months and 18 to 24 months post-trauma. Injury severity was assessed using a modified version of Dumitru and Wilbourn's scale (DWS) based on ES. Spontaneous recovery of brachial plexus components per subject was analysed using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A two-tailed Fisher's exact or Pearson's Chi-square test was used to examine the associations between initial injury severity (DWS grade 2 vs. 3, complete vs. incomplete), accompanying injury type (open vs. closed), main lesion location (supraclavicular vs. infraclavicular lesion), and spontaneous recovery. The most common cause of BPI was traffic accident (TA) (15 cases, 60%), and the most common type of TA-induced BPI was a motorcycle TA (5 cases), accounting for 20% of all injuries. The second most common type of injury was an occupational injury (6 cases, 24%). Thirty-eight (69%) of 55 injured brachial components in 25 cases had DWS grade 3 and 17 brachial components (31%) had grade 2. The DWS grade of brachial plexus components per subject significantly differed between the first and follow-up ES (p = 0.000). However, initial injury severity, accompanying injury type, and main lesion location were not statistically associated with spontaneous recovery (p > 0.05). Spontaneous recovery may be possible even in severe traumatic BPI. Multiple factors should be considered when predicting the clinical course of traumatic BPI.

  14. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. Methods To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. Results The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. Conclusion The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative

  15. Dendritic outgrowth of myenteric plexus neurons in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, M W; Romanchuk, G; Flowe, K

    1992-04-01

    Myenteric plexus neurons derived from neonatal guinea pigs, when exposed to serum, demonstrated a characteristic pattern of growth, including a proliferating outgrowth zone of glial cells, peripheral extension of dendritic processes, and progressive dendritic growth. Serum effects upon dendritic growth, measured morphometrically, was strongly dose- and temporally dependent. Dendritic density was increased 10-fold (120 hr) by the addition of 6% serum, while mean dendritic length was increased 3-fold. Development of cholinergic function was reflected by release of [3H]ACh in response to cholecystokinin octapeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (10(-10) and 10(-8) M).

  16. The basiepithelial nerve plexus of the viscera and coelom of eleutherozoan Echinodermata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J L; Raymond, A M

    1979-10-02

    The organisation of the basiepithelial nerve plexus in the alimentary canal of a starfish and the water vascular system of a sea-urchin is described. The plexus contains varicose aminergic neurones which terminate adjacent to the ciliated epithelial cells. It is proposed that the basiepithelial plexus innervates these cells and controls ciliary beating. The distribution of the basiepithelial plexus in various tissues described by other workers is discussed particularly in relation to whether it is the coelomic epithelium or the luminal epithelium which is innervated. It is concluded that where there is both an endothelium and a coelomic epithelium only one is innervated. The muscles, where present, of the viscera are innervated by a separate nervous system. The muscles are always on the opposite side of the non-cellular connective tissue sheath to the basiepithelial plexus.

  17. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Heart block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007658.htm Heart block To use the sharing features on this page, ... Date 4/16/2017 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of ...

  19. Brachial plexus injury in Thailand: a report of 520 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songcharoen, P

    1995-01-01

    Between October 1984 and October 1993, 520 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injuries were treated at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok. There were 486 male and 34 female patients. Eighty-two percent of the injuries were caused by motorcycle accidents, 9% by other traffic accidents, and 9% by gunshot, stabbing, and other means. The initial physical examination revealed 332 (63.8%) complete paralyses and 88 (36.2%) incomplete paralyses. One hundred twenty-seven patients were treated conservatively, 43 patients were observed before definitive treatment was given, and 350 patients were treated by operative means. Four hundred and twenty-one surgical procedures were performed, consisting of 314 neurotisations (250 spinal accessory, 14 plexo-plexal, 21 intercostal, 21 phrenic, 4 cervical plexus, 1 long thoracic, and 3 neuromuscular), 38 neurolyses, 23 nerve grafting, 16 free muscle transfers combined with neurotisations, and 30 musculotendinous transfers. Motor functional recovery of patients followed up for more than 2 years was evaluated. Nerve grafting gave 82% good (more than MRC grade 3) and 18% fair and poor recovery. Neurolysis gave 69% good and 31% fair and poor recovery. In patients with neurotisation, the spinal accessory (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculotaneous) intercostal (to musculotaneous), phrenic (to suprascapular, axillary, and musculocutaneous), and plexo- plexal methods gave a significant number of good results.

  20. Papiloma de los plexos coroideos Papilloma of choroid plexuses

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    Ivón Aimé Sánchez Monterrey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Los papilomas de los plexos coroideos son tumores infrecuentes de origen neuroectodérmico, que representan menos del 5 % del total de los tumores del sistema nervioso central en pediatría. La clínica suele estar provocada por el aumento de presión intracraneal debido a la hidrocefalia, con la que habitualmente cursan. La cirugía es curativa, con un porcentaje de supervivencia de casi el 100 % a los 5 años y ocasionales recurrencias. Se presenta el caso de un recién nacido con diagnóstico de papiloma de los plexos coroideos y evolución favorable.The papillomas of choroid plexuses are non-frequent tumors of neuroectoderm origin accounting for the less of the 5 % of total of tumors of the central nervous system (CNS in children. The clinic may be caused by the increase of the intracranial pressure due to the usually present hydrocephalus. The surgery is curative with a survival percentage of almost the 100 % at 5 years and occasional recurrences. This is the case of a newborn diagnosed with papilloma of choroid plexuses and a favorable evolution.

  1. Rapid, automated mosaicking of the human corneal subbasal nerve plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishnav, Yash J; Rucker, Stuart A; Saharia, Keshav; McNamara, Nancy A

    2017-11-27

    Corneal confocal microscopy (CCM) is an in vivo technique used to study corneal nerve morphology. The largest proportion of nerves innervating the cornea lie within the subbasal nerve plexus, where their morphology is altered by refractive surgery, diabetes and dry eye. The main limitations to clinical use of CCM as a diagnostic tool are the small field of view of CCM images and the lengthy time needed to quantify nerves in collected images. Here, we present a novel, rapid, fully automated technique to mosaic individual CCM images into wide-field maps of corneal nerves. We implemented an OpenCV image stitcher that accounts for corneal deformation and uses feature detection to stitch CCM images into a montage. The method takes 3-5 min to process and stitch 40-100 frames on an Amazon EC2 Micro instance. The speed, automation and ease of use conferred by this technique is the first step toward point of care evaluation of wide-field subbasal plexus (SBP) maps in a clinical setting.

  2. Imaging of the lumbosacral plexus. Diagnostics and treatment planning with high-resolution procedures; Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis. Diagnostik und Therapieplanung mithilfe hochaufgeloester Verfahren

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    Jengojan, S.; Schellen, C.; Bodner, G.; Kasprian, G. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2017-03-15

    Technical advances in magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound-based neurography nowadays facilitate the radiological assessment of the lumbosacral plexus. Anatomy and imaging of the lumbosacral plexus and diagnostics of the most common pathologies. Description of the clinically feasible combination of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound diagnostics, case-based illustration of imaging techniques and individual advantages of MRI and ultrasound-based diagnostics for various pathologies of the lumbosacral plexus and its peripheral nerves. High-resolution ultrasound-based neurography (HRUS) is particularly valuable for the assessment of superficial structures of the lumbosacral plexus. Depending on the examiner's experience, anatomical variations of the sciatic nerve (e. g. relevant in piriformis syndrome) as well as more subtle variations, for example as seen in neuritis, can be sonographically depicted and assessed. The use of MRI enables the diagnostic evaluation of more deeply located nerve structures, such as the pudendal and the femoral nerves. Modern MRI techniques, such as peripheral nerve tractography allow three-dimensional depiction of the spatial relationship between nerves and local tumors or traumatic alterations. This can be beneficial for further therapy planning. The anatomy and pathology of the lumbosacral plexus can be reliably imaged by the meaningful combination of MRI and ultrasound-based high resolution neurography. (orig.) [German] Durch technische Fortschritte im Bereich der magnetresonanz- (MR-) und ultraschallbasierten Neurographie ist der Plexus lumbosacralis heute der radiologischen Abklaerung zugaenglich. Anatomie und Bildgebung des Plexus lumbosacralis, Abklaerung der haeufigsten Pathologien. Erlaeuterung der klinisch sinnvollen Kombination von MR- und Ultraschalldiagnostik, Darstellung der Untersuchungstechniken und der jeweiligen Vorteile von MRT und Ultraschall anhand fallbasierter Praesentation unterschiedlicher

  3. Preservation of hypogastric artery blood flow during endovascular aneurysm repair of an abdominal aortic aneurysm with bilateral common and internal iliac artery involvement: utilization of off-the-shelf stent-graft components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesenman, Paul J; Ricotta, Joseph J; Veeraswamy, Ravi K

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old male presented with a 7.4-cm abdominal aortic aneurysm with bilateral common and internal iliac involvement. To maintain pelvic perfusion, preservation of the patient's left hypogastric artery (HA) was pursued. Two weeks after right HA embolization, endovascular repair of the patient's aneurysms was performed using a branched endograft approach. A 22-mm main body bifurcated endograft was unsheathed and the proximal covered stent was removed. The contralateral gate was preloaded with a wire and catheter. The device was resheathed and placed in the left common iliac artery. The preloaded wire in the contralateral gate was snared from the right side, establishing through-and-through femoral access. A contralateral femoral sheath was advanced up and over the aortic bifurcation from the right side into the contralateral gate of the bifurcated endograft. The repair was bridged to the left HA using a balloon-expandable stent-graft, followed by standard endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Completion angiography demonstrated exclusion of patient's aneurysms, without evidence of endoleak, and maintenance of pelvic blood flow through the left HA. The patient recovered without complication and was discharged home on postoperative day 4. This technique illustrates the technical feasibility of using a preloaded commercially available endograft to preserve HA blood flow and maintain pelvic perfusion during endovascular aortic aneurysm repair. Copyright © 2012 Annals of Vascular Surgery Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuch, Carlos; Carro, Eva

    2011-05-11

    The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR.

  5. Contribution of plexus MRI in the diagnosis of atypical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Lacour, Marie-Christine; Vandendries, Christophe; Théaudin, Marie; Cauquil, Cécile; Denier, Christian; Lacroix, Catherine; Adams, David

    2016-01-15

    Nerve enlargement has early been recognized in CIDP and plexus MRI hypertrophy has been reported in typical CIDP cases. Our aim is to determine plexus MRI value in the diagnosis of CIDP with an initial atypical presentation, which, up to now, has not been demonstrated. Retrospective study of 33 consecutive patients suspected of CIDP. Plexus MRI was performed on the most affected territory (brachial or lumbar). Were assessed: plexus trophicity, T2-STIR signal intensity and gadolinium enhancement. Final CIDP diagnosis was made after comprehensive workup. A histo-radiological correlation was performed. Final CIDP diagnosis was made in 25 (76%) including 21 with initial atypical clinical presentation. Eleven CIDP patients (52%) with initial atypical clinical presentation had abnormal plexus MRI including 9 suggestive of CIDP (43%) and none of the patients with an alternative diagnosis. Hypertrophy of the proximal plexus and/or extraforaminal roots was found in 8 cases and Gadolinium enhancement in 2 cases. Abnormalities were more frequent on brachial (86%) than lumbosacral MRIs (29%) and asymmetrical (72%) and most often associated with histological signs of demyelination. The nerve biopsy was suggestive of CIDP in 9/13 patients with normal MRI. Plexus MRI seems useful in the diagnostic strategy of patients with suspicion of CIDP with atypical presentation. Nerve biopsy remains important when other investigations are inconclusive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The p75 neurotrophin receptor localization in blood-CSF barrier: expression in choroid plexus epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The presence of neurotrophins and their receptors Trk family has been reported in the choroid plexus. High levels of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), Neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) and TrkB receptor were detected, while nothing was know about p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. In neurons, p75NTR receptor has a dual function: promoting survival together with TrkA in response to NGF, and inducing apoptotic signaling through p75NTR. We postulated that p75NTR may also affect the survival pathways in the choroid plexus and also undergoes regulated proteolysis with metalloproteases. Results Here, we demonstrated the presence of p75NTR receptor in the choroid plexus epithelial cells. The p75NTR receptor would be involved in cell death mechanisms and in the damaged induced by amyloid beta (Aβ) in the choroid plexus and finally, we propose an essential role of p75NTR in the Aβ transcytosis through out choroid plexus barrier. Conclusions The presence analysis reveals the new localization of p75NTR in the choroid plexus and, the distribution mainly in the cytoplasm and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) side of the epithelial cells. We propose that p75NTR receptor plays a role in the survival pathways and Aβ-induced cell death. These data suggest that p75NTR dysfunction play an important role in the pathogenesis of brain diseases. The importance and novelty of this expression expands a new role of p75NTR. PMID:21569322

  7. Lipomas of the Brachial Plexus: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Alexander; Yang, Kai; King, David; Dzwierzynski, William; Sanger, James; Hettinger, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    Lipomas are common benign tumors. When they develop in proximity to peripheral nerves, they can cause neurologic symptoms secondary to mass effect. Previous reports have shown symptom resolution after removal of lipomas compressing various upper extremity peripheral nerves. However, brachial plexus lipomas are relatively rare. Our multidisciplinary experience with brachial plexus lipoma resection is reviewed in the largest case series to date. A retrospective chart review of all patients undergoing resection of brachial plexus lipomatous tumors between 2006 and 2016 was performed. Patient demographic data, diagnostic imaging, clinical presentation, operative details, surgical pathology, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Twelve brachial plexus lipomatous tumors were resected in 11 patients: 10 lipomas, 1 hibernoma, and 1 atypical lipomatous tumor. The most common tumor location was supraclavicular (50%), followed by axillary (42%), and proximal medial arm (8%). The most common brachial plexus segment involved was the upper trunk (50%), followed by posterior cord (25%), lateral pectoral nerve (8%), lower trunk (8%), and proximal median nerve (8%). Most patients presented with an enlarging painless mass (58%). Of the patients who presented with neurologic symptoms, symptoms resolved in the majority (80%). Brachial plexus lipomas are rare causes of compression neuropathy in the upper extremity. Careful resection and knowledge of brachial plexus anatomy, which may be distorted by the tumor, are critical to achieving a successful surgical outcome with predictable symptom resolution. Finally, surveillance magnetic resonance imaging may be warranted for atypical lesions.

  8. Anatomy of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Tyler S; Johnson, Marjorie; Power, Adam; Power, Nicholas E; Allman, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that the aortic plexus is a network of pre- and post-ganglionic nerves overlying the abdominal aorta, which is primarily involved with the sympathetic innervation to the mesenteric, pelvic and urogenital organs. Because a comprehensive anatomical description of the aortic plexus and its connections with adjacent plexuses are lacking, these delicate structures are prone to unintended damage during abdominal surgeries. Through dissection of fresh, frozen human cadavers (n = 7), the present study aimed to provide the first complete mapping of the nerves and ganglia of the aortic plexus in males. Using standard histochemical procedures, ganglia of the aortic plexus were verified through microscopic analysis using haematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase stains. All specimens exhibited four distinct sympathetic ganglia within the aortic plexus: the right and left spermatic ganglia, the inferior mesenteric ganglion and one previously unidentified ganglion, which has been named the prehypogastric ganglion by the authors. The spermatic ganglia were consistently supplied by the L1 lumbar splanchnic nerves and the inferior mesenteric ganglion and the newly characterized prehypogastric ganglion were supplied by the left and right L2 lumbar splanchnic nerves, respectively. Additionally, our examination revealed the aortic plexus does have potential for variation, primarily in the possibility of exhibiting accessory splanchnic nerves. Clinically, our results could have significant implications for preserving fertility in men as well as sympathetic function to the hindgut and pelvis during retroperitoneal surgeries. PMID:25382240

  9. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  10. Brachial and lumbar plexuses in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy: MRI assessment including apparent diffusion coefficient

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    Adachi, Yuko; Sato, Noriko; Yamashita, Fumio; Kida, Jiro; Takahashi, Tomoyuki [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Radiology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Okamoto, Tomoko [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Masayuki; Komaki, Hirofumi [National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Department of Child Neurology, Kodaira, Tokyo (Japan); Matsuda, Hiroshi [Saitama Medial University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Iruma-gun, Saitama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Our purpose was to clarify the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of the brachial and lumbar plexuses in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) using various kinds of sequences, including diffusion-weighted images (DWI). We evaluated the MR imaging findings for lumbar and/or brachial nerve plexuses in 13 CIDP patients and 11 normal volunteers. The nerve swelling was evaluated in comparison with normal controls by coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR), and signal abnormalities were evaluated by coronal STIR, T1-weighted images, and DWIs. The degrees of contrast enhancement and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the plexus were also assessed. In the patient group, diffuse enlargement and abnormally high signals were detected in 16 out of 24 plexuses (66.7%) on STIR, a slightly high signal was detected in 12 of 24 plexuses (50%) on T1-weighted images, and a high-intensity signal was detected in 10 of 18 plexuses (55.6%) on DWIs with high ADC values. Contrast enhancement of the plexuses was revealed in 6 of 19 plexuses (31.6%) and was mild in all cases. There were statistically significant differences between the ADC values of patients with either swelling or abnormal signals and those of both normal volunteers and patients without neither swelling nor abnormal signals. There were no relationships between MR imaging and any clinical findings. STIR is sufficient to assist clinicians in diagnosing CIDP. T1-weighted images and DWIs seemed useful for speculating about the pathological changes in swollen plexuses in CIDP patients. (orig.)

  11. Pathological alteration in the choroid plexus of Alzheimer's disease: implication for new therapy approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Carro, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Morphological alterations of choroid plexus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been extensively investigated. These changes include epithelial atrophy, thickening of the basement membrane, and stroma fibrosis. As a result, synthesis, secretory, and transportation functions are significantly altered resulting in decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) turnover. Recent studies discuss the potential impacts of these changes, including the possibility of reduced resistance to stress insults and slow clearance of toxic compounds from CSF with specific reference to the amyloid peptide. Here, we review new evidences for AD-related changes in the choroid plexus. The data suggest that the significantly altered functions of the choroid plexus contribute to the multiparametric pathogenesis of late-onset AD.

  12. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, R

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Professor Birch argues for early exploration of the brachial plexus as the optimum both to delineate the pathology and undertake reconstructive surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Development of the lateral ventricular choroid plexus in a marsupial, Monodelphis domestica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandeBerg John L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choroid plexus epithelial cells are the site of blood/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF barrier and regulate molecular transfer between the two compartments. Their mitotic activity in the adult is low. During development, the pattern of growth and timing of acquisition of functional properties of plexus epithelium are not known. Methods Numbers and size of choroid plexus epithelial cells and their nuclei were counted and measured in the lateral ventricular plexus from the first day of its appearance until adulthood. Newborn Monodelphis pups were injected with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU at postnatal day 3 (P3, P4 and P5. Additional animals were injected at P63, P64 and P65. BrdU-immunopositive nuclei were counted and their position mapped in the plexus structure at different ages after injections. Double-labelling immunocytochemistry with antibodies to plasma protein identified post-mitotic cells involved in protein transfer. Results Numbers of choroid plexus epithelial cells increased 10-fold between the time of birth and adulthood. In newborn pups each consecutive injection of BrdU labelled 20-40 of epithelial cells counted. After 3 injections, numbers of BrdU positive cells remained constant for at least 2 months. BrdU injections at an older age (P63, P64, P65 resulted in a smaller number of labelled plexus cells. Numbers of plexus cells immunopositive for both BrdU and plasma protein increased with age indicating that protein transferring properties are acquired post mitotically. Labelled nuclei were only detected on the dorsal arm of the plexus as it grows from the neuroependyma, moving along the structure in a 'conveyor belt' like fashion. Conclusions The present study established that lateral ventricular choroid plexus epithelial cells are born on the dorsal side of the structure only. Cells born in the first few days after choroid plexus differentiation from the neuroependyma remain present even two months later. Protein

  14. Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Meng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To report a rare case of atypical choroid plexus papilloma and explore its clinical presentations and histopathological features, at the same time to take a review of relevant literature. Methods and Results A 1-year-old male patient presented with vomiting for 3 days after a sudden tumbling. Computed Tomography (CT showed a space-occupying lesion located in the left lateral ventricle. The lesion was with slight hyper-intensity signal compared to the adjacent brain parenchyma. Left lateral ventricle was enlarged and hydrocephalus was visible. Besides, edema occured in adjacent cerebral tissues. The surgical operation was performed under general anesthesia. During the operation, the tumor tissue was in heterogeneous consistency and rich blood supply, showing grey-white color, and attached to the choroid plexus. Microscopically, most tumor cells grew around the fibrovascular axis forming papillary pattern and showed no obvious atypia. However, in some areas, solid and sheet-like patterns were identified. Within these areas, increased cell density, mild to moderate cellular atypia and focal necrosis were appreciated. Some cells with acidophilic cytoplasm, few giant tumor cells and accidental mitosis were also seen, and the counting of mitosis was 2/10 HPF. Immunohistochemistry showed positive expression of pancytokeratin (PCK, synaptophysin (Syn, cytokeratin (CK8/18, vimentin (Vim and podoplanin (D2-40 in tumor cells. Integrase interactor-1 (INI-1 were also positively and focally expressed. The Ki-67 labeling index of tumor cells was 8% . S-100 protein, CK19, neuronal nuclei (Neu-N, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, chromogranin A (CgA, CK7 and CK20 were negatively stained. The patient was followed up for 6 months after operation and no recurrence was found. Conclusion Atypical choroid plexus papilloma, the biological behavior of which is between benignancy and malignancy, is one of the rare tumors

  15. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial.

  16. Brachial plexus injury in adults: Diagnosis and surgical treatment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Mukund R.; Babhulkar, Sonali; Hiremath, Amita

    2013-01-01

    Adult post traumatic Brachial plexus injury is unfortunately a rather common injury in young adults. In India the most common scenario is of a young man injured in a motorcycle accident. Exact incidence figures are not available but of the injuries presenting to us about 90% invole the above combination This article reviews peer-reviewed publications including clinical papers, review articles and Meta analysis of the subject. In addition, the authors′ experience of several hundred cases over the last 15 years has been added and has influenced the ultimate text. Results have been discussed and analysed to get an idea of factors influencing final recovery. It appears that time from injury and number of roots involved are most crucial. PMID:23661959

  17. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-27

    The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further guideline development and multicentre research. A structured

  18. Radiation-induced brachial plexus neuropathy in breast cancer patients

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    Olsen, N.K.; Pfeiffer, P.; Mondrup, K.; Rose, C. (Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Neurology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Oncology R)

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and latency period of radiation-induced brachial plexopathy (RBP) were assessed in 79 breast cancer patients by a neurological follow-up examination at least 60 months (range 67-130 months) after the primary treatment. All patients were treated primarily with simple mastectomy, axillary nodal sampling and radiotherapy (RT). Postoperatively, pre- and postmenopausal patients were randomly allocated chemotherapy for antiestrogen treatment. All patients were recurrence-free at time of examination. Clinically, 35% (25-47%) of the patients had RBP; 19% (11-29%) had definite RBP, i.e. were physically disabled, and 16% (9-26%) had probable RBP. Fifty percent (31-69%) had affection of the entire plexus, 18% (7-35%) of the upper trunk only, and 4% (1-18%) of the lower trunk. In 28% (14-48%) of cases assessment of a definite level was not possible. RBP was more common after radiotherapy and chemotherapy (42%) than after radiotherapy alone (26%) but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The incidence of definite RBP was significantly higher in the younger age group (p = 0.02). This could be due to more extensive axillary surgery but also to the fact that chemotherapy was given to most premenopausal patients. In most patients with RBP the symptoms began during or immediately after radiotherapy, and were thus without significant latency. Chemotherapy might enhance the radiation-induced effect on nerve tissue, thus diminishing the latency period. Lymphedema was present in 22% (14-32%), especially in the older patients, and not associated with the development of RBP. In conclusion, the damaging effect of RT on peripheral nerve tissue was documented. Since no successful treatment is available, restricted use of RT to the brachial plexus is warranted, especially when administered concomitantly with cytotoxic therapy. (orig.).

  19. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

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    Van de Velde, Joris, E-mail: joris.vandevelde@ugent.be [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoof, Tom [Department of Anatomy, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  20. Neurolymphomatosis of Brachial Plexus in Patients with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Jun Choi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurolymphomatosis (NL is a rare clinical disease where neoplastic cells invade the cranial nerves and peripheral nerve roots, plexus, or other nerves in patients with hematologic malignancy. Most NL cases are caused by B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Diagnosis can be made by imaging with positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. We experienced two cases of NL involving the brachial plexus in patients with NHL. One patient, who had NHL with central nervous system (CNS involvement, experienced complete remission after 8 cycles of R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy but relapsed into NL of the brachial plexus 5 months later. The other patient, who suffered from primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, had been undergoing chemoradiotherapy but progressed to NL of the brachial plexus.

  1. COMPLICATIONS DURING A SUPRACLAVICULAR ANESTHESIA OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS WITH INTERSCALENE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minko Minkov

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A hemidiaphragmatic paresis is one of the most frequently observed complications following the supraclavicular anesthesia of the brachial plexus with interscalene approach. In patients, crucially dependant on adequate diaphragmatic function, hemidiaphragmatic paresis may provoke acute respiratory disturbances. The aim of this study was to analyze the anatomical features the brachial plexus with regard of the anesthesia of specific areas of the shoulder and the upper limb.A dissection of the cervical and the brachial plexuses was done in human cadavers. We established that in some cases the phrenic nerve and the accessory phrenic nerve arise from the superior trunk of the brachial plexus. This type of anatomical arrangement significantly increases the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis during supraclavicular anesthesia with interscalene approach because the anesthetic tends to invade the supraclavicular space.

  2. Nerve reconstruction: A cohort study of 93 cases of global brachial plexus palsy

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    Anil Bhatia

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: Acceptable function (restoration of biceps power ≥3 can be obtained in more than two thirds (73% of these global brachial plexus injuries by using the principles of early exploration and nerve transfer with rehabilitation.

  3. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  4. La prise en charge de la paralysie obstétricale du plexus brachial du ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Averagely, evaluations of the results were uncertain due to a high drop out rate. And finally the authors suggest that prevention should be refrained in our African context. Keywords: Physiotherapy – Obstetrical paralysis- Brachial plexus – Infancy ...

  5. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  6. Neonatal brachial plexus injury: comparison of incidence and antecedents between 2 decades.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Jennifer M

    2011-04-01

    We sought to compare the incidence and antecedents of neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI) in 2 different 5-year epochs a decade apart following the introduction of specific staff training in the management of shoulder dystocia.

  7. Paravertebral Block Plus Thoracic Wall Block versus Paravertebral Block Alone for Analgesia of Modified Radical Mastectomy: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Liang Li

    Full Text Available Paravertebral block placement was the main anesthetic technique for modified radical mastectomy in our hospital until February 2014, when its combination with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature was initiated. We compared the analgesic effects of paravertebral blocks with or without blocks targeting the pectoral musculature for modified radical mastectomy.We retrospectively collected data from a single surgeon and anesthesiologist from June 1, 2012, to May 31, 2015. Intraoperative sedatives and analgesic requirements, time to the first analgesic request, postoperative analgesic doses, patient satisfaction, and complications were compared.Fifty-four patients received a paravertebral block alone (PECS 0, and 46 received a paravertebral block combined with blocks targeting the pectoral musculature (PECS 1. The highest intraoperative effect-site concentration of propofol was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group than in the PECS 0 group [2.3 (1.5, 2.8 vs 2.5 (1.5, 4 μg/mL, p = 0.0014]. The intraoperative rescue analgesic dose was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group [0 (0, 25 vs 0 (0, 75 mg of ketamine, p = 0.0384]. Furthermore, the PECS 1 group had a significantly longer time to the first analgesic request [636.5 (15, 720 vs 182.5 (14, 720 min, p = 0.0001]. After further adjustment for age, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status classification, chronic pain history, incidence of a superficial cervical plexus block placement, and operation duration, blocks targeting the pectoral musculature were determined to be the only significant factor (hazard ratio, 0.36; 95% confidence interval, 0.23-0.58; p < 0.0001. Very few patients used potent analgesics including morphine and ketorolac; the cumulative use of morphine or ketorolac was similar in the study groups. However, the incidence of all analgesic use, namely morphine, ketorolac, acetaminophen, and celecoxib, was significantly lower in the PECS 1 group [3

  8. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C.; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z.; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I.; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T.

    2013-01-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and oncogenic pathways associated with this disease. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted to identify manuscripts discussing the clinical, molecular, and genetic features of choroid plexus papillomas. Articles concerning diagnosis, treatment, and long-term patient outcomes were also reviewed. The introduction of atypical choroid plexus papilloma as a distinct entity has increased the need for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. Advances in immunohistochemical staining have improved our ability to differentiate choroid plexus papillomas from other intracranial tumors or metastatic lesions using combinations of key markers and mitotic indices. Recent findings have implicated Notch3 signaling, the transcription factor TWIST1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and the tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand pathway in choroid plexus papilloma tumorigenesis. A combination of commonly occurring chromosomal duplications and deletions has also been identified. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be considered for recurrent or metastatic lesions. While generally considered benign, these tumors possess a complex biology that sheds insight into other choroid plexus tumors, particularly malignant choroid plexus carcinomas. Improving our understanding of the molecular biology, genetics, and oncogenic pathways associated with this tumor will allow for the development of targeted therapies and improved outcomes for patients with this disease. PMID:23172371

  10. Choroid plexus epithelial monolayers ? a cell culture model from porcine brain

    OpenAIRE

    Reichel Valeska; Baehr Carsten; Fricker Gert

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The goal of the present study was to develop an in vitro choroid plexus (CP) epithelial cell culture model for studying transport of protein-mediated drug secretion from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and vice versa. Methods Cells were isolated by mechanical and enzymatic treatment of freshly isolated porcine plexus tissue. Epithelial cell monolayers were grown and CSF secretion and transepithelial resistance were determined. The expression of f-actin as well as the ch...

  11. Associations of prenatally detected choroid plexus cysts with biochemical risk for congenital disorders

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    Danielius Serapinas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: C horoid plexus cysts are one of the foetus ultrasonography findings that raise parents’ concerns about their child’s health. Usually cysts are found in an estimated 1% all performed ultrasonographies. Aim of the research: To evaluate the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect when choroid plexus cysts are found. Material and methods : The risks of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect were calculated by using second-trimester biomarkers (a-fetoprotein, human choriongonadotropin, unconjugated estriol for patients with choroid plexus cysts. A control group was selected randomly with calculated risks and without any abnormal ultrasonography findings. These risks were compared between the two groups. Results: Twelve pregnancies with diagnosed choroid plexus cysts were included in this study during the year 2012. Choroid plexus cyst findings during this case/control study have shown that only one case from the test group had progressed to more serious foetal aberrations (Edward’s syndrome; nonetheless, this progression did not influence statistically significant changes in the test and control groups. No statistically significant changes between the risks of disorders according the PRISCA method were observed in the appearance of Down syndrome or neural tube defect.  Conclusions : There is no data that choroid plexus cysts increase the risk of Down syndrome, Edward’s syndrome and neural tube defect.

  12. Anatomical visualization of neural course and distribution of anterior ascending aortic plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Sato, Fumi

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to document the detailed anatomy of neural course and distribution on the anterior ascending aorta, to identify the high and low density areas of the anterior ascending aortic plexus for further understandings in cardiovascular surgery. The embalmed hearts of 42 elderly individuals were submacroscopically and microscopically examined, after excluding any that were macroscopically abnormal. With its origins in the anterior ascending aortic plexus, the right coronary plexus substantially innervated the right coronary artery, the right atrium and ventricle, and the sinus node. The intensive neural area extending from 10 mm lateral to the interatrial groove below the pericardial reflection as far as the right coronary artery opening contained almost all the right coronary plexus in 61.3% of patients, and more than 40.9% of the total nerve volume of the anterior ascending aortic plexus. Our findings suggest that the most superior and lateral area on the ascending aorta show the lowest neural density of right coronary component in the anterior ascending aortic plexus and the high density areas are invisible in right lateral field of view as seen in the right trans-axillary MICS approach.

  13. Utility of ultrasound in noninvasive preoperative workup of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Di Pietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound has been utilized in the evaluation of compressive and traumatic peripheral nerve pathology. To determine whether US can provide comprehensive evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in the setting of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and whether this information can be used to guide preoperative nerve reconstruction strategies. In this retrospective cohort study, preoperative brachial plexus ultrasonography was performed in 52 children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who were being considered for surgery. The 33 children who had surgery compose the patient cohort. The presence and location of post-ganglionic neuromas were evaluated by US and compared to the surgical findings. US evaluation of shoulder muscle atrophy was conducted as an indirect way to assess the integrity of nerves. Finally, we correlated glenohumeral joint laxity to surgical and clinical management. Ultrasound correctly identified 21 of 25 cases of upper trunk and middle trunk neuroma involvement (84% sensitivity for each). It was 68% sensitive and 40% specific in detection of lower trunk involvement. US identified shoulder muscle atrophy in 11 of 21 children evaluated; 8 of these 11 went on to nerve transfer procedures based upon the imaging findings. US identified 3 cases of shoulder joint laxity of the 13 children evaluated. All 3 cases were referred for orthopedic evaluation, with 1 child undergoing shoulder surgery and another requiring casting. Ultrasound can provide useful preoperative evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  14. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  15. [Interscalene block combined with general anesthesia under spontaneous breathing in a patient with a giant bulla].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Takeshi; Akiyoshi, Rumiko; Kato, Rina; Sasano, Hiroshi; Sobue, Kazuya

    2011-09-01

    Respiratory management for patients with a giant bulla during anesthesia should avoid positive-pressure ventilation to reduce the risk of barotraumas. We report a case of anesthetic management of a 42-year-old man with a giant bulla who had an elective surgery for biopsy of a tumor on his left elbow. Balanced anesthesia consisting of general anesthesia was given under spontaneous breathing combined with interscalene brachial plexus blockade for intra- and postoperative analgesia for the elbow surgery. The patient was monitored by electrocardiography, non-invasive arterial pressure, SpO2, endtidal CO2 tension and bispectral index. Ultrasound-guided interscalene block was performed with the patient awake. After injection of 0.75% ropivacaine 20 ml and 1% lidocaine 16 ml for brachial plexus block, general anesthesia was induced with a bolus of fentanyl 100 microg to reduce cough reflex and propofol using target control infusion with a 2 microg x ml(-1) plasma concentration. The airway was maintained with a size 4 LMA-Proseal, which was inserted with care under spontaneous breathing. There were no serious complications such as pneumothorax in perioperative period. We performed successful anesthetic management, without any complications, combined with interscalene brachial plexus block and spontaneous breathing in a patient with a giant bulla.

  16. Surgical outcomes following nerve transfers in upper brachial plexus injuries

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    Bhandari P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brachial plexus injuries represent devastating injuries with a poor prognosis. Neurolysis, nerve repair, nerve grafts, nerve transfer, functioning free-muscle transfer and pedicle muscle transfer are the main surgical procedures for treating these injuries. Among these, nerve transfer or neurotization is mainly indicated in root avulsion injury. Materials and Methods: We analysed the results of various neurotization techniques in 20 patients (age group 20-41 years, mean 25.7 years in terms of denervation time, recovery time and functional results. The inclusion criteria for the study included irreparable injuries to the upper roots of brachial plexus (C5, C6 and C7 roots in various combinations, surgery within 10 months of injury and a minimum follow-up period of 18 months. The average denervation period was 4.2 months. Shoulder functions were restored by transfer of spinal accessory nerve to suprascapular nerve (19 patients, and phrenic nerve to suprascapular nerve (1 patient. In 11 patients, axillary nerve was also neurotized using different donors - radial nerve branch to the long head triceps (7 patients, intercostal nerves (2 patients, and phrenic nerve with nerve graft (2 patients. Elbow flexion was restored by transfer of ulnar nerve motor fascicle to the motor branch of biceps (4 patients, both ulnar and median nerve motor fascicles to the biceps and brachialis motor nerves (10 patients, spinal accessory nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening sural nerve graft (1 patient, intercostal nerves (3rd, 4th and 5th to musculocutaneous nerve (4 patients and phrenic nerve to musculocutaneous nerve with an intervening graft (1 patient. Results: Motor and sensory recovery was assessed according to Medical Research Council (MRC Scoring system. In shoulder abduction, five patients scored M4 and three patients M3+. Fair results were obtained in remaining 12 patients. The achieved abduction averaged 95 degrees (range, 50 - 170

  17. MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos; Mailley, Kathleen; del Carpio O’Donovan, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. The imaging assessment of the brachial plexus, in particular, has been traditionally challenging due to the complexity of its anatomy, its distribution in space and due to technical factors. Herein, we describe a modified technique used in our institution for the evaluation of the brachial plexus which led to a substantial decrease in scanning time and to better visualization of all the segments of the brachial plexus from the roots to the branches, in only one or two images, facilitating therefore the understanding of the anatomy and the interpretation of the study. To our knowledge, we are the first group to describe this technique of imaging the brachial plexus. We illustrate the benefit of this modified technique with an example of a patient with a lesion in the proximal branches of the left brachial plexus that was clinically suspected but missed on conventional brachial plexus imaging for six consecutive years. In addition, we review the common and infrequent benign and malignant pathology that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:24355190

  18. Analgesia pós-operatória em cirurgia ortopédica: estudo comparativo entre o bloqueio do plexo lombar por via perivascular inguinal (3 em 1 com ropivacaína e a analgesia subaracnóidea com morfina Analgesia pós-operatoria en cirugía ortopédica: estudio comparativo entre el bloqueo del plexo lombar por vía perivascular inguinal (3 en 1 con ropivacaína y la analgesia subaracnóidea con morfina Postoperative analgesia following orthopedic surgery: a study comparing perivascular lumbar plexus inguinal block with ropivacaine (3 in 1 and spinal anesthesia with morphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuber Martins Fonseca

    2003-04-01

    perivascular inguinal, llamado de bloqueo 3 en 1, ha sido utilizado para analgesia pós-operatoria. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la analgesia pós-operatoria del bloqueo 3 en 1 a la de la morfina subaracnóidea en pacientes sometidos a cirugías ortopédicas en miembro inferior (MI. MÉTODO: Fueron estudiados 40 pacientes escalados para cirugía ortopédica de MI, de ambos sexos, estado físico ASA I y II, con edades entre 15 y 75 años, distribuidos en 2 grupos (M y BPL. Fue realizada anestesia subaracnóidea en todos los pacientes, en L3-L4 ó L4-L5, con 20 mg de bupivacaína isobárica a 0,5%. En el grupo M (n = 20 fue asociado 50 µg de morfina al anestésico local. En el grupo BPL (n = 20 fue realizado el bloqueo 3 en 1 al término de la cirugía, utilizando 200 mg de ropivacaína a 0,5%. Se evaluó la analgesia y la intensidad del dolor a las 4, 8, 12, 14, 16, 20 y 24 horas después del término de la cirugía, el nivel del bloqueo subaracnóideo, el tiempo quirúrgico y las complicaciones. RESULTADOS: La duración de la analgesia en el grupo BPL fue de 13,1 ± 2,47, en cuanto en el grupo M todos los pacientes referían dolor y ausencia de bloqueo motor en el primero instante evaluado (4 horas. Hubo falla del bloqueo de uno de los 3 nervios en 3 pacientes. La incidencia de náusea y prurito fue significativamente mayor en el grupo M. Cuanto a la retención urinaria, no hubo diferencia significante entre los grupos. No hubo depresión respiratoria, hipotensión arterial o bradicardia. La analgesia pós-operatoria fue mas efectiva en el grupo BPL, comparada al grupo M a las 4, 8, 12,14 y 16 horas. A las 20 y 24 horas no hubo diferencia significante entre los grupos.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Perivascular Lumbar plexus inguinal block, (3-in-1 block has been used for postoperative analgesia. This study aimed at comparing postoperative analgesia of 3-in-1 block and spinal morphine in patients submitted to lower limb orthopedic surgeries (LL. METHODS: Forty ASA I

  19. Use of ropivacain and lidocaine for axillary plexus blockade ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The use of certain peripheral nerve blocks in paediatric patients is gaining increasing popularity, although distinctive characteristics of the juvenile anatomy, psychological barriers, time constraints on block placement, and risks of neurotoxic and cardio toxic side effects are still mentioned. However, newer agents ...

  20. Anatomy of the spinal accessory nerve plexus: relevance to head and neck cancer and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Henry

    2002-09-01

    The term spinal accessory nerve plexus may be defined as the spinal accessory nerve with all its intra- and extracranial connections to other nerves, principally cranial, cervical, and sympathetic. The term is not new. This review examines its applied anatomy in head and neck cancer and atherosclerosis. Over the centuries, general studies of neural and vascular anatomy and embryology formed a basis for the understanding upon which the plexus is described. During the past century, its anatomy and blood supply have come to be better understood. The importance of almost all of the plexus to head, neck, and upper extremity motor and sensory functions has come to be realized. Because of this understanding, surgical neck dissection has become progressively more conservative. This historical progression is traced. Even the most recent anatomic studies of the spinal accessory nerve plexus reveal configurations, new to many of us. They were probably known to classical anatomists, and not recorded in readily available literature, or not recorded at all. Human and comparative anatomic studies indicate that the composition of this plexus and its blood supply vary widely, even though within the same species their overall function is very nearly the same. Loss of any of these structures, then, may have very different consequences in different individuals. As a corollary to this statement, data are presented that the spinal accessory nerve itself need not be cut during surgical neck dissections for severe impairment to occur. In addition, data are presented supporting the theory that atherosclerosis by obstructing vessels to this plexus and its closely connected brachial plexus will very likely result in their ischemic dysfunction, often painful. Finally evidence, as well as theory, is stated concerning anatomic issues, methodology, outcome, and possible improvements in surgical procedures emphasizing conservatism.

  1. Postfixed brachial plexus radiculopathy due to thoracic disc herniation in a collegiate wrestler: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Scott A; Doberstein, Scott T; Rushlow, David R

    2013-01-01

    To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1-T2 disc herniation. A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1-T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1-T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for patients with suspected brachial plexus radiculopathies.

  2. The functional role of the pharyngeal plexus in vocal cord innervation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uludag, Mehmet; Aygun, Nurcihan; Isgor, Adnan

    2017-02-01

    Classical understanding of the function of the pharyngeal plexus in humans is that it relies on both motor branches for innervation of the majority of pharyngeal muscles and sensory branches for the pharyngeal wall sensation. To date there has been no reported data on the role of the pharyngeal plexus in vocal cord innervation. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether or not the plexus pharyngeus contributes to the innervation of the vocal cords. One hundred twenty-five sides from 79 patients (59 female, 20 male) undergoing thyroid surgery with intraoperative neuromonitoring were prospectively evaluated. While vocal cord function was evaluated with endotracheal tube surface electrodes, cricothyroid and cricopharyngeal muscle electromyographic recordings were obtained with a pair of needle electrodes. The ipsilateral pharyngeal plexus, external branch of the superior laryngeal nerve, and recurrent laryngeal nerve were stimulated with a monopolar probe at 1 mA. With stimulation of the plexus pharyngeus on 125 operated sides, positive electromyographic waveforms were detected from five ipsilateral vocal cords (accounting for 3.2% of all vocal cords monitored and 6.3% of patients). The mean EMG amplitude of the vocal cords with stimulation of the plexus pharyngeus was 147 ± 35.5 μV (range 110-203). In one case, the long latency time of 19.8 ms correlated with innervation by the glottic closure reflex pathway. The short latencies seen in the other four cases [3.9 ± 1.1 ms (range 3.2-5.5)] correlated with direct innervation. In some cases, the plexus pharyngeus may contribute to vocal cord innervation by reflex or direct innervation patterns in humans.

  3. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  4. The lumbosacral plexus of the red-rumped agouti (Dasyprocta leporina Linnaeus, 1758 (Rodentia: Caviidae

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    Gleidson Benevides de Oliveira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The red-rumped agouti is a small-sized wild rodent, belonging to the Dasyproctidae family, with great zootechnical potential, and it adapts well to captivity. In order to contribute to the species biology, this study describes the origin of the nerves forming the lumbosacral plexus. Twelve animals (six males and six females were used, from previous experiments. The animals were fixed in a 10% formaldehyde aqueous solution and eviscerated after 72 hours. Then, the major and minor psoas muscles were retracted, exposing the nerves forming the plexus. Cotton soaked with 20-volume hydrogen peroxide was placed on these nerves, remaining for 12 hours straight for bleaching and subsequent dissection. The topographical relations of the lumbosacral plexus were grouped into tables and arranged in terms of simple percentage. In 7 cases (58.34%, the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti stemmed from the ventral roots of the last 4 lumbar nerves and the first 3 sacral nerves (Type I – L4-S3, in 4 animals (33.33% it stemmed from L5-S3 (Type II, and in 1 case (8.33% it stemmed from L5-S4 (Type III. The nerves participating of the lumbosacral plexus in the red-rumped agouti were: lateral femoral cutaneous, genitofemoral, femoral, obturator, sciatic, cranial gluteal, caudal gluteal, and pudendal nerve. The origin of the lumbosacral plexus and the spinal nerves making up this plexus in red-rumped agoutis were similar to that described in other rodents, such as rock cavy, lowland paca and spix's yellow-toothed cavy.

  5. Bilateral occipital endoscopic choroid plexus cauterization for persistent hydrocephalus following frontal endoscopic third ventriculostomy and choroid plexus cauterization--the "bowling ball" technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Hannah E; Kennedy, Benjamin C; Santos, Junia; Anderson, Richard C E; Feldstein, Neil A

    2016-04-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization (ETV/CPC) as a primary treatment for hydrocephalus is gaining popularity in North America, particularly among the infant population. Unfortunately, despite considerable experience with ETV/CPC at several centers, treatment failures still exist. Early reports have suggested that greater than 90 % cauterization of the choroid plexus is associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, individual patient anatomy and smaller overall ventricular size can limit the amount of choroid plexus cauterization that is technically possible through a single frontal burr hole. Furthermore, the degree of cauterization achieved by surgeons using this technique is difficult to quantify objectively. In this report, we describe the case of an infant who failed initial ETV/CPC but then had successful resolution of hydrocephalus after additional choroid plexus cauterization performed through bilateral occipital burr holes. The child remains shunt-free over a year after treatment, suggesting that this three-pronged CPC approach (the "bowling ball" technique) may be successful in some young children with persistent hydrocephalus after ETV/CPC from a single frontal burr hole.

  6. Morphology of the lumbosacral plexus of the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis

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    Jessica Albuquerque Lopes

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Popularly known as the ocelot, Leopardus pardalis occurs throughout Brazil in all ecosystems, but prefers riparian regions and forests. The objective of this study was to learn more about the macroscopic, anatomical aspects of the plexus lumbossacral of this species. Three specimens were studied, two males and one female, from the region near the Bauxite Mine in Paragominas, PA. The specimens were donated to the Laboratório de Pesquisa Morfológica Animal (LaPMA at UFRA after being run over (authorization numbers 485/2009 and 522/2009. The animals were fixed in an aqueous solution of 10% formaldehyde and then the hind limb was dissected by removing some muscles to expose the nerves. In two animals, the femoral nerve originated in the fourth lumbar nerve (L4 and transformed into the saphenous nerve. The obturator nerve and sciatic nerve originated in the last lumbar nerve (L5, and the latter was divided into branches that formed the tibial and common peroneal nerves, which dorsally formed the cranial gluteal and caudal gluteal nerves.

  7. Proliferation of cultured mouse choroid plexus epithelial cells.

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    Basam Z Barkho

    Full Text Available The choroid plexus (ChP epithelium is a multifunctional tissue found in the ventricles of the brain. The major function of the ChP epithelium is to produce cerebrospinal fluid (CSF that bathes and nourishes the central nervous system (CNS. In addition to the CSF, ChP epithelial cells (CPECs produce and secrete numerous neurotrophic factors that support brain homeostasis, such as adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Accordingly, damage and dysfunction to CPECs are thought to accelerate and intensify multiple disease phenotypes, and CPEC regeneration would represent a potential therapeutic approach for these diseases. However, previous reports suggest that CPECs rarely divide, although this has not been extensively studied in response to extrinsic factors. Utilizing a cell-cycle reporter mouse line and live cell imaging, we identified scratch injury and the growth factors insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF as extrinsic cues that promote increased CPEC expansion in vitro. Furthermore, we found that IGF-1 and EGF treatment enhances scratch injury-induced proliferation. Finally, we established whole tissue explant cultures and observed that IGF-1 and EGF promote CPEC division within the intact ChP epithelium. We conclude that although CPECs normally have a slow turnover rate, they expand in response to external stimuli such as injury and/or growth factors, which provides a potential avenue for enhancing ChP function after brain injury or neurodegeneration.

  8. Celiac plexus neurolysis in pancreatic cancer: the endoscopic ultrasound approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada

    2014-01-07

    Pain in pancreatic cancer is often a major problem of treatment. Administration of opioids is frequently limited by side effects or insufficient analgesia. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis (EUS-CPN) represents an alternative for the palliative treatment of visceral pain in patients with pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on the indications, technique, outcomes of EUS-CPN and predictors of pain relief. EUS-CPN should be considered as the adjunct method to standard pain management. It moderately reduces pain in pancreatic cancer, without eliminating it. Nearly all patients need to continue opioid use, often at a constant dose. The effect on quality of life is controversial and survival is not influenced. The approach could be done in the central position of the celiac axis, which is easy to perform, or in the bilateral position of the celiac axis, with similar results in terms of pain alleviation. The EUS-CPN with multiple intraganglia injection approach seems to have better results, although extended studies are still needed. Further trials are required to enable more confident conclusions regarding timing, quantity of alcohol injected and the method of choice. Severe complications have rarely been reported, and great care should be taken in choosing the site of alcohol injection.

  9. A giant plexiform schwannoma of the brachial plexus: case report

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    Kohyama Sho

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report the case of a patient who noticed muscle weakness in his left arm 5 years earlier. On examination, a biloculate mass was observed in the left supraclavicular area, and Tinel's sign caused paresthesia in his left arm. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a continuous, multinodular, plexiform tumor from the left C5 to C7 nerve root along the course of the brachial plexus to the left brachia. Tumor excision was attempted. The median and musculocutaneous nerves were extremely enlarged by the tumor, which was approximately 40 cm in length, and showed no response to electric stimulation. We resected a part of the musculocutaneous nerve for biopsy and performed latissimus dorsi muscle transposition in order to repair elbow flexion. Morphologically, the tumor consisted of typical Antoni A areas, and immunohistochemistry revealed a Schwann cell origin of the tumor cells moreover, there was no sign of axon differentiation in the tumor. Therefore, the final diagnosis of plexiform Schwannoma was confirmed.

  10. Types and severity of operated supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries caused by traffic accidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Radek; Waldauf, Petr; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injuries occur in up to 5% of polytrauma cases involving motorcycle accidents and in approximately 4% of severe winter sports injuries. One of the criteria for a successful operative therapy is the type of lesion. Upper plexus palsy has the best prognosis, whereas lower plexus palsy is surgically untreatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate a group of patients with brachial plexus injury caused by traffic accidents, categorize the injuries according to type of accident, and look for correlations between type of palsy (injury) and specific accidents. A total of 441 brachial plexus reconstruction patients from our department were evaluated retrospectively(1993 to 2011). Sex, age, neurological status, and the type and cause of injury were recorded for each case. Patients with BPI caused by a traffic accident were assessed in detail. Traffic accidents were the cause of brachial plexus injury in most cases (80.7%). The most common type of injury was avulsion of upper root(s) (45.7%) followed by rupture (28.2%), complete avulsion (16.9%) and avulsion of lower root(s) (9.2%). Of the patients, 73.9% had an upper,22.7% had a complete and only 3.4% had a lower brachial plexus palsy. The main cause was motorcycle accidents(63.2%) followed by car accidents (23.5%), bicycle accidents(10.7%) and pedestrian collisions (3.1%) (pcar accidents had a higher percentage of lower avulsion (22.7%) and a lower percentage of upper avulsion (29.3%), whereas cyclists had a higher percentage of upper avulsion (68.6%) based on the data from the entire group of patients (pcar accidents (9.3%,pcar and motorcycle accidents),significantly more upper and fewer lower palsies were present. In the bicycle accident group, upper palsy was the most common (89%). Study results indicate that the most common injury was an upper plexus palsy. It was characteristic of bicycle accidents, and significantly more common in car and motorcycle accidents. The results also indicate that it is

  11. Diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury

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    Medina, L.S. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Yaylali, Ilker [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); Zurakowski, David [Harvard Medical School, Boston Children' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ruiz, Jennifer; Altman, Nolan R. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Division of Neuroradiology, Department of Radiology, Brain Institute, Health Outcomes, Policy, and Economics (HOPE) Center, Miami, FL (United States); Grossman, John A.I. [Miami Children' s Hospital, Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Surgery Program, Miami, FL (United States); New York University, Hospital for Joint Disease, New York, NY (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Detailed evaluation of a brachial plexus birth injury is important for treatment planning. To determine the diagnostic performance of MRI and MR myelography in infants with a brachial plexus birth injury. Included in the study were 31 children with perinatal brachial plexus injury who underwent surgical intervention. All patients had cervical and brachial plexus MRI. The standard of reference was the combination of intraoperative (1) surgical evaluation and (2) electrophysiological studies (motor evoked potentials, MEP, and somatosensory evoked potentials, SSEP), and (3) the evaluation of histopathological neuronal loss. MRI findings of cord lesion, pseudomeningocele, and post-traumatic neuroma were correlated with the standard of reference. Diagnostic performance characteristics including sensitivity and specificity were determined. From June 2001 to March 2004, 31 children (mean age 7.3 months, standard deviation 1.6 months, range 4.8-12.1 months; 19 male, 12 female) with a brachial plexus birth injury who underwent surgical intervention were enrolled. Sensitivity and specificity of an MRI finding of post-traumatic neuroma were 97% (30/31) and 100% (31/31), respectively, using the contralateral normal brachial plexus as the control. However, MRI could not determine the exact anatomic area (i.e. trunk or division) of the post-traumatic brachial plexus neuroma injury. Sensitivity and specificity for an MRI finding of pseudomeningocele in determining exiting nerve injury were 50% and 100%, respectively, using MEP, and 44% and 80%, respectively, using SSEP as the standard of reference. MRI in infants could not image well the exiting nerve roots to determine consistently the presence or absence of definite avulsion. In children younger than 18 months with brachial plexus injury, the MRI finding of pseudomeningocele has a low sensitivity and a high specificity for nerve root avulsion. MRI and MR myelography cannot image well the exiting nerve roots to determine

  12. Acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuberbuhler, Paz; León Cejas, Luciana V; Binaghi, Daniela; Reisin, Ricardo C

    2013-11-15

    Acute brachial plexus neuropathy is characterized by acute onset of shoulder girdle and arm pain, followed by weakness of the shoulder and arm muscles. It affects primarily nerves of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus and the long thoracic nerve. Cranial nerve involvement is an infrequent association and implies a diagnostic challenge. We report a unique case of acute brachial plexus neuropathy with involvement of the cranial nerves IX, X, XI and XII. Fifty six year-old woman who developed acute dysphonia, dysphagia and left shoulder pain, followed, six days later, by left arm weakness. Needle examination showed only fibrillation potentials and positive sharp waves in the left deltoid muscle. MRI of the brachial plexus shows enlargement of the trunks, cords and terminal branches, with mild gadolinium enhancement. This case illustrates the unique presentation of neuralgic amyotrophy with involvement of nerves outside the brachial plexus, and the importance of MRI for diagnosis, in the absence of electrophysiologic involvement. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Expression of regulatory proteins in choroid plexus changes in early stages of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; García-Consuegra, Inés; Pascual, Consuelo; Antequera, Desiree; Ferrer, Isidro; Carro, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that the choroid plexus has important physiologic and pathologic roles in Alzheimer disease (AD). To obtain additional insight on choroid plexus function, we performed a proteomic analysis of choroid plexus samples from patients with AD stages I to II (n = 16), III to IV (n = 16), and V to VI (n = 11) and 7 age-matched control subjects. We used 2-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a complete picture of changes in choroid plexus protein expression occurring in AD patients. We identified 6 proteins: 14-3-3 β/α, 14-3-3 ε, moesin, proteasome activator complex subunit 1, annexin V, and aldehyde dehydrogenase, which were significantly regulated in AD patient samples (p 1.5-fold variation in expression vs control samples). These proteins are implicated in major physiologic functions including mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis regulation. These findings contribute additional significance to the emerging importance of molecular and functional changes of choroid plexus function in the pathophysiology of AD.

  14. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  15. Choroid plexus separation in fetuses without ventriculomegaly: Natural course and postnatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipek, Ali; Sayit, Asli Tanrivermis; Idilman, Ilkay S; Kurt, Aydın; Cay, Nurdan; Unal, Ozlem; Karabulut, Erdem; Keskin, Huseyin Levent; Karaoglanoglu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate fetuses with choroid plexus separation without ventriculomegaly in terms of fetal malformations, behavior of the separation during follow-up, and postnatal outcome. In total, 172 fetuses with choroid plexus separation without ventriculomegaly were included in this prospective study. Fetal sonography was performed at 2- to 4-week intervals, and detailed physical and neurologic examinations were performed after their delivery. Fetuses were categorized into normal and abnormal subgroups according to the outcome. Sixteen fetuses (9.3%) were included in the abnormal-outcome group and 156 fetuses (90.7%) were included in the normal-outcome group. Both the initial mean lateral ventricular diameter (9.3 mm versus 8.6 mm) and the initial mean choroid plexus separation (4.8 mm versus 3.3 mm) were greater in the abnormal group than in the normal group (p plexus separation to detect a major anomaly, with 87.5% sensitivity and 93.6% specificity. Choroid plexus separation without ventriculomegaly often resolves within the third trimester and does not affect postnatal outcome. It can be associated with various fetal malformations; however, with a comprehensive examination, all fetal malformations can be detected prenatally. Follow-up sonography studies would be useful, especially in the case of suspected corpus callosum agenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Transmigration of macrophages across the choroid plexus epithelium in response to the feline immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Rick B.; Bragg, D. C.; Poulton, Winona; Hudson, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Although lentiviruses such as human, feline and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV, FIV, SIV) rapidly gain access to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the mechanisms that control this entry are not well understood. One possibility is that the virus may be carried into the brain by immune cells that traffic across the blood–CSF barrier in the choroid plexus. Since few studies have directly examined macrophage trafficking across the blood–CSF barrier, we established transwell and explant cultures of feline choroid plexus epithelium and measured trafficking in the presence or absence of FIV. Macrophages in co-culture with the epithelium showed significant proliferation and robust trafficking that was dependent on the presence of epithelium. Macrophage migration to the apical surface of the epithelium was particularly robust in the choroid plexus explants where 3-fold increases were seen over the first 24 h. Addition of FIV to the cultures greatly increased the number of surface macrophages without influencing replication. The epithelium in the transwell cultures was also permissive to PBMC trafficking, which increased from 17 to 26% of total cells after exposure to FIV. Thus, the choroid plexus epithelium supports trafficking of both macrophages and PBMCs. FIV significantly enhanced translocation of macrophages and T cells indicating that the choroid plexus epithelium is likely to be an active site of immune cell trafficking in response to infection. PMID:22281685

  17. Rectal foreign body insertion as a rare cause of persistent lumbosacral plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, F A; Amygdalos, I; Neumann, U P; Lurje, G

    2017-07-01

    Rectal foreign body insertion is a common condition in emergency surgery, which often requires surgical intervention. Here we report a clinical case of rectal foreign body insertion as a rare cause of persistent lumbosacral plexus injury. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department complaining of acute bilateral paraplegia with loss of sensation in both legs, as well as total urinary retention. The patient underwent abdominal computed tomography, which showed a rectal foreign body measuring 13 × 11.5 × 10 cm in the lower abdomen and pelvis. Extraluminal assistance through a median laparotomy was required after unsuccessful attempts at transanal recovery alone. After removal of the foreign body, the rectal wall and anorectal sphincter were massively dilated, with severe bruising of the rectal mucosa on proctoscopy. A protective loop-ileostomy was performed. The sacral plexus is located posteriorly in the pelvis. Physiologically, the nerves are well protected by surrounding anatomical structures. Post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injuries with paraplegia, urinary retention and anorectal sphincter insufficiency occur quite frequently after heavy traffic accidents. Lumbosacral plexus injury as a result of rectal foreign body insertion is rare. Severe neurological deficits through rectal foreign body insertion are rare but known medical conditions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of severe and persistent post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injury through a rectal foreign body.

  18. Hourglass-Like Constriction of the Brachial Plexus in the Posterior Cord: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yasunobu; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2018-01-01

    Hourglass-like constrictions are fascicular conditions confirmed definitively by interfascicular neurolysis. Certain peripheral nerves have vulnerable areas such as around the elbow in the posterior interosseous nerve. We report the first hourglass-like constriction in the brachial plexus supplying the radial innervated forearm musculature. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the brachial plexus were consistent with neuralgic amyotrophy (NA). A 9-yr-old boy experienced worsening left arm pain and difficulty in elevating the shoulder. Sequentially, severe palsy emerged when extending the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Based on the clinical picture, we diagnosed him with NA. The oblique coronal T2-weighted short-tau inversion recovery images showed mildly diffuse enlargement and hyperintensity of the brachial plexus. He showed few signs of improvement and interfascicular neurolysis was performed 11 mo after the onset. One of the fascicles in the posterior cord had developed an hourglass-like constriction. Electrical stimulation confirmed that the fascicle supplied forearm muscles. His wrist and finger extension had almost recovered at the 12-mo postoperative visit. Hourglass-like constrictions can occur in the brachial plexus. Although surgical approaches for the constrictions are still controversial, several reports demonstrated their effectiveness. Meanwhile, concerning NA treatment, evidence on the surgical intervention is lacking. Brachial plexus MRI might help in discerning the lesion and planning treatment options including surgical interventions. Hourglass-like constrictions are a possible etiology for certain NA patients with residual symptoms or paresis.

  19. [Choroid plexus tumours in childhood: Experience in Sant Joan de Déu hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río-Pérez, Clara Maria; Suñol-Capella, Mariona; Cruz-Martinez, Ofelia; Garcia-Fructuoso, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Choroid plexus tumours are rare, with a peak incidence in the first two years of life. The most common location is the lateral ventricle in children, while in adults it is the fourth ventricle. The most common clinical manifestation is the signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension. They are histologically classified as plexus papilloma, atypical plexus papilloma, and plexus carcinoma. A review is presented on choroid plexus tumours treated in the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu between 1980 and 2014. A total of 18 patients have been treated. An analysis was made of the demographic, clinical, histological data, treatment, and recurrences. The treatment of choice is complete resection, accompanied by adjuvant therapy in carcinomas. In atypical papillomas, the use of adjuvant therapies is controversial, reserving radiation therapy for recurrences. Papillomas have a good outcome, whereas atypical papillomas and carcinomas outcome is poor. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilateral Choroid Plexus Metastasis from Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Guive; Bakhtevari, Mehrdad Hosseinzadeh; Alghasi, Mohsen; Nosari, Masood Asghsri; Rahmanzade, Ramin; Rezaei, Omidvar

    2015-10-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most common type of thyroid cancer. It has an indolent clinical course and favorable prognosis. Brain metastasis is uncommon and complicates about 0.1%-5% of PTCs. Metastasis to the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles has been reported in 7 cases of thyroid malignancies, all of which were unilateral. We report a case of a 52-year-old woman with a history of PTC who presented with severe headache, nausea and vomiting, right hemiparesis, and speech disturbance. Imaging studies depicted lesions in both lateral ventricles. The patient underwent microsurgical tumor resection. Histopathologic examination revealed choroid plexus metastasis from PTC. Metastases to the choroid plexus from extracranial tumors are very rare, with only a few cases reported thus far. A demographic analysis of these cases suggests there may be a tropism of some extracranial carcinomas, such as renal cell carcinoma, for choroid plexus, especially in the lateral ventricles. We report the eighth case of choroid plexus metastasis, but it is the first bilateral one arising from thyroid cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Decreased FOXJ1 expression and its ciliogenesis programme in aggressive ependymoma and choroid plexus tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedalthagafi, Malak S; Wu, Michael P; Merrill, Parker H; Du, Ziming; Woo, Terri; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hurwitz, Shelley; Ligon, Keith L; Santagata, Sandro

    2016-03-01

    Well-differentiated human cancers share transcriptional programmes with the normal tissue counterparts from which they arise. These programmes broadly influence cell behaviour and function and are integral modulators of malignancy. Here, we show that the master regulator of motile ciliogenesis, FOXJ1, is highly expressed in cells along the ventricular surface of the human brain. Strong expression is present in cells of the ependyma and the choroid plexus as well as in a subset of cells residing in the subventricular zone. Expression of FOXJ1 and its transcriptional programme is maintained in many well-differentiated human tumours that arise along the ventricle, including low-grade ependymal tumours and choroid plexus papillomas. Anaplastic ependymomas as well as choroid plexus carcinomas show decreased FOXJ1 expression and its associated ciliogenesis programme genes. In ependymomas and choroid plexus tumours, reduced expression of FOXJ1 and its ciliogenesis programme are markers of poor outcome and are therefore useful biomarkers for assessing these tumours. Transitions in ciliogenesis define distinct differentiation states in ependymal and choroid plexus tumours with important implications for patient care. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ′excellent′ and ′good′ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery.

  3. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  4. Dorsal Scapular Artery Variations and Relationship to the Brachial Plexus, and a Related Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenna, Anne-Marie A; Alexandru, Daniela; Karimi, Afshin; Brown, Justin M; Bove, Geoffrey M; Daly, Frank J; Pastore, Anthony M; Pearson, Helen E; Barbe, Mary F

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Knowledge of the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery (DSA) with the brachial plexus is limited. Objective We report a case of a variant DSA path, and revisit DSA origins and under-investigated relationship with the plexus in cadavers. Methods The DSA was examined in a male patient and 106 cadavers. Results In the case, we observed an unusual DSA compressing the lower plexus trunk, that resulted in intermittent radiating pain and paresthesia. In the cadavers, the DSA originated most commonly from the subclavian artery (71%), with 35% from the thyrocervical trunk. Nine sides of eight cadavers (seven females) had two DSA branches per side, with one branch from each origin. The most typical DSA path was a subclavian artery origin before passing between upper and middle brachial plexus trunks (40% of DSAs), versus between middle and lower trunks (23%), or inferior (4%) or superior to the plexus (1%). Following a thyrocervical trunk origin, the DSA passed most frequently superior to the plexus (23%), versus between middle and lower trunks (6%) or upper and middle trunks (4%). Bilateral symmetry in origin and path through the brachial plexus was observed in 13 of 35 females (37%) and 6 of 17 males (35%), with the most common bilateral finding of a subclavian artery origin and a path between upper and middle trunks (17%). Conclusion Variability in the relationship between DSA and trunks of the brachial plexus has surgical and clinical implications, such as diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome.

  5. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  6. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Fiber Tractography of the Sacral Plexus in Children with Spina Bifida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie; Froeling, Martijn; Nievelstein, Rutger A. J.; Cuppen, Inge; de Jong, Tom P. V. M.; Leemans, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated

  7. Subclavian perivascular block for open reduction and internal fixation of left midshaft humeral fracture--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukewe, A; Ogunlade, S O; Idowu, O A; Aderinto, D A

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic injuries affecting bones of the hand and forearm often require peripheral nerve blocks for analgesia and surgical intervention. The successful use of subclavian perivascular block as a sole anaesthetic for orthopaedic surgery has not been reported in our environment. We report the use of this technique for open reduction and internal fixation of a left midshaft humeral fracture. The trunk of the brachial plexus was localized by a Polystim II nerve stimulator. Complete sensorimotor block was achieved within 15 minutes and surgery lasted 55 minutes without complications. This technique obviated the use of general anaesthesia with its risks. The surgeon and the patient were satisfied with the quality of the anaesthesia.

  8. Treatment of a brachial plexus injury using kinesiotape and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon Fleming

    2010-10-01

    This describes a child whose neonatal brachial plexus injury was treated with kinesiotape and exercise. The subject was a two-year-old female whose X-rays demonstrated severe inferior subluxation of the humeral head and winging of the scapula on the left. She was fitted with a shoulder brace with surgery scheduled in six months. The initial PT exam noted 80 degrees of shoulder abduction (trumpet sign), significant asymmetry, and nonuse. Mallet score was 15/25. Treatment consisted of d/c of the brace and E-stimulation, parent education on exercise and taping, and kinesiotape to facilitate rotator cuff and scapular stabilizers. Typical wear time was 2-3 days on, 1-2 days off. After 2 weeks, there was prominent deltoid definition. The shoulder was in 20 degrees of abduction, shoulders level with less scapular winging. Scapular stabilizers were then taped. At 4 weeks, her arm was held to her side displaying a stable symmetrical scapula. The arm displayed increased fine motor use and initiation of activities. At 10 weeks there was a forced d/c, and a decline toward baseline levels. After 2 weeks of reinstatement, function returned to prior level. At 20 weeks (12 total visits) she displayed full ROM, symmetrical shoulders, Mallet score of 20/25, rare trumpet sign, and was hanging by arms during play. X-rays displayed significant improvement in humeral head position, rib cage rotation, angle of scapula and clavicle, and size and mineralization of humerus. Reconstructive surgery was cancelled. Kinesiotape and parent education made a significant difference in this child's function.

  9. Rehabilitation of patients following traction lesions of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn Parry, C B

    1984-01-01

    The management of patients with brachial plexus lesions requires a multidisciplinary approach. We insist on admission to our rehabilitation ward for a full assessment by the physiotherapist, occupational therapist, rehabilitation officer, and social worker when necessary. We confirm the diagnosis by clinical, electrophysiologic, and radiologic techniques and set out a plan of action, either involving definitive surgery or a conservative program involving functional splintage, relief of pain when possible, and return to work. We insist on regular follow-ups to check that the pain is still being relieved. At subsequent reviews it may become clear that spontaneous recovery is not going to occur, and a program of reconstructive surgery can be instituted. In general terms, three years or more should have elapsed before accepting that elbow flexion is not going to return. In patients with C5-C6 lesions, where elbow flexion is permanently paralyzed, the simple elbow lock splint may be perfectly satisfactory, but in some patients it may be wise to advise reconstructive procedure. In our experience the most satisfactory means of restoring elbow flexion is the Steindler flexor plasty, advancing the origins of the extensors and flexors of the forearm up the humerus. If present, latissimus dorsi can be transferred to replace the biceps. The pectoralis major transfer is useful but almost always requires an external rotation osteotomy, as there is too much adduction when the patient flexes the elbow. Finally, triceps can be transferred to biceps, but this is an operation that we do not like, as elbow extension is so useful.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. [Treatment of residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy with tendon transfer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirhan, Mehmet; Erdem, Mehmet; Uysal, Mustafa

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the results of the correction of adduction and internal rotation deformities of the shoulder associated with residual obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) by the transfer of latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff. In order to correct adduction and internal rotation deformities associated with residual OBPP, 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; mean age 8.1 years; range 4 to 19 years) underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles to the rotator cuff and lengthening of the pectoralis major tendon with Z-plasty. The right and left extremities were affected in seven and three patients, respectively. Involvement of the C5-C6 nerve roots was detected in four, and C5-C6-C7 nerve roots in six patients. In two patients with a positive Putti sign, axillary roentgenograms showed posterior subluxation of the humeral head, and magnetic resonance and computed tomography scans revealed type III glenohumeral deformity. Functional evaluations were made using a 5-point scoring system proposed by Mallet. The mean follow-up was 23.6 months (range 5 to 42 months). Postoperatively, the mean abduction and external rotation were 134.5 degrees (range 95 degrees to 170 degrees ) and 70 degrees (range 45 degrees to 90 degrees ), respectively. The mean global abduction score was 4, external rotation score was 4.2, and the scores assigned to the ability to move hand to the neck and mouth were 3.5. Of two patients with type III glenohumeral deformity, whose ages were four and 19 years, abduction and external rotation were 150 degrees and 45 degrees in the former, 135 degrees and 70 degrees in the latter, respectively. The transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major tendons is a necessary procedure to restore external rotation and abduction functions of paralysed shoulders. Compared to other techniques employed, it offers obvious advantages in terms of ease and cost, as well.

  11. Homeostatic capabilities of the choroid plexus epithelium in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan John

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As the secretory source of vitamins, peptides and hormones for neurons, the choroid plexus (CP epithelium critically provides substances for brain homeostasis. This distributive process of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF volume transmission reaches many cellular targets in the CNS. In ageing and ageing-related dementias, the CP-CSF system is less able to regulate brain interstitial fluid. CP primarily generates CSF bulk flow, and so its malfunctioning exacerbates Alzheimers disease (AD. Considerable attention has been devoted to the blood-brain barrier in AD, but more insight is needed on regulatory systems at the human blood-CSF barrier in order to improve epithelial function in severe disease. Using autopsied CP specimens from AD patients, we immunocytochemically examined expression of heat shock proteins (HSP90 and GRP94, fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFr and a fluid-regulatory protein (NaK2Cl cotransporter isoform 1 or NKCC1. CP upregulated HSP90, FGFr and NKCC1, even in end-stage AD. These CP adjustments involve growth factors and neuropeptides that help to buffer perturbations in CNS water balance and metabolism. They shed light on CP-CSF system responses to ventriculomegaly and the altered intracranial pressure that occurs in AD and normal pressure hydrocephalus. The ability of injured CP to express key regulatory proteins even at Braak stage V/VI, points to plasticity and function that may be boosted by drug treatment to expedite CSF dynamics. The enhanced expression of human CP 'homeostatic proteins' in AD dementia is discussed in relation to brain deficits and pharmacology.

  12. Ultrastructure of interstitial cells of Cajal associated with deep muscular plexus of human small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Mikkelsen, H B; Thuneberg, L

    1992-01-01

    Evidence showing that interstitial cells of Cajal have important regulatory functions in the gut musculature is accumulating. In the current study, the ultrastructure of the deep muscular plexus and associated interstial cells of Cajal in human small intestine were studied to provide a reference...... for identification and further physiological or pathological studies. The deep muscular plexus was sandwiched between a thin inner layer of smooth muscle (one to five cells thick) and the bulk of the circular muscle. Interstitial cells of Cajal in this region very much resembled smooth muscle cells (with......, and only few gap junctions with other interstitial cells of Cajal or with the musculature were observed. Compared with interstitial cells of Cajal from other mammals, those associated with the deep muscular plexus in the human small intestine more closely resemble smooth muscle cells...

  13. [Plexus lesions following radiation therapy. Report of nineteen cases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamin, F; Mignot, B; Ecoffet, M; Ollat, H; Jouneau, P

    Nineteen patients with plexus lesions following radiation therapy were investigated: fifteen with brachial plexus, 4 with lumbar or sacral plexus involvement. Symptoms at onset are usually sensory. Motor disturbances occur either simultaneously or after some delay, their course is generally gradual and unfavourable. Areflexia appears early and was present in every case. Important cutaneous lesions (radiodermitis) and considerable induration of soft tissues were observed in every patient. Diagnosis is a relapse of the mitotic process. Severity of prognosis makes imperative a definite technique of radiation therapy. In all the patients included in this study, dosage had exceded 1,600 rets. Patients were tentatively treated with D-penicillamine, an inhibitor of collagen synthesis.

  14. Pathological Alteration in the Choroid Plexus of Alzheimer’s Disease: Implication for New Therapy Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Agnieszka; Carro, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Morphological alterations of choroid plexus in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been extensively investigated. These changes include epithelial atrophy, thickening of the basement membrane, and stroma fibrosis. As a result, synthesis, secretory, and transportation functions are significantly altered resulting in decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) turnover. Recent studies discuss the potential impacts of these changes, including the possibility of reduced resistance to stress insults and slow clearance of toxic compounds from CSF with specific reference to the amyloid peptide. Here, we review new evidences for AD-related changes in the choroid plexus. The data suggest that the significantly altered functions of the choroid plexus contribute to the multiparametric pathogenesis of late-onset AD. PMID:22563316

  15. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Pretto Flores

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. METHOD: A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. RESULTS: The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  16. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Diffusion tensor MRI and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated...... anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... compared to 10 healthy controls. RESULTS: Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial...

  18. Differential axillary nerve block for hand or forearm soft-tissue surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kii, Natsumi; Yamauchi, Masanori; Takahashi, Kazunobu; Yamakage, Michiaki; Wada, Takuro

    2014-08-01

    This study determined the effective concentration of ropivacaine required to produce the type of differential block known as sensory block with mobilization, for adequate analgesia after forearm or hand soft tissue surgery by axillary brachial plexus block. Forty-four patients were enrolled, and ultrasound-guided axillary nerve block with nerve stimulation was achieved using 16 mL of ropivacaine in total. Postoperative analgesia and sensory/motor function, side effects, the use of rescue analgesics, and the patient satisfaction score were evaluated 24 h after surgery. The effective concentration of nerve block was calculated by probit analysis. Eighteen patients achieved differential block and were sufficiently satisfied with the block, which was significantly better than the patient satisfaction obtained with incomplete differential block. The maximum effective concentration of 6 mL of ropivacaine needed for differential block was calculated as 0.1285 %, which meant that 71 % of the patients experienced both sensory block and maintenance of motor function. This analysis showed that 16 ml of 0.1285 % ropivacaine is suitable for achieving differential block in ultrasound-guided axillary nerve block for hand and forearm surgery.

  19. Real-time mapping of the corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Zhivov, Andrey; Stachs, Oliver

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to produce two-dimensional reconstruction maps of the living corneal sub-basal nerve plexus by in vivo laser scanning confocal microscopy in real time. CLSM source data (frame rate 30Hz, 384x384 pixel) were used to create large-scale maps of the scanned area by selecting the Automatic Real Time (ART) composite mode. The mapping algorithm is based on an affine transformation. Microscopy of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed on normal and LASIK eyes as well as on rabbit eyes. Real-time mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus was performed in large-scale up to a size of 3.2mm x 3.2mm. The developed method enables a real-time in vivo mapping of the sub-basal nerve plexus which is stringently necessary for statistically firmed conclusions about morphometric plexus alterations.

  20. The choroid plexus as a site of damage in hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke and its role in responding to injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jianming; Routhe, Lisa J; Wilkinson, D Andrew; Hua, Ya; Moos, Torben; Xi, Guohua; Keep, Richard F

    2017-03-28

    While the impact of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes on the blood-brain barrier has been extensively studied, the impact of these types of stroke on the choroid plexus, site of the blood-CSF barrier, has received much less attention. The purpose of this review is to examine evidence of choroid plexus injury in clinical and preclinical studies of intraventricular hemorrhage, subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. It then discusses evidence that the choroid plexuses are important in the response to brain injury, with potential roles in limiting damage. The overall aim of the review is to highlight deficiencies in our knowledge on the impact of hemorrhagic and ischemic strokes on the choroid plexus, particularly with reference to intraventricular hemorrhage, and to suggest that a greater understanding of the response of the choroid plexus to stroke may open new avenues for brain protection.

  1. Quantitative changes of nitrergic neurons during postnatal development of chicken myenteric plexus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Gandahi, Jameel Ahmed; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Lin-li; Bian, Xun-guang; Wu, Li; Liu, Yi; Chen, Qiu-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Information regarding the development of the enteric nervous system (ENS) is important for understanding the functional abnormalities of the gut. Because fertilized chicken eggs provide easy access to embryos, chicken models have been widely used to study embryonic development of myenteric plexus; however, no study has been focused on the postnatal period. The aim of this study was to perform a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the nitrergic neurons in the myenteric plexus of developing chickens in the postnatal period. Methods: Whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus were made in 7-d, 15-d, and 40-d old (adult) chickens of either sex (n=15). The myenteric plexus was studied after nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPH-d) histochemistry using light microscopy, digital photography, and Image-Pro Plus 6.0 software. The numbers of positively stained neurons and ganglia were counted in the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum, and colon in the different age groups. Data were expressed as mean±standard deviation (SD), and statistical analysis was performed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) test. Results: The positively stained neurons showed various morphologies and staining intensities, and formed bead-shaped and U-shaped arrangements in the myenteric plexus. The densities of neurons and ganglia increased with age. However, the number of positive neurons per ganglion increased. The number of NADPH-d-positive neurons was highest in the colon, followed by the ileum, the jejunum, the duodenum, and the caeca in all age groups. Conclusions: Developmental changes in the myenteric plexus of chickens continue in the postnatal period, indicating that the maturation process of the gastrointestinal function is gradual. In addition, no significant difference is happening among different intestinal segments during postnatal development, suggesting that the function of different intestinal segments had been determined after

  2. Evaluation of the sacral nerve plexus in pelvic endometriosis by three-dimensional MR neurography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Meizhi; Guan, Jian; Wang, Huanjun; Li, Shurong; Guo, Yan; Liu, Mingjuan

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of three-dimensional MR neurography (3D MRN) for the sacral plexus using sampling perfection with application-optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolution (SPACE) sequences, and to demonstrate structural abnormalities in the pelvic nerve of women with pelvic endometriosis. Twenty patients with pelvic endometriosis and 20 healthy controls were examined by contrast-enhanced 3D short time inversion recovery T2-weighted imaging (CE 3D STIR T2WI) SPACE sequences on 3 Tesla MRI. Image quality and diagnostic confidence of the sequences in identifying abnormalities of the sacral plexus were analyzed and compared with conventional three-plane images of 2D turbo-spin echo T2-weighted images (2D TSE T2WI). The changes in the sacral plexus caused by endometrial lesions were evaluated. The sacral plexus was clearly revealed in both healthy controls and patients with endometriosis on 3D STIR SPACE images. A good agreement was reached in the evaluation of both imaging quality (Kappa value [κ] = 0.73-1.00) and diagnostic confidence (κ = 0.66-0.81) when compared between the two independent readers. Abnormalities caused by endometriosis were identified in 17 patients, unilaterally in 10 patients, and bilaterally in 7 patients. Nerve fiber abnormalities of lumbar 5 (L5) were detected in 11 patients, of sacral 1 (S1) in 14 patients and of sacral 2 (S2) in 9 patients. CE 3D STIR SPACE sequences demonstrate its significant capacity to investigate and map the sacral plexus, and reveal the compression and adhesion of the sacral plexus nerve as a result of ectopic lesions. 3 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:1225-1231. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Injury to the Lumbar Plexus and its Branches After Lateral Fusion Procedures: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Peter; Drazin, Doniel; Iwanaga, Joe; Schmidt, Cameron; Alonso, Fernando; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens R; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, Richard Shane

    2017-09-01

    Neurologic deficits from lumbar plexus nerve injuries commonly occur in patients undergoing lateral approaches. However, it is not yet clear what types of injury occur, where anatomically they are located, or what mechanism causes them. We aimed to study 1) the topographic anatomy of lumbar plexus nerves and their injuries in human cadavers after lateral transpsoas approaches to the lumbar spine, 2) the structural morphology of those injuries, and 3) the topographic anatomy of the lumbar plexus throughout the mediolateral approach corridor. Fifteen adult fresh frozen cadaveric torsos (26 sides) underwent lateral approaches (L1-L5) by experienced lateral spine surgeons. The cadavers were subsequently opened and the entire plexus dissected and examined for nerve injuries. The topographic anatomy of the lumbar plexus and its branches, their injuries, and the morphology of these injuries were documented. Fifteen injuries were found with complete or partial nerve transections (Sunderland IV and V). Injuries were found throughout the mediolateral approach corridor. At L1/2, the iliohypogastric, ilioinguinal, and subcostal nerves were injured within the psoas major muscle, the retroperitoneal space, or the outer abdominal muscles and subcutaneous tissues. Genitofemoral nerve injuries were found in the retroperitoneal space. Nerve root injuries occurred within the retroperitoneal space and psoas muscle. Femoral nerve injuries were found only within the psoas major muscle. No obturator nerve injuries occurred. Lateral approaches can lead to structural nerve damage. Knowledge of the complex plexus anatomy, specifically its mediolateral course, is critical to avoid approach-related injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  5. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  6. The choroid plexus in health and in disease: dialogues into and out of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Fernanda; Sousa, João Carlos; Brito, Maria Alexandra; Pahnke, Jens; Santos, Cecilia; Correia-Neves, Margarida; Palha, Joana Almeida

    2017-11-01

    This article brings the choroid plexus into the context of health and disease. It is remarkable that the choroid plexus, composed by a monolayer of epithelial cells that lie in a highly vascularized stroma, floating within the brain ventricles, gets so little attention in major physiology and medicine text books and in the scientific literature in general. Consider that it is responsible for producing most of the about 150mL of cerebrospinal fluid that fills the brain ventricles and the subarachnoid space and surrounds the spinal cord in the adult human central nervous system, which is renewed approximately 2-3 times daily. As such, its activity influences brain metabolism and function, which will be addressed. Reflect that it contains an impressive number of receptors and transporters, both in the apical and basolateral sides of the epithelial cells, and as such is a key structure for the communication between the brain and the periphery. This will be highlighted in the context of neonatal jaundice, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease. Realize that the capillaries that irrigate the choroid plexus stroma do not possess tight junctions and that the blood flow to the choroid plexus is five times higher than that in the brain parenchyma, allowing for a rapid sensing system and delivery of molecules such as nutrients and metals as will be revised. Recognize that certain drugs reach the brain parenchyma solely through the choroid plexus epithelia, which has potential to be manipulated in diseases such as neonatal jaundice and Alzheimer's disease as will be discussed. Without further notice, it must be now clear that understanding the choroid plexus is necessary for comprehending the brain and how the brain is modulated and modulates all other systems, in health and in disease. This review article intends to address current knowledge on the choroid plexus, and to motivate the scientific community to consider it when studying normal brain physiology and diseases of

  7. [Applied anatomy study of posterior approach via sacrectomy for reaching the deep intrapelvic sacral plexus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Wang, S F; Li, P C; Xue, Y H

    2017-12-01

    Objective: To observe the possibility of posterior approach via sacrectomy for reaching intrapelvic sacral plexus and expose the deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus in order to perform nerve graft. Methods: Five adult cadaver specimens were used in the study with prone position in May 2012. Cut off the gluteus maximus along the origins and lift to the lateral side, the piriformis was lay beneath. The sciatic nerve and the inferior gluteal nerve pierced from the infrapiriformis foramen in the operative field. Excise the origin of the piriformis via sacrectomy with osteotome and the length and width of the insertion on sacrum were measured. The piriformis was resected and then the sacral nerve roots beneath were exposed. The S2-S4 sacral nerve roots and the deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus were revealed after carefully dissecting. From July 2012 to June 2016, nine patients with lumbosacral plexus injury were performed surgery through the posterior approach in Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital.There were 6 male and 3 female patients, with a mean age of 29 years. All patients were diagnosed as upper and lower sacral plexus injury, in one of them combing with contralateral lower sacral plexus injury. The average time from injury to operation was 8.3 months. Results: The length and width of the piriformis insertion on sacrum were (3.44±0.15) cm and (2.42±0.11) cm, respectively. The deep intrapelvic origin of sciatic nerve from sacral plexus in all nine patients can be revealed clearly and there was enough operative space that nerve transfer or graft can be performed through the posterior approach via sacrectomy. The total blood loss during operation was (1 822±1 523) ml. Conclusion: The piriformis and part of sacrum it attached can be resected safely through the posterior approach and the deep intrapelvic sacral plexus and the origin of sciatic nerve can be well exposed.

  8. The current role of diagnostic imaging in the preoperative workup for refractory neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Wilson, Thomas J; DiPietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in perinatal care, the incidence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains relatively common. CT myelography is currently considered to be the optimal imaging modality for evaluating nerve root integrity. Recent improvements in MRI techniques have made it an attractive alternative to evaluate nerve root avulsions (preganglionic injuries). We demonstrate the utility of MRI for the evaluation of normal and avulsed spinal nerve roots. We also show the utility of ultrasound in providing useful preoperative evaluation of the postganglionic brachial plexus in patients with NBPP.

  9. Radiologic manifestation of the malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumor involving the brachial plexus

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    Shima Aran, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A 63-year-old African American female with history of bilateral breast cancer status after lumpectomy and radiation therapy presented with right hand, wrist, and arm pain. She was found to have a right axillary mass and a large lesion in the right brachial plexus. A biopsy of the brachial plexus mass came back as a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. This case report illustrates the critical value of multiple imaging modalities in definitive diagnosis of this rare pathologic entity.

  10. CLINICAL COMPARISON BETWEEN 0.25% BUPIVACAINE AND BUPIVACAINE 0.25% AND TRAMADOL (2MG/KG IN BRACHIAL PHLEXUS BLOCK BY SUPRACLAVICULAR APPROACH

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    Suresh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES : Adjunc ts to local anaesthetics for brachial plexus block may enhance the quality and duration of analgesia. Tramadol a synthetic 4 - phenylpiperidine analog of codeine is known to produce antinociception and enhance the effect of local anaesthetics when given epid urally , intrathecally or in various peripheral nerve blocks. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of Tramadol added to brachial plexus block by supraclavicular approach. METHODS : A prospective , randomized , single blinded study was conducted o n 60 ASA I or II adult patients undergoing upper limb surgeries under supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Patients were randomly divided into two groups. Patients in Group I (n=30 were given 38mL of 0.25% Bupivacaine plus 2ml NS and Group II (n = 30 w ere given 38 mL of 0.25% Bupivacaine plus 2 ml Tramadol (2mg/kg. The onset time and duration of sensory and motor blockade were recorded. Haemodynamic variables (i.e. heart rate , noninvasive blood pressure , oxygen saturation , and rescue analgesic require ments were recorded for 24 hrs postoperatively. RESULTS: the onset of sensory and motor block was significantly faster in Group II compared to Group I (P <0.05. Rescue analgesic requirements were significantly less in Group II compared to Group I (P , 0.05 . Haemodynamic variables did not differ between groups in the post - operative period. CONCLUSION: Tramadol (2mg/kg in combination with 38mL of Bupivacaine (0.25% hastened onset of sensory and motor block , and improved postoperative analgesia when used in brachial plexus block , without producing any adverse events.

  11. Comparison of peripheral nerve stimulator versus ultrasonography guided axillary block using multiple injection technique

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    Alok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The established methods of nerve location were based on either proper motor response on nerve stimulation (NS or ultrasound guidance. In this prospective, randomised, observer-blinded study, we compared ultrasound guidance with NS for axillary brachial plexus block using 0.5% bupivacaine with the multiple injection techniques. Methods : A total of 120 patients receiving axillary brachial plexus block with 0.5% bupivacaine, using a multiple injection technique, were randomly allocated to receive either NS (group NS, n = 60, or ultrasound guidance (group US, n = 60 for nerve location. A blinded observer recorded the onset of sensory and motor blocks, skin punctures, needle redirections, procedure-related pain and patient satisfaction. Results: The median (range number of skin punctures were 2 (2-4 in group US and 3 (2-5 in group NS (P =0.27. Insufficient block was observed in three patient (5% of group US and four patients (6.67% of group NS (P > =0.35. Patient acceptance was similarly good in the two groups. Conclusion: Multiple injection axillary blocks with ultrasound guidance provided similar success rates and comparable incidence of complications as compared with NS guidance with 20 ml 0.5% bupivacaine.

  12. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  13. Variations in the formation of supraclavicular brachial plexus among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surg. 2006;. 72(2): 188-192. 14. Bigeleisen P.E. Anatomical variations of the phrenic nerve and its clinical implication for supraclavicular block. Brit. J. Anaesthesia. 2003; 91(6): 916-917. 15. Abdelazeem Ali El-Dawlatly. Phrenic nerve paralysis after subclavian revascularization surgery: A case report. Internet J. Anesthesiol.

  14. [Ultrasound-guided continuous infraclavicular block for hand surgery: technical report arm position for perineural catheter placement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza-Lemus, Guadalupe; Hernández-Gasca, Verónica; Espinosa-Gutiérrez, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Continuous perineural infusion of local anesthetic provides better postoperative analgesia than intravenous administration of opioids or NSAIDs in upper limb surgery. The infraclavicular approach is a good option due to the muscular stability to catheter; the abduction of the arm apparently makes more superficial the brachial plexus and which elevates clavicle cephalad. The aim of this study was to identify whether the abduction of the arm for to decreases the skin-plexus distance, facilitating it catheter insertion in a perineural way for a better analgesia. This relation between the arm and the colocation of catheter has not yet been established. We included 58 adult patients, undergoing forearm and hand surgery, initially divided into two groups, adduction and abduction. It was placed continuous infraclavicular block guided by ultrasound, it allow the catheter tip was adjacent to the posterior cord. In the group patients with high technical difficulties were allowed to reposition the arm abduction, recording number of punctures, redirects, ease of insertion of the catheter and skin-plexus distance. The abduction of the arm moved the clavicle toward cephalad and separated it from the linear transducer, this allowed to maneuver the needle right angle and redirect it, the distance skin-plexus did not decrease significantly with arm position. Arm abduction allows better scanning facilitates the infraclavicular puncture and catheter introduction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A.

  15. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human and mouse choroid plexus epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F. Janssen (Sarah); S.J.F. van der Spek (Sophie); J.B. ten Brink (Jacoline); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is

  16. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human and Mouse Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Sarah F.; van der Spek, Sophie J. F.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Essing, Anke H. W.; Gorgels, Theo G. M. F.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) is a lobed neuro-epithelial structure that forms the outer blood-brain barrier. The CPE protrudes into the brain ventricles and produces the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), which is crucial for brain homeostasis. Malfunction of the CPE is possibly

  17. Neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injuries: an historical cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, Agnes F.; ter Steeg, Anne Marie; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J. R.; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J.; de Jong, Bareld A.

    2004-01-01

    An historical cohort study was conducted to investigate the rate and extent of neurological recovery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) and to identify possible prognostic factors in a cohort of children with OBPI from birth to 7 years. All children (n=56; 31 females, 25 males) with OBPI

  18. Anatomical characteristics of the brachial plexus of the maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus Illiger, 1811

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    Gessica Ariane de Melo Cruz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Eight male and female maned sloth (Bradypus torquatus cadavers, previously fixed in formalin, were used to identify the origin of the brachial plexus, nerves and innervation territory in order to determine an anatomical pattern for this species. The plexus of B. torquatus was derived from the C7 to C10 and T1 to T2 spinal nerves, but the participation of T2 was variable. The spinal nerves gave origin to the cranial and caudal trunks, which joined to form a common trunk, from which two fascicles were formed. All the nerves from the brachial plexus were originated from these two fascicles, except the thoracic, long pectoral and suprascapular nerves, which arose before the formation of the common trunk. The organization of the brachial plexus into trunks and fascicles, and subsequent origin of peripheral nerves, demonstrates that most of the spinal nerves contribute to the composition of the peripheral nerves and the possibility that lesions or traumatic injuries would damage most of the thoracic member.

  19. Robot-Assisted Surgery of the Shoulder Girdle and Brachial Plexus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facca, Sybille; Hendriks, Sarah; Mantovani, Gustavo; Selber, Jesse C.; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    New developments in the surgery of the brachial plexus include the use of less invasive surgical approaches and more precise techniques. The theoretical advantages of the use of robotics versus endoscopy are the disappearance of physiological tremor, three-dimensional vision, high definition, magnification, and superior ergonomics. On a fresh cadaver, a dissection space was created and maintained by insufflation of CO2. The supraclavicular brachial plexus was dissected using the da Vinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA). A segment of the C5 nerve root was grafted robotically. A series of eight clinical cases of nerve damage around the shoulder girdle were operated on using the da Vinci robot. The ability to perform successful microneural repair was confirmed in both the authors' clinical and experimental studies, but the entire potential of robotically assisted microneural surgery was not realized during these initial cases because an open incision was still required. Robotic-assisted surgery of the shoulder girdle and brachial plexus is still in its early stages. It would be ideal to have even finer and more suitable instruments to apply fibrin glue or electrostimulation in nerve surgery. Nevertheless, the prospects of minimally invasive techniques would allow acute and subacute surgical approach of traumatic brachial plexus palsy safely, without significant and cicatricial morbidity. PMID:24872778

  20. A Case of Scapulothoracic Dissociation with Brachial Plexus Injury: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings

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    Lee, G.K.; Suh, K.J.; Choi, J.A.; Oh, O.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2007-11-15

    Scapulothoracic dissociation is defined as violent lateral or rotational displacement of the shoulder girdle from its thoracic attachments with severe neurovascular injury. We describe the radiographic and associated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of a case of scapulothoracic dissociation with brachial plexus injury in a 17-year-old man, and include a review of the relevant literature.

  1. Medical Rehabilitation and Occupational Therapy in Patients with Lesion of Plexus Brachialis

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    Vacheva D.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Causes for plexus brachialis damage are versatile, and in some cases remain unknown, but mostly result from degenerative and inflammatory processes. Treatment of brachial plexus dysfunction is often conservative and is subject to a team of specialists - neurologists, traumatologists, rehabilitation physicians, kinesitherapists and occupational therapists. The objective of the research is to report the recovery of patients with lesion of plexus brachialis after a complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation treatment program that includes electrostimulation, remedial massage, kinesitherapy, electrotherapy and occupational therapy. A total of 159 patients, treated at the Clinic of Physical Therapy, University Hospital of Pleven, were included in the study. Improvement of measured indexes: pain assessment, centimetry, assessment of upper limb muscle weakness, dynamometry and functional test of activities of daily living, was registered in all patients under observation. In order to achieve good results in the rehabilitation of patients with injured plexus brachialis, timely diagnosis, good medication therapy and early start of complex physiotherapy and rehabilitation are of crucial importance, so that performance of daily living activities improves. The good results come slowly and with difficulties, but the quality of life of patients and the quality of labor performed by them, improves significantly.

  2. Pathological and immunohistochemical studies of choroid plexus carcinoma of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantile, C; Campani, D; Menicagli, M; Arispici, M

    2002-01-01

    Choroid plexus carcinomas in four dogs (three male, one female) aged small middle 2.5 to 10 years, were examined by light microscopy and immunohistochemistry. The dogs showed progressive neurological signs including ataxia, seizures, vestibular disease and cranial nerve deficits, lasting for several months in some cases. Primary tumours were localized in the lateral (one case), third (one case), and fourth (two cases) ventricles. Hydrocephalus was evident at post-mortem examination in one case. In two cases the neoplastic cells closely resembled the structure of normal choroid plexus, with a distinct papillary pattern, composed of well-differentiated columnar epithelium. In the other two cases, cellular pleomorphism, nuclear atypia, increased mitotic activity and necrosis were observed. In all cases, dissemination of neoplastic cell clusters was detected within the subarachnoid space or the ventricular cavity. Immunohistochemical examination showed a multifocal labelling pattern for pankeratin and cytokeratin AE1 and diffuse vimentin positivity in poorly differentiated tumours. Well-differentiated choroid plexus carcinomas showed multifocal immunoreactivity for cytokeratin AE3, multifocal to diffuse immunoreactivity for vimentin and occasional positivity for carcinoembryonic antigen. Epithelial membrane antigen, Ber EP4 and S-100 were negative in all cases. Glial fibrillary acidic protein labelling occurred only in a single, poorly differentiated tumour. Occasional reactions for proliferating cell nuclear antigen and MIB-1 were seen in two cases. It was concluded that at least two morphological and possibly phenotypic subtypes (well-differentiated and anaplastic) of choroid plexus carcinoma of the dog could be identified.

  3. Feedback control of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of pancreatic endocrine progenitors in an epithelial plexus niche

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankaitis, Eric D.; Bechard, Matthew E.; Wright, Christopher V.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian pancreas, endocrine cells undergo lineage allocation upon emergence from a bipotent duct/endocrine progenitor pool, which resides in the “trunk epithelium.” Major questions remain regarding how niche environments are organized within this epithelium to coordinate endocrine differentiation with programs of epithelial growth, maturation, and morphogenesis. We used EdU pulse-chase and tissue-reconstruction approaches to analyze how endocrine progenitors and their differentiating progeny are assembled within the trunk as it undergoes remodeling from an irregular plexus of tubules to form the eventual mature, branched ductal arbor. The bulk of endocrine progenitors is maintained in an epithelial “plexus state,” which is a transient intermediate during epithelial maturation within which endocrine cell differentiation is continually robust and surprisingly long-lived. Within the plexus, local feedback effects derived from the differentiating and delaminating endocrine cells nonautonomously regulate the flux of endocrine cell birth as well as proliferative growth of the bipotent cell population using Notch-dependent and Notch-independent influences, respectively. These feedback effects in turn maintain the plexus state to ensure prolonged allocation of endocrine cells late into gestation. These findings begin to define a niche-like environment guiding the genesis of the endocrine pancreas and advance current models for how differentiation is coordinated with the growth and morphogenesis of the developing pancreatic epithelium. PMID:26494792

  4. Perineural spread of melanoma to the brachial plexus: identifying the anatomic pathway(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Tomas; Laughlin, Ruple S; Howe, B Matthew; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-08

    Perineural spread of melanoma is a well-known mechanism of metastasis in cases involving cranial nerves. Brachial plexus involvement is rare and the pathway is unknown. A retrospective review of the Mayo Clinic database was performed to identify patients with a history of melanoma and brachial plexus compromise between 1994 and 2017. Inclusion criteria were a history of melanoma, a clinical diagnosis of brachial plexopathy, radiological features consistent with perineural spread and biopsy of melanoma within nerve. We identified 42 cases, 24 men and 18 women with a median age of 61 years (37 - 84 years) with a history of melanoma and a brachial plexopathy. After review of their clinical information, 2 cases fulfilled inclusion criteria. Both patients presented with progressive brachial plexopathy and imaging studies revealed features consistent with perineural spread. In 40 excluded cases, brachial plexopathy was caused by: metastasis to axillary lymph nodes (n = 11); trauma (n = 8); post-surgical sequelae (n = 7); tumors other than melanoma (n = 5); inflammation (n = 5); radiation (n = 2); a combination of radiation and post-surgical changes (n = 1); and radiculopathy (n = 1). The 2 identified cases both showed similar clinical and radiological features. We believe that there is a pattern of perineural spread to the brachial plexus through the cervical plexus. Literature review shows several recently published cases demonstrating an analogous mechanism of melanoma spread involving upper cervical nerves which supports our proposed pathway. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Chabok, Shahrokh Yousefzadeh; Samini, Fariborz; Alijani, Babak; Behzadnia, Hamid; Firozabadi, Fariborz Ayati; Reihanian, Zoheir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers. Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females) consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons. PMID:27517072

  6. Het plexus brachialis letsel. Een retrospectief onderzoek naar de functionele gevolgen.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelot, Cornelis Hendrik

    1994-01-01

    The central issue of this study is accidental damage to the brachial plexus. In terms of medical rehabilitation, an understanding of the factors which determine the functional abilities is a prerequisite, since this understanding will eventually have an effect on therapeutic procedures. In a

  7. Origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of the gray brocket deer Mazama gouazoubira (Artiodactyla: Cervidae

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    Lucélia Gonçalves Vieira

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The brachial plexus is a set of nerves originated in the cervicothoracic medular region which innervates the thoracic limb and its surroundings. Its study in different species is important not only as a source of morphological knowledge, but also because it facilitates the diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders resulting from various pathologies. This study aimed to describe the origins and branchings of the brachial plexus of Mazama gouazoubira. Three specimens were used, belonging to the scientific collection of the Laboratory for Teaching and Research on Wild Animals of Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU; they were fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde and dissected. In M. gouazoubira, the brachial plexus resulted from connections between the branches of the three last cervical spinal nerves, C6, C7, C8, and the first thoracic one, T1, and it had as derivations the nerves suprascapular, cranial and caudal subscapular, axillary, musculocutaneous, median, ulnar, radial, pectoral, thoracodorsal, long thoracic and lateral thoracic. The muscles innervated by the brachial plexus nerves were the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, subscapularis, teres major, teres minor, deltoid, cleidobrachial, coracobrachialis, biceps brachialis, brachial, triceps brachialis, anconeus, flexor digitorum superficialis, flexor digitorum profundus, flexor carpi radialis, flexor carpi ulnaris, extensor carpi radialis, lateral ulnar, extensor carpi obliquus, extensor digitorum, superficial pectoral, deep pectoral, ventral serratus, and external oblique abdominal.

  8. Organization and collateralization of a subendocardial plexus in end-stage human heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; van Horssen, Pepijn; ter Wee, Rene; Coronel, Ruben; de Bakker, Jacques Mt; de Jonge, Nicolaas; Siebes, Maria; Spaan, Jos A E

    2010-01-01

    In the failing myocardium a subendocardial plexus can develop. Detection of the presence or function, however, of such a plexus does not form part of the present diagnostic spectrum for heart failure. This may now change as new methods for high-resolution imaging of myocardial perfusion distribution are being developed. A severely hypertrophic heart was harvested during transplantation and analyzed for morphology of the intramural coronary arterial vasculature. The heart only had one coronary ostium, and the main branches of the coronary artery were cannulated. A fluorescent casting material was infused that was allowed to harden under physiological pressure. The entire heart was frozen and placed in a novel imaging cryomicrotome and sequentially cut in 25-microm slices. High-resolution images of each cutting plane were acquired, allowing a detailed three-dimensional reconstruction of the arterial vasculature. The epicardial layer of the free wall demonstrated a normal vasculature with penetrating branching arteries. The endocardial layer and the septum revealed a highly interconnected vascular plexus with large vessels oriented parallel to the apicobasal axis. An extensive endocardial network with collaterals was detected, forming connections between the main epicardial branches. We conclude that an outward remodeling of transmural vessels did not prevent the generation and growth of subendocardial conduit arteries. The orientation and vascular volume in the plexus provides an opportunity for detection by novel techniques of MRI contrast imaging currently developed. Knowledge of the effect on perfusion studies is required to prevent a misinterpretation of subendocardial perfusion images in heart failure.

  9. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  10. Reproductive cyst and operculum formation in the Cambrian-Ordovician galeate-plexus microfossils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agic, Heda; Moczydlowska, Malgorzata; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2016-01-01

    alga Acetabularia (Chlorophyta), which possesses an intrinsic lid-forming apparatus used during the organism's reproductive stage. Based on the observations on the fossil material and studies on the Acetabularia lid formation, we propose a model of operculum formation in the galeate plexus micro...

  11. Anatomical Variations of Brachial Plexus in Adult Cadavers; A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Emamhadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Variations of the brachial plexus are common and a better awareness of the variations is of crucial importance to achieve successful results in its surgical procedures. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anatomical variations of the brachial plexus in adult cadavers.   Methods: Bilateral upper limbs of 32 fresh cadavers (21 males and 11 females consecutively referred to Guilan legal medicine organization from November 2011 to September 2014, were dissected and the trunks, cords and terminal nerves were evaluated. Results: Six plexuses were prefixed in origin. The long thoracic nerve pierced the middle scalene muscle in 6 cases in the supra clavicular zone. The suprascapular nerve in 7 plexuses was formed from posterior division of the superior trunk. Five cadavers showed anastomosis between medial brachial cutaneous nerve and T1 root in the infra clavicular zone. Terminal branches variations were the highest wherein the ulnar nerve received a communicating branch from the lateral cord in 3 cases. The median nerve was formed by 2 lateral roots from lateral cord and 1 medial root from the medial cord in 6 cadavers. Some fibers from C7 root came to the musculocutaneous nerve in 8 cadavers. Conclusion: The correlation analysis between the variations and the demographic features was impossible due to the small sample size. The findings of the present study suggest a meta-analysis to assess the whole reported variations to obtain a proper approach for neurosurgeons.

  12. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  13. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Jin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C 6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C 6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10 6 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C 6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  14. Reliability of CSF turbulence and choroid plexus visualization on fast-sequence MRI in pediatric hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozzelle, Curtis J; Madura, Casey; Reeder, Ron W

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of neonatal and infant hydrocephalus has gained popularity in the past decade. Identifying treatment failure is critically important. Results of a pilot study of 2 novel imaging markers seen on fast-sequence T2-weighted axial MRI showed potential clinical utility. However, the reliability of multiple raters detecting these markers must be established before a multicenter validation study can be performed. METHODS Two sets of de-identified single-shot T2-weighted turbo spin-echo axial images were prepared from scans of patients before and after they underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization between March 2013 and January 2016. The first set showed the lateral and third ventricles for visualization of turbulent CSF dynamics, and the second set showed the lateral ventricular atria for choroid plexus glomus detection. Three raters (Group 1) received written instructions before evaluating each image set once and then again 1 week later. Another 8 raters (Group 2) evaluated both image sets after oral instruction and group training on a pretest image set. Fleiss' kappa coefficients with 95% CIs were calculated for intrarater and interrater reliability in Group 1 and interrater reliability in Group 2. RESULTS Intrarater reliability kappa coefficients for Group 1 were ≥ 0.74 for turbulence and ≥ 0.80 for choroid plexus; their interrater kappa coefficients at the initial assessment were 0.50 (95% CI 0.37-0.62) and 0.56 (95% CI 0.43-0.69), respectively. The Group 2 interrater kappa scores were 0.82 (95% CI 0.78-0.86) for turbulence and 0.62 (95% CI 0.58-0.66) for choroid plexus. CONCLUSIONS With minimal training, intrarater reliability on visualization of turbulence and the choroid plexus was substantial, but interrater reliability was only moderate. After modestly increasing training, interrater reliability improved to near perfect and to

  15. Diagnostic Value of Magnetic Resonance Neurography in Cervical Radiculopathy: Plexus Patterns and Peripheral Nerve Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Daniel; Kele, Henrich; Kronlage, Moritz; Godel, Tim; Hilgenfeld, Tim; Bendszus, Martin; Bäumer, Philipp

    2017-10-02

    The aim of this study was to assess the imaging appearance and diagnostic value of plexus and peripheral nerve magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in cervical radiculopathy. This prospective study was approved by our institutional ethics committee and written informed consent was obtained from all participants. A total of 24 patients were included with a diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy based on clinical examination, supporting electrophysiological examinations and spinal imaging consistent with the clinical syndrome. All patients then underwent a high-resolution MRN protocol including the brachial plexus from nerve roots to plexus cords using a 3-dimensional turbo spin echo with variable flip angle short tau inversion recovery and sagittal-oblique T2-weighted spectral adiabatic inversion recovery sequence, and ulnar, median, and radial nerves at the upper arm and elbow in T2-weighted fat saturated sequences. Two readers independently rated plexus elements regarding the presence of lesions at neuroforaminal levels, roots, trunks, and cord segments. Median, ulnar, and radial nerves were likewise rated. Findings were then compared to a referenced standard of cervical radiculopathy that was defined as the combined diagnosis of clinical syndrome including supporting electrophysiological exams and matching positive spinal imaging, and diagnostic performance parameters were calculated. Additional quantitative and qualitative analysis assessed peripheral nerve caliber and normalized T2-signal at arm level in cervical radiculopathy and compared them to 25 inflammatory neuropathy controls. Cervical radiculopathy resulted in distinct plexus lesion patterns for each level of neuroforaminal stenosis. Overall, brachial plexus MRN in cervical radiculopathy reached a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 96%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and overall diagnostic accuracy of 87%. Initial spinal magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple positive findings for clinically

  16. Does obturator nerve block always occur in 3-1 block?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Tekdemir

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the femoral “3-in-1 block”, obturator nerve block is routinely unsuccessful. Anatomical studies are not available to explain why blockade of obturator nerve or lumbar plexus does not occur. The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of femoral “3-in-1 block” obturator nerve block on a cadaver model.Materials and methods: Totally, 12 mature adult human cadavers were selected. Methylene blue dye (30 ml was injected under the fascia iliaca in eight cadavers and into the femoral nerve sheath in four cadavers. Careful bilateral dissections were performed following dye injections.Results: It was seen that the dye did not spread to the medial part of the psoas major muscle and the obturator nerve was not stained with the dye in eight cadavers in whom dye was injected laterally into the femoral sheat. In four cadavers in whom dye was injected into the femoral nerve sheat, metylene blue spread through fascial layers in the plane under the psoas muscle and stained the obturator nerve just before emerging medially from the fascia psoas. At this point, the obturator nerve pierced the psoas fascia and extended extrafascially in the medial and deep borders of the psoas muscle. In this area, the upper section of the obturator nerve was found also to be stained with the dye.Conclusion: We concluded that the cause of an unsuccessful obturator nerve block might be the fascial anatomy of this region. The lateral cutaneous femoral nerve and the femoral nerve easily can be blocked in the fascia iliaca compartment, but the obturator nerve block fails because of its being extrafascial in this region. J Clin Exp Invest 2011;2(2:149-51

  17. Transport of thyroid hormones via the choroid plexus into the brain: the roles of transthyretin and thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Samantha J; Wijayagunaratne, Roshen C; D'Souza, Damian G; Darras, Veerle M; Van Herck, Stijn L J

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key players in regulating brain development. Thus, transfer of appropriate quantities of thyroid hormones from the blood into the brain at specific stages of development is critical. The choroid plexus forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In reptiles, birds and mammals, the main protein synthesized and secreted by the choroid plexus is a thyroid hormone distributor protein: transthyretin. This transthyretin is secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid and moves thyroid hormones from the blood into the cerebrospinal fluid. Maximal transthyretin synthesis in the choroid plexus occurs just prior to the period of rapid brain growth, suggesting that choroid plexus-derived transthyretin moves thyroid hormones from blood into cerebrospinal fluid just prior to when thyroid hormones are required for rapid brain growth. The structure of transthyretin has been highly conserved, implying strong selection pressure and an important function. In mammals, transthyretin binds T4 (precursor form of thyroid hormone) with higher affinity than T3 (active form of thyroid hormone). In all other vertebrates, transthyretin binds T3 with higher affinity than T4. As mammals are the exception, we should not base our thinking about the role of transthyretin in the choroid plexus solely on mammalian data. Thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters are involved in moving thyroid hormones into and out of cells and have been identified in many tissues, including the choroid plexus. Thyroid hormones enter the choroid plexus via thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters and leave the choroid plexus to enter the cerebrospinal fluid via either thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters or via choroid plexus-derived transthyretin secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid. The quantitative contribution of each route during development remains to be elucidated. This is part of a review series on ontogeny and phylogeny of brain barrier mechanisms.

  18. Transport of thyroid hormones via the choroid plexus into the brain: the roles of transthyretin and thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Samantha J.; Wijayagunaratne, Roshen C.; D'Souza, Damian G.; Darras, Veerle M.; Van Herck, Stijn L. J.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key players in regulating brain development. Thus, transfer of appropriate quantities of thyroid hormones from the blood into the brain at specific stages of development is critical. The choroid plexus forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. In reptiles, birds and mammals, the main protein synthesized and secreted by the choroid plexus is a thyroid hormone distributor protein: transthyretin. This transthyretin is secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid and moves thyroid hormones from the blood into the cerebrospinal fluid. Maximal transthyretin synthesis in the choroid plexus occurs just prior to the period of rapid brain growth, suggesting that choroid plexus-derived transthyretin moves thyroid hormones from blood into cerebrospinal fluid just prior to when thyroid hormones are required for rapid brain growth. The structure of transthyretin has been highly conserved, implying strong selection pressure and an important function. In mammals, transthyretin binds T4 (precursor form of thyroid hormone) with higher affinity than T3 (active form of thyroid hormone). In all other vertebrates, transthyretin binds T3 with higher affinity than T4. As mammals are the exception, we should not base our thinking about the role of transthyretin in the choroid plexus solely on mammalian data. Thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters are involved in moving thyroid hormones into and out of cells and have been identified in many tissues, including the choroid plexus. Thyroid hormones enter the choroid plexus via thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters and leave the choroid plexus to enter the cerebrospinal fluid via either thyroid hormone transmembrane transporters or via choroid plexus-derived transthyretin secreted into the cerebrospinal fluid. The quantitative contribution of each route during development remains to be elucidated. This is part of a review series on ontogeny and phylogeny of brain barrier mechanisms. PMID:25784853

  19. Refinement of myotome values in the upper limb: Evidence from brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, S W; Brown, M J C; Hems, T J

    2017-02-01

    We reviewed patients with partial supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries in order to refine the myotome values of the upper limb. Forty-two patients with defined partial injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus were reviewed from a prospective database. The injuries patterns covered C5, C5-6, C5-7, C5-8, C7-T1 and C8-T1 roots. Upper plexus injuries were classified on the basis of surgical exploration and intraoperative stimulation and lower plexus injuries from MRI. Flexor Carpi Radialis (FCR) was paralyzed in C5-7 injuries, in addition to paralysis of deltoid, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and biceps, when compared to C5-6 injuries. Complete paralysis of Flexor Digitorum Profundus (FDP) and Flexor Digitorum Superficialis (FDS) to all digits was identified in C7-T1 injuries. In C5-8 injuries weakness was noted in FDP of ulnar digits and intrinsics innervated by the ulnar nerve, while in C8-T1 injuries paralysis was noted in the FDP to the radial digits. All patients with C8-T1 injuries had paralysis of FDS and the thenar muscles. In upper plexus injuries paralysis of FCR indicated involvement of C7 root in addition to C5 and C6 roots. The results provide new detail of innervation of muscles acting on the hand. Flexor muscles and intrinsic muscles of the thumb and radial fingers (median nerve) have an important contribution from T1, while for those acting on the ulnar digits (ulnar nerve) the main contribution is from C8 with some input from C7. T1 also gives consistent innervation to extensor pollicis longus. A revised myotome chart for the upper limb is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging in post-traumatic brachial plexus injuries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzari, Helen K B; Dornelas de Andrade, Armèle; Vilar, Clarice F; Sayão, Larissa B; Diniz, Paula R B; Souza, Fernando H; de Oliveira, Daniella A

    2017-11-11

    Computed Tomographic Myelography (CTM) is a gold-standard imaging test for evaluating the brachial plexus and has been used for a long time. Another imaging test more recently used is Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), which is also part of the plexus evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of MRI in diagnosing post-traumatic injuries of the brachial plexus. We conducted a Systematic Review with cross-sectional studies of diagnostic accuracy. Studies with populations presenting post-traumatic brachial plexus injury, over 16 years old, both genders, and examined by CT Myelography and MRI were evaluated. The trial resulted in three studies that covered the inclusion criteria. The sample consisted of 46 participants. The tool Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) was used to evaluate the quality of the studies, and the software RevMan was used to identify the homogeneity of the studies that entered the analysis. The study was registered in PROSPERO under the number CRD42016041720. Studies showed moderate to high risk of bias, with low or very low quality of evidence due to the limitations of studies and differences in comparing the assessment groups. The heterogeneity of the studies made it impossible to create meta-analyzes. MRI has been an excellent test for assessing traumatic brachial plexus injuries in clinical practice; however, the quantitative analysis of studies identified a lack in methodological rigor. Future studies should focus on methodological rigor, providing more accurate assessments of modalities and their benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus: a transcriptome study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Norman R.; Dziegielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Habgood, Mark D.; Wakefield, Matthew J.; Lindsay, Helen; Stratzielle, Nathalie; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-Francois; Liddelow, Shane A.

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analyzed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC) transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E) 15 and adult with additional data obtained at intermediate ages from microarray analysis. The largest represented functional group in the embryo was amino acid transporters (twelve) with expression levels 2–98 times greater than in the adult. In contrast, in the adult only six amino acid transporters were up-regulated compared to the embryo and at more modest enrichment levels (plexus five glucose transporters, in particular Glut-1, and only one monocarboxylate transporter were enriched compared to the adult, whereas only two glucose transporters but six monocarboxylate transporters in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain with higher amino acid transport activity reported previously. Data for divalent metal transporters are also considered. Immunohistochemistry of several transporters (e.g., Slc16a10, a thyroid hormone transporter) gene products was carried out to confirm translational activity and to define cellular distribution of the proteins. Overall the results show that there is substantial expression of numerous influx transporters in the embryonic choroid plexus, many at higher levels than in the adult. This, together with immunohistochemical evidence and data from published physiological transport studies suggests that the choroid plexus in embryonic brain plays a major role in supplying the developing brain with essential nutrients. PMID:25972776

  2. The role of elective amputation in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-03-01

    Despite undergoing complex brachial plexus, surgical reconstructions, and rehabilitation, some patients request an elective amputation. This study evaluates the role of elective amputation after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective chart review was performed for all the 2140 patients with brachial plexus injuries treated with elective amputation between 1999 and 2012 at a single institution. Analysis was conducted on the potential predisposing factors for amputation, amputation level, and postamputation complications. Patients were evaluated using pre- and postamputation Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and hand scores in addition to visual analog pain scores. The following three conditions were observed in all nine patients who requested an elective amputation: (1) Pan-plexus injury; (2) non-recovery (mid-humeral amputation) or elbow flexion recovery only (forearm amputation) 1 year after all other surgical options were performed; and (3) at least one chronic complication (chronic infection, nonunion fractures, full-thickness burns, chronic neck pain with arm weight, etc.). Pain improvement was found in five patients. Subjective patient assessments and visual analog pain scores before and after amputation did not show a statistically significant improvement in Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand Scores. However, four patients reported that their shoulder pain felt "better" than it did before the amputation, and two patients indicated they were completely cured of chronic pain after surgery. Elective amputation after brachial plexus injury should be considered as an option in the above circumstances. When the informed and educated decision is made, patients can have satisfactory outcomes regarding amputation. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Influx mechanisms in the embryonic and adult rat choroid plexus: a transcriptome study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Ruthven Saunders

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptome of embryonic and adult rat lateral ventricular choroid plexus, using a combination of RNA-Sequencing and microarray data, was analysed by functional groups of influx transporters, particularly solute carrier (SLC transporters. RNA-Seq was performed at embryonic day (E 15 and adult with additional data obtained at intermediate ages from microarray analysis. The largest represented functional group in the embryo was amino acid transporters (twelve with expression levels 2-98 times greater than in the adult. In contrast, in the adult only six amino acid transporters were up-regulated compared to the embryo and at more modest enrichment levels (<5-fold enrichment above E15. In E15 plexus five glucose transporters, in particular Glut-1, and only one monocarboxylate transporter were enriched compared to the adult, whereas only two glucose transporters but six monocarboxylate transporters in the adult plexus were expressed at higher levels than in embryos. These results are compared with earlier published physiological studies of amino acid and monocarboxylate transport in developing rodents. This comparison shows correlation of high expression of some transporters in the developing brain with higher amino acid transport activity reported previously. Data for divalent metal transporters are also considered. Immunohistochemistry of several transporters (e.g. Slc16a10, a thyroid hormone transporter gene products was carried out to confirm translational activity and to define cellular distribution of the proteins. Overall the results show that there is substantial expression of numerous influx transporters in the embryonic choroid plexus, many at higher levels than in the adult. This, together with immunohistochemical evidence and data from published physiological transport studies suggests that the choroid plexus in embryonic brain plays a major role in supplying the developing brain with essential nutrients.

  4. MR-myelography for the brachial plexus injury. Comparison of the MR-myelography, myelography and CT myelography

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    Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Yabe, Hiroshi; Horiuchi, Ikuo; Takayama, Shinichiro; Yamanaka, Kazuyoshi; Ichikawa, Toru [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-03-01

    The usefulness of MR-myelography was evaluated in 6 patients with brachial plexus injury. Pseudo-meningocele was confirmed clearly on MR-myelography in 4 patients with whole plexus injury. In 2 patients with upper plexus injury, damages of C6 nerve root were confirmed but pseudo-meningocele was not found on MR-myelography. MR-myelography is noninvasive and the accuracy is not inferior to myelography. Because MR-myelography needs no contrast media and the images can be observed in three-dimensional direction, it is expected in future application. (H.O.)

  5. Types of Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  6. What Causes Heart Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  7. Living with Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  8. Evaluation of cranial tibial and extensor carpi radialis reflexes before and after anesthetic block in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudury, Eduardo Alberto; de Figueiredo, Marcella Luiz; Fernandes, Thaiza Helena Tavares; Araújo, Bruno Martins; Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; Diogo, Camila Cardoso; Silva, Amanda Camilo; Santos, Cássia Regina Oliveira; Rocha, Nadyne Lorrayne Farias Cardoso

    2017-02-01

    Objectives This study aimed to test the extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats before and after anesthetic block of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus, respectively, to determine whether they depend on a myotatic reflex arc. Methods Fifty-five cats with a normal neurologic examination that were referred for elective gonadectomy were divided into group 1 (29 cats) for testing the extensor carpi radialis reflex, and group 2 (26 cats) for testing the cranial tibial reflex. In group 1, the extensor carpi radialis reflex was tested after anesthetic induction and 15 mins after brachial plexus block with lidocaine. In group 2, the cranial tibial, withdrawal and patellar reflexes were elicited in 52 hindlimbs and retested 15 mins after epidural anesthesia. Results In group 1, before the anesthetic block, 55.17% of the cats had a decreased and 44.83% had a normal extensor carpi radialis reflex. After the block, 68.96% showed a decreased and 27.59% a normal reflex. No cat had an increased or absent reflex before anesthetic block. In group 2, prior to the anesthetic block, 15.38% of the cats had a decreased cranial tibial reflex and 84.62% had a normal response, whereas after the block it was decreased in 26.92% and normal in 73.08% of the cats. None of the cats had an increased or absent reflex. Regarding the presence of both reflexes before and after anesthetic block, there was no significant difference at 1% ( P = 0.013). Conclusions and relevance The extensor carpi radialis and cranial tibial reflexes in cats are not strictly myotatic reflexes, as they are independent of the reflex arc, and may be idiomuscular responses. Therefore, they are not reliable for neurologic examination in this species.

  9. High prevalence of neuropathic pain in the hand of patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V. B. Santana

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To describe the pain profile of patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. Methods We enrolled 65 patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. The Douleur Neuropathique 4 questionnaire was used to classify pain and the SF-36 was used to evaluate quality of life. Results The patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury were predominantly young male victims of motorcycle accidents. Pain was present in 75.4% of the individuals and 79% presented with neuropathic pain, mostly located in the hands (30.41%. The use of auxiliary devices (p = 0.05 and marital status (p = 0.03 were both independent predictors of pain. Pain also impacted negatively on the quality of life (p = 0.001. Conclusions Pain is frequent in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury. Despite the peripheral nervous system injury, nociceptive pain is not unusual. Pain evaluation, including validated instruments, is essential to guide optimal clinical management of patients with the condition.

  10. Participation restrictions among adolescents and adults with neonatal brachial plexus palsy: the patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Holst, Menno; Groot, Jeroen; Steenbeek, Duco; Pondaag, Willem; Nelissen, Rob Ghh; Vliet Vlieland, Thea Pm

    2017-09-24

    To examine the impact of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) on societal participation of adolescents and adults. This cross-sectional study was conducted among patients with NBPP, aged ≥16 years, who had visited our NBPP clinic. Patients completed questions on the influence of NBPP on their choices regarding education/work and their work-performance, the Impact on Participation/Autonomy questionnaire and the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation (USER-P). In addition, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was assessed. Seventy-five patients participated (median age 20, inter quartile range 17-27). Twenty were full-time students, 28 students with a job, 21 employed, two unemployed, and four work-disabled. Sixty-six patients had had a job at some stage. Patients' overall HRQoL was comparable to the general population. 27/75 patients reported that NBPP had affected their choices regarding education and 26/75 those regarding work. 33/66 reported impact on their work performance. On the Impact on Participation/Autonomy questionnaire, 80% (49/61) reported restrictions in the work-and-education domain, 74% in social-relations and 67% in autonomy-outdoors. 37/61 reported participation restrictions on the USER-P. Although their overall HRQoL was not impaired, a substantial proportion of adolescent/adult patients reported that NBPP had an impact on choices regarding education and profession, as well as on work-performance. Restrictions in participation, especially in work and education were also reported. Guiding patients in making choices on education and work at an early stage and providing tailored physical as well as psychosocial care may prevent or address restrictions, which may improve participation. Implications for Rehabilitation Adolescent and adult patients with neonatal brachial plexus palsy perceive restrictions in societal participation, especially regarding the work-and-education domain. All patients with neonatal brachial plexus

  11. Explaining daily functioning in young adults with obstetric brachial plexus lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Conny; Beckerman, Heleen; Groot, Vincent de

    2015-01-01

    To study the influence of obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) on arm-hand function and daily functioning in adults, and to investigate the relationship of arm-hand function and pain to daily functioning. Adults with unilateral OBPL who consulted the brachial plexus team at the VU University Medical Center in the past were invited to participate. Daily functioning was measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and the SF36, pain with VAS Pain Scales and arm-hand function with the Nine Hole Peg Test (9-HP-test) and the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT). Scores of the affected arm were compared to those of the non-affected arm or norm values for healthy controls. Twenty-seven persons (mean age 22, SD 4.2 years), of whom 10 men, participated. The ARAT and 9-HP-test scores for the affected arm were significantly worse than those for the non-affected arm. Moderate to severe pain in the affected arm, the non-affected arm or the back was reported by 50% of the participants. The DASH general, sports/music and SF36 physical functioning scores were significantly worse than norm values. The ARAT/9-HP-test and daily functioning showed little association. Low to moderate associations were found between pain and daily functioning. Many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Implications for Rehabilitation Obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL) is caused by traction to the brachial plexus during labour, resulting in denervation of the muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle. Adults with OBPL are hardly seen in rehabilitation medicine. This study shows that many young adults with OBPL experience limitations in daily functioning. Pain, rather than arm-hand function, seems to explain these limitations. Fifty percent of the participants complained about moderate or severe pain, which was located in the affected arm, the back and the non

  12. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Successful Outcome of Modified Quad Surgical Procedure in Preteen and Teen Patients with Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of modified Quad procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Background: We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in shoulder abduction, resulting from the modified Quad procedure in children (mean age 2.5 years; range, 0.5?9 years) with obstetric brachial plexus injury. Methods: We describe in this report the outcome of 16 patients (6 girls and 10 boys; 7 preteen and 9 teen) who have undergone the modified Quad ...

  14. Sonographic assessment of predictors of depth of the corner pocket for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Yadav

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Prescanning of supraclavicular region for estimating depth of corner pocket should be done before choosing an appropriate size needle. Furthermore, the needle should not be advanced more than the predicted corner pocket depth.

  15. Iodine 125-lysergic acid diethylamide binds to a novel serotonergic site on rat choroid plexus epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagaloff, K.A.; Hartig, P.R.

    1985-12-01

    /sup 125/I-Lysergic acid diethylamide (/sup 125/I-LSD) binds with high affinity to serotonergic sites on rat choroid plexus. These sites were localized to choroid plexus epithelial cells by use of a novel high resolution stripping film technique for light microscopic autoradiography. In membrane preparations from rat choroid plexus, the serotonergic site density was 3100 fmol/mg of protein, which is 10-fold higher than the density of any other serotonergic site in brain homogenates. The choroid plexus site exhibits a novel pharmacology that does not match the properties of 5-hydroxytryptamine-1a (5-HT1a), 5-HT1b, or 5-HT2 serotonergic sites. /sup 125/I-LSD binding to the choroid plexus site is potently inhibited by mianserin, serotonin, and (+)-LSD. Other serotonergic, dopaminergic, and adrenergic agonists and antagonists exhibit moderate to weak affinities for this site. The rat choroid plexus /sup 125/I-LSD binding site appears to represent a new type of serotonergic site which is located on non-neuronal cells in this tissue.

  16. Bupivacaína racêmica a 0,5% e mistura com excesso enantiomérico de 50% (S75-R25 a 0,5% no bloqueio do plexo braquial para cirurgia ortopédica. Estudo comparativo Bupivacaína racémica a 0,5% y mezcla con exceso enantiomérico del 50% (S75-R25 a 0,5% en el bloqueo del plexo braquial para cirugía ortopédica. Estudio comparativo Comparative study of 0.5% racemic bupivacaine versus enantiomeric mixture (S75-R25 of 0.5% bupivacaine in brachial plexus block for orthopedic surgery

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    Roberto Tsuneo Cervato Sato

    2005-04-01

    segura y efectiva para el bloqueo del plexo braquial para cirugía ortopédica de miembro superior.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several studies were performed with bupivacaine isomers in the attempt to find a safer drug than racemic bupivacaine. This study aimed at evaluating the efficacy of 0.5% bupivacaine enantiomeric mixture (MEE50% as compared to 0.5% racemic bupivacaine in brachial plexus block for upper limb orthopedic surgery. METHODS: Participated of this randomized double-blind study 40 patients aged 18 to 90 years, physical status ASA I and II, submitted to upper limb orthopedic surgeries, who were divided in two groups: Group R received 0.5% racemic bupivacaine; and Group L received 0.5% enantiomeric mixture (S75-R25 of bupivacaine both with 1:200,000 epinephrine, in a volume of 0.6 mL.kg-1 (3 mg.kg-1, limited to 40 mL. Motor and/or sensory characteristics of each nerve involved (musculocutaneous, radial, median, ulnar and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm, as well as the incidence of side effects were evaluated. RESULTS: There were no statistical differences in demographics. Hemodynamic parameters were similar between groups but systolic pressure was higher for Group R. There were no statistically significant differences in time to reach the greatest intensity of sensory and motor blocks. With one exception, the onset of motor block within the muscles innervated by the ulnar nerve was longer for Group L (10.75 versus 14.25 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: There were adequate sensory and motor blocks in both groups, with few side effects, suggesting that the 0.5% enantiomeric mixture (S75-R25 of bupivacaine with epinephrine is safe and effective for brachial plexus block of upper limb orthopedic surgeries.

  17. Cellular Specificity of the Blood-CSF Barrier for Albumin Transfer across the Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only......To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated...... in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements...

  18. Choroid-Plexus-Derived Otx2 Homeoprotein Constrains Adult Cortical Plasticity

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    Julien Spatazza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain plasticity is often restricted to critical periods in early life. Here, we show that a key regulator of this process in the visual cortex, Otx2 homeoprotein, is synthesized and secreted globally from the choroid plexus. Consequently, Otx2 is maintained in selected GABA cells unexpectedly throughout the mature forebrain. Genetic disruption of choroid-expressed Otx2 impacts these distant circuits and in the primary visual cortex reopens binocular plasticity to restore vision in amblyopic mice. The potential to regulate adult cortical plasticity through the choroid plexus underscores the importance of this structure in brain physiology and offers therapeutic approaches to recovery from a broad range of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  19. Extended long-term (5 years) outcomes of triangle tilt surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, ptriangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients.

  20. Leukemic changes of the brain: the involvement of the choroid plexus

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    Aristides Cheto de Queiroz

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available In the study of 38 cases of leukemia, neoplastic infiltration of the brain was the most frequent lesion, occuring in 70,5%, compared to 48,5% for hemorrhage. The leptomeninges were the most frequent site of leukemic infiltration followed by the choroid plexus (57,8% and the nervous tissue (50%. In few cases leukemic infiltration of choroid plexus was seen in the absence of meningeal involvement. Very often the leukemic infiltration of the CNS courses without clinical manifestations. The paper points out the importance of the cytologic study of the cerebro-spinal fluid as a routine procedure in cases of leukemia, since it is well known that the therapeutic agents have difficulty in penetrating the blood-brain barrier and that foci of CNS leukemic infiltration may represent points of reactivation of the disease even during the therapeutic remission.

  1. [Prophylactic plexus catheter treatment in operations following complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubrech, Florian; Pronk, Roderick Franciscus; Bigdeli, Amir Khosrow; Tapking, Christian; Kneser, Ulrich; Harhaus, Leila

    2017-08-01

    Background This paper investigates and discusses the effect of perioperative plexus catheter treatment in former CRPS patients. Patients and Methods A retrospective matched-pair analysis was conducted on 10 CRPS patients with comparable injuries, who underwent surgery in the disease-free interval. In 10 cases, the procedure was performed with perioperative plexus catheter treatment (intervention group), whereas 10 patients did not receive perioperative plexus catheter treatment (control group). Results In the intervention group, after a follow-up time of 105 (20-184) days after the last surgical procedure, pain intensity on the visual analogue scale (VAS; 0 to 10) was 6.4 (4-8), fingertip-to-palm distance averaged 3.2 (0-7.6) cm, active range of wrist motion was 47.5 (0-95), and grip strength was 9.2 (2.1-16.6) kg. In the control group, after a follow-up time of 129 (19-410) days since the last surgical procedure, pain intensity on the visual analogue scale was 6 (3-10), fingertip-to-palm distance averaged 2.7 (0-4.5) cm, active range of wrist-motion was 64 (0-125), and grip strength was 12.4 (0.8-23.8) kg. There was no significant difference between the groups. There was no recurrence of CRPS disease in either group after surgery. Conclusion There is no evidence so far for perioperative plexus catheter treatment to prevent recurrence in former CRPS patients. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Vascular entrapment of the sciatic plexus causing catamenial sciatica and urinary symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nucelio; Marques, Renato Moretti; Kamergorodsky, Gil; Ploger, Christine; Schor, Eduardo; Girão, Manoel J B C

    2016-02-01

    Pelvic congestion syndrome is a well-known cause of cyclic pelvic pain (Ganeshan et al., Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol 30(6):1105-11, 2007). What is much less well known is that dilated or malformed branches of the internal or external iliac vessels can entrap the nerves of the sacral plexus against the pelvic sidewalls, producing symptoms that are not commonly seen in gynecological practice, such as sciatica, or refractory urinary and anorectal dysfunction (Possover et al., Fertil Steril 95(2):756-8. 2011). The objective of this video is to explain and describe the symptoms suggestive of vascular entrapment of the sacral plexus, as well as the technique for the laparoscopic decompression of these nerves. Two anecdotal cases of intrapelvic vascular entrapment are used to review the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus and demonstrate the laparoscopic surgical technique for decompression at two different sites, one on the sciatic nerve and one on the sacral nerve roots. After surgery, the patient with the sciatic entrapment showed full recovery of the sciatica and partial recovery of the myofascial pain. The patient with sacral nerve root entrapment showed full recovery with resolution of symptoms. The symptoms suggestive of intrapelvic nerve entrapment are: perineal pain or pain irradiating to the lower limbs in the absence of a spinal disorder, and lower urinary tract symptoms in the absence of prolapse of a bladder lesion. In the presence of such symptoms, the radiologist should provide specific MRI sequences of the intrapelvic portion of the sacral plexus and a team and equipment to expose and decompress the sacral nerves should be prepared.

  3. Monoamines in the pedal plexus of the land snail Megalobulimus oblongus (Gastropoda, Pulmonata

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    Faccioni-Heuser M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In molluscs, the number of peripheral neurons far exceeds those found in the central nervous system. Although previous studies on the morphology of the peripheral nervous system exist, details of its organization remain unknown. Moreover, the foot of the terrestrial species has been studied less than that of the aquatic species. As this knowledge is essential for our experimental model, the pulmonate gastropod Megalobulimus oblongus, the aim of the present study was to investigate monoamines in the pedal plexus of this snail using two procedures: glyoxylic acid histofluorescence to identify monoaminergic structures, and the unlabeled antibody peroxidase anti-peroxidase method using antiserum to detect the serotonergic component of the plexus. Adult land snails weighing 48-80 g, obtained from the counties of Barra do Ribeiro and Charqueadas (RS, Brazil, were utilized. Monoaminergic fibers were detected throughout the pedal musculature. Blue fluorescence (catecholamines, probably dopamine was observed in nerve branches, pedal and subepithelial plexuses, and in the pedal muscle cells. Yellow fluorescence (serotonin was only observed in thick nerves and in muscle cells. However, when immunohistochemical methods were used, serotonergic fibers were detected in the pedal nerve branches, the pedal and subepithelial plexuses, the basal and lateral zones of the ventral integument epithelial cells, in the pedal ganglion neurons and beneath the ventral epithelium. These findings suggest catecholaminergic and serotonergic involvement in locomotion and modulation of both the pedal ganglion interneurons and sensory information. Knowledge of monoaminergic distribution in this snail´s foot is important for understanding the pharmacological control of reflexive responses and locomotive behavior.

  4. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the myenteric nervous plexus ganglion structures along the human digestive tract

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    Mandić Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. All the functions of the digestive system are controlled, guided and initiated by the autonomic nervous system. A special part of this system placed in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract is known as the enteric or metasympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to analyse myenteric nervous plexus in different parts of the digestive tract. Methods. We examined the myenteric nervous plexus of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, transverse colon and rectum in tissue samples taken from 30 cadavers of persons aged 20-84 years. After standard histological processing sections were stained with hematoxylineosin, cresyl violet (CV and AgNO3 method. Multipurpose test system M42 was used in morphometric analysis. The results were analyzed by t-test and analysis of variance. Results. The number of neurons per cm2 surface was the lowest in the esophagus (2.045 ± 310.30 and the largest in the duodenum (65,511 ± 5,639. The statistical processing showed significant differences (p < 0.001 in the number of neurons between the esophagus and all other parts of the digestive tract. The maximal value of the average surface of the myenteric nervous plexus neurons was observed in the esophagus (588.93 ± 30.45 μm2 and the lowest in the stomach (296.46 ± 22.53 μm2. Conclusion. There are differences in the number of ganglion cells among different parts of the human digestive tract. The differences range from a few to several tens of thousands of neuron/cm2. The myenteric nervous plexus of the esophagus was characterized by a significantly smaller number of neurons but their bodies and nuclei are significantly larger compared to other parts of the digestive tract.

  5. A French retrospective study on clinical outcome in 102 choroid plexus tumors in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, A; Morin, S; Munzer, C; Delisle, M B; Gambart, M; Puget, S; Maurage, C A; Miquel, C; Dufour, C; Leblond, P; André, N; Branger, D Figarella; Kanold, J; Kemeny, J-L; Icher, C; Vital, A; Coste, E Uro; Bertozzi, A I

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to review and describe therapeutic approaches in children with choroid plexus tumor (CPT) based on a nationwide series. The World Health Organization classification subdivides these rare tumors into three histological subtypes corresponding to three grades of malignancy: low grade (grade I) choroid plexus papilloma (CPP), intermediate grade (grade II) atypical choroid plexus papilloma (aCPP) and high grade (grade III) choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC). This retrospective study included 102 French children younger than 18 years, treated from 2000 to 2012: 54 CPP, 26 aCPP and 22 CPC. The 5 year overall survival was 100% in CPP, 96.2% in aCPP and 64.7% in CPC. In patients with localized disease, complete surgical resection was achieved in 48/52 CPP, 20/26 aCPP and 7/14 CPC. In this group, patients with complete surgical resection had better event free survival than patients with partial resection (88.9 vs. 41.6%). 28 patients (1 CPP, 6 aCPP and 22 CPC) had adjuvant chemotherapy. 2 aCPP and 9 CPC had radiotherapy. We underlined the need for a central histological review to accurately analyze clinical data; we reported a much higher overall survival for CPC than in most previous CPT series probably including atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. In our series, the 5 years overall survival in CPC (64.7%) was higher than event free survival (25.2%) and could be interpreted as a clue for the efficiency of adjuvant/salvage therapy even if the heterogeneity of applied treatments in this retrospective series does not allow for meaningful statistical comparisons.

  6. Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus: rationale and operative technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumonerie, Pierre; Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Dyck, P James B; Spinner, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Nerve biopsy is useful in the management of neuromuscular disorders and is commonly performed in distal, noncritical cutaneous nerves. In general, these procedures are diagnostic in only 20%-50%. In selected cases in which preoperative evaluation points toward a more localized process, targeted biopsy would likely improve diagnostic yield. The authors report their experience with targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus and provide a description of the operative technique. METHODS All cases of targeted biopsy of the brachial plexus biopsy performed between 2003 and 2015 were reviewed. Targeted nerve biopsy was performed using a supraclavicular, infraclavicular, or proximal medial arm approach. Demographic data and clinical presentation as well as the details of the procedure, adverse events (temporary or permanent), and final pathological findings were recorded. RESULTS Brachial plexus biopsy was performed in 74 patients (47 women and 27 men). The patients' mean age was 57.7 years. All patients had abnormal findings on physical examination, electrodiagnostic studies, and MRI. The overall diagnostic yield of biopsy was 74.3% (n = 55). The most common diagnoses included inflammatory demyelination (19), breast carcinoma (17), neurolymphomatosis (8), and perineurioma (7). There was a 19% complication rate; most of the complications were minor or transient, but 4 patients (5.4%) had increased numbness and 3 (4.0%) had additional weakness following biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Targeted fascicular biopsy of the brachial plexus is an effective diagnostic procedure, and in highly selected cases should be considered as the initial procedure over nontargeted, distal cutaneous nerve biopsy. Using MRI to guide the location of a fascicular biopsy, the authors found this technique to produce a higher diagnostic yield than historical norms as well as providing justification for definitive treatment.

  7. Texas Red transport across rat and dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) choroid plexus

    OpenAIRE

    Reichel, Valeska; Miller, David S.; Fricker, Gert

    2008-01-01

    Confocal microscopy and image analysis were used to compare driving forces, specificity, and regulation of transport of the fluorescent organic anion, Texas Red (sulforhodamine 101 free acid; TR), in lateral choroid plexus (CP) isolated from rat and an evolutionarily ancient vertebrate, dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias). CP from both species exhibited concentrative, specific, and metabolism-dependent TR transport from bath to subepithelial/vascular space; at steady state, TR accumulation in v...

  8. Morphology and Topography of the Celiac Plexus in Degu (Octodon Degus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchinka, Jacek; Nowak, Elżbieta; Kuder, Tadeusz; Szczurkowski, Aleksander

    2015-11-01

    Here, we investigate the morphology and topography of the celiac plexus components in degu (Octodon degus). The study was performed using six adult individuals of both sexes. Macromorphological observations were performed using a derivative of the thiocholine method specially adapted for this study type (Gienc, 1977). The classical H&E technique was used for analysis of the cytoarchitectonic of the ganglion, and the AChE (Karnovsky and Roots, 1964) and SPG (De la Torre, 1980) techniques to observe cholinergic and adrenergic activity. The celiac plexus of degu is located on the ventral and lateral surface of the abdominal aorta, at the level where the celiac artery separates from the aorta. This structure consists of two large and two smaller aggregations of neurocytes connected with postganglionic fibers. Histochemical investigations have demonstrated the mainly cholinergic characteristic of the intraganglionic and postganglionic fibers of the celiac plexus, while the adrenergic fibers accompanied only the blood vessels and neurocytes revealed differentiation of adrenergic activity. Histological analysis revealed that neurocytes occupied about half of the cross-section area, with the nerve fibers, connective tissue, and blood vessels forming the remaining part. Ganglionic cells were oval, and usually contained a single nucleus, although two nuclei were sometimes observed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Morphometry of submucous and myenteric esophagic plexus of dogs experimentally reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

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    Machado Evandro MM

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out a morphometric study of the esophagus of cross-bred dogs experimentally infected or consecutively reinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi 147 and SC-1 strains, in order to verify denervation and/or neuronal hypertrophy in the intramural plexus. The animals were sacrificed in the chronic stage, 38 months after the initial infection. Neither nests of amastigotes, nor myositis or ganglionitis, were observed in all third inferior portions of esophageal rings analyzed. No nerve cell was identified in the submucous of this organ. There was no significant difference (p>0.05 between the number, maximum diameter, perimeter, or area and volume of the nerve cells of the myenteric plexus of infected and/or reinfected dogs and of the non-infected ones. In view of these results we may conclude that the 147 and SC-1 strains have little neurotropism and do not determine denervation and/or hypertrophy in the intramural esophageal plexuses in the animals studied, independent of the reinfections.

  10. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

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    Duz Bulent

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients.

  11. Morphometry and acetylcholinesterase activity of the myenteric plexus of the wild mouse Calomys callosus

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    L.B.M. Maifrino

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available The myenteric plexus of the digestive tract of the wild mouse Calomys callosus was examined using a histochemical method that selectively stains nerve cells, and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE histochemical technique in whole-mount preparations. Neuronal density was 1,500 ± 116 neurons/cm2 (mean ± SEM in the esophagus, 8,900 ± 1,518 in the stomach, 9,000 ± 711 in the jejunum and 13,100 ± 2,089 in the colon. The difference in neuronal density between the esophagus and other regions was statistically significant. The neuron profile area ranged from 45 to 1,100 µm2. The difference in nerve cell size between the jejunum and other regions was statistically significant. AChE-positive nerve fibers were distributed within the myenteric plexus which is formed by a primary meshwork of large nerve bundles and a secondary meshwork of finer nerve bundles. Most of the nerve cells displayed AChE activity in the cytoplasm of different reaction intensities. These results are important in order to understand the changes occurring in the myenteric plexus in experimental Chagas' disease

  12. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: reviewing the literature comparing the results of primary versus secondary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Costales, Javier Robla; Paez, Miguel Domínguez; Nizzo, Gustavo; Valbuena, Sebastian; Varone, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPP) are a relatively common stretch injury of the brachial plexus that occurs during delivery. Roughly 30 % of patients will not recover completely and will need a surgical repair. Two main treatment strategies have been used: primary surgery, consisting in exploring and reconstructing the affected portions of the brachial plexus within the first few months of the patient's life, and secondary procedures that include tendon or muscle transfers, osteotomies, and other orthopedic techniques. Secondary procedures can be done as the only surgical treatment of OBPP or after primary surgery, in order to minimize any residual deficits. Two things are crucial to achieving a good outcome: (1) the appropriate selection of patients, to separate those who will spontaneously recover from those who will recover only partially or not at all; and (2) a good surgical technique. The objective of the present review is to assess the published literature concerning certain controversial issues in OBPP, especially in terms of the true current state of primary and secondary procedures, their results, and the respective roles each plays in modern-day treatment of this complex pathology. Considerable published evidence compiled over decades of surgical experience favors primary nerve surgery as the initial therapeutic step in patients who do not recover spontaneously, followed by secondary surgeries for further functional improvement. As described in this review, the results of such treatment can greatly ameliorate function in affected limbs. For best results, multi-disciplinary teams should treat these patients.

  13. Purely endoscopic resection of a choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Maria M; Souweidane, Mark M

    2015-07-01

    The authors report an illustrative case of a purely endoscopic surgical approach to successfully remove a solid choroid plexus papilloma of the third ventricle in an infant. A 10-week-old male infant first presented with transient episodes of forced downward gaze, divergent macrocephaly, a tense anterior fontanel, diastasis of the cranial sutures, and papilledema. Brain MRI revealed a small, multilobulated contrast-enhancing mass situated within the posterior third ventricle, with resultant obstructive hydrocephalus. A purely endoscopic removal of the tumor was performed through a single right frontal bur hole. Intraoperatively, a unique vascular tributary was recognized coming from the tela choroidea and was controlled with coagulation and sharp dissection. Postoperative MRI confirmed complete tumor removal, and the tumor was classified as a choroid plexus papilloma. There has been no evidence of tumor recurrence over 42 months of follow-up. With this case report the authors intended to show that endoscopic surgery can be an additional tool to consider when planning a choroid plexus tumor approach. It seems to be of particular interest in selected cases in which there are concerns about the patient's total blood volume, as in infants with potential hemorrhagic tumors and when it is possible to preoperatively identify a single vascular pedicle that can be approached early in the surgery.

  14. Lesões expansivas do plexo coróide Choroid plexus mass lesions

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    Ernesto Lima Araújo Melo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available As lesões expansivas do plexo coróide constituem um grupo bastante amplo e heterogêneo de doenças e seus simuladores. Tumores, infecções, anomalias congênitas, hemorragias, cistos e fenômenos degenerativos são alguns dos exemplos de causas de lesões expansivas do plexo coróide. No presente trabalho fizemos revisão da literatura pertinente, descrevendo os achados de imagem e ilustrando-os com alguns casos do nosso serviço. Apesar de não existir na literatura descrição de sinais patognomônicos, a avaliação criteriosa e sistemática das características das lesões pode sugerir determinada etiologia.Choroid plexus mass lesions encompass a broad and heterogeneous group of diseases and their simulators. Tumors, infections, congenital anomalies, hemorrhage, cysts and degenerative diseases are some examples of mass lesions affecting the choroid plexus. In this article we review the current literature, describing the imaging findings and illustrating choroid plexus mass lesions with some cases diagnosed at our facility. Despite the inexistence of pathognomonic signs, a careful and systematic evaluation of the imaging characteristics may suggest many etiologies.

  15. Transport of cefodizime, a novel third generation cephalosporin antibiotic, in isolated rat choroid plexus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohjoh, T.; Suzuki, H.; Sawada, Y.; Sugiyama, Y.; Iga, T.; Hanano, M.

    1989-07-01

    To characterize the transport system by which cephalosporin antibiotics are accumulated by the choroid plexus, kinetic analysis of cefodizime transport was performed. Accumulation of cefodizime was against an electrochemical potential gradient via a saturable process (Km = 470 microM, Vmax = 174 nmol/ml of tissue per min) that was inhibited by metabolic inhibitors (KCN and 2,4-dinitrophenol), hypothermia, a sulfhydryl reagent (p-hydroxymer-curibenzoic acid) and anion transport inhibitors (probenecid and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene -2,2'-disulfonic acid). Accumulation of cefodizime was inhibited competitively by benzylpenicillin with an inhibition constant of aproximately 100 microM. Cefodizime inhibited competitively the accumulation of benzylpenicillin with an inhibition constant of approximately 500 microM. Kinetic analysis using 16 kinds of beta-lactam antibiotics also supported the view (1) that the transport system of cefodizime is shared by benzylpenicillin and (2) that these beta-lactam antibiotics are transported via a common transport system. These findings indicate that the major transport system of cephalosporin antibiotics in the rat choroid plexus is via a carrier-mediated active anion transport process. The affinity of beta-lactam antibiotics for this transport system in the choroid plexus may be a major factor in determining their pharmacokinetics in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  16. DEVELOPMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS IN BLUE-FRONTED PARROT (Amazona aestiva, Linnaeus, 1758

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    Rayssa Marley Nóbrega da Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetic procedures are commonly used in domestic and wild birds, because of its low cost and fast induction, as long as applied with great precision, which requires specific anatomical knowledge of the site of incision. This study aimed to establish the origin and distribution of the brachial plexus of the Blue-fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva by anatomic dissection of the skin and musculature of 22 specimens (17 males and 5 females from the Wild Animals Screening Center of the Federal District after death by natural causes. The dissection work promoted the isolation of the forming roots of the brachial plexus, as well as its ramifications. The brachial plexus was formed by four trunks, including the ventral spinal cord rami segments from C9 to C10, C10 to C11, C11 to T1 and T1 to T2, which joined into a short common trunk, branched into dorsal and ventral cords. The thin nerves subcoracoideus and subscapularis and the branch to the scapulohumeralis muscle originated from the common trunk. The dorsal cord originated the anconeal, axillaris and radialis nerves, while the ventral cord gave origin for the pectoralis cranialis, pectoralis caudalis, coracobrachialis and medianoulnaris. These branches innervated the muscles of the extensor and flexor compartments of the forelimb, pectoral muscles and overlying skin.

  17. Connecting the coronaries: How the coronary plexus develops and is functionalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Laura; Pi, Xinchun; Patterson, Cam

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of the coronary circulation is one of the final critical steps during heart development. Despite decades of research, our understanding of how the coronary vasculature develops and connects to the aorta remains limited. This review serves two specific purposes: it addresses recent advances in understanding the origin of the coronary endothelium, and it then focuses on the last crucial step of coronary vasculature development, the connection of the coronary plexus to the aorta. The chick and quail animal models have yielded most of the information for how these connections form, starting with a fine network of vessels that penetrate the aorta and coalesce to form two distinct ostia. Studies in mouse and rat confirm that at least some of these steps are conserved in mammals, but gaps still exist in our understanding of mammalian coronary ostia formation. The signaling cues necessary to guide the coronary plexus to the aorta are also incompletely understood. Hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1 and its downstream targets are among the few identified genes that promote the formation of the coronary stems. Together, this review summarizes our current knowledge of coronary vascular formation and highlights the significant gaps that remain. In addition, it highlights some of the coronary artery anomalies known to affect human health, demonstrating that even seemingly subtle defects arising from incorrect coronary plexus formation can result in significant health crises. PMID:25173872

  18. Ultrasound-Guided Nerve Block with Botulinum Toxin Type A for Intractable Neuropathic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Eun Moon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain includes postherpetic neuralgia (PHN, painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN, and trigeminal neuralgia, and so on. Although various drugs have been tried to treat neuropathic pain, the effectiveness of the drugs sometimes may be limited for chronic intractable neuropathic pain, especially when they cannot be used at an adequate dose, due to undesirable severe side effects and the underlying disease itself. Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A has been known for its analgesic effect in various pain conditions. Nevertheless, there are no data of nerve block in PHN and PDN. Here, we report two patients successfully treated with ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block using BoNT-A for intractable PHN and PDN. One patient had PHN on the left upper extremity and the other patient had PDN on a lower extremity. Due to side effects of drugs, escalation of the drug dose could not be made. We injected 50 Botox units (BOTOX®, Allergan Inc., Irvine, CA, USA into brachial plexus and lumbar plexus, respectively, under ultrasound. Their pain was significantly decreased for about 4–5 months. Ultrasound-guided nerve block with BoNT-A may be an effective analgesic modality in a chronic intractable neuropathic pain especially when conventional treatment failed to achieve adequate pain relief.

  19. In with the new, out with the old? Comparison of two approaches for psoas compartment block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mannion, Stephen

    2012-02-03

    We compared the approaches of Winnie and Capdevila for psoas compartment block (PCB) performed by a single operator in terms of contralateral spread, lumbar plexus blockade, and postoperative analgesic efficacy. Sixty patients underwent PCB (0.4 mL\\/kg levobupivacaine 0.5%) and subsequent spinal anesthesia for primary joint arthroplasty (hip or knee) in a prospective, double-blind study. Patients were randomly allocated to undergo PCB by using the Capdevila (group C; n = 30) or a modified Winnie (group W; n = 30) approach. Contralateral spread and lumbar plexus blockade were assessed 15, 30, and 45 min after PCB. Contralateral spread (bilateral from T4 to S5) and femoral and lateral cutaneous nerve block were evaluated by sensory testing, and obturator motor block was assessed. Bilateral anesthesia occurred in 10 patients in group C and 12 patients in group W (P = 0.8). Blockade of the femoral, lateral cutaneous, and obturator nerves was 90%, 93%, and 80%, respectively, for group C and 93%, 97%, and 90%, respectively, for group W (P > 0.05). No differences were found in PCB procedure time, pain scores, 24-h morphine consumption, or time to first morphine analgesia.

  20. Generalized Block Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe

    2015-01-01

    Block tearing is considered in several codes as a pure block tension or a pure block shear failure mechanism. However in many situations the load acts eccentrically and involves the transfer of a substantial moment in combination with the shear force and perhaps a normal force. A literature study...

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ROPIVACAINE V/S ROPIVACAINE WITH MAGNESIUM SULPHATE FOR BRACHIAL PLUXUS BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarjuna Reddy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The prime duty of any anesthesiologist is to relive pain in the perioperative period. Today regional anesthesia is well established as equal to general anesthesia in effectiveness and patient acceptability. Regional anesthesia is blocking of peripheral ner ve conduction in a reversible way using local anesthetic agents. For surgeries on upper extremities, particularly in emergency surgeries, regional anesthesia has many advantages over general anesthesia. The brachial plexus is approached at the level of tru nks and the compact arrangement of trunks at the supraclavicular level gives a high success rate with minimum local anesthetic drug volume and a dense and fast onset of the block. To prolong the duration of analgesia various drugs have been studied as adju vants to the local anesthetics. AIM : To compare the efficacy of Ropivacaine and Ropivacaine with Magnesium Sulphate for Brachial Plexus Block by Supraclavicular technique, for upper limb orthopedic surgeries. DESIGN : A Prospective randomized comparative st udy . METHODS : Sixty adult patients of both sexes in the age group of 20 - 60 years belonging to ASA I/II category posted for various types of upper limb surgeries. The patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Supraclavicular brachial plexus block wa s performed. Group – I (Ropivacaine alone – 30 patients received 29ml of 0.75% Ropiva caine with 1ml of normal saline .Group – II (Ropivacaine+Magnesium – 30 patients received 29ml of 0.75% Ropivacaine with Magnesium Sulphate 250mg (1ml of 500mg drug diluted wi th 1ml of distilled water. The following parameters were observed after performing Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus block in both the groups: 1. Time of onset of block (Sensory and Motor 2. Total Duration of Analgesia 3. Total Duration of Motor Blockade 4 . Dermatomes/Nerves blocked 5. Complications if any. RESULTS : There was no significant difference in onset of sensory blockade between Group I ( 4

  2. Total Spinal Block after Thoracic Paravertebral Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyaz, Serbülent Gökhan; Özocak, Hande; Ergönenç, Tolga; Erdem, Ali Fuat; Palabıyık, Onur

    2014-02-01

    Thoracic paravertebral block (TPVB) can be performed with or without general anaesthesia for various surgical procedures. TPVB is a popular anaesthetic technique due to its low side effect profile and high analgesic potency. We used 20 mL of 0.5% levobupivacaine for a single injection of unilateral TPVB at the T7 level with neurostimulator in a 63 year old patient with co-morbid disease who underwent cholecystectomy. Following the application patient lost consciousness, and was intubated. Haemodynamic instability was normalised with rapid volume replacement and vasopressors. Anaesthetic drugs were stopped at the end of the surgery and muscle relaxant was antagonised. Return of mucle strenght was shown with neuromuscular block monitoring. Approximately three hours after TPVB, spontaneous breathing started and consciousness returned. A total spinal block is a rare and life-threatening complication. A total spinal block is a complication of spinal anaesthesia, and it can also occur after peripheral blocks. Clinical presentation is characterised by hypotension, bradicardia, apnea, and cardiac arrest. An early diagnosis and appropriate treatment is life saving. In this case report, we want to present total spinal block after TPVB.

  3. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable option for shoulder reinnervation in

  4. Results of intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng-Bo; Chen, Liang; Zhou, Cheng-Huan; Hu, Shao-Nan; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2011-12-01

    Intercostal nerve (ICN) transfer has been one of the main extraplexal nerve transfers in treating brachial plexus root avulsion. This retrospective study evaluated results of ICN transfer for reconstruction of the musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) in brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP). Eighteen boys and 6 girls with BPBP, who had avulsion of at least 2 spinal nerves of the plexus, underwent ICN transfer for reconstruction of MCN, from March 2003 to October 2005. The brachial plexus lesion was diagnosed by clinical assessment, surgical exploration, and intraoperative neurophysiological investigations. The age at surgery ranged from 3 to 11 months of life, with a mean of 5 months. Two intercostals were used for one, 3 intercostals for 9, and 4 intercostals for 14 patients. The intercostals were transferred to MCN in 12 and to the anterior division of the upper trunk in the other 12 cases. Twenty-four children were followed up for 24 to 79 months, with an average of 53 months. No complications were found in the respiratory system. Of 14 transfers with 4 intercostals, biceps gained M4 strength in 8, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. Of 9 transfers with 3 intercostals, biceps obtained M4 strength in 8 and M3 in 1. One transfer with 2 intercostals got M4 strength of biceps. Twelve patients whose intercostals were transferred to MCN, gained M4 strength of biceps in 11 and M3 in 1, whereas the other 12 patients with intercostals transferred to anterior division of the upper trunk, obtained M4 strength of biceps in 6, M3 in 4, and M2 in 2. The rate of M3 strength or more was 92% and that of M4 was 71%. ICN transfer is a safe and reliable procedure for reconstruction of the MCN in BPBP. There seems to be no difference of effects between transfers with 3 and those with 4 intercostals. The transferred nerves should be coapted to MCN, rather than a more proximal portion of the plexus. Level III: retrospective comparative study.

  5. Biceps Brachii Long Head Overactivity Associated with Elbow Flexion Contracture in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C.; Lattanza, Lisa; Sison-Williamson, Mitell; James, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The etiology of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy remains unclear. We hypothesized that the long head of the biceps brachii muscle assists with shoulder stabilization in children with brachial plexus birth palsy and that overactivity of the long head during elbow and shoulder activity is associated with an elbow flexion contracture. Methods: Twenty-one patients with brachial plexus birth palsy-associated elbow flexion contracture underwent testing with surface electromyography. Twelve patients underwent repeat testing with fine-wire electromyography. Surface electrodes were placed on the muscle belly, and fine-wire electrodes were inserted bilaterally into the long and short heads of the biceps brachii. Patients were asked to perform four upper extremity tasks: elbow flexion-extension, hand to head, high reach, and overhead ball throw. The mean duration of muscle activity in the affected limb was compared with that in the contralateral, unaffected limb, which was used as a control. Three-dimensional motion analysis, surface dynamometry, and validated function measures were used to evaluate upper extremity kinematics, elbow flexor-extensor muscle imbalance, and function. Results: The mean activity duration of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle was significantly higher in the affected limb as compared with the contralateral, unaffected limb during hand-to-head tasks (p = 0.02) and high-reach tasks (p = 0.03). No significant differences in mean activity duration were observed for the short head of the biceps brachii muscle between the affected and unaffected limbs. Isometric strength of elbow flexion was not significantly higher than that of elbow extension in the affected limb (p = 0.11). Conclusions: Overactivity of the long head of the biceps brachii muscle is associated with and may contribute to the development of elbow flexion contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. Elbow flexion

  6. Neurochemical features of endomorphin-2-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Gao, Chang-Jun; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Jiao, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Lian-Xiang; Wu, Zhen-Yu; He, Zhong-Yi; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-09-14

    To investigate the distribution and neurochemical phenotype of endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-containing neurons in the submucosal plexus of the rat colon. The mid-colons between the right and left flexures were removed from rats, and transferred into Kreb's solution. For whole-mount preparations, the mucosal, outer longitudinal muscle and inner circular muscle layers of the tissues were separated from the submucosal layer attached to the submucosal plexus. The whole-mount preparations from each rat mid-colon were mounted onto seven gelatin-coated glass slides, and processed for immunofluorescence histochemical double-staining of EM-2 with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), neuron-specific enolase (NSE), substance P (SP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). After staining, all the fluorescence-labeled sections were observed with a confocal laser scanning microscope. To estimate the extent of the co-localization of EM-2 with CGRP, ChAT, NOS, NSE, SP and VIP, ganglia, which have a clear boundary and neuronal cell outline, were randomly selected from each specimen for this analysis. In the submucosal plexus of the mid-colon, many EM-2-immunoreactive (IR) and NSE-IR neuronal cell bodies were found in the submucosal plexus of the rat mid-colon. Approximately 6 ± 4.2 EM-2-IR neurons aggregated within each ganglion and a few EM-2-IR neurons were also found outside the ganglia. The EM-2-IR neurons were also immunopositive for ChAT, SP, VIP or NOS. EM-2-IR nerve fibers coursed near ChAT-IR neurons, and some of these fibers were even distributed around ChAT-IR neuronal cell bodies. Some EM-2-IR neuronal cell bodies were surrounded by SP-IR nerve fibers, but many long processes connecting adjacent ganglia were negative for EM-2 immunostaining. Long VIP-IR processes with many branches coursed through the ganglia and surrounded the EM-2-IR neurons. The percentages of the EM-2-IR neurons that were also positive for

  7. PARACENTRAL ACUTE MIDDLE MACULOPATHY AND DEEP RETINAL CAPILLARY PLEXUS INFARCTION SECONDARY TO REPERFUSED CENTRAL RETINAL ARTERY OCCLUSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iafe, Nicholas A; Onclinx, Tania; Tsui, Irena; Sarraf, David

    2017-01-01

    To report a case of reperfused central retinal artery occlusion causing a globular pattern of paracentral acute middle maculopathy with en face optical coherence tomography (OCT). Retrospective case report. Widefield fluorescein angiography, en face OCT, and OCT-angiography were performed. Retinal capillary plexus vessel density (mm) was measured using OCT-angiography analysis and was defined as total vessel length (mm) per area (mm). A 76-year-old female presented with decreased vision in the left eye for 1 day. Widefield fluorescein angiography revealed delayed venous filling in the early phase and selective arterial staining in the late phase. Spectral domain OCT demonstrated paracentral acute middle maculopathy. Optical coherence tomography-angiography showed an ischemic deep retinal capillary plexus that colocalized with a globular shaped hyper-reflective pattern identified with structural en face OCT. Quantitative vessel density analysis comparing the fellow eye to the affected eye at presentation demonstrated 43% reduction in the superficial capillary plexus vessel density and 33% reduction of the deep capillary plexus in the affected eye. At 2 months follow-up, the reduction of superficial capillary plexus vessel density improved to 33%, whereas the deep capillary plexus vessel density reduced further to 35% compared with the fellow eye. The authors report a case of reperfused central retinal artery occlusion leading to a globular shaped paracentral acute middle maculopathy lesion with en face OCT. Quantitative OCT-angiography vessel density analysis in the chronic phase revealed disproportionate reduction of deep capillary plexus vessel density. The globular pattern of paracentral acute middle maculopathy with en face OCT can be an important clue to the diagnosis of central retinal artery occlusion.

  8. The Prevalence, Rate of Progression, and Treatment of Elbow Flexion Contracture in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffler, Lindsey C.; Lattanza, Lisa; Hagar, Yolanda; Bagley, Anita; James, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Elbow flexion contracture is a well-known complication of brachial plexus birth palsy that adversely affects upper-extremity function. The prevalence, risk factors, and rate of progression of elbow flexion contracture associated with brachial plexus birth palsy have not been established, and the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment involving nighttime splinting or serial casting has not been well studied. Methods: The medical records of 319 patients with brachial plexus birth palsy who had been seen at our institution between 1992 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with an elbow flexion contracture (≥10°). The chi-square test for trend and the Kaplan-Meier estimator were used to evaluate risk factors for contracture, including age, sex, and the extent of brachial plexus involvement. Longitudinal models were used to estimate the rate of contracture progression and the effectiveness of nonoperative treatment. Results: An elbow flexion contracture was present in 48% (152) of the patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. The median age of onset was 5.1 years (range, 0.25 to 14.8 years). The contracture was ≥30° in 36% (fifty-four) of these 152 patients and was accompanied by a documented radial head dislocation in 6% (nine). The prevalence of contracture increased with increasing age (p contracture increased by 4.4% per year before treatment (p contracture decreased by 31% when casting was performed (p contracture did not improve when splinting was performed but the rate of increase thereafter decreased to contracture in children with brachial plexus birth palsy may be greater than clinicians perceive. The prevalence increased with patient age but was not significantly affected by sex or by the extent of brachial plexus involvement. Serial casting may initially improve severe contractures, whereas nighttime splinting may prevent further progression of milder contractures. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See

  9. Blocked Randomization with Randomly Selected Block Sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Efird

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  10. Blocked randomization with randomly selected block sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Jimmy

    2011-01-01

    When planning a randomized clinical trial, careful consideration must be given to how participants are selected for various arms of a study. Selection and accidental bias may occur when participants are not assigned to study groups with equal probability. A simple random allocation scheme is a process by which each participant has equal likelihood of being assigned to treatment versus referent groups. However, by chance an unequal number of individuals may be assigned to each arm of the study and thus decrease the power to detect statistically significant differences between groups. Block randomization is a commonly used technique in clinical trial design to reduce bias and achieve balance in the allocation of participants to treatment arms, especially when the sample size is small. This method increases the probability that each arm will contain an equal number of individuals by sequencing participant assignments by block. Yet still, the allocation process may be predictable, for example, when the investigator is not blind and the block size is fixed. This paper provides an overview of blocked randomization and illustrates how to avoid selection bias by using random block sizes.

  11. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang G Thakkar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM. Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study.

  12. Description of the brachial plexus of the short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis Sclater, 1882: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luane Lopes Pinheiro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The short-eared dog (Atelocynus microtis is one of the rarest species of South American canids. Aiming to describe the morphology of this animal and enhance the study of comparative neuroanatomy, we studied the anatomical makeup of the brachial plexus of a female specimen from Paragominas (PA. The specimen was donated, after natural death, to the Institute of Animal Health and Production (ISPA at the Universidade Federal Rural da Amazônia (UFRA. The animal was fixed in 10% formalin and later dissected bilaterally to reveal the origin of the brachial plexus. In A. microtis, the brachial plexus is derived from the ventral rami of the last three cervical spinal nerves and the first thoracic spinal nerve (C6-T1. The brachial plexus derivatives with their respective origins were: suprascapular n. (C6 and C7, subscapular n. (C6, musculocutaneous n. (C6 and C7, axillary n. (C6 and C7, radial n. (C7 and C8, median n. (C7, C8 and T1, ulnar n. (C8 and T1, thoracodorsal n. (C8 and T1, cranial pectoral nn. (C7, C8 and T1 and caudal pectoral nn. (C8 and T1. The brachial plexus of A. microtis resembled what has been described for the domestic dog, in relation to the origin of the initial and final segment, but showed differences in the composition of some nerves.

  13. To Block or Not to Block?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. (Arona) Cristina; N.M.G. (Nicole) Tweeboom; E.M. (Ellen) Wesselingh

    2013-01-01

    An investigation into whether or not young people studying in higher education in the Netherlands have modified their download behaviour, in the light of a legal obligation to block The Pirate Bay (TPB) by Dutch Internet Service Providers (ISPs). In the lawsuit, it is argued that a blockade by the

  14. Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann; Meier, Kaare; Perinpam, Larshan

    Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report......Peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) in the trapezius muscle region alleviate chronic neuropathic pain after lower brachial plexus root avulsion lesion: A case report...

  15. Pathological alteration in the choroid plexus of Alzheimer´s disease: implication for new therapy approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka eKrzyzanowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Morphological alterations of choroid plexus in Alzheimer´s disease (AD have been extensively investigated. These changes include epithelial atrophy, thickening of the basement membrane and stroma fibrosis. As a result, synthesis, secretory, and transportation functions are significantly altered resulting in decreased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF turnover. Recent studies discuss the potential impacts of these changes, including the possibility of reduced resistance to stress insults and slow clearance of toxic compounds from CSF with specific reference to the amyloid peptide. Here, we review new evidences for AD-related changes in the choroid plexus. The data suggest that the significantly altered functions of the choroid plexus contribute to the multiparametric pathogenesis of late-onset AD.

  16. Sensory restoration by lateral antebrachial cutaneous to ulnar nerve transfer in children with global brachial plexus injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruchelsman, David E; Price, Andrew E; Valencia, Herbert; Ramos, Lorna E; Grossman, John A I

    2010-12-01

    Selective peripheral nerve transfers represent an emerging reconstructive strategy in the management of both pediatric and adult brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm into the distal ulnar nerve is a useful means to restore sensibility to the ulnar side of the hand when indicated. This technique is particularly valuable in the management of global brachial plexus birth injuries in children for which its application has not been previously reported. Four children ages 4 to 9 years who sustained brachial plexus birth injury with persistent absent sensibility on the unlar aspect of the hand underwent transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the distal ulnar nerve. In three patients, a direct transfer with a distal end-to-side repair through a deep longitudinal neurotomy was performed. In a single patient, an interposition nerve graft was required. Restoration of sensibility was evaluated by the "wrinkle test."

  17. Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: spontaneous resolution of diffuse leptomeningeal contrast enhancement after primary tumor removal in 2 pediatric cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Marcello; Morana, Giovanni; Milanaccio, Claudia; Pavanello, Marco; Nozza, Paolo; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2017-09-01

    Atypical choroid plexus papillomas can metastasize in the form of leptomeningeal seeding. Postoperative chemotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment when gross-total removal is not achieved or in cases of disseminated disease. Here the authors report on 2 children with atypical choroid plexus papillomas and MRI findings of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at diagnosis, later presenting with spontaneous resolution of the leptomeningeal involvement after removal of the primary lesions. Observations in this report expand our knowledge about the natural history and biological behavior of these tumors and highlight the role of close neuroimaging surveillance in the management of atypical choroid plexus papillomas in cases with MRI evidence of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at presentation.

  18. Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and fiber tractography of the sacral plexus in children with spina bifida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakma, Wieke; Dik, Pieter; ten Haken, Bennie

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: It is still largely unknown how neural tube defects in spina bifida affect the nerves at the level of the sacral plexus. Visualizing the sacral plexus in 3 dimensions could improve our anatomical understanding of neurological problems in patients with spina bifida. We investigated...... anatomical and microstructural properties of the sacral plexus of patients with spina bifida using diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tractography. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients 8 to 16 years old with spina bifida underwent diffusion tensor imaging on a 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging system...... compared to 10 healthy controls. RESULTS: Nerves of patients with spina bifida showed asymmetry and disorganization to a large extent compared to those of healthy controls. Especially at the myelomeningocele level it was difficult to find a connection with the cauda equina. Mean, axial and radial...

  19. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Extraventricular Intraparenchymal Choroid Plexus Tumors in Cerebral Hemisphere: A Series of 6 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qichao; Ni, Shilei; Zhou, Xudong; Huang, Bin; Li, Xingang

    2015-12-01

    Extraventricular intraparenchymal choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) in the cerebral hemisphere are extremely rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, radiologic findings, and surgical outcomes of this atypical type of CPT. The study comprised 6 patients with pathologically proven extraventricular intraparenchymal CPTs who were surgically treated at Qilu Hospital of Shandong University. The PubMed database was searched for similar cases published before January 2015, and these cases were reviewed. Patients were 5 (83.3%) men and 1 (16.7%) woman with an average age of 46.5 years. Symptoms and signs of CPT were usually associated with increased intracranial pressure and invasion of functional areas by tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging commonly demonstrated a contrast-enhancing intraparenchymal mass with cysts; hydrocephalus was not observed in any cases. Subtotal resection and gross total resection were achieved in 1 (16.7%) and 5 (83.3%) cases, respectively. There were 3 cases (50.0%) of choroid plexus papilloma, 2 cases (33.3%) of atypical choroid plexus papilloma, and 1 case (16.7%) not otherwise specified. There was a low incidence of postoperative complications, and surgical outcomes of CPTs were satisfactory. In contrast to typical lesions, extraventricular intraparenchymal CPTs in the cerebral hemisphere are rarely associated with hydrocephalus. Magnetic resonance imaging features are key in preoperative diagnosis; nevertheless, it is difficult to distinguish this atypical type of CPT from other lesions. Surgical removal of the tumor is safe and efficacious. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters in duodenum, collecting ducts and choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    Epithelia cover the internal and external surfaces of the organism and form barriers between the various compartments. Some of these epithelia are specialized for effective transmembrane or even transepithelial movement of acid-base equivalents. Certain epithelia with a high rate of HCO3- transport express a few potent Na+-coupled acid-base transporters to gain a net HCO3- movement across the epithelium. Examples of such epithelia are renal proximal tubules and pancreatic ducts. In contrast, multiple Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters are expressed in other HCO3- secreting epithelia, such as the duodenal mucosa or the choroid plexus, which maintain suitable intracellular pH despite a variable demand for secreting HCO3-. In the duodenum, the epithelial cells must secrete HCO3- for neutralization of the gastric acid, and at the same time prevent cellular acidification. During the neutralization, large quantities of CO2 are formed in the duodenal lumen, which enter the epithelial cells. This would tend to lower intracellular pH and require effective counteracting mechanisms to avoid cell death and to maintain HCO3- secretion. The choroid plexus secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and controls the pH of the otherwise poorly buffered CSF. The pCO2 of CSF fluctuates with plasma pCO2, and the choroid plexus must regulate the HCO3- secretion to minimize the effects of these fluctuations on CSF pH. This is done while maintaining pH neutrality in the epithelial cells. Thus, the Na+-HCO3- cotransporters appear to be involved in HCO3- import in more epithelia, where Na+/H+ exchangers were until recently thought to be sufficient for maintaining intracellular pH.

  2. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik

    Full Text Available Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm.This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures. Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted.Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future.This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed.Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases.

  3. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, Linda; Fantini, Christopher; Latlief, Gail; Phillips, Samuel; Sasson, Nicole; Sepulveda, Eve

    2017-01-01

    Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm. This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey) and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures). Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted. Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC) DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL) at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC) DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future. This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed. Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases.

  4. Neonatal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Without Sedation Correlates With Injury Severity in Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy.

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    Bauer, Andrea S; Shen, Peter Y; Nidecker, Anna E; Lee, Paul S; James, Michelle A

    2017-05-01

    Which infants with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) should undergo microsurgical plexus reconstruction remains controversial. The current gold standard for the decision for plexus reconstruction is serial clinical examinations, but this approach obviates the possibility of early surgical treatment. We hypothesize that a new technique using 3-dimensional volumetric proton density magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) without sedation can evaluate the severity of BPBP injury earlier than serial clinical examinations. Infants were prospectively enrolled prior to 12 weeks of age and imaged using 3 Tesla MRI without sedation. Clinical scores were collected at all visits. The imaging findings were graded based on the number of injured levels and the severity of each injury, and a radiological score was calculated. All infants were followed at least until the decision for surgery was made based on clinical examination. Nine infants completed the MRI scan and clinical follow-up. The average Toronto score at presentation was 4.4 out of 10 (range, 0-8.2); the average Active Movement Scale score was 50 out of 105 (range, 0-86). Four infants required surgery: 2 because of a flail limb and Horner syndrome and 2 owing to failure to recover antigravity elbow flexion by age 6 months. Radiological scores ranged from 0 to 18 out of a maximum score of 25. The average radiological score for those infants who required surgery was 12 (range, 6.5-18), whereas the average score for infants who did not require surgery was 3.5 (range, 0-8). Three-dimensional proton density MRI can evaluate spinal nerve roots in infants without the need for radiation, contrast agents, or sedation. These data suggest that MRI can help determine the severity of injury earlier than clinical examination in infants with BPBP, although further study of a larger sample of infants with varying severity of disease is necessary. Diagnostic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by

  5. Imaging of the lumbar plexus: Optimized refocusing flip angle train design for 3D TSE.

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    Cervantes, Barbara; Bauer, Jan S; Zibold, Felix; Kooijman, Hendrik; Settles, Marcus; Haase, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J; Wörtler, Klaus; Karampinos, Dimitrios C

    2016-04-01

    To study the effects of refocusing angle modulation with 3D turbo spin echo (TSE) on signal and sharpness of small oblique nerves embedded in muscle and suppressed fat in the lumbar plexus. Flip angle trains were generated with extended phase graphs (EPG) for a sequence parameter subspace. Signal loss and width broadening were simulated for a single-pixel nerve embedded in muscle and suppressed fat to prescribe a flip angle modulation that gives the best compromise between signal and sharpness of small nerves. Two flip angle trains were defined based on the simulations of small embedded nerves: design denoted A, predicting maximum global signal, and design denoted B, predicting maximum signal for minimum width broadening. In vivo data of the lumbar plexus in 10 healthy volunteers was acquired at 3.0T with 3D TSE employing flip angle trains A and B. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the acquired data were made to assess changes in width and signal intensity. Changing flip angle modulation from A to B resulted in: 1) average signal losses of 23% in (larger) L5 nerves and 9% in (smaller) L3 nerves; 2) average width reductions of 4% in L5 nerves and of 16% in L3 nerves; and 3) statistically significant sharpness improvement (P = 0.005) in L3 nerves. An optimized flip angle train in 3D TSE imaging of the lumbar plexus considering geometry-specific blurring effects from both the nerve and the surrounding tissue can improve the delineation of small nerves. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Lesson of the month 2: A choroid plexus papilloma manifesting as anorexia nervosa in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prateush; Khan, Asim; Scott, Georgia; Jasper, Manuel; Singh, Esha

    2017-04-01

    A Caucasian female previously diagnosed with anorexia nervosa was referred by psychiatric services to the general medical team. She presented with dehydration, vomiting, weakness, a body mass index of 13 kg/m(2) and was treated with intravenous and enteral supplementation. During admission her vomiting worsened and she developed visual hallucinations and confabulation. Neurological examination demonstrated cerebellar signs and bilateral papilloedema on fundoscopy. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a large fourth ventricular tumour causing obstructive hydrocephalus. The tumour was excised and histologically confirmed to be a choroid plexus papilloma. Postoperatively her neurological symptoms and negative feelings towards eating resolved. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased Selenoprotein P in Choroid Plexus and Cerebrospinal Fluid in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Rueli, Rachel H.L.H.; Parubrub, Arlene C.; Dewing, Andrea S.T.; Hashimoto, Ann C.; Bellinger, Miyoko T.; Weeber, Edwin J.; Uyehara-Lock, Jane H.; White, Lon R.; Berry, Marla J.; Bellinger, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Subjects with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have elevated brain levels of the selenium transporter selenoprotein P (Sepp1). We investigated if this elevation results from increased release of Sepp1 from the choroid plexus (CP). Sepp1 is significantly increased in CP from AD brains in comparison to non-AD brains. Sepp1 localizes to the trans-Golgi network within CP epithelia, where it is processed for secretion. The cerebrospinal fluid from AD subjects also contains increased levels Sepp1 in compar...

  8. Cardiac plexus of dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: inflammatory lesions and quantitative studies

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    Marcelo V. Caliari

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative and quantitative aspects of the superficial and profound cardiac plexus of dogs experimentally infected with Be-62 and Be-78 strains of Trypanosoma cruzi were studied. Animals were autopsied in the acute phase of infection. The inflammatory process, lesions and number of parasites were more intense and frequent in animals infected with the Be-78 strain than in those infected with Be-62. Despite this, no statistically significant differences could be found between the number of neuron bodies in the ganglia of infected and control dogs.

  9. Glenohumeral abduction contracture in children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eismann, Emily A; Little, Kevin J; Laor, Tal; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-01-21

    Following neonatal brachial plexus palsy, the Putti sign-obligatory tilt of the scapula with brachiothoracic adduction-suggests the presence of glenohumeral abduction contracture. In the present study, we utilized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify this glenohumeral abduction contracture and evaluate its relationship to shoulder joint deformity, muscle atrophy, and function. We retrospectively reviewed MRIs of the thorax and shoulders obtained before and after shoulder rebalancing surgery (internal rotation contracture release and external rotation tendon transfer) for twenty-eight children with unresolved neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Two raters measured the coronal positions of the scapula, thoracic spine, and humeral shaft bilaterally on coronal images, correcting trigonometrically for scapular protraction on axial images. Supraspinatus, deltoid, and latissimus dorsi muscle atrophy was assessed, blinded to other measures. Correlations between glenohumeral abduction contracture and glenoid version, humeral head subluxation, passive external rotation, and Mallet shoulder function before and after surgery were performed. MRI measurements were highly reliable between raters. Glenohumeral abduction contractures were present in twenty-five of twenty-eight patients, averaging 33° (range, 10° to 65°). Among those patients, abductor atrophy was present in twenty-three of twenty-five, with adductor atrophy in twelve of twenty-five. Preoperatively, greater abduction contracture severity correlated with greater Mallet global abduction and hand-to-neck function. Abduction contracture severity did not correlate preoperatively with axial measurements of glenohumeral dysplasia, but greater glenoid retroversion was associated with worse abduction contractures postoperatively. Surgery improved passive external rotation, active abduction, and hand-to-neck function, but did not change the abduction contracture. A majority of patients with persistent shoulder weakness

  10. Choroid plexus tumors in adult and pediatric populations: the Cleveland Clinic and University Hospitals experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Michal; Hashem, Hasan; Tekautz, Tanya; Worley, Sarah; Tang, Anne; de Blank, Peter; Wolff, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    Choroid plexus tumors (CPT) are rare neoplasms accounting for 1-4% of all pediatric brain tumors. They are divided into choroid plexus papilloma (CPP), atypical choroid plexus papilloma (APP) and choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC). CPTs are known to primarily affect children less than 2 years of age. Gross total resection is the most important predictor of survival especially in CPC. Although small case series have been published, limited clinical data are available to describe treatment and outcome of CPTs. More clinical data would be necessary to complete the picture, particularly in populations that are not age limited. Here we share data from the two major hospitals in Cleveland to describe treatment and outcome of adult and pediatric patients. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with CPT seen in Cleveland Clinic from 1990 to 2015 and at University Hospitals from 1994 to 2015. Results were compared to previously published historical controls. We identified 30 cases with CPT, including 22 pediatric and eight adult cases; 11 females and 19 males. The mean age at presentation was 12.4 years with a median age of 4.5 years (range 2 months-51 years). Gross total surgical resection was achieved in 22, subtotal resection in four, partial resection in two and unknown in two. The histology was CPP in 23 patients, two of whom developed recurrence requiring repeat resection and adjuvant therapy. Median event free survival (EFS) for CPP patients was 7.6 years. The histology was CPC in seven patients. All CPC patients were treated with adjuvant therapy. Median EFS of CPC patients was 4.4 years. Overall survival of all CPT patients was 100% with a median follow up of 7 years. A systematic literature review identified 1012 CPT patients treated from 1989 to 2013. The mean and median age of CPT patients was 13 and 3 years respectively. The median survival of 541 CPP patients was undefined vs. 2.7 years for the 452 CPC patients. The difference between the two

  11. Quantitative study of the myenteric plexus of the stomach of rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes

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    Fregonesi Cristina Elena Prado Teles

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the morphological and quantitative alterations of the myenteric plexus neurons of the stomach of rats with streptozotocin-induced chronic diabetes and compare them to those of non-diabetic animals. Samples from the body of the stomach were used for whole-mount preparations stained with NADH-diaphorase and for histological sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin. It was observed that diabetes cause a significant decrease on the number of neurons.

  12. Choroid plexus epithelial monolayers – a cell culture model from porcine brain

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    Reichel Valeska

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of the present study was to develop an in vitro choroid plexus (CP epithelial cell culture model for studying transport of protein-mediated drug secretion from blood to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and vice versa. Methods